Science.gov

Sample records for liquid-argon time projection

  1. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  2. Operation of a liquid argon time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.

    1983-02-01

    For the first time, the operation of a three-dimensional liquid argon time projection chamber has been demonstrated. This was accomplished in a 50 liter test detector using a readout plane with a woven structure etched on a PC-board.

  3. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  4. Proton decay and solar neutrino experiment with a liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in development of the liquid argon Time Projection Chamber is reviewed. Application of this technique to a search for proton decay and /sup 8/B solar neutrinos with directional sensitivity is considered. The steps necessary for a large scale application of this technique deep underground are described.

  5. ArgoNeuT: A Physics-Minded Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitz, Joshua

    2009-05-01

    ArgoNeuT is a 170 liter Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector set in the on-axis NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The experiment's research/design goals and physics possibilities, including a charged current quasi-elastic cross section and MA parameter measurement, are reviewed. Also, the results of the above-ground cosmic ray commissioning run with accompanying event displays and reconstructed muon tracks and the current status of the experiment are shown.

  6. Liquid-Argon Time Projection Chambers in the U.S

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detectors are ideally suited for studying neutrino interactions and probing the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. The ability to drift ionization particles over long distances in purified argon and to trigger on abundant scintillation light allows for excellent particle identification and triggering capability. Recent U.S. based work in the development of LAr TPC technology for massive kiloton size detectors will be discussed in this talk, including details of the ArgoNeuT (Argon Neutrino Test) test-beam project, which is a 175 liter LAr TPC exposed to Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beamline.

  7. MicroBooNE: A New Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber detectors are well suited to study neutrino interactions, and are an intriguing option for future massive detectors capable of measuring the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. These detectors combine fine-grained tracking with calorimetry, allowing for excellent imaging and particle identification ability. In this talk the details of the MicroBooNE experiment, a 175 ton LArTPC which will be exposed to Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beamline starting in 2011, will be presented. The ability of MicroBooNE to differentiate electrons from photons gives the experiment unique capabilities in low energy neutrino interaction measurements.

  8. The Development of a 2000L Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and its Application to the Search for Proton Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming

    A new type of particle detector, the liquid argon time projection chamber, is developed and systematically tested using cosmic ray muons with a three ton prototype. The main technical problems, such as the liquid argon purity, wire chamber configuration, low noise electronics, and their long term stability, are solved after two years of run. Most of the basic parameters associated with the liquid argon TPC technology, the charge drift velocity, the spatial resolution, charge recombination and diffusion, are extracted. In order to apply this technique to solar neutrino physics, a measurement of the intrinsive radioactive Ar^{42} was performed and the results are compatible with current limits. An application to the search for proton decay with the liquid argon TPC technique is studied and some preliminary results are reported.

  9. a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mao-Tung

    The construction and successful test of a large liquid argon time projection chamber prototype detector is presented. This effort is a part of the ICARUS project which is aimed at the development of new detector techniques to uncover the very rare events like proton decay and solar neutrinos. The construction and test of this detector has been carried out at CERN from 1989 until the present time. The charge lifetime measured is 3.19 +/- 0.13 ms. We also report on a precision measurement of lifetime by a laser monitoring chamber and the operation of the recirculation system essential to keeping liquid for a long time. We show that a liquid argon detector is very well suited to study mass-enhanced neutrino oscillation (MSW effect) from the Sun by detecting simultaneous two modes of reaction. Ratio of two modes provides a model independent probe of neutrino oscillation, free of deviations from different solar models. Contour plots are presented at various threshold energies.

  10. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  11. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  12. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber research and development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Buchanan, N.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Gehman, V.; Greenlee, H.; Guardincerri, E.; Jones, B.; Junk, T.; Katori, T.; Kirby, M.; Lang, K.; Loer, B.; Marchionni, A.; Maruyama, T.; Mauger, C.; Menegolli, A.; Montanari, D.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sanders, R.; Soderberg, M.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.; Tope, T.; Touramanis, C.; Thorn, C.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Yu, B.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-05-01

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in seven topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity, ii) Cryogenics, iii) TPC and High Voltage, iv) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, v) Scintillation Light Detection, vi) Calibration and Test Beams, and vii) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  13. Image Processing Techniques applied to Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, Jessica; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Large scale Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers(LArTPC), like MicroBooNE, offer new ways to study neutrino cross sections and neutrino oscillations. The data from these LArTPCs are very detailed images of charged particles passing through the detector. A plethora of hit finding, cluster finding and tracking algorithms have been implemented to process data coming from MicroBooNE, but it is still possible that particle tracks that are easily visible by eye are being missed during data processing. Because the human eye sometimes does a better job at finding particle tracks that are sometimes missed by data processing, using Image Processing algorithms which emulate the human eye in conjunction with the already implemented algorithms could be beneficial. In particular Edge Detection algorithms could be useful due to the fact that tracks will often have defined deposited energy along straight lines. This talk will cover preliminary data processed with Edge Detection algorithms, and discussion of what the potential benefits are to this approach to LArTPC data analysis. On behalf of the MicroBooNE Collaboration.

  14. ArgoNeuT: A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Test in the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber detectors are ideally suited for studying neutrino interactions and probing the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. The ability to drift ionization particles over long distances in purified argon and to trigger on abundant scintillation light allows for excellent particle identification and triggering capability. In these proceedings the details of the ArgoNeuT test-beam project will be presented after a brief introduction to the detector technique. ArgoNeuT is a 175 liter detector exposed to Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beamline. The first neutrino interactions observed in ArgoNeuT will be presented, along with discussion of the various physics analyses to be performed on this data sample.

  15. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; et al.

    2015-04-21

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  16. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; B. Carls; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; Dharmapalan, R.; Foreman, W.; Hahn, A.; Johnson, M.; Jones, B. J.P.; Junk, T.; Lang, K.; Lockwitz, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mauger, C.; Montanari, C.; Mufson, S.; Nessi, M.; Back, H. Olling; Petrillo, G.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sinins, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spooner, N.; Stancari, M.; Strauss, T.; Terao, K.; Thorn, C.; Tope, T.; Toups, M.; Urheim, J.; Water, R. Van de; Wang, H.; Wasserman, R.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Yang, T.

    2015-07-28

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  17. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; B. Carls; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the currentmore » efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.« less

  18. Summary of the second workshop on liquid argon time projection chamber research and development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Carls, B.; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; Dharmapalan, R.; Foreman, W.; Hahn, A.; Johnson, M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Junk, T.; Lang, K.; Lockwitz, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mauger, C.; Montanari, C.; Mufson, S.; Nessi, M.; Olling Back, H.; Petrillo, G.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sinins, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Stancari, M.; Strauss, T.; Terao, K.; Thorn, C.; Tope, T.; Toups, M.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Wasserman, R.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Yang, T.

    2015-07-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  19. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  20. Simulations of Charged-Current Supernova νe Events in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Steven; Grant, Christopher; Pantic, Emilija; Svoboda, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Although it is still in its infancy, the study of supernova neutrinos has proven to be a fertile topic for fundamental science. A mere two dozen events recorded from supernova 1987A, the only supernova neutrino source observed so far, have led to numerous publications on a wide variety of topics. This bountiful scientific harvest has prompted the neutrino physics community to prepare to make more detailed observations of the neutrinos that will be produced in the next nearby supernova. Because of their unique νe sensitivity, liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) experiments such as DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) have the potential to make valuable contributions to this detection effort. To better understand the expected SN νe signal in a LArTPC, we have developed a Monte Carlo event generator called MARLEY (Model of Argon Reaction Low-Energy Yields) for charged-current νe reactions on argon. By combining MARLEY with LArSoft, a LArTPC simulation package, we have obtained the most detailed predictions currently available for the response of a LArTPC to supernova νe. We will discuss the implications of these results for the design and operation of LArTPCs sensitive to SN neutrinos.

  1. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  2. Performance of a liquid argon time projection chamber exposed to the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Arneodo, F.; Cavanna, F.; Mitri, I. De; Mortari, G. Piano; Benetti, P.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Calligarich, E.; Cesana, E.; Dolfini, R.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Terrani, M.; Vignoli, C.; Bonesini, M.; Boschetti, B.; Cavalli, D.; Curioni, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low-multiplicity neutrino interactions.

  3. A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Bromberg, C.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; Gallagher, H.; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

    2005-09-01

    Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very

  4. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barros, N.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bastos, J.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernadez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de La Taille, C.; de Mora, L.; de Oliveira Branco, M.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Deberg, H.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Dennis, C.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, D. J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Eerola, P.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N. P.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Granado Cardoso, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Groer, L. S.; Grognuz, J.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guarino, V. J.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hackenburg, R.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Härtel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Haug, F.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N. P.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, D.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Homma, Y.; Homola, P.; Horazdovsky, T.; Hori, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Hoummada, A.; Howe, T.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hurst, P.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilyushenka, Y.; Imori, M.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issakov, V.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M.; Jahoda, M.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R. C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarron, P.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, G.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. W.; Jones, T. J.; Jonsson, O.; Joos, D.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V. V.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Kazi, S. I.; Keates, J. R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kelly, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Kholodenko, A. G.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kilvington, G.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, P. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B. T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G. P.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kokott, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Koreshev, V.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotamäki, M. J.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotov, K. Y.; Koupilova, Z.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Krepouri, A.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, P.; Krobath, G.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kubota, T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Kvasnicka, O.; Kwee, R.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lamanna, M.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lane, J. L.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larionov, A. V.; Larner, A.; Lasseur, C.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lazzaro, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Maner, C.; Le Menedeu, E.; Le Vine, M.; Leahu, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebel, C.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Legeyt, B. C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lellouch, J.; Leltchouk, M.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lester, C. G.; Leung Fook Cheong, A.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levitski, M. S.; Levonian, S.; Lewandowska, M.; Leyton, M.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lilley, J. N.; Lim, H.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Lindsay, S. W.; Linhart, V.; Linnemann, J. T.; Liolios, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lipinsky, L.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, M.; Liu, S.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Lockwitz, S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Lovas, L.; Love, J.; Love, P.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Luisa, L.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundquist, J.; Lutz, G.; Lynn, D.; Lys, J.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Macana Goia, J. A.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Mader, W. F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Magalhaes Martins, P. J.; Magradze, E.; Magrath, C. A.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahmood, A.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makouski, M.; Makovec, N.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mambelli, M.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Manabe, A.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Manjavidze, I. D.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C. P.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, R.; Marshall, Z.; Martens, F. K.; Marti I Garcia, S.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F. F.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, T. A.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martini, A.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Maruyama, T.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massaro, G.; Massol, N.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathes, M.; Matricon, P.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mattravers, C.; Maxfield, S. J.; May, E. N.; Mayne, A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzanti, P.; Mc Donald, J.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; McGlone, H.; McHedlidze, G.; McLaren, R. A.; McMahon, S. J.; McMahon, T. R.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Melamed-Katz, A.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meng, Z.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Merkl, D.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A. M.; Messmer, I.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C. M.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moloney, G.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Llácer, M. Moreno; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, J. D.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. N.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; P Ottersbach, J.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S. I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.8% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of (0.29^{+0.05}_{-0.04})% in the barrel and (0.54^{+0.06}_{-0.04})% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61±0.07 mm/μs at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  5. Performance and technical challenges of liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers offer the possibility of incredible resolution of particle interactions. This review outlines the ongoing research and development towards the realization of a multi-kiloton scale detector. The ICARUS and ArgoNeuT experiments which make use of liquid argon time projection chamber technology are also described.

  6. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  7. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  8. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  9. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  10. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2015-06-12

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  11. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  12. Scintillation photon detection in liquid argon at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Bruce; Adams, Brice; Baugh, Brian; Buchanan, Norm; Bugel, Len; Conrad, Janet; Davis, Ronald; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Miner, Bill; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Pordes, Stephen; Rebel, Brian; Smith, Paul; Toups, Matt; Urheim, Jon; Warner, David; Wongjirad, Taritree; Whittington, Denver

    2015-04-01

    The proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) aims to answer outstanding questions relating to neutrino physics and other phenomena, such as proton decay and supernova neutrinos. The proposed far detector design calls for a multi-kiloton liquid argon time-projection chamber at a long baseline. In addition to its utility as a target material, liquid argon scintillates in the far UV, providing further physics information and serving as a trigger for non-beam events. The photon detection system in development for the LBNF far detector includes a mechanism for capturing and transporting the light, a method to detect the photons (silicon photomultipliers), and the necessary readout electronics. Testing in liquid argon has occurred at the ``TallBo'' facility at Fermilab to characterize and compare the performance of these systems. In this talk, we present the details of these photon detection systems and the latest results of testing.

  13. Liquid Argon Dielectric Breakdown Studies with the MicroBooNE Purification System

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Carls, B.; James, C.; Johnson, B.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Lundberg, B.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Rebel, B.; Zeller, G. P.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-11-04

    The proliferation of liquid argon time projection chamber detectors makes the characterization of the dielectric properties of liquid argon a critical task. To improve understanding of these properties, a systematic study of the breakdown electric field in liquid argon was conducted using a dedicated cryostat connected to the MicroBooNE cryogenic system at Fermilab. An electrode sphere-plate geometry was implemented using spheres with diameters of 1.3 mm, 5.0 mm, and 76 mm. The MicroBooNE cryogenic system allowed measurements to be taken at a variety of electronegative contamination levels ranging from a few parts-per-million to tens of parts-per-trillion. The cathode-anode distance was varied from 0.1 mm to 2.5 cm. The results demonstrate a geometric dependence of the electric field strength at breakdown. This study is the first time that the dependence of the breakdown field on stressed cathode area has been shown for liquid argon.

  14. a Measurement of the Electron/pion Ratio Difference Between Short (250 Nanoseconds) and Long (2.2 Microseconds) Integration Times with the d0 Uranium-Liquid Argon Central Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Bo.

    1992-01-01

    The differences of the ratios of the high energy electron and pion responses (e/pi) in the D0 Uranium-liquid Argon central calorimeter is measured using the D0 calorimeter trigger readout (short integration time: 250 ns) and precision readout (long integration time: 2.2 mus). This measurement found a 5% difference in the e/pi ratio between short and long integration times, with estimated uncertainty of 2.3%.

  15. A measurement of the e/{pi} ratio difference between short (250 ns) and long (2.2 {mu}s) integration times with the D0 uranium-liquid argon central calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, B.

    1992-12-31

    The difference of the ratios of the high energy electron and pion responses(e/{pi}) in the DO Uranium-liquid Argon central calorimeter is measured using the DO calorimeter trigger readout (short integration time: 250 ns) and precision readout (long integration time: 2.2 {mu}s). This measurement found a 5% difference in the e/{pi} ratio between short and long integration times, with estimated uncertainty of 2.3%.

  16. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R&D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors.

  17. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  18. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  19. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  20. Development of a Photon Detection System in Liquid Argon for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Denver; Adams, Brice; Baptista, Brian; Baugh, Brian; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Smith, Paul; Urheim, Jon

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the LBNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. The team at Indiana University is exploring a design based on acrylic waveguides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, combined with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. Large-scale tests of this design are being conducted at the ``TallBo'' liquid argon dewar facility at Fermilab, where performance studies with cosmic ray events are helping steer decisions for the final detector design. We present an overview of the design and function of this photon detection system and the latest results from the analysis of data collected during these tests. Photon Detector R&D Team at Indiana University.

  1. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  2. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  3. A Large Liquid Argon TPC for Off-axis NuMI Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menary, Scott

    2006-07-11

    The ICARUS collaboration has shown the power of the liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) technique to image events with bubble-chamber-like quality. I will describe a proposed long-baseline {nu}e appearance experiment utilizing a large ({>=} 15 kton1) LArTPC placed off-axis of Fermilab's NuMI {nu}{mu} beam. The total LArTPC program as it presently stands, which includes a number of smaller R and D projects designed to examine the key design issues, will be outlined.

  4. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  5. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Dardin, S. M.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Peskov, V.; Wenzel, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon (xe) in the high electric field ( >7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure-dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure-independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure-dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure-independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure-dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  6. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  7. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  8. WA105: a large-scale demonstrator of the Liquid Argon double phase TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonazzo, A.; WA105 Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The physics case for a large underground detector devoted to neutrino oscillation measurements, nucleon decay and astrophysics is compelling. A time projection chamber based on the dual-phase liquid Argon technique is an extremely attractive option, allowing for long drift distances, low energy threshold and high readout granularity. It has been extensively studied in the LAGUNA-LBNO Design Study and is one of the two designs foreseen for the modules of the DUNE detector in the US. The WA105 experiment envisages the construction of a large scale prototype at CERN, to validate technical solutions and perform physics studies with charged particle beams.

  9. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  10. Front-End ASIC for Liquid Argon TPC

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, G.; Li, S.; D'Andragora, A.; Nambiar, N.; Rescia, S.; Vernon, E.; Chen, H.; Lanni, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Thorn, C.; Yu, B.

    2011-06-15

    We present a front-end application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a wire based time-projection-chamber (TPC) operating in liquid Argon (LAr). The LAr TPC will be used for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The ASIC must provide a low-noise readout of the signals induced on the TPC wires, digitization of those signals at 2 MSamples/s, compression, buffering and multiplexing. A resolution of better than 1000 rms electrons at 200 pF input capacitance for an input range of 300 fC is required, along with low power and operation in LAr (at 87 K). We include the characterization of a commercial technology for operation in the cryogenic environment and the first experimental results on the analog front end. The results demonstrate that complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistors have lower noise and much improved dc characteristics at LAr temperature. Finally, we introduce the concept of '1/f equivalent' to model the low-frequency component of the noise spectral density, for use in the input metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor optimization.

  11. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  12. A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10-4 cm-1ppm-1, corresponding to an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10-21 cm2molecule-1. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, where a concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuation length due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  13. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  14. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carminati, L.

    2005-10-12

    The construction of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed and commissioning is in progress. After a brief description of the detector layout, readout electronics and calibration, a review of the present status of the integration and the detector qualification is reported. Finally a selection of performance results obtained during several test beams will be presented with particular attention to linearity, uniformity, position reconstruction and {gamma}/{pi}0 separation.

  15. GLADE Global Liquid Argon Detector Experiment: a letter of intent to FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-05-13

    The recent measurements of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, which controls the observable size of any CP violation effects, open a window of opportunity to take advantage of the world's most powerful existing neutrino beam together with recent successes in development of the ultimate detector technology for the detection of electron neutrinos : a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber. During this proposed project a 5kt LAr detector (GLADE) will be developed by European groups to be put in a cryostat in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the US and will start taking data in 3-5 years time to address the neutrino mass ordering. The successful fruition of this project, along with nominal exposure at NO{nu}A and T2K, together with information from double beta decay experiments could ascertain that neutrinos are Dirac particles in the next decade.

  16. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  17. Liquid argon scintillation read-out with silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canci, N.; Cattadori, C.; D'Incecco, M.; Lehnert, B.; Machado, A. A.; Riboldi, S.; Sablone, D.; Segreto, E.; Vignoli, C.

    2013-10-01

    Silicon photosensors represent a viable alternative to standard photomultipliers in fields such as communications and medical imaging. We explored the interesting possibility of using these sensors in combination with liquid argon (LAr) for astroparticle physics applications such as neutrino, dark matter and double beta decay experiments. In fact, silicon photosensors have detection efficiencies comparable with those of the highest performance PMTs and can be manufactured with high level of radiopurity. In particular within the on-going R&D activity of the SILENT project (Low background and low noise techniques for double beta decay physics funded by ASPERA) a large area SiPM (Silicon PhotoMultiplier - Hamamatsu S11828-3344M - 1.7 cm2 area) has been installed in a LAr scintillation chamber of 0.5 liters volume together with a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu R11065) used as a reference. The liquid argon chamber has been exposed to many gamma sources of different energies and single photoelectron response and light yield for the SiPM and PMT have been measured and compared. In this contribution the results of the tests, and the ongoing R&D to optimize the SiPM for cryogenic and for ultralow background applications, are reported, as well as the possible application in the GERDA experiment on Double Beta Decay Searches of 76Ge.

  18. Explosive cavitation in superheated liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, V E; Pavlov, P A; Baidakov, V G

    2008-06-21

    The kinetics of explosive boiling-up of liquid argon has been investigated at negative pressures created by the reflection of a compression pulse 3-5 mus long from the free surface of a liquid by the method of liquid pulse heating on a thin platinum wire (with a rate of temperature increase of about 1 Kmus). The limiting superheats T(*) (stretches p(*)), the effective nucleation rate J(*), and the derivative G(T)=(d ln JdT)(T=T(*) ) have been determined by experimental data on the thermal perturbation of a wire probe and the results of solution of the problem on the initial stage of explosive boiling-up of a liquid. The experimental data are compared with homogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:18570511

  19. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  20. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  1. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  2. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  3. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Boyle, G J; McEachran, R P; Cocks, D G; White, R D

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies. PMID:25903897

  4. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  5. A measurement of E/{pi} for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S.; Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J.; Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T.; Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Bowen, T.; Forden, G.; Jenkins, E.; Johns, K.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M.; Burnett, T.; Cook, V.; Davisson, R.; Mockett, P.; Rothberg, J.; Williams, R.W.; Cremaldi, L.; Reidy, J.; Summers, D.; DiGiacomo, N.; Draper, P.; Ferbel, T.; Lobkowicz, F.; Faust, J.; Hauptman, J.; Pang, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Hagopian, V.; Womersley, J.; Handler, T.; Hitlin, D.; Mulholland, G.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Weerts, H.

    1990-12-31

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  6. A measurement of E/. pi. for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S. ); Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J. ); Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T. ); Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A. (Maryland U

    1990-01-01

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  7. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Montanari, D.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.

    2015-12-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these installations (parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). This paper gives an overview of the installations involved in these cryogenic projects, describes the functional demands made to these cryogenic systems and presents the initial studies on which these future cryogenic systems will be based.

  8. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.

    1996-12-31

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV.

  9. Anode-coupled readout for light collection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Toups, M.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will discuss a new method of signal read-out from photon detectors in ultra-large, underground liquid argon time projection chambers. In this design, the signal from the light collection system is coupled via capacitive plates to the TPC wire-planes. This signal is then read out using the same cabling and electronics as the charge information. This greatly benefits light collection: it eliminates the need for an independent readout, substantially reducing cost; it reduces the number of cables in the vapor region of the TPC that can produce impurities; and it cuts down on the number of feed-throughs in the cryostat wall that can cause heat-leaks and potential points of failure. We present experimental results that demonstrate the sensitivity of a LArTPC wire plane to photon detector signals. We also simulate the effect of a 1 μs shaping time and a 2 MHz sampling rate on these signals in the presence of noise, and find that a single photoelectron timing resolution of ~30 ns can be achieved.

  10. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  11. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors.

  12. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  13. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  14. A Demonstration of Light Guides for Light Detection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are a developing technology that is becoming a popular choice for neutrino and dark matter experiments due to the low cost of the LAr as a target material and the high signal effciency and background rejection that these detectors can achieve. When excited by a passing charged particle created in a neutrino interaction, argon produces scintillation light at 128 nm. Several types of systems exist for detecting this light. Most involve shifting the wavelength of the light using Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB), resulting in visible light which is detected by a PMT.I will discuss our work on a new system under development for light detection in LAr which uses acrylic lightguides. The lightguides are coated with a thin film consisting of TPB embedded in polystyrene. This system could provide a solution to some of the issues associated with scaling existing systems for a larger future LAr detector. Though we are only in the preliminary stages of this R&D, we have shown that the results are already suffcient for triggering.

  15. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  16. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  17. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter system for the SLC Large Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Fox, J.D.; Smith, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper the physical packaging and the logical organization of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) electronics system for the Stanford Linear Collider Large Detector (SLD) at SLAC are described. This system processes signals from approximately 44,000 calorimeter towers and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged within the detector itself as opposed to an external electronics support rack. The signal path from the towers in the liquid argon through the vacuum to the outside of the detector is explained. The organization of the control logic, analog electronics, power regulation, analog-to-digital conversion circuits, and fiber optic drivers mounted directly on the detector are described. Redundancy considerations for the electronics and cooling issues are discussed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Demonstration and comparison of photomultiplier tubes at liquid Argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Boffelli, F.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Cocco, A. G.; Deniskina, N.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Kryczynski, P.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Perfetto, F.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Triossi, A.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Zani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Liquified noble gases are widely used as a target in direct Dark Matter searches. Signals from scintillation in the liquid, following energy deposition from the recoil nuclei scattered by Dark Matter particles (e.g. WIMPs), should be recorded down to very low energies by photosensors suitably designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Liquid Argon based detectors for Dark Matter searches currently implement photomultiplier tubes for signal read-out. In the last few years PMTs with photocathodes operating down to liquid Argon temperatures (87 K) have been specially developed with increasing Quantum Efficiency characteristics. The most recent of these, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Mod. R11065 with peak QE up to about 35%, has been extensively tested within the R&D program of the WArP Collaboration. During these tests the Hamamatsu PMTs showed excellent performance and allowed obtaining a light yield around 7 phel/keVee in a Liquid Argon detector with a photocathodic coverage in the 12% range, sufficient for detection of events down to few keVee of energy deposition. This shows that this new type of PMT is suited for experimental applications, in particular for new direct Dark Matter searches with LAr-based experiments.

  19. MicroBooNE and the Road to Large Liquid Argon Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiorgi, G.

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC's) provide a promising technology for multi-kiloton scale detectors aiming to address-among other pressing particle physics questions-the possibility of short and long baseline electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance. MicroBooNE, a 170 ton LArTPC under construction, is the next necessary step in a phased R&D effort toward construction and stable operation of larger-scale LArTPC's. This development effort also leans heavily on the ArgoNeuT and LAr1 LArTPC R&D experiments at Fermilab. In addition to advancing the LArTPC technology, these projects also provide unique physics opportunities. For example, Micro-BooNE will be located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab, at ∼470 m from neutrino production. Thus, in addition to measuring a suite of low energy neutrino cross sections on argon, MicroBooNE will investigate the anomalous low energy excess seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Furthermore, the neutrino beam energy and relatively short baseline provide MicroBooNE with sensitivity to high-∼m2 neutrino oscillations. These proceedings summarize the role of the MicroBooNE detector in the US LArTPC R&D program, present its physics reach, and briefly discuss the physics potential of a dedicated near-future neutrino oscillation program at the Booster Neutrino Beamline, as a way to maximize the physics output of the Fermilab LArTPC R&D projects.

  20. Evidence of delayed light emission of tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid-argon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.

    2015-03-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV. This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s, namely, the inconsistency in the measured values of the long decay time constant and the appearance of an intermediate component. Similar effects should be also expected when the TPB is used in combination with helium and neon, which emit scintillation photons with wavelengths shorter than 127 nm.

  1. Searching for dark matter with single phase liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr.

    The first hint that we fail to understand the nature of a large fraction of the gravitating matter in the universe came from Fritz Zwicky's measurements of the velocity distribution of the Coma cluster in 1933. Using the Virial theorem, Zwicky found that galaxies in the cluster were orbiting far too fast to remain gravitationally bound when their mass was estimated by the brightness of the visible matter. This led to the postulation that some form of non-luminous dark matter is present in galaxies comprising a large fraction of the galactic mass. The nature of this dark matter remains yet unknown over 80 years after Zwicky's measurements despite the efforts of many experiments. Dark matter is widely believed to be a beyond the Standard Model particle which brings the dark matter problem into the realm of particle physics. Supersymmetry is one widely explored extension of the Standard model, from which particles meeting the constraints on dark matter properties can naturally arise. These particles are generically termed weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and are a currently favored dark matter candidate. A variety of experimental efforts are underway aimed towards direct detection of dark matter through observation of rare scattering of WIMPs in terrestrial detectors. Single phase liquid argon detectors are an appealing WIMP detection technique due to the scintillation properties of liquid argon and the scalability of the single phase approach. The MiniCLEAN dark matter detector is a single phase liquid argon scintillation scintillation detector with a 500 kg active mass. The modular design offers 4pi coverage with 92 optical cassettes, each containing TPB coated acrylic and a cryogenic photomultiplier tube. The MiniCLEAN detector has recently completed construction at SNOLAB. The detector is currently being commissioned, and will soon begin operation with the liquid argon target. Utilizing advanced pulse-shape discrimination techniques, MiniCLEAN will

  2. PERFORMANCE OF THE LEAD/LIQUID ARGON SHOWER COUNTER SYSTEM OF THE MARK II DETECTOR AT SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Briggs, D.D.; Carithers, W.C.; Dieterle, W.E.; Eaton, M.W.; Lankford, A.J.; Pang, C.Y.; Vella, E.N.; Breidenbach, M.; Dorfan, J.M.; Hanson, G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Jenni, P.; Luth, V.

    1980-05-01

    The shower counter system of the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector is a large lead/liquid argon system of the type pioneered by Willis and Radekal; however, it differs in most details and is much larger than other such detectors currently in operation, It contains, for example, 8000 liters of liquid argon and 3000 channels of low noise electronics, which is about eight times the size of the system of Willis et al. in the CERN ISR. This paper reports, with little reference to design, on the operation and performance of the Mark II system during approximately a year and a half of operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's e{sup +}-e{sup -} facility, SPEAR. The design and construction of the system have previously been described and a detailed discussion of all aspects -- design, construction, operation, and performance -- is in preparation.

  3. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yichen; Tsang, Thomas; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2016-04-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev-Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  4. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  5. Tetraphenyl-butadiene films: VUV-Vis optical characterization from room to liquid argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    A thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor's optical window is the most common solution to down convert argon VUV scintillation light in current and planned liquid argon based experiments for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. Characterization of the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  6. Performance of the electronics for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter system of the SLC large detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.; Abt, I.; Haller, G.M.; Honma, A.

    1988-10-01

    Results of performance tests on electronics for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) for the SLD experiment at SLAC are presented. The behavior of a sub-unit called a ''tophat,'' which processes 720 detector signals, is described. The electronics consists of charge sensitive preamplifiers, analog memories, A/D converters, and associated control and readout circuitry. An internal charge injection system is used to calibrate the overall response of the devices. Linearity is better than 1% of 0--28 pC charge at the input of the amplifiers. Noise (expressed as equivalent input charge) is less than 3000 electrons at a shaping time of 4 ..mu..s, with a slope of 2600 e/sup /minus///nF. Crosstalk to adjacent channels is less than 0.5%. The power consumption at a duty cycle of 13% is 61 W. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  7. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Olivier; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2015-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton (pp) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η| < 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5 < |η| < 4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5 K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and timing boards. In the first three years of LHC operation, approximately 27 fb-1 of pp collision data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV. Throughout this period, the calorimeter consistently operated with performances very close to specifications, with high data-taking efficiency. This is in large part due to a sophisticated data monitoring procedure designed to quickly identify issues that would degrade the detector performance, to ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. After a description of the detector design, main characteristics and operation principles, this paper details the data quality assessment procedures developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, when more than 98% of the luminosity recorded by ATLAS had high quality LAr calorimeter data suitable for physics analysis.

  8. Photon Detection System for LBNE Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2014-03-01

    The LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is the next generation accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment planned in US. The experiment will use a new muon-neutrino beam sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics goal of the LBNE is a definitive determination the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta-23, and precise measurement of CP violation in neutrino oscillation. Neutrino interaction in LAr result in charged particles producing ionization and scintillation light signals. Dedicated photon detection system is under design for use in the LBNE LArTPC far detectors. The baseline design couples wavelength-shifter coated ultraviolet transmitting acrylic to 3 mm2 silicon photomultipliers. By detecting scintillation light we aim to improve event reconstruction capabilities and efficiently separate neutrino events from background. Current status of the system will be described.

  9. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Bremer, J.; Gendotti, A.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Loew, T.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Murphy, S.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sharma, R.; Smargianaki, D.; Stewart, J.; Vignoli, C.; Wilson, P.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study neutrinos from a new beam from Fermilab. These cryostats will be engineered, constructed, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution presents the on-going effort on the development of the cryostats and details the requirements and the current status of the design.

  10. Atomistic modelling of evaporation and explosive boiling of thin film liquid argon over internally recessed nanostructured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to investigate evaporation and explosive boiling phenomena of thin film liquid argon on nanostructured solid surface with emphasis on the effect of solid-liquid interfacial wettability. The nanostructured surface considered herein consists of trapezoidal internal recesses of the solid platinum wall. The wetting conditions of the solid surface were assumed such that it covers both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic conditions and hence effect of interfacial wettability on resulting evaporation and boiling phenomena was the main focus of this study. The initial configuration of the simulation domain comprised of a three phase system (solid platinum, liquid argon and vapor argon) on which equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. After equilibrium of the three-phase system was established, the wall was set to different temperatures (130 K and 250 K for the case of evaporation and explosive boiling respectively) to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat flux normal to the solid surface was also calculated to illustrate the effectiveness of heat transfer for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces in cases of both nanostructured surface and flat surface. The results obtained show that both the wetting condition of the surface and the presence of internal recesses have significant effect on normal evaporation and explosive boiling of the thin liquid film. The heat transfer from solid to liquid in cases of surface with recesses are higher compared to flat surface without recesses. Also the surface with higher wettability (hydrophilic) provides more favorable conditions for boiling than the low-wetting surface (hydrophobic) and therefore, liquid argon responds quickly and shifts from liquid to vapor phase faster in

  11. Delayed light emission of Tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid argon scintillation light. Current status and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.; Machado, A. A.; Araujo, W.; Teixeira, V.

    2016-02-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV . This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s. Precision measurements of the properties of TPB, when excited by Vacuum Ultra Violet photons are being carried on at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Campinas (State of São Paulo).

  12. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  13. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cooldown was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling, liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cooldown, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  14. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cool down was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cool down, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  15. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  16. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Zander

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss the outcome of recent research and development of wavelength-shifting lightguides for LArTPCs. The response of the lightguides was characterized in both air and liquid argon. Attenuation lengths over 100cm were consistently measured in air, which is an important step in the development of meter-scale lightguides for future LArTPCs. Additionally, good agreement was found between simulations and measurements performed in air and liquid argon. Such agreement indicates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of lightguide production. Zander Moss for the MIT Light Collection R&D Group.

  17. Expected performance of an ideal liquid argon neutrino detector with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorel, M.

    2014-10-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about 10-3. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our results are based on detailed simulations, with neutrino interactions modelled according to the GENIE event generator, while the charge and light responses of a large LAr ideal detector are described by the Geant4 and NEST simulation tools. A neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent level, for few-GeV neutrino interactions that are fully contained. We argue that the construction of large LAr detectors with sufficiently high light collection efficiencies is in principle possible.

  18. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HyŻorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods—the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm.

  19. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods-the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm. PMID:27208958

  20. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; et al

    2016-06-06

    Here, we describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). Moreover, this system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. Finally, a gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  1. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; Tsang, T.; Zhang, L.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  2. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  4. Radon backgrounds in the DEAP-1 liquid-argon-based Dark Matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chouinard, R.; Cleveland, B. T.; Contreras, D.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F.; Ford, R.; Gagnon, R.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hakobyan, R.; Hallin, A. L.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Jillings, C. J.; Kuźniak, M.; Lawson, I.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J.; Liimatainen, P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; McElroy, T.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J.; Noble, T.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K. S.; Ouellet, C.; Pasuthip, P.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, W.; Retiere, F.; Ronquest, M.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T.; Tang, J.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Ward, M.

    2015-03-01

    The DEAP-1 7 kg single phase liquid argon scintillation detector was operated underground at SNOLAB in order to test the techniques and measure the backgrounds inherent to single phase detection, in support of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter detector. Backgrounds in DEAP are controlled through material selection, construction techniques, pulse shape discrimination, and event reconstruction. This report details the analysis of background events observed in three iterations of the DEAP-1 detector, and the measures taken to reduce them. The 222 Rn decay rate in the liquid argon was measured to be between 16 and 26 μBq kg-1. We found that the background spectrum near the region of interest for Dark Matter detection in the DEAP-1 detector can be described considering events from three sources: radon daughters decaying on the surface of the active volume, the expected rate of electromagnetic events misidentified as nuclear recoils due to inefficiencies in the pulse shape discrimination, and leakage of events from outside the fiducial volume due to imperfect position reconstruction. These backgrounds statistically account for all observed events, and they will be strongly reduced in the DEAP-3600 detector due to its higher light yield and simpler geometry.

  5. Development of an anti-Compton veto for HPGe detectors operated in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Aghaei Khozani, H.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.

    2011-10-01

    A proof of concept detector is presented for scintillation light detection in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers. The aim of the work is to build an anti-Compton veto for germanium detectors operated directly in liquid argon as in the GERDA experiment. Wavelength shifting fibers are used to collect the scintillation light and to guide it to Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC). Sufficient light yield was achieved to realize an effective anti-Compton veto. Properties of the MPPC were studied at cryogenic temperatures and are additionally reported.

  6. Numerical experiments on evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid argon film on aluminum nanostructure substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weidong; Zhang, Haiyan; Tian, Conghui; Meng, Xiaojie

    2015-04-01

    Evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film are of great significant fundamental importance for both science and engineering applications. The evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film absorbed on an aluminum nanostructure solid wall are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated system consists of three regions: liquid argon, vapor argon, and an aluminum substrate decorated with nanostructures of different heights. Those simulations begin with an initial configuration for the complex liquid-vapor-solid system, followed by an equilibrating system at 90 K, and conclude with two different jump temperatures, including 150 and 310 K which are far beyond the critical temperature. The space and time dependences of temperature, pressure, density number, and net evaporation rate are monitored to investigate the phase transition process on a flat surface with and without nanostructures. The simulation results reveal that the nanostructures are of great help to raise the heat transfer efficiency and that evaporation rate increases with the nanostructures' height in a certain range.

  7. Numerical experiments on evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid argon film on aluminum nanostructure substrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Zhang, Haiyan; Tian, Conghui; Meng, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film are of great significant fundamental importance for both science and engineering applications. The evaporation and explosive boiling of ultra-thin liquid film absorbed on an aluminum nanostructure solid wall are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated system consists of three regions: liquid argon, vapor argon, and an aluminum substrate decorated with nanostructures of different heights. Those simulations begin with an initial configuration for the complex liquid-vapor-solid system, followed by an equilibrating system at 90 K, and conclude with two different jump temperatures, including 150 and 310 K which are far beyond the critical temperature. The space and time dependences of temperature, pressure, density number, and net evaporation rate are monitored to investigate the phase transition process on a flat surface with and without nanostructures. The simulation results reveal that the nanostructures are of great help to raise the heat transfer efficiency and that evaporation rate increases with the nanostructures' height in a certain range. PMID:25918494

  8. First Tests of a New Fast Waveform Digitizer for PMT Signal Read-out from Liquid Argon Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelc, A. M.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Cortopassi, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Mini, G.; Pietropaolo, F.; Romboli, A.; Segreto, E.; Acciarri, R.

    A new generation Waveform Digitizer board as been recently made available on the market by CAEN. The new board CAEN V1751 with 8 Channels per board, 10 bit, 1 GS/s Flash ADC Waveform Digitizer (or 4 channel, 10 bit, 2 GS/s Flash ADC Waveform Digitizer -Dual Edge Sampling mode) with threshold and Auto-Trigger capabilities provides an ideal (relatively low-cost) solution for reading signals from liquid Argon detectors for Dark Matter search equipped with an array of PMTs for the detection of scintillation light. The board was extensively used in real experimental conditions to test its usefulness for possible future uses and to compare it with a state of the art digital oscilloscope. As results, PMT Signal sampling at 1 or 2 GS/s is appropriate for the reconstruction of the fast component of the signal scintillation in Argon (characteristic time of about 4 ns) and the extended dynamic range, after a small customization, allows for the detection of signals in the range of energy needed. The bandwidth is found to be adequate and the intrinsic noise is very low.

  9. Design of single phase liquid argon detectors for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastler, Daniel E.

    2012-05-01

    Within our current understanding of the makeup of the universe, dark matter makes up 25% of the total energy and over 80% of the matter in the universe. Little is known about the makeup of dark matter, but its existence has been indirectly measured using the rotation curves of galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the Cosmic Microwave Background. To gain a greater understanding of this component of the universe, direct detection of dark matter is a major objective in particle astrophysics. One popular candidate for dark matter is the weakly interacting massive particle, or WIMP. The allowed rate of interaction between a WIMP and normal matter is extremely low, requiring new detection technologies with greater sensitivity to be explored. Though several experiments have already been conducted, no direct detection experiment has unambiguously identified a dark matter signal. This work explores the use of noble liquids, in a single liquid phase design, to detect single scatters of dark matter particles. The goal of current experiments is to investigate matter-dark-matter interaction cross-sections down to 10--45cm2. With that in mind, the MiniCLEAN detector has been designed with a 500 kg liquid argon detector volume and will be viewed by a spherical 4pi configuration of 92 photo-multiplier tubes. In order to determine the ability for single phase noble liquid to detect nuclear recoils from dark matter, several R&D experiments have been performed. These experiments undertook the measurement of how dark-matter-like nuclear recoils and background-like electronic recoils behave in liquid argon. In addition to reviewing the measurements of pulse shape discrimination and other noble liquid properties, my measurement of the scintillation efficiency is described. The scintillation efficiency characterizes the differing energy responses for nuclear and electron recoils. This was the first measurement of the scintillation efficiency in liquid argon for nuclear recoils over a wide

  10. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  11. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  12. Muon-induced background to proton decay in the p →K+ ν decay channel with large underground liquid argon TPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Richardson, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.

    2015-06-01

    Large liquid argon TPC detector programs such as LBNE and LAGUNA-LBNO will be able to make measurements of the proton lifetime which will outperform Cherenkov detectors in the proton decay channel p →K+ ν. At the large depths which are proposed for such experiments, a non-negligible source of isolated charged kaons may be produced in the showers of cosmogenic muons. We present an estimate of the cosmogenic muon background to proton decay in the p →K+ ν channel. The simulation of muon transport to a depth of 4 km w.e. is performed in the MUSIC framework and the subsequent propagation of muons and secondary particles in the vicinity of a cylindrical 20 kt LAr target is performed using GEANT4. An exposure time of 100 years is considered, with a rate of <0.0012 events/kt/year at 90% CL predicted from our simulations.

  13. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy resolution of a liquid-argon scintillator with xenon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, C. G.; Bernard, E. P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Nikkel, J. A.; Shin, Y.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-argon scintillation detectors are used in fundamental physics experiments and are being considered for security applications. Previous studies have suggested that the addition of small amounts of xenon dopant improves performance in light or signal yield, energy resolution, and particle discrimination. In this study, we investigate the detector response for xenon dopant concentrations from 9 ± 5 ppm to 1100 ± 500 ppm xenon (by weight) in 6 steps. The 3.14-liter detector uses tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) wavelength shifter with dual photomultiplier tubes and is operated in single-phase mode. Gamma-ray-interaction signal yield of 4.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV improved to 5.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV with dopant. Energy resolution at 662 keV improved from (4.4 ± 0.2)% (σ) to (3.5 ± 0.2)% (σ) with dopant. Pulse-shape discrimination performance degraded greatly at the first addition of dopant, slightly improved with additional additions, then rapidly improved near the end of our dopant range, with performance becoming slightly better than pure argon at the highest tested dopant concentration. Some evidence of reduced neutron scintillation efficiency with increasing dopant concentration was observed. Finally, the waveform shape outside the TPB region is discussed, suggesting that the contribution to the waveform from xenon-produced light is primarily in the last portion of the slow component.

  14. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbouZeid, Hass; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particle flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 88 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 9 fb-1 (as of June, 2012) of data have been collected at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating almost optimally, with performances very close to the specifications.

  15. Resolving the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos using a liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2008-10-01

    We explore the potential offered by large-mass liquid argon detectors for determination of the sign of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through interactions of atmospheric neutrinos. We give results for a 100 kT sized magnetized detector which provides separate sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and, over a limited energy range, to {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub e}. We also discuss the sensitivity for the unmagnetized version of such a detector. After including the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporating the relevant statistical, theoretical, and systematic errors, we perform a binned {chi}{sup 2} analysis of simulated data. The {chi}{sup 2} is marginalized over the presently allowed ranges of neutrino parameters and determined as a function of {theta}{sub 13}. We find that such a detector offers superior capabilities for hierarchy resolution, allowing a >4{sigma} determination for a 100 kT detector over a 10-year running period for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.05. For an unmagnetized detector, a 2.5{sigma} hierarchy sensitivity is possible for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}=0.04.

  16. The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter: One year of LHC operation and future upgrade plans for HL-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, P. W.

    2011-07-01

    An overview of the ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeter system is provided, along with a discussion of its operation and performance during the first year of LHC running. Upgrade planning related to the proposed high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC is also discussed, with an emphasis on the forward part of the calorimeter where the effects of the higher luminosity are a particular challenge. (authors)

  17. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  18. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampl, W.

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadron calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadron calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at centre of mass energies of 7-8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter has been operating almost optimally, with performance very close to specifications. The talk will cover all aspects of these first years of operation, including the calibration efforts and the data quality assessment procedure. The excellent performance achieved will also be briefly reviewed, especially in the context of the recently announced discovery of the Higgs boson.

  19. Measurement of the response of the ATLAS liquid argon barrel calorimeter to electrons at the 2004 combined test-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Aharrouche, M.; Ma, H.; Adam-Bourdarios, C.; Aleksa, M.; Banfi, D.; Benchekroun, D.; Benslama, K.; Boonekamp, M.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Chen, H.; Citterio, M.; Dannheim, D.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Girolamo, B.; El Kacimi, M.; Fanti, M.; Froeschl, R.; Fournier, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Kado, M.; Kerschen, N.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Laplace, S.; Lechowski, M.; Lelas, D.; Liang, Z.; Loureiro, K.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; McPherson, R.; Meng, Z.; Paganis, S.; Prieur, D.; Puzo, P.; Ridel, M.; Riu, I.; Rousseau, D.; Sauvage, G.; Schwemling, P.; Simon, S.; Spano, F.; Straessner, A.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Thioye, M.; Unal, G.; Wilkens, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I. and Zhang, H.

    2010-03-11

    During summer and fall 2004, the response of a full slice of the ATLAS barrel detector to different particles was studied in controlled beam. One module of the ATLAS liquid argon barrel calorimeter - identical to the production modules and read out by the final front-end and back-end electronics - was used for electromagnetic calorimetry. This paper presents and discusses the electron performance of the LAr barrel calorimeter, including linearity, uniformity, and resolution with different amounts of material upstream the calorimeter and energies ranging from 1 to 250 GeV.

  20. The DarkSide project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DarkSide project, The

    2016-02-01

    DarkSide is a graded experimental project based on radiopure argon, and is now, and will be, used in direct dark matter searches. The present DarkSide-50 detector, operating at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, is a dual-phase, 50 kg, liquid argon time-projection-chamber surrounded by an active liquid scintillator veto. It is designed to be background free in 3 years of operation. DS-50 performances, when filled with atmospheric argon, are reported. However DS-50 filled with underground argon, shows impressive reduction of the 39Ar isotope. The application of this powerful technology in a future generation of the DarkSide program is discussed.

  1. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop towards the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuto; Nishikawa, Koichiro

    2011-07-01

    "Neutrino physics is largely an art of learning a great deal by observing nothing" (Haim Harari, 1988) was our general understanding of the field for the ~25 years previous. A new neutrino era was abruptly brought from outer space by a burst of SN1987A neutrinos. The detection of neutrinos from SN1987A gave a new impetus to neutrino research. As we know, new discoveries of neutrinos have since been made. Neutrinos were no longer mysterious, but attained particle citizenship. Giant liquid argon charge imaging experiments have the prospect of opening the door to the second new era in neutrino physics. The coming era would provoke not evolution, but revolution in particle physics. However, paving the way for the new era requires not evolutionary, but revolutionary detector developments. I hope this workshop will be conducive to reaping a rich harvest from its activities. In 1993, Professor Carlo Rubbia presented "The Renaissance of Experimental Neutrino Physics" in which he discussed various possibilities of shooting neutrino beams from CERN towards Gran Sasso, Super-Kamiokande at Kamioka and DUMAND in Hawaii. Now KEK hopes to shoot neutrino beams from J-PARC to Kamioka, Okinoshima, Korea and Gran Sasso. Signature Atsuto SuzukiDirector General, KEK J-PARC has moved into a new phase of operation. The commissioning of the accelerator complex and experiment facilities has begun, and it is urgent to attain initial design performance as soon as possible. For the immediate future, KEK has a 5 year plan. The plan includes the upgrade of the J-PARC accelerator to a multi-Mega-Watt facility, and detector R&Ds to form the basis for a next step in the neutrino experiment. One of the main issues of the future neutrino experiment will be the search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, which demands much more precision than studying neutrino oscillation or non-zero theta13. This naturally requires a very massive detector with higher precision than presently available

  2. VUV-Vis optical characterization of Tetraphenyl-butadiene films on glass and specular reflector substrates from room to liquid Argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    The use of efficient wavelength-shifters from the vacuum-ultraviolet to the photo-sensor's range of sensitivity is a key feature in detectors for Dark Matter search and neutrino physics based on liquid argon scintillation detection. Thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor optical window is the most common solution in current and planned experiments. Detector design and response can be evaluated and correctly simulated only when the properties of the optical system in use (TPB film + substrate) are fully understood. Characterization of the optical system requires specific, sometimes sophisticated optical methodologies. In this paper the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of two independent campaigns of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  3. Project TIME. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroyer, Connie J.; Payne, David L.

    Project TIME (Training Initiative for Manufacturing Employees) was an 18-month National Workplace Literacy Program conducted by Lord Fairfax Community College in conjunction with an automotive parts plant and Triplett Technical and Business Institute in Virginia. Project TIME had three primary objectives: to help employees obtain the basic…

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizenec, P.

    2014-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid Argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at a unprecedented center of mass energies between 7 TeV and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating with performances very close to the specification ones. After 2019, the instantaneous luminosity will reach 2-3 × 1034 cm-2s-1, well above the luminosity for which the calorimeter was designed. In order to preserve its triggering capabilities, the detector will be upgraded with a new fully digital trigger system with a refined granularity. In 2023, the instantaneous luminosity will ultimately reach 5-7 × 1034 cm-2s-1, requiring a complete replacement of the readout electronics. Moreover, with an increased particle flux, several phenomena (liquid argon boiling, space charge effects...) will affect the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal). A replacement with a new FCal with smaller LAr gaps or a new calorimeter module are considered. The performance of these new

  5. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Capillary Driven Free Surface Oscillations of Liquid Argon Under Non-Isothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulev, Nikolai; Dreyer, Michael E.

    Knowledge of dynamic behaviour of cryogenic fluids under microgravity is of key importance for the management of cryogenic propellants in space vehicles. In this work we present experimental and numerical investigations of the capillary driven free surface oscillations of liquid argon (Tsat = 87.3K @ 1013 hPa) under non-isothermal boundary conditions. Such oscillations take place during the reorientation of the equilibrium position of the free surface upon step reduction of gravity. The aim was to investigate the impact on the reorientation when the main capillary flow is superimposed in the vicinity of the contact line by a flow, induced by thermal effects due to heat flux from the vessel's hot wall towards the cold cryogenic liquid. The experiments were performed at the Bremen Drop Tower. Axial wall temperature gradients of averaged 0.15 K/mm -1.93 K/mm towards the free surface were implemented. A general dependence of the system behavior on the value of these gradients was observed. Thus the characteristics of the free surface oscillations vary accordingly. The aperiodic movement of the apparent contact line changes to a periodic one, accompanied by a distinctive change in the vapor pressure increase -hinting to a peak evaporation on the receding contact line. Nucleation boiling in the highest range of the axial wall temperature gradients, indicating the formation of thermal wall boundary layers, was also observed. The individual or combined action of the physical mechanisms of Marangoni convection, vapor recoil and evaporation/condensation are to be expected behind the observation. Numerical simulations of the drop tower experiments utilizing the VOF method were exploited in search for the explanation. Simulation results and comparison to the experiment are also presented.

  6. Study of the response of ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeters to muons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwemling, P.; Lanni, F.; Aharrouche, M.; Colas, J.; Di Ciaccio, L.; El Kacimi, M.; Gaumer, O.; Gouanere, M.; Goujdami, D.; Lafaye, R.; Laplace, S.; Le Maner, C.; Neukermans, L.; Perrodo, P.; Poggioli, L.; Prieur, D.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sauvage, G.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Zitoun, R.; Lanni, F.; Ma, H.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H.; Belymam, A.; Benchekroun, D.; Hakimi, M.; Hoummada, A.; Gao, Y.; Lu, L.; Stroynowski, R.; Aleksa, M.; Carli, T.; Fassnacht, P.; Gianotti, F.; Hervas, L.; Lampl, W.; Collot, J.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Malek, F.; Martin, P.; Viret, S.; Leltchouk, M.; Parsons, J.A.; Simion, S.; Barreiro, F.; DelPeso, J.; Labarga, L.; Oliver, C.; Rodier, S.; Barrillon, P.; Djama, F.; Hubaut, F.; Mangeard, P.S.; Monnier, E.; Niess, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Resende, B.; Sauvage, D.; Serfon, C.; Tisserant, S.; Toth, J.; Zhang, H.; Banfi, D.; Carminati, L.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Delmastro, M.; Fanti, M.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Kotov, K.; Maslennikov, A.; Pospelov, G.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Bourdarios, C.; Fayard, L.; Fournier, D.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Kado, M.; Parrour, G.; Plamondon, M.; Puzo, P.; Rousseau, D.; Sacco, R.; Serin, L.; Unal, G.; Zerwas, D.; Dekhissi, B.; Derkaoui, J.; El Kharrim, A.; Maaroufi, F.; Cleland, W.; Lacour, D.; Laforge, B.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Schwemling, Ph.; Ghazlane, H.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A.; Boonekamp, M.; Mansoulie, B.; Meyer, P.; Schwindling, J.; Lund-Jensen,B.; Tayalat, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The response of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter to muons has been studied in this paper. Results on signal over noise ratio, assessment of the detector response uniformity, and position resolution are presented. The possibility to study fine details of the structure of the detector through its response to muons is illustrated on a specific example. Finally, the performance obtained on muons in test-beam is used to estimate the detector uniformity and time alignment precision that will be reachable after the commissioning of the ATLAS detector with cosmic rays.

  7. Optical readout of a two phase liquid argon TPC using CCD camera and THGEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrokoridis, K.; Ball, F.; Carroll, J.; Lazos, M.; McCormick, K. J.; Smith, N. A.; Touramanis, C.; Walker, J.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study into the use of CCDs to image secondary scintillation light generated by THick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) in a two phase LAr TPC. A Sony ICX285AL CCD chip was mounted above a double THGEM in the gas phase of a 40 litre two-phase LAr TPC with the majority of the camera electronics positioned externally via a feedthrough. An Am-241 source was mounted on a rotatable motion feedthrough allowing the positioning of the alpha source either inside or outside of the field cage. Developed for and incorporated into the TPC design was a novel high voltage feedthrough featuring LAr insulation. Furthermore, a range of webcams were tested for operation in cryogenics as an internal detector monitoring tool. Of the range of webcams tested the Microsoft HD-3000 (model no:1456) webcam was found to be superior in terms of noise and lowest operating temperature. In ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure 1 ppm pure argon gas, the THGEM gain was ≈ 1000 and using a 1 msec exposure the CCD captured single alpha tracks. Successful operation of the CCD camera in two-phase cryogenic mode was also achieved. Using a 10 sec exposure a photograph of secondary scintillation light induced by the Am-241 source in LAr has been captured for the first time.

  8. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event and other experiments, based on liquid Ar detectors. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10-1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields, between 0.6 and 2.3 kV/cm, are determined in liquid Ar based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15-40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a computer program, to correctly determine the absorbed X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  9. Long-term operation of a double phase LAr LEM Time Projection Chamber with a simplified anode and extraction-grid design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, C.; Epprecht, L.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Murphy, S.; Natterer, G.; Periale, L.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Viant, T.; Wu, S.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the successful operation of a double phase Liquid Argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC) equipped with two dimensional projective anodes with dimensions 10 × 10 cm2, and with a maximum drift length of 21 cm. The anodes were manufactured for the first time from a single multilayer printed circuit board (PCB). Various layouts of the readout views have been tested and optimised. In addition, the ionisation charge was efficiently extracted from the liquid to the gas phase with a single grid instead of two previously. We studied the response and the gain of the detector to cosmic muon tracks. To study long-term stability over several weeks, we continuously operated the chamber at fixed electric field settings. We reproducibly observe that after an initial decrease with a characteristic time of τ ≈ 1.6 days, the observed gain is stable. In 46 days of operation, a total of 14.6 million triggers have been collected at a stable effective gain of G∞ ~ 15 corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)gtrsim60 for minimum ionising tracks. During the full period, eight discharges across the LEM were observed. A maximum effective gain of 90 was also observed, corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)gtrsim400 for minimum ionising tracks, or S/N ≈ 10 for an energy deposition of 15 keV on a single readout channel.

  10. The DELPHI time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.; Cairanti, G.; Charpentier, P.; Clara, M.P.; Delikaris, D.; Foeth, H.; Heck, B.W.; Hilke, H.J.; Sulkowski, K.; Aubret, C.

    1989-02-01

    The central tracking device of the DELPHI Experiment at LEP is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an active volume of 2 x 1.34m in length and 2.22m in diameter. Since spring 1988 the TPC has undergone extensive tests in a cosmic ray set-up. It will be installed in the LEP tunnel by early 1989. This report covers the construction, the read-out electronics and the contribution of the TPC to the DELPHI trigger. Emphasis is given to novelties which are not used in similar detectors.

  11. LOCx2, a low-latency, low-overhead, 2 × 5.12-Gbps transmitter ASIC for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Li, X.; Gong, D.; Chen, J.; Guo, D.; He, H.; Hou, S.; Huang, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Sun, X.; Teng, P.; Vosooghi, B.; Xiang, A. C.; Ye, J.; You, Y.; Zuo, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design and test results of LOCx2, a transmitter ASIC for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter trigger upgrade. LOCx2 consists of two channels and each channel encodes ADC data with an overhead of 14.3% and transmits serial data at 5.12 Gbps with a latency of less than 27.2 ns. LOCx2 is fabricated with a commercial 0.25-μm Silicon-on-Sapphire CMOS technology and is packaged in a 100-pin QFN package. The power consumption of LOCx2 is about 843 mW.

  12. Single-walled nanohorns and other nanocarbons generated by submerged arc discharge between carbon electrodes in liquid argon and other media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, K.; Pramoda, K.; Moses, K.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2014-03-01

    Arc discharge between two graphite electrodes submerged in different liquid media yields various dimensional nanocarbon structures such as 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) prepared by submerged arc discharge in liquid nitrogen medium are found to have nitrogen impurities. Here, we report the structure and properties of pure and nitrogen-doped SWNHs obtained by submerged arc discharge in a liquid argon medium. The absence of an XPS N 1s signal, which is present in nanohorns obtained in liquid nitrogen, indicate that the nanohorns are free from nitrogen impurities. Raman spectra show a strong defect-induced D band and current-voltage characteristics show a slight nonlinear behavior. N2 adsorption of pure SWNHs shows type-IV isotherms with a surface area of 300 m2 g-1. Adsorption of CO2 and H2 in pure SWNHs has also been measured. Arc discharge in other liquid media such as water, ethanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), n-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), formamide, benzene, heptane and acetone yields different nanocarbon structures including multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), few-layer graphene, carbon onions and carbon nanoparticles.

  13. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-28

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H{sub 2}, F{sub 2} and O{sub 3} at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  14. Time-dependent projected Hartree-Fock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) has recently emerged as an alternative approach to describing degenerate systems where static correlation is abundant, when the spin-symmetry is projected. Here, we derive a set of linearized time-dependent equations for PHF in order to be able to access excited states. The close connection of such linear-response time-dependent PHF (TDPHF) to the stability condition of a PHF wave function is discussed. Expanding this analysis also makes it possible to give analytical expressions for the projected coupling terms of Hamiltonian and overlaps between excited Slater determinants. TDPHF with spin-projection (TDSUHF) and its Tamm-Dancoff approximation are benchmarked for several electronically degenerate molecules including the dissociating H2, F2 and O3 at equilibrium, and the distorted ethylene. It is shown that they give consistently better descriptions of excited states than does time-dependent HF (TDHF). Furthermore, we demonstrate that they offer not only singly but also doubly excited states, which naturally arise upon spin-projection. We also address the thermodynamic limit of TDSUHF, using non-interacting He gas. While TDPHF singly excited states tend to converge to those of HF with the size of the system due to the lack of size-extensivity of PHF, doubly excited states remain reasonable even at the thermodynamic limit. We find that the overall performance of our method is systematically better than the regular TDHF in many cases at the same computational scaling.

  15. High pressure hydrogen time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a high pressure hydrogen gas time projection chamber which consists of two cylindrical drift regions each 45 cm in diameter and 75 cm long. Typically, at 15 atm of H/sub 2/ with 2 kV/cm drift field and 7 kV on the 35..mu.. sense wires, the drift velocity is about 0.5 cm/..mu..sec and the spatial resolution +-200..mu...

  16. Container Refurbishment Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aloi, t.; anthony, p; blair, t; forester, c; hall, k; hawk, t; gordon, b; johnsen, s; keck, g; clifford, m; reichert, d; rogers, p; richards, w; smallen, p; tilley, e

    2000-05-15

    In mid-1999, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the overall efficiency of the Container Refurbishment process. A cross-functional team was formed by the Industrial Engineering Services group within Product Certification Organization to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. The CTR team efforts have resulted in increased productivity equaling approximately $450K per year. The effort also significantly reduced the wait time required necessary to start assembly work on the shop floor. Increasing daily production time and identifying delays were key team goals. Following is a brief summary of accomplishments: (A) Productivity Improvements: (1) Reduced Radcon survey time for empty containers: (i) 50% at 9720-3 (ii) 67% at 9204-2 and (iii) 100% at 9212; (2) Eliminated container inspections at 9720-3; (3) Reduced charged time (includes hands-on labor and support functions) per empty container by 25%; (4) Reduced cycle time to refurbish a container by 25%. (Dramatic wait time reduction -Assembly); (5) Reduced the time for 9212 to receive empty, refurbished containers by 67-80%; (6) Reduced the time for 9204-2E to receive empty, refurbished containers from 1 day to immediate; (7) Implemented software to track time charged per container for continuous improvement; (8) Initiated continuous improvement efforts between Workstream experts and Refurbishment personnel, reworded complex Workstream prompts to allow worker data corrections, and reduces time of support groups, Workstream personnel, and Refurbishment personnel; (9) Consolidated refurbished, container warehousing areas, eliminated long travel times to areas outside the protected area portals to an area in the vicinity of the refurbishment area and a process area, benefits are improved container flow and better housekeeping; and (10) improved overall communication of team by flowcharting entire process. B. Annual Cost Savings: $453K

  17. Performance of the TOPAZ time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Shirahashi, A.; Aihara, H.; Itoh, R.; Kamae, T.; Kusuki, N.; Tanaka, M.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, K.; Ikeda, H.; Iwasaki, H.

    1988-02-01

    The TOPAZ detector has began taking data at the TRISTAN e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beam ring in May 1987. The major detector elements including the time projection chamber (TPC) have been working quite satisfactorily. The authors report here the performance of TPC based on real e/sup +/e/sup -/ events and cosmic ray events. They measure spatial resolution of sigma/sub xy/ = 185..mu..m and sigma/sub z/ = 335..mu..m, momentum resolution of sigma/sub PT//P/sub T/ = ..sqrt..(1.5P/sub T/)/sup 2/ + (1.6)/sup 2%/ and dE/dx resolution of 4.6%.

  18. Project Management in Real Time: A Service-Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Erik; Drexler, John A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a service-learning assignment for a project management course. It is designed to facilitate hands-on student learning of both the technical and the interpersonal aspects of project management, and it involves student engagement with real customers and real stakeholders in the creation of real events with real outcomes. As…

  19. Triggering the LBL time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.; Millaud, J.; McGathen, T.

    1981-10-01

    A fast digital trigger was built for the LBL Time Projection Chamber (TPC) installed in the PEP-4 detector at SLAC. The TPC is an innovative High Energy Physics detector which will provide particle identification from dE/dx information within the tracking volume. The TPC trigger uses discriminator signals from 2220 dE/dx wire channels to require a track of ionization in the TPC which originates from the colliding beam intersection region. The trigger processing is performed as the ionization drifts onto the proportional wires and is completed 17 ..mu..s after beam crossing. This report describes the basic operation of the TPC detector and its trigger; a pretrigger which uses prompt TPC information from the endcap region; and the electronic implementation. The trigger can be tested with realistic simulated patterns of ionization deposits in the TPC which are stored in local memories. Test results from electronic simulations and first results of a test with cosmic rays are shown.

  20. The Sol project: the sun in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, L. G. F.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Do Nascimento, J. D., Jr.; da Silva, L.

    2003-08-01

    The solar place in the set of stellar properties of the neighborhood, such as chemical composition, magnetic activity, lithium depletion, and others, suggests that the Sun may not exactly be a representative star. A few of the solar putative peculiarities seem to involve details of its evolutionary history, and that some light might be shed onto this question by a new approach based on the analysis of a time line in the HR diagram, searching for stars that might represent past, present and future solar evolutionary loci. The SOL Project (Solar Origin and Life) aims towards the identification, among the nearby stars, of those that share in detail the solar evolutionary track, in order to put the Sun as a star in proper perspective. We aim at obtaining, spectroscopically, atmospheric parameters, Fe and Li abundances, space velocities, state of evolution, degree of chromospheric activity and rotational velocities of a stellar sample, selected from precise astrometry and photometry of the Hipparcos catalogue, as to represent the Sun in various evolutionary stages along the solar mass, solar metallicity theoretical track: the early Sun, the present Sun, the subgiant Sun and the giant Sun. Here we present a progress report of the survey: the sample selection, OPD spectroscopic observations and preliminary results of the atmospheric parameters and evolutionary status analysis. As a by-product, we also present a new effective temperature calibration, based on published Infrared Flux Method data, and calibrated explicitly for precise spectroscopic stellar metallicities, for the (B-V), (BT-VT), (R-I), (V-I), (V-R) and (V-K) color indices, and valid for cool, normal and moderately metal-poor giant stars.

  1. Time frames for geothermal project development

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, David W.

    2001-04-17

    Geothermal development can generally be broken down into distinct phases: Exploration and Leasing; Project Development And Feasibility Studies; Well Field Development; Project Finance, Construction and Start-up Operations; and Commercial Operations. Each phase represents different levels of cost and risk and different types of management teams that are needed to assess and manage the project and associated risk. Orderly transitions of management at each major phase are needed. Exploration programs are largely science based, the primary focus of the science based investigations should be to: secure the lease position, and develop sufficient information to identify and characterize an economical geothermal resource. Project development specialists build on the exploration data to: pull together a project design, develop a detailed cost estimate; prepare an environmental assessment; and collect all data needed for project financing. Construction specialist build from the development phase to: develop detailed engineering, procure equipment and materials, schedule and manage the facilities construction programs, and start and test the power plant. Operations specialists take over from construction during start-up and are responsible for sustainable and reliable operations of the resource and power generation equipment over the life of the project.

  2. Electronic transfers save time and money for FGD project

    SciTech Connect

    Kindig, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to support the numerous construction projects that PSI Energy is currently engaged in, particularly the FGD (Flue Gas Desulfurization) Project at Gibson, it was decided to establish hardware, software, and procedures that would help shorten the project completion time. This would be accomplished by reducing the review times at PSI Energy for drawings and specifications received from the architect/engineer. The FGD Project, which uses Chicago-based Sargent and Lundy (S and L) as the primary architect/engineer and which involves construction at the Gibson Generating Station, was to be the pilot project for putting this system in place.

  3. Mask cycle time reduction for foundry projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2011-11-01

    One of key deliverables of foundry based manufacturing is low cycletime. Building new and enhancing existing products by mask changes involves significant logistical effort, which could be reduced by standardizing data management and communication procedures among design house, mask shop, and foundry (fab) [1]. As an example, a typical process of taping out can take up to two weeks in addition to technical effort, for database handling, mask form completion, management approval, PO signoff and JDV review, translating into loss of revenue. In order to reduce this delay, we are proposing to develop a unified online system which should assist with the following functions: database edits, final verifications, document approvals, mask order entries, and JDV review with engineering signoff as required. This would help a growing number of semiconductor products to be flexibly manufactured at different manufacturing sites. We discuss how the data architecture based on a non-relational database management system (NRDMBS) extracted into a relational one (RDMBS) should provide quality information [2], to reduce cycle time significantly beyond 70% for an example 2 week tapeout schedule.

  4. 36 CFR 72.33 - Timing and duration of projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.33 Timing and duration of projects. (a) Construction components of projects... completing construction components of either Rehabilitation or Innovation proposals will be limited to three... Program, and of benefit to the federal government. Any component of an Innovation proposal which is...

  5. 36 CFR 72.33 - Timing and duration of projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.33 Timing and duration of projects. (a) Construction components of projects... completing construction components of either Rehabilitation or Innovation proposals will be limited to three... Program, and of benefit to the federal government. Any component of an Innovation proposal which is...

  6. 36 CFR 72.33 - Timing and duration of projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.33 Timing and duration of projects. (a) Construction components of projects... completing construction components of either Rehabilitation or Innovation proposals will be limited to three... Program, and of benefit to the federal government. Any component of an Innovation proposal which is...

  7. 36 CFR 72.33 - Timing and duration of projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.33 Timing and duration of projects. (a) Construction components of projects... completing construction components of either Rehabilitation or Innovation proposals will be limited to three... Program, and of benefit to the federal government. Any component of an Innovation proposal which is...

  8. 36 CFR 72.33 - Timing and duration of projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.33 Timing and duration of projects. (a) Construction components of projects... completing construction components of either Rehabilitation or Innovation proposals will be limited to three... Program, and of benefit to the federal government. Any component of an Innovation proposal which is...

  9. Projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Cun-Fang; Xu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2008-06-01

    We study projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random networks. We relax some limitations of previous work, where projective-anticipating and projective-lag synchronization can be achieved only on two coupled chaotic systems. In this paper, we realize projective-anticipating and projective-lag synchronization on complex dynamical networks composed of a large number of interconnected components. At the same time, although previous work studied projective synchronization on complex dynamical networks, the dynamics of the nodes are coupled partially linear chaotic systems. In this paper, the dynamics of the nodes of the complex networks are time-delayed chaotic systems without the limitation of the partial linearity. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, we suggest a generic method to achieve the projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random dynamical networks, and we find both its existence and sufficient stability conditions. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated and verified by examining specific examples using Ikeda and Mackey-Glass systems on Erdös-Rényi networks.

  10. Railway network design with multiple project stages and time sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuby, Michael; Xu, Zhongyi; Xie, Xiaodong

    This paper presents a spatial decision support system for network design problems in which different kinds of projects can be built in stages over time. It was developed by the World Bank and China's Ministry of Railways to plan investment strategies for China's overburdened railway system. We first present a mixed-integer program for the single-period network design problem with project choices such as single or multiple tracks and/or electrification with economies of scale. Then, because such projects can be built all at once or in stages, we developed a heuristic backwards time sequencing procedure with a cost adjustment factor to solve the ``project staging'' problem. Other innovations include a preloading routine; coordinated modeling of arcs, paths, and corridors; and a custom-built GIS.

  11. A compact Time Projection Chamber for the Crystal Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, O.; Wolfes, M.; Gradl, W.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a development of a compact Time Projection Chamber with triple Gas Electron Multiplier readout to replace the current tracking detector in the Crystal Ball/TAPS Experiment at the A2 Tagged Photon Facility at MAMI in Mainz, Germany. Challenges are the limitations in size and the absence of a longitudinal magnetic flied.

  12. Signal processing for the TOPAZ Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwata, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Matsuda, T.; Nakamura, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Aihara, H.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.

    1987-02-01

    The signals from the TOPAZ Time Projection Chamber, after being processed by a low noise preamplifier and a shaper amplifier, are recorded by a CCD based digitizer system. The system achieved an integral operation in the environment of FASTBUS with Sector Sequencers and FPI.

  13. Vectorised simulation of the response of a time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulos, C. H.; Mermikides, M. E.

    1989-12-01

    A Monte Carlo code used for the detailed simulation of the response of the ALEPH time projection chamber has been successfully restructured to exploit the vector architectures of the CDC CYBER-205, ETA10 and CRAY X-MP supercomputers. Some aspects of the vector implementation are discussed and the performance on the various processors is compared.

  14. Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project, 1987-1997 Project Review.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrock, Robin M.; Hans, Karen M.; Beeman, John W.

    1997-12-01

    The assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis Project (Bonneville Power Administration Project 87-401) monitored attributes of salmonid smolt physiology in the Columbia and Snake River basins from 1987 to 1997, under the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, in cooperation with the Smolt Monitoring Program of the Fish Passage Center. The primary goal of the project was to investigate the physiological development of juvenile salmonids related to migration rates. The assumption was made that the level of smolt development, interacting with environmental factos such as flow, would be reflected in travel times. The Fish Passage Center applied the physiological measurements of smolt condition to Water Budget management, to regulate flows so as to decrease travel time and increase survival.

  15. New Fission Cross Section Measurements using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2008-03-01

    A group of six universities (ACU, California Polytechnic, Colorado School of Mines, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ohio, and Oregon State) and three national laboratories (Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Idaho) have undertaken the task of building a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure the fission cross sections needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. The fission TPC concept will be presented, and why we think we can improve on 50 years of fission study.

  16. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, C.O.; Baldwin, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  17. SUNLAB-The Project of a Polish Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiel, J.; Budzanowski, M.; Chorowski, M.; Cygan, S.; Dorda, J.; Hanzel, S.; Harańczyk, M.; Horoszczak, L.; Januszewska, K.; Jaroń, L.; Konefalł, A.; Kozak, K.; Lankof, L.; Mania, S.; Markiewicz, A.; Markowski, P.; Mazur, J.; Mertuszka, P.; Mietelski, J. W.; Poliński, J.; Puchalska, M.; Pytel, W.; Raczyński, M.; Sadecki, Z.; Sadowski, A.; Ślizowski, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Szeglowski, T.; Tomankiewicz, E.; Urbańczyk, K.; Zalewska, A.

    2010-11-01

    The project of the first Polish underground laboratory SUNLAB, in the Polkowice-Sieroszowice copper mine, belonging to the KGHM Polska Miedź S.A. holding, is presented. Two stages of the project are foreseen: SUNLAB1 (a small laboratory in the salt layer exhibiting extremely low level of natural radioactivity) and SUNLAB2 (a big laboratory in the anhydrite layer, able to host the next generation liquid argon detector-GLACIER, which is considered within the LAGUNA FP7 project). The results of the natural radioactivity background measurements performed in the Polkowice-Sieroszowice salt cavern are also briefly summarized.

  18. SUNLAB - The Project of a Polish Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kisiel, J.; Dorda, J.; Konefall, A.; Mania, S.; Szeglowski, T.; Budzanowski, M.; Haranczyk, M.; Kozak, K.; Mazur, J.; Mietelski, J. W.; Puchalska, M.; Szarska, M.; Tomankiewicz, E.; Zalewska, A.; Chorowski, M.; Polinski, J.; Cygan, S.; Hanzel, S.; Markiewicz, A.; Mertuszka, P.

    2010-11-24

    The project of the first Polish underground laboratory SUNLAB, in the Polkowice-Sieroszowice copper mine, belonging to the KGHM Polska Miedz S.A. holding, is presented. Two stages of the project are foreseen: SUNLAB1 (a small laboratory in the salt layer exhibiting extremely low level of natural radioactivity) and SUNLAB2 (a big laboratory in the anhydrite layer, able to host the next generation liquid argon detector - GLACIER, which is considered within the LAGUNA FP7 project). The results of the natural radioactivity background measurements performed in the Polkowice-Sieroszowice salt cavern are also briefly summarized.

  19. Integrated Project Scheduling and Staff Assignment with Controllable Processing Times

    PubMed Central

    Framinan, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a decision problem related to simultaneously scheduling the tasks in a project and assigning the staff to these tasks, taking into account that a task can be performed only by employees with certain skills, and that the length of each task depends on the number of employees assigned. This type of problems usually appears in service companies, where both tasks scheduling and staff assignment are closely related. An integer programming model for the problem is proposed, together with some extensions to cope with different situations. Additionally, the advantages of the controllable processing times approach are compared with the fixed processing times. Due to the complexity of the integrated model, a simple GRASP algorithm is implemented in order to obtain good, approximate solutions in short computation times. PMID:24895672

  20. The timing upgrade project of the TOTEM Roman Pots detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the upgrade project developed by the TOTEM Collaboration to measure the time of flight (TOF) of the protons in the vertical Roman Pot detectors. The physics program that the upgraded system aims to accomplish will be addressed. Simulation studies allowed us to define a geometry of the sensor such that the detection inefficiency due to the pile-up of the particles in the same electrode is low even with a small amount of read-out channels. The measurement of the protons TOF with ~ 50 ps time resolution requires the development of several challenging technological solutions. The arrival time of the protons will be measured by scCVD diamond detectors, for which a dedicated fast and low-noise electronics for the signal amplification has been designed. Indeed, while diamond sensors have the advantage of higher radiation hardness, lower noise and faster signal than silicon sensors, the amount of charge released in the medium is lower. The sampling of the waveform is performed at a rate up to 10 GS/s with the SAMPIC chip. The sampled waveforms are then analysed offline where optimal algorithms can be implemented to reduce the time walk effects. The clock distribution system, based on the Universal Picosecond Timing System developed at GSI, is optimized in order to have a negligible uncertainty on the TOF measurement. Finally an overview of the control system which will interface the timing detectors to the experiment DAQ is given.

  1. Basic processes in time-projection like detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sauli, F.

    1984-01-01

    There is a general feeling that unpleasant surprises may still appear in the operation of time projection chambers, and that some modifications of the original design (e.g., the choice of the wire and pad geometry and of the gas mixing) may result in improved performances. The purpose of these notes is, after a short discussion of some physical processes involved in the TPC-like detectors operation, to point out the areas where detailed information is still lacking and where problems have been found or may be expected. If possible, a solution or a line of research are offered to overcome the problems.

  2. Innovative Fission Measurements with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M D; Barnes, P D; Klay, J L

    2005-11-16

    This study explores a pioneering idea to utilize a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure fission cross sections and other fission quantities. The TPC is inherently capable of measuring fragments from fission events, decay alphas, and beam-material scatters. This document explores whether the TPC can improve the precision of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section and measure other new and significant fission quantities simultaneously. This work shows that the TPC can in fact deliver sub-1% cross section measurements and should provide breakthroughs in both the quality and quantity of information available from neutron-induced fission experiments.

  3. The time projection chamber for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Luciano; ALICE Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is the main tracking detector in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. The task of large acceptance tracking in a heavy ion experiment is similar to that encountered in the NA49 and STAR experiments at the SPS and RHIC respectively. However, the extreme multiplicities of ion collisions at the LHC set qualitatively and quantitatively new demands making new designs indispensable. In this paper we present an overview of the main components, with special focus on the front-end and readout electronics, and some of the most crucial aspects addressed by the R&D activities that have preceded the design and construction of the ALICE TPC.

  4. ? and ? reconstruction in central ? collisions using a time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, T.; NA49 Collaboration; Afanasiev, S. V.; Alber, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bächler, J.; Bailey, S. J.; Barnby, L. S.; Bartke, J.; Bialkowska, H.; Blyth, C. O.; Bock, R.; Bormann, C.; Brady, F. P.; Brockmann, R.; Buncic, N.; Buncic, P.; Caines, H. L.; Cebra, D.; Chan, P.; Cooper, G. E.; Cramer, J. G.; Cramer, P. B.; Csato, P.; Dietz, O.; Dunn, J.; Eckardt, V.; Eckhardt, F.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fischer, H. G.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Fuchs, M.; Gabler, F.; Gal, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Gladysz, E.; Grebieszkow, J.; Günther, J.; Harris, J. W.; Hegyi, S.; Henkel, T.; Hill, L. A.; Huang, I.; Howe, M. A.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Irmscher, D.; Jacobs, P.; Jones, P. G.; Kadija, K.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kowalski, M.; Lasiuk, B.; Lévai, P.; Malakhov, A. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mock, A.; Molnár, J.; Nelson, J. M.; Odyniec, G.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Petridis, A.; Piper, A.; Porter, R. J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Poziombka, S.; Prindle, D. J.; Pühlhofer, F.; Rauch, W.; Reid, J. G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Ritter, H. G.; Röhrich, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, H.; Rybicki, A.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Semenov, A. Yu; Schäfer, E.; Schmischke, D.; Schmitz, N.; Schönfelder, S.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.; Sikler, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Squier, G. T. A.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Toy, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Ullrich, T.; Vassiliou, M.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wang, F.; Weerasundara, D. D.; Wenig, S.; Whitten, C.; Wienold, T.; Wood, L.; Yates, T. A.; Zimanyi, J.; Zhu, X.-Z.; Zybert, R.

    1997-12-01

    The large acceptance time projection chambers of the NA49 experiment are used to record the trajectory of charged particles from Pb+ Pb collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. Neutral strange hadrons have been reconstructed from their charged decay products. To obtain distributions of 0954-3899/23/12/013/img5, 0954-3899/23/12/013/img6 and 0954-3899/23/12/013/img7 in discrete bins of rapidity, y, and transverse momentum, 0954-3899/23/12/013/img8, calculations have been performed to determine the acceptance of the detector and the efficiency of the reconstruction software as a function of both variables. The lifetime distributions obtained give values of 0954-3899/23/12/013/img90.6 cm for 0954-3899/23/12/013/img5 and 0954-3899/23/12/013/img11 cm for 0954-3899/23/12/013/img7, consistent with data book values.

  5. Proton Radiography With Timepix Based Time Projection Chambers.

    PubMed

    Biegun, Aleksandra K; Visser, Jan; Klaver, Tom; Ghazanfari, Nafiseh; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Koffeman, Els; van Beuzekom, Martin; Brandenburg, Sytze

    2016-04-01

    The development of a proton radiography system to improve the imaging of patients in proton beam therapy is described. The system comprises gridpix based time projection chambers, which are based on the Timepix chip designed by the Medipix collaboration, for tracking the protons. This type of detector was chosen to have minimal impact on the actual determination of the proton tracks by the tracking detectors. To determine the residual energy of the protons, a BaF 2 crystal with a photomultiplier tube is used. We present data taken in a feasibility experiment with phantoms that represent tissue equivalent materials found in the human body. The obtained experimental results show a good agreement with the performed simulations. PMID:26701179

  6. Abstract Algebra, Projective Geometry and Time Encoding of Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel; Saniga, Metod

    2005-10-01

    Algebraic geometrical concepts are playing an increasing role in quantum applications such as coding, cryptography, tomography and computing. We point out here the prominent role played by Galois fields viewed as cyclotomic extensions of the integers modulo a prime characteristic p. They can be used to generate efficient cyclic encoding, for transmitting secrete quantum keys, for quantum state recovery and for error correction in quantum computing. Finite projective planes and their generalization are the geometric counterpart to cyclotomic concepts, their coordinatization involves Galois fields, and they have been used repetitively for enciphering and coding. Finally, the characters over Galois fields are fundamental for generating complete sets of mutually unbiased bases, a generic concept of quantum information processing and quantum entanglement. Gauss sums over Galois fields ensure minimum uncertainty under such protocols. Some Galois rings which are cyclotomic extensions of the integers modulo 4 are also becoming fashionable for their role in time encoding and mutual unbiasedness.

  7. Beam commissioning of the SπRIT time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, Genie; Barney, Jon; Estee, Justin; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kaneko, Masanori; Kurata-Nishimura, Mizuki; Cerizza, Giordano; Santamaria, Clementine; Lee, Jung Woo; Lasko, Paweł; Łukasik, Jerzy; Lynch, William G.; McIntosh, Alan B.; Murakami, Tetsuya; Pawłowski, Piotr; Shane, Rebecca; Tangwancharoen, Suwat; Tsang, Manyee Betty; Baba, Hidetada; Hong, Byungsik; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hyo Sang; Otsu, Hideaki; Pelczar, Krzysztof; Sakurai, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Xiao, Zhigang; Yennello, Sherry J.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    The SπRIT Time Projection Chamber (TPC) was constructed at Michigan State University in the U.S.A. and transported to the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN in Japan. In October 2015, the SπRIT TPC was commissioned with 200 AMeV 79Se beams outside the SAMURAI dipole magnet. The experimental setup consists of the SπRIT TPC, a Multiplicity Trigger Array, a KATANA array, and a Active Veto array. The TPC is fully equipped with a newly-developed read-out electronics system, GET electronics. The trigger logic to select events of the TPC based on the ancillary detectors was tested. The analysis software, SpiRITROOT, was developed to analyze the SπRIT TPC data to determine the best trigger logic for upcoming experiments.

  8. The projected timing of climate departure from recent variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Camilo; Frazier, Abby G.; Longman, Ryan J.; Dacks, Rachel S.; Walton, Maya M.; Tong, Eric J.; Sanchez, Joseph J.; Kaiser, Lauren R.; Stender, Yuko O.; Anderson, James M.; Ambrosino, Christine M.; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Giuseffi, Louise M.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.

    2013-10-01

    Ecological and societal disruptions by modern climate change are critically determined by the time frame over which climates shift beyond historical analogues. Here we present a new index of the year when the projected mean climate of a given location moves to a state continuously outside the bounds of historical variability under alternative greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Using 1860 to 2005 as the historical period, this index has a global mean of 2069 (+/-18years s.d.) for near-surface air temperature under an emissions stabilization scenario and 2047 (+/-14years s.d.) under a `business-as-usual' scenario. Unprecedented climates will occur earliest in the tropics and among low-income countries, highlighting the vulnerability of global biodiversity and the limited governmental capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change. Our findings shed light on the urgency of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions if climates potentially harmful to biodiversity and society are to be prevented.

  9. Project planning and design: getting it right the first time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Jeffery

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes JPL's Project Formulation Support Team (PFST), which plays a central role in providing the institutional support tools and services for projects during their early formulation phases and ensure they get off to the right start.

  10. Analog signal processing for the Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Landis, D.A.; Goulding, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a large gas filled cylindrical detector designed to provide 3-D images of tracks radiating from the center of the detector where e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions occur. Ionization along the tracks is drifted in an electric field to the end planes which are equipped with a large array of proportional wires and position pads (17,000 channels). The wire signals are used to derive radial data while the pad signals provide the azmuthal information. The axial dimension is determined using the drift time of the ionization. Preamplifiers mounted in the ends of the chamber feed the signals to remote amplifiers whose outputs drive Charge Coupled Devices (CCD). The CCDs are normally clocked at 10 MHz and hold a 45.5 ..mu..s history (445 CCD buckets) of analog drift information from the TPC. During readout the clock is changed to 20 KHz and 17,000 CCD outputs are digitized (9 bits) in parallel. The non-zero data is then transferred to buffer memories associated with the digitizers. This paper emphasizes the analog signal processing part of the system.

  11. Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

    2000-12-01

    In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to

  12. "Babies Grow a Long Time": A Preschool Project about Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Andromahi

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project related to babies undertaken by preschoolers in a university-affiliated child care center in the Midwest. Following a description of the class, the author discusses the three phases of the project. Photographs taken during the project are included throughout the article. The article concludes with the author's…

  13. 3-D tracking in a miniature time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahsen, S. E.; Hedges, M. T.; Jaegle, I.; Ross, S. J.; Seong, I. S.; Thorpe, T. N.; Yamaoka, J.; Kadyk, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) detection of millimeter-scale ionization trails is of interest for detecting nuclear recoils in directional fast neutron detectors and in direction-sensitive searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may constitute the Dark Matter of the universe. We report on performance characterization of a miniature gas target Time Projection Chamber (TPC) where the drift charge is avalanche-multiplied with Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and detected with the ATLAS FE-I3 Pixel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). We report on measurements of gain, gain resolution, point resolution, diffusion, angular resolution, and energy resolution with low-energy X-rays, cosmic rays, and alpha particles, using the gases Ar:CO2 (70:30) and He:CO2 (70:30) at atmospheric pressure. We discuss the implications for future, larger directional neutron and Dark Matter detectors. With an eye to designing and selecting components for these, we generalize our results into analytical expressions for detector performance whenever possible. We conclude by demonstrating the 3-D directional detection of a fast neutron source.

  14. Relationship between time management in construction industry and project management performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Najuwa; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, construction industry particularly in Malaysia struggle in achieving status of eminent time management for construction project. Project managers have a great responsibility to keep the project success under time of project completion. However, studies shows that delays especially in Malaysian construction industry still unresolved due to weakness in managing the project. In addition, quality of time management on construction projects is generally poor. Due to the progressively extended delays issue, time performance becomes an important subject to be explored to investigate delay factors. The method of this study is review of literature towards issues in construction industry which affecting time performance of project in general by focusing towards process involved for project management. Based on study, it was found that knowledge, commitment, cooperation are the main criteria as an overall to manage the project into a smooth process during project execution until completion. It can be concluded that, the strength between project manager and team members in these main criteria while conducting the project towards good time performance is highly needed. However, there is lack of establishment towards factors of poor time performance which strongly related with project management. Hence, this study has been conducted to establish factors of poor time performance and its relations with project management.

  15. Information Collected on Nonapplied Time, Engaged Time, Nonengaged Time and Applied Time. Comparative Studies of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Norman L.; Nerenz, Anne G.

    This is one of a series of reports which provide definitions of and descriptive data on the variables used in the Comparative Study of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IEG) Evaluation Project. Phase IV investigated three curriculum programs specifically designed to be compatible with instructional programming for the individual…

  16. Real-Time Projection to Verify Plan Success During Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, David A.; Dvorak, Daniel L.; Rasmussen, Robert D.; Knight, Russell L.; Morris, John R.; Bennett, Matthew B.; Ingham, Michel D.

    2012-01-01

    The Mission Data System provides a framework for modeling complex systems in terms of system behaviors and goals that express intent. Complex activity plans can be represented as goal networks that express the coordination of goals on different state variables of the system. Real-time projection extends the ability of this system to verify plan achievability (all goals can be satisfied over the entire plan) into the execution domain so that the system is able to continuously re-verify a plan as it is executed, and as the states of the system change in response to goals and the environment. Previous versions were able to detect and respond to goal violations when they actually occur during execution. This new capability enables the prediction of future goal failures; specifically, goals that were previously found to be achievable but are no longer achievable due to unanticipated faults or environmental conditions. Early detection of such situations enables operators or an autonomous fault response capability to deal with the problem at a point that maximizes the available options. For example, this system has been applied to the problem of managing battery energy on a lunar rover as it is used to explore the Moon. Astronauts drive the rover to waypoints and conduct science observations according to a plan that is scheduled and verified to be achievable with the energy resources available. As the astronauts execute this plan, the system uses this new capability to continuously re-verify the plan as energy is consumed to ensure that the battery will never be depleted below safe levels across the entire plan.

  17. Schedule Analysis Software Saves Time for Project Planners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, a resource management team at Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and improved the Schedule Test and Assessment Tool, a software add-on capable of analyzing, summarizing, and finding logic gaps in project schedules. Companies like Lanham, Maryland-based Vantage Systems Inc. use the tool to manage NASA projects, but it has also been released for free to more than 200 US companies, agencies, and other entities.

  18. Directional Detection of Fast Neutrons Using a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, N; Heffner, M; Carosi, G; Carter, D; Foxe, M; Jovanovic, I

    2009-06-03

    maintained. Directional detection of neutrons has been previously considered for applications such as controlled fusion neutron imaging [2], nuclear fuel safety research [3], imaging of solar neutrons and SNM [4], and in nuclear science [5]. The use of scintillating crystals and fibers has been proposed for directional neutron detection [6]. Recently, a neutron scatter camera has been designed, constructed, and tested for imaging of fast neutrons, characteristic for SNM material fission [7]. The neutron scatter camera relies on the measurement of the proton recoil angle and proton energy by time of flight between two segmented solid-state detectors. A single-measurement result from the neutron scatter camera is a ring containing the possible incident neutron direction. Here we describe the development and commissioning of a directional neutron detection system based on a time projection chamber (TPC) detector. The TPC, which has been widely used in particle and nuclear physics research for several decades, provides a convenient means of measuring the full 3D trajectory, specific ionization (i.e particle type) and energy of charged particles. For this application, we observe recoil protons produced by fast neutron scatters on protons in hydrogen or methane gas. Gas pressures of a few ATM provide reasonable neutron interaction/scattering rates.

  19. Large Time Projection Chambers for Rare Event Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2009-11-03

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept [add ref to TPC section] has been applied to many projects outside of particle physics and the accelerator based experiments where it was initially developed. TPCs in non-accelerator particle physics experiments are principally focused on rare event detection (e.g. neutrino and darkmater experiments) and the physics of these experiments can place dramatically different constraints on the TPC design (only extensions to the traditional TPCs are discussed here). The drift gas, or liquid, is usually the target or matter under observation and due to very low signal rates a TPC with the largest active mass is desired. The large mass complicates particle tracking of short and sometimes very low energy particles. Other special design issues include, efficient light collection, background rejection, internal triggering and optimal energy resolution. Backgrounds from gamma-rays and neutrons are significant design issues in the construction of these TPCs. They are generally placed deep underground to shield from cosmogenic particles and surrounded with shielding to reduce radiation from the local surroundings. The construction materials have to be carefully screened for radiopurity as they are in close contact with the active mass and can be a signification source of background events. The TPC excels in reducing this internal background because the mass inside the fieldcage forms one monolithic volume from which fiducial cuts can be made ex post facto to isolate quiet drift mass, and can be circulated and purified to a very high level. Self shielding in these large mass systems can be significant and the effect improves with density. The liquid phase TPC can obtain a high density at low pressure which results in very good self-shielding and compact installation with a lightweight containment. The down sides are the need for cryogenics, slower charge drift, tracks shorter than the typical electron diffusion, lower energy resolution (e

  20. Fluctuations in Conjunction Miss Distance Projections as Time Approaches Time of Closest Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A., III

    2005-01-01

    A responsibility of the Trajectory Operations Officer is to ensure that the International Space Station (ISS) avoids colliding with debris. United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) tracks and catalogs a portion of the debris in Earth orbit, but only objects with a perigee less than 600 km and a radar cross section (RCS) greater than 10 cm-objects that, in fact, represent only a small fraction of the objects in Earth orbit. To accommodate for this, the ISS uses shielding to protect against collisions with smaller objects. This study provides a better understanding of how quickly, and to what degree, USSPACECOM projections tend to converge to the final, true miss distance. The information included is formulated to better predict the behavior of miss distance data during real-time operations. It was determined that the driving components, in order of impact on miss distance fluctuations, are energy dissipation rate (EDR), RCS, and inclination. Data used in this analysis, calculations made, and conclusions drawn are stored in Microsoft Excel log sheets. A separate log sheet, created for each conjunction, contains information such as predicted miss distances, apogee and perigee of debris orbit, EDR, RCS, inclination, tracks and observations, statistical data, and other evaluation/orbital parameters.

  1. Library Information System Time-Sharing (LISTS) Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Donald V.

    The Library Information System Time-Sharing (LISTS) experiment was based on three innovations in data processing technology: (1) the advent of computer time-sharing on third-generation machines, (2) the development of general-purpose file-management software and (3) the introduction of large, library-oriented data bases. The main body of the…

  2. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T.

    2014-01-29

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  3. A Time for Immersion, A Time for Reflection: The Multigenre Research Project and Portfolio Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Tom

    This paper describes the senior honors thesis (a multigenre research paper), and narrates the process by which a senior English major at the University of New Hampshire and her project advisor worked together on this semester-long project. In the first section, the multigenre research paper is defined as a work that combines poems, monologues,…

  4. Automobile Engine: Basic Ignition Timing. Fordson Bilingual Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, James E.

    These two vocational instructional modules on basic automobile ignition timing and on engine operation, four-stroke cycle, are two of eight such modules designed to assist recently arrived Arab students, limited in English proficiency (LEP), in critical instructional areas in a comprehensive high school. Goal stated for this module is for the…

  5. Time Management of Final Year Undergraduate English Projects: Supervisees' and the Supervisor's Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Belinda

    2003-01-01

    Explores how the individuality of students affects their time management strategies in doing undergraduate final year projects. Investigates how four students responded differently to the same time management advice given by the supervisor of their final year projects in two different teacher education programs on teaching English as a Second…

  6. Fission Fragment Angular Distributions measured with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinrath, Verena

    2015-04-28

    The subject is presented in a series of slides with the following organization: Introduction (What is anisotropy? Relevance (Theory and ratio cross section), Previous measurements); Experiment (Particle tracking in the fissionTPC, Neutron time of flight, Data analysis & uncertainty calculation, Preliminary result for 235U); and Future Work (Refine 235U result, Process 239Pu data).

  7. Real Time Technology Application Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, John; Hampson, Steve; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-09-01

    The work and results described in this final report pertain to the demonstration of real-time characterization technologies applied to potentially contaminated surface soils in and around Area of Concern (AOC) 492 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The work was conducted under the auspices of Kentucky Research Consortium for Energy and Environment (KRCEE). KRCEE was created to support the Department of Energy's (DOE) efforts to complete the expeditious and economically viable environmental restoration of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), and surrounding areas.

  8. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  9. Real-time lucky imaging in FastCam project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ramos, L. F.; Piqueras Meseguer, J. J.; Martin Hernando, Y.; Oscoz, A.; Rebolo, R.

    2008-07-01

    Lucky imaging techniques implemented by the FastCam group (see http://www.iac.es/proyecto/fastcam/) at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias have demonstrated its ability to obtain spectacular diffraction limited images in telescopes ranging from 1 to 4.2 m in visible wavelengths (mainly in the I band), at the expense of using only a small percentage of the available images. This work presents the development of a real-time processor, FPGA-based, capable of performing all the required processing involved in the lucky imaging technique: Bias and flat-field correction, quality evaluation of images, quality threshold for image selection, image recentering and accumulation, and finally sending through Gigabit Ethernet both raw and processed images to a PC computer. Furthermore, a real time display is generated directly from FPGA showing both types of images, plus a histogram of the computed quality values and the threshold used. All processes can co-exist physically located in separated places inside the FPGA, using its natural parallel approach, and can easily handle the 512x512 pixels at 30 fps found at the sensor camera output (an Andor Ixon+ DU-897ECSO EMCCD). Flexibility and parallel processing features of the reconfigurable logic have been used to implement a novel imaging strategy for segmented-mirror telescopes, allowing separate evaluation of every segment and posterior accumulation to achieve the resolution limit of a single segment with the integration capability of the full primary mirror.

  10. Project deliverables - a waste of time or a chance for knowledge transfer and dissemination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Deliverables are a common tool to measure a distinct output of a project. They should be meaningful in terms of the project's objectives and are normally constituted by e.g. a written report or document, a developed tool or software, an organized training or conference. They can be scientific or technical. The number of deliverables must be reasonable and commensurate to the project and its content. Deliverables as contractual obligations are often time consuming and often seen as a waste of "research" time, as one more administrative task without any use. However, deliverables are needed to verify the progress of a project and to convince the sponsor that the project is going in the right direction and the money well-invested. The presentation will deal with the question on how to use a deliverable in a profitable way for the project and what are the possibilities of use.

  11. Project deliverables - a waste of time or a chance for knowledge transfer and dissemination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Deliverables are a common tool to measure a distinct output of a project. They should be meaningful in terms of the projec&tacute;s objectives and are normally constituted by e.g. a written report or document, a developed tool or software, an organized training or conference. They can be scientific or technical. The number of deliverables must be reasonable and commensurate to the project and its content. Deliverables as contractual obligations are often time consuming and often seen as a waste of "research" time, as one more administrative task without any use. However, deliverables are needed to verify the progress of a project and to convince the sponsor that the project is going in the right direction and the money well-invested. The presentation will deal with the question on how to use a deliverable in a profitable way for the project and what are the possibilities of use.

  12. An Innovative Time-Cost-Quality Tradeoff Modeling of Building Construction Project Based on Resource Allocation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The time, quality, and cost are three important but contradictive objectives in a building construction project. It is a tough challenge for project managers to optimize them since they are different parameters. This paper presents a time-cost-quality optimization model that enables managers to optimize multiobjectives. The model is from the project breakdown structure method where task resources in a construction project are divided into a series of activities and further into construction labors, materials, equipment, and administration. The resources utilized in a construction activity would eventually determine its construction time, cost, and quality, and a complex time-cost-quality trade-off model is finally generated based on correlations between construction activities. A genetic algorithm tool is applied in the model to solve the comprehensive nonlinear time-cost-quality problems. Building of a three-storey house is an example to illustrate the implementation of the model, demonstrate its advantages in optimizing trade-off of construction time, cost, and quality, and help make a winning decision in construction practices. The computational time-cost-quality curves in visual graphics from the case study prove traditional cost-time assumptions reasonable and also prove this time-cost-quality trade-off model sophisticated. PMID:24672351

  13. Investigate Methods to Decrease Compilation Time-AX-Program Code Group Computer Science R& D Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cottom, T

    2003-06-11

    Large simulation codes can take on the order of hours to compile from scratch. In Kull, which uses generic programming techniques, a significant portion of the time is spent generating and compiling template instantiations. I would like to investigate methods that would decrease the overall compilation time for large codes. These would be methods which could then be applied, hopefully, as standard practice to any large code. Success is measured by the overall decrease in wall clock time a developer spends waiting for an executable. Analyzing the make system of a slow to build project can benefit all developers on the project. Taking the time to analyze the number of processors used over the life of the build and restructuring the system to maximize the parallelization can significantly reduce build times. Distributing the build across multiple machines with the same configuration can increase the number of available processors for building and can help evenly balance the load. Becoming familiar with compiler options can have its benefits as well. The time improvements of the sum can be significant. Initial compilation time for Kull on OSF1 was {approx} 3 hours. Final time on OSF1 after completion is 16 minutes. Initial compilation time for Kull on AIX was {approx} 2 hours. Final time on AIX after completion is 25 minutes. Developers now spend 3 hours less waiting for a Kull executable on OSF1, and 2 hours less on AIX platforms. In the eyes of many Kull code developers, the project was a huge success.

  14. Analysis and modeling of concurrency, cycle time, and productivity in aerospace development projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilscher, Richard Walter

    Engineering development projects are a key element of continued economic growth and profitability for companies that produce durable goods based on evolving technology. Today's world economy and the rapid pace of technology development necessitate a minimum development project cycle time to maximize the economic value of new products. Concurrent engineering and Integrated Product-Process Development (IPPD) evolved as an industry-wide strategy in the late 1980's and early 1990's to address the need for rapid product development and improved product quality. Rapid development of computer-based tools for communications and engineering has occurred in parallel with the emergence of concurrent engineering strategies. The combination of new computer tools and concurrent engineering practices has rendered many project management tools less effective or obsolete. New methods are needed for tracking progress and benchmarking projects employing concurrent engineering. Concurrent engineering and the resulting concurrency between specific activities within development projects has been associated with both positive and negative effects on project performance. This research applies empirical data analysis and computer simulation to evaluate these relationships using new metrics designed specifically for concurrent engineering analysis. By looking within the project at concurrency between specific activities, new insights have been gained into the nature and progress of concurrent engineering implementation. These relationships are useful tools in developing project plans with greater probability of success. A new metric for measuring concurrency is applied that uses the timing of information transactions between project activities and yields different conclusions than those related to time-based metrics. The research also applies a new methodology for comparison of project performance across product lines within aerospace. By using productivity rates and a new work content

  15. Riemannian mean and space-time adaptive processing using projection and inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Barbaresco, Frédéric

    2013-05-01

    The estimation of the covariance matrix from real data is required in the application of space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to an airborne ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar. A natural approach to estimation of the covariance matrix that is based on the information geometry has been proposed. In this paper, the output of the Riemannian mean is used in inversion and projection algorithms. It is found that the projection class of algorithms can yield very significant gains, even when the gains due to inversion-based algorithms are marginal over standard algorithms. The performance of the projection class of algorithms does not appear to be overly sensitive to the projected subspace dimension.

  16. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  17. DELIVERING TIMELY WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY. THE LAKE ACCESS-MINNEAPOLIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a summary of the near-real-time water quality-monitoring project conducted by a consortium of interested parties in the greater Minneapolis area. It was funded by an EPA program known as EMPACT (Environmental Monitoring, Public Access, and Community Tracking). In 1...

  18. "Making Time for What Matters Most." I3 Development Project: Year 5 Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Tara; Ho, Hsiang-Yah; Knotts, Ashli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study evaluates the work completed in the "Jefferson County Public Schools" (JCPS) project, "Making Time for What Matters Most", aiming to improve student achievement, narrow achievement gaps, strengthen students' college readiness skills, and increase the percentages of students who graduate and go on to…

  19. The search for particle dark matter with the XENON imaging time projection chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, E.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide race to direct dark matter detection has been accelerated by the evolution of Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chambers (LXeTPCs). The XENON program has demonstrated the effective scaling of LXeTPCs with phased detectors of increasing sensitivity.

  20. Neutral-Current Supernova Neutrino Interactions in Liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated a new neutral-current ν-40 Ar channel for interaction of supernova neutrinos in liquid 40Ar. We used the default smearing assumptions and the ar17 kt detector configuration in SNOwGLoBES, an event rate calculator, to determine the expected number of events. For this analysis, the ``Livermore'' supernova flux and cross-section calculated by Dr. Anna Hayes were used. We found that there is a sizeable peak at this energy, which shows that this interaction will be easily measureable, and thus allow the total supernova neutrino flux to be calculated. In the future, we hope to improve the accuracy of our energy resolution algorithm since it might have been too optimistic, and we hope to use this data in full detector simulations to determine what effect this research will have in practice.

  1. Real-time interactive projection system based on infrared structured-light method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xiaorui; Zhou, Qian; Ni, Kai; He, Liang; Wu, Guanhao; Mao, Leshan; Cheng, Xuemin; Ma, Jianshe

    2012-11-01

    Interactive technologies have been greatly developed in recent years, especially in projection field. However, at present, most interactive projection systems are based on special designed interactive pens or whiteboards, which is inconvenient and limits the improvement of user experience. In this paper, we introduced our recent progress on theoretically modeling a real-time interactive projection system. The system permits the user to easily operate or draw on the projection screen directly by fingers without any other auxiliary equipment. The projector projects infrared striping patterns onto the screen and the CCD captures the deformational image. We resolve the finger's position and track its movement by processing the deformational image in real-time. A new way to determine whether the finger touches the screen is proposed. The first deformational fringe on the fingertip and the first fringe at the finger shadow are the same one. The correspondence is obtained, so the location parameters can be decided by triangulation. The simulation results are given, and errors are analyzed.

  2. Image projection clues for improved real-time vehicle tracking in tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelaca, Vedran; Niño Castaneda, Jorge Oswaldo; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle tracking is of great importance for tunnel safety. To detect incidents or disturbances in traffic flow it is necessary to reliably track vehicles in real-time. The tracking is a challenging task due to poor lighting conditions in tunnels and frequent light reflections from tunnel walls, the road and the vehicles themselves. In this paper we propose a multi-clue tracking approach combining foreground blobs, optical flow of Shi-Tomasi features and image projection profiles in a Kalman filter with a constant velocity model. The main novelty of our approach lies in using vertical and horizontal image projection profiles (so-called vehicle signatures) as additional measurements to overcome the problems of inconsistent foreground and optical flow clues in cases of severe lighting changes. These signatures consist of Radon-transform like projections along each image column and row. We compare the signatures from two successive video frames to align them and to correct the predicted vehicle position and size. We tested our approach on a real tunnel video sequence. The results show an improvement in the accuracy of the tracker and less target losses when image projection clues are used. Furthermore, calculation and comparison of image projections is computationally efficient so the tracker keeps real-time performance (25 fps, on a single 1.86 GHz processor).

  3. The Origins and Evolution of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Idea

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, David

    2012-09-19

    In February 1974, I conceived an idea for a tracking detector with only one spatial projection, thereby eliminating ambiguities that occur in conventional detector systems based on wires. I called it the “Time Projection Chamber”, or TPC, a name that has stuck even though the concept has evolved considerably over the following decades. I will recount the history leading to its conception and development in that now distant epoch, and will attempt to show why this is an interesting and instructive story and how the idea may continue to extend scientific reach in the coming era.

  4. WE-G-BRF-04: Robust Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Based On One Single Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time volumetric imaging is highly desirable to provide instantaneous image guidance for lung radiation therapy. This study proposes a scheme to achieve this goal using one single projection by utilizing sparse learning and a principal component analysis (PCA) based lung motion model. Methods: A patient-specific PCA-based lung motion model is first constructed by analyzing deformable vector fields (DVFs) between a reference image and 4DCT images at each phase. At the training stage, we “learn” the relationship between the DVFs and the projection using sparse learning. Specifically, we first partition the projections into patches, and then apply sparse learning to automatically identify patches that best correlate with the principal components of the DVFs. Once the relationship is established, at the application stage, we first employ a patchbased intensity correction method to overcome the problem of different intensity scale between the calculated projection in the training stage and the measured projection in the application stage. The corrected projection image is then fed to the trained model to derive a DVF, which is applied to the reference image, yielding a volumetric image corresponding to the projection. We have validated our method through a NCAT phantom simulation case and one experiment case. Results: Sparse learning can automatically select those patches containing motion information, such as those around diaphragm. For the simulation case, over 98% of the lung region pass the generalized gamma test (10HU/1mm), indicating combined accuracy in both intensity and spatial domain. For the experimental case, the average tumor localization errors projected to the imager are 0.68 mm and 0.4 mm on the axial and tangential direction, respectively. Conclusion: The proposed method is capable of accurately generating a volumetric image using one single projection. It will potentially offer real-time volumetric image guidance to facilitate lung

  5. Timely integration of safeguards and security with projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Blount, P. M.; Garcia, S. W.; Gonzales, R. L.; Salazar, J. B.; Campbell, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Safeguards and Security (S&S) Requirements Integration Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed and implemented an innovative management process that will be described in detail. This process systematically integrates S&S planning into construction, facility modifications or upgrades, mission changes, and operational projects. It extends and expands the opportunities provided by the DOE project management manual, DOE M 413.3-1. Through a series of LANL documents, a process is defined and implemented that formally identifies an S&S professional to oversee, coordinate, facilitate, and communicate among the identified S&S organizations and the project organizations over the life cycle of the project. The derived benefits, namely (1) elimination/reduction of re-work or costly retrofitting, (2) overall project cost savings because of timely and improved planning, (3) formal documentation, and (4) support of Integrated Safeguards and Security Management at LANL, will be discussed. How many times, during the construction of a new facility or the modification of an existing facility, have the persons responsible for the project waited until the last possible minute or until after construction is completed to approach the security organizations for their help in safeguarding and securing the facility? It's almost like, 'Oh, by the way, do we need access control and a fence around this building and just what are we going to do with our classified anyway?' Not only is it usually difficult; it's also typically expensive to retrofit or plan for safeguards and security after the fact. Safeguards and security organizations are often blamed for budget overruns and delays in facility occupancy and program startup, but these problems are usually due to poor front-end planning. In an effort to help projects engage safeguards and security in the pre-conceptual or conceptual stages, we implemented a high level formality of operations. We established institutional

  6. Comparison of back projection methods of determining earthquake rupture process in time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Back projection is a method to back project the seismic energy recorded in a seismic array back to the earthquake source region and determine the rupture process of a large earthquake. The method takes advantage of the coherence of seismic energy in a seismic array and is quick in determining some important properties of earthquake source. The method can be performed in both time and frequency domains. In time domain, the most conventional procedure is beam forming with some measures of suppressing the noise, such as the Nth root stacking, etc. In the frequency domain, the multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) estimates the direction of arrivals of multiple waves propagating through an array using the subspace method. The advantage of this method is the ability to study rupture properties at various frequencies and to resolve simultaneous arrivals making it suitable for detecting biliteral rupture of an earthquake source. We present a comparison of back projection results on some large earthquakes between the methods in time domain and frequency domain. The time-domain procedure produces an image that is smeared and exhibits some artifacts, although some enhancing stacking methods can at some extent alleviate the problem. On the other hand, the MUSIC method resolves clear multiple arrivals and provides higher resolution of rupture imaging.

  7. Gaseous time projection chambers for rare event detection: results from the T-REX project. I. Double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irastorza, I. G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; Galán, J.; Garcia, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Gómez, H.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Luzon, G.; Mirallas, H.; Ruiz, E.; Seguí, L.; Tomás, A.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the T-REX project, a number of R&D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches like double beta decay, axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. In both this and its companion paper, we compile the main results of the project and give an outlook of application prospects for this detection technique. While in the companion paper we focus on axions and WIMPs, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the measurement of the double beta decay (DBD) of 136Xe in a high pressure Xe (HPXe) TPC. Micromegas of the microbulk type have been extensively studied in high pressure Xe and Xe mixtures. Particularly relevant are the results obtained in Xe + trimethylamine (TMA) mixtures, showing very promising results in terms of gain, stability of operation, and energy resolution at high pressures up to 10 bar. The addition of TMA at levels of ~ 1% reduces electron diffusion by up to a factor of 10 with respect to pure Xe, improving the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability. Operation with a medium size prototype of 30 cm diameter and 38 cm of drift (holding about 1 kg of Xe at 10 bar in the fiducial volume, enough to contain high energy electron tracks in the detector volume) has allowed to test the detection concept in realistic experimental conditions. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least a ~ 3% FWHM @ Qββ. This value was experimentally demonstrated for high-energy extended tracks at 10 bar, and is probably improvable down to the ~ 1% FWHM levels as extrapolated from low energy events. In addition, first results on the topological signature information (one straggling track ending in two blobs) show promising

  8. Real-time multicamera system for measurement of 3D coordinates by pattern projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainov, Ventseslav; Stoykova, Elena; Harizanova, Jana

    2007-06-01

    The report describes a real-time pattern-projection system for measurement of 3D coordinates with simultaneous illumination and recording of four phase-shifted fringe patterns which are projected at four different wavelengths and captured by four synchronized CCD cameras. This technical solution overcomes the main drawback of the temporal phase-shifting profilometry in which the pattern acquisition is made successively in time. The work considers the use of a sinusoidal phase grating as a projection element which is made by analysis of the frequency content of the projected fringes in the Fresnel diffraction zone and by test measurements of relative 3D coordinates that are performed with interferometrically recorded sinusoidal phase gratings on holographic plates. Finally, operation of a four-wavelength profilometric system with four spatially phase-shifted at π/2 sinusoidal phase gratings illuminated with four diode lasers at wavelengths 790 nm, 810 nm, 850 nm and 910 nm is simulated and the systematical error of the profilometric measurement is evaluated.

  9. A Time Projection Chamber for precision 239Pu(n,f) cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2008-01-14

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  10. The content, format and timing of a preparation for childhood hospitalization booklet: An action research project.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bronwyn K; Crisp, Jackie

    2016-06-01

    The experience of childhood hospitalization may be improved by appropriate preparation. As part of a larger project to improve preparation practices for children and their families, a group of health-care professionals investigated the content, format and timing of a pre-existing preparation booklet for a particular procedure. This article analyses the evaluation of the preparation booklet that led to a finding that collaboration among health-care professionals enables improved practice and shared professional power and responsibility. PMID:25613140

  11. Incentive contract design in project management with serial tasks and uncertain completion times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Zhao, Ruiqing; Lan, Yanfei

    2016-04-01

    This article investigates an incentive contract design problem for a project manager who operates a project consisting of multiple tasks performed sequentially by different subcontractors in which all task completion times are uncertain and described by fuzzy variables. On the basis of an expected value criterion and a critical value criterion, two classes of fuzzy bilevel programming models are developed. In the case where the uncertain task completion times are mutually independent, each model can first be decomposed into multiple equivalent sub-models by taking advantage of the structural characteristics, and then a two-step optimization method is employed to derive the optimal incentive contract in each sub-model. In a more general case where the uncertain task completion times are correlative, the approximation approach (AA) technique is adopted first in order to evaluate the objective functions involving fuzzy parameters, which are usually difficult to convert into their crisp equivalents. Then, an AA-based hybrid genetic algorithm integrated with the golden search method and variable neighbourhood search is designed to solve the proposed fuzzy bilevel programming models. Finally, a numerical example of a construction project is conducted to demonstrate the modelling idea and the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  12. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity.

  13. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction.

    PubMed

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity. PMID:27176442

  15. Generalized Projective Synchronization between Two Complex Networks with Time-Varying Coupling Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei; Zeng, Chang-Yan; Tian, Li-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two complex networks with time-varying coupling delay is investigated. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a nonlinear controller and adaptive updated laws are designed. Feasibility of the proposed scheme is proven in theory. Moreover, two numerical examples are presented, using the energy resource system and Lü's system [Physica A 382 (2007) 672] as the nodes of the networks. GPS between two energy resource complex networks with time-varying coupling delay is achieved. This study can widen the application range of the generalized synchronization methods and will be instructive for the demand-supply of energy resource in some regions of China.

  16. The NASA Smart Probe Project for real-time multiple microsensor tissue recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.; Mah, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Remote surgery requires automated sensors, effectors and sensor-effector communication. The NASA Smart Probe Project has focused on the sensor aspect. METHODS: The NASA Smart Probe uses neural networks and data from multiple microsensors for a unique tissue signature in real time. Animal and human trials use several probe configurations: (1) 8-microsensor probe (2.5 mm in diameter) for rodent studies (normal and subcutaneous mammary tumor tissues), and (2) 21-gauge needle probe with 3 spectroscopic fibers and an impedance microelectrode for breast cancer diagnosis in humans. Multisensor data are collected in real time (update 100 times/s) using PCs. RESULTS: Human data (collected by NASA licensee BioLuminate) from 15 women undergoing breast biopsy distinguished normal tissue from both benign tumors and breast carcinoma. Tumor margins and necrosis are rapidly detected. CONCLUSION: Real-time tissue identification is achievable. Potential applications, including probes incorporating nanoelectrode arrays, are presented. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Stone Soup Projects: Using real-time resources and creative partnering to meet multiple needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, S.; Searle, R.; Zala, K.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada oversees the VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada undersea cabled observatories. Its Centre for Enterprise and Engagement communicates the scientific discoveries and technological innovations happening at the two systems. Not surprisingly, funders in ocean science are interested in seeing evidence of increased recruitment of Highly Qualified Personnel into marine science and industry. This demand creates a series of opportunities for inspiring students, ranging from graduate school down to middle school, to pursue studies in chemistry, biology, physics, geology, engineering, and beyond. As the Engagement section is a small operation, we partner with others to produce educational assets incorporating real-time data from VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada observatories that enable frontline educators to create exciting ocean science experiences for students and the public. In one project, the lab component of an entire undergraduate course lets students conduct their own investigations into marine oxygen levels by using VENUS data. In another, Fine Arts graduate and undergraduate students are using high-tech tools to create a series of webisodes that map the principles of Ocean Literacy onto the science themes of VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada. In a third project, we hosted a website for a collaborative expedition to small coastal towns that focused on the marine science happening in the Salish Sea, British Columbia. Our projects and challenges for engaging students and the public with ocean science using real-time and other data offer strategies for outreach and education sections of similar organizations.

  18. The Time-Convolutionless Projection Operator Technique in the Quantum Theory of Dissipation and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Kappler, Bernd; Petruccione, Francesco

    2001-07-01

    The time-convolutionless projection operator method is used to investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems. On the basis of this method a systematic perturbation expansion for the reduced density matrix equation is obtained involving a time-dependent generator which is local in time. This formalism is generalized to enable the treatment of system-environment correlations in the initial state, which arise in the computation of equilibrium correlation functions or from the preparation of the system by a quantum measurement. The general method is illustrated by means of the damped harmonic oscillator and of the spin-boson model. The perturbation expansion of the equation of motion is applied to a study of relaxation and dephasing processes and to the determination of the stationary state and of equilibrium correlation functions. Special emphasis is laid on the construction of general, computable error estimates which allow the explicit validation of the obtained results. In particular, the parameter regime for which an expansion of the equation of motion to fourth order yields reliable results is determined. The results clearly reveal that a large range of physically relevant parameters, in particular those that might be interesting for experiments on macroscopic quantum coherence phenomena, can already be treated using the expansion to fourth order. It is thus demonstrated that the time-convolutionless projection operator technique provides a transparent and technically feasible method to go beyond the Markovian approximation in the study of open quantum systems.

  19. The Bonus Detector: A Radial Time Projection Chamber for tracking Spectator Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Fenker

    2004-01-25

    A GEM-based Radial Time Projection Chamber is being developed as a spectator-proton tracker for an experiment at Jefferson Lab. The purpose of the experiment is the study of the structure of nearly free neutrons. Interactions on such neutrons can be identified by the presence of a backward-moving proton in the final state of a beam-deuterium collision. The detector must be of very low mass in order to provide sensitivity to the slowest possible protons. The ionization electron trail left by the protons will drift radially outward to an amplification structure composed of curved GEMs, and the resulting charge will be collected on pads on the outer layer of the detector. Unique design challenges are imposed by the cylindrical geometry and the low mass requirement. The status of the project and results of prototype tests are presented.

  20. Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget

    SciTech Connect

    Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

    2009-07-01

    This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states’ (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

  1. Statistical analysis of real-time, enviromental radon monitoring results at the Fernald Enviromental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Spitz, H.B.; Tomezak, L.

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive real-time, environmental radon monitoring program is being conducted at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, where a large quantity of radium-bearing residues have been stored in two covered earth-bermed silos. Statistical analyses was conducted to determine what impact radon emitted by the radium bearing materials contained in the silos has on the ambient radon concentration at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site. The distribution that best describes the outdoor radon monitoring data was determined before statistical analyses were conducted. Random effects associated with the selection of radon monitoring locations were accommodated by using nested and nested factorial classification models. The Project site was divided into four general areas according to their characteristics and functions: (1) the silo area, where the radium-bearing waste is stored; (2) the production/administration area; (3) the perimeter area, or fence-line, of the Fernald Environmental Management Project site; and (4) a background area, located approximately 13 km from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site, representing the naturally-occurring radon concentration. A total of 15 continuous, hourly readout radon monitors were installed to measure the outdoor radon concentration. Measurement results from each individual monitor were found to be log-normally distributed. A series of contrast tests, which take random effects into account, were performed to compare the radon concentration between different areas of the site. These comparisons demonstrate that the radon concentrations in the production/administration area and the perimeter area are statistically equal to the natural background, whereas the silo area is significantly higher than background. The study also showed that the radon concentration in the silo area was significantly reduced after a sealant barrier was applied to the contents of the silos. 10 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Statistical analysis of real-time, environmental radon monitoring results at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Spitz, H B; Tomczak, L

    1996-02-01

    A comprehensive real-time, environmental radon monitoring program is being conducted at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, where a large quantity of radium-bearing residues have been stored in two covered earth-bermed silos. Statistical analyses of radon measurement results were conducted to determine what impact, if any, radon emitted by the radium bearing materials contained in the silos has on the ambient radon concentration at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site. The distribution that best describes the outdoor radon monitoring data was determined before statistical analyses were conducted. Random effects associated with the selection of radon monitoring locations were accommodated by using nested and nested factorial classification models. The Fernald Environmental Management Project site was divided into four general areas according to their characteristics and functions: 1) the silo area, where the radium-bearing waste is stored; 2) the production/administration area; 3) the perimeter area, or fence-line, of the Fernald Environmental Management Project site; and 4) a background area, located approximately 13 km from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site, representing the naturally-occurring radon concentration. A total of 15 continuous, hourly readout radon monitors were installed in these 4 areas to measure the outdoor radon concentration. Measurement results from each individual monitor were found to be log-normally distributed. A series of contrast tests, which take random effects into account, were performed to compare the radon concentration between different areas of the site. These comparisons demonstrate that the radon concentrations in the production/administration area and the perimeter area are statistically equal to the natural background, whereas the silo area is significantly higher than background. The study also showed that the radon concentration in the silo area was significantly reduced after a sealant

  3. Constraints of relic gravitational waves by pulsar timing arrays: Forecasts for the FAST and SKA projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yang; You, Xiao-Peng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Measurement of pulsar timing residuals provides a direct way to detect relic gravitational waves at the frequency f˜1/yr. In this paper, we investigate the constraints on the inflationary parameters, the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, and the tensor spectral index nt, by the current and future pulsar timing arrays. We find that the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope in China and the planned Square Kilometre Array projects have fairly strong abilities to test the phantomlike inflationary models. If r=0.1, then Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope could give the constraint on the spectral index nt<0.56 and Square Kilometre Array could give nt<0.32, while an observation with total time T=20yr, pulsar noise level σw=30ns, and monitored pulsar number n=200 could even constrain nt<0.07. These are much tighter than those inferred from the current results of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, European Pulsar Timing Array, and North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. By studying the effects of various observational factors on the sensitivities of pulsar timing arrays, we find that compared with σw and n, the total observation time T has the most significant effect.

  4. Gaseous time projection chambers for rare event detection: results from the T-REX project. II. Dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irastorza, I. G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; Galán, J.; Garcia, J. A.; Garza, J. G.; Gómez, H.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Luzon, G.; Mirallas, H.; Ruiz, E.; Seguí, L.; Tomás, A.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the T-REX project, a number of R&D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches like double beta decay, axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. While in the companion paper we focus on double beta decay, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the search for dark matter candidates, both axions and WIMPs. Small (few cm wide) ultra-low background Micromegas detectors are used to image the axion-induced x-ray signal expected in axion helioscopes like the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment. Background levels as low as 0.8 × 10-6 counts keV-1 cm-2 s-1 have already been achieved in CAST while values down to ~10-7 counts keV-1 cm-2 s-1 have been obtained in a test bench placed underground in the Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc (LSC). Prospects to consolidate and further reduce these values down to ~10-8 counts keV-1 cm-2 s-1 will be described. Such detectors, placed at the focal point of x-ray telescopes in the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO), would allow for 105 better signal-to-noise ratio than CAST, and search for solar axions with gaγ down to few 1012 GeV-1, well into unexplored axion parameter space. In addition, a scaled-up version of these TPCs, properly shielded and placed underground, can be competitive in the search for low-mass WIMPs. The TREX-DM prototype, with ~ 0.300 kg of Ar at 10 bar, or alternatively ~ 0.160 kg of Ne at 10 bar, and energy threshold well below 1 keV, has been built to test this concept. We will describe the main technical solutions developed, as well as the results from the commissioning phase on surface. The anticipated sensitivity of this technique might reach ~10-44 cm2 for low mass (<10 GeV) WIMPs, well beyond current experimental limits in this mass range.

  5. A multiple sampling time projection ionization chamber for nuclear fragment tracking and charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Chance, J. C.; Christie, W. F.; Gilkes, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Müller, Walter F. J.; Romero, J. L.; Sann, H.; Tull, C. E.; Warren, P.

    1997-02-01

    A detector has been developed for the tracking and charge measurement of the projectile fragment nuclei produced in relativistic nuclear collisions. This device, MUSIC II, is a second generation Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC), and employs the principles of ionization and time projection chambers. It provides unique charge determination for charges Z≥6, and excellent track position measurement. MUSIC II has been used most recently with the EOS (Equation of State) TPC and other EOS Collaboration detectors. Earlier it was used with other systems in experiments at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the ALADIN spectrometer at GSI.

  6. Project My Heart Your Heart: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Kim A.; Crawford, Thomas C.; Baman, Timir

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that nearly 1 million patients in low-income countries die every year from bradyarrhythmias coupled with no access to a pacemaker. At the same time, it is estimated that tens of thousands of used devices could be harvested from hospitals, funeral homes, and crematories in wealthy nations if such a practice was legal and proven to be safe and efficacious. Project My Heart Your Heart is a collaborative, multinational effort with a goal of making pacemaker recycling a reality. Since its inception 4 years ago, the project has studied beliefs and attitudes of this idea among patients, pacemaker recipients, funeral home directors, and arrhythmia specialists. The project has explored the safety and efficacy of this practice in several small pilot studies. Nearly 15,000 used devices have been received and evaluated. Efforts to fully define optimal methods for sterilization and device processing have progressed positively. Safe, effective pacemaker recycling is possible and is generally supported by the public, patients, and cardiovascular specialists. An ongoing dialogue with the FDA will hopefully lead to a large pivotal study in five countries which will definitively establish this practice including optimal strategies for device removal, interrogation, sterilization, handling, implantation, and follow-up at charitable pacemaker facilities servicing low income patients throughout the world. PMID:26330671

  7. Real-time monitoring of CO2 storage sites: Application to Illinois Basin-Decatur Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picard, G.; Berard, T.; Chabora, E.; Marsteller, S.; Greenberg, S.; Finley, R.J.; Rinck, U.; Greenaway, R.; Champagnon, C.; Davard, J.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage operations for efficiency and safety requires use of monitoring techniques and implementation of control protocols. The monitoring techniques consist of permanent sensors and tools deployed for measurement campaigns. Large amounts of data are thus generated. These data must be managed and integrated for interpretation at different time scales. A fast interpretation loop involves combining continuous measurements from permanent sensors as they are collected to enable a rapid response to detected events; a slower loop requires combining large datasets gathered over longer operational periods from all techniques. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it presents an analysis of the monitoring objectives to be performed in the slow and fast interpretation loops. Second, it describes the implementation of the fast interpretation loop with a real-time monitoring system at the Illinois Basin-Decatur Project (IBDP) in Illinois, USA. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Nuclear physics at PEP: Recent results using the Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikoff, S.O.

    1987-04-01

    A preliminary result on Bose-Einstein correlations is reported using the PEP-4 Time Projection Chamber facility. The data, from scattering 14.5 GeV electrons on nuclei, was taken at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center positron-electron (PEP) storage ring. Bose-Einstein (BE) correlations were measured from events having identified like-sign pion pairs. The particle identification and tracking capability of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) was used to select like-sign pion pair events. The resulting correlation function for the data was fitted to a gaussian form R(q) = 1 + lambda exp(-q/sup 2/sigma/sup 2/) where q is the relative four-momentum difference of the pions. The fitted value to the chaoticity is lambda = 0.37 +- 0.19 and sigma = 1.37 +- 0.41 fermi. This result agrees with that from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation data taken with the TPC. The operation of the TPC and the analysis of the data is explained. The feasibility of similar detectors for doing high energy electron scattering on nuclei at PEP is briefly discussed. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Center of pressure and the projection of the time-course of sitting skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Joshua L; Harbourne, Regina T; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    A normal time-course for the acquisition of sitting is essential. A delay in sitting may affect other developmental milestones, resulting in deficiencies in overall skill. Therefore, our aim was to identify variables whose measures at the very beginning of sitting would allow for the projection of the evolution of the sitting skill. Center of pressure data were collected from the postural sway of twenty-six typically developing infants while sitting on a force platform with a beginning ability to sit upright. Spatial, temporal and frequency variables of postural sway were obtained from both the medial/lateral and anterior/posterior directions of sway. Discriminant function analysis was conducted to identify potential predictors of the duration between onset and fully independent sitting. Gender (p=0.025), median frequency (p=0.006), and correlation dimension (p=0.002) were identified to be predictive of grouping with 73.1% correct classification of the participating infants into short, mid, and long delay groups. In conclusion, measures taken at the earliest stage of sitting may allow the projection of the time-course to achieve independent sitting for typical infants. This approach may be useful for monitoring typical development. PMID:23602446

  10. The impact of word prevalence on lexical decision times: Evidence from the Dutch Lexicon Project 2.

    PubMed

    Brysbaert, Marc; Stevens, Michaël; Mandera, Paweł; Keuleers, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    Keuleers, Stevens, Mandera, and Brysbaert (2015) presented a new variable, word prevalence, defined as word knowledge in the population. Some words are known to more people than other. This is particularly true for low-frequency words (e.g., screenshot vs. scourage). In the present study, we examined the impact of the measure by collecting lexical decision times for 30,000 Dutch word lemmas of various lengths (the Dutch Lexicon Project 2). Word prevalence had the second highest correlation with lexical decision times (after word frequency): Words known by everyone in the population were responded to 100 ms faster than words known to only half of the population, even after controlling for word frequency, word length, age of acquisition, similarity to other words, and concreteness. Because word prevalence has rather low correlations with the existing measures (including word frequency), the unique variance it contributes to lexical decision times is higher than that of the other variables. We consider the reasons why word prevalence has an impact on word processing times and we argue that it is likely to be the most important new variable protecting researchers against experimenter bias in selecting stimulus materials. PMID:26501839

  11. Statistical downscaling of meteorological time series and climatic projections in a watershed in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göncü, S.; Albek, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, meteorological time series from five meteorological stations in and around a watershed in Turkey were used in the statistical downscaling of global climate model results to be used for future projections. Two general circulation models (GCMs), Canadian Climate Center (CGCM3.1(T63)) and Met Office Hadley Centre (2012) (HadCM3) models, were used with three Special Report Emission Scenarios, A1B, A2, and B2. The statistical downscaling model SDSM was used for the downscaling. The downscaled ensembles were put to validation with GCM predictors against observations using nonparametric statistical tests. The two most important meteorological variables, temperature and precipitation, passed validation statistics, and partial validation was achieved with other time series relevant in hydrological studies, namely, cloudiness, relative humidity, and wind velocity. Heat waves, number of dry days, length of dry and wet spells, and maximum precipitation were derived from the primary time series as annual series. The change in monthly predictor sets used in constructing the multiple regression equations for downscaling was examined over the watershed and over the months in a year. Projections between 1962 and 2100 showed that temperatures and dryness indicators show increasing trends while precipitation, relative humidity, and cloudiness tend to decrease. The spatial changes over the watershed and monthly temporal changes revealed that the western parts of the watershed where water is produced for subsequent downstream use will get drier than the rest and the precipitation distribution over the year will shift. Temperatures showed increasing trends over the whole watershed unparalleled with another period in history. The results emphasize the necessity of mitigation efforts to combat climate change on local and global scales and the introduction of adaptation strategies for the region under study which was shown to be vulnerable to climate change.

  12. A Quality Improvement Project to Assess Timing of Initial Investigations in Stroke Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sarah; Jones, Rhian

    2016-01-01

    There are several investigations that can be completed in the acute phase of admission for patients with suspected stroke.These include receiving a CT Head scan and also blood tests specific for stroke. The national guidelines regarding CT Head scans detail they should be completed within 12 hours of admission1 and the trust guidelines, local to where this quality improvement project was based, advise a CT Head should be completed within four hours of admission.2 The current national guidelines do not specify exact stroke blood tests, however trust guidelines give a specific set of blood tests that would be appropriate to be taken when a patient presents to A&E with a suspected stroke. These included FBC, U&E, blood glucose, ESR, cholesterol, TFTs, and coagulation screen.2 The aim of this quality improvement project was to assess the timing of CT Head scans and blood tests and to implement a tool to ensure these are done in a timely fashion, within the emergency care setting. The project was completed through three PSDA cycles. The first was undertaken in an A&E department, which was soon to be closed and moved to a different site. The second cycle was then completed at the new site, to assess if there had been any change in timings of these interventions. In the previous site it was found that 97% of patients audited received a CT Head scan within four hours. At the new site it was found 94% patients received a CT Head within four hours, therefore both meeting trust targets on the whole. A full set of stroke blood tests were completed at the old site in 53% of patients and this decreased to 22% of patients at the new site. At this point it was decided an intervention should be implemented to ensure this did not continue. The intervention used was updating a stroke panel on the trust computer system (an easy to use, one-click button entitled “Stroke/TIA”) with the correct blood tests and the use of this was promoted throughout the trust. A post

  13. Overview of the CAPTAIN program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuguang; CAPTAIN Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Liquid argon time projection chamber detectors are taking center stage for the next large projects that the high-energy physics society will pursue. A series of tens of kiloton liquid argon detectors are under development to be used to measure the neutrino oscillation parameters, the CP violation in the neutrino sector, and the neutrino mass hierarchy, while also for the opportunity to the search for proton decay and supernova measurement as part of the DUNE program. However, several smaller liquid argon detectors are needed to study cross-sections and perform studies at various energies. The CAPTAIN Collaboration is building a 10-ton liquid argon detector as well as a prototype detector to perform measurements that include neutron interactions in liquid argon using the beam at LANSCE and neutrino measurements using the beam at Fermilab. The prototype experiment, MiniCAPTAIN, has been commissioned and is successfully running with laser operations, cosmic rays, and recently with neutrons from LANSCE. I will present an overview and status of the CAPTAIN program.

  14. Limited-memory scaled gradient projection methods for real-time image deconvolution in microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, F.; Zanella, R.; Zanghirati, G.; Zanni, L.

    2015-04-01

    Gradient projection methods have given rise to effective tools for image deconvolution in several relevant areas, such as microscopy, medical imaging and astronomy. Due to the large scale of the optimization problems arising in nowadays imaging applications and to the growing request of real-time reconstructions, an interesting challenge to be faced consists in designing new acceleration techniques for the gradient schemes, able to preserve their simplicity and low computational cost of each iteration. In this work we propose an acceleration strategy for a state-of-the-art scaled gradient projection method for image deconvolution in microscopy. The acceleration idea is derived by adapting a step-length selection rule, recently introduced for limited-memory steepest descent methods in unconstrained optimization, to the special constrained optimization framework arising in image reconstruction. We describe how important issues related to the generalization of the step-length rule to the imaging optimization problem have been faced and we evaluate the improvements due to the acceleration strategy by numerical experiments on large-scale image deconvolution problems.

  15. Track Reconstruction in a Time Projection Chamber Designed to Make High Precision Fission Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarvagya

    2010-10-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber), being constructed by the NIFFTE (Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment) collaboration will be used for high-precision fission cross-section measurements. These measurements will aid in the design of future generations of nuclear power plants. The NIFFTE track reconstruction effort has developed two approaches consisting of a variety of statistical estimators. The first, consists of traditional cluster and hit finding algorithms that are performed on 2D planes. A least squares is performed on the hits to produce a track in the TPC. The alternate approach uses the Hough Transform, a brute force attempt at finding tracks that isolates features in the TPC volume through data binning. To determine fit parameters, a Kalman Filter has been implemented that accounts for multiple scattering and kinks in the track. Comparing simulated and reconstructed tracks have shown the validity of these methods. The software uses open source packages to ensure re-usability for future TPC projects. In my talk, I will describe these methods in detail.

  16. IGS/BIPM pilot project: GPS carrier phase for time/frequency transfer and timescale formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Senior, K.

    2003-06-01

    The development within the International GPS Service (IGS) of a suite of clock products, for both satellites and tracking receivers, offers some experiences which mirror the operations of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in its formation of TAI/UTC but some aspects differ markedly. The IGS relies exclusively on the carrier phase-based geodetic technique whereas BIPM time/frequency transfers use only common-view and two-way satellite (TWSTFT) methods. The carrier-phase approach has the potential of very high precision but suitable instrumental calibration procedures are only in the initial phases of deployment; the current BIPM techniques are more mature and widely used among timing labs, but are either less precise (common-view) or much more expensive (TWSTFT). In serving its geodetic users, the essential requirement for IGS clock products is that they be fully self-consistent in relative terms and also fully consistent with all other IGS products, especially the satellite orbits, in order to permit an isolated user to apply them with accuracy of a few centimetres. While there is no other strong requirement for the IGS timescale except to be reasonably close to broadcast GPS time, it is nonetheless very desirable for the IGS clock products to possess additional properties, such as being highly stable and being accurately relatable to UTC. These qualities enhance the value of IGS clock products for applications other than pure geodesy, especially for timing operations. The jointly sponsored `IGS/BIPM Pilot Project to Study Accurate Time and Frequency Comparisons using GPS Phase and Code Measurements' is developing operational strategies to exploit geodetic GPS methods for improved global time/frequency comparisons to the mutual benefit of both organizations. While helping the IGS to refine its clock products and link them to UTC, this collaboration will also provide new time transfer results for the BIPM that may eventually improve the formation

  17. AEP Ohio gridSMART Demonstration Project Real-Time Pricing Demonstration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Somani, Abhishek; Marinovici, Maria C.; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.

    2014-02-01

    This report contributes initial findings from an analysis of significant aspects of the gridSMART® Real-Time Pricing (RTP) – Double Auction demonstration project. Over the course of four years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) worked with American Electric Power (AEP), Ohio and Battelle Memorial Institute to design, build, and operate an innovative system to engage residential consumers and their end-use resources in a participatory approach to electric system operations, an incentive-based approach that has the promise of providing greater efficiency under normal operating conditions and greater flexibility to react under situations of system stress. The material contained in this report supplements the findings documented by AEP Ohio in the main body of the gridSMART report. It delves into three main areas: impacts on system operations, impacts on households, and observations about the sensitivity of load to price changes.

  18. JPL's Real-Time Weather Processor project (RWP) metrics and observations at system completion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loesh, Robert E.; Conover, Robert A.; Malhotra, Shan

    1990-01-01

    As an integral part of the overall upgraded National Airspace System (NAS), the objective of the Real-Time Weather Processor (RWP) project is to improve the quality of weather information and the timeliness of its dissemination to system users. To accomplish this, an RWP will be installed in each of the Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs), located in 21 of the 23 Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs). The RWP System is a prototype system. It is planned that the software will be GFE and that production hardware will be acquired via industry competitive procurement. The ARTCC is a facility established to provide air traffic control service to aircraft operating on Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight plans within controlled airspace, principally during the en route phase of the flight. Covered here are requirement metrics, Software Problem Failure Reports (SPFRs), and Ada portability metrics and observations.

  19. Liquid xenon time projection chamber for gamma rays in the MeV region: Development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, E.; Bolotnikov, A.; Chen, D.; Mukherjee, R.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of a large volume Liquid Xenon Time Projection Chamber (LXe-TPC) for three dimensional imaging and spectroscopy of cosmic gamma ray sources, was tested with a 3.5 liter prototype. The observation of induction signals produced by MeV gamma rays in liquid xenon is reported, with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The results represent the first experimental demonstration with a liquid xenon ionization chamber of a nondestructive readout of the electron image produced by point-like charges, using a sense wire configuration of the type originally proposed in 1970 by Gatti et al. An energy resolution as good as that previously measured by the millimeter size chambers, was achieved with the large prototype of 4.4 cm drift gap.

  20. Real-time multimedia communications in medical emergency - the CONCERTO project solution.

    PubMed

    Martini, Maria G; Iacobelli, Lorenzo; Bergeron, Cyril; Hewage, Chaminda T; Panza, Gianmarco; Piri, Esa; Vehkapera, Janne; Amon, Peter; Mazzotti, Matteo; Savino, Ketty; Bokor, Laszlo

    2015-08-01

    The management of medical emergency, in particular cardiac emergency, requests prompt intervention and the possibility to communicate in real time from the emergency area / ambulance to the hospital as much diagnostic information as possible about the patient. This would enable a prompt emergency diagnosis and operation and the possibility to prepare the appropriate actions in the suitable hospital department. To address this scenario, the CONCERTO European project proposed a wireless communication system based on a novel cross-layer architecture, including the integration of building blocks for medical media content fusion, delivery and access. This paper describes the proposed system architecture, outlining the developed components and mechanisms, and the evaluation of the proposed system, carried out in a hospital with the support of medical staff. The technical results and the feedback received highlight the impact of the CONCERTO approach in the healthcare domain, in particular in enabling a prompt and reliable diagnosis in challenging medical emergency scenarios. PMID:26737983

  1. Simulation of the time-projection chamber with triple GEMs for the LAMPS at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, Genie; Lee, Jung Woo; Moon, Byul; Hong, Byungsik; Ahn, Jung Keun; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Kyong Sei; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hyo Sang

    2016-03-01

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) with triple gas-electron multipliers (GEMs) is designed for the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer (LAMPS) at the new radioactive ion-beam facility RAON, a pure Korean term for the accelerator complex, in Korea. The simulation environment has been set up to test the performance of the designed chamber, and the software package for analysis has been developed. Particle identification has been demonstrated to be possible up to 2 GeV/ c in momentum for particles with the charge number 1 and 2 by using the simulated heavy-ion events. The transverse-momentum resolutions are expected to be about 2% for protons and about 1.3% for pions in the relatively high-momentum region. The total reconstruction efficiencies are estimated to be about 90 and 80% for charged pions and protons, respectively.

  2. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  3. SπRIT: A time-projection chamber for symmetry-energy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, R.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Baba, H.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Chartier, M.; Estee, J.; Famiano, M.; Hong, B.; Ieki, K.; Jhang, G.; Lemmon, R.; Lu, F.; Murakami, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Nishimura, M.; Olsen, R.; Powell, W.; Sakurai, H.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Usukura, T.; Wang, R.; Yennello, S. J.; Yurkon, J.

    2015-06-01

    A time-projection chamber (TPC) called the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (SπRIT) has recently been constructed at Michigan State University as part of an international effort to constrain the symmetry-energy term in the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). The SπRIT TPC will be used in conjunction with the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN to measure yield ratios for pions and other light isospin multiplets produced in central collisions of neutron-rich heavy ions, such as 132Sn+124Sn. The SπRIT TPC can function both as a TPC detector and as an active target. It has a vertical drift length of 50 cm, parallel to the magnetic field. Gas multiplication is achieved through the use of a multi-wire anode plane. Image charges, produced in the 12096 pads, are read out with the recently developed Generic Electronics for TPCs.

  4. Project of a Near-Real-Time Sismo-acoustic Submarine Station for offshore monitoring (NRTSSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, G.; Calore, D.; Mangano, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Favali, P.

    2011-12-01

    The INGV seismic network ensures reliable and continuous monitoring of the Italian territory. However, the peculiarity of the Italian peninsula, characterised by an intense offshore geodynamic and seismic activity, requires the extension of the seismic monitoring to the sea. The aim of this project is: - to identify bottleneck is related to the construction, installation and use of underwater seismic station; - to define the most appropriate and low-cost architecture to guarantee the minimum functionality required for a seismic station. In order to obtain reliable seafloor seismic signals integrated to land-based network, the requirements to be fulfill are: - an acceptable coupling with the seabed; - the orientation of the components with respect to the magnetic North and to the verticality; - the correct time stamp of the data; - the data transfer to the land for the integration. Currently, the optimal solution for offshore seismic station is a cable connection to power and real-time data transfer, like the case of Western Ionian Sea cabled observatory, one of the operative node of the EMSO research infrastructure (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory, http://emso-eu.org). But in the Mediterranean many seismic areas are located a few tens-hundreds of miles from the coast and cabled solutions are not feasible essentially for economic reasons. For this kind of installations EMSO research infrastructure foresees no-cabled solution, that requires a surface buoy deployed in the vicinity seafloor modules.This project plans to develop a surface buoy equipped with autonomous power supply system to power also the seafloor platforms and two-way communication system enabling the data transfer through latest generation of broadband radio communication or satellite link (Fig. 1). All the components of the prototype system are described.

  5. Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring, SoilCAM project highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Van Der Zee, S. E.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Tsocano, G.

    2013-12-01

    The SoilCAM project (2008- 2012, EU-FP7-212663) aimed at improving methods for monitoring subsurace contaminant distribution and biodegradation. Two test sites were chosen, Oslo airport Gardermoen, Norway where de-icing agents infiltrate the soil during snowmelt and the Trecate site in Italy where an inland crude oil spill occurred in 1994. A number of geophysical investigation techniques were combined with soil and water sampling techniques. Data obtained from time-lapse measurements were further analysed by numerical modelling of flow and transport at different scales in order to characterise transport processes in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Laboratory experiments provided physical and biogeochemical data for model parameterisation and to select remediation methods. The geophysical techniques were used to map geological heterogeneities and to conduct time-lapse measurements of processes in the unsaturated zone. Both cross borehole and surface electrodes were used for electrical resistivity and induced polarisation surveys. Results showed clear indications of areas highly affected by de-icing chemicals along the runway at Oslo airport. The time lapse measurements along the runway at the airport showed infiltration patterns during snowmelt and were used to validate 2D unsaturated flow and transport simulations using SUTRA. The simulations illustrate the effect of layering geological structures and membranes, buried parallel to the runway, on the flow pattern. Complex interaction between bio-geo-chemical processes in a 1D vertical profile along the runway were described with the ORCHESTRA model. Smaller scale field site measurements revealed increase of iron and manganese during degradation of de-icing chemicals. At the Trecate site a combination of georadar, electrical resistivity and radio magneto telluric provided a broad outline of the geology down to 50 m. Anomalies in the Induced polarisation and electrical resistivity data from the cross borehole

  6. Charged particle tracking in a water Cherenkov optical time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberla, Eric

    A first experimental test of tracking relativistic charged particles by `drifting' Cherenkov photons in a water-based optical time-projection chamber (OTPC) at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility is described. By measuring the relative time-of-arrival and (z,φ) coordinates of individual photons, we show spatial and angular resolutions on the charged particle track of 15 mm and 60 mrad, respectively, over a track length of 40 cm. The OTPC consists of a 77 cm long, 40~kg cylindrical water mass instrumented with a combination of commercial 5.1x 5.1 cm2 micro-channel plate photo-multiplier tubes (MCP-PMT) and 6.7 x6.7 cm2 mirrors. Using planar MCP-PMTs with an anode of 50O microstrips, it is feasible to resolve the time-of-arrival of a single photon to ≤100 ps and its detected position to a few~mm. The MCP-PMTs are installed in two columns along the OTPC cylinder in a small-angle stereo configuration. A mirror is mounted opposing each MCP-PMT on the far side of the detector cylinder, which effectively doubles the photo-detection efficiency and provides a time-resolved image of the Cherenkov light on the opposing wall. A 180-channel data acquisition system digitizes the MCP-PMT signals using the PSEC4 waveform sampling chip operating at 10 Gigasamples-per-second. The detector was installed on the Fermilab MCenter test-beam in a location where the primary flux is multi-GeV muons. Approximately 80 Cherenkov photons are detected for a through-going muon track in an event duration of 2 ns.

  7. Meeting Environmental Guidelines and Completing School Construction Projects on Time and Within Budget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyar, Chester F.

    2000-01-01

    Taxpayers expect school-construction projects to be managed efficiently and in accordance with environmental standards. Phases include selecting an architect and site, stating project requirements, working with the architect, considering environmental factors, getting budget estimates and reviews, and choosing a contractor and project-schedule…

  8. Real time soil moisture forecasts for irrigation management: the Pre.G.I. project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Mancini, M.; Salerno, R.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years frequent periods of water scarcity have enhanced the need to use water more carefully. Future climate change scenarios, combined with limited water resources require better irrigation management and planning for farmers' water cooperatives. This has occurred also in areas traditionally rich of water as Lombardy Region, in the North of Italy. In this study we show the development and implementation of a real-time drought forecasting system with a soil moisture hydrological alert, in particular we describe preliminary results of the Pre.G.I. Project, an Italian acronym that stands for "Hydro-Meteorological forecast for irrigation management", funded by Lombardy Region. The project develops a support decision system based on an ensemble weather prediction in the medium-long range (up to 30 days) with hydrological simulation of water balance to forecast the soil water content in every parcel over the Consorzio Muzza basin, in order to use the irrigation water in a wiser and thriftier way. The studied area covers 74,000 ha in the middle of the Po Valley, near Lodi city. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are based on 20 meteorological members of a modified version of the non-hydrostatic WRF model, with multiple nesting to scale to the region of interest. Different physical schemes are also used to take into account a larger variability; these data are provided by Epson Meteo Centre. The hydrological model used to generate the soil moisture and water table simulations is the rainfall-runoff distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano. The analysis shows the system reliability based on most significant case-studies occurred in the recent years.

  9. Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

    2005-08-30

    The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a

  10. The design and performance of a prototype water Cherenkov optical time-projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberla, Eric; Frisch, Henry J.

    2016-04-01

    A first experimental test of tracking relativistic charged particles by 'drifting' Cherenkov photons in a water-based optical time-projection chamber (OTPC) has been performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The prototype OTPC detector consists of a 77 cm long, 28 cm diameter, 40 kg cylindrical water mass instrumented with a combination of commercial 5.1 × 5.1cm2 micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMT) and 6.7 × 6.7cm2 mirrors. Five MCP-PMTs are installed in two columns along the OTPC cylinder in a small-angle stereo configuration. A mirror is mounted opposite each MCP-PMT on the inner surface of the detector cylinder, effectively increasing the photo-detection efficiency and providing a time-resolved image of the Cherenkov light on the opposing wall. Each MCP-PMT is coupled to an anode readout consisting of thirty 50 Ω microstrips. A 180-channel data acquisition system digitizes the MCP-PMT signals on one end of the microstrips using the PSEC4 waveform sampling-and-digitizing chip operating at a sampling rate of 10.24 Gigasamples-per-second. The single-ended microstrip readout determines the time and position of a photon arrival at the face of the MCP-PMT by recording both the direct signal and the pulse reflected from the unterminated far end of the strip. The detector was installed on the Fermilab MCenter secondary beam-line behind a steel absorber where the primary flux is multi-GeV muons. Approximately 80 Cherenkov photons are detected for a through-going muon track in a total event duration of ~2 ns. By measuring the time-of-arrival and the position of individual photons at the surface of the detector to ≤ 100 ps and a few mm, respectively, we have measured a spatial resolution of ~15 mm for each MCP-PMT track segment, and, from linear fits over the entire track length of ~40 cm, an angular resolution on the track direction of ~60 mrad.

  11. Exploiting the Photoelectric effect for X-ray Polarimetry using Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, Keith; Black, Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The promise of photoelectric X-ray polarimetry has now been realized in laboratory demonstrations and may soon be used for astrophysical observations. Photoelectric polarimetry in gas filled proportional counters achieves high sensitivity through a combination of broad band width and good modulation. The band can be tuned by careful choice of gas composition and pressure. The measurements rely on imaging the tracks of photoelectrons. The initial direction of each track carries information about the electric field of the X-ray photon, and an ensemble of such measurements thus measures the net polarization of the source. A novel readout geometry using time projection chambers (TPC) allows deep (i.e. high efficiency) detectors, albeit without the ability to image the sky. Polarimeters which exploit the TPC geometry can be optimized for use behind telescopes, to study faint persistent sources, or as wide field of view instruments, designed to study bright transient events such as gamma-ray bursts or solar flares. We present the conceptual design of both types of TPC polarimeter. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that these polarimeters can achieve substantial gains in the polarization sensitivity achievable in experiments of modest size.

  12. Field cage development for a time-projection chamber to constrain the nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estee, J.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Famiano, M.; Dunn, J.; Lu, F.; Lynch, W. G.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Murakami, T.; Sakurai, H.; Shane, R.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yennello, S.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (sTPC) is being developed for use in the dipole magnet of the newly-commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIBF facility in Japan. The main scientific objective of the sTPC is to provide constraints on the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities. The TPC allows for tracking and identification of light charged particles such as pions, protons, tritons and ^3He. The sTPC must have a Cartesian geometry to match the symmetry of the dipole magnet. The walls of the field cage (FC) detector volume consist of sections of rigid, two-layer circuit boards. Inside and outside copper strips form decreasing equipotentials via a resistor chain, and create a uniform electric field with a maximum of 400 V/cm. The FC volume is hermetically sealed from the enclosure volume to create an insulation volume which can be filled with dry N2 to inhibit corona discharge. I will be presenting the current status of the design and assembly of the sTPC field cage.

  13. Lifetime Estimation of a Time Projection Chamber X-ray Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Brieda, Lubos; Dickens, Patsy L.; deGarcia, Kristina Montt; Hawk, Douglas L.; Hayato, Asami; Jahoda, Keith; Mohammed, Jelila

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimeter Instrument (XPI) was designed to measure the polarization of 23 sources over the course of its 9 month mission. The XPI design consists of two telescopes each with a polarimeter assembly at the focus of a grazing incidence mirror. To make sensitive polarization measurements the GEMS Polarimeter Assembly (PA) employed a gas detection system based on a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) technique. Gas detectors are inherently at risk of degraded performance arising from contamination from outgassing of internal detector components or due to loss of gas. This paper describes the design and the materials used to build a prototype of the flight polarimeter with the required GEMS lifetime. We report the results from outgassing measurements of the polarimeter subassemblies and assemblies, enclosure seal tests, life tests, and performance tests that demonstrate that the GEMS lifetime is achievable. Finally we report performance measurements and the lifetime enhancement from the use of a getter.

  14. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Brett; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for actinides have long been of great interest for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements were performed using fission chambers which provided limited information about the detected fission events. For the case of 239Pu(n,f), sensitivity studies have shown a need for more precise measurements. Recently the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure fission cross sections to better than 1% uncertainty by providing 3D tracking of fission fragments. The fissionTPC collected data to calculate the 239Pu(n,f) cross section at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during the 2014 run cycle. Preliminary analysis has been focused on studying particle identification and target and beam non-uniformities to reduce the uncertainty on the cross section. Additionally, the collaboration is investigating other systematic errors that could not be well studied with a traditional fission chamber. LA-UR-15-24906.

  15. Multiobjective resource-constrained project scheduling with a time-varying number of tasks.

    PubMed

    Abello, Manuel Blanco; Michalewicz, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    In resource-constrained project scheduling (RCPS) problems, ongoing tasks are restricted to utilizing a fixed number of resources. This paper investigates a dynamic version of the RCPS problem where the number of tasks varies in time. Our previous work investigated a technique called mapping of task IDs for centroid-based approach with random immigrants (McBAR) that was used to solve the dynamic problem. However, the solution-searching ability of McBAR was investigated over only a few instances of the dynamic problem. As a consequence, only a small number of characteristics of McBAR, under the dynamics of the RCPS problem, were found. Further, only a few techniques were compared to McBAR with respect to its solution-searching ability for solving the dynamic problem. In this paper, (a) the significance of the subalgorithms of McBAR is investigated by comparing McBAR to several other techniques; and (b) the scope of investigation in the previous work is extended. In particular, McBAR is compared to a technique called, Estimation Distribution Algorithm (EDA). As with McBAR, EDA is applied to solve the dynamic problem, an application that is unique in the literature. PMID:24883398

  16. Multiobjective Resource-Constrained Project Scheduling with a Time-Varying Number of Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Abello, Manuel Blanco

    2014-01-01

    In resource-constrained project scheduling (RCPS) problems, ongoing tasks are restricted to utilizing a fixed number of resources. This paper investigates a dynamic version of the RCPS problem where the number of tasks varies in time. Our previous work investigated a technique called mapping of task IDs for centroid-based approach with random immigrants (McBAR) that was used to solve the dynamic problem. However, the solution-searching ability of McBAR was investigated over only a few instances of the dynamic problem. As a consequence, only a small number of characteristics of McBAR, under the dynamics of the RCPS problem, were found. Further, only a few techniques were compared to McBAR with respect to its solution-searching ability for solving the dynamic problem. In this paper, (a) the significance of the subalgorithms of McBAR is investigated by comparing McBAR to several other techniques; and (b) the scope of investigation in the previous work is extended. In particular, McBAR is compared to a technique called, Estimation Distribution Algorithm (EDA). As with McBAR, EDA is applied to solve the dynamic problem, an application that is unique in the literature. PMID:24883398

  17. Development studies for the ILC: Measurements and simulations for a time projection chamber with GEM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermann, Bernhard; Kaminski, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Müller, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology is well suited for usage as central tracker at the International Linear Collider (ILC). To study the high potential of this detector type a small prototype of 25 cm length was built in Karlsruhe and used in several experimental setups. In this publication the results of these measurements and of additional Monte Carlo simulations are presented. By introducing the so-called equivalent drift distance a combination of all results was possible leading to a recommended configuration of the multi-GEM tower for the ILC-TPC. It will be shown that for conditions considered in the TESLA-TDR the transverse spatial resolution will be able to reach 65 μm for 10 cm and 190 μm for 200 cm drift at the ILC. This as well as the expectations for longitudinal spatial resolution, for energy resolutions of the specific ionization, and for single pad row efficiency should be able to meet the requirements of a future ILC-TPC.

  18. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1998-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of Infrared sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL) simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurate testing. Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost-effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC), researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is used to provide dynamic inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band seeker testing and for direct signal injection into the seeker or processor electronics. AMCOM MRDEC has developed a second generation IRSG, namely IRSG2, using the latest Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) Onyx2 with Infinite Reality graphics. As reported in previous papers, the SGI Onyx Reality Engine 2 is the platform of the original IRSG that is now referred to as IRSG1. IRSG1 has been in operation and used daily for the past three years on several IR projection and signal injection HWIL programs. Using this second generation IRSG, frame rates have increased from 120 Hz to 400 Hz and intensity resolution from 12 bits to 16 bits. The key features of the IRSGs are real time missile frame rates and frame sizes, dynamic missile-to-target(s) viewpoint updated each frame in real-time by a six-degree-of- freedom (6DOF) system under test (SUT) simulation, multiple dynamic objects (e.g. targets, terrain/background, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects), latency compensation, point-to-extended source anti-aliased targets, and

  19. The effect of passive material on the detection of hadrons in calorimeter configurations for the SDC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Trost, H.J.

    1991-08-14

    We have used a flexible geometry model of a calorimeter design for SDC to study the effect of passive material in front of the calorimeter and between the barrel and endcap modules on the apparent response to hadrons. The thicknesses of the passive materials have been chosen to closely resemble the currently projected wall thicknesses of the scintillating tile-fiber and liquid-argon calorimeter designs. The liquid-argon model contains about three times the amount of material in its shells compared to the tile-fiber model. The solenoid coil reduces the relative difference somewhat in the barrel region but constitutes only a minor correction in the transition region from barrel to endcap. Correspondingly, we find a significantly worse response for the liquid-argon case which we demonstrate using beams of single {pi}{sup minus} particles of 10 GeV/c momentum. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  20. 36 CFR 218.12 - Timing of authorized hazardous fuel reduction project decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with 40 CFR 1506.10, or DN may occur on, but not before, the fifth business day following the end... hazardous fuel reduction project decision. 218.12 Section 218.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... Administrative Review Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects Authorized by the Healthy Forests...

  1. 36 CFR 218.12 - Timing of authorized hazardous fuel reduction project decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accordance with 40 CFR 1506.10, or DN may occur on, but not before, the fifth business day following the end... hazardous fuel reduction project decision. 218.12 Section 218.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... Administrative Review Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects Authorized by the Healthy Forests...

  2. 36 CFR 218.12 - Timing of authorized hazardous fuel reduction project decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accordance with 40 CFR 1506.10, or DN may occur on, but not before, the fifth business day following the end... hazardous fuel reduction project decision. 218.12 Section 218.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... Administrative Review Process for Hazardous Fuel Reduction Projects Authorized by the Healthy Forests...

  3. "Our Journey through Time": An Oral History Project Carried out by Young People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Sarah; Nicholls, Rickie; Price, Maxine; Wilkinson, Aaron; Purcell, Matthew; Woodhall, Martin; Walmsley, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We are five young people with learning disabilities who found out about the history of hospitals for people with learning disabilities in our area, and made a film about the project. The project taught us what life had been like for some people with learning disabilities only 30 years ago. It was very different to our lives; we have more choice,…

  4. A time projection chamber for high-rate experiments: Towards an upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzer, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for three-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. of the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region of the MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires offers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built with the largest active volume to date for a detector of this type. It has been commissioned with cosmic rays and with particle beams at the FOPI experiment at GSI, and was employed for a physics measurement with pion beams. For the future operation of the ALICE TPC at the CERN LHC beyond 2019, where Pb-Pb collision rates of 50 kHz are expected, it is planned to replace the existing MWPCs by GEM detectors, operated in a continuous, triggerless readout mode, thus allowing an increase in event rate by a factor of 100. As a first step of the R&D program, a prototype of an Inner Readout Chamber was equipped with large-size GEM foils and exposed to beams of protons, pions and electrons from the CERN PS. In this paper, new results are shown concerning ion backflow, spatial and momentum resolution of the FOPI GEM-TPC, detector calibration, and dE/dx resolution with both detector prototypes. The perspectives of a GEM-TPC for ALICE with continuous readout will be discussed.

  5. Incidence of mesothelioma in Lombardy, Italy: exposure to asbestos, time patterns and future projections

    PubMed Central

    Mensi, Carolina; De Matteis, Sara; Dallari, Barbara; Riboldi, Luciano; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Consonni, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In Italy, asbestos has been extensively used from 1945 to 1992. We evaluated the impact of exposure to asbestos on occurrence of malignant mesothelioma (MM) in the Lombardy Region, Northwest Italy, the most populated and industrialised Italian region. Methods From the Lombardy Mesothelioma Registry, we selected all incident cases of MM diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. We described sources of exposure to asbestos and examined time trends of MM rates. Using Poisson age-cohort models, we derived projections of burden of MM in the Lombardy population for the period 2013–2029. Results In 2000–2012, we recorded 4442 cases of MM (2850 men, 1592 women). Occupational exposure to asbestos was more frequent in men (73.6%) than in women (38.2%). Non-occupational exposure was found for 13.6% of women and 3.6% of men. The average number of cases of MM per year was still increasing (+3.6% in men, +3.3% in women). Incidence rates were still increasing in individuals aged 65+ years and declining in younger people. A maximum of 417 cases of MM (267 men, 150 women) are expected in 2019. We forecast there will be 6832 more cases (4397 in men, 2435 in women) in the period 2013–2029, for a total of 11 274 cases of MM (7247 in men, 4027 in women) in 30 years. Conclusions This study documented a high burden of MM in both genders in the Lombardy Region, reflecting extensive occupational (mainly in men) and non-occupational (mainly in women) exposure to asbestos in the past. Incidence rates are still increasing; a downturn in occurrence of MM is expected to occur after 2019. PMID:27312399

  6. A distributed agent architecture for real-time knowledge-based systems: Real-time expert systems project, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    We propose a distributed agent architecture (DAA) that can support a variety of paradigms based on both traditional real-time computing and artificial intelligence. DAA consists of distributed agents that are classified into two categories: reactive and cognitive. Reactive agents can be implemented directly in Ada to meet hard real-time requirements and be deployed on on-board embedded processors. A traditional real-time computing methodology under consideration is the rate monotonic theory that can guarantee schedulability based on analytical methods. AI techniques under consideration for reactive agents are approximate or anytime reasoning that can be implemented using Bayesian belief networks as in Guardian. Cognitive agents are traditional expert systems that can be implemented in ART-Ada to meet soft real-time requirements. During the initial design of cognitive agents, it is critical to consider the migration path that would allow initial deployment on ground-based workstations with eventual deployment on on-board processors. ART-Ada technology enables this migration while Lisp-based technologies make it difficult if not impossible. In addition to reactive and cognitive agents, a meta-level agent would be needed to coordinate multiple agents and to provide meta-level control.

  7. Real-Time Feedback in the Singing Studio: An Innovatory Action-Research Project Using New Voice Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Graham F.; Howard, David M.; Himonides, Evangelos; Brereton, Jude

    2005-01-01

    The article reports on a one-year AHRB-funded Innovations project that was designed to evaluate the usefulness, or otherwise, of the application of real-time visual feedback technology in the singing studio. The basis for the research was a multi-disciplinary approach that drew on voice science and acoustics, the psychology of singing and voice…

  8. Students' Failure to Submit Research Projects on Time: A Case Study from Masvingo Regional Centre at Zimbabwe Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabaya, Owence; Chiome, Chrispen; Chabaya, Raphinos A.

    2009-01-01

    The study sought to determine lecturers' and students' perceptions of factors contributing to students' failure to submit research projects on time in three departments of the Zimbabwe Open University. The study employed a descriptive survey design and was both quantitative and qualitative. The questionnaire used as a data-gathering instrument had…

  9. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  10. Design and Analysis for the DarkSide-10 Two-Phase Argon Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Christina Elena

    Astounding evidence for invisible "dark" matter has been found from galaxy clusters, cosmic and stellar gas motion, gravitational lensing studies, cosmic microwave background analysis, and large scale galaxy surveys. Although all studies indicate that there is a dominant presence of non-luminous matter in the universe (about 22 percent of the total energy density with 5 times more dark matter than baryonic matter), its identity and its "direct" detection (through non-gravitational effects) has not yet been achieved. Dark matter in the form of massive, weakly interacting particles (WIMPs) could be detected through their collisions with target nuclei. This requires detectors to be sensitive to very low-energy (less than 100 keV) nuclear recoils with very low expected rates (a few interactions per year per ton of target). Reducing the background in a direct dark matter detector is the biggest challenge. A detector capable of seeing such low-energy nuclear recoils is difficult to build because of the necessary size and the radio- and chemical- purity. Therefore it is imperative to first construct small-scale prototypes to develop the necessary technology and systems, before attempting to deploy large-scale detectors in underground laboratories. Our collaboration, the DarkSide Collaboration, utilizes argon in two-phase time projection chambers (TPCs). We have designed, built, and commissioned DarkSide-10, a 10 kg prototype detector, and are designing and building DarkSide-50, a 50 kg dark matter detector. The present work is an account of my contribution to these efforts. The two-phase argon TPC technology allows powerful discrimination between dark matter nuclear recoils and background events. Presented here are simulations, designs, and analyses involving the electroluminescence in the gas phase from extracted ionization charge for both DarkSide-10 and DarkSide-50. This work involves the design of the HHV systems, including field cages, that are responsible for

  11. A scientific project locked in time. The Terman Genetic Studies of Genius, 1920s-1950s.

    PubMed

    Cravens, H

    1992-02-01

    Lewis M. Terman is well-known in the history of American psychology for the Stanford Revision of the Binet-Simon intelligence tests and the Genetic Studies of Genius project. The same assumptions informed the genius project and Terman's work in intelligence testing: the notion of the fixity of the IQ at birth and the maturation theory. According to the maturation theory, individuals developed only within the range of differences made possible by the genetic endowment of the "group"--natural, cultural, or both--to which they belonged. In this article the historicity and nonuniversality of Terman's work is discussed. PMID:1567087

  12. EOS: A project to investigate the design and construction of real-time distributed embedded operating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.; Essick, R. B.; Grass, J.; Johnston, G.; Kenny, K.; Russo, V.

    1986-01-01

    The EOS project is investigating the design and construction of a family of real-time distributed embedded operating systems for reliable, distributed aerospace applications. Using the real-time programming techniques developed in co-operation with NASA in earlier research, the project staff is building a kernel for a multiple processor networked system. The first six months of the grant included a study of scheduling in an object-oriented system, the design philosophy of the kernel, and the architectural overview of the operating system. In this report, the operating system and kernel concepts are described. An environment for the experiments has been built and several of the key concepts of the system have been prototyped. The kernel and operating system is intended to support future experimental studies in multiprocessing, load-balancing, routing, software fault-tolerance, distributed data base design, and real-time processing.

  13. University of Kentucky Engaging Differences Project: Providing Information about Accommodations On Line and Just in Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampe, Kristina M.; Berdine, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The University of Kentucky Engaging Differences (UK-ED) project focused on developing, evaluating, and disseminating a web-based performance support system (WPSS) to enhance accommodations provided by personnel at the University of Kentucky (UK), the Lexington Community College (LCC), and the Kentucky Community and Technical College System…

  14. Two ESP Projects under the Test of Time: The Case of Brazil and Tunisia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labassi, Tahar

    2010-01-01

    The paper is a response to Holmes and Celani's (2006) invitation to learn from the Brazilian ESP experience. It discusses the conditions which sustained this experience, and compares the Brazilian situation to the Tunisian one. The paper also discusses the challenges that ESP projects in EFL environments face, the opportunities that ESP…

  15. Time, Space and Structure in an E-Learning and E-Mentoring Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loureiro-Koechlin, Cecilia; Allan, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on a project, "EMPATHY Net-Works," which developed a learning community as a means of encouraging women to progress into employment and management positions in the logistics and supply chain industries (LaSCI). Learning activities were organised in the form of a taught module containing face-to-face and online elements and…

  16. Time Past: Impacts of ICT on the Pedagogic Discourse in the Interactive Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    The "pedagogic discourse" can describe the power relations and fields of influence within schools. This article extends the approach to include ICT-mediated learning in schools by considering evidence from the InterActive project, undertaken by the University of Bristol, England, in 2000-04. The article also considers how the pedagogic…

  17. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  18. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  19. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  20. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross Reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  1. 34 CFR 75.511 - Waiver of requirement for a full-time project director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and 3474) Cross Reference: See 34 CFR 74.25, Revision of budget and program plans; and 34 CFR 80.30... PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.511 Waiver of requirement for a...

  2. Replacement Ratio Projections in Defined Contribution Retirement Plans: Time, Salary Growth, Investment Return, and Real Income.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Michael; King, Francis P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a method of projecting inflation-adjusted (real) retirement benefit replacement ratios for defined contribution retirement plans such as TIAA-CREF (Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association--College Retirement Equities Fund). The illustrated ratios are comparable to the ratios in defined benefit plans that result…

  3. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 10. Spectral analysis with high-time resolution of the thermal-radiation pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, J.J.; Harris, L.H.; Hennecke, H.J.; Claflin, A.B.; Fekete, M.W.

    1985-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to investigate the spectral irradiance and luminosity versus time for the first thermal pulse at Shot Small Boy. This was accomplished by use of spectral filters with narrow band passes, phototubes, and magnetic tape recorders with high time resolution at two locations. The measured elapsed time to the first thermal maximum was from 50 to 110 microseconds, depending on wavelength. A graph of radiant thermal power versus time was obtained for the thermal pulse. The delineation of the first thermal pulse, especially the rise portion, is considered to be more definite than has been obtained previously. The resolution time of the instrumentation was approximately 50 microseconds. Secondary objectives were to measure the total luminosity versus time and also to measure the atmospheric attenuation. These objectives were accomplished by making measurements at two distances, 2.5 and 3.5 miles, from ground zero. In the case of the total luminosity measurements, a system of filters with a spectral transmittance approximating the sensitivity response of the average human eye was used. The results are tabulated in the report.

  4. The TimeStudio Project: An open source scientific workflow system for the behavioral and brain sciences.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Pär; Falck-Ytter, Terje; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a new open source scientific workflow system, the TimeStudio Project, dedicated to the behavioral and brain sciences. The program is written in MATLAB and features a graphical user interface for the dynamic pipelining of computer algorithms developed as TimeStudio plugins. TimeStudio includes both a set of general plugins (for reading data files, modifying data structures, visualizing data structures, etc.) and a set of plugins specifically developed for the analysis of event-related eyetracking data as a proof of concept. It is possible to create custom plugins to integrate new or existing MATLAB code anywhere in a workflow, making TimeStudio a flexible workbench for organizing and performing a wide range of analyses. The system also features an integrated sharing and archiving tool for TimeStudio workflows, which can be used to share workflows both during the data analysis phase and after scientific publication. TimeStudio thus facilitates the reproduction and replication of scientific studies, increases the transparency of analyses, and reduces individual researchers' analysis workload. The project website ( http://timestudioproject.com ) contains the latest releases of TimeStudio, together with documentation and user forums. PMID:26170051

  5. Parallelism at CERN: real-time and off-line applications in the GP-MIMD2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calafiura, Paolo

    1997-02-01

    A wide range of General Purpose High-Energy Physics applications, ranging from Monte carlo simulation to data acquisition, from interactive data analysis to on-line filtering, have been ported, or developed, and run in parallel on IBM SP-2 and Meiko CS-2 CERN large multi-processor machines. The ESPRIT project GP-MIMD2 has been a catalyst for the interest in parallel computing at CERN. The project provided the 128 processors Meiko CS-2 system that is now succesfully integrated in the CERN computing environment. The CERN experiment NA48 was involved in the GP-MIMD2 project since the beginning. NA48 physicists run, as part of their day-to-day work, simulation and analysis programs parallelized using the Message Passing Interface MPI. The CS-2 is also a vital component of the experiment Data Acquisition System and will be used to calibrate in real-time the 13 000 channels liquid krypton calorimeter.

  6. Project of Near-Real-Time Generation of ShakeMaps and a New Hazard Map in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yan; Weginger, Stefan; Horn, Nikolaus; Hausmann, Helmut; Lenhardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Target-orientated prevention and effective crisis management can reduce or avoid damage and save lives in case of a strong earthquake. To achieve this goal, a project for automatic generated ShakeMaps (maps of ground motion and shaking intensity) and updating the Austrian hazard map was started at ZAMG (Zentralanstalt für Meteorologie und Geodynamik) in 2015. The first goal of the project is set for a near-real-time generation of ShakeMaps following strong earthquakes in Austria to provide rapid, accurate and official information to support the governmental crisis management. Using newly developed methods and software by SHARE (Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe) and GEM (Global Earthquake Model), which allows a transnational analysis at European level, a new generation of Austrian hazard maps will be ultimately calculated. More information and a status of our project will be given by this presentation.

  7. EOS: A project to investigate the design and construction of real-time distributed Embedded Operating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.; Essick, Ray B.; Johnston, Gary; Kenny, Kevin; Russo, Vince

    1987-01-01

    Project EOS is studying the problems of building adaptable real-time embedded operating systems for the scientific missions of NASA. Choices (A Class Hierarchical Open Interface for Custom Embedded Systems) is an operating system designed and built by Project EOS to address the following specific issues: the software architecture for adaptable embedded parallel operating systems, the achievement of high-performance and real-time operation, the simplification of interprocess communications, the isolation of operating system mechanisms from one another, and the separation of mechanisms from policy decisions. Choices is written in C++ and runs on a ten processor Encore Multimax. The system is intended for use in constructing specialized computer applications and research on advanced operating system features including fault tolerance and parallelism.

  8. Multi-objective optimization of discrete time-cost tradeoff problem in project networks using non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The time-cost tradeoff problem is one of the most important and applicable problems in project scheduling area. There are many factors that force the mangers to crash the time. This factor could be early utilization, early commissioning and operation, improving the project cash flow, avoiding unfavorable weather conditions, compensating the delays, and so on. Since there is a need to allocate extra resources to short the finishing time of project and the project managers are intended to spend the lowest possible amount of money and achieve the maximum crashing time, as a result, both direct and indirect costs will be influenced in the project, and here, we are facing into the time value of money. It means that when we crash the starting activities in a project, the extra investment will be tied in until the end date of the project; however, when we crash the final activities, the extra investment will be tied in for a much shorter period. This study is presenting a two-objective mathematical model for balancing compressing the project time with activities delay to prepare a suitable tool for decision makers caught in available facilities and due to the time of projects. Also drawing the scheduling problem to real world conditions by considering nonlinear objective function and the time value of money are considered. The presented problem was solved using NSGA-II, and the effect of time compressing reports on the non-dominant set.

  9. Rationale and study design for a randomised controlled trial to reduce sedentary time in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project stand (Sedentary Time ANd diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem. There is an urgent need for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent the development of T2DM. Sedentary behaviour (sitting time) has recently been identified as a risk factor for diabetes, often independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes) is a study which aims to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at high risk of T2DM. Methods/Design A reduction in sedentary time is targeted using theory driven group structured education. The STAND programme is subject to piloting and process evaluation in line with the MRC framework for complex interventions. Participants are encouraged to self-monitor and self-regulate their behaviour. The intervention is being assessed in a randomised controlled trial with 12 month follow up. Inclusion criteria are a) aged 18-40 years with a BMI in the obese range; b) 18-40 years with a BMI in the overweight range plus an additional risk factor for T2DM. Participants are randomised to the intervention (n = 89) or control (n = 89) arm. The primary outcome is a reduction in sedentary behaviour at 12 months as measured by an accelerometer (count < 100/min). Secondary outcomes include physical activity, sitting/lying time using the ActivPAL posture monitor, fasting and 2 h oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, illness perceptions, and efficacy beliefs for behaviour change. Conclusions This is the first UK trial to address sedentary behaviour change in a population of younger adults at risk of T2DM. The results will provide a platform for the development of a range of future multidisciplinary interventions in this rapidly expanding high-risk population. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08434554, MRC project 91409. PMID:22151909

  10. The Economics of Adolescents' Time Allocation: Evidence from the Young Agent Project in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Restrepo, Susana

    2012-01-01

    What are the socioeconomic implications of the time allocation decisions made by low-income adolescents? The way adolescents allocate their time between schooling, labor and leisure has important implications for their education attainment, college aspirations, job opportunities and future earnings. This study focuses on adolescents and young…

  11. Retention projection enables accurate calculation of liquid chromatographic retention times across labs and methods.

    PubMed

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Freund, Dana M; Ma, Yan; Simón-Manso, Yamil; Hollender, Juliane; Broeckling, Corey D; Huhman, David V; Krokhin, Oleg V; Stoll, Dwight R; Hegeman, Adrian D; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver; Schymanski, Emma L; Prenni, Jessica E; Sumner, Lloyd W; Boswell, Paul G

    2015-09-18

    Identification of small molecules by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) can be greatly improved if the chromatographic retention information is used along with mass spectral information to narrow down the lists of candidates. Linear retention indexing remains the standard for sharing retention data across labs, but it is unreliable because it cannot properly account for differences in the experimental conditions used by various labs, even when the differences are relatively small and unintentional. On the other hand, an approach called "retention projection" properly accounts for many intentional differences in experimental conditions, and when combined with a "back-calculation" methodology described recently, it also accounts for unintentional differences. In this study, the accuracy of this methodology is compared with linear retention indexing across eight different labs. When each lab ran a test mixture under a range of multi-segment gradients and flow rates they selected independently, retention projections averaged 22-fold more accurate for uncharged compounds because they properly accounted for these intentional differences, which were more pronounced in steep gradients. When each lab ran the test mixture under nominally the same conditions, which is the ideal situation to reproduce linear retention indices, retention projections still averaged 2-fold more accurate because they properly accounted for many unintentional differences between the LC systems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most successful study to date aiming to calculate (or even just to reproduce) LC gradient retention across labs, and it is the only study in which retention was reliably calculated under various multi-segment gradients and flow rates chosen independently by labs. PMID:26292625

  12. AXEL: High pressure xenon gas Time Projection Chamber for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    AXEL is a high pressure xenon gas TPC detector being developed for neutrinoless double-beta decay search. We use proportional scintillation mode with a new electroluminescence light detection scheme to achieve very high energy resolution with a large detector. The detector has a capability of tracking which can be used reduce background. The project is in a R&D phase, and we report current status of our prototype chamber with 10 L and 8 bar Xe gas. We also present the results of the photon detection efficiency measurement and the linearity test of silicon photomultiplier(SiPM).

  13. The double beta decay spectrum of sup 100 Mo as measured with a TPC (time projection chamber)

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.R. ); Moe, M.K.; Nelson, M.A.; Vient, M.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A time projection chamber with 8.3 grams of enriched {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} as the central electrode has been operating approximately five months in an underground laboratory. A preliminary analysis of the two-electron sum energy spectrum, the spectrum of those same electrons taken singly, and the opening angle distribution yields a half life of 1.16{sub -0.08}{sup +0.34} {times} 10{sup 19} y at the 68% confidence level for two-neutrino double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officers report - Project 6. 4. Measurement of gamma dose rate as a function of time

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg; Markow; Balton, I.A.

    1985-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to obtain measurements of gamma rate as a function of distance and time for evaluation of the electromagnetic (EM) effect. The secondary objective was to measure the gamma rate as a function of distance without involving the EM effect. Such data are of interest in connection with transient radiation effects on electronic components. A newly developed gamma detector, called SEMIRAD, was used. The reason for choosing this device rather than other conventional gamma detectors is its extremely rapid time response, limited only the collection time of the secondary electrons, and its high dose-rate saturation limit. Results of the gamma-dose-rate measurement as a function of time are fragmentary and represent an undistorted measurement in only a few intervals. Failures of equipment and/or human factors accounted for missing data. The data could be improved in future experiments if changes are made in the instrumentation, i.e., better EM shielding, improved tape recorders and generally higher quality electronics.

  15. Real-time application of PASSER IV: Project summary and guidelines. Research report, September 1994--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.A.

    1997-10-01

    PASSER IV is a program for timing traffic signals in networks based on progression bandwidth optimization. It is capable of optimizing signals timings for arterials as well as multi-arterial closed-loop networks. This report presents a summary of work conducted under a three-year research project funded by TxDOT. It provides guidelines for using PASSER IV as a 1.5 generation real-time traffic control system using a test-bed from the city of Richardson, Texas. In addition, the report addresses the issue of signal timing transition and provides the description of a preliminary algorithm for finding the cost of transition. Finally, the report provides new PASSER IV developments and describes new features.

  16. NTT's ultra-high-speed networking experiment: a real-time VLBI project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uose, Hisao; Irie, Kazunari; Iwamura, Sotetsu

    2002-11-01

    Since 1995 Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) has been conducting experiments on real-time VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) using a large scale network testbed having the maximum speed of 2.4Gb/s. With the real-time data transmission using high-speed communications network, the bottleneck resulted from the limited data rates with the conventional magnetic tape based VLBI system can be removed. Two applications of VLBI, geodesy and radio astronomy, are being pursued with our trial and extensive research items regarding the real-time VLBI technology are being conducted. So far, through the experiments using the developed real-time VLBI system, great improvement in observation performance has been achieved. Now we are concentrated in developing an economical VLBI data transfer system using advanced IP (Internet Protocol) technologies to achieve greater connectivity to other research organizations.

  17. Historical series and Near Real Time data analysis produced within ASI-SRV project infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, M.; Musacchio, M.; Buongiorno, M.; Corradini, S.; Lombardo, V.; Merucci, L.; Spinetti, C.; Sansosti, E.; Pugnaghi, S.; Teggi, S.; Vignoli, S.; Amodio, A.; Dini, L.

    2009-12-01

    ASI-Sistema Rischio Vulcanico (SRV) project is devoted to the development of a pre-operative integrated system managing different Earth Observation (EO) and Non EO data to respond to specific needs of the Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC) and improve the monitoring of Italian active volcanoes. The project provides the capability to maintain a repository where the acquired data are stored and generates products offering a support to risk managers during the different volcanic activity phases. All the products are obtained considering technical choices and developments of ASI-SRV based on flexible and scalable modules which take into account also the new coming space sensors and new processing algorithms. An important step of the project development regards the technical and scientific feasibility of the provided products that depends on the data availability, accuracy algorithms and models used in the processing and of course the possibility to validate the results by means of comparison with non-EO independent measurements. The ASI-SRV infrastrucutre is based on a distributed client/server architecture which implies that different processors need to ingest data set characterized by a constant and common structure. ASI-SRV will develop, in its final version, a centralized HW-SW system located at INGV which will control two complete processing chains, one located at INGV for Optical data, and the other located at IREA for SAR data. The produced results will be disseminated through a WEB-GIS interface which will allow the DPC to overview and assimilate the products in a compatible format respect to their local monitoring system in order to have an immediate use of the provided information. In this paper the first results producing ground deformation measurement via Differential Interferometric SAR (DInSAR) techniques by using SAR data and via the application of the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique developed at IREA, are reported. Moreover different

  18. Arctic sea ice decline: Projected changes in timing and extent of sea ice in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic region is warming faster than most regions of the world due in part to increasing greenhouse gases and positive feedbacks associated with the loss of snow and ice cover. One consequence has been a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice over the past 3 decades?a decline that is projected to continue by state-of-the-art models. Many stakeholders are therefore interested in how global warming may change the timing and extent of sea ice Arctic-wide, and for specific regions. To inform the public and decision makers of anticipated environmental changes, scientists are striving to better understand how sea ice influences ecosystem structure, local weather, and global climate. Here, projected changes in the Bering and Chukchi Seas are examined because sea ice influences the presence of, or accessibility to, a variety of local resources of commercial and cultural value. In this study, 21st century sea ice conditions in the Bering and Chukchi Seas are based on projections by 18 general circulation models (GCMs) prepared for the fourth reporting period by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007. Sea ice projections are analyzed for each of two IPCC greenhouse gas forcing scenarios: the A1B `business as usual? scenario and the A2 scenario that is somewhat more aggressive in its CO2 emissions during the second half of the century. A large spread of uncertainty among projections by all 18 models was constrained by creating model subsets that excluded GCMs that poorly simulated the 1979-2008 satellite record of ice extent and seasonality. At the end of the 21st century (2090-2099), median sea ice projections among all combinations of model ensemble and forcing scenario were qualitatively similar. June is projected to experience the least amount of sea ice loss among all months. For the Chukchi Sea, projections show extensive ice melt during July and ice-free conditions during August, September, and October by the end of the century, with high agreement

  19. DELIVERING TIME-RELEVANT WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY THE LAKE ACCESS-MINNEAPOLIS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EMPACT was created in 1996 to take advantage of new technologies that make it possible to provide environmental information to the public in near real time. EMPACT is working with the 86 largest metropolitan areas of the country to help communities in these areas: Collecting, ma...

  20. Project Golden Gate: towards real-time Java in space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Daniel; Bollella, Greg; Canham, Tim; Carson, Vanessa; Champlin, Virgil; Giovannoni, Brian; Indictor, Mark; Meyer, Kenny; Murray, Alex; Reinholtz, Kirk

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the problem domain and our experimentation with the first commercial implementation of the Real Time Specification for Java. The two main issues explored in this report are: (1) the effect of RTSJ's non-heap memory on the programming model, and (2) performance benchmarking of RTSJ/Linux relative to C++/VxWorks.

  1. THE JEFFERSON PARISH-LOUISIANA PROJECT - DELIVERING TIME RELEVANT WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has developed a handbook to help state and local governmental officials implement near-real-time water quality monitoring and outreach programs with step-by-step instructions on how to: 1) Employ satellite and robotic water monitoring equipment, 2) collect, transfer, an...

  2. Small and Part-Time Farmer Innovative Program Delivery Project, Madison County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John G.; McAlister, Maurice

    Two approaches to providing information about beef cattle preconditioning to randomly selected farmers were compared in a study involving 12 small and part-time farmers in Madison County, North Carolina. Half the farmers received the information from an extension agent via face-to-face consultations, telephone conversations, and an educational…

  3. Protein Analysis Using Real-Time PCR Instrumentation: Incorporation in an Integrated, Inquiry-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Instrumentation for real-time PCR is used primarily for amplification and quantitation of nucleic acids. The capability to measure fluorescence while controlling temperature in multiple samples can also be applied to the analysis of proteins. Conformational stability and changes in stability due to ligand binding are easily assessed. Protein…

  4. Function projective synchronization of memristor-based Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Abdurahman, Abdujelil; Jiang, Haijun; Rahman, Kaysar

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of function projective synchronization for a class of memristor-based Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with time-varying delays. Based on the theory of differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side, some novel criteria are obtained to realize the function projective synchronization of addressed networks by combining open loop control and linear feedback control. As some special cases, several control strategies are given to ensure the realization of complete synchronization, anti-synchronization and the stabilization of the considered memristor-based Cohen-Grossberg neural network. Finally, a numerical example and its simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:26557930

  5. Investigation of onboard quantum time scale for orbital flight of a space radio telescope (the RadioAstron project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    Results of observing the operation of instrumentation of the ground-space complex of the Radio-Astron project during space flight conditions of the radio observatory are presented. The technology of quality evaluation of the data received from the space radio telescope (SRT) is considered. The dependence of readings of the onboard frame counter on SRT radial velocity and distance is determined. Technology of constructing a model of the ground-space atomic clocks and onboard quantum time scale based on the results of radio astronomic observations is tested. The method of measurement of the coherent cumulative navigation delay using the onboard quantum time scale is considered. The results of observation of the effect of relativistic and kinematic time dilation onboard the SRT are presented.

  6. Combining endoscopic ultrasound with Time-Of-Flight PET: The EndoTOFPET-US Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration develops a multimodal imaging technique for endoscopic exams of the pancreas or the prostate. It combines the benefits of high resolution metabolic imaging with Time-Of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) and anatomical imaging with ultrasound (US). EndoTOFPET-US consists of a PET head extension for a commercial US endoscope and a PET plate outside the body in coincidence with the head. The high level of miniaturization and integration creates challenges in fields such as scintillating crystals, ultra-fast photo-detection, highly integrated electronics, system integration and image reconstruction. Amongst the developments, fast scintillators as well as fast and compact digital SiPMs with single SPAD readout are used to obtain the best coincidence time resolution (CTR). Highly integrated ASICs and DAQ electronics contribute to the timing performances of EndoTOFPET. In view of the targeted resolution of around 1 mm in the reconstructed image, we present a prototype detector system with a CTR better than 240 ps FWHM. We discuss the challenges in simulating such a system and introduce reconstruction algorithms based on graphics processing units (GPU).

  7. Final Report for the SEED Project: ''Inexpensive Chemresistor Sensors for Real Time Ground Water Contamination Measurement''

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, ROBERT C.; DAVIS, CHAD E.; THOMAS, MICHAEL L.

    2002-04-01

    This report details some proof-of-principle experiments we conducted under a small, one year ($100K) grant from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) under the SERDP Exploratory Development (SEED) effort. Our chemiresistor technology had been developed over the last few years for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air, but these sensors had never been used to detect VOCs in water. In this project we tried several different configurations of the chemiresistors to find the best method for water detection. To test the effect of direct immersion of the (non-water soluble) chemiresistors in contaminated water, we constructed a fixture that allowed liquid water to pass over the chemiresistor polymer without touching the electrical leads used to measure the electrical resistance of the chemiresistor. In subsequent experiments we designed and fabricated probes that protected the chemiresistor and electronics behind GORE-TEX{reg_sign} membranes that allowed the vapor from the VOCs and the water to reach a submerged chemiresistor without allowing the liquids to touch the chemiresistor. We also designed a vapor flow-through system that allowed the headspace vapor from contaminated water to be forced past a dry chemiresistor array. All the methods demonstrated that VOCs in a high enough concentration in water can be detected by chemiresistors, but the last method of vapor phase exposure to a dry chemiresistor gave the fastest and most repeatable measurements of contamination. Answers to questions posed by SERDP reviewers subsequent to a presentation of this material are contained in the appendix.

  8. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms.

    PubMed

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A

    2016-01-28

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement--correlations in the properties of microscopic systems--to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million (87)Rb atoms in their 'clock' states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source. PMID:26751056

  9. The Utah Remote Monitoring Project: Improving Health Care One Patient at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Leslie; Petersen, Marta; Woolsey, Sarah; McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Coursey, Jeffrey M.; Whittaker, Thomas C.; Hyer, Christian; LaMarche, Deb; Carroll, Patricia; Chuy, Libbey

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The expanding role of technology to augment diabetes care and management highlights the need for clinicians to learn about these new tools. As these tools continue to evolve and enhance improved outcomes, it is imperative that clinicians consider the role of telemonitoring, or remote monitoring, in patient care. This article describes a successful telemonitoring project in Utah. Subjects and Methods: This was a nonrandomized prospective observational preintervention–postintervention study, using a convenience sample. Patients with uncontrolled diabetes and/or hypertension from four rural and two urban primary care clinics and one urban stroke center participated in a telemonitoring program. The primary clinical outcome measures were changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and blood pressure. Other outcomes included fasting lipids, weight, patient engagement, diabetes knowledge, hypertension knowledge, medication adherence, and patient perceptions of the usefulness of the telemonitoring program. Results: Mean A1C decreased from 9.73% at baseline to 7.81% at the end of the program (P<0.0001). Systolic blood pressure also declined significantly, from 130.7 mm Hg at baseline to 122.9 mm Hg at the end (P=0.0001). Low-density lipoprotein content decreased significantly, from 103.9 mg/dL at baseline to 93.7 mg/dL at the end (P=0.0263). Other clinical parameters improved nonsignificantly. Knowledge of diabetes and hypertension increased significantly (P<0.001 for both). Patient engagement and medication adherence also improved, but not significantly. Per questionnaires at study end, patients felt the telemonitoring program was useful. Conclusions: Telemonitoring improved clinical outcomes and may be a useful tool to help enhance disease management and care of patients with diabetes and/or hypertension. PMID:24991923

  10. Projection of controlled repeatable real-time moving targets to test and evaluate motion imagery quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Stephen D.; Mendez, Michael; Trent, Randall

    2015-05-01

    The projection of controlled moving targets is key to the quantitative testing of video capture and post processing for Motion Imagery. This presentation will discuss several implementations of target projectors with moving targets or apparent moving targets creating motion to be captured by the camera under test. The targets presented are broadband (UV-VIS-IR) and move in a predictable, repeatable and programmable way; several short videos will be included in the presentation. Among the technical approaches will be targets that move independently in the camera's field of view, as well targets that change size and shape. The development of a rotating IR and VIS 4 bar target projector with programmable rotational velocity and acceleration control for testing hyperspectral cameras is discussed. A related issue for motion imagery is evaluated by simulating a blinding flash which is an impulse of broadband photons in fewer than 2 milliseconds to assess the camera's reaction to a large, fast change in signal. A traditional approach of gimbal mounting the camera in combination with the moving target projector is discussed as an alternative to high priced flight simulators. Based on the use of the moving target projector several standard tests are proposed to provide a corresponding test to MTF (resolution), SNR and minimum detectable signal at velocity. Several unique metrics are suggested for Motion Imagery including Maximum Velocity Resolved (the measure of the greatest velocity that is accurately tracked by the camera system) and Missing Object Tolerance (measurement of tracking ability when target is obscured in the images). These metrics are applicable to UV-VIS-IR wavelengths and can be used to assist in camera and algorithm development as well as comparing various systems by presenting the exact scenes to the cameras in a repeatable way.

  11. Measurement noise 100 times lower than the quantum-projection limit using entangled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Onur; Engelsen, Nils J.; Krishnakumar, Rajiv; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum metrology uses quantum entanglement—correlations in the properties of microscopic systems—to improve the statistical precision of physical measurements. When measuring a signal, such as the phase shift of a light beam or an atomic state, a prominent limitation to achievable precision arises from the noise associated with the counting of uncorrelated probe particles. This noise, commonly referred to as shot noise or projection noise, gives rise to the standard quantum limit (SQL) to phase resolution. However, it can be mitigated down to the fundamental Heisenberg limit by entangling the probe particles. Despite considerable experimental progress in a variety of physical systems, a question that persists is whether these methods can achieve performance levels that compare favourably with optimized conventional (non-entangled) systems. Here we demonstrate an approach that achieves unprecedented levels of metrological improvement using half a million 87Rb atoms in their ‘clock’ states. The ensemble is 20.1 ± 0.3 decibels (100-fold) spin-squeezed via an optical-cavity-based measurement. We directly resolve small microwave-induced rotations 18.5 ± 0.3 decibels (70-fold) beyond the SQL. The single-shot phase resolution of 147 microradians achieved by the apparatus is better than that achieved by the best engineered cold atom sensors despite lower atom numbers. We infer entanglement of more than 680 ± 35 particles in the atomic ensemble. Applications include atomic clocks, inertial sensors, and fundamental physics experiments such as tests of general relativity or searches for electron electric dipole moment. To this end, we demonstrate an atomic clock measurement with a quantum enhancement of 10.5 ± 0.3 decibels (11-fold), limited by the phase noise of our microwave source.

  12. A time splitting projection scheme for compressible two-phase flows. Application to the interaction of bubbles with ultrasound waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Grégory; Tanguy, Sébastien; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Gilles, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    This paper is focused on the numerical simulation of the interaction of an ultrasound wave with a bubble. Our interest is to develop a fully compressible solver in the two phases and to account for surface tension effects. As the volume oscillation of the bubble occurs in a low Mach number regime, a specific care must be paid to the effectiveness of the numerical method which is chosen to solve the compressible Euler equations. Three different numerical solvers, an explicit HLLC (Harten-Lax-van Leer-Contact) solver [48], a preconditioning explicit HLLC solver [14] and the compressible projection method [21,53,55], are described and assessed with a one dimensional spherical benchmark. From this preliminary test, we can conclude that the compressible projection method outclasses the other two, whether the spatial accuracy or the time step stability are considered. Multidimensional numerical simulations are next performed. As a basic implementation of the surface tension leads to strong spurious currents and numerical instabilities, a specific velocity/pressure time splitting is proposed to overcome this issue. Numerical evidences of the efficiency of this new numerical scheme are provided, since both the accuracy and the stability of the overall algorithm are enhanced if this new time splitting is used. Finally, the numerical simulation of the interaction of a moving and deformable bubble with a plane wave is presented in order to bring out the ability of the new method in a more complex situation.

  13. Speckle reduction in holographic projection by random pixel separation with time multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yutaka; Fukuoka, Takahiko; Nomura, Takanori

    2014-12-10

    A speckle-reduction method with random locations of sparse object points is proposed for image quality improvement based on a time-multiplexing approach in holographic reconstruction. The object points of a reconstructed image are divided into groups of sparse object points. Pixel separation of the periodic location, in general, is used for the sparse object points. However, an unwanted periodic fringe pattern is caused, and it dominantly degrades the reconstructed image quality. The proposed random pixel separation enables the reconstructed image quality to improve more effectively. The numerical simulation and the optical experiment are presented to confirm the performance of the proposed method. PMID:25608058

  14. Commissioning the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber: Towards the 238U / 235U (n, f) Cross-section Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, R.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Heffner, M.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Laptev, A. B.; Loveland, W.; Massey, T. N.; Qu, H.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.

    2014-05-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration is developing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure neutron-induced fission cross sections with unprecedented accuracy. Modifying TPC technology for nuclear physics applications is a challenging endeavor, and frequent testing and evaluation is required to ensure that all components are behaving as expected. In-beam tests of the NIFFTE TPC at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LAN-SCE) commenced in 2010. An overview of the NIFFTE TPC experiments performed at LANSCE will be presented, along with preliminary performance results.

  15. Data acquisition electronics and reconstruction software for real time 3D track reconstruction within the MIMAC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrion, O.; Bosson, G.; Grignon, C.; Bouly, J. L.; Richer, J. P.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Billard, J.; Santos, D.

    2011-11-01

    Directional detection of non-baryonic Dark Matter requires 3D reconstruction of low energy nuclear recoils tracks. A gaseous micro-TPC matrix, filled with either 3He, CF4 or C4H10 has been developed within the MIMAC project. A dedicated acquisition electronics and a real time track reconstruction software have been developed to monitor a 512 channel prototype. This auto-triggered electronic uses embedded processing to reduce the data transfer to its useful part only, i.e. decoded coordinates of hit tracks and corresponding energy measurements. An acquisition software with on-line monitoring and 3D track reconstruction is also presented.

  16. The projection of world geothermal energy consumption from time series and regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanullang, Elwin Y.; Supriatna, Agus; Supriatna, Asep K.

    2015-12-01

    World population growth has many impacts on human live activities and other related aspects. One among the aspects is the increase of the use of energy to support human daily activities, covering industrial aspect, transportation, domestic activities, etc. It is plausible that the higher the population size in a country the higher the needs for energy to support all aspects of human activities in the country. Considering the depletion of petroleum and other fossil-based energy, recently there is a tendency to use geothermal as other source of energy. In this paper we will discuss the prediction of the world consumption of geothermal energy by two different methods, i.e. via the time series of the geothermal usage and via the time series of the geothermal usage combined with the prediction of the world total population. For the first case, we use the simple exponential smoothing method while for the second case we use the simple regression method. The result shows that taking into account the prediction of the world population size giving a better prediction to forecast a short term of the geothermal energy consumption.

  17. Summer-time climate impacts of projected megapolitan expansion in Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.; Moustaoui, M.; Mahalov, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts characterizing the changing climate of southwestern North America by focusing exclusively on the impacts of increasing levels of long-lived greenhouse gases omit fundamental elements with similar order-of-magnitude impacts as those owing to large-scale climate change. Using a suite of ensemble-based, multiyear simulations, here we show the intensification of observationally based urban-induced phenomena and demonstrate that the direct summer-time climate effects of the most rapidly expanding megapolitan region in the USA--Arizona's Sun Corridor--are considerable. Although urban-induced warming approaches 4°C locally for the maximum expansion scenario, impacts depend on the particular trajectory of development. Cool-roof implementation reduces simulated warming by about 50%, yet decreases in summer-time evapotranspiration remain at least as large as those from urban expansion without this mode of adaptation. The contribution of urban-induced warming relative to mid- and end-of-century climate change illustrates strong dependence on built environment expansion scenarios and emissions pathways. Our results highlight the direct climate impacts that result from newly emerging megapolitan regions and their significance for overcoming present challenges concerning sustainable development.

  18. Implementing performance improvement in New Zealand emergency departments: the six hour time target policy national research project protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In May 2009, the New Zealand government announced a new policy aimed at improving the quality of Emergency Department care and whole hospital performance. Governments have increasingly looked to time targets as a mechanism for improving hospital performance and from a whole system perspective, using the Emergency Department waiting time as a performance measure has the potential to see improvements in the wider health system. However, the imposition of targets may have significant adverse consequences. There is little empirical work examining how the performance of the wider hospital system is affected by such a target. This project aims to answer the following questions: How has the introduction of the target affected broader hospital performance over time, and what accounts for these changes? Which initiatives and strategies have been successful in moving hospitals towards the target without compromising the quality of other care processes and patient outcomes? Is there a difference in outcomes between different ethnic and age groups? Which initiatives and strategies have the greatest potential to be transferred across organisational contexts? Methods/design The study design is mixed methods; combining qualitative research into the behaviour and practices of specific case study hospitals with quantitative data on clinical outcomes and process measures of performance over the period 2006-2012. All research activity is guided by a Kaupapa Māori Research methodological approach. A dynamic systems model of acute patient flows was created to frame the study. Consequences of the target (positive and negative) will be explored by integrating analyses and insights gained from the quantitative and qualitative streams of the study. Discussion At the time of submission of this protocol, the project has been underway for 12 months. This time was necessary to finalise both the case study sites and the secondary outcomes through key stakeholder consultation. We

  19. Reducing Door‐to‐Puncture Times for Intra‐Arterial Stroke Therapy: A Pilot Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Brijesh P.; Leslie‐Mazwi, Thabele M.; Chandra, Ronil V.; Bell, Donnie L.; Sun, Chung‐Huan J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Rabinov, James D.; Rost, Natalia S.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Levine, Wilton C.; Gupta, Rishi; Yoo, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Delays to intra‐arterial therapy (IAT) lead to worse outcomes in stroke patients with proximal occlusions. Little is known regarding the magnitude of, and reasons for, these delays. In a pilot quality improvement (QI) project, we sought to examine and improve our door‐puncture times. Methods and Results For anterior‐circulation stroke patients who underwent IAT, we retrospectively calculated in‐hospital time delays associated with various phases from patient arrival to groin puncture. We formulated and then implemented a process change targeted to the phase with the greatest delay. We examined the impact on time to treatment by comparing the pre‐ and post‐QI cohorts. One hundred forty‐six patients (93 pre‐ vs. 51 post‐QI) were analyzed. In the pre‐QI cohort (ie, sequential process), the greatest delay occurred from imaging to the neurointerventional (NI) suite (“picture‐suite”: median, 62 minutes; interquartile range [IQR], 40 to 82). A QI measure was instituted so that the NI team and anesthesiologist were assembled and the suite set up in parallel with completion of imaging and decision making. The post‐QI (ie, parallel process) median picture‐to‐suite time was 29 minutes (IQR, 21 to 41; P<0.0001). There was a 36‐minute reduction in median door‐to‐puncture time (143 vs. 107 minutes; P<0.0001). Parallel workflow and presentation during work hours were independent predictors of shorter door‐puncture times. Conclusions In‐hospital delays are a major obstacle to timely IAT. A simple approach for achieving substantial time savings is to mobilize the NI and anesthesia teams during patient evaluation and treatment decision making. This parallel workflow resulted in a >30‐minute (25%) reduction in median door‐to‐puncture times. PMID:25389281

  20. Climate Central World Weather Attribution (WWA) project: Real-time extreme weather event attribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    Extreme weather detection and attribution analysis has emerged as a core theme in climate science over the last decade or so. By using a combination of observational data and climate models it is possible to identify the role of climate change in certain types of extreme weather events such as sea level rise and its contribution to storm surges, extreme heat events and droughts or heavy rainfall and flood events. These analyses are usually carried out after an extreme event has occurred when reanalysis and observational data become available. The Climate Central WWA project will exploit the increasing forecast skill of seasonal forecast prediction systems such as the UK MetOffice GloSea5 (Global seasonal forecasting system) ensemble forecasting method. This way, the current weather can be fed into climate models to simulate large ensembles of possible weather scenarios before an event has fully emerged yet. This effort runs along parallel and intersecting tracks of science and communications that involve research, message development and testing, staged socialization of attribution science with key audiences, and dissemination. The method we employ uses a very large ensemble of simulations of regional climate models to run two different analyses: one to represent the current climate as it was observed, and one to represent the same events in the world that might have been without human-induced climate change. For the weather "as observed" experiment, the atmospheric model uses observed sea surface temperature (SST) data from GloSea5 (currently) and present-day atmospheric gas concentrations to simulate weather events that are possible given the observed climate conditions. The weather in the "world that might have been" experiments is obtained by removing the anthropogenic forcing from the observed SSTs, thereby simulating a counterfactual world without human activity. The anthropogenic forcing is obtained by comparing the CMIP5 historical and natural simulations

  1. Quartic - a Precise Time-Of Counter for the Atlas Forward Physics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, James L.

    2010-04-01

    Precise ToF counters are employed by AFP to reduce pile-up background in the forward proton spectrometers. It is expected that at the highest LHC luminosity up to ~35 interactions occur at the same bunch crossing in ATLAS. A precision of the order of few mm (~10 ps) or better is required to adequately distinguish the vertex of interest - from which the unbroken scattered protons originate - from other pile-up vertices, with good efficiency. The development and testing of the QUARTIC precision ToF detector and its readout is described. This detector utilizes fused-silica radiators readout by Micro-Channel Plates Photomultipliers. The frontend readout electronics is based on the High Precision Time to Digital Converter (HPTDC).

  2. The TAOS Project: Statistical Analysis of Multi-Telescope Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M. J.; Coehlo, N. K.; Zhang, Z.-W.; Bianco, F. B.; Wang, J.-H.; Rice, J. A.; Protopapas, P.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Byun, Y.-I.; Chen, W. P.; Cook, K. H.; de Pater, I.; Kim, D.-W.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Marshall, S. L.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2010-08-01

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) monitors fields of up to ~1000 stars at 5 Hz simultaneously with four small telescopes to detect occultation events from small (~1 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). The survey presents a number of challenges, in particular the fact that the occultation events we are searching for are extremely rare and are typically manifested as slight flux drops for only one or two consecutive time series measurements. We have developed a statistical analysis technique to search the multi-telescope data set for simultaneous flux drops which provides a robust false-positive rejection and calculation of event significance. In this article, we describe in detail this statistical technique and its application to the TAOS data set.

  3. Status of FARTECH's Multi-Sensor Real-Time Resistive Wall Mode Identification Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, Y. B.; Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Leuer, J. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-11-01

    Early detection of resistive wall mode (RWM) identification (ID) is possible utilizing multiple sensors to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, and mode structure recognition with a pre-modeled numerical structure, assuming similar equilibria to be reproduced. Magnetic probes, and internal and external saddle loops are currently used. The predicted structures are modeled via FARVAC(D.H. Edgell, FARTECH, Inc. Report FT020523, May (2002).) and VACUUM using the GATO linear RWM mode. The RWM structures are then matched to the experimental data in real-time. For better algorithm and understanding of the modes, other sensors such as soft x-ray data are being incorporated in the program. In addition, an equilibrium and stability code is being developed for basic understanding of the RWM physics such as RWM rotation and dissipation. Systematic implementation and communication of our mode identification to the DIII-D PCS are being developed and tested.

  4. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1997-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of infrared (IR) sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurately testing systems under test (SUT). Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial off-the- shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM) researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is being used to provide inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band sensor testing and for direct signal injection into the sensor or processor electronics. Using this `baseline' IRSG, up to 120 frames per second (Hz) of 12-bit intensity images are being generated at 640 by 640 pixel resolution. The IRSG SUT-to- target viewpoint is dynamically updated in real time by a six-degree-of-freedom SUT simulation executing on a facility simulation computer, synchronized with an external signal from the SUT hardware, and compensates for system latency using a special purpose hardware component implemented on a single VME card. Multiple dynamic targets, terrain/backgrounds, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects in real time by the facility simulation computer via a shared memory interface to the IRSG. The `next generation' IRSG is currently under development at MICOM using `next generation' COTS hardware and software. `Next generation' performance specifications are estimated to yield 16-bit intensity, 250 - 300 Hz frame rate, at 1024 X 1024 pixel resolution.

  5. Making Quality Improvement Happen in the Real World: Building Capability and Improving Multiple Projects at the Same Time

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Malcolm; Puxty, Alex; Miles, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Improving work as part of clinical practice is challenging. Plans for improvement are often made, but not followed through. A recent experience of failure in an ICU led to a change in approach. Members of the multi-professional team committed to meet weekly to learn about quality improvement by working on improvement projects. The group selected four topics they wanted to work on. These were: a bundle for patients admitted with septic shock; early (≤4 hours) sedation vacation after admission to ICU to allow titration of sedation to effect; achieving ≥ 20 minutes of mobilisation per day in ventilated patients; and medicines reconciliation. This quality improvement meeting was built into another regular weekly meeting. Initially the meeting ran for 30 minutes; each week some focused quality improvement teaching was provided in addition to talking about each individual project. The team found the meeting useful, they saw the progress they were making but felt the allotted time was too short. After 6 weeks, the initial early results persuaded the team to increase the duration of this meeting to 45 minutes. At the start reliability of each process was low (between 10% and 38%). All four projects achieved their stated process reliability aim. This took between 165 and 334 days for each project. Many tests of change ideas were required to achieve this. We have been able to improve multiple topics in a short period and produce sustainable change. The weekly meeting provided the focus to this improvement work. The teaching and coaching on quality improvement methodology that occurred as part of this meeting helped accelerate our rate of progress. We believe this experience and the learning we have gained will help provide ideas for others who also want to improve healthcare delivery in different settings. PMID:27158493

  6. Making Quality Improvement Happen in the Real World: Building Capability and Improving Multiple Projects at the Same Time.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Malcolm; Puxty, Alex; Miles, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Improving work as part of clinical practice is challenging. Plans for improvement are often made, but not followed through. A recent experience of failure in an ICU led to a change in approach. Members of the multi-professional team committed to meet weekly to learn about quality improvement by working on improvement projects. The group selected four topics they wanted to work on. These were: a bundle for patients admitted with septic shock; early (≤4 hours) sedation vacation after admission to ICU to allow titration of sedation to effect; achieving ≥ 20 minutes of mobilisation per day in ventilated patients; and medicines reconciliation. This quality improvement meeting was built into another regular weekly meeting. Initially the meeting ran for 30 minutes; each week some focused quality improvement teaching was provided in addition to talking about each individual project. The team found the meeting useful, they saw the progress they were making but felt the allotted time was too short. After 6 weeks, the initial early results persuaded the team to increase the duration of this meeting to 45 minutes. At the start reliability of each process was low (between 10% and 38%). All four projects achieved their stated process reliability aim. This took between 165 and 334 days for each project. Many tests of change ideas were required to achieve this. We have been able to improve multiple topics in a short period and produce sustainable change. The weekly meeting provided the focus to this improvement work. The teaching and coaching on quality improvement methodology that occurred as part of this meeting helped accelerate our rate of progress. We believe this experience and the learning we have gained will help provide ideas for others who also want to improve healthcare delivery in different settings. PMID:27158493

  7. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  8. A decision-theoretic approach to the display of information for time-critical decisions: The Vista project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvitz, Eric; Ruokangas, Corinne; Srinivas, Sampath; Barry, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    We describe a collaborative research and development effort between the Palo Alto Laboratory of the Rockwell Science Center, Rockwell Space Operations Company, and the Propulsion Systems Section of NASA JSC to design computational tools that can manage the complexity of information displayed to human operators in high-stakes, time-critical decision contexts. We shall review an application from NASA Mission Control and describe how we integrated a probabilistic diagnostic model and a time-dependent utility model, with techniques for managing the complexity of computer displays. Then, we shall describe the behavior of VPROP, a system constructed to demonstrate promising display-management techniques. Finally, we shall describe our current research directions on the Vista 2 follow-on project.

  9. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Total variation based reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities in tissue from time-resolved optical projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Alexander B.; Vlasov, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    The important advantage of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is the possibility of tissue functional diagnosis. However the possibility implements if only we separately reconstruct the spatial distributions of optical parameters, specifically the absorption and scattering coefficients. We have recently demonstrated that time-domain DOT based on the perturbation model by Lyubimov is capable of reconstructing absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue with a DOT high spatial resolution (better than 3 mm at a depth of 4 cm). This paper continues our research and focuses on the reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities. We consider the flat layer transmission geometry which is traditional for optical mammography, and use diffusion approximation to derive analytical expressions for weight functions responsible for the reconstruction of scattering inhomogeneities. To confirm that our calculations are correct we perform a numerical experiment where we reconstruct a rectangular scattering object 10×8 cm in size with 4 circular scattering macroinhomogeneities 4 mm in diameter each, and a randomly inhomogeneous scattering structure. The inverse DOT problem is solved with a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique where interim iterations are processed through total variation norm minimization. The results suggest that our DOT method reliably resolves the scattering macroinhomogeneities of mentioned size against a randomly inhomogeneous structure.

  11. A comparative study on first-time and experienced project-based learning students in an engineering design module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, K. J.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to compare and evaluate the learning ability and performance differences between two groups of students undergoing project-based learning (PjBL), with one group having prior PjBL experience, while the other group is being freshly exposed to PjBL. More specifically, it examines if there are significant differences in knowledge score, problem-solving ability, and eventual project-deliverable outcomes between the two sets of students. Performances were compared via qualitative and quantitative analyses. Key findings have indicated a significant increase in fundamental formative knowledge; enhanced problem-solving abilities; and production of better performing artefacts with regard to the set of design skills between experienced and first-time PjBL groups. This study also highlighted that experienced PjBL students have less conflicts within their groups, and are more receptive to PjBL compared to first-time PjBL students. Results from this study provide a starting point for educators to seek new learning/facilitating strategies that are relevant based on the experience and learning styles of students.

  12. Deep-Time drilling in the Australian Archean: the Agouron Institute geobiological drilling project. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buick, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Agouron Institute has sponsored deep-time drilling across the South African Archean-Proterozoic boundary, investigating the rise of oxygen over an onshore-offshore environmental transect. It is now supporting a drilling program in the Australian Archean of the Pilbara Craton, addressing a similar theme but with the added goal of resolving controversy over the age and origin of hydrocarbon biomarker molecules in ancient kerogenous shales. As these have been claimed to provide evidence for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis long before the rise of atmospheric oxygen to persistently high levels during the ~2.3 Ga “Great Oxidation Event”, their syngenesis with their host shales is thus of critical importance for the interpretation of Earth’s early oxygenation history. During the first drilling season, 3 holes were drilled using techniques and equipment to minimize organic geochemical contamination (new drill-string components cleaned before drilling potentially biomarker-bearing rocks, pre-contamination of drilling fluid with a synthetic organic compound of similar geochemical characteristics to biomarkers, sterile cutting and storage of samples immediately upon retrieval from the core-barrel). The initial hole was a blank control for organic geochemistry, drilled into rocks too metamorphosed to retain biomarker molecules. These rocks, cherts, carbonates and pelites of the 3.52 Ga Coucal Formation, Coonterunah Group, have been metamorphosed to upper greenschist facies at temperatures near 500°C and so should have had any ancient soluble hydrocarbons destroyed. However, because they contain both carbonate and organic carbon, these rocks can instead provide isotopic information about the earliest evolution of biological metabolism as they possess residues of both the reactant and product sides of the carbon-fixation reaction. The second hole sampled an on-shore section of carbonates and kerogenous shales in the ~2.65 Ga Carawine Dolomite and Lewin Shale

  13. Standards-based publication and sharing of time series information in the DRIHM project: a EU-US collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Richard; Zaslavsky, Ilya; Parodi, Antonio; Gochis, David; Jha, Shantenu; Whitenack, Thomas; Valentine, David; Caumont, Olivier; Dekic, Ljiljana; Ivkovic, Marija; Molini, Luca; Bedrina, Tatiana; Gijsbers, Peter J. A.; de Rooij, Erik; Rebora, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    To enable a plug-and-play infrastructure, the European DRIHM (Distributed Research Infrastructure for Hydro-Meteorology) project aims to develop a comprehensive data publication and sharing system presenting uniform standards-based data discovery and access interfaces for hydrometeorological data collected by DRIHM partners in several European countries. This is a challenging task due to heterogeneity in types of data being collected and organized for modeling, and different semantic and structural conventions adopted by different data publishers. To meet this goal, the DRIHM project, and its DRIHM2US extension, collaborates with the recently funded US SCIHM (Standards-based Cyberinfrastructure for HydroMeteorology) project to develop a data sharing infrastructure for time series information. We report initial results of the application of the data integrating technologies developed by the NSF-funded CUAHSI HIS (Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Data, Inc., Hydrologic Information System) project, to information collected within DRIHM. The CUAHSI HIS system has been widely used in the US; it provides access to about a hundred water data collections that can be queried via uniform web services. The DRIHM partners initially implementing the system, include the CIMA Research Foundation (Italy), the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and the Republic Hydrometeorological Service of Serbia. The collected time series information was ingested into CUAHSI Observations Data Model databases, and water data services were created for each of the partners. At the time of writing, the water data services include SOAP and REST endpoints that provide access to the time series in WaterML 1 and WaterML 2.0 formats. The former encoding, developed by CUAHSI HIS, has been adopted by a number of federal agencies and research groups in the US, while the latter, created by an international group of experts under the aegis of the Hydrology

  14. Design and Operation of A Setup with A Camera and Adjustable Mirror to Inspect the Sense-Wire Planes of the Time Projection Chamber Inside the MicroBooNE Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Carls, Benjamin; Horton-Smith, Glenn; James, Catherine C.; Kubinski, Robert M.; Pordes, Stephen; Schukraft, Anne; Strauss, Thomas

    2015-08-26

    Detectors in particle physics, particularly when including cryogenic components, are often enclosed in vessels that do not provide any physical or visual access to the detectors themselves after installation. However, it can be desirable for experiments to visually investigate the inside of the vessel. The MicroBooNE cryostat hosts a TPC with sense-wire planes, which had to be inspected for damage such as breakage or sagging. This inspection was performed after the transportation of the vessel with the enclosed detector to its final location, but before filling with liquid argon. Our paper describes an approach to view the inside of the MicroBooNE cryostat with a setup of a camera and a mirror through one of its cryogenic service nozzles. The paper also describes the camera and mirror chosen for the operation, the illumination, and the mechanical structure of the setup. It explains how the system was operated and demonstrates its performance.

  15. From RISING to the DESPEC fast-timing project within NUSTAR at FAIR: sub-nanosecond nuclear timing spectroscopy with LaBr3 scintillators.

    PubMed

    Regan, P H

    2012-07-01

    This paper summarises a presentation given at the IRRMA8 conference in June 2011 which reviewed briefly the topic of current research studies in the evolution of nuclear structure with changing proton and neutron numbers. A short review of relevant contemporary spectroscopic studies of the structure of nuclei with highly exotic N/Z ratios using projectile fragmentation and fission reactions is given, together with an overview of some of the physics research aims to be attacked using the proposed Decay Spectroscopy (DESPEC) LaBr3 Fast-Timing gamma-ray array for the NUSTAR project at the upcoming Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR). Examples of recent results using both 'isomer' and β--delayed gamma-ray decay measurements with the Stopped RISING hyper-pure germanium array at GSI are summarised and used to highlight some of the fundamental physics studies which are expected to become available in this area of research in the coming decade. Examples of the performance of cerium-doped LaBr3 detectors from 'in-beam' test experiments are presented together with initial plans for the geometry of the planned multi-detector LaBr3(Ce) array for DESPEC. PMID:22285659

  16. Possibilities For The LAGUNA Projects At The Frejus Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mosca, Luigi

    2010-11-24

    The present laboratory (LSM) at the Frejus site and the project of a first extension of it, mainly aimed at the next generation of dark matter and double beta decay experiments, are briefly reviewed. Then the main characteristics of the LAGUNA cooperation and Design Study network are summarized. Seven underground sites in Europe are considered in LAGUNA and are under study as candidates for the installation of Megaton scale detectors using three different techniques: a liquid Argon TPC (GLACIER), a liquid scintillator detector (LENA) and a Water Cerenkov (MEMPHYS), all mainly aimed at investigation of proton decay and properties of neutrinos from SuperNovae and other astrophysical sources as well as from accelerators (Super-beams and/or Beta-beams from CERN). One of the seven sites is located at Frejus, near the present LSM laboratory, and the results of its feasibility study are presented and discussed. Then the physics potential of a MEMPHYS detector installed in this site are emphasized both for non-accelerator and for neutrino beam based configurations. The MEMPHYNO prototype with its R and D programme is presented. Finally a possible schedule is sketched.

  17. A Global R&D Program on Liquid Ar Time Projection Chambers Under Execution at the University of Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhrees, I.; Ereditato, A.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Messina, M.; Haug, S.; Rossi, B.; Rohr, C. Rudolf von; Weber, M.; Zeller, M.

    A comprehensive R&D program on LAr Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC) is presently being carried out at the University of Bern. Many aspects of this technology are under investigation: HV, purity, calibration, readout, etc. Furthermore, multi-photon interaction of UV-laser beams with LAr has successfully been measured. Possible applications of the LAr TPC technology in the field of homeland security are also being studied. In this paper, the main aspects of the program will be reviewed and the achievements underlined. Emphasis will be given to the largest device in Bern, i.e. the 5 m long ARGONTUBE TPC, meant to prove the feasibility of very long drifts in view of future large scale applications of the technique.

  18. Search for α-Cluster Structure in Exotic Nuclei with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, A.; Ayyad, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Carpenter, L.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Becchetti, F. D.; Howard, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Some exotic nuclei appear to exhibit α-cluster structure. While various theoretical models currently describe such clustering, more experimental data are needed to constrain model predictions. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) has low-energy thresholds for charged-particle decay and a high luminosity due to its thick gaseous active target volume, making it well-suited to search for low-energy α-cluster reactions. Radioactive-ion beams produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame were delivered to the PAT-TPC to study nuclei including 14C and 14O via α-resonant scattering. Differential cross sections and excitation functions were measured. Preliminary results from our recent experiments will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  19. Design Improvements and X-Ray Performance of a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter for Persistent Astronomical Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Emmett, Thomas J.; Enoto, Teruaki; Jahoda, Keith M.; Kaaret, Philip; Nolan, David S.; Tamagawa, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The design of the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) Polarimeter for the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) was demonstrated to Technology Readiness Level 6 (TRL-6)3 and the flight detectors fabricated, assembled and performance tested. A single flight detector was characterized at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source with polarized X-rays at 10 energies from 2.3-8.0 keV at five detector positions. The detector met all of the GEMS performance requirements. Lifetime measurements have shown that the existing flight design has 23 years of lifetime4, opening up the possibility of relaxing material requirements, in particular the consideration of the use of epoxy, to reduce risk elsewhere. We report on design improvements to the GEMS detector to enable a narrower transfer gap that, when operated with a lower transfer field, reduces asymmetries in the detector response. In addition, the new design reduces cost and risk by simplifying the assembly and reducing production time. Finally, we report on the performance of the narrow-gap detector in response to polarized and unpolarized X-rays.

  20. The allusive cognitive deficit in paranoia: the case for mental time travel or cognitive self-projection.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, R

    2010-08-01

    Delusional beliefs are characteristic of psychosis and, of the delusions, the paranoid delusion is the single most common type associated with psychosis. The many years of research focused on neurocognition in schizophrenia, using standardized neurocognitive tests, have failed to find conclusive cognitive deficits in relation to positive symptoms. However, UK-based psychological research has identified sociocognitive anomalies in relation to paranoid thinking in the form of theory of mind (ToM), causal reasoning and threat-related processing anomalies. Drawing from recent neuroscientific research on the default mode network, this paper asserts that the common theme running through the psychological tests that are sensitive to the cognitive impairment of paranoia is the need to cognitively project the self through time, referred to as mental time travel. Such an understanding of the cognitive roots of paranoid ideation provides a synthesis between psychological and biological accounts of psychosis while also retaining the powerful argument that understanding abnormal thinking must start with models of normal cognition. This is the core theme running through the cognitive psychological literature of psychiatric disorders that enables research from this area to inform psychological therapy. PMID:20594394

  1. Assessment of a demonstration project to supply near real-time sea ice information to end users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, C.; Howes, Sally; Whitelaw, Alan S.; Laxon, S.; Mantripp, D.

    1994-12-01

    Sea ice maps are required by a diverse range of users for scientific research and operational activities. Satellite remote sensing provides opportunities for monitoring and producing sea ice maps at a range of scales, in near real time. During March 1994 ESYS Limited and the University College London Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) operated a sea ice demonstration project to supply near real time sea ice maps in the southern ocean. The sea ice information was derived from a number of data sources: DMSP SSM/I data; ERS-1 SAR and Radar Altimeter fast delivery data; NOAA AVHRR data; and PoSAT-1 imagery. The maps were supplied to three users, two involved in yacht races in the southern ocean and a ship on an oceanographic research cruise in the waters of the Princess Elizabeth Trough region of Antarctica. The demonstration was successful, supplying the users with sea ice information which they had previously not received and combining data from various sources to produce sea ice maps. The demonstration also developed operational skills within ESYS and enabled the transfer of knowledge from MSSL to ESYS.

  2. 45 CFR 2102.10 - Timing, scope and content of submissions for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or disclose: (i) The nature, location, and justification of the project, including any relevant... depending upon the nature, size, and importance of the project to be reviewed by the Commission. Also, it is... for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or other structures. (a) A party proposing a...

  3. 45 CFR 2102.10 - Timing, scope and content of submissions for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or disclose: (i) The nature, location, and justification of the project, including any relevant... depending upon the nature, size, and importance of the project to be reviewed by the Commission. Also, it is... for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or other structures. (a) A party proposing a...

  4. 45 CFR 2102.10 - Timing, scope and content of submissions for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or disclose: (i) The nature, location, and justification of the project, including any relevant... depending upon the nature, size, and importance of the project to be reviewed by the Commission. Also, it is... for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or other structures. (a) A party proposing a...

  5. 45 CFR 2102.10 - Timing, scope and content of submissions for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or disclose: (i) The nature, location, and justification of the project, including any relevant... depending upon the nature, size, and importance of the project to be reviewed by the Commission. Also, it is... for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or other structures. (a) A party proposing a...

  6. DELIVERING TIMELY AIR QUALITY, TRAFFIC, AND WEATHER INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY/THE PASO DEL NORTE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a technology transfer handbook for the EMPACT Paso del Norte Project. The EMPACT Paso del Norte Environmental Monitoring Project is a mobile vehicle emissions project that involves the international community of El Paso, TX; Sundland Park, NM; and Juarez, Mexico...

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF TIME- AND HEALTH-RELEVANT MONITORING METHODS FOR PM 2.5 EPISODE PREDICTION (SALT LAKE CITY EMPACT PROJECT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scope: Primary project goals are: (a) evaluate usefulness of a newly-developed, real-time, continuous monitor for total (nonvolatile plus semivolatile) PM2.5 mass, and particularly time- and health-relevance of this method as compared to other measurements of PM paramete...

  8. A Proteomic Study of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project's Pilot Samples using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Vitzthum, Frank; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2005-08-01

    Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome is critical to the discovery of routinely useful clinical biomarkers. We used an Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag strategy with high-resolution mass accuracy capillary liquid chromatography Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (cLC-FTICR MS) to perform a global proteomic analysis of pilot study samples as part of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project. HUPO reference serum and citrated plasma samples from African Americans, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans were analyzed, in addition to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reference serum and plasma. The AMT tag strategy allowed us to leverage two previously published “shotgun” proteomics experiments to perform global analyses on these samples in triplicate in less than 4 days total analysis time. A total of 722 (22% with multiple peptide identifications) International Protein Index (IPI) redundant proteins, or 377 protein families by ProteinProphet, were identified over the 6 individual HUPO serum and plasma samples. The samples yielded a similar number of identified redundant proteins in the plasma samples (average 446 +/-23) as found in the serum samples (average 440+/-20). These proteins were identified by an average of 956+/-35 unique peptides in plasma and 930+/-11 unique peptides in serum. In addition to this high-throughput analysis, the AMT tag approach was used with a Z-score normalization to compare relative protein abundances. This analysis highlighted both known differences in serum and citrated plasma such as fibrinogens, and reproducible differences in peptide abundances from proteins such as soluble activin receptor-like kinase 7b and glycoprotein m6b. The AMT tag strategy not only improved our sample throughput, and provided a basis for estimated quantitation.

  9. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber used with TwinSol radioactive-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Becchetti, F. D.; Bradt, J.; Brodeur, M.; Carpenter, L.; Chajecki, Z.; Cortesi, M.; Fritsch, A.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; O'Malley, P.; Suzuki, D.

    2016-06-01

    The study of low-energy reactions with radioactive-ion beams has been greatly enhanced by the recent use of active-target detectors, which have high efficiency and low thresholds to detect low-energy charged-particle decays. Both of these features have been used in experiments with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber to study α -cluster structure in unstable nuclei and 3-body charged-particle decays after implantation. Predicted α -cluster structures in 14 C were probed using resonant α scattering and the nature of the 3- α breakup of the 02+ Hoyle state in 12 C after the beta decay of 12 N and 12 B was studied. These experiments used in-flight radioactive-ion beams that were produced using the dual superconducting solenoid magnets TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. Preliminary results from these experiments as well as the development of future radioactive beams to be used in conjunction with the PAT-TPC are presented.

  10. Fusion studies with low-intensity radioactive ion beams using an active-target time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Becchetti, F. D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Chajecki, Z.; Febbrarro, M.; Fritsch, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Roberts, A.; Shore, A.; Torres-Isea, R. O.

    2016-09-01

    The total fusion excitation function for 10Be+40Ar has been measured over the center-of-momentum (c.m.) energy range from 12 to 24 MeV using a time-projection chamber (TPC). The main purpose of this experiment, which was carried out in a single run of duration 90 h using a ≈100 particle per second (pps) 10Be beam, was to demonstrate the capability of an active-target TPC to determine fusion excitation functions for extremely weak radioactive ion beams. Cross sections as low as 12 mb were measured with acceptable (50%) statistical accuracy. It also proved to be possible to separate events in which charged particles were emitted from the fusion residue from those in which only neutrons were evaporated. The method permits simultaneous measurement of incomplete fusion, break-up, scattering, and transfer reactions, and therefore fully exploits the opportunities presented by the very exotic beams that will be available from the new generation of radioactive beam facilities.

  11. Reconstruction of ^16O(,)^12C Events in the HIγS Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stave, S.; Ahmed, M. W.; Clinton, E. R.; Howell, C. R.; Seo, P.-N.; Weller, H. R.; Gai, M.; Young, A. H.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2008-10-01

    A new optical readout time projection chamber (O-TPC) is in use at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) located at the Free Electron Laser Laboratory on the Duke University campus. One application of the HIγS O-TPC is the study of the inverse of the ^12C(,)^16O reaction which is important for stellar evolution theory. In the O-TPC, incoming γ-rays interact with an ^16O nucleus producing an α and a ^12C which then leave trails of ionization electrons along their path. The O-TPC then provides several signals each of which must be interpreted simultaneously to determine the different particle types, their energies and their directions. Part of the challenge of operating the O-TPC is integrating the fast signals from the photomultiplier tubes and drift chamber with the slow signals from the CCD camera which images the tracks. Automated routines have been developed to take all of the available track information and provide a reliable determination of the interaction cross section. Examples of the method and preliminary results will be presented.

  12. NIHAO project - I. Reproducing the inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time with a large sample of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2015-11-01

    We introduce project NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of a Hundred Astrophysical Objects), a set of 100 cosmological zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations performed using the GASOLINE code, with an improved implementation of the SPH algorithm. The haloes in our study range from dwarf (M200 ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙) to Milky Way (M200 ˜ 2 × 1012 M⊙) masses, and represent an unbiased sampling of merger histories, concentrations and spin parameters. The particle masses and force softenings are chosen to resolve the mass profile to below 1 per cent of the virial radius at all masses, ensuring that galaxy half-light radii are well resolved. Using the same treatment of star formation and stellar feedback for every object, the simulated galaxies reproduce the observed inefficiency of galaxy formation across cosmic time as expressed through the stellar mass versus halo mass relation, and the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation. We thus conclude that stellar feedback is the chief piece of physics required to limit the efficiency of star formation in galaxies less massive than the Milky Way.

  13. Data on Log Allocated Time for 11 Reading and 8 Math Schools. Comparative Study of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerenz, Anne G.; Webb, Norman L.

    This is one of a series of reports which provide definitions of and descriptive data on the variables used in the Comparative Study of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IEG) Evaluation Project. Phase IV investigated three curriculum programs specifically designed to be compatible with instructional programming for the individual…

  14. SU-E-J-167: Improvement of Time-Ordered Four Dimensional Cone-Beam CT; Image Mosaicing with Real and Virtual Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M; Kida, S; Masutani, Y; Shiraki, T; Yamamoto, K; Shiraishi, K; Nakagawa, K; Haga, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the previous study, we developed time-ordered fourdimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) technique to visualize nonperiodic organ motion, such as peristaltic motion of gastrointestinal organs and adjacent area, using half-scan reconstruction method. One important obstacle was that truncation of projection was caused by asymmetric location of flat-panel detector (FPD) in order to cover whole abdomen or pelvis in one rotation. In this study, we propose image mosaicing to extend projection data to make possible to reconstruct full field-of-view (FOV) image using half-scan reconstruction. Methods: The projections of prostate cancer patients were acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging system (XVI, version 4.5) on Synergy linear accelerator system (Elekta, UK). The XVI system has three options of FOV, S, M and L, and M FOV was chosen for pelvic CBCT acquisition, with a FPD panel 11.5 cm offset. The method to produce extended projections consists of three main steps: First, normal three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction which contains whole pelvis was implemented using real projections. Second, virtual projections were produced by reprojection process of the reconstructed 3D image. Third, real and virtual projections in each angle were combined into one extended mosaic projection. Then, 4D CBCT images were reconstructed using our inhouse reconstruction software based on Feldkamp, Davis and Kress algorithm. The angular range of each reconstruction phase in the 4D reconstruction was 180 degrees, and the range moved as time progressed. Results: Projection data were successfully extended without discontinuous boundary between real and virtual projections. Using mosaic projections, 4D CBCT image sets were reconstructed without artifacts caused by the truncation, and thus, whole pelvis was clearly visible. Conclusion: The present method provides extended projections which contain whole pelvis. The presented reconstruction method also enables time-ordered 4D CBCT

  15. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators, technologists, and…

  16. Highlights from the SoilCAM project: Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Toscano, G.

    2012-04-01

    The SoilCAM project (Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring 2008-2012, EU-FP7-212663) is aimed at improving current methods for monitoring contaminant distribution and biodegradation in the subsurface. At two test sites, Oslo airport Gardermoen in Norway and the Trecate site in Italy, a number of geophysical techniques, lysimeter and other soil and water sampling techniques as well as numerical flow and transport modelling have been combined at different scales in order to characterise flow transport processes in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Laboratory experiments have provided data on physical and bio-geo-chemical parameters for use in models and to select remediation methods. The geophysical techniques were used to map geological heterogeneities and also conduct time-lapse measurements of processes in the unsaturated zone. Both cross borehole and surface electrodes were used for electrical resistivity and induced polarisation surveys. The geophysical surveys showed clear indications of areas highly affected by de-icing chemicals along the runway at Oslo airport. The time lapse measurements along the runway at the airport show infiltration patterns during snowmelt and are used to validate 2D unsaturated flow and transport simulations using SUTRA. The Orchestra model is used to describe the complex interaction between bio-geo-chemical processes in a 1D profile along the runway. The presence of installations such as a membrane along the runway highly affects the flow pattern and challenges the capacity of the numerical code. Smaller scale field site measurements have revealed the increase of iron and manganese during degradation of de-icing chemicals. The use of Nitrate to increase red-ox potential was tested, but results have not been analysed yet. So far it cannot be concluded that degradation process can be quantified indirectly by geophysical monitoring. At the Trecate site a combination of georadar, electrical

  17. Project 1: Microbial Genomes: A Genomic Approach to Understanding the Evolution of Virulence. Project 2: From Genomes to Life: Drosophilia Development in Space and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Robert DeSalle

    2004-09-10

    This project seeks to use the genomes of two close relatives, A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus, to understand the evolutionary changes that take place in a genome to make it more or less virulent. Our primary specific aim of this project was to sequence, annotate, and analyze the genomes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (CU1000, serotype f) and Haemophilus aphrophilus. With these genome sequences we have then compared the whole genome sequences to each other and to the current Aa (HK1651 www.genome.ou.edu) genome project sequence along with other fully sequenced Pasteurellaceae to determine inter and intra species differences that may account for the differences and similarities in disease. We also propose to create and curate a comprehensive database where sequence information and analysis for the Pasteurellaceae (family that includes the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus) are readily accessible. And finally we have proposed to develop phylogenetic techniques that can be used to efficiently and accurately examine the evolution of genomes. Below we report on progress we have made on these major specific aims. Progress on the specific aims is reported below under two major headings--experimental approaches and bioinformatics and systematic biology approaches.

  18. Using project life-cycles as guide for timing the archival of scientific data and supporting documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, E.; Glassy, J. M.; Fowler, D. K.; Khayat, M.; Olding, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups (ESDSWG) focuses on improving technologies and processes related to science discovery and preservation. One particular group, the Data Preservation Practices, is defining a set of guidelines to aid data providers in planning both what to submit for archival, and when to submit artifacts, so that the archival process can begin early in the project's life cycle. This has the benefit of leveraging knowledge within the project before staff roll off to other work. In this poster we describe various project archival use cases and identify possible archival life cycles that map closely to the pace and flow of work. To understand "archival life cycles", i.e., distinct project phases that produce archival artifacts such as instrument capabilities, calibration reports, and science data products, the workig group initially mapped the archival requirements defined in the Preservation Content Specification to the typical NASA project life cycle. As described in the poster, this work resulted in a well-defined archival life cycle, but only for some types of projects; it did not fit well for condensed project life cycles experienced within airborne and balloon campaigns. To understand the archival process for projects with compressed cycles, the working group gathered use cases from various communities. This poster will describe selected uses cases that provided insight into the unique flow of these projects, as well as proposing archival life cycles that map artifacts to projects with compressed timelines. Finally, the poster will conclude with some early recommendations for data providers, which will be captured in a formal Guidelines document - to be published in 2015.

  19. Measurement of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio with the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, Rhiannon; Niffte Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear data play a fundamental role in energy and defense related applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate into calculated performance parameters. It is important therefore that nuclear data uncertainties are minimized and well-understood. To this end, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration is developing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. (n,f) cross-section measurements with the NIFFTE TPC take place at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR facility, a spallation neutron source which provides a neutron spectrum ranging from hundreds of keV to hundreds of MeV. During the 2012 LANSCE run cycle, data were collected on several actinide samples, including U-238 and U-235. These data, along with those collected during the 2013 LANSCE run cycle, will be used to deduce a U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio, to benchmark TPC performance, and to provide high-quality data to the community. A brief overview of the NIFFTE TPC and preliminary analysis of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) ratio data will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LA-UR-13-24779.

  20. AIDS among older children and adolescents in Southern Africa: projecting the time course and magnitude of the epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Ferrand, Rashida A; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Wood, Robin; Hargrove, John; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Cowan, Frances M; Gouws, Eleanor; Williams, Brian G

    2012-01-01

    Objective An AIDS epidemic among older children and adolescents is clinically apparent in Southern Africa. We estimated the likely scale and time course of the epidemic in older survivors of vertical HIV infection. Design We modelled demographic, HIV prevalence, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) and child survival data to project HIV burden among older children in two Southern African countries at different stages of severe HIV epidemics. Using measured survival data for children, we estimate that 64% of HIV-infected infants are fast-progressors with median survival=0.64 years and 36% are slow-progressors with median survival=16.0 years. We confirmed model validity by comparing model predictions to available epidemiological data. Findings Without treatment, HIV prevalence among 10-year olds in South Africa is expected to increase from 2.1% in 2008 to 3.3% in 2020 while in Zimbabwe, it will decrease from 3.2% in 2008 to 1.6% in 2020. Deaths among untreated slow-progressors will increase in South Africa from 7000/year in 2008 to 23,000/year in 2030, and in Zimbabwe from 8000/year in 2008 to peak at 9700/year in 2014. Drugs to prevent MTCT could reduce death rate in 2030 to 8700/year in South Africa and to 2800/year in Zimbabwe in 2014. Conclusions A substantial epidemic of HIV/AIDS in older survivors of MTCT is emerging in Southern Africa. The lack of direct observations of survival in slow-progressors has resulted in failure to anticipate the magnitude of the epidemic and to adequately address the clinical needs of HIV-infected older children and adolescents. Better HIV diagnostic and care services for this age-group are urgently required. PMID:19684508

  1. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime

  2. Idaho Completion Project’s Accelerated Retrieval Project Overview of the Pit 4 Non-Time Critical Removal Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. L. Clements; R. E. Arbon; B. D. Preussner

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Accelerated Retrieval Project performed by the Idaho Completion Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Topics include an overall description of the process and methods that will retrieve, characterize, and certify newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The retrieval and characterization of buried TRU waste presents unique challenges. Innovative approaches developed and discussed are: excavation, RCRA waste sampling, visual examination, and deployment of the WIPP Central Characterization Project mobile systems to the INL.

  3. Cryogenic THGEM-GPM for the readout of scintillation light from liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenqing; Fu, Yidong; Li, Yulan; Li, Jin; Li, Yuanjing; Yue, Qian

    2015-02-01

    A GPM (Gaseous Photo Multiplier) based on GEMs (Gas Electron Multipliers) and THGEMs (Thick Gas Electron Multipliers) is a promising detector for VUV (Vacuum Ultra Violet) photon readouts in rare event experiments which use cryogenic two-phase detectors with detection media of Ar and Xe. A GPM based on THGEM made of PTFE (herein named PTFE-THGEM) was developed inspired by the wide use of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethene) boards as low radioactive background PCB in rare event experiments. The efficiencies of the THGEM, a CsI photocathode, and finally a GPM are presented here. At low temperature (113 K) and 1.1 atm, the quantum efficiency of the GPM for VUV photons from liquid Ar in a two-phase detector is estimated to be 8.1% and the low threshold of the detector system for initial electrons prior to multiplication is 12 using 5 N purity Ar (0.99999).

  4. Low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon for a coherent neutrino-nucleus scatter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, Michael P.

    A mode of interaction predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, but not yet observed, is coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS). CNNS results from the neutrino (or antineutrino) scattering coherently with the entire nucleus rather than a single nucleon. The leading challenge in detecting CNNS is the resulting sub-keV nuclear recoil energies, producing little ionization in the detector medium. In order to detect the CNNS interaction, it is beneficial to first measure the nuclear ionization yield for the chosen detector medium. The ionization yield represents the expected number of electrons produced by a nuclear recoil, and it depends both on the recoil energy and on the detector medium in which the recoil occurs. Additionally, the ionization yield depends on the applied electron drift electric field, and for this reason it should be measured directly in the detector type anticipated for future CNNS measurements. This dissertation is focused on making the prediction and measurement of the ionization yield in LAr using a dual-phase Ar detector. Due to the complexity of measuring the ionization yield at various energies, it is beneficial to also construct a predictive model for the ionization yield. In this dissertation, the prediction of the ionization yield is made on the basis of a simulation of a two-stage process. The number of ionizations generated from Ar recoil of a given energy is simulated using a Monte Carlo atomic collision model, along with the cross sections for ionization and excitation in Ar + Ar collisions. After the electrons are generated, a fraction of them recombine with the initially generated ion cloud. The electron recombination fraction is simulated by assigning the emitted electrons either 1 or 10 eV of initial kinetic energy and transporting the electrons under the influence of Coulomb forces of the ion cloud and an applied external electric field. The simulation predicts the energy dependent ionization yield, with a value of ~ 4 e-- per keVr at 8 keVr. For gaseous Ar, the nuclear ionization quench factor is predicted to be ~ 0.13 at 10 keVr, which is the upper limit on this quantity obtained from the atomic collision model. In order to confidently apply the predictions of the ionization yield model, several experiments have been carried out for its validation. A single-phase Ar detector is used to both understand the processes occurring in the amplification region of a dual-phase Ar detector and to measure the nuclear ionization quench factor (ratio of the ionization signal produced in a nuclear recoil compared to that produced in an electron recoil of equal energy) in gaseous Ar. Using a portable neutron generator based on the 7Li(p,n)7 Be reaction, the nuclear ionization quench factor at 13 keVr was measured in gaseous Ar to be 0:138--0:012, which is in good agreement with the predictions of the ionization yield model. The absolute ionization yield was not measurable in gaseous Ar, because single ionization electron sensitivity has not been achieved in the single-phase Ar detector. The Gamma or Neutron Argon Recoils Resulting in Liquid Ionization (G/NARRLI) detector is a dual-phase Ar detector, which was developed to measure the ionization yield at energies below 10 keVr. While operating the G/NARRLI detector, high purity was achieved, extending the electron lifetime to ≈ 100 -- 200 micros. The ultimate sensitivity was achieved by detecting the single ionization electron peak. Detection of the single electron peak allowed absolutely calibrated spectroscopy to be performed using 55Fe to produce a 6 keV peak and 37Ar to produce a peak at 2.822 keV and a low-energy peak at 270 eV. Spectroscopic detection of the 270 eV peak represents the lowest energy measured to date in a dual-phase Ar detector. The electron yields for the 55Fe and 37Ar sources were used for the validation of the electron transport code, which was in good agreement with the modeling results. An effort was made to measure the ionization yield at energies below ~8 keVr, using neutrons generated from the 7Li(p,n) 7Be reaction in a similar manner as that performed with the gaseous Ar detector. Unfortunately, the Li target had degraded due to the diffusion of Ag into the Li, and the neutron production rates were ~ 10x lower than expected, which resulted in a low signal-to-background ratio for this measurement. Therefore, the ionization yield model was used alone to predict the detector response to elastic neutron scatters. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. Darkside-20k: A 20 ton Liquid Argon Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Henning; Darkside-20k Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Darkside-20k detector is the next step in the Darkside dark matter search program at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The Darkside detectors have grown in fiducial mass starting with 10kg in Darkside10, to 50 kg in Darkside50, and finally a proposed 20,000 kg fiducial mass, Darkside20k. The Darkside detectors are dual-phase argon TPCs that combine the very powerful scintillation pulse-shape analysis and ionization information to discriminate against background events. Two unique aspects to the Darkside program is the use of an external neutron veto based on borated liquid scintillator, and the use of low radioactivity argon from underground sources as the target. Argon from the atmosphere has an 39Ar activity of 1Bq/kg, which would be the limiting background, but the underground argon is essentially free of 39Ar. Additionally, the detector is placed in a water Cherenkov muon veto. Combining all these techniques allows Darkside-20k to achieve a background-free 100 t-yr exposure accumulated in a 5 yr run. Darkside-20k is expected to start operations in 2020 with data taking starting in 2021, and will be sensitive to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections of 1×10-47 cm2 (1x10-46 cm2) for WIMPs of 1 TeV/c2 (10 TeV/c2) mass.

  6. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  7. Radiation hardness tests of GaAs amplifiers operated in liquid argon in the ATLAS calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, J.; Brettel, H.; Cheplakov, A.; Cwienk, W.; Fent, J.; Golikov, V.; Golubyh, S.; Jakobs, K.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulagin, E.; Kurchaninov, L.; Ladygin, E.; Luschikov, V.; Oberlack, H.; Obudovsky, V.; Schacht, P.; Shalyugin, A.; Stiegler, U.; Zweimüller, T.

    2008-09-01

    Highly integrated Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) chips of preamplifiers and summing amplifiers have been exposed to high fluence of fast neutrons and γ-dose at the IBR-2 reactor in Dubna. A stable performance of the electronics has been demonstrated up to a fluence of 5×1014 n cm-2 and a γ-dose of 55 kGy. The radiation hardness tests confirm the applicability of the preamplifiers for more than 10 years operation in the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter at LHC.

  8. 45 CFR 2102.10 - Timing, scope and content of submissions for proposed projects involving land, buildings, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... submission when concept plans for the project are ready but before detailed plans and specifications or... right to postpone consideration until its next subsequent meeting. (b) (1) Each submission should...

  9. Malczyce, Poland: a multifaceted community action project in eastern Europe in a time of rapid economic change.

    PubMed

    Moskalewicz, J; Swiatktewicz, G

    2000-01-01

    The major focus of this paper is the sustainability of a one-year demonstration project on drug misuse prevention, which was implemented in a local community affected by acute economic crisis and high unemployment. The project was initiated by the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, and supported by the European Commission. The primary goal of the project was to demonstrate that community-based prevention is possible and feasible within the context of current transitions in Poland. Its major outcome was a community prevention package consisting of a number of booklets and videos to assist other communities in their prevention efforts. Experiences from this study suggest that factors contributing to the sustainability of a community prevention project can be identified and emphasized through simple analysis of community surveys, as well as focus group discussion. PMID:10677883

  10. A real-time, full-field, and low-cost velocity sensing approach for linear motion using fringe projection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei-Hung; Co, Wei-Ting

    2016-06-01

    A velocity sensing approach using the fringe projection technique is presented. The moving object is projected with a sinusoidal fringe pattern. A CCD camera located at a different view angle observes the projected fringes on the dynamic object. The long exposure time of the CCD camera makes the fringes blurred by linear motion. The blurred fringes provide additional information to describe the depth displacement, and therefore the velocity vector can be identified. There is no need to take multiple-shot measurements to address the change in 3D positions at a sequence of time. Only one-shot measurement is required. Consequently, there is no need to perform image registration. The full-field approach also makes it possible to simultaneously inspect several objects.

  11. 18 CFR 16.25 - Disposition of a project for which no timely application is filed following a notice of intent to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disposition of a project for which no timely application is filed following a notice of intent to file. 16.25 Section 16.25 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. 18 CFR 16.26 - Disposition of a project for which no timely application is filed following a notice of intent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disposition of a project for which no timely application is filed following a notice of intent not to file. 16.26 Section 16.26 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  13. TIME (Training in a Manila Envelope): A Child Care Plus+ Outreach Project To Expand Care and Education Options for Young Children with Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sandra L.

    This final report summarizes the activities of TIME (Training in a Manila Envelope), a federally funded project designed to replicate the Child Care plus+ model of inservice training by providing: (1) a course on inclusion directly for child care providers and other early childhood professionals in rural areas across the nation; and (2) training…

  14. PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING A REAL-TIME AIR POLLUTION MONITORING AND OUTREACH PROGRAM FOR YOUR COMMUNITY: THE AIRBEAT PROJECT OF ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a technology transfer handbook for the EMPACT Roxbury Air Monitoring (AirBeat) Project. The purpose of AirBeat is to make real-time air quality monitoring information (for ozone, black carbon, and fine particulates) available to the Boston MA community of Roxbur...

  15. "I Wish Kids Didn't Watch So Much TV": Out-of-School Time in Three Low Income Communities. School-Age Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth M.; And Others

    Research suggests that how children spend their out-of-school hours can significantly affect their social development and school success. The Out-of-School Time Study, conducted by the School-Age Child Care Project at the Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, investigated how young low-income children in three urban communities spent…

  16. Muon Charge Sign Determination in LArIAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubasis, Brandon; LArIAT Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    LArTPC In A Test beam experiment (LArIAT) at the Fermilab aims to calibrate and characterize liquid argon time projection chambers with a beam of charges particles. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) are ideal neutrino detectors which has full 3D-imaging and particle Identification (PID) capability. Processes for which the μ undergoes capture vs. decay in LArIAT TPC for sign-determination (without magnetic field) is one area of studies we are currently interested in. Systematic study of the processes following μ- capture in argon have never been performed and LArTPC sign-determination capability has never been explored. Statistical analysis on topological criteria can be used to determine the sign of a particle's charge (without magnetic field). LArIAT test beam with selectable polarity will provide data for direct measurement of the sign separation efficiency (and purity) for muons.

  17. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 2. 2. Measurement of fast-neutron dose rate as a function of time

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg; Markow; Balton, I.A.

    1985-09-01

    The dose rates of fast neutrons as a function of time were obtained. In view of the fact that the measurement of the neutron spectrum as a function of time was only an attempt and was instrumented very marginally, the objective of the experiment was achieved. However, because of the paucity of data points, the information was marginal and was obtained only because of multiple duplication at each station. The detectors worked well in all cases where they were not damaged by rough handling. The biggest drawback in the experiment was difficulty with electronic equipment, in particular with the amplifiers that had to be designed and built in the laboratory within a very limited time. The reliability of the recorded data was good, and it was concluded that effects other than radiation did not influence th sensor outputs.

  18. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  19. Balancing Act: How College Students Manage Technology While in the Library during Crunch Time. Project Information Literacy Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Alison J.; Eisenberg, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents findings from 560 interviews with undergraduates on 10 campuses distributed across the US, as part of Project Information Literacy (PIL). Overall, the findings suggest that students use a "less is more" approach to manage and control all of the IT devices and information systems available to them while they are in the library…

  20. DELIVERING TIMELY WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY: THE CHESAPEAKE BAY/NATIONAL AQUARIUM IN BALTIMORE EMPACT PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The TTSD in conjunction with a multi-agency Chesapeake Bay Project team, has developed this handbook to provide state and local governments and others "How-to" steps needed to design, employ, and maintain water quality monitoring, data management/delivery, and communications syst...

  1. The ArgoNeuT experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, J.; /Yale U.

    2010-01-01

    ArgoNeuT is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber neutrino experiment that recently completed its physics run in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. Along with research and design for future LArTPCs, the experiments goals include performing a number of neutrino and anti-neutrino cross section measurements. Also, ArgoNeuT hopes to further the understanding of the nuclear physics involved in neutrino scattering by characterizing the low energy protons created in such interactions.

  2. The Photomultiplier Tube Calibration System of the MicroBooNE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, J.; Jones, B. J.P.; Moss, Z.; Strauss, T.; Toups, M.

    2015-06-03

    We report on the design and construction of a LED-based fiber calibration system for large liquid argon time projection detectors. This system was developed to calibrate the optical systems of the MicroBooNE experiment. As well as detailing the materials and installation procedure, we provide technical drawings and specifications so that the system may be easily replicated in future LArTPC detectors.

  3. Reducing time delay in the thrombolysis of myocardial infarction: an internal quality improvement project. ARIAM Project Group. Analisis del Retraso en Infarto Agudo de Miocardio.

    PubMed

    Saturno, P J; Felices, F; Segura, J; Vera, A; Rodriguez, J J

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to improve thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction by reducing the "door-to-needle" time in a 285-bed university hospital in Spain. A quality management approach was used involving all the relevant staff. Target standard was set at 35 minutes. Baseline data, intervention effect, and continuous monitoring were analyzed using x control charts. Analysis of baseline data showed a wide out-of-control variation and 72 minutes' average delay. Cause analysis revealed organizational and clinical problems that were subjected to intervention. Postintervention data showed a stable process, with an average of 30 minutes. Continuous monitoring showed further improvement in average time and predictable variation. The template of the current control chart has an average of 26 minutes. Quality management methods, particularly staff involvement in problem analysis and intervention design, and the use of control charts were useful to understand, solve, and continuously monitor an important clinical problem whose existence was evident only after it was measured. PMID:10872258

  4. Design and Operation of A Setup with A Camera and Adjustable Mirror to Inspect the Sense-Wire Planes of the Time Projection Chamber Inside the MicroBooNE Cryostat

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carls, Benjamin; Horton-Smith, Glenn; James, Catherine C.; Kubinski, Robert M.; Pordes, Stephen; Schukraft, Anne; Strauss, Thomas

    2015-08-26

    Detectors in particle physics, particularly when including cryogenic components, are often enclosed in vessels that do not provide any physical or visual access to the detectors themselves after installation. However, it can be desirable for experiments to visually investigate the inside of the vessel. The MicroBooNE cryostat hosts a TPC with sense-wire planes, which had to be inspected for damage such as breakage or sagging. This inspection was performed after the transportation of the vessel with the enclosed detector to its final location, but before filling with liquid argon. Our paper describes an approach to view the inside of themore » MicroBooNE cryostat with a setup of a camera and a mirror through one of its cryogenic service nozzles. The paper also describes the camera and mirror chosen for the operation, the illumination, and the mechanical structure of the setup. It explains how the system was operated and demonstrates its performance.« less

  5. Application of power time-projection on the operator-splitting coupling scheme of the TRACE/S3K coupled code

    SciTech Connect

    Wicaksono, D.; Zerkak, O.; Nikitin, K.; Ferroukhi, H.; Chawla, R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports refinement studies on the temporal coupling scheme and time-stepping management of TRACE/S3K, a dynamically coupled code version of the thermal-hydraulics system code TRACE and the 3D core simulator Simulate-3K. The studies were carried out for two test cases, namely a PWR rod ejection accident and the Peach Bottom 2 Turbine Trip Test 2. The solution of the coupled calculation, especially the power peak, proves to be very sensitive to the time-step size with the currently employed conventional operator-splitting. Furthermore, a very small time-step size is necessary to achieve decent accuracy. This degrades the trade-off between accuracy and performance. A simple and computationally cheap implementation of time-projection of power has been shown to be able to improve the convergence of the coupled calculation. This scheme is able to achieve a prescribed accuracy with a larger time-step size. (authors)

  6. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Reduce Sedentary Time in Young Adults at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Edwardson, Charlotte L.; Wilmot, Emma G.; Yates, Thomas; Gorely, Trish; Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Ashra, Nuzhat; Khunti, Kamlesh; Nimmo, Myra A.; Davies, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a serious and prevalent chronic disease, is traditionally associated with older age. However, due to the rising rates of obesity and sedentary lifestyles, it is increasingly being diagnosed in the younger population. Sedentary (sitting) behaviour has been shown to be associated with greater risk of cardio-metabolic health outcomes, including T2DM. Little is known about effective interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at risk of T2DM. We aimed to investigate, through a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design, whether a group-based structured education workshop focused on sitting reduction, with self-monitoring, reduced sitting time. Methods Adults aged 18–40 years who were either overweight (with an additional risk factor for T2DM) or obese were recruited for the Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes (STAND) RCT. The intervention programme comprised of a 3-hour group-based structured education workshop, use of a self-monitoring tool, and follow-up motivational phone call. Data were collected at three time points: baseline, 3 and 12 months after baseline. The primary outcome measure was accelerometer-assessed sedentary behaviour after 12 months. Secondary outcomes included other objective (activPAL) and self-reported measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity, and biochemical, anthropometric, and psycho-social variables. Results 187 individuals (69% female; mean age 33 years; mean BMI 35 kg/m2) were randomised to intervention and control groups. 12 month data, when analysed using intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) and per-protocol analyses, showed no significant difference in the primary outcome variable, nor in the majority of the secondary outcome measures. Conclusions A structured education intervention designed to reduce sitting in young adults at risk of T2DM was not successful in changing behaviour at 12 months. Lack of change may be due to the brief nature of such an intervention and lack of focus

  7. Oral biopharmaceutics tools - time for a new initiative - an introduction to the IMI project OrBiTo.

    PubMed

    Lennernäs, H; Aarons, L; Augustijns, P; Beato, S; Bolger, M; Box, K; Brewster, M; Butler, J; Dressman, J; Holm, R; Julia Frank, K; Kendall, R; Langguth, P; Sydor, J; Lindahl, A; McAllister, M; Muenster, U; Müllertz, A; Ojala, K; Pepin, X; Reppas, C; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Verwei, M; Weitschies, W; Wilson, C; Karlsson, C; Abrahamsson, B

    2014-06-16

    OrBiTo is a new European project within the IMI programme in the area of oral biopharmaceutics tools that includes world leading scientists from nine European universities, one regulatory agency, one non-profit research organization, four SMEs together with scientists from twelve pharmaceutical companies. The OrBiTo project will address key gaps in our knowledge of gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption and deliver a framework for rational application of predictive biopharmaceutics tools for oral drug delivery. This will be achieved through novel prospective investigations to define new methodologies as well as refinement of existing tools. Extensive validation of novel and existing biopharmaceutics tools will be performed using active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), formulations and supporting datasets from industry partners. A combination of high quality in vitro or in silico characterizations of API and formulations will be integrated into physiologically based in silico biopharmaceutics models capturing the full complexity of GI drug absorption. This approach gives an unparalleled opportunity to initiate a transformational change in industrial research and development to achieve model-based pharmaceutical product development in accordance with the Quality by Design concept. Benefits include an accelerated and more efficient drug candidate selection, formulation development process, particularly for challenging projects such as low solubility molecules (BCS II and IV), enhanced and modified-release formulations, as well as allowing optimization of clinical product performance for patient benefit. In addition, the tools emerging from OrBiTo are expected to significantly reduce demand for animal experiments in the future as well as reducing the number of human bioequivalence studies required to bridge formulations after manufacturing or composition changes. PMID:24189462

  8. Photon detection system designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  9. Photon Detection System Designs for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver

    2015-11-19

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the DUNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. To maximize the active area while maintaining a small photocathode coverage, the experiment will utilize a design based on plastic light guides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, along with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. This report presents recent preliminary performance measurements of this baseline design and several alternative designs which promise significant improvements in sensitivity to low-energy interactions.

  10. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry of DNA laser-ablated from frozen aqueous solutions: applications to the Human Genome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter W.; Schieltz, David; Nelson, Randall W.; Chou, Chau-Wen; Luo, Cong-Wen; Thomas, Robert

    1993-06-01

    Techniques have been developed to volatilize intact massive DNA molecules using pulsed laser ablation of thin frozen films of aqueous DNA solutions. Electrophoresis assay of the ablated DNA shows that molecules as massive as approximately 400,000 Da can be ablated intact. It has been possible to obtain time-of-flight mass spectra of ablated multicomponent mixtures of single-stranded DNA with masses up to approximately 18,000 Da (a 60-nucleotide DNA oligomer). The possible application of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to the analysis and readout of DNA sequence mixtures, and the potential thereby to accelerate the Human Genome project, are discussed.

  11. Where the Sun Breezes Don't Stop Shining. Teachers' Journals and Students' Writings on First-Time Homebuying from the New American Homeowners Project, February-June 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Catherine, Ed.

    The writings of both teachers and students participating in the New Americans Homeowners Project, a project combining English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction and information on first-time home-buying for immigrants in language minority groups are presented. The project provided training and technical assistance to ESL teachers, and reached…

  12. 'Shooting at the sun god Apollo': the Apollonian-Dionysian balance of the TimeSlips Storytelling Project.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    In The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche celebrated the dueling forces of reason and emotion as personified by the ancient Greek gods Apollo and Dionysus. A subtle Apollonian-Dionysian balance can be observed in TimeSlips, a group-based creative storytelling activity developed in the 1990s and increasingly used in dementia care settings worldwide. This article explains how the Apollonion-Dionysian aspects of TimeSlips are beneficial not only for persons with dementia, but also for their carers. Narrative data from medical students at Penn State College of Medicine who participated in TimeSlips at a local retirement community are shared. PMID:23722245

  13. Strategies TO reduce time delays in patients with AcuTe coronary heart disease treated with primary PCI—the STOP WATCH study: a multistage action research project

    PubMed Central

    Tödt, Tim; Thylén, Ingela; Alfredsson, Joakim; Swahn, Eva; Janzon, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and reduce system delay times in an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) network by targeted reorganisation of logistics and personal feedback to staff on time delays. Design Multistage action research project. Three study phases were used (exploration, tailored intervention and evaluation). Setting Single centre study, Sweden. Patients Consecutive patients (N=156) with prehospital STEMI onset treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Interventions Areas of delays were identified through participant observations and collaborative discussions. To increase the awareness of delay factors, continuous feedback on time delays was given. Elements of the logistics’ reorganisation were (1) prioritised ECG recording by emergency medical services personnel, (2) central evaluation of ECG in all patients and (3) start of PCI procedure when two of three PCI team members were on site. Multiple key time measurements were made before (N=67) and after (N=89) the intervention. Main outcomes Time difference (minutes) in system delay between the preintervention and postintervention phases. Results Time from first medical contact (FMC) to a patent artery and time from FMC-to-catheter laboratory (cath-lab) arrival decreased by 6 and 12 min, respectively (ns). Time from FMC-to-ECG recording remained unchanged after the intervention. Time from ECG to decision for primary PCI was reduced by 6 min, p=0.004 and time from ECG-to-cath-lab arrival by 11 min, p=0.02. Total time from diagnosis to a patent artery decreased by 11 min (ns). Conclusions Identification of time delays in an STEMI network with awareness of delay factors, reorganisation of logistics and continuous feedback can reduce system delay times significantly. PMID:24002986

  14. Night-time measurements of HOx during the RONOCO project and analysis of the sources of HO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. M.; Stone, D.; Ingham, T.; Vaughan, S.; Cain, M.; Jones, R. L.; Kennedy, O. J.; McLeod, M.; Ouyang, B.; Pyle, J.; Bauguitte, S.; Bandy, B.; Forster, G.; Evans, M. J.; Hamilton, J. F.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Lidster, R. T.; Punjabi, S.; Morgan, W. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the radical species OH and HO2 were made using the fluorescence assay by gas expansion (FAGE) technique during a series of night-time and daytime flights over the UK in summer 2010 and winter 2011. OH was not detected above the instrument's 1σ limit of detection during any of the night-time flights or during the winter daytime flights, placing upper limits on [OH] of 1.8 × 106 molecule cm-3 and 6.4 × 105 molecule cm-3 for the summer and winter flights, respectively. HO2 reached a maximum concentration of 3.2 × 108 molecule cm-3 (13.6 pptv) during a night-time flight on 20 July 2010, when the highest concentrations of NO3 and O3 were also recorded. An analysis of the rates of reaction of OH, O3, and the NO3 radical with measured alkenes indicates that the summer night-time troposphere can be as important for the processing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as the winter daytime troposphere. An analysis of the instantaneous rate of production of HO2 from the reactions of O3 and NO3 with alkenes has shown that, on average, reactions of NO3 dominated the night-time production of HO2 during summer and reactions of O3 dominated the night-time HO2 production during winter.

  15. Real-time 3D shape measurement with digital stripe projection by Texas Instruments Micro Mirror Devices DMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Gottfried; Chen, Mai; Huth, Torsten

    2000-03-01

    The fast, contact-free and highly precise shape measurement of technical objects is of key importance in the scientific- technological area as well as the area of practical measurement technology. The application areas of contact- free surface measurement extend across widely different areas, e.g., the automation of production processes, the measurement and inspection of components in microsystem technology or the fast 3D in-vivo measurement of human skin surfaces in cosmetics and medical technology. This paper describes methodological and technological possibilities as well as measurement technology applications for fast optical 3D shape measurements using micromirror-based high-velocity stripe projection. Depending on the available projector and camera facilities, it will be possible to shoot and evaluate compete 3D surface profiles within only a few milliseconds.

  16. A retrospective study evaluating response time and survival from a cardiopulmonary arrest: a creative inquiry project with undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, John J; Seawright, Jenna; Wadsworth, Rachel; Flehan, Allison; Duncan, Emily; Easler, Anna Grace; Echols, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is a major health problem that claims lives daily in the United States. The adoption of a new standard of care or healthcare technology needs to be evaluated based on patient outcomes. This review focuses on this problem and possible solutions. This retrospective study reviews clinical characteristics of cardiac resuscitative events associated with "code blue" team response. Team-based investigations are led by a faculty mentor and typically span 2 to 4 semesters. Students take ownership of their projects and take the risks necessary to solve problems and get answers. This review indicates areas of concern that need to be improved to create better patient outcomes. Findings include that improved documentation will provide data elements for review analysis that then may be utilized to improve care related to cardiac arrest. PMID:23222232

  17. Automatic slice positioning (ASP) for passive real-time tracking of interventional devices using projection-reconstruction imaging with echo-dephasing (PRIDE).

    PubMed

    Patil, S; Bieri, O; Jhooti, P; Scheffler, K

    2009-10-01

    A novel and fast approach for passive real-time tracking of interventional devices using paramagnetic markers, termed "projection-reconstruction imaging with echo-dephasing" (PRIDE) is presented. PRIDE is based on the acquisition of echo-dephased projections along all three physical axes. Dephasing is preferably set to 4pi within each projection ensuring that background tissues do not contribute to signal formation and thus appear heavily suppressed. However, within the close vicinity of the paramagnetic marker, local gradient fields compensate for the intrinsic dephasing to form an echo. Successful localization of the paramagnetic marker with PRIDE is demonstrated in vitro and in vivo in the presence of different types of off-resonance (air/tissue interfaces, main magnetic field inhomogeneities, etc). In order to utilize the PRIDE sequence for vascular interventional applications, it was interleaved with balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) to provide positional updates to the imaged slice using a dedicated real-time feedback link. Active slice positioning (ASP) with PRIDE is demonstrated in vitro, requiring approximately 20 ms for the positional update to the imaging sequence, comparable to existing active tracking methods. PMID:19585605

  18. Time trends of Italian former smokers 1980-2009 and 2010-2030 projections using a Bayesian age period cohort model.

    PubMed

    Carreras, Giulia; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe past time trends of the prevalence of former smokers in Italy and to estimate prevalence projections using a Bayesian approach. An age-period-cohort (APC) analysis has been carried out in order to investigate the effect of the age, period and birth cohort on the prevalence of former smokers during 1980-2009. A Bayesian APC model with an autoregressive structure for the age, period and cohort parameters has been used to estimate future trends. Results showed that awareness of harm from smoking occurred at younger ages with each advancing cohort, and that women were more likely to attempt to stop smoking during pregnancies and breastfeeding, whereas men attempted to quit only when smoking-related diseases became evident. Projections of future trend recorded a further increase in the number of former smokers in future decades, showing an estimate of the "end of smoking" around years 2060 and 2055 in men and women, respectively. The application of the APC analysis to study the prevalence of former smokers turned out to be a useful method for the evaluation of past smoking trends, reflecting the effects of tobacco control policies on time and generations, and to make projections of future trend. PMID:24452251

  19. Time-lapse 3D VSP monitoring of a carbon dioxide injection project at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, Muhammad Husni Mubarak

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. The estimated original oil in place (OOIP) is 357 mmbo and approximately 54% of OOIP has been produced through the primary production and water-flooding. A CO2-EOR program has been implemented since November 2009 to recover an additional 17% of OOIP. Reservoir surveillance using time-lapse 3D seismic data has been conducted to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency. The goal of this study is to monitor the CO2 flow-path in the area around the injector using time-lapse 3D VSP data. For this purpose, two 3D VSPs acquired in June 2010 and again in August 2011 were processed together. Fluid substitution and VSP modeling were performed to understand the influence of pore-fluid saturation change on VSP records. A cross-equalization was performed to improve the similarity of the datasets. This step is important to reduce the ambiguity in time-lapse observation. The splice of a 3D VSP image into the surface seismic data becomes the key point in determining the reflector of the reservoir. By integrating the observation from the modeling and the splice of 3D VSP image to surface seismic, the CO2 flow-path from injector 164-3 can be identified from 3D time-lapse VSP data. The CO2 was not radially distributed around the injector, but moved toward southwest direction. This finding is also consistent with the flow-path interpreted from surface seismic. This consistency implies that time-lapse 3D VSP surveys at Delhi Field confirm and augment the time-lapse interpretation from surface seismic data.

  20. High dynamic range adaptive real-time smart camera: an overview of the HDR-ARTiST project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Ginhac, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Standard cameras capture only a fraction of the information that is visible to the human visual system. This is specifically true for natural scenes including areas of low and high illumination due to transitions between sunlit and shaded areas. When capturing such a scene, many cameras are unable to store the full Dynamic Range (DR) resulting in low quality video where details are concealed in shadows or washed out by sunlight. The imaging technique that can overcome this problem is called HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging. This paper describes a complete smart camera built around a standard off-the-shelf LDR (Low Dynamic Range) sensor and a Virtex-6 FPGA board. This smart camera called HDR-ARtiSt (High Dynamic Range Adaptive Real-time Smart camera) is able to produce a real-time HDR live video color stream by recording and combining multiple acquisitions of the same scene while varying the exposure time. This technique appears as one of the most appropriate and cheapest solution to enhance the dynamic range of real-life environments. HDR-ARtiSt embeds real-time multiple captures, HDR processing, data display and transfer of a HDR color video for a full sensor resolution (1280 1024 pixels) at 60 frames per second. The main contributions of this work are: (1) Multiple Exposure Control (MEC) dedicated to the smart image capture with alternating three exposure times that are dynamically evaluated from frame to frame, (2) Multi-streaming Memory Management Unit (MMMU) dedicated to the memory read/write operations of the three parallel video streams, corresponding to the different exposure times, (3) HRD creating by combining the video streams using a specific hardware version of the Devebecs technique, and (4) Global Tone Mapping (GTM) of the HDR scene for display on a standard LCD monitor.

  1. A new Time-of-Flight mass measurement project for exotic nuclei and ultra-high precision detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bao-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Yan, Wen-Qi; Le, X. Y.; Lin, Wen-Jian; Song, C. Y.; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, S.; Wang, T. F.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhu, L. H.

    2016-02-01

    The time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer equipped with a fast particle tracking system, is well recognized by its ability in weighing the most exotic nuclei. Currently such TOF-MS can achieve a mass resolution power of about 2×10-4. We show that the mass resolution can be further improved by one order of magnitude with augmented timing and position detectors. We report the progress in developing ultra-fast detectors to be used in TOF-MS.

  2. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  3. Calibrating the MicroBooNE Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) Array with Michel Electrons from Cosmic Ray Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Amy

    2013-04-01

    MicroBooNE is a neutrino experiment at Fermilab designed to investigate the 3σ low-energy electron candidate events measured by the MiniBooNE experiment. Neutrinos from the Booster Neutrino Beam are detected by a 89-ton liquid argon time projection chamber, which is expected to start taking data in 2014. MicroBooNE measures both the ionization electrons and scintillation light produced by neutrino interactions in the liquid argon. The scintillation light is collected by an array of 30 PMTs located at one side of the detector. This array can be calibrated using Michel electrons from stopping cosmic ray muons, by fitting the measured PMT response with the theoretical expectation. I will report on the progress of the PMT calibration software that has been developed using the MicroBooNE Monte Carlo.

  4. In Vivo Time-Lapse Imaging in the Zebrafish Lateral Line: A Flexible, Open-Ended Research Project for an Undergraduate Neurobiology Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Molly H.; Tobias, Zachary J.C.; Cohen, Hannah R.; Glover, Greta; Weissman, Tamily A.

    2015-01-01

    The lateral line sensory system in fish detects movements in the water and allows fish to respond to predators, prey, and other stimuli. As the lateral line forms in the first two days of zebrafish development, axons extend caudally along the lateral surface of the fish, eventually forming synapses with hair cells of neuromasts. Growing lateral line axons are located superficially under the skin and can be labeled in living zebrafish using fluorescent protein expression. This system provides a relatively straightforward approach for in vivo time-lapse imaging of neuronal development in an undergraduate setting. Here we describe an upper-level neurobiology laboratory module in which students investigate aspects of axonal development in the zebrafish lateral line system. Students learn to handle and image living fish, collect time-lapse videos of moving mitochondria, and quantitatively measure mitochondrial dynamics by generating and analyzing kymographs of their movements. Energy demands may differ between axons with extending growth cones versus axons that have already reached their targets and are forming synapses. Since relatively little is known about this process in developing lateral line axons, students generate and test their own hypotheses regarding how mitochondrial dynamics may differ at two different time points in axonal development. Students also learn to incorporate into their analysis a powerful yet accessible quantitative tool, the kymograph, which is used to graph movement over time. After students measure and quantify dynamics in living fish at 1 and 2 days post fertilization, this module extends into independent projects, in which students can expand their studies in a number of different, inquiry-driven directions. The project can also be pared down for courses that wish to focus solely on the quantitative analysis (without fish handling), or vice versa. This research module provides a useful approach for the design of open-ended laboratory

  5. The Use of PIT Tagging to Estimate Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration Time Through the Priest Rapids Project Area on the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R; McMichael, Geoffrey A. )

    2000-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating how the Priest Rapids Project (PRP, located north of the Hanford reach on the Columbia River) affects populations of wild, fall Chinook salmon that are produced. One part of this project involves using mark-recapture technique to monitor fall juvenile Chinook movement in the area. A passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag technology was used to document migration timing out of the influence of the PRP, and track fish through downstream dams as they make their way to the ocean. On June 6 and 7, 2000, we tagged 1083 fall Chinook sub-yearlings above and below Wanapum Dam, subsequently detecting them as they began to pass through downstream dams. As of 9 August 2000, 122 fish had been detected in one or more of the dams downstream of the PRP. A mean migration time for tagged the fish of 5.5 km/day below the McNary dam and 4.5 km/day above the McNary Dam. The mean migration rate between McNary Dam and John Day Dam was 21.4 km/day. Back calculation, indicated the mean date of departure for juveniles tagged in the pool above Wanapum Dam was July 16, 2000, while juveniles tagged below Wanapum Dam was July 1, 2000. Because fish are still being detected at the dams only preliminary conclusions can be attempted. Since the peak of migration time for these fish seems to have passed, the time when these fish most likely left the PRP area can also be estimated. Data analysis will continue analysis, and hopefully some of the adult returns will be measured as they come through the dams throughout the duration of the project.

  6. In Vivo Time-Lapse Imaging in the Zebrafish Lateral Line: A Flexible, Open-Ended Research Project for an Undergraduate Neurobiology Laboratory Course.

    PubMed

    Marra, Molly H; Tobias, Zachary J C; Cohen, Hannah R; Glover, Greta; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-01-01

    The lateral line sensory system in fish detects movements in the water and allows fish to respond to predators, prey, and other stimuli. As the lateral line forms in the first two days of zebrafish development, axons extend caudally along the lateral surface of the fish, eventually forming synapses with hair cells of neuromasts. Growing lateral line axons are located superficially under the skin and can be labeled in living zebrafish using fluorescent protein expression. This system provides a relatively straightforward approach for in vivo time-lapse imaging of neuronal development in an undergraduate setting. Here we describe an upper-level neurobiology laboratory module in which students investigate aspects of axonal development in the zebrafish lateral line system. Students learn to handle and image living fish, collect time-lapse videos of moving mitochondria, and quantitatively measure mitochondrial dynamics by generating and analyzing kymographs of their movements. Energy demands may differ between axons with extending growth cones versus axons that have already reached their targets and are forming synapses. Since relatively little is known about this process in developing lateral line axons, students generate and test their own hypotheses regarding how mitochondrial dynamics may differ at two different time points in axonal development. Students also learn to incorporate into their analysis a powerful yet accessible quantitative tool, the kymograph, which is used to graph movement over time. After students measure and quantify dynamics in living fish at 1 and 2 days post fertilization, this module extends into independent projects, in which students can expand their studies in a number of different, inquiry-driven directions. The project can also be pared down for courses that wish to focus solely on the quantitative analysis (without fish handling), or vice versa. This research module provides a useful approach for the design of open-ended laboratory

  7. TRANSIT MONITORING IN THE SOUTH (TraMoS) PROJECT: DISCARDING TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS IN WASP-5b

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; Lopez-Morales, M. E-mail: pato@das.uchile.cl

    2012-03-20

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M{sub Circled-Plus }, 1 M{sub Circled-Plus }, and 2 M{sub Circled-Plus} around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by {approx}5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  8. Transit Monitoring in the South (TraMoS) Project: Discarding Transit Timing Variations in WASP-5b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; López-Morales, M.

    2012-03-01

    We report nine new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet WASP-5b, observed in the Bessell I band with the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope at the Cerro Pachon Observatory and with the SMARTS 1 m Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, between 2008 August and 2009 October. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new Transit Timing Variation (TTV) analysis of its orbit. We find no evidence of TTV rms variations larger than 1 minute over a 3 year time span. This result discards the presence of planets more massive than about 5 M ⊕, 1 M ⊕, and 2 M ⊕ around the 1:2, 5:3, and 2:1 orbital resonances, respectively. These new detection limits exceed by ~5-30 times the limits imposed by current radial velocity observations in the mean motion resonances of this system. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth, also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. This result supports formation theories that predict a paucity of planetary companions to hot Jupiters.

  9. PROVIDING TIMELY DRINKING WATER AND SOURCE WATER QUALITY INFORMATION TO YOUR COMMUNITY THE DES MOINES WATER WORKS PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EMPACT was created in 1996 to take advantage of new technologies that make it possible to provide environmental information to the public in near real time. EMPACT is working with the 86 largest metropolitan areas of the country to help communities in these areas: Collecting, m...

  10. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  11. An alternative interpretation for a hyper-runaway star based on the 5-dimension space-time projection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kai Wai; Curatolo, Susana; Dreschhoff, Gisela

    The distribution of masses in the galaxy have been investigated within the frame of the 5D space-time field theory [1,2; also see www.google groups/group/5Duniverse/]. Here we will focus on one of the results which is related to the exponentially time increasing outward spiral speed of stars in the galaxy. The solution of the centripetal force equation leading to this result also indicates that this hypervelocity may be present only during the early stage after the galaxy's creation. However, it can also be shown, that, as the outward spiral rate of this star depends on the motion of all the galactic masses within the galaxy, the star must slow down with aging as the other masses spiral outward. For this reason it is suggested that the 5D space-time field theory may be applicable to the recent findings of some runaway stars, such as HD 271791, seemingly escaping from the galaxy [3]. [1] K.W. Wong, Nova Sciences, in press [2] K.W. Wong, Nova science, in press [3] N. Przybilla et al., Ap. J., 684, L103-l106, 2008

  12. Wavelet-based Time Series Bootstrap Approach for Multidecadal Hydrologic Projections Using Observed and Paleo Data of Climate Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkyihun, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding streamflow variability and the ability to generate realistic scenarios at multi-decadal time scales is important for robust water resources planning and management in any River Basin - more so on the Colorado River Basin with its semi-arid climate and highly stressed water resources It is increasingly evident that large scale climate forcings such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) are known to modulate the Colorado River Basin hydrology at multi-decadal time scales. Thus, modeling these large scale Climate indicators is important to then conditionally modeling the multi-decadal streamflow variability. To this end, we developed a simulation model that combines the wavelet-based time series method, Wavelet Auto Regressive Moving Average (WARMA) with a K-nearest neighbor (K-NN) bootstrap approach. In this, for a given time series (climate forcings), dominant periodicities/frequency bands are identified from the wavelet spectrum that pass the 90% significant test. The time series is filtered at these frequencies in each band to create ';components'; the components are orthogonal and when added to the residual (i.e., noise) results in the original time series. The components, being smooth, are easily modeled using parsimonious Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) time series models. The fitted ARMA models are used to simulate the individual components which are added to obtain simulation of the original series. The WARMA approach is applied to all the climate forcing indicators which are used to simulate multi-decadal sequences of these forcing. For the current year, the simulated forcings are considered the ';feature vector' and K-NN of this are identified; one of the neighbors (i.e., one of the historical year) is resampled using a weighted probability metric (with more weights to nearest neighbor and least to the farthest) and the corresponding streamflow is the

  13. The MCSA 2.1: A fully digital real-time spectrum analyzer developed for NASA's SETI Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duluk, J. F.; Jeday, A.; Massing, M.; Chen, Chih-Kang; Nguyen, Huy

    The MCSA 2.1, the Multi-Channel Spectrum Analyzer, is a fully digital spectrometer optimized for the detection of narrow-band signals. The MCSA 2.1 has a single analog input, which is fed to an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter running at 130 M samples per second, and hence covers a 65 MHz bandwidth. The MCSA 2.1 design includes a digital downconverter, which bandpasses 10 MHz, downshifts it to baseband, and outputs complex samples at 10.833 MHz. This 10 MHz "superband" is split into 144 "bands" of 69.4 kHz, then further split into 108 "subbands" of 643 Hz, then divided into "bins" of six simultaneous resolutions: 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 28 Hz. The data from each resolution is normalized by the estimated noise power and then output as: (1) 4-bit power for incoherent Continuous Wave (CW) detection; (2) 8-bit thresholded power for pulsed signal detection; and (3) 32-bit complex amplitude for almost non-drifting coherent CW detection and for possible future signal detectors. The MCSA 2.2 has two inputs, exactly twice the hardware, and processes two antenna polarizations which are available at radioastronomy observatories. The MSCA 2.2 includes 70 Printed Circuit Boards (PCB), including 10 custom logic board designs and two buffer board designs. The system is under development for NASA's Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Project. Provided adequate NASA funding is available, the MCSA 2.2 will be installed and performing SETI searches in October 1992.

  14. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  15. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  16. Catalog of earth photographs from the Apollo-Soyuz test project. [listing cloud photographs and data acquired at time photograph was taken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Information is given on earth photographs obtained by the Apollo astronauts during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. The data are arranged in three sections. A map index shows the boundaries of each photograph and is used for a quick survey of the coverage for a given geographical area. A tabular index provides the following data: list of photographs by serial number, description of geographic location, latitude and longitude of the center point of the photograph, date when photograph was taken, ground elapsed time, revolution number of Apollo spacecraft, approximate spacecraft altitude, tilt, sun angle, camera, and lens. The photographic index provides same size black and white prints made from the original color negatives.

  17. Time of flight mass spectrometry of DNA laser-ablated from frozen aqueous solutions: applications to the Human Genome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter

    1994-02-01

    Time of flight mass spectrometry offers an extremely rapid and accurate alternative to gel electrophoresis for sizing DNA fragments in the Sanger sequencing process, if large single-stranded DNA molecules can be volatilized and ionized without fragmentation. A process based on pulsed laser ablation of thin frozen films of DNA solutions has been shown to ablate intact DNA molecules up to [approximate]400 kDa in mass, and also has been shown to yield molecular ions of single-stranded DNA up to [approximate]18 500 Da. The theoretical basis and the progress to date in this approach are described and the potential impact of mass spectrometry on large-scale DNA sequencing is discussed.

  18. The AMERE project: Enabling real-time detection of radiation effects in individual cells in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Meesen, Geert; Szpirer, Cedric; Scohy, Sophie; Cherukuri, Chaitanya; Evrard, Olivier; Hutsebaut, Xavier; Beghuin, Didier

    2012-12-01

    A major concern for long-term deep space missions is the detrimental impact of cosmic radiation on human health. Especially the presence of high-energy particles of high atomic mass (HZE) represents a serious threat. To contribute to a fundamental understanding of space radiation effects and to help improving risk assessment for humans on the Moon, the ESA Lunar Lander mission model payload includes a package dedicated to cell-based radiobiology experiments in the form of an Autonomous Microscope for Examination of Radiation Effects (AMERE). The purpose of this setup is to enable real-time visualization of DNA damage repair in living cells after traversal of HZE particles on the Moon. To assess the feasibility of this challenging experiment, we have analysed the biological and technological demands. In this article, we discuss the experimental concept, the biological considerations and describe the implications for system design.

  19. Calculation of the weighting functions for the reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue by time-resolved optical projections

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, A B; Vlasov, V V

    2014-08-31

    We report a new method for determining the weighting functions to reconstruct absorbing inhomogeneities in tissue by perturbation time-domain diffuse optical tomography using the transmission geometry of a flat layer. The method is based on an analytical approach to the calculation of the weighting functions for a semi-infinite scattering medium and on the use of the original method of an equivalent inverse source in order to obtain weight distributions for the flat layer geometry. The correctness of the proposed method of the weighting function calculation is evaluated by a numerical experiment on the reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities. It is shown that the perturbation reconstruction model based on the proposed weighting function calculation method allows the inhomogeneities smaller than 0.3 cm and ∼0.4 cm, located respectively in the transverse and longitudinal directions to the probe light direction, to be resolved in the centre of an 8-cm-thick object. (laser biophotonics)

  20. Pembina Cardium CO2-EOR monitoring project: Integrated surface seismic and VSP time-lapse seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshuhail, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the Pembina field in west-central Alberta, Canada, approximately 40,000 tons of supercritical CO2 was injected into the 1650 m deep, 20 m thick upper-Cretaceous Cardium Fm. between March 2005 and 2007. A time-lapse seismic program was designed and incorporated into the overall measurement, monitoring and verification program. The objectives were to track the CO2 plume within the reservoir, and to evaluate the integrity of storage. Fluid replacement modeling predicts a decrease in the P-wave velocity and bulk density in the reservoir by about 4% and 1%, respectively. Synthetic seismograms show subtle reflectivity changes at the Cardium Fm. and a traveltime delay at the later high-amplitude Viking event of less than 1 ms. The time-lapse datasets, however, show no significant anomalies in the P-wave seismic data that can be attributed to supercritical CO2 injected into the Cardium Fm. (Figure 1). The converted-wave (P-S) data, on the other hand, showed small traveltime anomalies. The most coherent results were those obtained by the fixed-array VSP dataset (Figure 2) due to higher frequency bandwidth and high signal to noise ratio. The amplitude and traveltime changes observed in the VSP dataset are small but are consistent in magnitude with those predicted from rock physics modeling. The analysis suggests that the inability to clearly detect the CO2 plume in surface seismic data is likely due to the CO2 being contained in thin permeable sandstone members of the Cardium Formation. The seismic signature of the Cardium Fm. in this area may also be degraded by multiples and strong attenuation involving the shallow Ardley coals. However, the lack of a 4D seismic changes above the reservoir indicates that the injected CO2 is not migrating through the caprock into shallower formations.

  1. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. III. Optical Continuum Emission and Broadband Time Delays in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, M. M.; Denney, K. D.; Barth, A. J.; Bentz, M. C.; Bottorff, M. C.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; De Rosa, G.; Goad, M. R.; Horne, Keith; Joner, M. D.; Kaspi, S.; Kim, M.; Klimanov, S. A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Leonard, D. C.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.-K.; Zu, Y.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brewer, B. J.; Cackett, E. M.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grier, C. J.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, S. C.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Lee, J. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pancoast, A.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Siegel, M.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Treu, T.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multiwavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (BVRI and ugriz). Combined with ultraviolet data from the Hubble Space Telescope and Swift, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158 Å to the z band (~9160 Å). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the V band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He ii λ 1640 and λ 4686), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with τ \\propto {λ }4/3. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10% of the Eddington luminosity (L=0.1{L}{{Edd}}). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination (~20%) can be important for the shortest continuum lags and likely has a significant impact on the u and U bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.

  2. Antibiotic Prescriptions and Prophylaxis in Italian Children. Is It Time to Change? Data from the ARPEC Project

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani, Carlotta; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Romanengo, Marta; Tagliabue, Claudia; Centenari, Chiara; D’Argenio, Patrizia; Lundin, Rebecca; Giaquinto, Carlo; Galli, Luisa; Guarino, Alfredo; Esposito, Susanna; Sharland, Mike; Versporten, Ann; Goossens, Herman; Nicolini, Giangiacomo

    2016-01-01

    Background Antimicrobials are the most commonly prescribed drugs. Many studies have evaluated antibiotic prescriptions in the paediatric outpatient but few studies describing the real antibiotic consumption in Italian children’s hospitals have been published. Point-prevalence survey (PPS) has been shown to be a simple, feasible and reliable standardized method for antimicrobials surveillance in children and neonates admitted to the hospital. In this paper, we presented data from a PPS on antimicrobial prescriptions carried out in 7 large Italian paediatric institutions. Methods A 1-day PPS on antibiotic use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed in Italy between October and December 2012 as part of the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children project (ARPEC). Seven institutions in seven Italian cities were involved. The survey included all admitted patients less than 18 years of age present in the ward at 8:00 am on the day of the survey, who had at least one on-going antibiotic prescription. For all patients data about age, weight, underlying disease, antimicrobial agent, dose and indication for treatment were collected. Results The PPS was performed in 61 wards within 7 Italian institutions. A total of 899 patients were eligible and 349 (38.9%) had an on-going prescription for one or more antibiotics, with variable rates among the hospitals (25.7% - 53.8%). We describe antibiotic prescriptions separately in neonates (<30 days old) and children (> = 30 days to <18 years old). In the neonatal cohort, 62.8% received antibiotics for prophylaxis and only 37.2% on those on antibiotics were treated for infection. Penicillins and aminoglycosides were the most prescribed antibiotic classes. In the paediatric cohort, 64.4% of patients were receiving antibiotics for treatment of infections and 35.5% for prophylaxis. Third generation cephalosporins and penicillin plus inhibitors were the top two antibiotic classes. The main reason for

  3. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22} eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23} eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  4. Multifrequency space time orthogonal projection (MF-STOP): a radar signal processing algorithm for detecting and discriminating targets in heavy clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrat, Yalew; Hatleberg, Clancy

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we present a Multi-Frequency Space-Time Orthogonal (MF-STOP) adaptive filtering approach for detection and discrimination of targets based on a two stage orthogonal projection whereby target parameters can be extracted in the presence of heavy clutter and noise. The proposed technique detects targets within heavy clutter tracked by a radar system. After targets are detected, motion information is extracted that can be used to discriminate threats such as reentry vehicles from other targets. Target detection is generated in stage one by a combination of Windowed Short Time Fast Fourier Transform (WSTFFT) processing and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Target discrimination is done in a second stage via Partial Least Squares (PLS) using a training filter constructed from the stage one detection. The target is discriminated explicitly by metric criteria such as size or precession. These discriminate features do not have to be known a priori.

  5. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-01

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were Ppe=4.0 ×1022 eV/m for InSb and Ppe=1.2 ×1023 eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  6. Mechanisms of time-dependent crack growth at elevated temperature. Final project report, July 1, 1986--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Stock, S.R.

    1990-04-15

    Objective of this 3-y study was to conduct creep and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments and to characterize the crack tip damage mechanisms in a model material (Cu-1wt%Sb), which is known to cavitate at grain boundaries under creep deformation. Results were: In presence of large scale cavitation damage and crack branching, time rate of creep crack growth da/dt does not correlate with C{sub t} or C{sup *}. When cavitation damage is constrained, da/dt is characterized by C{sub t}. Area fraction of grain boundary cavitated is the single damage parameter for the extent of cavitation damage ahead of crack tips. C{sub t} is used for the creep-fatigue crack growth behavior. In materials prone to rapid cavity nucleation, creep cracks grow faster initially and then reach a steady state whose growth rate is determined by C{sub t}. Percent creep life exhausted correlates with average cavity diameter and fraction of grain boundary area occupied by cavities. Synchrotron x-ray tomographic microscopy was used to image individual cavities in Cu-1wt% Sb. A methodology was developed for predicting the remaining life of elevated temperature power plant components; (C{sub t}){sub avg} was used to correlate creep-fatigue crack growth in Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel and weldments.

  7. A case study on the feasibility and performance of an UWB-AoA real time location system for resources management of civil construction projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Esmond; Xia, Linyuan; Retscher, Guenther; Tian, Hui

    2010-06-01

    The application of integrated satellite and modern wireless positioning technologies for ubiquitous real-time resources management in large scale civil engineering projects can greatly optimize the time and cost in the construction process, and is now the trend for modern construction project management. As the outdoor conditions of most civil construction sites are open to sky, satellite positioning with the popularly used Global Positioning System (GPS) has been proved to be very efficient and effective. However, the condition in indoor and underground construction site is very complicated due to the fact that different construction activities would be carried out in different congested areas, involving heavy construction plant, equipment, professionals and technical personnel. Nowadays different emerging technologies such as Wi-Fi and ZigBee can be adopted for position and tracking in indoor environments. Nevertheless, under the very complicated construction site conditions these technologies may fail due to movement of human resources and construction plant, variation of metrological conditions, and serious multipath effects of signals. It is considered that Ultra Wide Band (UWB) technology is more suitable for indoor construction site environments. In this paper, a case study on the attempt of integrating GPS with Ubisense Real-time Location System (RTLS) for resources management in an underground railway construction site is discussed. Laboratory and field tests have shown that the RTLS can provide better resources management capability in terms of positioning accuracy and stability than Wi-Fi and ZigBee technologies under complicated construction environments. The test results show that the system can normally achieve better than 15 cm accuracy, and better than 1 m under adverse geometrical site condition. However, the high instrumental set up cost and the requirement for high quality data transmission cable for high precision time synchronization between

  8. Measurement of the response time of the delay window for the neutron converter of the SPIRAL2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, G.; Andre, T.; Bermudez, J.; Blinov, M. F.; Jamet, C.; Logatchev, P. V.; Semenov, Y. I.; Starostenko, A. A.; Tecchio, L. B.; Tsyganov, A. S.; Udup, E.; Vasquez, J.

    2014-09-01

    Research and development of a safety system for the SPIRAL2 facility has been conceived to protect the UCx target from a possible interaction with the 200 kW deuteron beam. The system called "delay window" (DW) is designed as an integral part of the neutron converter module and is located in between the neutron converter and the fission target. The device has been designed as a barrier, located directly behind the neutron converter on the axis of the deuteron beam, with the purpose of "delaying" the eventual interaction of the deuteron beam with the UCx target in case of a failure of the neutron converter. The "delay" must be long enough to allow the interlock to react and safely stop the beam operation, before the beam will reach the UCx target. The working concept of the DW is based on the principle of the electrical fuse. Electrically insulated wires placed on the surface of a Tantalum disk assure a so called "free contact", normally closed to an electronic circuit located on the HV platform, far from the radioactive environment. The melting temperature of the wires is much less than Tantalum. Once the beam is impinging on the disk, one or more wires are melted and the "free contact" is open. A solid state relay is changing its state and a signal is sent to the interlock device. A prototype of the DW has been constructed and tested with an electron beam of power density equivalent to the SPIRAL2 beam. The measured "delay" is 682.5 ms (σ=116 ms), that is rather long in comparison to the intrinsic delays introduced by the detectors itself (2 ms) and by the associated electronic devices (120 ns). The experimental results confirm that, in the case of a failure of the neutron converter, the DW as conceived is enable to withstand the beam power for a period of time sufficiently long to safely shut down the SPIRAL2 accelerator.

  9. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - V. Time-variable interstellar absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Smoker, Jonathan V.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smith, Keith T.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Keenan, Francis P.; Lambert, David L.; Welty, Daniel E.; Lauroesch, James T.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and properties of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales, sub-au to 1 pc, are poorly understood. We compare interstellar absorption lines, observed towards a selection of O- and B-type stars at two or more epochs, to search for variations over time caused by the transverse motion of each star combined with changes in the structure in the foreground ISM. Two sets of data were used: 83 VLT/UVES spectra with approximately 6 yr between epochs and 21 McDonald observatory 2.7-m telescope echelle spectra with 6-20 yr between epochs, over a range of scales from ˜0-360 au. The interstellar absorption lines observed at the two epochs were subtracted and searched for any residuals due to changes in the foreground ISM. Of the 104 sightlines investigated with typically five or more components in Na I D, possible temporal variation was identified in five UVES spectra (six components), in Ca II, Ca I and/or Na I absorption lines. The variations detected range from 7 per cent to a factor of 3.6 in column density. No variation was found in any other interstellar species. Most sightlines show no variation, with 3σ upper limits to changes of the order 0.1-0.3 dex in Ca II and Na I. These variations observed imply that fine-scale structure is present in the ISM, but at the resolution available in this study, is not very common at visible wavelengths. A determination of the electron densities and lower limits to the total number density of a sample of the sightlines implies that there is no striking difference between these parameters in sightlines with, and sightlines without, varying components.

  10. Real-Time Access to Altimetry and Operational Oceanography Products via OPeNDAP/LAS Technologies : the Example of Aviso, Mercator and Mersea Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudel, S.; Blanc, F.; Jolibois, T.; Rosmorduc, V.

    2004-12-01

    The Products and Services (P&S) department in the Space Oceanography Division at CLS is in charge of diffusing and promoting altimetry and operational oceanography data. P&S is so involved in Aviso satellite altimetry project, in Mercator ocean operational forecasting system, and in the European Godae /Mersea ocean portal. Aiming to a standardisation and a common vision and management of all these ocean data, these projects led to the implementation of several OPeNDAP/LAS Internet servers. OPeNDAP allows the user to extract via a client software (like IDL, Matlab or Ferret) the data he is interested in and only this data, avoiding him to download full information files. OPeNDAP allows to extract a geographic area, a period time, an oceanic variable, and an output format. LAS is an OPeNDAP data access web server whose special feature consists in the facility for unify in a single vision the access to multiple types of data from distributed data sources. The LAS can make requests to different remote OPeNDAP servers. This enables to make comparisons or statistics upon several different data types. Aviso is the CNES/CLS service which distributes altimetry products since 1993. The Aviso LAS distributes several Ssalto/Duacs altimetry products such as delayed and near-real time mean sea level anomaly, absolute dynamic topography, absolute geostrophic velocities, gridded significant wave height and gridded wind speed modulus. Mercator-Ocean is a French operational oceanography centre which distributes its products by several means among them LAS/OPeNDAP servers as part of Mercator Mersea-strand1 contribution. 3D ocean description (temperature, salinity, current and other oceanic variables) of the North Atlantic and Mediterranean are real-time available and weekly updated. LAS special feature consisting in the possibility of making requests to several remote data centres with same OPeNDAP configurations particularly fitted to Mersea strand-1 problematics. This European

  11. Development Status of the WetLab-2 Project: New Tools for On-orbit Real-time Quantitative Gene Expression.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Jimmy; Parra, Macarena P.; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Chinn, Tori; Ricco, Antonio; Souza, Kenneth; Hyde, Liz; Rukhsana, Yousuf; Richey, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform to facilitate gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens grown or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 equipment will be capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. In addition to the logistical benefits of in-situ sample processing and analysis, conducting qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms. The system can also validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing quantitative on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Finally, WetLab-2 can be used for analysis of air, surface, water, and clinical samples to monitor environmental contaminants and crew health. The verification flight of the instrument is scheduled to launch on SpaceX-5 in Aug. 2014.Progress to date: The WetLab-2 project completed a thorough study of commercially available qRT-PCR systems and performed a downselect based on both scientific and engineering requirements. The selected instrument, the Cepheid SmartCycler, has advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, and rapid ramp times. The SmartCycler has multiplex capabilities, assaying up to four genes of interest in each of the 16 modules. The WetLab-2 team is currently working with Cepheid to modify the unit for housing within an EXPRESS rack locker on the ISS. This will enable the downlink of data to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project is

  12. BRITICE-CHRONO: A multi-method project to determine the timing and rates of change of a marine-influenced ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabel, Derek; Clark, Chris; Chiverrell, Richard; O'Cofaigh, Colm; Scourse, James; Hindmarsh, Richard

    2016-04-01

    BRITICE-CHRONO is a five-year Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded consortium of more than 44 researchers comprising glaciologists, marine and terrestrial Quaternary scientists and ice sheet-modellers, with the specific aim to systematically collect and date material to constrain the timing and rates of change of the marine-influenced sectors of the collapsing British Irish Ice Sheet (http://britice-chrono.org/). At the halfway point of the project we have collected over 400 cores during two 40-day research cruises circumnavigating the British Isles and Ireland, and completed over 300 person-days of terrestrial fieldwork, yielding around 15 tonnes of samples for dating by optically stimulated luminescence-, surface exposure-, and radiocarbon methods. By end 2016 we expect to have generated about 850 new dates from landforms associated with the deglaciation of the last British and Irish ice-sheet. The success of the project will in part depend on the team being able to provide ice-sheet modellers with robust chronological markers against which the ice-sheet models can be tested. The decision-making process in deciding robustness of ages derived from multiple samples and different Quaternary geochronological methods will be discussed. Some geochronological highlights thus far are that deglaciation of the northwest sector of the ice-sheet was in progress at 28ka, well before the global LGM, and the northern tip of mainland Scotland was ice free by 25ka. At the same time the Irish Sea ice stream in the south appears to have been advancing towards its maximum extend. Although deglaciation in the south commences much later, both the main southern and northern ice streams appear to have persisted for at least 10ka with final retreat onto the mainland occurring at approximately the same time (16ka).

  13. The LAGUNA-LBNO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, Margherita Buizza

    LAGUNA-LBNO is a Design Study funded by the European Commission to develop the design of a large and deep underground neutrino observatory; its physics program involves the study of neutrino oscillations at long baselines, the investigation of the Grand Unification of elementary forces and the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Building on the successful format and on the findings of the previous LAGUNA Design Study, LAGUNA-LBNO is more focused and is specifically considering Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations (LBNO) with neutrino beams from CERN. Two sites, Fréjus (in France at 130 km) and Pyhäsalmi (in Finland at 2300 km), are being considered. Three different detector technologies are being studied: Water Cherenkov, Liquid Scintillator and Liquid Argon. Recently the LAGUNA-LBNO consortium has submitted an Expression of Interest for a very long baseline neutrino experiment, selecting as a first priority the option of a Liquid Argon detector at Pyhäsalmi. Detailed potential studies have been curried out for the determination of the neutrino Mass Hierarchy and the discovery of the CP-violation, using a conventional neutrino beam from the CERN SPS with a power of 750 kW.

  14. Decadal Time Scale change in terrestrial plant communities in North American arctic and alpine tundra: A contribution to the International Polar Year Back to the Future Project (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedie, C. E.; Ebert-May, D.; Hollister, R. D.; Johnson, D. R.; Lara, M. J.; Villarreal, S.; Spasojevic, M.; Webber, P.

    2010-12-01

    The International Polar Year-Back to the Future (IPY-BTF) is an endorsed International Polar Year project (IPY project #214). The overarching goal of this program is to determine how key structural and functional characteristics of high latitude/altitude terrestrial ecosystems have changed over the past 25 or more years and assess if such trajectories of change are likely to continue in the future. By rescuing data, revisiting, re-sampling historic research sites and assessing environmental change over time, we aim to provide greater understanding of how tundra is changing and what the possible drivers of these changes are. Resampling of sites established by Patrick J. Webber between 1964 and 1975 in northern Baffin Island, Northern Alaska and in the Rocky Mountains form a key contribution to the BTF project. Here we report on resampling efforts at each of these locations and initial results of a synthesis effort that finds similarities and differences in change between sites. Results suggest that although shifts in plant community composition are detectable at each location, the magnitude and direction of change differ among locations. Vegetation shifts along soil moisture gradients is apparent at most of the sites resampled. Interestingly, however, wet communities seem to have changed more than dry communities in the Arctic locations, while plant communities at the alpine site appear to be becoming more distinct regardless of soil moisture status. Ecosystem function studies performed in conjunction with plant community change suggest that there has been an increase in plant productivity at most sites resampled, especially in wet and mesic land cover types.

  15. Near Real Time Surface Solar Radiation and Meteorological Parameters From the CERES FLASHFlux Project: Examples of Usage for Energy-Related Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoell, J. M.; Stockhouse, P.; Chandler, W.; Zhang, T.; Kratz, D. P.; Gupta, S. K.; Wilber, A. C.; Sawaengphokhai, P.; Edwards, A. C.; Westberg, D.; Zell, E.; Leng, G.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Fast Longwave And SHortwave Radiative Fluxes (FLASHFlux) project is producing global near real-time surface and top of Atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes and analyzing these quantities and their variability on regional and global scales. This is being accomplished by using a portion of the existing Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) processing system that fuses CERES with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) to produce orbital flux products. The orbital products from both Terra and Aqua are subsequently merged to derive global gridded radiative flux products. The FLASHFlux processing system also uses meteorological surface and profile file information from NASA Global Modeling and Data Assimilation Office (GMAO) Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) operational analysis version 5.2. The production of these together considering the latency times results in the global gridded surface radiative fluxes within 6-7 days of the original satellite observations. Data from the FLASHFlux have been merged and made available through a user-friendly web-based data portal (http://power.larc.nasa.gov/). Solar data from this portal are being continuously updated to provide time series of daily solar radiation to current time minus 7-days. While the current solar data represents an average over a 1-degree cell, comparison with ground observations exhibits a high degree of correlation on a daily time scale. These data are promoted to the web along with surface meteorological data from the GMAO GEOS 5.2 to provide a complete suite of parameters useful for many applications. This paper highlights the use of these data sets in the Ventyx Corporation database Velocity Suite that is being provided to utilities for power load forecasting. Examples of the usage and impact of this data on subsequent load forecasts are presented. The data sets are also being evaluated in collaboration with the Natural Resource Canada RETScreen

  16. HELICoiD project: a new use of hyperspectral imaging for brain cancer detection in real-time during neurosurgical operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabelo, Himar; Ortega, Samuel; Kabwama, Silvester; Callico, Gustavo M.; Bulters, Diederik; Szolna, Adam; Pineiro, Juan F.; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral images allow obtaining large amounts of information about the surface of the scene that is captured by the sensor. Using this information and a set of complex classification algorithms is possible to determine which material or substance is located in each pixel. The HELICoiD (HypErspectraL Imaging Cancer Detection) project is a European FET project that has the goal to develop a demonstrator capable to discriminate, with high precision, between normal and tumour tissues, operating in real-time, during neurosurgical operations. This demonstrator could help the neurosurgeons in the process of brain tumour resection, avoiding the excessive extraction of normal tissue and unintentionally leaving small remnants of tumour. Such precise delimitation of the tumour boundaries will improve the results of the surgery. The HELICoiD demonstrator is composed of two hyperspectral cameras obtained from Headwall. The first one in the spectral range from 400 to 1000 nm (visible and near infrared) and the second one in the spectral range from 900 to 1700 nm (near infrared). The demonstrator also includes an illumination system that covers the spectral range from 400 nm to 2200 nm. A data processing unit is in charge of managing all the parts of the demonstrator, and a high performance platform aims to accelerate the hyperspectral image classification process. Each one of these elements is installed in a customized structure specially designed for surgical environments. Preliminary results of the classification algorithms offer high accuracy (over 95%) in the discrimination between normal and tumour tissues.

  17. Using loose-fill perlite with normal weight precast wall panels to lower the cost, time of construction projects, and to provide an alternative to lightweight concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al kulabi, Ahmed Kamil

    Lightweight concrete has been used in construction because of its properties, such as thermal, and fire resistances although it is more expensive and less available than normal weight concrete. One way to save time, cost, and to provide an alternative to lightweight concrete in construction projects is to reduce the number of installed insulations on precast wall panels and to improve the properties of normal weight concrete panels, respectively. These goals can be achieved by improving the four properties of precast panels, such as thermal resistance, fire resistance, heat capacity, and sound insulation by using perlite as insulation. The main goals of this research are getting buildings constructed or modified in less time and cost by producing superior wall panels and improving the properties of normal weight panels. Superior wall panels are new panels that provide the four properties listed above. Precast panels with different cross sections, concrete type, and different amounts of perlite will be investigated to observe the impact of each factor on the mentioned properties. The cost of each panel will be studied, and analytical methods will be used to find the optimum panel that provides the four mentioned properties with least cost. Moreover, theoretical methods will be applied to calculate the four properties for each panel. The preliminary theoretical calculations approved a good improvement in the four properties. In summary, the four properties of precast panels can be improved, time, and cost of construction can be reduced by using perlite as insulation.

  18. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  19. Ace Project as a Project Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Melinda; Guynes, Carl S.; Simard, Karine

    2010-01-01

    The primary challenge of project management is to achieve the project goals and objectives while adhering to project constraints--usually scope, quality, time and budget. The secondary challenge is to optimize the allocation and integration of resources necessary to meet pre-defined objectives. Project management software provides an active…

  20. The application of operations research methodologies to the delivery of care model for traumatic spinal cord injury: the access to care and timing project.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Vanessa K; Soril, Lesley; Atkins, Derek; Lewis, Rachel; Santos, Argelio; Fehlings, Michael G; Burns, Anthony S; Singh, Anoushka; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2012-09-01

    The long-term impact of spinal cord injury (SCI) on the health care system imposes a need for greater efficiency in the use of resources and the management of care. The Access to Care and Timing (ACT) project was developed to model the health care delivery system in Canada for patients with traumatic SCI. Techniques from Operations Research, such as simulation modeling, were used to predict the impact of best practices and policy initiatives on outcomes related to both the system and patients. These methods have been used to solve similar problems in business and engineering and may offer a unique solution to the complexities encountered in SCI care delivery. Findings from various simulated scenarios, from the patients' point of injury to community re-integration, can be used to inform decisions on optimizing practice across the care continuum. This article describes specifically the methodology and implications of producing such simulations for the care of traumatic SCI in Canada. Future publications will report on specific practices pertaining to the access to specialized services and the timing of interventions evaluated using the ACT model. Results from this type of research will provide the evidence required to support clinical decision making, inform standards of care, and provide an opportunity to engage policymakers. PMID:22800432

  1. Time Resolved Contrast Enhanced Intracranial MRA Using a Single Dose Delivered as Sequential Injections and Highly Constrained Projection Reconstruction (HYPR CE)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijing; Johnson, Kevin; Kecskemeti, Steven R.; Wang, Kang; Wieben, Oliver; Aagaard-Kienitz, Beverly L.; Rowley, Howard; Korosec, Frank R.; Mistretta, Charles; Turski, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the brain is challenging due to the need for rapid imaging and high spatial resolution. Moreover, the significant dispersion of the intravenous contrast bolus as it passes through the heart and lungs increases the overlap between arterial and venous structures, regardless of the acquisition speed and reconstruction window. An innovative technique is presented that divides a single dose contrast into two injections. Initially a small volume of contrast material (2–3 mL) is used to acquiring time-resolved weighting images with a high frame rate (2 frames/s) during the first pass of the contrast agent. The remaining contrast material is used to obtain a high resolution whole brain contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance angiography (0.57 × 0.57 × 1 mm3) that is used as the spatial constraint for Local Highly Constrained Projection Reconstruction (HYPR LR) reconstruction. After HYPR reconstruction, the final dynamic images (HYPR CE) have both high temporal and spatial resolution. Furthermore, studies of contrast kinetics demonstrate that the shorter bolus length from the reduced contrast volume used for the first injection significantly improves the arterial and venous separation. PMID:21413059

  2. Visualising apoptosis in live zebrafish using fluorescence lifetime imaging with optical projection tomography to map FRET biosensor activity in space and time.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Natalie; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Kerry, Louise; Lockwood, Nicola; Frolov, Antonina; Frankel, Paul; Bugeon, Laurence; McGinty, James; Dallman, Margaret J; French, Paul M W

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) combined with optical projection tomography (OPT) has the potential to map Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) readouts in space and time in intact transparent or near transparent live organisms such as zebrafish larvae, thereby providing a means to visualise cell signalling processes in their physiological context. Here the first application of FLIM OPT to read out biological function in live transgenic zebrafish larvae using a genetically expressed FRET biosensor is reported. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is mapped in 3-D by imaging the activity of a FRET biosensor that is cleaved by Caspase 3, which is a key effector of apoptosis. Although apoptosis is a naturally occurring process during development, it can also be triggered in a variety of ways, including through gamma irradiation. FLIM OPT is shown here to enable apoptosis to be monitored over time, in live zebrafish larvae via changes in Caspase 3 activation following gamma irradiation at 24 hours post fertilisation. Significant apoptosis was observed at 3.5 hours post irradiation, predominantly in the head region. PMID:26753623

  3. Estimated lag time in global carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations produced by commercial nuclear power through 2009 with projections through 2030.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Neil M; Abramson, Lee R; Coleman, Fiona A B

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the past and future impact of nuclear reactors on anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. If nuclear power had never been commercially developed, what additional global carbon emissions would have occurred? More than 44 y of global nuclear power have caused a lag time of at least 1.2 y in carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations through the end of 2009. This lag time incorporates the contribution of life cycle carbon emissions due to the construction and operation of nuclear plants. Cumulative global carbon emissions would have been about 13 Gt greater through 2009, and the mean annual CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa would have been ~2.7 ppm greater than without nuclear power. This study finds that an additional 14–17 Gt of atmospheric carbon emissions could be averted by the global use of nuclear power through 2030, for a cumulative total of 27–30 Gt averted during the period 1965–2030. This result is based on International Atomic Energy Agency projections of future growth in nuclear power from 2009–2030, modified by the recent loss or permanent shutdown of 14 reactors in Japan and Germany PMID:22420021

  4. Relative sea level trend and variability in the central Mediterranean in the time span 1872-2014 from tide gauge data: implications for future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Vecchio, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    We used tidal data collected in the time span 1872-2014 from a set of historical and modern stations located in the central Mediterranean, along the coasts of Italy, France, Slovenia and Croatia. The longest records span across the last two or three centuries for the tidal stations of Genova, Marseille, Trieste and Venice. While data from Bakar, Dubrovink, Rovinji and Split, all located along the coast of the Adriatic sea, provide valid records for a time span about 50 years long. In addition to these stations, since 1998 become available for the Italian region new sea level data from the dense national tidal network (www.mareografico.it). These digital stations are collecting data continuously at 10 minute sampling interval with a nominal accuracy at 1 mm. Therefore, in addition to the historical stations, we have the opportunity to analyze a sea level data set that cover about the last 16 years. In this study we show and discuss the results of our analysis of sea level data for the central Mediterranean, providing new insights on sea level trend and variability for about the past 140 years. Finally, based on sea level data and IPCC reports, we provide future sea level projections for this region for the year 2100 with implications for coastal flooding of lowland areas.

  5. Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: Temperature and Air quality): A Study of how the Urban Landscape Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G.; Lo, C. P.; Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan; Taha, Haider; Bornstein, Robert D.; Gillies, Robert R.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    It is our intent through this investigation to help facilitate measures that can be Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: applied to mitigate climatological or air quality Temperature and Air-quality) is a NASA Earth degradation, or to design alternate measures to sustain Observing System (EOS) Interdisciplinary Science or improve the overall urban environment in the future. investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta. The primary objectives for this research effort are: 1) To In the last half of the 20th century, Atlanta, investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta Georgia has risen as the premier commercial, urban growth, land cover change, and the development industrial, and transportation urban area of the of the urban heat island phenomenon through time at southeastern United States. The rapid growth of the nested spatial scales from local to regional; 2) To Atlanta area, particularly within the last 25 years, has investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta made Atlanta one of the fastest growing metropolitan urban growth and land cover change on air quality areas in the United States. The population of the through time at nested spatial scales from local to Atlanta metropolitan area increased 27% between 1970 regional; and 3) To model the overall effects of urban and 1980, and 33% between 1980-1990 (Research development on surface energy budget characteristics Atlanta, Inc., 1993). Concomitant with this high rate of across the Atlanta urban landscape through time at population growth, has been an explosive growth in nested spatial scales from local to regional. Our key retail, industrial, commercial, and transportation goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how services within the Atlanta region. This has resulted in land cover changes associated with urbanization in the tremendous land cover change dynamics within the Atlanta area, principally in transforming

  6. Binaries discovered by the SPY project . V. GD 687 - a massive double degenerate binary progenitor that will merge within a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: The ESO SN Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY) aims at finding merging double degenerate binaries as candidates for supernova type Ia (SN Ia) explosions. A white dwarf merger has also been suggested to explain the formation of rare types of stars like R CrB, extreme helium or He sdO stars. Here we present the hot subdwarf B binary GD 687, which will merge in less than a Hubble time. Methods: The orbital parameters of the close binary have been determined from time resolved spectroscopy. Since GD 687 is a single-lined binary, the spectra contain only information about the subdwarf primary and its orbit. From high resolution spectra the projected rotational velocity was derived. Assuming orbital synchronisation, the inclination of the system and the mass of the unseen companion were constrained. Results: The derived inclination is i = 39.3+6.2-5.6 °. The mass M2 = 0.71-0.21+0.22 M_⊙ indicates that the companion must be a white dwarf, most likely of C/O composition. This is only the fourth case that an sdB companion has been proven to be a white dwarf unambiguously. Its mass is somewhat larger than the average white dwarf mass, but may be as high as 0.93 M_⊙ in which case the total mass of the system comes close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Conclusions: GD 687 will evolve into a double degenerate system and merge to form a rare supermassive white dwarf with a mass in excess of solar. A death in a sub-Chandrasekhar supernova is also conceivable. Based on observations at the Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programme No. 165.H-0588(A). Based on observations at the La Silla Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes No. 072.D-0510(B), 079.D-0288(A), 080.D-0685(A) and 084.D-0348(A).

  7. Can reductions in logging damage increase carbon storage over time? Evaluation of a simulation model for a pilot carbon offset project in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Pinard, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Selective timber harvesting operations, if uncontrolled, can severely degrade a forest. Although techniques for reducing logging damage are well-known and inexpensive to apply, incentives to adopt these techniques are generally lacking. Power companies and other emitters of {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases soon may be forced to reduce or otherwise offset their net emissions; one offset option is to fund programs aimed at reducing logging damage. To investigate the consequences of reductions in logging damage for ecosystem carbon storage, I constructed a model to simulate changes in biomass and carbon pools following logging of primary dipterocarp forests in southeast Asia. I adapted a physiologically-driven, tree-based model of natural forest gap dynamics (FORMIX) to simulate forest recovery following logging. Input variables included stand structure, volume extracted, stand damage (% stems), and soil disturbance (% area compacted). Output variables included total biomass, tree density, and total carbon storage over time. Assumptions of the model included the following: (1) areas with soil disturbances have elevated probabilities of vine colonization and reduced rates of tree establishment, (2) areas with broken canopy but no soil disturbance are colonized initially by pioneer tree species and 20 yr later by persistent forest species, (3) damaged trees have reduced growth and increased mortality rates. Simulation results for two logging techniques, conventional and reduced-impact logging, are compared with data from field studies conducted within a pilot carbon offset project in Sabah, Malaysia.

  8. Hydrothermal conditions and resaturation times in underground openings for a nuclear waste repository in the Umtanum flow at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Bodvarsson, G.

    1982-07-01

    Numerical simulation techniques have been used to study heat flow and pore fluid migration in the near field of storage tunnels and canister storage holes in a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in the Umtanum Basalt at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project site at Hanford, Washington. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating boiling conditions in the host rock. Sensitivity studies were performed to determine the influence of variations in critical site-specific parameters which are not presently accurately known. The results indicate that, even when rather extreme values are assumed for key hydrothermal parameters, the volume of rock dried by boiling of pore fluids is negligible compared to the volume of excavated openings. The time required for saturation of backfilling materials is thus controlled by the volume of the mined excavations. When realistic values for the parameters of the natural and man-made systems are used resaturation is predicted to occur within less than two years after backfilling is placed. The approximations used in the analyses, and their limitations, are discussed in the body of the report. Recommendations are made for additional studies of the thermohydrological behavior of a high-level nuclear waste repository. 31 references, 76 figures, 7 tables.

  9. The Challenge of Time-Dependent Control of Both Processing and Performance of Materials at the Mesoscale, and the MaRIE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.

    DOE and NNSA are recognizing a mission need for flexible and reduced-cost product-based solutions to materials through accelerated qualification, certification, and assessment. The science challenge lies between the nanoscale of materials and the integral device scale, at the middle or ''mesoscale'' where interfaces, defects, and microstructure determine the performance of the materials over the lifecycle of the intended use. Time-dependent control of the processing, structure and properties of materials at this scale lies at the heart of qualifying and certifying additive manufactured parts; experimental data of high fidelity and high resolution are necessary to discover the right physical mechanisms to model and to validate and calibrate those reduced-order models in codes on Exascale computers. The scientific requirements to do this are aided by a revolution in coherent imaging of non-periodic features that can be combined with scattering off periodic structures. This drives the need to require a coherent x-ray source, brilliant and high repetition rate, of sufficiently high energy to see into and through the mesoscale. The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Project is a proposal to build such a very-high-energy X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  10. Highly dynamic sediment deposition in modern times on the submarine Amazon Delta - First results from the AMADEUS project (Cruise MSM 20/3, February/March 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Mulitza, S.; Chiessi, C.; Haberkern, J.; Wiers, S.

    2012-12-01

    The submarine Amazon Delta is the major sink for the enormous sediment load of the Amazon River during modern times. Supported by its large drainage area (7 M km2) and the huge total run-off of 6300 km3/yr, which is 20% of the global run-off into the oceans, the Amazon River discharges the worldwide highest total sediment load to the oceans, namely 1200 Mt/yr. Characterized by sedimentation rates of decimeters per year, the submarine Amazon Delta can act as an ultra-high resolution archive of the Anthropocene climatic history of the Amazon basin. However, it has to be kept in mind that the accumulation on the delta is controlled by an interaction of sediment supply and the shelf current pattern including strong tides. To study in general the response of Amazon sedimentation to deforestation, land use and climate variability, the Project AMADEUS has been established in cooperation between the MARUM, Bremen, Germany and the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Within this project a first cruise was carried out with the RV Maria S. Merian in February/March 2012 in order to collect high-resolution seismic data (Mini GI Gun, 50 m analogue streamer), sediment echosounder data (Parasound; 4 kHz, 18 kHz, 40 kHz), swath-sounder data (bathymetry and backscatter), sediment samples and water column samples in front of the Amazon River mouth. The presentation will focus mainly on the seismo-acoustic data sets. As a first step, the data were analyzed to understand the internal architecture of the recent clinoform build-up in time and space. The main emphasis were set on the foreset and bottomset, where most of the accretion occur, to allow volume and sediment budget calculations in relation to the denudation history of the Amazon basin. Especially the Parasound data reveal significant changes of the clinoform along the delta front in terms of thickness, slope angle, shape (oblique-sigmoidal-convex) and internal architecture (especially depths and character of erosional

  11. Project BALLOTS: Bibliographic Automation of Large Library Operations Using a Time-Sharing System. Progress Report (3/27/69 - 6/26/69).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veaner, Allen B.

    Project BALLOTS is a large-scale library automation development project of the Stanford University Libraries which has demonstrated the feasibility of conducting on-line interactive searches of complex bibliographic files, with a large number of users working simultaneously in the same or different files. This report documents the continuing…

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ESTABLISHMENT OF METHODOLOGY FOR TIME DOMAIN SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DST

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DST assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil, and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DST and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste. Soil-structure interaction analyses are traditionally solved in the frequency

  13. The Light Response of the XENON100 Time Projection Chamber and the Measurements of the Optical Parameters with the Xenon Scintillation Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bin

    The XENON program is a phased project using liquid xenon as a sensitive detector medium in search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These particles are the leading candidates to explain the non-baryonic, cold dark matter in our Universe. XENON100, the successor experiment of XENON10, has increased the target liquid xenon mass to 61 kg with a 100 times reduction in background rate enabling a large increase in sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross-section. To-date, the most stringent limit on this cross-section over a wide range of WIMP masses have been obtained with XENON100. XENON100 is a detector responding to the scintillation of xenon and the work of this thesis will mainly focus on the light response of the detector. Chapter 1 describes the evidences for dark matter and some of the detection methods, roughly divided by the indirect and the direct detection. In the section 1.2.2 for direct detection, a treatment of interaction rate of WIMPs is introduced. Chapter 2 is a description of the XENON100 detector, some of the main characteristics of liquid xenon, followed by the detector design. In Chapter 3, the light response of the XENON100 time projection chamber (TPC) is explained, including the Monte Carlo simulation work that was carried out prior to the main data taking. The Monte Carlo provided the basic idea of understanding the detector in the early stage of design and calibration, but the actual corrections of the light signals were determined later with the real data. Several optical parameters are critical in explaining the light response, such as the quantum efficiency (QE) of the photomultipliers (PMTs) used in the detector and the reflectivity of the teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) material that surrounds the liquid xenon target volume and defines the TPC. Since the few existing measurements of reflectivity of PTFE in liquid xenon were performed in different conditions and thus could not be applied, the XENON

  14. The Proposal Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The proposal project stretches over a significant portion of the semester-long sophomore course Professional Communication (ENG 250) at Monroe Community College. While developing their proposal project, students need to use time management skills to successfully complete a quality project on time. In addition, excellent oral and written…

  15. Calorimetry by immersion into liquid nitrogen and liquid argon: a better way to determine the internal surface area of micropores.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Ricardo; Llewellyn, Philip; Rouquerol, Françoise; Denoyel, Renaud; Rouquerol, Jean

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work is to assess the internal surface area of a set of samples (either carbons or oxides, either porous or nonporous, either microporous or mesoporous) by microcalorimetry via immersion into liquid nitrogen or argon. We have made use of an isothermal, heat-flux microcalorimeter, initially designed and built in our laboratory for the sake of gas adsorption experiments at 77 or 87 K. It seems that immersion calorimetry into liquid nitrogen and argon makes it possible to go one step further in the determination of the internal surface area of micropores. PMID:15341849

  16. A 3-D image chamber for the liquid argon TPC based on multi-layer printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cennini, P.; Cittolin, S.; Revol, J. P.; Rubbia, C.; Tian, W. H.; Li, X.; Picchi, P.; Cavanna, F.; Piano Mortari, G.; Verdecchia, M.; Cline, D.; Liu, Y.; Muratori, G.; Otwinowski, S.; Wang, H.; Zhou, M.; Bettini, A.; Casagrande, F.; Centro, S.; De Vecchi, C.; Pepato, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Rossi, P.; Ventura, S.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Dolfini, R.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Piazzoli, A.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, U. L.; Scannicchio, D.; Periale, L.; Suzuki, S.

    1994-08-01

    In our research and development programme for the ICARUS experiment we have developed a novel three-dimensional readout scheme for a liquefied noble gas TPC, where no charge multiplication process takes place. The design avoids completely wire grids and is based on the multilayer circuit technique. As a consequence it is intrinsically safe and suited to be used in large and modular structures as those foreseen for ICARUS. We describe here how the electrodes structure can be simplified leading to the new design principles and we present the results obtained with a small prototype chamber in a 100 GeV μ beam.

  17. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  18. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project Wild may…

  19. I Thought This Was Going to Be a Waste of Time: How Portfolio Construction Can Support Student Learning from Project-Based Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turns, Jennifer; Cuddihy, Elisabeth; Guan, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we sought to understand ways that students experienced a small-scale portfolio assignment provided to them as an opportunity reflect on their experiences in a project-based class. This work was motivated by research in various instructional contexts showing that portfolio construction results in important learning outcomes. We wanted…

  20. Accelerating Software Development through Agile Practices--A Case Study of a Small-Scale, Time-Intensive Web Development Project at a College-Level IT Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xuesong; Dorn, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Agile development has received increasing interest both in industry and academia due to its benefits in developing software quickly, meeting customer needs, and keeping pace with the rapidly changing requirements. However, agile practices and scrum in particular have been mainly tested in mid- to large-size projects. In this paper, we present…

  1. Steady Stream of High School Graduates Enter B.C. Public Post-Secondary Education for the First Time Each Year. Research Results from the Student Transitions Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student Transitions Project, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Student Transition project (STP) has collected eleven years of grade 12 and post-secondary enrollment data, since it's inception in 2003. This information is used to track student transitions from grade 12 graduation into post-secondary education, student mobility between post-secondary institutions and post-secondary credential completions.…

  2. Photovoltaic Installation Data from the Open PV Project: Real-time Status of the Solar Photovoltaic Market in the U.S.

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Open PV Project is a collaborative effort between government, industry, and the public that is compiling a comprehensive database of photovoltaic (PV) installation data for the United States. Data for the project are voluntarily contributed from a variety of sources including utilities, installers, and the general public. The data collected is actively maintained by the contributors and are always changing to provide an evolving, up-to-date snapshot of the US solar power market. The database allows searching by state or zipcode, size or date ranges, and organization name. The results include the cost of each solar install and an average of cost per power watt in that specific state. The Open PV Visualization Gallery features four interactive data maps that instantly reconfigure to display updated information as soon as an individual or organization uploads new data.

  3. Time-resolved cardiac interventional cone-beam CT reconstruction from fully truncated projections using the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT could replace preoperative multi-detector CT scans in the cardiac interventional setting. However, cardiac gating results in view angle undersampling and the small size of the detector results in projection data truncation. These problems are incompatible with conventional tomographic reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) reconstruction method was adapted to solve these issues. The performance of the proposed method was compared to that of FDK, FDK with extrapolated projection data (E-FDK), and total variation-based compressed sensing. A canine projection dataset acquired using a clinical C-arm imaging system supplied realistic cardiac motion and anatomy for this evaluation. Three different levels of truncation were simulated. The relative root mean squared error and the universal image quality index were used to quantify the reconstruction accuracy. Three main conclusions were reached. (1) The adapted version of the PICCS algorithm offered the highest image quality and reconstruction accuracy. (2) No meaningful variation in performance was observed when the amount of truncation was changed. (3) This study showed evidence that accurate interior tomography with an undersampled acquisition is possible for realistic objects if a prior image with minimal artifacts is available.

  4. Testing nonstandard neutrino matter interactions in atmospheric neutrino propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Mehta, Poonam; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Gandhi, Raj

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of nonstandard interactions on the oscillation pattern of atmospheric neutrinos. We use neutrino oscillograms as our main tool to infer the role of nonstandard interactions (NSI) parameters at the probability level in the energy range, E ∈[1 ,20 ] GeV and zenith angle range, cos θ ∈[-1 ,0 ] . We compute the event rates for atmospheric neutrino events in presence of NSI parameters in the energy range E ∈[1 ,10 ] GeV for two different detector configurations—a magnetized iron calorimeter and an unmagnetized liquid argon time projection chamber which have different sensitivities to NSI parameters due to their complementary characteristics.

  5. Improving Dark Matter Searches by Measuring the Nucleon Axial Form Factor: Perspectives from MicroBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Miceli, Tia; Papavassiliou, Vassili; Pate, Stephen; Woodruff, Katherine

    2015-11-01

    The MicroBooNE neutrino experiment at Fermilab is constructing a liquid-argon time-projection chamber for the Booster Neutrino Beam to study neutrino oscillations and interactions with nucleons and nuclei, starting in 2014. We describe the experiment and focus on its unique abilities to measure cross sections at low values of $Q^2$. In particular, the neutral-current elastic scattering cross section is especially interesting, as it is sensitive to the contribution of the strange sea quark spin to the angular-momentum of the nucleon, $\\Delta s$. Implications for dark-matter searches are discussed.

  6. MCP-based photodetectors for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmapalan, R.; Mane, A.; Byrum, K.; Demarteau, M.; Elam, J.; May, E.; Wagner, R.; Walters, D.; Xia, L.; Xie, J.; Zhao, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Argonne MCP-based photo detector is an offshoot of the Large Area Pico-second Photo Detector (LAPPD) project, wherein 6 cm × 6 cm sized detectors are made at Argonne National Laboratory. We have successfully built and tested our first detectors for pico-second timing and few mm spatial resolution. We discuss our efforts to customize these detectors to operate in a cryogenic environment. Initial plans aim to operate in liquid argon. We are also exploring ways to mitigate wave length shifting requirements and also developing bare-MCP photodetectors to operate in a gaseous cryogenic environment.

  7. Some recent results from ICARUS

    SciTech Connect

    Farnese, Christian

    2015-07-15

    ICARUS T600 is the largest Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) ever built. Thanks to the excellent spatial and calorimetric resolutions and the three-dimensional visualization capabilities ICARUS T600 represents a major milestone towards the realization of future LAr detectors for neutrino physics and for the search of rare events. Three new important results from the analysis of the events collected by this detector will be here shortly presented: in particular the new improved results on the electron neutrino search, the results on the determination of the muon momentum using the Multiple Scattering and the new LAr purification methods and improvements of the electron lifetime.

  8. Dark Sector Searches in LArTPC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himwich, Elizabeth; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiments, which allow for excellent event characterization and topological visualization, are sensitive to the distinct signatures of theorized low-energy dark sector phenomena. With the unique technology of LArTPC experiments, it is possible to perform a quasi-model independent dark sector search that can encompass a number of models. This talk will discuss the dark sector search in LArTPC experiments as well as the sensitivity of the MicroBooNE and Lar1-ND experiments to dark sector signatures predicted by leptophobic models, which has been evaluated based on simulated signal and background event rates.

  9. SIMBIOS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, NASA Research Announcement (NRAI) research status, satellite data processing, data product validation, and field calibration. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  10. Real time planning, guidance and validation of surgical acts using 3D segmentations, augmented reality projections and surgical tools video tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Angel; Galan, Juan-Antonio; Nauroy, Julien; Donars, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    When performing laparoscopies and punctures, the precise anatomic localizations are required. Current techniques very often rely on the mapping between the real situation and preoperative images. The PC based software we present realizes 3D segmentations of regions of interest from CT or MR slices. It allows the planning of punctures or trocars insertion trajectories, taking anatomical constraints into account. Geometrical transformations allow the projection over the patient's body of the organs and lesions shapes, realistically reconstructed, using a standard video projector in the operating room. We developed specific image processing software which automatically segments and registers images of a webcam used in the operating room to give feedback to the user.

  11. NSF Funded Projects: Perspectives of Project Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.; Loepp, Franzie; Martin, G. Eugene

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 23 principal investigators of National Science Foundation-funded projects identified the chief facilitating factor to be direct contact with program officers. They had difficulties conceptualizing and envisioning their projects, finding time and confidence for writing proposals, and dealing with the complexity of the guidelines and the…

  12. The UP4FUN Intervention Effect on Breaking Up Sedentary Time in 10- to 12-Year-Old Belgian Children: The ENERGY-Project.

    PubMed

    Verloigne, Maïté; Berntsen, Sveinung; Ridgers, Nicola D; Cardon, Greet; Chinapaw, Mai; Altenburg, Teatske; Brug, Johannes; Bere, Elling; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Maes, Lea

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no studies available reporting intervention effects on breaking up children's sedentary time. This study examined the UP4FUN intervention effect on objectively measured number of breaks in sedentary time, number of sedentary bouts (≥ 10 mins) and total and average amount of time spent in those sedentary bouts among 10- to 12-year-old Belgian children. The total sample included 354 children (mean age: 10.9 ± 0.7 years; 59% girls) with valid ActiGraph accelerometer data at pre- and posttest. Only few and small intervention effects were found, namely on total time spent in sedentary bouts immediately after school hours (4-6PM; β = -3.51mins) and on average time spent in sedentary bouts before school hours (6-8.30AM; β = -4.83mins) and immediately after school hours in favor of children from intervention schools (β = -2.71mins). Unexpectedly, girls from intervention schools decreased the number of breaks during school hours (8.30AM-4PM; β = -23.45breaks) and increased the number of sedentary bouts on a weekend day (β = +0.90bouts), whereas girls in control schools showed an increase in number of breaks and a decrease in number of bouts. In conclusion, UP4FUN did not have a consistent or substantial effect on breaking up children's sedentary time and these data suggest that more intensive and longer lasting interventions are needed. PMID:25389211

  13. The ‘pit-crew’ model for improving door-to-needle times in endovascular stroke therapy: a Six-Sigma project

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ansaar T; Smith, Matthew S; Boo, SoHyun; Tarabishy, Abdul R; Hobbs, Gerald R; Carpenter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Background Delays in delivering endovascular stroke therapy adversely affect outcomes. Time-sensitive treatments such as stroke interventions benefit from methodically developed protocols. Clearly defined roles in these protocols allow for parallel processing of tasks, resulting in consistent delivery of care. Objective To present the outcomes of a quality-improvement (QI) process directed at reducing stroke treatment times in a tertiary level academic medical center. Methods A Six-Sigma-based QI process was developed over a 3-month period. After an initial analysis, procedures were implemented and fine-tuned to identify and address rate-limiting steps in the endovascular care pathway. Prospectively recorded treatment times were then compared in two groups of patients who were treated ‘before’ (n=64) or ‘after’ (n=30) the QI process. Three time intervals were measured: emergency room (ER) to arrival for CT scan (ER–CT), CT scan to interventional laboratory arrival (CT–Lab), and interventional laboratory arrival to groin puncture (Lab–puncture). Results The ER–CT time was 40 (±29) min in the ‘before’ and 26 (±15) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.008). The CT–Lab time was 87 (±47) min in the ‘before’ and 51 (±33) min in the ‘after’ group (p=0.0002). The Lab–puncture time was 24 (±11) min in the ‘before’ and 15 (±4) min in the ‘after’ group (p<0.0001). The overall ER–arrival to groin-puncture time was reduced from 2 h, 31 min (±51) min in the ‘before’ to 1 h, 33 min (±37) min in the ‘after’ group, (p<0.0001). The improved times were seen for both working hours and off-hours interventions. Conclusions A protocol-driven process can significantly improve efficiency of care in time-sensitive stroke interventions. PMID:26863106

  14. Evaluating interannual vegetation anomalies in the Basilicata region using satellite spot vegetation 1999-2011 time series: preliminary results from the Mitra project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaponara, Rosa; Desantis, Fortunato; Aromando, Angelo; Lanorte, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The Basilicata region funded a fesr project, MITRA to develop reliable low cost technologies to preserve and enhance natural and cultural heritage in some relevant areas selected as test cases. " Cultural heritage and the natural heritage are increasingly threatened with destruction not only by the traditional causes of decay, but also by changing social and economic conditions which aggravate the situation with even more formidable phenomena of damage or destruction, from THE GENERAL CONFERENCE of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization meeting in Paris from 17 October to 21 November 1972, at its seventeenth session, available on line " (http://whc.unesco.org/en/conventiontext/). This paper is focused on the preliminary results obtained in the framework of the Mitra project. In particular, a temporal series (1999-2011) of the yearly Maximum Value Composit of SPOT/VEGETATION NDVI was used to carried out investigation on the whole Basilicata region. The PCA was used as a first step of data transform to enhance regions of localized change in multi-temporal data sets (Lasaponara 2006). Results from PCA were further processed using Support Vector machine (SVM) to identify and map land degradation phenomenon Both naturally vegetated areas (forest, shrub-land, herbaceous cover) and agricultural lands have been investigated in order to extract the most prominent natural and/or man induced alterations affecting vegetation behavior. Such analyses can provide valuable information for monitoring the status of vegetation which is an indicator of the degree of stress namely any disturbance that adversely influences plants in response to natural hazards and/or anthropogenic activities. Our findings suggest that the jointly use of PCA and SVM PCA can provide valuable information for environmental management policies involving biodiversity preservation and rational exploitation of natural and agricultural resources. Rosa Lasaponara 2006, On the use of

  15. Finding time.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    We understand time through our models of it. These are typically models of our physical chronometers, which we then project into our subjects. A few of these models of the nature of time and its effects on the behavior of organisms are reviewed. New models, such as thermodynamics and spectral decomposition, are recommended for the potential insights that they afford. In all cases, associations are essential features of timing. To make them, time must be discretized by stimuli such as hours, minutes, conditioned stimuli, trials, and contexts in general. Any one association is seldom completely dominant, but rather shares control through proximity in a multidimensional space, important dimensions of which may include physical space and time as rendered by Fourier transforms. PMID:23973706

  16. Ulcer healing time and antibiotic treatment before and after the introduction of the Registry of Ulcer Treatment: an improvement project in a national quality registry in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Öien, Rut F; Forssell, Henrik W

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate changes in ulcer healing time and antibiotic treatment in Sweden following the introduction of the Registry of Ulcer Treatment (RUT), a national quality registry, in 2009. Design A statistical analysis of RUT data concerning the healing time and antibiotic treatment for patients with hard-to-heal ulcers in Sweden between 2009 and 2012. Setting RUT is a national web-based quality registry used to capture areas of improvement in ulcer care and to structure wound management by registering patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot and pressure ulcers. Registration includes variables such as gender, age, diagnosis, healing time, antibiotic treatment, and ulcer duration and size. Population Every patient with a hard-to-heal ulcer registered with RUT between 2009 and 2012 (n=1417) was included. Main outcome measures Statistical analyses were performed using Stata V.12.1. Healing time was assessed with the Kaplan-Meier analysis and adjustment was made for ulcer size. A log-rank test was used for equality of survivor functions. Results According to the adjusted registry in December 2012, patients’ median age was 80 years (mean 77.5 years, range 11–103 years). The median healing time for all ulcers, adjusted for ulcer size, was 146 days (21 weeks) in 2009 and 63 days (9 weeks) in 2012 (p=0.001). Considering all years between 2009 and 2012, antibiotic treatment for patients with hard-to-heal ulcers was reduced from 71% before registration to 29% after registration of ulcer healing (p=0.001). Conclusions Healing time and antibiotic treatment decreased significantly during 3 years after launch of RUT. PMID:23959752

  17. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  18. Joint Solar Dynamics Project data summary (3rd): Solar magnetic field, chromospheric and coronal observations near the time of the 18 March 1988 solar eclipse. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Sime, D.G.; Garcia, C.J.; Lundin, W.E.; Yasukawa, E.A.

    1988-11-01

    The general goal of the HAO/University of Hawaii Joint Solar Dynamics Project is to establish the relationships that exist between the solar magnetic field, detected in the photosphere, and the structure and evolution of the corona. The SOLDYN programs of 1982 and 1983 demonstrated the ability to use existing instruments to gather data of value in the pursuit of that goal. The goals for the observations in 1988 are as follows: (1) document the state of the sun, from the photosphere up through the chromosphere and out into the corona for the approximately four-week interval around the total solar eclipse of 18 March 1988, and (2) identify the relationship between the photospheric magnetic fields and the temperature and density structure of the corona. This report contains the reduced observations made during this SOLDYN III period necessary to achieve these goals. They are presented both in the form of daily photographic and photoelectric measurements, and in synoptic format for the period.

  19. Project Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Henderson, A.; Lee, J.; Smith, G.; Stluka, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROJECT EXPLORER is a program that will fly student-developed experiments onboard the Space Shuttle in NASA's Get-Away Special (GAS) containers. The program is co-sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center, the Alabama-Mississippi Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Alabama A&M University and requires extensive support by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. A unique feature of this project will demonstrate transmissions to ground stations on amateur radio frequencies in English language. Experiments Nos. 1, 2, and 3 use the microgravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution, and the germination of radish seeds. Flight results will be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 features radio transmission and will also provide timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor will obtain real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements taken inside the canister. These data will be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they have been converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception.

  20. High sensitive reflection type long period fiber grating biosensor for real time detection of thyroglobulin, a differentiated thyroid cancer biomarker: the Smart Health project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quero, G.; Severino, R.; Vaiano, P.; Consales, M.; Ruvo, M.; Sandomenico, A.; Borriello, A.; Giordano, M.; Zuppolini, S.; Diodato, L.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of a reflection-type long period fiber grating (LPG) biosensor able to perform the real time detection of thyroid cancer markers in the needle washout of fine-needle aspiration biopsy. A standard LPG is first transformed in a practical probe working in reflection mode, then it is coated by an atactic-polystyrene overlay in order to increase its surrounding refractive index sensitivity and to provide, at the same time, the desired interfacial properties for a stable bioreceptor immobilization. The results provide a clear demonstration of the effectiveness and sensitivity of the developed biosensing platform, allowing the in vitro detection of human Thyroglobulin at sub-nanomolar concentrations.

  1. Analysis of High Precision GPS Time Series and Strain Rates for the Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis of Washington State Prospects Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-22

    Global Positioning System (GPS) time series from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Earthscope’s Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and Central Washington University’s Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA). GPS station velocities were used to infer strain rates using the ‘splines in tension’ method. Strain rates were derived separately for subduction zone locking at depth and block rotation near the surface within crustal block boundaries.

  2. THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERMAN,B.S.; ADAMS,J.W.; HEISER,J.; KALB,P.D.; LOCKWOOD,A.

    2003-04-01

    As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd{sup 3} of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd{sup 3}) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd{sup 3} units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd{sup 3} ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and

  3. Pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate critical factors in the performance of the site with respect to a criterion in terms of pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time. The degree of failure in the analytical model to meet the criterion is sensitive to the estimate of fracture porosity in the upper welded unit of the problem domain. Fracture porosity is derived from a number of more fundamental measurements including fracture frequency, fracture orientation, and the moisture-retention characteristic inferred for the fracture domain.

  4. Project Longshot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. Curtis; Chamberlain, Sally A.; Stevens, Robert; Pagan, Neftali

    1989-01-01

    Project Longshot is an unmanned probe to our nearest star system, Alpha Centauri, 4.3 light years away. The Centauri system is a trinary system consisting of two central stars (A and B) orbiting a barycenter, and a third (Proxima Centauri) orbiting the two. The system is a declination of -67 degrees. The goal is to reach the Centauri system in 50 years. This time space was chosen because any shorter time would be impossible of the relativistic velocities involved, and any greater time would be impossible because of the difficulty of creating a spacecraft with such a long lifetime. Therefore, the following mission profile is proposed: (1) spacecraft is assembled in Earth orbit; (2) spacecraft escapes Earth and Sun in the ecliptic with a single impulse maneuver; (3) spacecraft changed declination to point toward Centauri system; (4) spacecraft accelerates to 0.1c; (5) spacecraft coasts at 0.1c for 41 years; (6) spacecraft decelerates upon reaching Centauri system; and (7) spacecraft orbits Centauri system, conducts investigations, and relays data to Earth. The total time to reach the Centauri system, taking into consideration acceleration and deceleration, will be approximately 50 years.

  5. VIPER project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The VIPER project has so far produced a formal specification of a 32 bit RISC microprocessor, an implementation of that chip in radiation-hard SOS technology, a partial proof of correctness of the implementation which is still being extended, and a large body of supporting software. The time has now come to consider what has been achieved and what directions should be pursued in the future. The most obvious lesson from the VIPER project was the time and effort needed to use formal methods properly. Most of the problems arose in the interfaces between different formalisms, e.g., between the (informal) English description and the HOL spec, between the block-level spec in HOL and the equivalent in ELLA needed by the low-level CAD tools. These interfaces need to be made rigorous or (better) eliminated. VIPER 1A (the latest chip) is designed to operate in pairs, to give protection against breakdowns in service as well as design faults. We have come to regard redundancy and formal design methods as complementary, the one to guard against normal component failures and the other to provide insurance against the risk of the common-cause failures which bedevil reliability predictions. Any future VIPER chips will certainly need improved performance to keep up with increasingly demanding applications. We have a prototype design (not yet specified formally) which includes 32 and 64 bit multiply, instruction pre-fetch, more efficient interface timing, and a new instruction to allow a quick response to peripheral requests. Work is under way to specify this device in MIRANDA, and then to refine the spec into a block-level design by top-down transformations. When the refinement is complete, a relatively simple proof checker should be able to demonstrate its correctness. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}ȯ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  7. Shop Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob

    Vocational agriculture teachers in Oklahoma prepared the shop project drawings which comprise the document. Seventy-one projects, with lists of required materials, diagrams, and measurements, are included. Construction projects fall into six categories (number of projects in parentheses): Trailers (5), racks (3), livestock production projects…

  8. SISCAL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Richard P.; Fell, Frank

    2003-05-01

    The first "ocean colour" sensor, Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), was launched in 1978. Oceanographers learnt a lot from CZCS but it remained a purely scientific sensor. In recent years, a new generation of satellite-borne earth observation (EO) instruments has been brought into space. These instruments combine high spectral and spatial resolution with revisiting rates of the order of one per day. More instruments with further increased spatial, spectral and temporal resolution will be available within the next years. In the meantime, evaluation procedures taking advantage of the capabilities of the new instruments were derived, allowing the retrieval of ecologically important parameters with higher accuracy than before. Space agencies are now able to collect and to process satellite data in real time and to disseminate them via the Internet. It is therefore meanwhile possible to envisage using EO operationally. In principle, a significant demand for EO data products on terrestrial or marine ecosystems exists both with public authorities (environmental protection, emergency management, natural resources management, national parks, regional planning, etc) and private companies (tourist industry, insurance companies, water suppliers, etc). However, for a number of reasons, many data products that can be derived from the new instruments and methods have not yet left the scientific community towards public or private end users. It is the intention of the proposed SISCAL (Satellite-based Information System on Coastal Areas and Lakes) project to contribute to the closure of the existing gap between space agencies and research institutions on one side and end users on the other side. To do so, we intend to create a data processor that automatically derives and subsequently delivers over the Internet, in Near-Real-Time (NRT), a number of data products tailored to individual end user needs. The data products will be generated using a Geographical Information System (GIS

  9. SISCAL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, Richard P.; Fell, Frank

    2003-05-01

    The first "ocean colour" sensor, Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), was launched in 1978. Oceanographers learnt a lot from CZCS but it remained a purely scientific sensor. In recent years, a new generation of satellite-borne earth observation (EO) instruments has been brought into space. These instruments combine high spectral and spatial resolution with revisiting rates of the order of one per day. More instruments with further increased spatial, spectral and temporal resolution will be available within the next years. In the meantime, evaluation procedures taking advantage of the capabilities of the new instruments were derived, allowing the retrieval of ecologically important parameters with higher accuracy than before. Space agencies are now able to collect and to process satellite data in real time and to disseminate them via the Internet. It is therefore meanwhile possible to envisage using EO operationally. In principle, a significant demand for EO data products on terrestrial or marine ecosystems exists both with public authorities (environmental protection, emergency management, natural resources management, national parks, regional planning, etc) and private companies (tourist industry, insurance companies, water suppliers, etc). However, for a number of reasons, many data products that can be derived from the new instruments and methods have not yet left the scientific community towards public or private end users. It is the intention of the proposed SISCAL (Satellite-based Information System on Coastal Areas and Lakes) project to contribute to the closure of the existing gap between space agencies and research institutions on one side and end users on the other side. To do so, we intend to create a data processor that automatically derives and subsequently delivers over the Internet, in Near-Real-Time (NRT), a number of data products tailored to individual end user needs. The data products will be generated using a Geographical Information System (GIS

  10. Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) project and a next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, S.

    2012-12-01

    The first Workshop of Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER1) was held in Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan from February 23 to 24, 2012. The workshop focused on the formulation of strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions. More than 150 participants attended the workshop. During the workshop, the G-EVER1 accord was approved by the participants. The Accord consists of 10 recommendations like enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information about the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The G-EVER Hub website (http://g-ever.org) was established to promote the exchange of information and knowledge among the Asia-Pacific countries. Several G-EVER Working Groups and Task Forces were proposed. One of the working groups was tasked to make the next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment system is useful for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is planned to be developed based on volcanic eruption scenario datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Defining volcanic eruption scenarios based on precursor phenomena leading up to major eruptions of active volcanoes is quite important for the future prediction of volcanic eruptions. Compiling volcanic eruption scenarios after a major eruption is also important. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and styles, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represent a subset of possible future scenarios. Hence, different distributions from the previous deposits are mainly observed due to the differences in

  11. SIMBIOS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, NASA Research Announcement (NRA) research status, satellite data processing, data product validation, and field calibration. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project. The SIMBIOS Science Team Principal Investigators' (PIs) original contributions to this report are in chapters four and above. The purpose of these contributions is to describe the current research status of the SIMBIOS-NRA-96 funded research. The contributions are published as submitted, with the exception of minor edits to correct obvious grammatical or clerical errors.

  12. Project Week at Yeovil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadd, K. F.

    1979-01-01

    This article describes an approach to science teaching in which secondary school students and faculty members lived and worked together for a week at Yeovil College, concentrating on science project work. The projects investigated during this time are briefly described. (GA)

  13. Family Reunification Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Utah's Department of Human Services' Family Reunification Project was initiated to demonstrate that intensive, time-limited, home-based services would enable children in foster care to return to their natural families more rapidly than regular foster care management permits. The following steps were taken in project development: (1) sites were…

  14. Project CAPABLE: Model Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madawaska School District, ME.

    Project CAPABLE (Classroom Action Program: Aim: Basic Learning Effectiveness) is a classroom approach which integrates the basic learning skills with content. The goal of the project is to use basic learning skills to enhance the learning of content and at the same time use the content to teach basic learning skills. This manual illustrates how…

  15. MEXICAN MIGRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mexican Migration Project is designed to make timely, high-quality data on documented and undocumented Mexican migrants available to researchers and policy analysts. Each year since 1987 the project has administered a semi-structured interview schedule to representative sampl...

  16. Underestimation of Project Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Large projects almost always exceed their budgets. Estimating cost is difficult and estimated costs are usually too low. Three different reasons are suggested: bad luck, overoptimism, and deliberate underestimation. Project management can usually point to project difficulty and complexity, technical uncertainty, stakeholder conflicts, scope changes, unforeseen events, and other not really unpredictable bad luck. Project planning is usually over-optimistic, so the likelihood and impact of bad luck is systematically underestimated. Project plans reflect optimism and hope for success in a supposedly unique new effort rather than rational expectations based on historical data. Past project problems are claimed to be irrelevant because "This time it's different." Some bad luck is inevitable and reasonable optimism is understandable, but deliberate deception must be condemned. In a competitive environment, project planners and advocates often deliberately underestimate costs to help gain project approval and funding. Project benefits, cost savings, and probability of success are exaggerated and key risks ignored. Project advocates have incentives to distort information and conceal difficulties from project approvers. One naively suggested cure is more openness, honesty, and group adherence to shared overall goals. A more realistic alternative is threatening overrun projects with cancellation. Neither approach seems to solve the problem. A better method to avoid the delusions of over-optimism and the deceptions of biased advocacy is to base the project cost estimate on the actual costs of a large group of similar projects. Over optimism and deception can continue beyond the planning phase and into project execution. Hard milestones based on verified tests and demonstrations can provide a reality check.

  17. DOE Robotics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  18. Manpower and project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to study how manpower and projects are planned at the Facilities Engineering Division (FENGD) within the Systems Engineering and Operations Directorate of the LaRC and to make recommendations for improving the effectiveness and productivity ot the tools that are used. The existing manpower and project planning processes (including the management plan for the FENGD, existing manpower planning reports, project reporting to LaRC and NASA Headquarters, employee time reporting, financial reporting, and coordination/tracking reports for procurement) were discussed with several people, and project planning software was evaluated.

  19. DAF Glovebox Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.W.; Higgs, R.L.

    2000-11-14

    This document defines how the glovebox project will be managed and executed. It provides a path forward for establishing a glovebox capability in Building 341 of the DAF in time to meet JASPER programmatic requirements as the first user. Note that some elements of the glovebox project have been under way for some time and are more mature than others; other elements are being worked concurrently. This plan serves the following purposes: Assign organizational and individual responsibilities for bringing the glovebox capability online; Coordinate activities between organizations; Facilitate communication between project members and management; and Identify the mechanisms used to manage and control the project. The scope of this plan includes all activities conducted to achieve project objectives, culminating in DOE/NV approval to operate. This plan does not address the issues associated with the steady-state operation of the glovebox.

  20. High Resolution Telesesimic P-wave Back-Projection Imaging Using Variable Travel Time Corrections: Characterizing Sub-Events of the Great April 11th 2012 Indian Ocean Intraplate Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, K. B.; Koper, K. D.; Yue, H.; Lay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Two of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded occurred off the coast of northern Sumatra on April 11th 2012. The Mw 8.7 mainshock and Mw 8.2 aftershock occurred east of the NinetyEast Ridge in the Wharton Basin, a region of intraplate deformation with prominent fracture zones striking NNE-SSW. The relative lack of geodetic and local seismic data compared to other recent great earthquakes make teleseismic data especially important for understanding the rupture properties of these events. We performed short-period P-wave back-projection imaging using independent networks of stations in Europe and Japan. Preliminary images from the two networks showed similarly complex multi-event sources for the mainshock that indicate rupture occurred along both nodal planes of the gCMT solution, consistent with the locations of early aftershocks. Back-projection images of the Mw 8.2 aftershock showed a single, compact, bilateral rupture corresponding to the NNE-SSW nodal plane of the CMT solution [Yue et al., 2012]. Here we improve upon the resolution and accuracy of our initial back-projection images by estimating station specific travel time corrections that vary across the source region [e.g., Ishii et al., 2007]. These corrections are used to compensate for 3D variations in Earth structure that occur between the source region and the seismometers, and act to focus the array beams. We perform multi-channel cross-correlations of P waves recorded for 7 aftershocks that were (1) distributed broadly around the source region and (2) well-observed at seismometers in Europe. For each seismometer in the array, the 8 measured static corrections are smoothly interpolated over the entire source region with a Kriging method to form a travel time correction surface. These surfaces are then used with an otherwise conventional back-projection approach [Xu et al., 2009] to image the ruptures. Our new images are broadly consistent with our original results, indicating that the