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Sample records for liquid-phase activity coefficients

  1. High-Throughput Determination of Octanol-Water Partition Coefficients by Ultrasound-Assisted Liquid-Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yugao; Ma, Shuo; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A method of high-throughput determination, which is based on ultrasound-assisted liquid-phase microextraction, was developed to measure directly the partition coefficients of n-octanol-water. In ultrasound-assisted liquid-phase microextraction, ultrasonic energy can facilitate the mass transfer process of six or more microextractors simultaneously. Therefore, high-throughput determination of n-octanol-water partition coefficients can be performed favorably, and the equilibrium time of each microextractor can be decreased effectively. Several experimental parameters including ultrasonic power and frequency, centrifugation conditions, extractant volume and sample concentration were analyzed and optimized at 25°C. Under the optimum conditions, it only takes 2 min to reach extraction equilibrium, and the solutions of sample can be separated by centrifugation in 4 min. After centrifugation, the concentrations in n-octanol phases are analyzed with gas chromatography. The method was further evaluated with eight reference compounds and the findings demonstrated that this method is suitable to determine the partition coefficients of organic compounds accurately and quickly. Next, the method was exploited to measure the partition coefficients of n-octanol-water containing 20 organic compounds, which cover the [Formula: see text] values from 0.05 to 4.36, with comparatively low relative standard deviation (RSD) directly. The results of this study illustrated that the RSD (n = 6) was under 3%. PMID:25583971

  2. Active role of the liquid phase of developer in revealing surface flaws by capillary methods

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorenko, P.P.; Dezhkunov, N.V.; Stoicheva, I.V.

    1988-08-01

    The article investigates the interaction of two chemically nonreacting liquids after they have been brought into contact with each other in a capillary. It is established that the liquid phase of the developer is not only a passive carrier of the developing component but also exerts an active influence on the process of development, and consequently, on the detectability of flaws.

  3. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  4. Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

  5. Vapour and Liquid-Phase Artemisia annua Essential Oil Activities against Several Clinical Strains of Candida.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Francesca; Donato, Rosa; Sacco, Cristiana; Pini, Gabriella; Flamini, Guido; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Candida spp. are often the cause of infection in immune-compromised individuals. They are characterized by a strong resistance to antimicrobial drugs and disinfectants. The activity of Artemisia annua essential oil against Candida spp. was determined by vapour contact and microdilution assay. The oil was characterized by the presence of oxygenated monoterpenes (more than 75 % of the constituents), mainly represented by the irregular monoterpene artemisia ketone (ca. 22 %), and the widespread monoterpenes 1,8 cineole (ca. 19 %) and camphor (ca. 17 %). Other representative constituents were artemisia alcohol (5.9 %), α-pinene (5.7 %), and pinocarvone (3.0 %). Thujone, a typical toxic constituent of the Artemisia species, was not detected. The results are reported as minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration, and diameter of inhibition zone obtained by the vapour diffusion assay. We tested 10 clinical Candida strains, coming from both clinical samples and international collections. The results show that the antifungal activity of A. annua is influenced by the type of method adopted. The inhibitory action of the essential oil was, in fact, higher in the vapour than in the liquid phase. Our results show an average minimum inhibitory concentration in the liquid phase of 11.88 µL/mL, while in the vapour phase, the growth of all Candida strains tested at a concentration of 2.13 µL/cm(3) was inhibited. A strain of Candida glabrata was found to be less susceptible to the liquid medium than the vapour assay (50 µL/mL vs. 0.64 µL/cm(3), respectively). Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis were the most susceptible to the vapour test, while Candida parapsilosis was the most resistant. PMID:27286334

  6. Metal Nanoparticles Catalyzed Selective Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation in the Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rong; Yuan, Bing; Zhao, Jie; Ralston, Walter T; Wu, Chung-Yeh; Unel Barin, Ebru; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the C-C bond activation mechanism is essential for developing the selective production of hydrocarbons in the petroleum industry and for selective polymer decomposition. In this work, ring-opening reactions of cyclopropane derivatives under hydrogen catalyzed by metal nanoparticles (NPs) in the liquid phase were studied. 40-atom rhodium (Rh) NPs, encapsulated by dendrimer molecules and supported in mesoporous silica, catalyzed the ring opening of cyclopropylbenzene at room temperature under hydrogen in benzene, and the turnover frequency (TOF) was higher than other metals or the Rh homogeneous catalyst counterparts. Comparison of reactants with various substitution groups showed that electron donation on the three-membered ring boosted the TOF of ring opening. The linear products formed with 100% selectivity for ring opening of all reactants catalyzed by the Rh NP. Surface Rh(0) acted as the active site in the NP. The capping agent played an important role in the ring-opening reaction kinetics. Larger particle size tended to show higher TOF and smaller reaction activation energy for Rh NPs encapsulated in either dendrimer or poly(vinylpyrrolidone). The generation/size of dendrimer and surface group also affected the reaction rate and activation energy. PMID:27322570

  7. Liquid-Phase Adsorption of Phenol onto Activated Carbons Prepared with Different Activation Levels.

    PubMed

    Hsieh; Teng

    2000-10-01

    The influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions was explored. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons, determined according to the Dubinin-Stoeckli equation, were found to vary with the burn-off level. By incorporating the distribution with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation using an inverse proportionality between the micropore size and the adsorption energy, the isotherms for the adsorption of phenol onto these carbons can be well predicted. The present study has demonstrated that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998301

  8. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  9. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  10. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  11. Nonhomogeneity effects in adsorption from gas and liquid phases on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derylo-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A.W.

    1999-05-25

    The process of adsorption of dissociating organic substances from dilute aqueous solutions on various activated carbons is studied. The investigated adsorbents have different pore structure and chemical properties of the surface. The characteristics of activated carbons are determined from nitrogen and benzene isotherms and potentiometric titration data. The properties of pore structure--BET specific surface area, the total pore volume, the external surface area, the micropore volume, and the density of surface charge--are evaluated. The isotherms of benzoic acid adsorption from the aqueous phase are measured for a wide range of solution pH and constant ionic strength by using the static method. The liquid adsorption data are analyzed in terms of the theory of adsorption on heterogeneous solids.

  12. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolekas, P.D.; Maggenakis, G.

    2007-02-14

    The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.

  13. In-situ activation of CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalysts in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Dennis M.; Hsiung, Thomas H.; Rao, Pradip; Roberts, George W.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of activation of a CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst slurried in a chemically inert liquid. Successful activation of the catalyst requires the use of a process in which the temperature of the system at any time is not allowed to exceed a certain critical value, which is a function of the specific hydrogen uptake of the catalyst at that same time. This process is especially critical for activating highly concentrated catalyst slurries, typically 25 to 50 wt %. Activation of slurries of CuO/ZnO/Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst is useful in carrying out the liquid phase methanol or the liquid phase shift reactions.

  14. Extensive database of liquid phase diffusion coefficients of some frequently used test molecules in reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Huiying; Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Adams, Erwin; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion plays an important role in all aspects of band broadening in chromatography. An accurate knowledge of molecular diffusion coefficients in different mobile phases is therefore crucial in fundamental column performance studies. Correlations available in literature, such as the Wilke-Chang equation, can provide good approximations of molecular diffusion under reversed-phase conditions. However, these correlations have been demonstrated to be less accurate for mobile phases containing a large percentage of acetonitrile, as is the case in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. A database of experimentally measured molecular diffusion coefficients of some 45 polar and apolar compounds that are frequently used as test molecules under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed-phase conditions is therefore presented. Special attention is given to diffusion coefficients of polar compounds obtained in large percentages of acetonitrile (>90%). The effect of the buffer concentration (5-10mM ammonium acetate) on the obtained diffusion coefficients is investigated and is demonstrated to mainly influence the molecular diffusion of charged molecules. Diffusion coefficients are measured using the Taylor-Aris method and hence deduced from the peak broadening of a solute when flowing through a long open tube. The validity of the set-up employed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficients is demonstrated by ruling out the occurrence of longitudinal diffusion, secondary flow interactions and extra-column effects, while it is also shown that radial equilibration in the 15m long capillary is effective. PMID:27240944

  15. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  16. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  17. Liquid Phase Miscibility Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Markworth, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The manner in which the microstructural features of liquid-phase miscibility gap alloys develop was determined. This will allow control of the microstructures and the resultant properties of these alloys. The long-duration low gravity afforded by the shuttle will allow experiments supporting this research to be conducted with minimal interference from buoyancy effects and gravitationally driven convection currents. Ground base studies were conducted on Al-In, Cu-Pb, and Te-Tl alloys to determine the effect of cooling rate, composition, and interfacial energies on the phase separation and solidification processes that influence the development of microstructure in these alloys. Isothermal and directional cooling experiments and simulations are conducted. The ground based activities are used as a technological base from which flight experiments formulated and to which these flight experiments are compared.

  18. Liquid-phase electroepitaxy - Dopant segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented which accounts for the dopant segregation in liquid-phase electroepitaxy in terms of dopant transport in the liquid phase (by electromigration and diffusion), the growth velocity, and the Peltier effect at the substrate-solution interface. The contribution of dopant electromigration to the magnitude of the effective segregation coefficient is dominant in the absence of convection; the contribution of the Peltier effect becomes significant only in the presence of pronounced convection. Quantitative expressions which relate the segregation coefficient to the growth parameters also permit the determination of the diffusion constant and electromigration mobility of the dopant in the liquid phase. The model was found to be in good agreement with the measured segregation characteristics of Sn in the electroepitaxial growth of GaAs from Ga-As solutions. For Sn in Ga-As solution at 900 C the diffusion constant was found to be 4 x 10 to the -5 sq cm/s and the electromigration velocity (toward the substrate with a positive polarity 2 x 10 to the -5 cm/s current density of 10 A/sq cm.

  19. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2016-02-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  20. Liquid-phase hydrogenation of citral over Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. 1. Temperature effects on activity and selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.K.; Vannice, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    Liquid-phase hydrogenation of citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal) over Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied in the temperature and pressure ranges 298--423 K and 7--21 atm, respectively. The reaction kinetics were shown to be free of artifacts arising from transport limitations and poisoning effects. The reaction rate in hexane at the solvent exhibited an activity minimum at 373 K. The initial turnover frequency for citral disappearance over 1.44% Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst at 20 atm H{sub 2} pressure decreased from 0.19 s{sup {minus}1} at 298 K to 0.02 s{sup {minus}1} at 373 K, but exhibited normal Arrhenius behavior between 373 and 423 K with an activation energy of 7 kcal/mol. Reaction at 298 K produced substantial deactivation, with the rate decreasing by more than an order of magnitude during the first 4 h of reaction; however, reaction at temperatures greater than 373 K exhibited negligible deactivation and a constant rate up to citral conversions greater than 70%. These unusual temperature effects were modeled using Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics invoking dissociative adsorption of hydrogen, competitive adsorption between hydrogen and the organic compounds, and addition of the second hydrogen atom to each reactant as the rate-determining step. Decomposition of the unsaturated alcohol (either geraniol or nerol) was proposed to occur concurrently with the hydrogenation steps to yield adsorbed CO and carbonaceous species which cause the deactivation, but at higher temperatures these species could be removed from the Pt surface by desorption or rapid hydrogenation, respectively. The activity minimum observed in the present study is attributed to the relative rates of the alcohol decomposition reaction and CO desorption, with the decomposition reaction having an activation barrier lower than that for CO desorption.

  1. Activity coefficient of aqueous sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Peiper, J. Christopher

    1980-09-01

    The determination of the activity coefficient and related properties of sodium bicarbonate presents special problems because of the appreciable vapor pressure of CO2 above such solutions. With the development of reliable equations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed electrolytes, it is possible to determine the parameters for NaHCO3 from cell measurements or NaCl-NaHCO3 mixtures. Literature data are analyzed to illustrate the method and provide interim values, hoever it is noted that further measurements over a wider range of concentrations would yield more definitive results. Lastly, an estimate is also given for the activity coefficient of KHCO3.

  2. Depositing spacing layers on magnetic film with liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, J. W.; Shaw, R. W.; Sanfort, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy spacing layer is compatible with systems which are hard-bubble proofed by use of second magnetic garnet film as capping layer. Composite is superior in that: circuit fabrication time is reduced; adherence is superior; visibility is better; and, good match of thermal expansion coefficients is provided.

  3. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  4. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  5. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  6. Effect of additions of sodium hydroxide on the catalytic activity of partially deactivated skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in aqueous-organic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, M. V.; Afineevskii, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The effect the concentration of sodium hydroxide has on the catalytic activity of skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in ternary methanol-water-sodium hydroxide solutions with a methanol content of 0.11 mole fractions and different concentrations of sodium hydroxide is studied. The key role of the solvent during changes in the activity of skeletal nickel in the hydrogenation reaction of sodium maleate is assumed, based on data on the redistribution of individual forms of adsorbed hydrogen.

  7. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  8. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  9. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  10. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  11. Liquid-phase combinatorial synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, H; Wolfe, M M; Brenner, S; Janda, K D

    1995-01-01

    A concept termed liquid-phase combinatorial synthesis (LPCS) is described. The central feature of this methodology is that it combines the advantages that classic organic synthesis in solution offers with those that solid-phase synthesis can provide, through the application of a linear homogeneous polymer. To validate this concept two libraries were prepared, one of peptide and the second of nonpeptide origin. The peptide-based library was synthesized by a recursive deconvolution strategy [Erb, E., Janda, K. D. & Brenner, S. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 11422-11426] and several ligands were found within this library to bind a monoclonal antibody elicited against beta-endorphin. The non-peptide molecules synthesized were arylsulfonamides, a class of compounds of known clinical bactericidal efficacy. The results indicate that the reaction scope of LPCS should be general, and its value to multiple, high-throughput screening assays could be of particular merit, since multimilligram quantities of each library member can readily be attained. PMID:7541541

  12. Application of dynamic liquid-phase microextraction and injection port derivatization combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to the determination of acidic pharmaceutically active compounds in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lee, Hian Kee

    2009-10-30

    A method has been established for the determination of four pharmaceutically active compounds (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen and clofibric acid) in water samples using dynamic hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF/LPME) followed by gas chromatography (GC) injection port derivatization and GC-mass spectrometric (MS) determination. Dynamic HF/LPME is a novel approach to microextraction that involves the use of a programmable syringe pump to move the liquid phases participating in the extraction so as to facilitate the process. Trimethylanilinium hydroxide (TMAH) was used as derivatization reagent for the analytes to increase their volatility and improve chromatographic separation. Parameters that affect extraction efficiency (selection of organic solvent, volume of organic solvent, agitation in the donor phase, plunger movement and extraction time) were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method provided good enrichment factors up to 251, reproducibility ranging from 3.26% to 10.61%, and good linearity from 0.2 to 50 microg/L. The limits of detection ranged between 0.01 and 0.05 microg/L (S/N=3) using selective ion monitoring. This method was applied to the determination of the four pharmaceutically active compounds in tap water and wastewater collected from a drain in the vicinity of a hospital. PMID:19345366

  13. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  14. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  15. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  16. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si-xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si-xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  17. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si- xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-06-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si- xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  18. Effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.; Mcanelly, W. B.; Mckannan, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    The unique conditions offered by the earth orbital environment in material processing involving both solid and liquid phases, such as liquid phase sintering, were studied. An experimental development program involving both test and theoretical work was initiated. Experimental work using material combinations selected such that maximum information about the effect of gravity can be derived has been conducted. Wetting of the solid phase by the liquid during sintering is an important phenomenon in liquid phase sintering, and gravity has influence on both capillary phenomenon and density segregation; hence, material combinations were selected such that these two effects can be suitably studies. The experimental work is meant to form the basis for similar comparative work done under low-g conditions. The part of the model dealing with the capillary phenomenon, as related to liquid phase sintering and the effect of gravity on it, suggest that gravity will have negligible effect on the Bond number and that the cohesive force is dependent on both the amount of liquid phase and the angle of contact.

  19. Structure analysis of turbulent liquid phase by POD and LSE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, S. Muthuvalu, M. S.; Siddiqui, M. I.; Heikal, M. R. Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, vortical structures and turbulence characteristics of liquid phase in both single liquid phase and two-phase slug flow in pipes were studied. Two dimensional velocity vector fields of liquid phase were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV). Two cases were considered one single phase liquid flow at 80 l/m and second slug flow by introducing gas at 60 l/m while keeping liquid flow rate same. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Linear stochastic estimation techniques were used for the extraction of coherent structures and analysis of turbulence in liquid phase for both cases. POD has successfully revealed large energy containing structures. The time dependent POD spatial mode coefficients oscillate with high frequency for high mode numbers. The energy distribution of spatial modes was also achieved. LSE has pointed out the coherent structured for both cases and the reconstructed velocity fields are in well agreement with the instantaneous velocity fields.

  20. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  1. Liquid phase sintered compacts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T. K.; Mcanelly, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A model that will explain the effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering was developed. Wetting characteristics and density segregation which are the two important phenomena in liquid phase sintering are considered in the model development. Experiments were conducted on some selected material combinations to study the gravity effects on liquid phase sintering, and to verify the validity of the model. It is concluded that: (1) The surface tension forces acting on solid particles in a one-g environment are not appreciably different from those anticipated in a 0.00001g/g sub 0 (or lower) environment. (2) The capillary forces are dependent on the contact angle, the quantity of the liquid phase, and the distance between solid particles. (3) The pores (i.e., bubbles) do not appear to be driven to the surface by gravity-produced buoyancy forces. (4) The length of time to produce the same degree of settling in a low-gravity environment will be increased significantly. (5) A low gravity environment would appear to offer a unique means of satisfactorily infiltrating a larger and/or complex shaped compact.

  2. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  3. Activity coefficients of chlorophenols in water at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Tabai, S.; Rogalski, M.; Solimando, R.; Malanowski, S.K.

    1997-11-01

    The total pressure of aqueous solutions of chlorophenols was determined by a ebulliometric total pressure method for the aqueous solutions of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol in the temperature range from 40 to 90 C. The activity coefficients at infinite dilution and the Henry constants were derived.

  4. Gravitational Role in Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyaya, Anish; Iacocca, Ronald G.; German, Randall M.

    1998-01-01

    To comprehensively understand the gravitational effects on the evolution of both the microstructure and the macrostructure during liquid phase sintering, W-Ni-Fe alloys with W content varying from 35 to 98 wt.% were sintered in microgravity. Compositions that slump during ground-based sintering also distort when sintered under microgravity. In ground-based sintering, low solid content alloys distort with a typical elephant-foot profile, while in microgravity, the compacts tend to spheroidize. This study shows that microstructural segregation occurs in both ground-based as well as microgravity sintering. In ground-based experiments, because of the density difference between the solid and the liquid phase, the solid content increases from top to the bottom of the sample. In microgravity, the solid content increases from periphery to the center of the samples. This study also shows that the pores during microgravity sintering act as a stable phase and attain anomalous shapes.

  5. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    A study of porous plug use for vapor-liquid phase seperation in spaceborne cryogenic systems was conducted. The three main topics addressed were: (1) the usefulness of porous media in designs that call for variable areas and flow rates; (2) the possibility of prediction of main parameters of porous plugs for a given material; and (3) prediction of all parameters of the plug, including secondary parameters.

  6. Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Farahani, Hadi; Norouzi, Parviz; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Kashtiaray, Amir

    2010-04-16

    Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction (SDLPME) is a novel sample preparation technique possessing obvious advantages of simple operation with a high pre-concentration factor, low cost and low consumption of organic solvent. SDLPME coupled with gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been widely applied to the analyses of a different variety of samples. The basic principles, parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, and the latest applications of SDLPME are reviewed in this article. PMID:19962710

  7. On liquid phases in cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard; Faillace, George A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we review the relevant literature and investigate conditions likely to lead to melting of H2O ice, methanol (CH3OH) ice, ethane (C2H6) ice and other volatile ices in cometary nuclei. On the basis of a heat balance model which takes account of volatiles loss, we predict the formation of occasional aqueous and hydrocarbon liquid phases in subsurface regions at heliocentric distances, rh of 1-3 AU, and 5-12 AU, respectively. Low triple-point temperatures and low vapour pressures of C2H6, C3H8, and some higher-order alkanes and alkenes, favour liquid phase formation in cometary bodies at high rh. Microporosity and the formation of a stabilization crust occluding the escape of volatiles facilitate liquid-phase formation. Characteristics of the near-surface which favour subsurface melting include; low effective surface emissivity (at low rh), high amorphous carbon content, average pore sizes of ˜10 μm or less, presence of solutes (e.g. CH3OH), mixtures of C2-C6 hydrocarbons (for melting at high rh), diurnal thermal cycling, and slow rotation rate. Applying the principles of soil mechanics, capillary forces are shown to initiate pre-melting phenomena and subsequent melting, which is expected to impart considerable strength of ˜104 Pa in partially saturated layers, reducing porosity and permeability, enhancing thermal conductivity and heat transfer. Diurnal thermal cycling is expected to have a marked effect on the composition and distribution of H2O ice in the near-surface leading to frost heave-type phenomena even where little if any true melting occurs. Where melting does take place, capillary suction in the wetted zone has the potential to enhance heat transfer via capillary wetting in a low-gravity environment, and to modify surface topography creating relatively smooth flat-bottomed features, which have a tendency to be located within small depressions. An important aspect of the "wetted layer" model is the prediction that diurnal melt-freeze cycles

  8. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  9. Coexisting Liquid Phases Underlie Nucleolar Subcompartments.

    PubMed

    Feric, Marina; Vaidya, Nilesh; Harmon, Tyler S; Mitrea, Diana M; Zhu, Lian; Richardson, Tiffany M; Kriwacki, Richard W; Pappu, Rohit V; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2016-06-16

    The nucleolus and other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) bodies are membrane-less organelles that appear to assemble through phase separation of their molecular components. However, many such RNP bodies contain internal subcompartments, and the mechanism of their formation remains unclear. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro studies, together with computational modeling, to show that subcompartments within the nucleolus represent distinct, coexisting liquid phases. Consistent with their in vivo immiscibility, purified nucleolar proteins phase separate into droplets containing distinct non-coalescing phases that are remarkably similar to nucleoli in vivo. This layered droplet organization is caused by differences in the biophysical properties of the phases-particularly droplet surface tension-which arises from sequence-encoded features of their macromolecular components. These results suggest that phase separation can give rise to multilayered liquids that may facilitate sequential RNA processing reactions in a variety of RNP bodies. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27212236

  10. Vapor-liquid activity coefficients for methanol and ethanol from heat of solution data: application to steam-methane reforming.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R G; Baade, W F

    2001-11-16

    This paper presents equations and curves to calculate vapor-liquid phase equilibria for methanol and ethanol in dilute aqueous solution as a function of temperature, using activity coefficients at infinite dilution. These thermodynamic functions were originally derived to assess the distribution of by-product contaminants in the process condensate and the steam-system deaerator of a hydrogen plant [Paper ENV-00-171 presented at the NPRA 2000 Environmental Conference, San Antonio, TX, 10-12 September 2000], but have general applicability to other systems as well. The functions and calculation method described here are a necessary piece of an overall prediction technique to estimate atmospheric emissions from the deaerator-vent when the process condensate is recycled as boiler feed water (BFW) make-up. Having such an estimation technique is of particular significance at this time because deaerator-vent emissions are already coming under regulatory scrutiny in California [Emissions from Hydrogen Plant Process Vents, Adopted 21 January 2000] followed closely elsewhere in the US, and eventually worldwide. The overall technique will enable a permit applicant to estimate environmental emissions to comply with upcoming regulations, and a regulatory agency to evaluate those estimates. It may also be useful to process engineers as a tool to estimate contaminant concentrations and flow rates in internal process streams such as the steam-generating system. Metallurgists and corrosion engineers might be able to use the results for materials selection. PMID:11606240

  11. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(TM)) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-30

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOHTM) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOIYM Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman complex in Kingsport. During this quarter, comments from the DOE on the Topical Report "Economic Analysis - LPMEOHTM Process as an Add-on to IGCC for Coproduction" were received. A recommendation to continue with design verification testing for the coproduction of dimethyl ether (DIME) and methanol was made. DME design verification testing studies show the liquid phase DME (LPDME) process will have a significant economic advantage for the coproduction of DME for local markets. An LPDME catalyst system with reasonable long-term activity and stability is being developed. A recommendation document summarizing catalyst targets, experimental results, and the corresponding economics for a commercially successful LPDME catalyst was issued on 30 June 1997. The off-site, product-use test plan was updated in June of 1997. During this quarter, Acurex Environmental Corporation and Air Products screened proposals for this task by the likelihood of the projects to proceed and the timing for the initial methanol requirement. Eight sites from the list have met these criteria. The formal submission of the eight projects for review and concurrence by the DOE will be made during the next reporting period. The site paving and final painting were completed in May of 1997. Start-up activities were completed during the reporting period, and the initial methanol production from the demonstration unit occurred on 02 April 1997. The first extended stable operation at the nameplate capacity of 80,000 gallons per day (260 tons

  12. Replication Experiments in Microgravity Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Randall M.; Johnson, John L.

    2016-05-01

    Although considerable experience exists with sintering on Earth, the behavior under reduced gravity conditions is poorly understood. This study analyzes replica microgravity liquid phase sintering data for seven tungsten alloys (35 to 88 wt pct tungsten) sintered for three hold times (1, 180, or 600 minutes) at 1773 K (1500 °C) using 0.002 pct of standard gravity. Equivalent sintering is performed on Earth using the same heating cycles. Microgravity sintering results in a lower density and more shape distortion. For Earth-based sintering, minimized distortion is associated with low liquid contents to avoid solid settling and slumping. Distortion in microgravity sintering involves viscous spreading of the component at points of contact with the containment crucible. Distortion in microgravity is minimized by short hold times; long hold times allow progressive component reshaping toward a spherical shape. Microgravity sintering also exhibits pore coalescence into large, stable voids that cause component swelling. The microgravity sintering results show good replication in terms of mass change and sintered density. Distortion is scattered but statistically similar between the replica microgravity runs. However, subtle factors, not typically of concern on Earth, emerge to influence microgravity sintering, such that ground experiments do not provide a basis to predict microgravity behavior.

  13. Viscosity of the entangled-vortex-liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.E. )

    1992-06-01

    The entangled-flux-line liquid phase of high-temperature superconductors is considered. This is a phase of directed, mutually avoiding polymerlike flux lines which are strongly entangled. However, there is a finite rate constant for topological reconnection of the flux lines. The viscosity {eta} of the phase is discussed using a simplified model, following that recently developed by Marchetti and Nelson (Phys. Rev. B 42, 9938 (1990)). We find, as did these authors, a result of the form {eta}={eta}{sub 0}{ital e}{sup {ital U}/{ital k}{ital T}}. However, our estimate for {ital U} is one-third of their value; the difference could be significant when the activation energy for flux-line reconnection is large.

  14. Liquid-Phase Electroepitaxy of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, Sadik

    The chapter presents a review of the growth of single-crystal bulk semiconductors by liquid-phase electroepitaxy (LPEE). Following a short introduction, early modeling and theoretical studies on LPEE are briefly introduced. Recent experimental results on LPEE growth of GaAs/GaInAs single crystals under a static applied magnetic field are discussed in detail. The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations carried out for LPEE growth of GaAs under various electric and magnetic field levels are presented. The effect of magnetic field nonuniformities is numerically examined. Crystal growth experiments show that the application of a static magnetic field in LPEE growth of GaAs increases the growth rate very significantly. A continuum model to predict such high growth rates is also presented. The introduction of a new electric mobility in the model, i.e., the electromagnetic mobility, allows accurate predictions of both the growth rate and the growth interface shape. Space limitation required the citation of a limited number of references related to LPEE [29.1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73]. For details of many aspects of the LPEE growth process and its historical developments, the reader is referred to these references and also others cited therein.

  15. Ferrofluid-based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Yufeng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2010-11-19

    A new mode of liquid-phase microextraction based on a ferrofluid has been developed. The ferrofluid was composed of silica-coated magnetic particles and 1-octanol as the extractant solvent. The 1-octanol was firmly confined within the silica-coated particles, preventing it from being lost during extraction. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were used as model compounds in the development and evaluation of the extraction procedure in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The optimal conditions were as follows: 20mL sample volume, 10mg of the silica-coated magnetic particles (28mg of ferrofluid), agitation at 20Hz, 20min extraction time, and 2min by sonication with 100μL acetonitrile as the final extraction solvent. Under optimal extraction conditions, enrichment factors ranging from 102- to 173-fold were obtained for the analytes. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 16.8 and 56.7pgmL(-1) and 0.06 and 0.19ngmL(-1), respectively. The linearities were between 0.5-100 and 1-100ngmL(-1) for different PAHs. As the ferrofluid can respond to and be attracted by a magnet, the extraction can be easily achieved by reciprocating movement of an external magnet that served to agitate the sample. No other devices were needed in this new approach of extraction. This new technique is affordable, efficient and convenient for microextraction, and offers portability for potential onsite extraction. PMID:20961552

  16. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-02

    This report consists of Detailed Data Acquisition Sheets for Runs E-6 and E-7 for Task 2.2 of the Modification, Operation, and Support Studies of the Liquid Phase Methanol Laporte Process Development Unit. (Task 2.2: Alternate Catalyst Run E-6 and Catalyst Activity Maintenance Run E-7).

  17. Twentieth international symposium on electro- and liquid-phase separation techniques (ITP2013): highlights.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Alejandro; Hernández-Borges, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The 20th edition of the International Symposium on Electro- and Liquid-Phase Separation Techniques (ITP2013) took place on October 6-9, 2013, at Puerto de la Cruz in Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain). This article reviews the highlights of this new edition of the symposia, also including the different activities that took place as well as the awards presented. PMID:24339404

  18. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  19. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  20. Spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-02-01

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating a fast spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation of water and a subsequent slow crystallization to ice. It is found that supercooled water separates rapidly into low- and high-density domains so as to reduce the surface energy in the rectangular simulation cell at certain thermodynamic states. The liquid-liquid phase separation, which is about two orders of magnitude faster than the crystallization, suggests a possibility to observe this phenomenon experimentally. PMID:25353404

  1. Liquid-phase mixing of bipropellant doublets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.; Rupe, J. H.; Sotter, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental results of unlike doublet mixing are correlated with an analytically derived equation predicting fluid cavitation. The correlation relates the minimum orifice pressure drop required to initiate cavitation, with the system back pressure, cold flow simulant vapor pressure, and the orifice flow discharge and contraction coefficients. Stream flow instabilities are also visually correlated with the onset of cavitation and orifice discharge coefficient measurements. The influence of cavitation on the characteristic phenomenon of hydraulic flip is observed for both circular and noncircular shaped orifices. For certain intermediate orifice lengths, some noncircular shapes are shown to produce more fully developed flows (shorter recovery lengths) and therefore a more cohesive jet, which in turn yields slightly higher cold flow mixing uniformities than circular shaped orifices of equal absolute length. The particular noncircular shaped elements evaluated are shown to be more sensitive to liquid stream misimpingement than the corresponding circular orifices.

  2. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. . Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  3. Graphene via sonication assisted liquid-phase exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, the 2D form of carbon based material existing as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has set the science and technology sectors alight with interest in the last decade in view of its astounding electrical and thermal properties, combined with its mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity. Two distinct strategies have been undertaken for graphene production, i.e. the bottom-up and the top-down. The former relies on the generation of graphene from suitably designed molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction to form covalently linked 2D networks. The latter occurs via exfoliation of graphite into graphene. Bottom-up techniques, based on the organic syntheses starting from small molecular modules, when performed in liquid media, are both size limited, because macromolecules become more and more insoluble with increasing size, and suffer from the occurrence of side reactions with increasing molecular weight. Because of these reasons such a synthesis has been performed more and more on a solid (ideally catalytically active) surface. Substrate-based growth of single layers can be done also by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or via reduction of silicon carbide, which unfortunately relies on the ability to follow a narrow thermodynamic path. Top-down approaches can be accomplished under different environmental conditions. Alongside the mechanical cleavage based on the scotch tape approach, liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) methods are becoming more and more interesting because they are extremely versatile, potentially up-scalable, and can be used to deposit graphene in a variety of environments and on different substrates not available using mechanical cleavage or growth methods. Interestingly, LPE can be applied to produce different layered systems exhibiting different compositions such as BN, MoS2, WS2, NbSe2, and TaS2, thereby enabling the tuning of numerous physico-chemical properties of the material. Furthermore, LPE can be

  4. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    . Our system exhibits flux-film-substrate interactions that can lead to dramatic changes to the microstructure. This effect is especially pronounced onc -sapphire, with Al diffusion from the substrate leading to formation of an epitaxial BaAl2O4 second phase at the substrate-film interface. The formation of this second phase in the presence of a liquid phase seeds {111} twins that drive abnormal grain growth. The orientation of the sapphire substrate determines the BaAl2O 4 morphology, enabling control the abnormal grain growth behavior. CuO additions leads to significant grain growth at 900 °C, with average grain size approaching 500 nm. The orthorhombic-tetragonal phase transition is clearly observable in temperature dependent measurements and both linear and nonlinear dielectric properties are improved. All films containing CuO are susceptible to aging. A number of other systems were investigated for efficacy at temperatures below 900 °C. Pulsed laser deposition was used to study flux + BaTiO 3 targets, layered flux films, and in situ liquids. RF-magnetron sputtering using a dual-gun approach was used to explore integration on flexible foils with Ba1-xSrxTiO3. Many of these systems were based on the BaO-B2O3 system, which has proven effective in thin films, multilayer ceramic capacitors, and bulk ceramics. Modifiers allow tailoring of the microstructure at 900 °C, however no compositions were found, and no reports exist in the open literature, that provide significant grain growth or densification below 900 °C. Liquid phase fluxes offer a promising path forward for low temperature processing of barium titanate, with the ultimate goal of integration with metalized silicon substrates. This work demonstrates significant improvements to dielectric properties and the necessity of understanding interactions in the film-flux-substrate system.

  5. Optical on-line method of ethyl mercaptan detection in liquid phase in motor fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    The letter reports on the experimental research of the absorption spectra of ethyl mercaptan in liquid phase in various motor fuels (petrol, kerosene, and diesel fuel). The values of ethyl mercaptan absorption sections were obtained in the above-mentioned fuels in the spectral range of 280-475 nm, and the dependences of ethyl mercaptan absorption coefficients on its part in the analyzed mixture with motor fuels were researched. On the basis of the obtained results we propose an optical on-line method of ethyl mercaptan detection in motor fuels. The optimal spectral ranges for the highest sensitivity of ethyl mercaptan detection in various motor fuels were determined.

  6. Novel Detection Method of Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hitoshi; Katayanagi, Hideki; Koga, Yoshikata; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2004-12-01

    A novel method of determining a liquid-liquid phase boundary was developed. This method is based on our discovery that a nascent low-density phase is attracted to the center of a Rankine vortex at the onset of phase separation. Thus a liquid-liquid phase boundary is detected easily, rapidly, and accurately. The phase diagrams of the ternary systems NaCl-H2O-1-propanol and NaCl-H2O-1-butanol were obtained by this method. The results matched well with literature values.

  7. Effects of Liquid-Phase Composition on Its Migration during Liquid-Phase Sintering of Cemented Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Peng; Guo, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Prichard, Paul

    2009-08-01

    Functionally graded composite materials (FGM composites) with a gradient of matrix phase can offer improved properties. Liquid-phase sintering is one of the approaches for making such materials with a desired gradient of the matrix phase by controlling the redistribution of the liquid phase during sintering. The present study on cemented carbide, WC-Co, demonstrates that the composition of the liquid phase (cobalt phase) is one of the key factors controlling the liquid redistribution. The dependence of the final gradient of the cobalt phase after sintering on its own chemical composition profile is quantitatively established, enabling the design and manufacture of WC-Co with a cobalt-phase-volume gradient via predesigned gradients of carbon content in the system.

  8. Green aspects, developments and perspectives of liquid phase microextraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Spietelun, Agata; Marcinkowski, Łukasz; de la Guardia, Miguel; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-02-01

    Determination of analytes at trace levels in complex samples (e.g. biological or contaminated water or soils) are often required for the environmental assessment and monitoring as well as for scientific research in the field of environmental pollution. A limited number of analytical techniques are sensitive enough for the direct determination of trace components in samples and, because of that, a preliminary step of the analyte isolation/enrichment prior to analysis is required in many cases. In this work the newest trends and innovations in liquid phase microextraction, like: single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME), and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) have been discussed, including their critical evaluation and possible application in analytical practice. The described modifications of extraction techniques deal with system miniaturization and/or automation, the use of ultrasound and physical agitation, and electrochemical methods. Particular attention was given to pro-ecological aspects therefore the possible use of novel, non-toxic extracting agents, inter alia, ionic liquids, coacervates, surfactant solutions and reverse micelles in the liquid phase microextraction techniques has been evaluated in depth. Also, new methodological solutions and the related instruments and devices for the efficient liquid phase micoextraction of analytes, which have found application at the stage of procedure prior to chromatographic determination, are presented. PMID:24401382

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W .L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  10. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  11. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-11-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  12. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(TM)) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(TM)) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). The LPMEOIWM Process Demonstration Unit is being built at a site located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) complex in Kingsport. During this quarter, the Cooperative Agreement was modified (Mod AO11) on 8 October 1996, authorizing the transition born Budget Period No. 2 (Design and Construction) to the . final Budget Period (Commissioning, Start-up, and Operation), A draft Topical Report on Process Economics Studies concludes that methanol coproduction with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power utilizing the LPMEOW process technology, will be competitive in serving local market needs. Planning for a proof-of- concept test run of the liquid phase dimethyl ether (DME) process at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) was recommended; and a deeision to proceed is pending. Construction (Task 2.2) is 97'Mo complete, asof31 December 1996. Completion of pipe pressure testing has taken longer than expected. This will delay completion of construction by about three weeks. Commissioning activities (Task 2.3) commenced in mid-October of 1996, and the demonstration unit is scheduled to be mechanically complete on 24 January 1997.

  14. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(TM)) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-30

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). Ak Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOITM Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman complex in Kingsport. During this reporting period, DOE accepted the recommendation to continue with dimethyl ether (DME) design verification testing (DVT). DME design verification testing studies show the liquid phase DME (LPDME) process will have a significant economic advantage for the coproduction of DME for local markets. An LPDME catalyst system with reasonable long-term activity and stzibility is being developed. Planning for a proof-of-concept test run at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) was recommended. DOE issued a letter dated 31 July 1997 accepting the recommendation to continue design verification testing. In order to allow for scale-up of the manufacturing technique for the dehydration catalyst from the pilot plant to the commercial scale, the time required to produce the catalyst to the AFDU has slipped. The new estimated delivery date is 01 June 1998.

  15. Liquid phase reaction-bonding of structural ceramics and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Y.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of ceramics via the reaction of a solid precursor with either a gas or liquid phase has a number of advantages compared to conventional sintering technology. These advantages are known for gas-phase processes. The authors have explored the potential for synthesizing high performance ceramics in the model system reaction-bonded silicon carbide, in which liquid silicon is used to infiltrate carbonaceous preforms. In this paper results are presented that illustrate the use of alloyed-melts to obtain dense silicon carbide composites with residual refractory silicide phases, such as MoSi/sub 2/, rather than the residual silicon phase which has heretofore limited high temperature properties. Infiltration processing considerations, such as the ultimate infiltration dimensions possible in the presence of simultaneous reaction, are discussed. Microstructure and mechanical properties characterization in the SIC-MoSi/sub 2/ system are presented. Other refractory ceramics systems to which liquid-phase reaction-bonding may be applied are discussed.

  16. Densification and shape distortion in liquid-phase sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; German, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    Densification and dimensional control are important aspects of liquid-phase sintering. The capillary force and the solid bonding affect both densification and shape preservation. Capillarity, which is orientated isotropically, causes uniform shrinkage and holds grains together to preserve the component shape in the early stage of sintering. On the other hand, solid bonding resists viscous flow and inhibits densification and shape distortion. The capillary force decreases with densification and approaches zero as pores are eliminated. Thus, shape retention eventually requires solid-grain bonding. The solid-grain bonding provides compact rigidity, which is represented by compact strength. Shape distortion occurs when the compact loses its strength. For every situation, there is a critical compact strength above which no shape distortion occurs. Distortion in liquid-phase sintering indicates that the compact strength passed below a critical level.

  17. Transport Phenomena in Liquid Phase Diffusion Growth of Silicon Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, Neil Alexander

    Silicon Germanium, SiGe, is an important emerging semiconductor material. In order to optimize growth techniques for SiGe production, such as Liquid Phase Diffusion, LPD, or Melt Replenishment Czochralski, a good understanding of the transport phenomena in the melt is required. In the context of the Liquid Phase Diffusion growth technique, the transport phenomena of silicon in a silicon-germanium melt has been explored. Experiments isolating the dissolution and transport of silicon into a germanium melt have been conducted under a variety of flow conditions. Preliminary modeling of these experiments has also been conducted and agreement with experiments has been shown. In addition, full LPD experiments have also been conducted under varying flow conditions. Altered flow conditions were achieved through the application of a variety of magnetic fields. Through the experimental and modeling work better understanding of the transport mechanisms at work in a silicon-germanium melt has been achieved.

  18. Electron-solid and electron-liquid phases in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoester, M. E.; Papić, Z.; Morais Smith, C.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the competition between electron-solid and quantum-liquid phases in graphene, which arise in partially filled Landau levels. The differences in the wave function describing the electrons in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field in graphene with respect to the conventional semiconductors, such as GaAs, can be captured in a form factor which carries the Landau-level index. This leads to a quantitative difference in the electron-solid and -liquid energies. For the lowest Landau level, there is no difference in the wave function of relativistic and nonrelativistic systems. We compute the cohesive energy of the solid phase analytically using a Hartree-Fock Hamiltonian. The liquid energies are computed analytically as well as numerically, using exact diagonalization. We find that the liquid phase dominates in the n =1 Landau level, whereas the Wigner crystal and electron-bubble phases become more prominent in the n =2 and 3 Landau level.

  19. Liquid-phase sintering of iron aluminide-bonded ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Iron aluminide intermetallics exhibit excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance and are therefore considered as the matrix in metal matrix composites, or the binder in hard metals or cermets. In this paper the authors discuss the processing and properties of liquid-phase sintered iron aluminide-bonded ceramics. It is found that ceramics such as TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, TiC, and WC may all be liquid phase-sintered. nearly complete densification is achieved for ceramic volume fractions ranging up to 60%. Depending on the composition, room temperature three point-bend strengths and fracture toughnesses reaching 1,500 MPa and 30 MPa m{sup 1/2}, respectively, have been found. Since the processing was carried out in a very simple manner, optimized processing is likely to result in further improvements.

  20. Liquid phase oxidation chemistry in continuous-flow microreactors.

    PubMed

    Gemoets, Hannes P L; Su, Yuanhai; Shang, Minjing; Hessel, Volker; Luque, Rafael; Noël, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-flow liquid phase oxidation chemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention as the reactor provides enhanced heat and mass transfer characteristics, safe use of hazardous oxidants, high interfacial areas, and scale-up potential. In this review, an up-to-date overview of both technological and chemical aspects of liquid phase oxidation chemistry in continuous-flow microreactors is given. A description of mass and heat transfer phenomena is provided and fundamental principles are deduced which can be used to make a judicious choice for a suitable reactor. In addition, the safety aspects of continuous-flow technology are discussed. Next, oxidation chemistry in flow is discussed, including the use of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, ozone and other oxidants in flow. Finally, the scale-up potential for continuous-flow reactors is described. PMID:26203551

  1. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  2. A model of liquid phase sintering by the homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Jean-Noël; Clementz, Philippe

    We study the first stage of liquid phase sintering, when the particles rearrangement due to capillary forces is over. We give the boundary value problem satisfied by the displacement field of points of the medium in the phase of elastic compression of solid particles, for given capillary forces acting as a density of external forces, by using the homogenization method and we characterize the mechanical behavior of this constrained medium from the material properties of each elementary components.

  3. Containerless Liquid-Phase Processing of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard (Principal Investigator); Nordine, Paul C.

    1996-01-01

    The present project builds on the results of research supported under a previous NASA grant to investigate containerless liquid-phase processing of molten ceramic materials. The research used an aero-acoustic levitator in combination with cw CO2 laser beam heating to achieve containerless melting, superheating, undercooling, and solidification of poorly-conducting solids and liquids. Experiments were performed on aluminum oxide, binary aluminum oxide-silicon dioxide materials, and oxide superconductors.

  4. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  5. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  6. Solid-liquid phase boundaries of lens protein solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Berland, C R; Thurston, G M; Kondo, M; Broide, M L; Pande, J; Ogun, O; Benedek, G B

    1992-01-01

    We report measurement of the solid-liquid phase boundary, or liquidus line, for aqueous solutions of three pure calf gamma-crystallin proteins: gamma II, gamma IIIa, and gamma IIIb. We also studied the liquidus line for solutions of native gamma IV-crystallin calf lens protein, which consists of 85% gamma IVa/15% gamma IVb. In all four proteins the liquidus phase boundaries lie higher in temperature than the previously determined liquid-liquid coexistence curves. Thus, over the range of concentration and temperature for which liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the coexistence of a protein crystal phase with a protein liquid solution phase is thermodynamically stable relative to the metastable separated liquid phases. The location of the liquidus lines clearly divides these four crystallin proteins into two groups: those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures greater than 70 degrees C: gamma IIIa and gamma IV, and those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures less than 50 degrees C: gamma II and gamma IIIb. We have analyzed the form of the liquidus lines by using specific choices for the structures of the Gibbs free energy in solution and solid phases. By applying the thermodynamic conditions for equilibrium between the two phases to the resulting chemical potentials, we can estimate the temperature-dependent free energy change upon binding of protein and water into the solid phase. PMID:1741375

  7. Liquid phase coating to produce controlled-release alginate microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Wah; Liu, Xiaohua; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2005-12-01

    This study explored a liquid phase coating technique to produce polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-coated alginate microspheres. Alginate microspheres with a mean diameter of 85.6 microm were prepared using an emulsification method. The alginate microspheres, as cores, were then coated with different types of PMMA by a liquid phase coating technique. The release characteristics of these coated microspheres in simulated gastric (SGF) and intestinal (SIF) fluids and the influence of drug load on encapsulation efficiency were studied. The release of paracetamol, as a model hydrophilic drug, from the coated microspheres in SGF and SIF was greatly retarded. Release rates of Eudragit RS100-coated microspheres in SGF and SIF were similar as the rate-controlling polymer coat was insoluble in both media. Drug release from Eudragit S100-coated microspheres was more sustained in SGF than in SIF, due to the greater solubility of the coating polymer in media with pH greater than 7.0. The drug release rate was affected by the core:coat ratio. Drug release from the coated microspheres was best described by the Higuchi's square root model. The liquid phase coating technique developed offers an efficient method of coating small microspheres with markedly reduced drug loss and possible controlled drug release. PMID:16423760

  8. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development. PMID:25637995

  9. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  10. Study of enrichment factors for six β-blockers in aliphatic alcohols by hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Lian; Jing, Shao-Jun; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Lin; Ran, Cong-Cong; Du, Chao-Hui; Jiang, Ye

    2015-10-01

    The selectivity of a suitable organic solvent is key for extraction in liquid-phase microextraction experiments. Nevertheless, the screening process remains a daunting task. Our research aimed to study the relationship between extraction efficiency and extraction solvents, analytes, and finally select the appropriate extraction solvent. In the present article, β-blockers and six extraction solvents were chosen as the models and hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction was conducted. The relationship was built by statistical analysis on the data. Factors affecting extraction efficiency including the logarithms of the octanol/water partition coefficient (logPo/w ) of analytes, acid dissociation constants, the logarithms of the octanol/water partition coefficient of solvents and pH of the sample solution were investigated. The results showed that a low water solubility of extraction solvent is the foundation to ensure higher extraction efficiency. Moreover, when ΔlogPo/w > 0, a higher extraction efficiency is observed at lower ΔlogPo/w , on the contrary, when ΔlogPo/w < 0, extraction efficiency is higher as the absolute value of ΔlogPo/w becomes greater. Finally, the relationship between enrichment factor and extraction solvents, analytes was established and a helpful guidance was provided for the selection of an optimal solvent to obtain the best extraction efficiency by liquid-phase microextraction. PMID:26224511

  11. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  12. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure. PMID:26274309

  13. Phase transition dynamics of liquid phase precipitation from a supersaturated gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Pines, V; Zlatkowski, M; Chait, A

    2004-11-01

    This work presents a self-consistent description of phase transition dynamics of disperse liquid phase precipitating from a supersaturated gas mixture. The unified approach integrates the macroscale transport phenomena of cloud dynamics with the essential microphysical kinetic processes of droplet condensation, evaporation, and droplet collisions simultaneously taking place in stochastic population of liquid droplets. A complete set of governing equations with well-defined dissipative fluxes and kinetic rates is derived for phase transition dynamics from nucleation to postnucleation to coarsening stages. The local thermodynamics of precipitating system, which is considered as ternary mixture of disperse liquid phase and water vapor with dry air, is redefined to explicitly include on equal basis both the vapor content and liquid content into the fundamental thermodynamic relations and equation of state. The molecular kinetic flux regularization method for growth of submicron droplets is reexamined to include, among others, significant contribution of vapor molecular energy flux into total heat flux, resulting in new expressions for the droplet temperature, growth rate, and effective diffusion coefficients. The local kinetic rates are determined on the basis of microscale kinetic equation for the droplet distribution function. This is in contrast to commonly used semiempirical parametrization schemes for kinetic rates with adjustable parameters, wherein the probabilistic aspects of microphysical processes are not rigorously addressed. Stochastic diffusion interactions among droplets competing for the available water vapor and modifications in the kinetic equation for droplets growing in stochastic population with direct long-range diffusion interactions amongst them are discussed and formulated as well. PMID:15527359

  14. Possibilities of liquid-phase low-temperature deposition of manganese oxides on NaY synthetic zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, A.P.; Petrusevich, E.F.

    1985-05-20

    This paper studies the possibilities of low-temperature liquid-phase deposition of manganese oxides on NaY synthetic zeolite and compares the results with literature data. The experiments were conducted in accordance with a design matrix that is presented in a table. The coefficients of regression equations are presented which describe the experimental responses against the background of the errors. A summary is given of rounded-off estimates of relative errors of determination of manganese oxides on the three zeolite types studied and the average values of responses of the same type for all the zeolites. It follows that the optimal estimates of the Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ contents are the same for all the zeolites within the averaged error limits, while the estimates of MnO contents and conversion of Mn (II) from solution on the zeolite surface are not the same for clinoptilolite as for synthetic NaY, confirming that oxidation proceeds more actively on the NaY surface, while conversion is very pronounced in the case of clinoptilolite.

  15. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~275 to ~400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures with the introduction of a new temperature dependence parameterisation. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multicomponent system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~190 to ~440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 25% in comparison to

  16. Numerical simulation of mass transfer in the liquid phase of the bubble layer of a thermal deaerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Misbakhov, R. Sh.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of one-dimensional diffusion model of the flow structure and boundary layer theory, a method for calculating the mass transfer of dissolved oxygen in the liquid phase of the bubble layer of a thermal deaerator is developed. Mass transfer with the bulk source of mass has been considered, wherein the basic parameter is mass-transfer coefficient. A model of pseudo laminar boundary layer on the bubble surface is proposed, and the possibility of calculating of mass-transfer coefficient from bubbles in the mass source of diffusion model is shown, taking into account the gas content and external turbulence. A comparison of the calculation results of mass-transfer coefficient is given from the bubbles with known experimental data. It is shown that taking into account gas content results in an increase of the mass-transfer coefficient by 2-4 times. Expressions for calculations of gas content, dynamic speed, and inverse stirring coefficient in the liquid phase of the bubble layer are presented. In the special case, transition from the diffusion model of the flow structure to cell model is made, and comparison of the calculation results on the concentration of oxygen in water at the output of DSA-300 bubbling thermal deaerator with experimental data is performed. The developed mathematical model and calculation algorithm can be used in the design, diagnosis, and modernization of thermal deaerators.

  17. Activity coefficients of microquantities of lanthanides and actinides in nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, V.S.; Rozen, A.M.

    1988-09-01

    We carried out calculations on the basis of the Zdanovskii-Mikulin rule. The radii of the ions of the actinides americium and curium(III) (0.099 nm) are closest to the radius of the neodymium ion (0.0995 nm), and the radius of the californium ion (0.0976 nm) is closest to the radius of the promethium ion (0.0979 nm). It may accordingly be assumed that the activity coefficients of americium and curium are approximately equal to the activity coefficients of neodymium and that the values for californium are approximately equal to the values for promethium.

  18. Transient liquid-phase bonding in the Ni-Al-B system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. E.; Boettinger, W. J.

    2000-11-01

    Transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonding experiments were performed using a Ni-10.3 at. pct Al alloy and a Ni-10 at. pct B filler material, and the results were compared to simulations performed using the finite-difference diffusion code, DICTRA. For the simulations, a thermodynamic assessment of the Ni-Al-B system was used to define the phase diagram and the thermodynamic factors of the diffusion coefficients. Composition-dependent diffusion mobilities were assessed for the ternary system. Predicted liquid widths as functions of time were in good agreement with the experiments. The calculated and experimental Al composition profiles agree in the matrix but not in the liquid. The simulations qualitatively predicted the observed precipitation and later dissolution of the intermetallic τ phase (Ni20Al3B6) in the base material. This research demonstrated the potential for modeling the formation of spurious phases during TLP bonding of practical superalloy systems.

  19. Synthesis of dimethyl ether and alternative fuels in the liquid phase from coal-derived synthesis gas. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Through the mid-1980s, Air Products has brought the liquid phase approach to a number of other synthesis gas reactions where effective heat management is a key issue. In 1989, in response to DOE`s PRDA No. DE-RA22-88PC88805, Air Products proposed a research and development program entitled ``Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether and Alternative Fuels in the Liquid Phase from Coal Derived Syngas.`` The proposal aimed at extending the LPMEOH experience to convert coal-derived synthesis gas to other useful fuels and chemicals. The work proposed included development of a novel one-step synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, and exploration of other liquid phase synthesis of alternative fuel directly from syngas. The one-step DME process, conceived in 1986 at Air Products as a means of increasing syngas conversion to liquid products, envisioned the concept of converting product methanol in situ to DME in a single reactor. The slurry reactor based liquid phase technology is ideally suited for such an application, since the second reaction (methanol to DME) can be accomplished by adding a second catalyst with dehydration activity to the methanol producing reactor. An area of exploration for other alternative fuels directly from syngas was single-step slurry phase synthesis of hydrocarbons via methanol and DME as intermediates. Other possibilities included the direct synthesis of mixed alcohols and mixed ethers in a slurry reactor.

  20. Liquid phase synthesis of copper indium diselenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jakhmola, Priyanka; Agarwal, Garima; Jha, Prafulla K.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    Nanoparticles of Copper Indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}), belongs to I-III-VI{sub 2} family has been synthesized via liquid phase route using ethylenediamine as a solvent. Characterization of as-grown particles is done by XRD, HRTEM, DLS, optical microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed that the CuInSe2 nanoparticles obtained reveals chalcopyrite structure. Particle size evaluated from dynamic light scattering of as grown particle possessing radius of 90 nm. The bandgap of 1.05eV is obtained from UV-Vis spectrum which will applicable to the solar cell devices.

  1. Diffusion mass transport in liquid phase epitaxial growth of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, S.; Qin, Z.; Kimura, M.

    1996-12-01

    A numerical simulation model for the mass transport occurring during the liquid phase epitaxial growth of AlGaAs is presented. The mass transport equations in the liquid and solid phases, and the relationships between concentrations and temperature obtained from the phase diagram constitute the governing equations. These equations together with appropriate interface and boundary conditions were solved numerically by the Finite Element Method. Numerical results show the importance of diffusion into the solid phase, affecting the composition of grown layers. Simulation results agree with experiments.

  2. Gravitational contributions to microstructural coarsening in liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipphut, C. M.; Kishi, T.; Bose, A.; German, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary experiments for determining the role of gravity in liquid phase sintering have been carried out. Tungsten heavy alloys were selected for this investigation because of the large density difference between solid and liquid, extensive interest in the alloys and considerable data on these alloys. By identifying and isolating the role that gravity plays in shape distortion and microstructural coarsening, further insight into the mechanisms of coarsening kinetics may be realized. Improvements in mechanical properties, shape complexity, and dimensional stability may be realized in the future from low gravity sintering.

  3. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  4. Vapors-liquid phase separator. [infrared telescope heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Brown, G. S.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1980-01-01

    The use of porous plugs, mostly with in the form of passive devices with constant area were considered as vapor-liquid phase separators for helium 2 storage vessels under reduced gravity. The incorporation of components with variable cross sectional area as a method of flow rate modification was also investigated. A particular device which uses a shutter-type system for area variation was designed and constructed. This system successfully permitted flor rate changes of up to plus or minus 60% from its mean value.

  5. Liquid liquid phase transition in Stillinger Weber silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucage, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2005-04-01

    It was recently demonstrated that Stillinger-Weber silicon undergoes a liquid-liquid first-order phase transition deep into the supercooled region (Sastry and Angell 2003 Nat. Mater. 2 739). Here we study the effects of perturbations on this phase transition. We show that the order of the liquid-liquid transition changes with negative pressure. We also find that the liquid-liquid transition disappears when the three-body term of the potential is strengthened by as little as 5%. This implies that the details of the potential could affect strongly the nature and even the existence of the liquid-liquid phase.

  6. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  7. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  8. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  9. Activity Coefficients of Acetone-Chloroform Solutions: An Undergraduate Experiment. Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozog, J. Z.; Morrison, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information, laboratory procedures, and results of an undergraduate experiment in which activity coefficients for a two-component liquid-vapor system are determined. Working in pairs, students can perform the experiment with 10 solutions in a given three-hour laboratory period. (Author/JN)

  10. Study on the mechanism of liquid phase sintering (M-12)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohara, S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were to (1) obtain the data representing the growth rate of solid particles in a liquid matrix without the effect of gravity; and (2) reveal the growth behavior of solid particles during liquid phase sintering using the data obtained. Nickel and tungsten are used as the constituent materials in liquid phase sintering. The properties of the constituent metals are given. When a compact of the mixture of tungsten and nickel powders is heated and kept at 1550 C, nickel melts down but tungsten stays solid. As the density of tungsten is much greater than that of nickel, the sedimentation of tungsten particles occurs in the experiment on Earth. The difference between the experiments on Earth and in space is illustrated. The tungsten particles sink to the bottom and are brought into contact with each other. The resulting pressure at the contact point causes the accelerated dissolution of tungsten. Consequently, flat surfaces are formed at the contact sites. As a result of dissolution and reprecipitation of tungsten, the shape of particles changes to a polygon. This phenomenon is called 'flattening.' An example of flattening of tungsten particles is shown. Thus, the data obtained by the experiment on Earth may not represent the exact growth behavior of the solid particles in a liquid matrix. If the experiments were done in a microgravity environment, the data corresponding to the theoretical growth behavior of solid particles could be achieved.

  11. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  12. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  13. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  14. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  15. Molecular radiotherapy: The NUKFIT software for calculating the time-integrated activity coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kletting, P.; Schimmel, S.; Luster, M.; Kestler, H. A.; Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.; Bröer, J. H.; Nosske, D.; Glatting, G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Calculation of the time-integrated activity coefficient (residence time) is a crucial step in dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy. However, available software is deficient in that it is either not tailored for the use in molecular radiotherapy and/or does not include all required estimation methods. The aim of this work was therefore the development and programming of an algorithm which allows for an objective and reproducible determination of the time-integrated activity coefficient and its standard error.Methods: The algorithm includes the selection of a set of fitting functions from predefined sums of exponentials and the choice of an error model for the used data. To estimate the values of the adjustable parameters an objective function, depending on the data, the parameters of the error model, the fitting function and (if required and available) Bayesian information, is minimized. To increase reproducibility and user-friendliness the starting values are automatically determined using a combination of curve stripping and random search. Visual inspection, the coefficient of determination, the standard error of the fitted parameters, and the correlation matrix are provided to evaluate the quality of the fit. The functions which are most supported by the data are determined using the corrected Akaike information criterion. The time-integrated activity coefficient is estimated by analytically integrating the fitted functions. Its standard error is determined assuming Gaussian error propagation. The software was implemented using MATLAB.Results: To validate the proper implementation of the objective function and the fit functions, the results of NUKFIT and SAAM numerical, a commercially available software tool, were compared. The automatic search for starting values was successfully tested for reproducibility. The quality criteria applied in conjunction with the Akaike information criterion allowed the selection of suitable functions. Function fit

  16. Liquid-phase alkylation of benzene with light olefins catalyzed by {beta} zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Bellussi, G.; Pazzuconi, G.; Perego, C.

    1995-11-01

    The catalytic performance of zeolite {beta} in the liquid-phase alkylation of benzene is compared with that of other solid catalysts. Zeolite {beta} is more active and more selective than zeolite Y in the alkylation with propylene and ethylene to cumene and ethylbenzene (EB). In the alkylation with propylene the overall selectivity of {beta} is higher than that of the traditional {open_quotes}solid phosphoric acid.{close_quotes} The catalytic activity is affected by the composition and the particle size of zeolite {beta} samples. Decreasing the framework Al content, by direct synthesis or by partial substitution of Al for B, produces a decrease in both conversion and selectivity in cumene and EB synthesis. A hypothesis to explain this behavior is given. The catalytic activity of zeolite {beta} is limited by intraparticle diffusion, as evidenced by the decreased activity corresponding to the particle size increase. 22 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Iron-aluminum cluster catalysts obtained by alkoxy synthesis. 1. Liquid-phase oxidation of hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, M.V.; Kugel, V.Ya.; Bukhtenko, O.V. ); Maksimov, Yu.V. ); Ellert, O.G.; Shcherbakov, V.M. )

    1994-07-01

    Much attention has previously been devoted to simple metal oxides as catalysts for low-temperature liquid-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. Iron-substituted boehmite gel has been prepared by alkoxy synthesis, i.e., by reaction of Fe(acac)[sub 3] with a fresh surface of AlOOH. Iron-aluminum complex oxide catalysts for liquid-phase oxidation of hexadecane were prepared by annealing the gel precursors. The gels with 0-20 wt.% of iron loading were studied by magnetic susceptibility and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Depending on the iron concentration, differing amounts of paramagnetic Fe[sup 3+] ions in the boehmite structure and small ferrimagnetic spinel clusters were observed in the X-ray amorphous precursors. Thermal treatment led to formation of substituted spinels, Fe[sub x]Al[sub 2-x]O[sub 3], as well as [gamma]-ferric oxide clusters. The overall rate of hexadecane oxidation increased with an increase in the relative content of magnetic clusters. The inclusion of nonmagnetic Al[sup 3+] ions in the [gamma]-Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] lattice reduced the number of terminal Fe[sup 3+]=O groups and the overall catalytic activity. The role of electronically excited terminal oxygen on the surface of [gamma]-ferric oxide clusters in the mechanism of hexadecane oxidation is discussed. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Liquid phase stability under an extreme temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-27

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the "bulk" driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid. PMID:24329454

  19. Liquid Phase Stability Under an Extreme Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we subject bulk liquid to a very high-temperature gradient and observe a stable liquid phase with a local temperature well above the boiling point. Also, under this high-temperature gradient, the vapor phase exhibits condensation into a liquid at a temperature higher than the saturation temperature, indicating that the observed liquid stability is not caused by nucleation barrier kinetics. We show that, assuming local thermal equilibrium, the phase change can be understood from the thermodynamic analysis. The observed elevation of the boiling point is associated with the interplay between the “bulk” driving force for the phase change and surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface that suppresses the transformation. This phenomenon is analogous to that observed for liquids in confined geometries. In our study, however, a low-temperature liquid, rather than a solid, confines the high-temperature liquid.

  20. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  1. Existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in methanol.

    PubMed

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-12-01

    A simple model is constructed to study the phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of methanol, which is described as a dimer of an apolar sphere mimicking the methyl group and a sphere with core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Performing classical Monte Carlo simulations, we obtained the phase diagram, showing a second critical point between two different liquid phases. Evaluating systems with a different number of particles, we extrapolate to infinite size in accordance with Ising universality class to obtain bulk values for critical temperature, pressure, and density. Strong evidence that the structure of the liquid changes upon transition from high- to low-density phase was provided. From the experimentally determined hydrogen bond strength and length in methanol and water, we propose where the second critical point of methanol should be. PMID:25615092

  2. Supersolidus Liquid Phase Sintering Modeling of Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy of Inconel 718 superalloy is advantageous as a near-net shape process for complex parts to reduce the buy-to-fly ratio and machining cost. However, sintering Inconel 718 requires the assistance of supersolidus liquid formation to achieve near full density and involves the risk of distortion at high temperatures. The present work is focused on modeling the onset of sintering and distortion as a function of temperature, grain size, and part geometry for Inconel 718. Using experimental sintering results and data available in the literature, the supersolidus liquid phase sintering of Inconel 718 was modeled. The model was used to define a processing window where part distortion would be avoided.

  3. A Computationally Efficient Model for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients, which are repeatedly updated in aerosol phase equilibrium and gas-aerosol partitioning calculations. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a new mixing rule for estimating multicomponent activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H(+), NH4(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), SO4(2-), HSO4(-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte A in a multicomponent solution from a linear combination of its values in ternary solutions of A-A-H2O, A-B-H2O, A-C-H2O, etc., as the amount of A approaches zero in the mixture at the solution water activity, aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. Predictions from MTEM are found to be within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) model over a wide range of water activities, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than the widely used Kusik and Meissner (KM) mixing rule, especially for electrolytes in sulfate-rich aerosol systems and for relatively minor but important aerosol components such as HNO3 and HCl acids. Because the ternary activity coefficient polynomials are parameterized as a function of aw, they have to be computed only once at every grid point at the beginning of every 3-D model time step as opposed to repeated evaluations of the ionic strength dependent binary activity coefficient polynomials in the KM method. Additionally, MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems, which is a major computational advantage over other iterative methods as will be shown by a comparison of the CPU time requirements of MTEM for both sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems relative to other methods.

  4. Liquid-phase chemical sensing using lateral mode resonant cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Beardslee, L A; Demirci, K S; Luzinova, Y; Mizaikoff, B; Heinrich, S M; Josse, F; Brand, O

    2010-09-15

    Liquid-phase operation of resonant cantilevers vibrating in an out-of-plane flexural mode has to date been limited by the considerable fluid damping and the resulting low quality factors (Q factors). To reduce fluid damping in liquids and to improve the detection limit for liquid-phase sensing applications, resonant cantilever transducers vibrating in their in-plane rather than their out-of-plane flexural resonant mode have been fabricated and shown to have Q factors up to 67 in water (up to 4300 in air). In the present work, resonant cantilevers, thermally excited in an in-plane flexural mode, are investigated and applied as sensors for volatile organic compounds in water. The cantilevers are fabricated using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication process based on bulk micromachining. The devices were coated with chemically sensitive polymers allowing for analyte sorption into the polymer. Poly(isobutylene) (PIB) and poly(ethylene-co-propylene) (EPCO) were investigated as sensitive layers with seven different analytes screened with PIB and 12 analytes tested with EPCO. Analyte concentrations in the range of 1-100 ppm have been measured in the present experiments, and detection limits in the parts per billion concentration range have been estimated for the polymer-coated cantilevers exposed to volatile organics in water. These results demonstrate significantly improved sensing properties in liquids and indicate the potential of cantilever-type mass-sensitive chemical sensors operating in their in-plane rather than out-of-plane flexural modes. PMID:20715842

  5. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E.

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  6. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  7. Improved estimation of solubility and partitioning through correction of UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Howard, P.H.

    1988-07-01

    Octanol-water partition coefficients (K/sub ow/) of 75 compounds ranging over 9 orders of magnitude are correlated by log K/sub ow/ = -0.40 + 0.73 log (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ -0.39 log (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ (r = 0.98), where (..gamma..//sub W/)/sub U/ and (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ are UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients in water and octanol, respectively. The constants 0.73 and -0.39 are obtained empirically and are intended to compensate for group nonadditivity. Correction factors of similar magnitude are obtained in independent correlations of water solubility with (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ and of octanol solubility with (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/, thereby confirming the validity of the approach.

  8. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Piccoli, R.L. ); Lovisi, H.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol on ion exchange catalyst (Amberlyst 15) were studied. Thermodynamic properties and rate data were obtained in a batch reactor operating under 1,013 kPa and 323--353 K. The kinetic equation was modeled following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson formalism according to a proposed surface mechanism where the rate-controlling step is the surface reaction. According to the experimental results, methanol adsorbs very strongly on the active sites, covering them completely, and thus the reaction follows an apparent first-order behavior. The isoamylenes, according to the proposed mechanism, adsorb simultaneously on the same single active center already occupied by methanol, migrating through the liquid layer formed by the alcohol around the catalyst to react in the acidic site. From the proposed mechanism a model was suggested and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained using nonlinear estimation methods.

  9. High temperature creep of SiC densified using a transient liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, Z.C.; Virkar, A.V. ); Cutler, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Silicon carbide-based ceramics can be rapidly densified above approximately 1850 {degree}C due to a transient liquid phase resulting from the reaction between alumina and aluminum oxycarbides. The resulting ceramics are fine-grained, dense, and exhibit high strength at room temperature. SiC hot pressed at 1875 {degree}C for 10 min in Ar was subjected to creep deformation in bending at elevated temperatures between 1500 and 1650 {degree}C in Ar. Creep was thermally activated with an activation energy of 743 kJ/mol. Creep rates at 1575 {degree}C were between 10{sup {minus}9}/s and 10{sup {minus}7}/s at an applied stress between 38 and 200 MPa, respectively, resulting in a stress exponent of {approx}1.7.

  10. A New Method for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients of Electrolytes in Aqueous Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2005-01-21

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients of various electrolytes in multicomponent aqueous solutions. This paper describes the development and application of a new mixing rule for calculating activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+ SO42-, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte in a multicomponent solution based on its values in binary solutions of all the electrolytes present in the mixture at the solution water activity aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. The aerosol water content is calculated using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson method. For self-consistency, most of the MTEM and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson parameters are derived using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model at 298.15 K. MTEM is evaluated for several multicomponent systems representing various continental and marine aerosols, and is contrasted against the mixing rule of Kusik and Meissner and the newer approach of Metzger et al. [2002]. Predictions of MTEM are found to be generally within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than predictions of the other two methods. MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems – a major computational advantage over other iterative methods. CPU time requirements of MTEM relative to other methods for sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems are also discussed.

  11. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-14

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, P(LPC-HDA)(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)] simulations suggest that the P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the P(LPC-HDA)(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the P(LDA-HDA)(T), P(HDA-LDA)(T), P(LPC-HDA)(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the glass

  12. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, PLPC-HDA(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.4605 simulations suggest that the PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the PLPC-HDA(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the PLDA-HDA(T), PHDA-LDA(T), PLPC-HDA(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the

  13. Microstructural control of silicon carbide via liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrotek, Sharon Robinson

    Silicon carbide ceramics with various microstructures were fabricated by controlling the amount and composition of a Y2O3-Al 2O3 liquid phase, crystallographic phase of the starting powders, trace impurities in those powders, and time and temperature of sintering and post- sintering heat-treatments. Alpha and beta SiC "seeds" were used to control grain growth during sintering. The grain size distribution and aspect ratio of the grains were determined through microstructural analysis of polished and etched samples. TEM was used in conjunction with EDS to determine the distribution of the sintering aids in the grains and the grain boundaries. Additionally, the final phase content of the samples was determined via x-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness and hardness were measured to evaluate the relative effects of the microstructural variations on the mechanical properties. Alpha silicon carbide samples exhibited a fine grained, equiaxed microstructure. Under appropriate conditions, samples prepared from beta-SiC powders underwent a phase transformation to alpha-SiC accompanied by the growth of elongated platelet grains. The addition of alpha seeds to the beta powder reduced the size of the platelets compared to unseeded samples of the same composition. If the beta to alpha phase transformation did not occur, the beta samples developed an equiaxed microstructure. The grain size of all samples decreased with increasing amounts of sintering additives. The beta to alpha phase transformation, required to obtain an elongated grain microstructure, was catalyzed by the presence of sufficient amounts of aluminum. If insufficient Al impurity was present in the powder, purposeful additions of Al metal could induce the phase transformation. Examination of the sintering progression over time indicated that the phase transformation occurred late in the sintering process and appeared to occur via a solution/reprecipitation mechanism. Post-sintering heat treatments were also used

  14. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOTH) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOW) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership) to produce methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOI-P Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman coal-to-chemicals complex in Kingsport. During this quarter, initial planning and procurement work continued on the seven project sites which have been accepted for participation in the off-site, product-use test program. Approximately 12,000 gallons of fuel-grade methanol (98+ wt% methanol, 4 wt% water) produced during operation on carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas at the LPMEOW Demonstration Unit was loaded into trailers and shipped off-site for Mure product-use testing. At one of the projects, three buses have been tested on chemical-grade methanol and on fhel-grade methanol from the LPMEOW Demonstration Project. During the reporting period, planning for a proof-of-concept test run of the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME~ Process at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX continued. The commercial catalyst manufacturer (Calsicat) has prepared the first batch of dehydration catalyst in large-scale equipment. Air Products will test a sample of this material in the laboratory autoclave. Catalyst activity, as defined by the ratio of the rate constant at any point in time to the rate constant for freshly reduced catalyst (as determined in the laborato~ autoclave), was monitored for the initial extended operation at the lower initial reactor operating temperature of 235oC. At this condition, the decrease in catalyst activity with time from the period 20 December 1997 through 27 January 1998 occurred at a rate of 1.0% per

  15. Solubility parameter and activity coefficient of HDEHP dimer in select organic diluents by vapor pressure osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zalupski, P.

    2013-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the non-ideal behavior of the chemical components utilized in solvent extraction contributes to the success of any large-scale spent nuclear fuel treatment. To address this, our current work uses vapor pressure osmometry to characterize the non-ideal behavior of the solvent extraction agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), a common extractant in proposed separation schemes. Solubility parameters were fit to data on HDEHP at four temperatures using models based on Scatchard Hildebrand regular solution theory with Flory Huggins entropic corrections. The results are comparable but not identical to the activity coefficients from prior slope analysis in the literature. (authors)

  16. Experimental Solubility Approach to Determine PDMS-Water Partition Constants and PDMS Activity Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sharon; Schacht, Veronika J; Escher, Beate I; Hawker, Darryl W; Gaus, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Freely dissolved aqueous concentration and chemical activity are important determinants of contaminant transport, fate, and toxic potential. Both parameters are commonly quantified using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) based on a sorptive polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This method requires the PDMS-water partition constants, KPDMSw, or activity coefficient to be known. For superhydrophobic contaminants (log KOW >6), application of existing methods to measure these parameters is challenging, and independent measures to validate KPDMSw values would be beneficial. We developed a simple, rapid method to directly measure PDMS solubilities of solid contaminants, SPDMS(S), which together with literature thermodynamic properties was then used to estimate KPDMSw and activity coefficients in PDMS. PDMS solubility for the test compounds (log KOW 7.2-8.3) ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (4.1-5700 μM), and was dependent on compound class. For polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), solubility-derived KPDMSw increased linearly with hydrophobicity, consistent with trends previously reported for less chlorinated congeners. In contrast, subcooled liquid PDMS solubilities, SPDMS(L), were approximately constant within a compound class. SPDMS(S) and KPDMSw can therefore be predicted for a compound class with reasonable robustness based solely on the class-specific SPDMS(L) and a particular congener's entropy of fusion, melting point, and aqueous solubility. PMID:26881312

  17. Predicting passive and active tissue:plasma partition coefficients: interindividual and interspecies variability.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Mahle, Deirdre A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2014-07-01

    A mechanistic tissue composition model incorporating passive and active transport for the prediction of steady-state tissue:plasma partition coefficients (K(t:pl)) of chemicals in multiple mammalian species was used to assess interindividual and interspecies variability. This approach predicts K(t:pl) using chemical lipophilicity, pKa, phospholipid membrane binding, and the unbound plasma fraction, together with tissue fractions of water, neutral lipids, neutral and acidic phospholipids, proteins, and pH. Active transport K(t:pl) is predicted using Michaelis-Menten transport parameters. Species-specific biological properties were identified from 126 peer reviewed journal articles, listed in the Supporting Information, for mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit, beagle dog, pig, monkey, and human species. Means and coefficients of variation for biological properties were used in a Monte Carlo analysis to assess variability. The results show K(t:pl) interspecies variability for the brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, red blood cell, skin, and spleen, but uncertainty in the estimates obscured some differences. Compounds undergoing active transport are shown to have concentration-dependent K(t:pl). This tissue composition-based mechanistic model can be used to predict K(t:pl) for organic chemicals across eight species and 10 tissues, and can be an important component in drug development when scaling K(t:pl) from animal models to humans. PMID:24832575

  18. Relative effectiveness coefficient: a quality characteristic of toothpastes containing active components.

    PubMed

    Borissova, R; Kirova, E

    1996-12-01

    It has been proposed that the parameter of relative effectiveness coefficient (REC) be used for the qualitative assessment of toothpastes containing active ingredients. REC is the ratio between the concentration of the active component in water eluates obtained after three minutes and adequately prolonged (up to the reaching of equilibrium state) dispersion of the toothpaste in distilled water at a 1:4 ratio (condition simulating the use of toothpaste in the oral cavity). The change in REC after storage following its production, as well as testing the toothpaste stability at high and low temperatures, provides an evidence for deviations in its quality. REC was applied for the assessment of toothpastes containing 0.5% zinc citrate as an active ingredient. PMID:8996867

  19. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box-Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process. PMID:27222748

  20. Self-Sputtering of Solid and Liquid Phase Tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coventry, M. D.; Tomchik, C. A.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2004-11-01

    The absolute self-sputtering yields of solid and liquid-phase Sn have been measured for incident ions with energies of 300 to 1000 eV at 45^o using the Ion-surface InterAction eXperiment (IIAX). A Sn divertor^1 would experience self-bombardment from redepositing Sn ions, and its use may be limited by a temperature-enhanced self-sputtering yield. Thus, an understanding of any temperature dependence is a key to predictive modeling of such a device. IIAX uses a Colutron^2 ion source to produce a velocity-filtered Sn^+ beam for sample irradiation. Experiments were carried out with sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to 380^oC. A quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) monitors sputtering by direct collection of ejected and reflected material; background noise is removed using a reference crystal. VFTRIM^3, which cannot simulate temperature, was used for comparison to recorded data and for data analysis. Hybrid Molecular-Dynamic/Monte Carlo simulations which include temperature effects^4 were also investigated. [1] Brooks, J.N. Fus. Eng. Des. 60 (2002) 515-526. [2] Menzinger, M. and Wahlin, L. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 40 (1969) 102-105. [3] Ruzic, D.N. Nuc. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. 47 (1990) 118-125. [4] Allain, J.P., D.N. Ruzic, submitted to Nuc. Instrum. Meth. B, January 2004

  1. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Dimensionality play significant role on `phase transitions'. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions `phase transition' properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor-liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  2. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S.; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M.; Baehtz, C.; Posselt, M.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  3. Impedance Spectroscopy of Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, D.S.; Sauti, G.; Vorster, A.; Hermann, M.

    2004-02-26

    Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide (LPSSiC) materials were produced with different Y2O3: Al2O3 and Y2O3: SiO2 sintering additive ratios. Densification was achieved by hot pressing (HP). The ratio of the polytypes and the amount and crystalline composition of the grain boundary phases was determined using Rietveld analysis. Microstructures of the materials were related to the mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness and strength), which are not presented. The impedance Spectroscopy measurements were made at temperatures between 100 deg. C and 400 deg. C and analyzed using Effective Media Theories and the Brick Layer Model. In some cases, in order to correctly fit the results, it was necessary to use or model the frequency dependence of the conductivity or dielectric constant of the SiC grains using various theoretical models. The impedance arcs for the SiC grains in the different samples varied widely, probably more due to the 'semiconductor' doping of the grains or nonstoichiometry, than the SiC polytypes in the grains. The SiC grains all showed an Arrhenius behavior with energy gaps in the range 0.3 to 0.5eV.

  4. Impedance Spectroscopy of Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, D. S.; Sauti, G.; Vorster, A.; Hermann, M.

    2004-02-01

    Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide (LPSSiC) materials were produced with different Y2O3: Al2O3 and Y2O3: SiO2 sintering additive ratios. Densification was achieved by hot pressing (HP). The ratio of the polytypes and the amount and crystalline composition of the grain boundary phases was determined using Rietveld analysis. Microstructures of the materials were related to the mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness and strength), which are not presented. The impedance Spectroscopy measurements were made at temperatures between 100°C and 400°C and analyzed using Effective Media Theories and the Brick Layer Model. In some cases, in order to correctly fit the results, it was necessary to use or model the frequency dependence of the conductivity or dielectric constant of the SiC grains using various theoretical models. The impedance arcs for the SiC grains in the different samples varied widely, probably more due to the "semiconductor" doping of the grains or nonstoichiometry, than the SiC polytypes in the grains. The SiC grains all showed an Arrhenius behavior with energy gaps in the range 0.3 to 0.5eV.

  5. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  6. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box–Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process. PMID:27222748

  7. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants, namely, difluoromethane (HFC-32), pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluorethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb), are carried out in the liquid phase. The range of temperature is 253-324 K for HFC-32, 257-305 K for HFC-125, 268-314 K for HFC-134a, 267-325 K for HCF-225ca, and 286-345 K for HCFC-225cb. The pressure range is from saturation to 30 MPa. The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5%, and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity of each substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125. The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances. The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  8. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles. PMID:26614290

  9. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr.; Cochran, H.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In the safe handling and processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), it is often desirable to calculate vapor composition and pressure from known liquid composition and temperature. Furthermore, the ability to use analyses of equilibrium vapor-phase samples to calculate liquid-phase compositions would be economically advantageous to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its international safeguards program and to uranium enrichment operators. The latter technique is projected to save the IAEA on the order of $1500 or more per sample. Either type of calculation could be performed with a multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model if this model were shown to apply to UF{sub 6} and its common impurities. This report is concerned with the distribution of four potential impurities in UF{sub 6} between liquid and vapor phases. The impurities are carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride, chloryl fluoride, and Freon-114 (CClF{sub 2}CClF{sub 2}). There are no binary equilibrium data on the first three of these impurities; hence, the VLE calculations are based entirely on the thermodynamic properties of the pure components. There are two sets of binary equilibrium data for the system Freon-114-UF{sub 6} that are analyzed in terms of the model of Prausnitz et al. Calculations based on these data are compared with those based solely on the thermodynamic properties of pure Freon-114 and pure UF{sub 6}. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. An overview of multidimensional liquid phase separations in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Franco, Maraíssa Silva; Padovan, Rodrigo Nogueira; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a priority public health concern that demands analytical methods capable to detect low concentration level of contaminants (e.g. pesticides and antibiotics) in different food matrices. Due to the high complexity of these matrices, a sample preparation step is in most cases mandatory to achieve satisfactory results being usually tedious, lengthy, and prone to the introduction of errors. For this reason, many research groups have focused efforts on the development of online systems capable to do the cleanup, concentration, and separation steps at once through multidimensional separation techniques (MDS). Among several possible setups, the most popular are the multidimensional chromatographic techniques (MDC) that consist in combining more than one mobile and/or stationary phase to provide a satisfactory separation. In the present review, we selected a variety of multidimensional separation systems used for food contaminant analysis in order to discuss the instrumentation aspects, the concept of orthogonality, column approaches used in these systems, and new materials that can be used in these columns. Selected classes of contaminants present in food matrices are introduced and discussed as example of the potential applications of multidimensional liquid phase separation techniques in food safety. PMID:27030380

  11. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Dimensionality play significant role on ‘phase transitions’. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions ‘phase transition’ properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor–liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  12. Microstructural development in transient liquid-phase bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, W. F.; Wallach, E. R.

    1991-10-01

    The applicability of conventional models of the transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonding process to the joining of nickel using ternary Ni-Si-B insert metals is considered in this article. It is suggested that diffusion of boron out of the liquid and into the solid substrate before the equilibration of the liquid and solid phases can result in the development of significant boron concentrations in the substrate. This, in turn, leads to the precipitation of boride phases in the substrate during holding at bonding temperatures below the binary nickel-boron eutectic temperature. The formation of boride phases during holding at the bonding temperature is of importance, because first, it is not predicted by the standard models of the TLP process, and second, the borides are not removed by prolonged holding at the bonding temperature and therefore may influence the in-service properties of the joint. In contrast, when bonding above the binary nickel-boron eutectic temperature, localized liquation of the substrate takes place. This liquid region resolidifies following prolonged holding and does not result in the formation of persistent boride phases. Experimental support is presented for the formation of borides during bonding, and characterization of the boride phases formed in the substrate is described.

  13. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M; Baehtz, C; Posselt, M; Skorupa, W; Helm, M

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  14. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets. PMID:27078333

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic simulation of transient liquid-phase bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Brad

    The use of numeric computational methods for the simulation of materials systems is becoming more prevalent and an understanding of these tools may soon be a necessity for Materials Engineers and Scientists. The applicability of numerical simulation methods to transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonding is evaluated using a type 316L/MBF-51 material system. The comparisons involve the calculation of bulk diffusivities, tracking of interface positions during dissolution, widening, and isothermal solidification stages, as well as comparison of elemental composition profiles. The simulations were performed with Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software packages and the experiments with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and optical microscopic methods. Analytical methods are also discussed to enhance understanding. The results of the investigation show that while general agreement between simulations and experiments can be obtained, assumptions made with the simulation programs may cause difficulty in interpretation of the results unless the user has sufficient, mathematical, thermodynamic, kinetic, and simulation background.

  16. A novel series of isoreticular metal organic frameworks: realizing metastable structures by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxuan; Lukose, Binit; Shekhah, Osama; Arslan, Hasan Kemal; Weidler, Peter; Gliemann, Hartmut; Bräse, Stefan; Grosjean, Sylvain; Godt, Adelheid; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Magdau, Ioan-Bogdan; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2012-12-01

    A novel class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been synthesized from Cu-acetate and dicarboxylic acids using liquid phase epitaxy. The SURMOF-2 isoreticular series exhibits P4 symmetry, for the longest linker a channel-size of 3 × 3 nm2 is obtained, one of the largest values reported for any MOF so far. High quality, ab-initio electronic structure calculations confirm the stability of a regular packing of (Cu++)2- carboxylate paddle-wheel planes with P4 symmetry and reveal, that the SURMOF-2 structures are in fact metastable, with a fairly large activation barrier for the transition to the bulk MOF-2 structures exhibiting a lower, twofold (P2 or C2) symmetry. The theoretical calculations also allow identifying the mechanism for the low-temperature epitaxial growth process and to explain, why a synthesis of this highly interesting, new class of high-symmetry, metastable MOFs is not possible using the conventional solvothermal process.

  17. P-I-N CdTe gamma-ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Bostrup, G.L.; Ryan, F.J.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Westmark, C.I.; Fuller, C.

    1984-01-01

    A new device concept of CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated by using p+(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n+(HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p+ and n/sup +/-type Hg/sub 0.25/Cd/sub 0.75/Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE-grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction formation and ohmic contact over standard ion-implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 keV were obtained for the 122 keV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  18. P-I-N CdTe gamma ray detectors by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Bostrup, G.L.; Fuller, C.; Khoshnevisan, M.; Niizawa, G.T.; Pasko, J.G.; Ryan, F.J.; Westmark, C.I.

    1985-02-01

    A new device concept for CdTe gamma ray detectors has been demonstrated using p/sup +/(HgCdTe)-n(CdTe)-n/sup +/ (HgCdTe) diode structures. Both p/sup +/ and n/sup +/ Hg /SUB 0.25/ Cd /SUB 0.75/ Te epilayers were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique on semi-insulating CdTe sensor elements. The LPE grown P-I-N structure offers potential advantages for p-n junction and ohmic contact formation over standard ion implanted diodes or Schottky barrier devices. Detectors with active areas of 2 mm/sup 2/ were fabricated. Resolutions of 10 KeV were obtained for the 122 KeV gamma peak of Co/sup 57/ at room temperature.

  19. Grain growth kinetics in liquid-phase-sintered zinc oxide-barium oxide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Sung-Chul; German, Randall M.

    1991-01-01

    Grain growth of ZnO in the presence of a liquid phase of the ZnO-BaO system has been studied for temperatures from 1300 to 1400 C. The specimens were treated in boiling water and the grains were separated by dissolving the matrix phase in an ultrasonic bath. As a consequence 3D grain size measurements were possible. Microstructural examination shows some grain coalescence with a wide range of neck size ratios and corresponding dihedral angles, however, most grains are isolated. Lognormal grain size distributions show similar shapes, indicating that the growth mechanism is invariant over this time and temperature. All regressions between G exp n and time for n = 2 and 3 proved statistically significant. The rate constants calculated with the growth exponent set to n = 3 are on the same order of magnitude as in metallic systems. The apparent activation energy for growth is estimated between 355 and 458 kJ/mol.

  20. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  1. Design and Fabrication of the First Commercial-Scale Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOHT) process uses a slurry bubble column reactor to convert synthesis gas (syngas), primarily a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, to methanol. Because of its superior heat management the process can utilize directly the carbon monoxide (CO)-rich syngas characteristic of the gasification of coal, petroleum coke, residual oil, wastes, or other hydrocarbon feedstocks. The LPMEOHM Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., a partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Eastman Chemical Company, to produce methanol from coal-derived syngas. Construction of the LPMEOH~ Process Demonstration Plant at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport was completed in January 1997. Following commissioning and shakedown activities, the fwst production of methanol from the facility occurred on April 2, 1997. Nameplate capacity of 260 short tons per day (TPD) was achieved on April 6, 1997, and production rates have exceeded 300 TPD of methanol at times. This report describes the design, fabrication, and installation of the Kingsport LPMEOEFM reactor, which is the first commercial-scale LPMEOEPM reaetor ever built. The vessel is 7.5 feet in diameter and 70 feet tall with design conditions of 1000 psig at 600 `F. These dimensions represent a significant scale-up from prior experience at the DOE-owned Alternative Fuels Development Unit in LaPorte, Texas, where 18-inch and 22-inch diameter reactors have been tested successfidly over thousands of hours. The biggest obstacles discovered during the scale- up, however, were encountered during fabrication of the vessel. The lessons learned during this process must be considered in tailoring the design for future sites, where the reactor dimensions may grow by yet another factor of two.

  2. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors. PMID:27510435

  3. Computation of infinite dilute activity coefficients of binary liquid alloys using complex formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, O. E.; Oshakuade, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for calculating Infinite Dilute Activity Coefficients (γ∞s) of binary liquid alloys has been developed. This method is basically computing γ∞s from experimental thermodynamic integral free energy of mixing data using Complex formation model. The new method was first used to theoretically compute the γ∞s of 10 binary alloys whose γ∞s have been determined by experiments. The significant agreement between the computed values and the available experimental values served as impetus for applying the new method to 22 selected binary liquid alloys whose γ∞s are either nonexistent or incomplete. In order to verify the reliability of the computed γ∞s of the 22 selected alloys, we recomputed the γ∞s using three other existing methods of computing or estimating γ∞s and then used the γ∞s obtained from each of the four methods (the new method inclusive) to compute thermodynamic activities of components of each of the binary systems. The computed activities were compared with available experimental activities. It is observed that the results from the method being proposed, in most of the selected alloys, showed better agreement with experimental activity data. Thus, the new method is an alternative and in certain instances, more reliable approach of computing γ∞s of binary liquid alloys.

  4. Supercritical phenomenon of hydrogen beyond the liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Chen, Ji; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the supercritical phenomenon associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition of hydrogen by studying the isothermal response functions, such as electric conductivity, molecular dissociation coefficient and isothermal compressibility, with respect to pressure. We find that, along each isotherm in the supercritical region, each of these response functions shows a maximum, the location of which is different for different response functions. As temperature decreases, the loci of these maxima asymptotically converge to a line of zero ordering field, known as the Widom line along which the magnitude of the response function maxima becomes larger and larger until it diverges as the critical point is approached. Thus, our study provides a possible way to locate the liquid-liquid critical point of hydrogen from the supercritical region at lower pressures. It also indicates that the supercritical phonomenon near the critical point of hydrogen is a rather general feature of second-order phase transition, it is not only true for classical systems with weak interactions but also true for highly condensed system with strong inter-atomic interactions.

  5. Liquid-phase microextraction of organophosphorus pesticides using supramolecular solvent as a carrier for ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Zohrabi, Parvin; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Mahdi; Hashemi, Beshare

    2016-11-01

    A liquid-phase microextraction based on application of supramolecular solvent as a carrier for ferrofluid has been developed for the extraction and determination of three organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs). The ferrofluid was produced from combination of oleic acid coated magnetic particles and supramolecular solvent as the extractant solvent. Ferrofluid can be attracted by a magnet, and no centrifugation step was needed for phase separation. A response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was used for efficient optimization of the main variables in the extraction procedure. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the calibration curves found to be linear in the range of 0.5-400µgL(-1) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9967 to 0.9984. The intra-day and inter-day precision (RSD %) for 100 and 200µgL(-1) of each pesticides were in the range of 2.0-5.3% and 2.6-5.7%, respectively. The limit of detection (S/N=3), ranged from 0.1 to 0.35μgL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of organophosphorus pesticide residues in water and fruit juice samples. PMID:27591622

  6. Liquid Phase Micro-Extraction of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Anionic Surfactants in Aqueous Samples

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Niklas; Otrembska, Paulina; Villar, Mercedes; Jönsson, Jan Åke

    2011-01-01

    Hollow fiber liquid phase micro-extraction (LPME) of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) from aqueous samples was studied. Ion pair extraction of C10, C11, C12 and C13 homologues was facilitated with trihexylamine as ion-pairing agent, using di-n-hexylether as solvent for the supported liquid membrane (SLM). Effects of extraction time, acceptor buffer concentration, stirring speed, sample volume, NaCl and humic acids were studied. At 10–50 μg L−1 linear R2-coefficients were 0.99 for C10 and C11 and 0.96 for C12. RSD was typically ∼15%. Three observations were especially made. Firstly, LPME for these analytes was unusually slow with maximum enrichment observed after 15–24 h (depending on sample volume). Secondly, the enrichment depended on LAS sample concentration with 35–150 times enrichment below ∼150 μg L−1 and 1850–4400 times enrichment at 1 mg L−1. Thirdly, lower homologues were enriched more than higher homologues at low sample concentrations, with reversed conditions at higher concentrations. These observations may be due to the fact that LAS and the amine counter ion themselves influence the mass transfer at the water-SLM interface. The observations on LPME of LAS may aid in LPME application to other compounds with surfactant properties or in surfactant enhanced membrane extraction of other compounds. PMID:24957870

  7. Limiting activity coefficients of some aromatic and aliphatic nitro compounds in water

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, M.; Dohnal, V.

    1999-09-01

    Limiting activity coefficients of nine nitroaromatic compounds and four nitroalkanes in water were determined in the range of environmentally related temperatures by measuring suitable phase equilibria. For liquid and solid nitroaromatics (nitrobenzene, 2-nitrotoluene, 3-nitrotoluene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 1-chloro-2-nitrobenzene, and 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene) the aqueous solubilities were measured by a conventional batch contacting method with UV spectrophotometric analysis, while for nitroalkanes (nitromethane, nitroethane, 1-nitropropane, and 2-nitropropane) the air-water partitioning (Henry`s law constant H{sub 12} or air-water partition coefficient K{sub aw}) was determined by the inert gas stripping method employing gas chromatography. Whenever possible, results were compared to literature values. Calculation of H{sub 12} or K{sub aw} for nitroaromatics from the measured solubilities is hindered by the lack of reliable vapor pressure data. On the basis of the temperature dependences of the solubilities measured, the enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution for the nitroaromatics in water were evaluated.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Ferroic and Multiferroic Nanostructures by Liquid Phase Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yourdkhani, Amin

    Magnetoelectric multiferroics have garnered an increasing interest in the past decade due to their unique properties and relevant applications in data storage, sensing and spintronics. A key requirement for the enhancement of the magnetoelectric effect at room temperature is the optimization of the interface between the constituting phases by designing nanocomposites with selectable topologies and variable chemical composition. In this research, the rational design of two-phase spinel-perovskite ceramic nanocomposites with two different geometries: coaxial nanostructures (1-D) and bilayered nanostructures (2-D), by a soft solution chemistry approach will be described. The liquid phase deposition (LPD) method is a simple and versatile route for the deposition of highly uniform spinel ferrite (MFe2O4) and/or titanium-based perovskite (BaTiO3, PbTiO3) by the controlled hydrolysis of metal fluoro-complexes at temperatures as low as 40°C. By designing a sequential deposition process, 1-D and 2-D magnetoelectric nanostructures were fabricated by filling perovskite nanotubes with the ferrite phase or depositing a ferrite layer on top of a perovskite thin film, respectively. The compositional and morphological characteristics of these highly uniform metal oxide nanostructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and electron microscopy (FE-SEM and TEM). The direct evidence of the stress mediated magnetoelectric coupling between the spinel and perovskite of the bilayered nanostructures was qualitatively studied by Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, the direct magnetoelectric effect in these 1-D and bilayered multiferroic nanocomposites was evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively by using a novel magnetic field-assisted piezoelectric force microscopy (M-PFM) technique. The quantitative estimation of the magnetoelectric coupling coefficients was performed by tracking the changes in the phase and -amplitude

  9. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  10. Application of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction for the determination of insecticides in water.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2005-04-22

    In the present work, a novel sample pre-treatment technique for the determination of trace concentrations of some insecticide compounds in aqueous samples has been developed and applied to the determination of the selected analytes in environmental water samples. The extraction procedure is based on coupling polypropylene hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) with gas chromatography by flame thermionic detection (GC-FTD). For the development of the method, seven organophosphorous insecticides (dichlorvos, mevinphos-cis, ethoprophos, chlorpyrifos methyl, phenthoate, methidathion and carbofenothion) and one carbamate (carbofuran) were considered as target analytes. Several factors that influence the efficiency of HF-LPME were investigated and optimized including agitation, organic solvent, sample volume, exposure time, salt additives and pH. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity with correlation coefficient = 0.990. The analytical precision for the target analytes ranged from 4.3 to 11.1 for within-day variation and 4.6 to 12.0% for between-day variation. The detection limits for all analytes were found in the range from 0.001 to 0.072 microg/L, well below the limits established by the EC Drinking Water Directive (EEC 80/778). Relative recoveries obtained by the proposed method from drinking and river water samples ranged from 80 to 104% with coefficient of variations ranging from 4.5 to 10.7%. The present methodology is easy, rapid, sensitive and requires small sample volumes to screen environmental water samples for insecticide residues. PMID:15881459

  11. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  12. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  13. Operation with three liquid phases in a staged liquid-liquid contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.A.; Ziegler, A.A.; Wigeland, R.A.; Bane, R.W.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Operation with three liquid phases was demonstrated in a staged liquid-liquid contactor. The possibility that three liquid phases could be handled in a liquid-liquid contactor normally used with two liquid phases was initially established using a laboratory batch test. Tht three liquid phases were obtained using a thorium flow sheet having high concentrations of both acid and thorium. To analyze the batch test, the concept of a dimensionless dispersion number for use with two liquid phases was extended so that it could be applied to three liquid phases. Based on the batch tests, continuous flow tests were run in a staged liquid-liquid contactor used for solvent extraction. A critical factor in the success of these tests was determining the position of the liquid-liquid interface in the contactor. Thus, a contactor was used which allows the position of the liquid-liquid interface to be adjusted. Actual three-phase operation was demonstrated using a 4-cm annular centrifugal contactor, albeit with a somewhat greater (3 to 4 vol. %) aqueous-phase contamination of the organic exit stream than normal (< 1 vol. %).

  14. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost. PMID:25246094

  15. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  16. Absorbance characteristics of a liquid-phase gas sensor based on gas-permeable liquid core waveguides.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Su, Shiguang; Wang, Jiahui

    2013-12-01

    The absorbance characteristics and influential factors on these characteristics for a liquid-phase gas sensor, which is based on gas-permeable liquid core waveguides (LCWs), are studied from theoretical and experimental viewpoints in this paper. According to theory, it is predicted that absorbance is proportional to the analyte concentration, sampling time, analyte diffusion coefficient, and geometric factor of this device when the depletion layer of the analyte is ignored. The experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical hypothesis. According to the experimental results, absorbance is time-dependent and increasing linearly over time after the requisite response time with a linear correlation coefficient r(2)>0.999. In the linear region, the rate of absorbance change (RAC) indicates improved linearity with sample concentration and a relative higher sensitivity than instantaneous absorbance does. By using a core liquid that is more affinitive to the analyte, reducing wall thickness and the inner diameter of the tubing, or increasing sample flow rate limitedly, the response time can be decreased and the sensitivity can be increased. However, increasing the LCW length can only enhance sensitivity and has no effect on response time. For liquid phase detection, there is a maximum flow rate, and the absorbance will decrease beyond the stated limit. Under experimental conditions, hexane as the LCW core solvent, a tubing wall thickness of 0.1 mm, a length of 10 cm, and a flow rate of 12 mL min(-1), the detection results for the aqueous benzene sample demonstrate a response time of 4 min. Additionally, the standard curve for the RAC versus concentration is RAC=0.0267c+0.0351 (AU min(-1)), with r(2)=0.9922 within concentrations of 0.5-3.0 mg L(-1). The relative error for 0.5 mg L(-1) benzene (n=6) is 7.4±3.7%, and the LOD is 0.04 mg L(-1). This research can provide theoretical and practical guides for liquid-phase gas sensor design and development based on a

  17. Lab-scale experimental strategy for determining micropollutant partition coefficient and biodegradation constants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J M; Wisniewski, C; Miège, C; Budzinski, H; Coquery, M

    2015-03-01

    The nitrifying/denitrifying activated sludge process removes several micropollutants from wastewater by sorption onto sludge and/or biodegradation. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate a lab-scale experimental strategy for the determination of partition coefficient and biodegradation constant for micropollutant with an objective of modelling their removal. Four pharmaceutical compounds (ibuprofen, atenolol, diclofenac and fluoxetine) covering a wide hydrophobicity range (log Kow from 0.16 to 4.51) were chosen. Dissolved and particulate concentrations were monitored for 4 days, inside two reactors working under aerobic and anoxic conditions, and under different substrate feed conditions (biodegradable carbon and nitrogen). We determined the mechanisms responsible for the removal of the target compounds: (i) ibuprofen was biodegraded, mainly under aerobic conditions by cometabolism with biodegradable carbon, whereas anoxic conditions suppressed biodegradation; (ii) atenolol was biodegraded under both aerobic and anoxic conditions (with a higher biodegradation rate under aerobic conditions), and cometabolism with biodegradable carbon was the main mechanism; (iii) diclofenac and fluoxetine were removed by sorption only. Finally, the abilities of our strategy were evaluated by testing the suitability of the parameters for simulating effluent concentrations and removal efficiency at a full-scale plant. PMID:25300180

  18. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by acclimated and unacclimated activated sludge-Evaluation of biokinetic coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dilek, Filiz B. . E-mail: fdilek@metu.edu.tr

    2005-10-01

    Unacclimated and acclimated activated sludges were examined for their ability to degrade 4-CP (4-chlorophenol) in the presence and absence of a readily growing substrate using aerobic batch reactors. The effects of 4-CP on the {mu} (specific growth rate), COD removal efficiency, Y (yield coefficient), and q (specific substrate utilization rate) were investigated. It was observed that the toxicity of 4-CP on the culture decreased remarkably after acclimation. For example, the IC{sub 50} value on the basis of {mu} was found to increase from 130 to 218mg/L with the acclimation of the culture. Although an increase in 4-CP concentration up to 300mg/L has no adverse effect on the COD removal efficiency of the acclimated culture, a considerable decrease was observed in the case of an unacclimated culture. Although 4-CP removal was not observed with an unacclimated culture, almost complete removal was achieved with the acclimated culture, up to 300mg/L. The Haldane kinetic model adequately predicted the biodegradation of 4-CP and the kinetic constants obtained were q{sub m}=41.17mg/(gMLVSSh), K{sub s}=1.104mg/L, and K{sub i}=194.4mg/L. The degradation of 4-CP led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was further metabolized, indicating complete degradation of 4-CP via a meta-cleavage pathway.

  19. Influences of the chemical structure of entrainers on the activity coefficients in presence of biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäder, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Fang, Ye; Ruck, W.; Krahl, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work we analyzed the strength of the intermolecular forces between biodiesel and the entrainer and their influence on the entrainer's ability to interact with biodiesel. Furthermore we investigated the influence of the chemical structure of an entrainer to the interaction with biodiesel. For this purpose the activity coefficients γ∞ at infinite dilution of acids, aldehydes, ketones and alcohols in biodiesel were measured with the method of headspace gas chromatography (HSGC). Short-chained acids showed the highest interaction of the analyzed entrainers caused by their ability to build hydrogen bonds with biodiesel. Increased chain length of the acids cause reduced interaction with biodiesel, which is mainly due to the higher obstruction of the acid molecule and therefore the reduced ability to build hydrogen bonds with biodiesel. Aldehydes, ketones and alcohols showed lower interaction with biodiesel compared to the acids. Longer-chained alcohols showed increased interaction with biodiesel due to the raised London Forces and an inductive +I effect of the molecule chain.

  20. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-23

    The objectives of this program are to implement and test the process improvements identified through the engineering studies of the current program to demonstrate the capability of long-term catalyst activity maintenance, and to perform process and design engineering work that can be applied to a scaled-up Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) facility. An optional series of PDU runs is offered to extend the testing of the process improvements. A parallel research program will be performed to enhance the LPMEOH technical data base to improve the likelihood of commercialization of the LPMEOH process. Activities this quarter include: Flow sheet development for La Porte PDU modifications continues. A preliminary P ID review was completed and flow sheet modifications were identified and are being incorporated. A preliminary hazards review was completed on 22 May. Some minor flow sheet modifications resulted and a number of action items were identified. The most significant action item is to develop a materials reactivity and compatibility grid for the different alcohols, ethers, and esters which will be produced at the PDU. Heat and material balances were completed for the maximum production case of the mixed DME/MEOH synthesis campaign. An improved rate expression was developed. 1 fig.

  1. Growth Kinetics of Intracellular RNA/Protein Droplets: Signature of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Zhu, Lian; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-03-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles are functional, dynamic assemblies of RNA and/or protein that can self-assemble and disassemble within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. The possibility that underlying intracellular phase transitions may drive and mediate the morphological evolution of some membrane-less organelles has been supported by several recent studies. In this talk, results from a collaborative experimental-theoretical study of the growth and dissolution kinetics of nucleoli and extranucleolar droplets (ENDs) in C. elegans embryos will be presented. We have employed Flory-Huggins solution theory, reaction-diffusion kinetics, and quantitative statistical dynamic scaling analysis to characterize the specific growth mechanisms at work. Our findings indicate that both in vivo and in vitro droplet scaling and growth kinetics are consistent with those resulting from an equilibrium liquid-liquid phase transition mediated by passive nonequilibrium growth mechanisms - simultaneous Brownian coalescence and Ostwald ripening. This supports a view in which cells can employ phase transitions to drive structural organization, while utilizing active processes, such as local transcriptional activity, to fine tune the kinetics of these phase transitions in response to given conditions.

  2. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  3. Liquid Phase Methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-31

    A gas phase and a slurry phase radioactive tracer study was performed on the 12 ton/day Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) in LaPorte, Texas. To study the gas phase mixing characteristics, a radioactive argon tracer was injected into the feed gas and residence time distribution was generated by measuring the response at the reactor outlet. Radioactive manganese oxide powder was independently injected into the reactor to measure the slurry phase mixing characteristics. A tanks-in-series model and an axial dispersion model were applied to the data to characterize the mixing in the reactor. From the axial dispersion model, a translation to the number of CSTR's (continuous stirred tank reactors) was made for comparison purposes with the first analysis. Dispersion correlations currently available in the literature were also compared. The tanks-in-series analysis is a simpler model whose results are easily interpreted. However, it does have a few drawbacks; among them, the lack of a reliable method for scaleup of a reactor and no direct correlation between mixing in the slurry and gas phases. The dispersion model allows the mixing in the gas and slurry phases to be characterized separately while including the effects of phase transfer. This analysis offers a means for combining the gas and slurry phase dispersion models into an effective dispersion coefficient, which, in turn, can be related to an equivalent number of tanks-in-series. The dispersion methods reported are recommended for scaleup of a reactor system. 24 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Liquid Phase Sintering of Boron-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Chromium and Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Fan, Yu-Chi; Huang, Her-Yueh; Cai, Wen-Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Liquid phase sintering is an effective method to improve the densification of powder metallurgy materials. Boron is an excellent alloying element for liquid phase sintering of Fe-based materials. However, the roles of chromium and carbon, and particularly that of the former, on liquid phase sintering are still undetermined. This study demonstrated the effects of chromium and carbon on the microstructure, elemental distribution, boride structure, liquid formation, and densification of Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels during liquid phase sintering. The results showed that steels with 0.5 wt pct C densify faster than those without 0.5 wt pct C. Moreover, although only one liquid phase forms in Fe-B-Cr steel, adding 0.5 wt pct C reduces the formation temperature of the liquid phase by about 50 K (°C) and facilitates the formation of an additional liquid, resulting in better densification at 1473 K (1200 °C). In both Fe-B-Cr and Fe-B-Cr-C steels, increasing the chromium content from 1.5 to 3 wt pct raises the temperature of liquid formation by about 10 K (°C). Thermodynamic simulations and experimental results demonstrated that carbon atoms dissolved in austenite facilitate the eutectic reaction and reduce the formation temperature of the liquid phase. In contrast, both chromium and molybdenum atoms dissolved in austenite delay the eutectic reaction. Furthermore, the 3Cr-0.5Mo additive in the Fe-0.4B steel does not change the typical boride structure of M2B. With the addition of 0.5 wt pct C, the crystal structure is completely transformed from M2B boride to M3(B,C) boro-carbide.

  5. Measurement and Modeling of Mean Activity Coefficients of NaCl in an Aqueous Mixed Electrolyte Solution Containing Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Paniz; Dehghani, M. R.; Safahieh, Tina

    2016-08-01

    An electrochemical cell with two ion-selective electrodes (Na+ glass) and (Cl- solid state) was used to measure the mean ionic activity coefficient of NaCl in an aqueous mixture containing NaCl, glycine, and NaNO3 at 308.15 K. The experiments were conducted at fixed molality of NaNO3 (0.1 m) and various molalities of glycine (0-1 m) and NaCl (up to 0.8 m). The experimental data were modeled using a modified version of the Pitzer equation. Finally the activity coefficient ratio of glycine was determined based on the Maxwell equation.

  6. Modeling 3H-3He Gas-Liquid Phase Transport for Interpretation of Groundwater Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carle, S. F.; Esser, B.; Moran, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    California’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program has measured many hundreds of tritium (3H) and helium-3 (3He) concentrations in well water samples to derive estimates of groundwater age at production and monitoring wells in California basins. However, a 3H-3He age differs from an ideal groundwater age tracer in several respects: (1) the radioactive decay of 3H results in the accumulation of 3He being first-order with respect to 3H activity (versus a zero-order age-mass accumulation process for an ideal tracer), (2) surface concentrations of 3H as measured in precipitation over the last several decades have not been uniform, and (3) the 3H-3He “clock” begins at the water table and not at the ground surface where 3H source measurements are made. To better understand how these non-idealities affect interpretation of 3H-3He apparent groundwater age, we are modeling coupled gas-liquid phase flow and 3H-3He transport including processes of radiogenic decay, phase equilibrium, and molecular diffusion for water, air, 3H, and 3He components continuously through the vadose zone and saturated zone. Assessment of coupled liquid-gas phase processes enables consideration of 3H-3He residence time and dispersion within the vadose zone, including partitioning of tritiogenic 3He to the gas phase and subsequent diffusion into the atmosphere. The coupled gas-liquid phase modeling framework provides direct means to compare apparent 3H-3He age to ideal mean or advective groundwater ages for the same groundwater flow conditions. Examples are given for common groundwater flow systems involving areal recharge, discharge to streams or long-screened wells, and aquifer system heterogeneity. The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment program is sponsored by the California State Water Resources Control Board and carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

  7. Characterization of Bimetallic Fe-Ru Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid-Phase Plasma Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Heon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Park, Hyunwoong; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the liquid-phase plasma (LPP) method which employed iron chloride and ruthenium chloride as precursors. The active species (OH·, Hα, Hβ, and OI) and the iron and ruthenium ions were observed in the plasma field created by the LPP process. The spherical-shaped bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the LPP reaction, and the size of the particles was growing along with the progression of the LPP reaction. The synthesized bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were comprised of Fe2O3, Fe3O4, RuO, and RuO2. Ruthenium had a higher reduction potential than iron and resulted in higher ruthenium composition in the synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles. The control of the molar ratio of the precursors in the reactant solution was found to be employed as a means to control the composition of the elements in bimetallic nanoparticles.

  8. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    SciTech Connect

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Hanzaei, A. Talebi

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  9. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  10. Characterization of Bimetallic Fe-Ru Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid-Phase Plasma Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Heon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Park, Hyunwoong; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2016-12-01

    The bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the liquid-phase plasma (LPP) method which employed iron chloride and ruthenium chloride as precursors. The active species (OH·, Hα, Hβ, and O(I)) and the iron and ruthenium ions were observed in the plasma field created by the LPP process. The spherical-shaped bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the LPP reaction, and the size of the particles was growing along with the progression of the LPP reaction. The synthesized bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were comprised of Fe2O3, Fe3O4, RuO, and RuO2. Ruthenium had a higher reduction potential than iron and resulted in higher ruthenium composition in the synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles. The control of the molar ratio of the precursors in the reactant solution was found to be employed as a means to control the composition of the elements in bimetallic nanoparticles. PMID:27456502

  11. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-28

    In April 1987, Air Products started the third and final contract with the US Department of Energy to develop the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) process. One of the objectives was to identify alternative commercial catalyst(s) for the process. This objective was strategically important as we want to demonstrate that the LPMEOH process is flexible and not catalyst selection limited. Among three commercially available catalysts evaluated in the lab, the catalyst with a designation of F21/0E75-43 was the most promising candidate. The initial judging criteria included not only the intrinsic catalyst activity but also the ability to be used effectively in a slurry reactor. The catalyst was then advanced for a 40-day life test in a laboratory 300 cc autoclave. The life test result also revealed superior stability when compared with that of a standard catalyst. Consequently, the new catalyst was recommended for demonstration in the Process Development Unit (PDU) at LaPorte, Texas. This report details the methodology of testing and selecting the catalyst.

  12. [Analysis of emodin and its metabolites based on hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jie; Chen, Xuan; Bai, Xiaohong

    2012-05-01

    Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HFLPME) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed to analyze the emodin and its metabolites in plasma and urine samples. The abilities of the absorption and metabolism for the active components in traditional Chinese medicines between the male and female rats were compared, and the biological metabolism and transmutation of the analyte were detailed discussed. Emodin and its metabolites in plasma and urine samples were extracted into n-octanol (acceptor) in hollow fiber. The acceptor phase was dried and dissolved by 50 microL methanol and then analyzed by HPLC. Under the optimal conditions, the linearities of the analytes were all very good in biological samples (r > 0.9960), the detection limits of the analytes were within the ranges of 0.1-3.0 microg/L. The enrichment factors were 12.2 to 26.3. The relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day precision were lower than 11.0%. The average recoveries of the analytes in plasma and urine samples were all in the range of 97.9% to 103%. HFLPME-HPLC can eliminate interference from complex biological samples, improve the sensitivity and reduce the detection limit, thus this method is suitable for the determination of trace compounds in complex sample. PMID:22934415

  13. A novel series of isoreticular metal organic frameworks: realizing metastable structures by liquid phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxuan; Lukose, Binit; Shekhah, Osama; Arslan, Hasan Kemal; Weidler, Peter; Gliemann, Hartmut; Bräse, Stefan; Grosjean, Sylvain; Godt, Adelheid; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Magdau, Ioan-Bogdan; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2012-01-01

    A novel class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been synthesized from Cu-acetate and dicarboxylic acids using liquid phase epitaxy. The SURMOF-2 isoreticular series exhibits P4 symmetry, for the longest linker a channel-size of 3 × 3 nm2 is obtained, one of the largest values reported for any MOF so far. High quality, ab-initio electronic structure calculations confirm the stability of a regular packing of (Cu++)2- carboxylate paddle-wheel planes with P4 symmetry and reveal, that the SURMOF-2 structures are in fact metastable, with a fairly large activation barrier for the transition to the bulk MOF-2 structures exhibiting a lower, twofold (P2 or C2) symmetry. The theoretical calculations also allow identifying the mechanism for the low-temperature epitaxial growth process and to explain, why a synthesis of this highly interesting, new class of high-symmetry, metastable MOFs is not possible using the conventional solvothermal process. PMID:23213357

  14. Water Detritiation: Better SCK-CEN Catalysts for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, Aime; Braet, Johan; Vanderbiesen, Sven

    2005-07-15

    A technically and economically sound technology for water detritiation is mandatory for the future of fusion. This technology is expected to be based on water electrolysis and Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE). LPCE requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past, which is prepared by depositing platinum on an activated charcoal carrier and mixing it with polytetrafluorethylene as a hydrophobic material. In combination with an appropriate wettable packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing us to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. Recently we succeeded in reproducing this catalyst and preparing a slightly different but clearly ameliorated type. By extrapolation these new results would allow us to obtain, at 40 deg. C and under typical but conservative operating conditions, a decontamination factor of 10000 with a column of less than 3 meters long. Such performances would make this catalyst an excellent candidate for application at JET or ITER. To confirm the performances of our improved catalyst for a longer period of time and in a longer column, we are now starting experiments in a newly built installation and we are collaborating with ICSI, Romania.

  15. Liquid-phase oxidation of phenanthrene in presence of Co-Mn catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kamneva, A.I.; Koroleva, N.V.; Artemov, A.V.; Sinitsyna, I.M.; Ryuffer, L.I.

    1983-06-10

    Phenanthrene is one of the large-tonnage products of the coal-tar chemical industry. However, so far this hydrocarbon has no economically justified uses. The purpose of the present work was to study the liquid-phase oxidation of phenanthrene in presence of Co-Mn catalyst in o-dichlorobenzene (with additions of valeric acid). It is shown that oxidation of phenanthrene to phenanthrenequinone in presence of Co-Mn catalyst in o-dichlorobenzene and VA is possible in principle. The yield and formation rate of phenanthrenequinone are determined mainly by the composition of the solvent and the initial concentration of the hydrocarbon (phenanthrene). Study, by the method of active factorial experiments, of the influence of temperature, reaction time, and catalyst and phenanthrene concentrations on the principal process characteristics showed that the highest selectivity is reasched at (Cat) = 2x10/sup -2/ M and (RH) = 1.0 M. Under the chosen reaction conditions the reaction proceeds by a consecutive route, with phenanthrenequinone as the intermediate product. The reaction conditions for obtaining the maximum yield of phenanthrenequinone were found.

  16. Solid-liquid phase equilibrium for binary Lennard-Jones mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, Monica R.; Hall, Carol K.

    1999-06-01

    Solid-liquid phase diagrams are calculated for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones spheres using Monte Carlo simulation and the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique of Kofke. We calculate solid-liquid phase diagrams for the model Lennard-Jones mixtures: argon-methane, krypton-methane, and argon-krypton, and compare our simulation results with experimental data and with Cottin and Monson's recent cell theory predictions. The Lennard-Jones model simulation results and the cell theory predictions show qualitative agreement with the experimental phase diagrams. One of the mixtures, argon-krypton, has a different phase diagram than its hard-sphere counterpart, suggesting that attractive interactions are an important consideration in determining solid-liquid phase behavior. We then systematically explore Lennard-Jones parameter space to investigate how solid-liquid phase diagrams change as a function of the Lennard-Jones diameter ratio, σ11/σ22, and well-depth ratio, ɛ11/ɛ22. This culminates in an estimate of the boundaries separating the regions of solid solution, azeotrope, and eutectic solid-liquid phase behavior in the space spanned by σ11/σ22 and ɛ11/ɛ22 for the case σ11/σ22<0.85.

  17. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations.

    PubMed

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah J; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney J; Shilling, John E; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T; Bertram, Allan K

    2012-08-14

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric aerosol particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere and the water content of the particles correspondingly changes, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the reactive uptake of gas species on atmospheric particles may be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of liquid-liquid phase separation within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we present images that show the coexistence of two noncrystalline phases for real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, GA as well as for laboratory-generated samples under simulated atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. To explore the implications of these findings, we carried out simulations of the Atlanta urban environment and found that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO(3) and N(2)O(5) due to decreased particle uptake of N(2)O(5). PMID:22847443

  18. Comparison of liquid-phase and gas-phase pure thermal cracking on n-hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G.; Katsumura, Yosuke; Matsuura, Chihiro; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Kubo, Junichi

    1996-12-01

    Thermal cracking of n-hexadecane in the mild temperature (330--375 C) range has been investigated in liquid and gas phases. The kinetic data of liquid-phase cracking are shown to be very similar to those of gas-phase cracking. However, the pattern and distribution of the products are greatly phase dependent. In liquid-phase cracking, there is an equimolar distribution of n-alkane and 1-alkene products in the C{sub 3}--C{sub 13} range at low conversion; when the conversion is increased, more alkanes than alkenes are produced. To the contrary, more alkenes than alkanes are always determined in products from gas-phase cracking. Liquid-phase cracking gives a low selectivity of gas products and a high selectivity of addition compounds (C{sub 18}--C{sub 30}), whereas gas-phase cracking produces a large amount of gas products and no addition compounds. The phase dependence of products can be interpreted in terms of a low concentration of hexadecane, under which {beta}-scission occurs more preferentially than in liquid phase. Reaction mechanisms are suggested based on the product analysis to account for cracking behaviors of liquid-phase and gas-phase cracking.

  19. Microstructural change during (liquid phase sintering) of W-Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Eun, K.Y. ); Kang, S.L

    1989-05-01

    The changes of bulk density and microstructures during heating and liquid phase sintering of 98W-1Ni-1Fe compacts prepared from 1 and 5 {mu}m W powders have been observed in order to characterize the densification behavior. The compact prepared from a fine (1 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1200{degrees}C in the solid state during heating, attaining about 95 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature of 1460{degrees}C. The compact prepared from a coarse (5 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1400{degrees}C in the solid state, attaining about 87 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature. Thus, the skeleton of grains is already formed prior to liquid formation. During the isothermal liquid phase sintering, substantial grain growth occurs, and the liquid flows into both open and closed pores, filling them sequentially from the regions with small cross-sections. The grains subsequently grow into the liquid pockets which have been formed at the pore sites. The sequential pore filling by first liquid thus is shown to be the dominant densification process during the liquid phase sintering of this alloy.

  20. Activity coefficients of aqueous sodium chloride from 15° to 50°C measured with a glass electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1968-01-01

    Values of the mean activity coefficient of sodium chloride at 15°, 25°, 38° and 50°C were determined for aqueous NaCl solutions of 0.01 to 1.0 molal from electromotive force measurements on the cell: (sodium-sensitive glass electrode, aqueous sodium chloride, silver chloride-silver).

  1. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  2. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction techniques in natural product analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunyan; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Shuang; Bai, Xiaohong

    2014-11-14

    Over the last years, liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) as a simple, rapid, practical and effective sample-preparation technique, coupled with various instrumental analytical methods, has been increasingly and widely used to research and determine trace or ultra-micro-levels of both inorganic and organic analytes from different matrix-complex samples. In this review, different kinds of LPMEs such as single drop liquid-phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction are summarized and recent applications of LPMEs in trace compounds in vivo and in vitro from different natural product matrice analysis such as tea, vegetables, seeds, herbs, and galenical are also discussed. Finally, future developments and applications of LPMEs in complex sample analysis are prospected. PMID:25441339

  3. Dynamic evolution of liquid–liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Katz, Martha R.; Ott, Thomas J.; Patterson, Brian M.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Clarke, Amy J.

    2015-01-06

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography was used to observe liquid-liquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis was used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamic instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.

  4. Dynamic evolution of liquid–liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Katz, Martha R.; Ott, Thomas J.; Patterson, Brian M.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Clarke, Amy J.

    2015-01-06

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography was used to observe liquid-liquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis was used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamicmore » instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.« less

  5. Rapid destruction of the rhodamine B using TiO2 photocatalyst in the liquid phase plasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhodamine B (RhB) is widely used as a colorant in textiles and food stuffs, and is also a well-known water tracer fluorescent. It is harmful to human beings and animals, and causes irritation of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. The carcinogenicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity and chronic toxicity toward humans and animals have been experimentally proven. RhB cannot be effectively removed by biological treatment due to the slow kinetics. Therefore, RhB is chosen as a model pollutant for liquid phase plasma (LPP) treatment in the present investigation. Results This paper presents experimental results for the bleaching of RhB from aqueous solutions in the presence of TiO2 photocatalyst with LPP system. Properties of generated plasma were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy methods. The results of electrical-discharge degradation of RhB showed that the decomposition rate increased with the applied voltage, pulse width, and frequency. The oxygen gas addition to reactant solution increases the degradation rate by active oxygen species. The RhB decomposition rate was shown to increase with the TiO2 particle dosage. Conclusion This work presents the conclusions on the photocatalytic oxidation of RhB, as a function of plasma conditions, oxygen gas bubbling as well as TiO2 particle dosage. We knew that using the liquid phase plasma system with TiO2 photocatalyst at high speed we could remove the organic matter in the water. PMID:24041151

  6. Measurements of liquid phase residence time distributions in a pilot-scale continuous leaching reactor using radiotracer technique.

    PubMed

    Pant, H J; Sharma, V K; Shenoy, K T; Sreenivas, T

    2015-03-01

    An alkaline based continuous leaching process is commonly used for extraction of uranium from uranium ore. The reactor in which the leaching process is carried out is called a continuous leaching reactor (CLR) and is expected to behave as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the liquid phase. A pilot-scale CLR used in a Technology Demonstration Pilot Plant (TDPP) was designed, installed and operated; and thus needed to be tested for its hydrodynamic behavior. A radiotracer investigation was carried out in the CLR for measurement of residence time distribution (RTD) of liquid phase with specific objectives to characterize the flow behavior of the reactor and validate its design. Bromine-82 as ammonium bromide was used as a radiotracer and about 40-60MBq activity was used in each run. The measured RTD curves were treated and mean residence times were determined and simulated using a tanks-in-series model. The result of simulation indicated no flow abnormality and the reactor behaved as an ideal CSTR for the range of the operating conditions used in the investigation. PMID:25528019

  7. In Situ Microfocus Chemical Computed Tomography of the Composition of a Single Catalyst Particle During Hydrogenation of Nitrobenzene in the Liquid Phase**

    PubMed Central

    Price, Stephen W T; Geraki, Kalotina; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Witte, Peter T; Beale, Andrew M; Mosselmans, J Fred W

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis performed in the liquid phase is an important type of catalytic process which is rarely studied in situ. Using microfocus X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction computed tomography (μ-XRF-CT, μ-XRD-CT) in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), we have determined the active state of a Mo-promoted Pt/C catalyst (NanoSelect) for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of nitrobenzene under standard operating conditions. First, μ-XRF-CT and μ-XRD-CT reveal the active state of Pt catalyst to be reduced, noncrystalline, and evenly dispersed across the support surface. Second, imaging of the Pt and Mo distribution reveals they are highly stable on the support and not prone to leaching during the reaction. This study demonstrates the ability of chemical computed tomography to image the nature and spatial distribution of catalysts under reaction conditions. PMID:26140613

  8. Pressureless Reaction Sintering of AlON using Aluminum Orthophosphate as a Transient Liquid Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Bakas; Henry Chu

    2009-01-01

    Use of aluminum oxynitride (AlON) in transparent armor systems has been difficult due to the expense and limitations of the processing methods currently necessary to achieve transparency. Development of a pressureless processing method based on direct reaction sintering of alumina and aluminum nitride powders would reduce costs and provide a more flexible and practical manufacturing method. It may be possible to develop such a processing method using liquid phase sintering; as long as the liquid phase does not remain in the final sample. AlPO4 forms a liquid phase with Al2O3 and AlN at the temperatures required to sinter AlON, and slowly decomposes into P2O5 and alumina. Therefore, it was investigated as a possible transient liquid phase for reaction-sintered AlON. Small compacts of alumina and aluminum nitride with up to of 15wt% AlPO4 additive were pressed and sintered. It was found that AlPO4 formed the requisite transient liquid phase, and it was possible to adjust the process to produce AlON samples with good transmission and densities of 3.66-3.67 g/cc. XRD confirmed the samples formed were AlON, with no trace of any remaining phosphate phases or excess alumina or aluminum nitride. Based on the results, it was concluded that AlPO4 could be utilized as a transient liquid phase to improve the density and transmission of AlON produced by pressureless reaction sintering.

  9. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  10. Chemical studies of elements with Z ≥ 104 in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagame, Yuichiro; Kratz, Jens Volker; Schädel, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies of the chemical separation and characterization experiments of the first three transactinide elements, rutherfordium (Rf), dubnium (Db), and seaborgium (Sg), conducted atom-at-a-time in liquid phases, are reviewed. A short description on experimental techniques based on partition methods, specifically automated rapid chemical separation systems, is also given. A newly developed experimental approach to investigate single atoms of the heaviest elements with an electrochemical method is introduced. Perspectives for liquid-phase chemistry experiments on heavier elements are briefly discussed.

  11. Large scale, liquid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides by the phosphoramidite approach.

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, G M; Biancotto, G; Maffini, M; Scremin, C L

    1993-01-01

    A new method for the liquid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides is described which makes use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) as soluble support and phosphoramidite derivatives as synthons. The new synthetic protocol was applied to a quite large scale production (about 100 mumoles) of such compounds up to the 20mer level. This solution method, called HELP High Efficiency Liquid Phase) Plus, appears effective in terms of speed and coupling yield and can be evaluated for the production of large amount of oligonucleotides. PMID:8464706

  12. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    he Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOW) Demonstration Project at Kingsport Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership) to produce methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOEP Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman coal-to-chemicals complex in Kingsport. The LPMEOHW Demonstration Facility completed its first year of operation on 02 April 1998. The LPMEOW Demonstration Facility also completed the longest continuous operating run (65 days) on 21 April 1998. Catalyst activity, as defined by the ratio of the rate constant at any point in time to the rate constant for freshly reduced catalyst (as determined in the laboratory autoclave), was monitored throughout the reporting period. During a six-week test at a reactor temperature of 225oC and Balanced Gas flowrate of 700 KSCFH, the rate of decline in catalyst activity was steady at 0.29-0.36% per day. During a second one-month test at a reactor temperature of 220oC and a Balanced Gas flowrate of 550-600 KSCFH, the rate of decline in catalyst activity was 0.4% per day, which matched the pefiorrnance at 225"C, as well as the 4-month proof-of-concept run at the LaPorte AFDU in 1988/89. Beginning on 08 May 1998, the LPMEOW Reactor temperature was increased to 235oC, which was the operating temperature tier the December 1997 restart with the fresh charge of catalyst (50'Yo of design loading). The flowrate of the primary syngas feed stream (Balanced Gas) was also increased to 700-750 KSCFH. During two stable operating periods between 08 May and 09 June 1998, the average catalyst deactivation rate was 0.8% per day. Due to the scatter of the statistical analysis of the results, this test was extended to better quanti

  13. Can we better use existing and emerging computing hardware to embed activity coefficient predictions in complex atmospheric aerosol models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Alibay, Irfan; Ruske, Simon; Hindriksen, Vincent; Noisternig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To predict the evolving concentration, chemical composition and ability of aerosol particles to act as cloud droplets, we rely on numerical modeling. Mechanistic models attempt to account for the movement of compounds between the gaseous and condensed phases at a molecular level. This 'bottom up' approach is designed to increase our fundamental understanding. However, such models rely on predicting the properties of molecules and subsequent mixtures. For partitioning between the gaseous and condensed phases this includes: saturation vapour pressures; Henrys law coefficients; activity coefficients; diffusion coefficients and reaction rates. Current gas phase chemical mechanisms predict the existence of potentially millions of individual species. Within a dynamic ensemble model, this can often be used as justification for neglecting computationally expensive process descriptions. Indeed, on whether we can quantify the true sensitivity to uncertainties in molecular properties, even at the single aerosol particle level it has been impossible to embed fully coupled representations of process level knowledge with all possible compounds, typically relying on heavily parameterised descriptions. Relying on emerging numerical frameworks, and designed for the changing landscape of high-performance computing (HPC), in this study we show that comprehensive microphysical models from single particle to larger scales can be developed to encompass a complete state-of-the-art knowledge of aerosol chemical and process diversity. We focus specifically on the ability to capture activity coefficients in liquid solutions using the UNIFAC method, profiling traditional coding strategies and those that exploit emerging hardware.

  14. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke; Zheng, Mengjia; Han, Yuxiang; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO2, CeO2, Al2O3 and SiO2 were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO2 was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO2 and pd-Pd/TiO2. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO2 catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO2 catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd loading amount, the Pd catalyst supported on TiO2 exhibited a much higher catalytic activity than those on other supports. Furthermore, dp-Pd/TiO2 was found to be more active than im-Pd/TiO2 and pd-Pd/TiO2.

  15. Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOW) Demonstration Project at Kingsport Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership) to produce methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas). Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOW Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman complex in Kingsport. During this quarter, initial planning and procurement work began on the seven project sites which have been accepted for participation in the off-site, methanol product-use test plan. Two of the projects have begun pre-testing of equipment and three other projects have commenced with equipment procurement, Methanol produced from carbon monoxide (CO)- rich syngas at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, TX has been shipped to four of the project sites in anticipation of the start of testing during the first quarter of calendar year 1998. Catalyst activity, as defined by the ratio of the rate constant at any point in time to the rate constant for a freshly reduced catalyst (as determined in the laboratory autoclave), continued to decline more rapidly than expected. In response to concentrations of arsenic and sulfbr detected on catalyst samples from the LPMEOW Reactor, Eastman replaced both the arsine- and sulfiwremoval material in the Eastman guard bed which treats the primary syngas feed stream (&danced Gas) prior to its introduction into both the Eastman fixed-bed methanol plant and the LPMEOWM Demonstration Unit. After restarting the demonstration unit, the catalyst deactivation rate remained essentially unchanged. Parallel testing in the laboratory using arsine-doped, and subsequently arsine- and SuIfi-doped syngas, ako ftiIed to prove that arsine was responsible for the higher-than-expected rate of

  16. Ecotoxicology of heavy metals: Liquid-phase extraction by nanosorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, A.; Romantsova, I.; Babkin, A.; Neskoromnaya, E.; Kucherova, A.; Kashevich, Z.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the problem of extreme toxicity heavy metal compounds dissolved in wastewater and liquid emissions of industrial enterprises to living organisms and environment as a whole. The possibility of increasing extraction efficiency of heavy metal ions by sorption materials was demonstrated. The porous space of the latter was modified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during process of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon on metal oxide catalysts. The increasing of the sorption capacity (10-30%) and the sorption rate of nanomodified activated carbons in comparison with standard materials in the example of absorption of Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from aqueous solutions was proven.

  17. Catalyst and reactor development for a liquid-phase Fischer-Tropsch process. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1983-31 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, P.N.; Pierantozzi, R.; Brian, B.W.; Nordquist, A.F.; Parsons, R.L.

    1983-09-01

    Two major tasks continued in the APCI/US DOE contract, Catalysts and Reactor Development for a Liquid Phase Fischer-Tropsch Process: (1) Slurry Catalyst Development; and (2) Slurry Reactor Design Studies. The first extended slurry test was continued using a proprietary catalyst. The results showed that it was possible to produce yields in the diesel fuel region equal to or greater than the Schulz-Flory maximum, without further optimization. Low deactivation rates were observed. Kinetic rate constants were derived from the CSTR experiments, and used in a computer simulation to predict conversions from bubble column operation under Rheinpreussen conditions. Short term (21 day) slurry tests were carried out on two other catalysts, optimized by the screening program. Parametric gas phase screening results were concluded for two additional modified conventional catalysts, and the optimum preparation and activation methods for diesel fuel selectively were chosen. In the hydrodynamic studies, work in the 5'' column was completed with measurements on the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3//water slurries. In the 12'' column, fitted with 7 heat transfer tubes, hydrodynamic parameters were determined for slurries of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in paraffin and water, and SiO/sub 2/ in water. Gas holdups were close to the Akita and Yoshida correlation for the hydrocarbon slurries, but lower for the aqueous ones. Solid concentration profiles, modelled by the sedimentation model, gave evidence of particle agglomeration in SiO/sub 2//hydrocarbon slurries, underlining the need to use chemically similar slurries in cold-flow modelling work. In the 5'' column, solid and liquid dispersion coefficients were found to be equal.

  18. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  19. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gardin, D.E.; Somorjai, G.A. )

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 [degree]C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  20. Fabrication of Janus droplets by evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingquan; Xu, Meng; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Wenfeng; Zong, Chenghua; Yu, Yang; Wang, Qi; Gai, Hongwei

    2016-04-11

    We present a universal and scalable method to fabricate Janus droplets based on evaporation driven liquid-liquid phase separation. In this work, the morphologies and chemical properties of separate parts of the Janus droplets can be flexibly regulated, and more complex Janus droplets (such as core-shell Janus droplets, ternary Janus droplets, and multiple Janus droplets) can be constructed easily. PMID:26983706

  1. A neutralization charge detection method for detecting ions under ambient and liquid-phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko-Keng; Cai, Yi-Hong; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-04-14

    The neutralization charge detection method detects induction signals produced from the neutralization of electric charges of ions at metal surfaces. The signals are intense and can propagate through phase boundaries for detection. The detection method can detect ions under ambient and liquid-phase conditions with high senstivity and fast response time. PMID:26996136

  2. Simplified thermodynamic functions for vapor-liquid phase separation and fountain effect pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1984-01-01

    He-4 fluid handling devices near 2 K require novel components for non-Newtonian fluid transport in He II. Related sizing of devices has to be based on appropriate thermophysical property functions. The present paper presents simplified equilibrium state functions for porous media components which serve as vapor-liquid phase separators and fountain effect pumps.

  3. Evidence for liquid phase reactions during single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Madonna Ripa, D; Lago, S; Spagnolo, R

    2004-07-01

    We extended the recent experiment by Lepoint et al. [Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, NATO ASI Series, Series C 524, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/Boston/London, 1999, p. 285], involving a so-called single bubble sonochemistry process, to a three-phase system. We have found experimental evidence that a single cavitating bubble can activate the oxidation of I- ions after the injection of a CCl4 liquid drop in the bubble trapping apparatus. The solvent drop (CCl4 is almost water insoluble) is pushed towards the bubble position and forms a thin film on the bubble surface. When the acoustic pressure drive is increased above 100 kPa, the three-phase system gives rise to a dark filament, indicating the complexation reaction between starch (added to the water phase) and I2. I2 species is the product of surface reactions involving bubble-induced decomposition of CCl4. Further increase of the acoustic drive causes the thin CCl4 film to separate from the bubble and stops I2 production. The study of the chemical activity of this three-phase system could give new advances on dynamics of the bubble collapse. PMID:15157862

  4. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  5. Heterogeneity of the Liquid Phase, and Vapor Separation in Los Azufres (Mexico) Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nieva, D.; Quijano, L.; Garfias, A.; Barragan, R.M.; Laredo, F.

    1983-12-15

    Data of chemical and isotopic composition of fluids from Los Azufres geothermal wells is interpreted in order to characterize the composition of the liquid phase, and to define the relation between this phase and fluids from steam-producing wells. Chemical and specific enthalpy data show that most wells considered are fed a mixture of steam and liquid. Thus, flashing occurs in the formation. This poses a problem on the interpretation of isotopic data, because the composition of the feeding mixture need not be representative of the composition of the liquid phase in the reservoir. Two extreme alternatives for the interpretation of isotopic data are considered. In the first alternative the composition of the total discharge is considered to be the same as that of the liquid in the reservoir. In the second alternative the feeding fluid is considered to be a mixture of the liquid phase in the reservoir and the calculated fraction of steam. In addition, this steam is assumed to separate from a much larger mass of that liquid phase at the downhole temperature. The contribution of steam is then subtracted from the total discharge to yield the composition of the liquid phase. Using data for silica concentration in total discharge and separated water, the chloride concentration in the reservoir liquid is calculated. This result is used to calculate the fraction of steam in the feeding mixture of each well. The isotopic data is then corrected as proposed for the second alternative, to yield the composition of the liquid phase. Comparison of the corrected and uncorrected isotopic values shows that the correction has an important effect only when the steam mass fraction in the feeding mixture is large (> 20%). The correction tends to reduce the dispersion of data points in a {delta} D vs {delta}{sup 18}O diagram. Points representing composition of liquid phase show an approximately linear distribution, suggesting a process of mixing of two fluids. Available data appears to

  6. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Wynne, D I

    1997-10-01

    Research into new semiconductor materials for measurement of electromagnetic radiation over a wide range of energies has been an active field for several decades. There is a strong desire to identify and develop new materials which can lead to improved detectors. Such devices are expected to solve problems that cannot be solved using the semiconductor materials and device structures which have been traditionally used for radiation detection. In order for a detector which is subjected to some type of irradiation to respond, the radiation must undergo an interaction with the detector. The net result of the radiation interaction in a broad category of detectors is the generation of mobile electric charge carriers (electrons and/or holes) within the detector active volume. This charge is collected at the detector contacts and it forms the basic electrical signal. Typically, the collection of the charge is accomplished through the imposition of an electric field within the detector which causes the positive and/or negative charges created by the radiation to flow in opposite directions to the contacts. For the material to serve as a good radiation detector, a large fraction (preferably 100%) of all carriers created by the interacting incident radiation must be collected. Charge trapping by deep level impurities and structural defects can seriously degrade detector performance. The focus of this thesis is on far infrared and X-ray detection. In X-ray detector applications of p-I-n diodes, the object is to measure accurately the energy distribution of the incident radiation quanta. One important property of such detectors is their ability to measure the energy of individual incident photons with high energy resolution.

  7. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  8. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification, operation, and support studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-02

    Liquid-entrained operations at the LaPorte Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) Process Development Unit (PDU) continued during June and July 1988 under Tasks 2.1 and 2.2 of Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC90005 for the US Department of Energy. The primary focus of this PDU operating program was to prepare for a confident move to the next scale of operation with an optimized and simplified process. Several new design options had been identified and thoroughly evaluated in a detailed process engineering study completed under the LPMEOH Part-2 contract (DE-AC22-85PC80007), which then became the basis for the current PDU modification/operating program. The focus of the Process Engineering Design was to optimize and simplifications focused on the slurry loop, which consists of the reactor, vapor/liquid separator, slurry heat exchanger, and slurry circulation pump. Two-Phase Gas Holdup tests began at LaPorte in June 1988 with nitrogen/oil and CO- rich gas/oil systems. The purpose of these tests was to study the hydrodynamics of the reactor, detect metal carbonyl catalyst poisons, and train operating personnel. Any effect of the new gas sparger and the internal heat exchanger would be revealed by comparing the hydrodynamic data with previous PDU hydrodynamic data. The Equipment Evaluation'' Run E-5 was conducted at the LaPorte LPMEOH PDU in July 1988. The objective of Run E-5 was to systematically evaluate each new piece of equipment (sparger, internal heat exchanger, V/L disengagement zone, demister, and cyclone) which had been added to the system, and attempt to run the reactor in an internal-only mode. In addition, a successful catalyst activation with a concentrated (45 wt % oxide) slurry was sought. 9 refs., 26 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V. Y.; Aykac, M.; Casey, M. E.

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction.

  10. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source.

    PubMed

    Panin, V Y; Aykac, M; Casey, M E

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction. PMID:23648397

  11. Correlation of three-liquid-phase equilibria involving ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escontrela, I; Arce, A; Soto, A; Marcilla, A; Olaya, M M; Reyes-Labarta, J A

    2016-08-01

    The difficulty in achieving a good thermodynamic description of phase equilibria is finding a model that can be extended to a large variety of chemical families and conditions. This problem worsens in the case of systems containing more than two phases or involving complex compounds such as ionic liquids. However, there are interesting applications that involve multiphasic systems, and the promising features of ionic liquids suggest that they will play an important role in many future processes. In this work, for the first time, the simultaneous correlation of liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-liquid equilibrium data for ternary systems involving ionic liquids has been carried out. To that end, the phase diagram of the water + [P6 6 6 14][DCA] + hexane system has been determined at 298.15 K and 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The importance of this system lies in the possibility of using the surface active ionic liquid to improve surfactant enhanced oil recovery methods. With those and previous measurements, thirteen sets of equilibrium data for water + ionic liquid + oil ternary systems have been correlated. The isoactivity equilibrium condition, using the NRTL model, and some pivotal strategies are proposed to correlate these complex systems. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data in all the regions (one triphasic and two biphasic) of the diagrams. The geometric aspects related to the Gibbs energy of mixing function obtained using the model, together with the minor common tangent plane equilibrium condition, are valuable tools to check the consistency of the obtained correlation results. PMID:27427420

  12. Binary Solid-Liquid Phase Diagram of Phenol and t-Butanol: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xinhua; Wang, Xiaogang; Wu, Meifen

    2014-01-01

    The determination of the solid-liquid phase diagram of a binary system is always used as an experiment in the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory courses. However, most phase diagrams investigated in the lab are simple eutectic ones, despite the fact that complex binary solid-liquid phase diagrams are more common. In this article, the…

  13. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-07-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  14. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-07-01

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  15. Properties of undoped and manganese-doped InGaAsP grown by liquid phase electroepitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Shanthi N.; Abul-Fadl, Ali; Collis, Ward J.; Khorrami, Mohammad N.

    1988-01-01

    Undoped and manganese-doped InGaAsP epilayers lattice matched to InP substrate have been grown by the liquid phase electroepitaxy technique. The dependence of growth velocity on current density for both undoped and doped layers has been studied. Layers of good surface morphology with hole concentrations in the range from 8 x 10 to the 16th to 4 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm have been achieved. The activation energy of the manganese acceptor level was estimated to vary from 57 to 32 meV with increasing hole concentration. The temperature dependence of carrier mobility data was analyzed in terms of different scattering mechanisms and the values of acceptor and donor densities determined were compared with those obtained from the temperature variation of Hall concentration data. Dependences of photoluminescence peak energy and intensity on the temperature and incident excitation levels have been investigated.

  16. Liquid phase methanol process development unit: installation, operation, and support studies, draft annual report. Technical progress report No. 8, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-20

    Engineering of the 5 TPD LPMeOH PDU was completed, and significant progress was made at the LaPorte, TX site. The LaPorte installation work will be totally complete in mid-November 1983, and shakedown will begin as scheduled. Significant new data and results were achieved in the laboratory support programs at Fairfield and Allentown (APCI). Gas phase screening (0.5 inch tubular reactors) of new catalysts for liquid-entrained (slurry) operation was completed in Allentown. Investigation of some 25 new catalyst preparations led to the advancement of 3 catalyst candidates for liquid phase screening at Fairfield. The catalyst activity with both feed gases was stable, with long, slow deactivation observed (similar to Fairfield), an encouraging result. Laboratory progress at CSI, Fairfield was significant. Liquid phase screening of outside slurry catalyst candidates in the 2-liter stirred autoclave reactors was completed. Several outside catalyst powders achieved good performance in the liquid phase, and one commercial powder was recommended for advancement to LaPorte. In the fundamental modeling effort, the chemical equilibrium description for the methanol synthesis reaction was improved. Intrinsic kinetics were derived from the data from the stirred autoclave reactors. These kinetics were incorporated along with the gas holdup data into the three-phase backflow model of the liquid-entrained reactor. The model was subsequently used to make predictions of LaPorte performance, and to predict the data of the first Lab PDU slurry run. The early results are quite encouraging.

  17. Hybrid biofilm-membrane bioreactor (Bf-MBR) for minimization of bulk liquid-phase organic substances and its positive effect on membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Sun, F Y; Li, P; Li, J; Li, H J; Ou, Q M; Sun, T T; Dong, Z J

    2015-12-01

    Four biofilm membrane bioreactors (Bf-MBRs) with various fixed carrier volumes (C:M) were operated in parallel to investigate the effect of attached-growth mode biomass involvement to the change of liquid-phase organics characteristics and membrane permeability, by comparing with conventional MBR. The experiments displayed that C:M and co-existence of biofilm with suspended solids in Bf-MBRs resulted in slight difference in pollutants removal effectiveness, and in rather distinct biomass properties and bacterial activities. The membrane permeability and specific resistance of bulk suspension of Bf-MBRs related closely with the liquid-phase organic substance, including soluble microbial products (SMP) and biopolymer cluster (BPC). Compared with conventional MBR, Bf-MBR with proper C:M had a low total biomass content and food-chain, where biofilm formation and its dominance affected liquid-phase organics, especially through reducing their content and minimizing strongly and weakly hydrophobic components with small molecular weight, and thus to mitigate membrane fouling significantly. PMID:26454042

  18. Stable non-Fermi-liquid phase of itinerant spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Yasaman; Potter, Andrew C.

    2015-07-01

    Direct (nongradient) coupling between a gapless bosonic field and a Fermi surface results in the destruction of Landau quasiparticles and a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory. Such a non-Fermi-liquid phase arises in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets with spontaneously broken continuous symmetries due to strong coupling between rotational Goldstone modes and itinerant electrons. These systems provide an experimentally accessible context for studying non-Fermi-liquid physics. Possible examples include low-density Rashba coupled electron gases, which have a natural tendency towards spontaneous ferromagnetism, or topological insulator surface states with proximity-induced ferromagnetism. Crucially, unlike the related case of a spontaneous nematic distortion of the Fermi surface, for which controlled field theory calculations predict that the non-Fermi-liquid regime will be masked by a superconducting dome, we show that the non-Fermi-liquid phase in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets is stable.

  19. Stable non-Fermi liquid phase of itinerant spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Yasaman; Potter, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Direct coupling between gapless bosons and a Fermi surface results in the destruction of Landau quasiparticles and a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory. Such a non-Fermi liquid phase arises in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets with spontaneously broken continuous symmetries due to strong coupling between rotational Goldstone modes and itinerant electrons. These systems provide an experimentally accessible context for studying non-Fermi liquid physics. Possible examples include low-density Rashba coupled electron gases, which have a natural tendency towards spontaneous ferromagnetism, or topological insulator surface states with proximity-induced ferromagnetism. Crucially, unlike the related case of a spontaneous nematic distortion of the Fermi surface, for which the non-Fermi liquid regime is expected to be masked by a superconducting dome, we show that the non-Fermi liquid phase in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets is stable.

  20. Liquid Phase Growth of YBa2Cu3O7-x at Low Temperatures Using KOHFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuji; Funaki, Shuhei; Nakayama, Fumiya; Okunishi, Ryota; Miyachi, Yugo

    Molten KOH method, which was reported for the growth of YBa2Cu4O8 (Y124) crystal, was applied to synthesize and grow YBa2Cu3O7-x (Y123) crystal. Y123 phase was synthesized by controlling growth temperature and oxygen partial pressure. The shape of synthesized grains was cubic-like, indicating that they grew by the transportation of solute through liquid phase. Using KOH flux method, substitution of rare-earth elements for Y in Y123 phase was easily obtained. Liquid phase epitaxy of Y123 film on a single crystalline substrate was achieved by slow cooling flux method but not by top-seeded solution growth yet.

  1. Diffusion-stress coupling in liquid phase during rapid solidification of binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the diffusion-viscous stress coupling in the liquid phase during rapid solidification of binary mixtures. The model starts with a set of evolution equations for diffusion flux and viscous pressure tensor, based on extended irreversible thermodynamics. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion-stress coupling leads to non-Fickian diffusion effects in the liquid phase. With only diffusive dynamics, the model results in the nonlocal diffusion equations of parabolic type, which imply the transition to complete solute trapping only asymptotically at an infinite interface velocity. With the wavelike dynamics, the model leads to the nonlocal diffusion equations of hyperbolic type and describes the transition to complete solute trapping and diffusionless solidification at a finite interface velocity in accordance with experimental data and molecular dynamic simulation.

  2. Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

  3. The Improvement of the Characteristics of Liquid Phase-Deposited SiliconDioxide/Silicon Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneji, Nobuo; Chanthamaly, Phonekeo; Mouri, Shigenobu

    Liquid phase deposition (LPD) is the method to deposit SiO2 films on the substrates at room temperature in the super-saturated fluorosilicic acid (H2SiF6) solution. When the SiO2 films are directly deposited on the Si substrates, which are treated with diluted HF to remove the native oxide, the characteristics of the the SiO2/Si interface are poor, because the surface Si atoms are terminated and covered with H atoms. Low temperature (30—500°C) annealing in O2 was found to be effective to improve the interface characteristics, and also the breakdown characteristics. This low temperature annealing in O2 ambient is useful without losing the merit of low temperature process in the liquid-phase deposition method, when the deposited SiO2 films are used as the gate insulators in Si MOS FETs.

  4. Dynamic evolution of liquid-liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, S. D.; Gibbs, P. J.; Katz, M. R.; Ott, T. J.; Patterson, B. M.; Lee, W. -K.; Fezzaa, K.; Cooley, J. C.; Clarke, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography has been used to observe liquideliquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis has been used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamic instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.

  5. Stabilization of copper catalysts for liquid-phase reactions by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brandon J; Jackson, David H K; Crisci, Anthony J; Farberow, Carrie A; Shi, Fengyuan; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Lu, Junling; Dietrich, Paul J; Gu, Xiangkui; Marshall, Christopher L; Stair, Peter C; Elam, Jeffrey W; Miller, Jeffrey T; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Voyles, Paul M; Greeley, Jeffrey; Mavrikakis, Manos; Scott, Susannah L; Kuech, Thomas F; Dumesic, James A

    2013-12-16

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of an alumina overcoat can stabilize a base metal catalyst (e.g., copper) for liquid-phase catalytic reactions (e.g., hydrogenation of biomass-derived furfural in alcoholic solvents or water), thereby eliminating the deactivation of conventional catalysts by sintering and leaching. This method of catalyst stabilization alleviates the need to employ precious metals (e.g., platinum) in liquid-phase catalytic processing. The alumina overcoat initially covers the catalyst surface completely. By using solid state NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy, it was shown that high temperature treatment opens porosity in the overcoat by forming crystallites of γ-Al2 O3 . Infrared spectroscopic measurements and scanning tunneling microscopy studies of trimethylaluminum ALD on copper show that the remarkable stability imparted to the nanoparticles arises from selective armoring of under-coordinated copper atoms on the nanoparticle surface. PMID:24282166

  6. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Jordana

    2001-05-12

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the {l_brace}111{r_brace} toward the {l_brace}100{r_brace}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ({approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ({approx}6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface

  7. Separation of coal-tar constituents from soil particles in a two-liquid-phase slurry system.

    PubMed

    Schuur, J H Berg; Mattiasson, B

    2003-06-01

    An evaluation has been made of the capability of rapeseed oil to dissolve polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) crystals in a biphasic system and of its capability to extract PAHs from polluted soil in a two-liquid-phase (TLP) slurry system. Up to 220 g l(-1) of the crystalline hydrocarbons could be dissolved in the organic phase, indicating oil/water-partitioning coefficients of 10(5). When soil from a former gasworks site was treated in a TLP slurry system, it was found that a certain critical amount of vegetable oil had to be added in order to form a free oil phase. Single and multiple extractions gave similar results for multiple short-term and single long-term treatments, with a maximum of 87% for pyrene release. Following a 30-day bioslurry treatment, the total concentration of the 16 EPA PAHs in the soil decreased from 2740 mg kg(-1) to 1366 mg kg(-1). This was followed by one of three different 12-day post-bioslurry treatments. Further bioslurry treatment reduced the final concentration to 1002 mg kg(-1). Abiotic treatment with a surfactant (Brij 30) achieved a reduction to 797 mg kg(-1). Treatment with rapeseed oil gave the best reduction to 343 mg kg(-1). PMID:12868531

  8. In situ derivatization hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction for the determination of biogenic amines in food samples.

    PubMed

    Saaid, Mardiana; Saad, Bahruddin; Ali, Abdussalam Salhin Mohamed; Saleh, Muhammad Idiris; Basheer, Chanbasha; Lee, Hian Kee

    2009-07-01

    Hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction with in situ derivatization using dansyl chloride has been successfully developed for the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) determination of the biogenic amines (tryptamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermidine) in food samples. Parameters affecting the performance of the in situ derivatization process such as type of extraction solvent, temperature, extraction time, stirring speed and salt addition were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions (extraction solvent, dihexyl ether; acceptor phase, 0.1M HCl; extraction time, 30 min; extraction temperature, 26 degrees C; without addition of salt), enrichment factors varying from 47 to 456 were achieved. Good linearity of the analytes was obtained over a concentration range of 0.1-5 microg mL(-1) (with correlation coefficients of 0.9901-0.9974). The limits of detection and quantification based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3-10, ranged from 0.0075 to 0.030 microg mL(-1) and 0.03 to 0.10 microg mL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations based on the peak areas for six replicate analysis of water spiked with 0.5 microg mL(-1) of each biogenic amine were lower than 7.5%. The method was successfully applied to shrimp sauce and tomato ketchup samples, offering an interesting alternative to liquid-liquid extraction and solid phase extraction for the analysis of biogenic amines in food samples. PMID:19481215

  9. Chemical Potentials, Activity Coefficients, and Solubility in Aqueous NaCl Solutions: Prediction by Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R

    2015-04-14

    We describe a computationally efficient molecular simulation methodology for calculating the concentration dependence of the chemical potentials of both solute and solvent in aqueous electrolyte solutions, based on simulations of the salt chemical potential alone. We use our approach to study the predictions for aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions of these properties by the recently developed polarizable force fields (FFs) AH/BK3 of Kiss and Baranyai (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 204507) and AH/SWM4-DP of Lamoureux and Roux (J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 3308 - 3322) and by the nonpolarizable JC FF of Joung and Cheatham tailored to SPC/E water (J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 9020 - 9041). We also consider their predictions of the concentration dependence of the electrolyte activity coefficient, the crystalline solid chemical potential, the electrolyte solubility, and the solution specific volume. We first highlight the disagreement in the literature concerning calculations of solubility by means of molecular simulation in the case of the JC FF and provide strong evidence of the correctness of our methodology based on recent independently obtained results for this important test case. We then compare the predictions of the three FFs with each other and with experiment and draw conclusions concerning their relative merits, with particular emphasis on the salt chemical potential and activity coefficient vs concentration curves and their derivatives. The latter curves have only previously been available from Kirkwood-Buff integrals, which require approximate numerical integrations over system pair correlation functions at each concentration. Unlike the case of the other FFs, the AH/BK3 curves are nearly parallel to the corresponding experimental curves at moderate and higher concentrations. This leads to an excellent prediction of the water chemical potential via the Gibbs-Duhem equation and enables the activity coefficient curve to be brought into excellent agreement

  10. Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper from aqueous solutions without reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kochemirovsky, V A; Tumkin, I I; Logunov, L S; Safonov, S V; Menchikov, Leonid G

    2012-08-31

    Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper without a traditional reducing agent has been used for the first time to obtain conductive patterns on a dielectric surface having a reducing ability. It is shown that phenol-formaldehyde binder of the dielectric (glass fibre) can successfully play the role of a reducing agent in this process. The resulting copper sediments have low electrical resistance and good topology. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)