Science.gov

Sample records for liver cancer patients

  1. Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Primary liver cancer starts in the liver. Metastatic liver ... and spreads to your liver. Risk factors for primary liver cancer include Having hepatitis B or C ...

  2. Multisciplinary management of patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Greef, Kathleen; Rolfo, Christian; Russo, Antonio; Chapelle, Thiery; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Coelho, Andreia; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Peeters, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been till now the main therapeutic strategies for disease control and improvement of the overall survival. Twenty-five per cent (25%) of CRC patients have clinically detectable liver metastases at the initial diagnosis and approximately 50% develop liver metastases during their disease course. Twenty-thirty per cent (20%-30%) are CRC patients with metastases confined to the liver. Some years ago various studies showed a curative potential for liver metastases resection. For this reason some authors proposed the conversion of unresectable liver metastases to resectable to achieve cure. Since those results were published, a lot of regimens have been studied for resectability potential. Better results could be obtained by the combination of chemotherapy with targeted drugs, such as anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However an accurate selection for patients to treat with these regimens and to operate for liver metastases is mandatory to reduce the risk of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach represents the best way for a proper patient management. The team needs to include surgeons, oncologists, diagnostic and interventional radiologists with expertise in hepatobiliary disease, molecular pathologists, and clinical nurse specialists. This review summarizes the most important findings on surgery and systemic treatment of CRC-related liver metastases. PMID:27621569

  3. Multisciplinary management of patients with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    De Greef, Kathleen; Rolfo, Christian; Russo, Antonio; Chapelle, Thiery; Bronte, Giuseppe; Passiglia, Francesco; Coelho, Andreia; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Peeters, Marc

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been till now the main therapeutic strategies for disease control and improvement of the overall survival. Twenty-five per cent (25%) of CRC patients have clinically detectable liver metastases at the initial diagnosis and approximately 50% develop liver metastases during their disease course. Twenty-thirty per cent (20%-30%) are CRC patients with metastases confined to the liver. Some years ago various studies showed a curative potential for liver metastases resection. For this reason some authors proposed the conversion of unresectable liver metastases to resectable to achieve cure. Since those results were published, a lot of regimens have been studied for resectability potential. Better results could be obtained by the combination of chemotherapy with targeted drugs, such as anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However an accurate selection for patients to treat with these regimens and to operate for liver metastases is mandatory to reduce the risk of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach represents the best way for a proper patient management. The team needs to include surgeons, oncologists, diagnostic and interventional radiologists with expertise in hepatobiliary disease, molecular pathologists, and clinical nurse specialists. This review summarizes the most important findings on surgery and systemic treatment of CRC-related liver metastases. PMID:27621569

  4. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. A Comprehensive Method for Predicting Fatal Liver Failure of Patients With Liver Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangfa; Lei, Biao; Nie, Xingju; Lin, Linku; Tahir, Syed Abdul; Shi, Wuxiang; Jin, Junfei; He, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are many methods to assess liver function, but none of them has been verified as fully effective. The purpose of this study is to establish a comprehensive method evaluating perioperative liver reserve function (LRF) in patients with primary liver cancer (PLC). In this study, 310 PLC patients who underwent liver resection were included. The cohort was divided into a training set (n = 235) and a validation set (n = 75). The factors affecting postoperative liver dysfunction (POLD) during preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods were confirmed by logistic regression analysis. The equation for calculating the preoperative liver functional evaluation index (PLFEI) was established; the cutoff value of PLFEI determined through analysis by receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to predict postoperative liver function. The data showed that body mass index, international normalized ratio, indocyanine green (ICG) retention rate at 15 minutes (ICGR15), ICG elimination rate, standard remnant liver volume (SRLV), operative bleeding volume (OBV), blood transfusion volume, and operative time were statistically different (all P < 0.05) between 2 groups of patients with and without POLD. The relationship among PLFEI, ICGR15, OBV, and SRLV is expressed as an equation of “PLFEI = 0.181 × ICGR15 + 0.001 × OBV − 0.008 × SRLV.” The cutoff value of PLFEI to predict POLD was −2.16 whose sensitivity and specificity were 90.3% and 73.5%, respectively. However, when predicting fatal liver failure (FLF), the cutoff value of PLFEI was switched to −1.97 whose sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 68.8%, respectively. PLFEI will be a more comprehensive, sensitive, and accurate index assessing perioperative LRF in liver cancer patients who receive liver resection. And keeping PLFEI <−1.97 is a safety margin for preventing FLF in PLC patients who underwent liver resection. PMID:25929924

  6. Risk factors for cancer recurrence or death within 6 months after liver resection in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Won; Yu, Young Dong; Han, Jae Hyun; Suh, Sung-Ock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to find risk factors for early recurrence (ER) and early death (ED) after liver resection for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRCLM). Methods Between May 1990 and December 2011, 279 patients underwent liver resection for CRCLM at Korea University Medical Center. They were assigned to group ER (recurrence within 6 months after liver resection) or group NER (non-ER; no recurrence within 6 months after liver resection) and group ED (death within 6 months after liver resection) or group NED (alive > 6 months after liver resection). Results The ER group included 30 patients (10.8%) and the NER group included 247 patients (89.2%). The ED group included 18 patients (6.6%) and the NED group included 253 patients (93.4%). Prognostic factors for ER in a univariate analysis were poorly differentiated colorectal cancer (CRC), synchronous metastasis, ≥5 cm of liver mass, ≥50 ng/mL preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level, positive liver resection margin, and surgery alone without perioperative chemotherapy. Prognostic factors for ED in a univariate analysis were poorly differentiated CRC, positive liver resection margin, and surgery alone without perioperative chemotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that poorly differentiated CRC, ≥5-cm metastatic tumor size, positive liver resection margin, and surgery alone without perioperative chemotherapy were independent risk factors related to ER. For ED, poorly differentiated CRC, positive liver resection margin, and surgery alone without perioperative chemotherapy were risk factors in multivariate analysis. Conclusion Complete liver resection with clear resection margin and perioperative chemotherapy should be carefully considered when patients have the following preoperative risk factors: metastatic tumor size ≥ 5 cm and poorly differentiated CRC. PMID:27186570

  7. [Comparison of serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients and healthy adults].

    PubMed

    Yin, D Z

    1990-05-01

    The contents of 15 trace elements in the sera of 30 liver cancer patients and 30 healthy adults were assayed by ICP-AES method. The data obtained were analysed by routine statistical tests, multi-variate discrimination analysis, multi-variate stepwise regression analysis and non-linear mapping algorithm. The results showed that the contents of copper, vanadium, cadmium, stannum, cobalt, nickel in liver cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy adults. The serum trace element spectrum of liver cancer patients was different from that of healthy adults. Hence, the liver cancer patients could be differentiated from healthy adults by serum trace element spectrum. PMID:2249593

  8. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  10. What Is Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics about liver cancer What is liver cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... structure and function of the liver. About the liver The liver is the largest internal organ. It ...

  11. Factors predicting early postoperative liver cirrhosis-related complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Nagano, Koshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Hanada, Shoji; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to determine the factors predicting liver cirrhosis-related complications in the early postoperative period after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent curative surgery for primary lung cancer in our institute from January 1990 to March 2007, finding 37 cases with comorbid liver cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups, according to whether liver failure, bleeding, and critical infection had occurred postoperatively. Various clinical parameters were analyzed statistically between the bigeminal groups. Liver cirrhosis-related complications occurred in seven of the 37 patients (18.9%). Transient liver failure occurred in two patients (5.4%) after pulmonary resection. Acute intrathoracic bleeding occurred in four cases (10.8%). Two patients died (5.4%) in both cases due to sepsis. Preoperative total bilirubin (P<0.05), and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (P<0.05) were significantly higher in patients with liver failure. Only serum value of total bilirubin was an independent risk factor (P<0.05) by multivariate analysis. In predicting death from infection, only preoperative nutritional status was a significant risk factor (P<0.05). To avoid postoperative cirrhosis-related complications, preoperative preparation to improve their liver function and nutrition status is essential. PMID:17766277

  12. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roujun, Chen; Yanhua, Yi; Bixun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66) and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86) higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients. PMID:27610222

  13. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  14. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. ...

  15. Analysis of liver-directed therapies in U.S. cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Alese, O.B.; Kim, S.; Chen, Z.; Ramalingam, S.S.; Owonikoko, T.K.; El-Rayes, B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The liver is a common site of primary and metastatic cancer. Liver-directed therapies are commonly used to treat cancer involving the liver. We report on the patterns, predictors, and outcomes of liver-directed therapies in hospitalized cancer patients in the United States. Methods Data were obtained from all U.S. states that contributed to the Nationwide Inpatient Sample maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality between 2006 and 2010. Univariate and multivariate testing was used to identify factors significantly associated with patient outcome. Results For the 5-year period of interest, 12,540 patient discharges were identified. Mean age in the sample was 60 years. Primary liver lesions (n = 8840) made up 26.9% of the sample; the remaining cases were metastases. Most procedures were performed in large (79%) urban (98%) hospitals and in patients with insurance (97.9%). The most common intervention was partial hepatectomy (42.7%), followed by open (9.9%), percutaneous (7.2%), and laparoscopic (5.04%) ablation of liver lesions; embolization (9.8%); and liver transplantation (2.64%). The incidence of in-hospital mortality was very low (2.4%), and the complication rate was 12.2%. Complications such as acute liver necrosis, ascites, hepatic coma, hepatorenal syndrome, liver abscess, and high number of comorbid illnesses (>8) accounted for 60% of the in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The low rate of morbidity and mortality associated with liver-directed therapies in hospitalized cancer patients supports the continuing utility of such procedures in the management of primary and metastatic liver cancer. The patterns of health disparities observed with respect to the use of liver-directed therapies are concerning. PMID:26715883

  16. A systematic review of a liver-first approach in patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vincent WT; Laurence, Jerome M; Pang, Tony; Johnston, Emma; Hollands, Michael J; Pleass, Henry CC; Richardson, Arthur J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since the liver metastases rather than the colorectal cancer itself is the main determinant of patient’s survival, the ‘Liver-First Approach (LFA)’ with upfront chemotherapy followed by a hepatic resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) and finally a colorectal cancer resection was proposed. The aim of this review was to analyse the evidence for LFA in patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous CLM. Methods: A literature search of databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) to identify published studies of LFA in patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous CLM was undertaken focussing on the peri-operative regimens of LFA and survival outcomes. Results: Three observational studies and one retrospective cohort study were included for review. A total of 121 patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous CLM were selected for LFA. Pre-operative chemotherapy was used in 99% of patients. One hundred and twelve of the initial 121 patients (93%) underwent a hepatic resection of CLM. In total, 60% had a major liver resection and the R0 resection rate was 93%. Post-operative morbidity and mortality after the hepatic resection were 20% and 1%, respectively. Ultimately, 89 of the initial 121 (74%) patients underwent a colorectal cancer resection. Post-operative morbidity and mortality after a colorectal resection were 50% and 6%, respectively. The median overall survival was 40 months (range 19–50) with a recurrence rate of 52%. Conclusions: Current evidence suggests that LFA is safe and feasible in selected patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous CLM. Future studies are required to further define patient selection criteria for LFA and the exact role of LFA in the management of synchronous CLM. PMID:23509899

  17. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-03-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  18. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  19. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver cancer is not common in the United States. Liver cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American men, have an increased ...

  20. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  1. Incidental biliary cystadenoma mimicking liver metastasis in a gastric cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Pınar; Aydın, Ünal

    2016-01-01

    Biliary cystadenoma represents a rare benign cystic hepatic neoplasm with premalignant potential. The diagnosis is usually difficult, and imaging methods may not be possible to clarify the pathology. It can be hard to determine, particularly in patients with a previous cancer history that has high metastatic potential in the liver. We presented a 53-year-old man with a newly diagnosed liver mass that was suspicious for metastasis 2 years after gastric cancer surgery and histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of biliary cystadenoma. PMID:27528806

  2. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  3. Mössbauer studies of hemoglobin of the patients with liver cancer and cirrhosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xinlei; Hsia, Yuanfu; Liu, Rongchuan; Lu, Qingyou; Huang, Runsheng; Sun, Yunhan; Wang, Quanxing; Long, Jianxui

    1992-04-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) of the patients with primary liver cancer and with cirrhosis were investigated by using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Control measurements were carried out on RBC from normal adults. The Mössbauer spectra of normal RBC are composed of two doublets corresponding to deoxy-Hb and Oxy-Hb. Besides disappearance or a decrease of the doublets corresponding to deoxy-Hb, no additional peak was detected in the samples from the patients.

  4. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  5. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER AND CONCOMITANT LIVER METASTASES].

    PubMed

    Shchepotin, S B; Kolesnik, O O; Burlaka, A A; Lukashenko, A V; Pryimak, V V

    2015-04-01

    Colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastasis (sm-CRC) is extremely unfavorable prognostic factor. Surgery remains is most effective method, able to extend the life of these patients. The results of treatment of 126 patients with sm-CRC were analyzed, whom performed simultaneous (group I) or staged (group II) surgery. Simultaneous resection of 3 segments of liver or less with metastases and primary tumor is a safe surgical strategy (complicatios level was 4.8%); simultaneous resection of 3 segments of liver or more increase the complicatios level to 20.9%. Simultaneous resection ensure reduction of hospital stay terms in 58.1% and duration of surgery in 71.3% (p < 0.001). The average cost of treatment patient treating with staged strategy exceeded in simultaneous surgical treatment in 40.9%. PMID:26263637

  6. Glycosylation and Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Herrera, Harmin; Block, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is the 5th most common cancer, but the 2nd leading cause of cancer death, in the world, with more than 700,000 fatalities annually. The major etiology of liver cancer is infection with an hepatotropic virus such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). While chronic viral infection remains the main cause of liver disease and risk of HCC, rates of non –viral associated HCC are occurring at an alarmingly increasing rate. Like many cancers, survival rates are closely associated with time of detection. If HCC is caught early, survival rates can be as high as 50%. Regrettably, most cases of HCC are caught late where survival rates can be as low as 2–7%. Thus, there has been great interest in discovering serum biomarkers that could be used to identify those with HCC. To this end, many groups have examined the N-linked glycans to identify changes that occur with HCC. As the liver secretes the vast majority of proteins into the serum, this has often been a starting point for study. In serum, alterations in core fucosylation, outer-arm fucosylation, increased sialylation and glycan branching have been observed in patients with HCC. Similar findings have been found directly in HCC tissue suggesting that these glycan changes may play a role in tumor formation and development. PMID:25727150

  7. Successful multimodal therapy for an α-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer patient with simultaneous liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YU; WANG, LIN; YANG, NINGRONG; GONG, XINLEI; ZHANG, YU; QIN, SHUKUI

    2015-01-01

    α-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer (AFPGC) is considered to be a special type of stomach cancer, due its features of high malignancy, fast progression, easy transferral and a poor prognosis. No standard therapy is currently available for patients with AFPGC. In the present study, the case of a 59-year-old male diagnosed with AFPGC and simultaneous liver metastases is presented. The patient presented with abdominal bloating and multiple liver lesions were revealed upon imaging. During the course of treatment, the patient's serum AFP level increased to a maximum of 20,624.6 µg/l. The patient survived for 30 months and was ultimately treated with multimodal therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, interventional therapy and molecular targeted therapy. Treatment with paclitaxel, irinotecan and TS-1, particularly sorafenib as a molecular targeted drug, are effective for such patients. The choice of chemotherapy regimen according to the Lauren classification and the use of oral sorafenib are likely to be novel and effective treatments for this type of stomach cancer. However, investigations should be performed to identify the gastric cancer patient population most receptive to sorafenib treatment. In addition, combined chemotherapy and molecular targeting treatment requires further study in order to determine if a synergistic effect is present. Further investigation in a large-sample study is required to confirm the validity of these results. PMID:26722283

  8. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer; a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Løgager, Vibeke B.; Skjoldbye, Bjørn; Møller, Jakob M.; Lorenzen, Torben; Rasmussen, Vera L.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Mollerup, Talie H.; Okholm, Cecilie; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT. Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were asked to participate in the study. Preoperative CT and diffusion weighted MR (DWMR) were compared to contrast enhanced laparoscopic ultrasound (CELUS). Results. A total of 35 patients were included, 15 patients in Group-1 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and 20 patients in Group-2 having the standard CT evaluation of the liver and DWMR of the liver. Compared with CELUS, the per-patient sensitivity/specificity was 50/100% for CT, and for DWMR: 100/94% and 100/100% for Reader 1 and 2, respectively. The per-lesion sensitivity of CT and DWMR were 17% and 89%, respectively compared with CELUS. Furthermore, one patient had non-resectable metastases after DWMR despite being diagnosed with resectable metastases after CT. Another patient was diagnosed with multiple liver metastases during CELUS, despite a negative CT-scan. Discussion. DWMR is feasible for preoperative evaluation of liver metastases. The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time. PMID:26793420

  9. Comparison of anamnestic history, alcohol intake and smoking, nutritional status, and liver dysfunction between thorotrast patients who developed primary liver cancer and those who did not

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyosawa, K.; Imai, H.; Sodeyama, T.; Franca, S.T.; Yousuf, M.; Furuta, S.; Fujisawa, K.; Kido, C. )

    1989-08-01

    In order to clarify the differences in past history, nutritional condition and, consumption of alcohol and tobacco, and liver dysfunction between the thorotrast patients who developed primary liver cancer and those who did not, 103 persons who had no primary liver cancer in January 1980 were studied. All subjects were military men who had undergone angiography with thorotrast between 1943 and 1946. Twenty persons developed hepatocellular carcinoma and 16 developed intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma by April 1987, whereas 67 are still alive without any cancer. There was no difference in age or period after thorotrast infusion between those two groups of patients in January 1980. A difference in history of hepatitis and/or jaundice and presence of hepatic dysfunction was found between the subjects who developed primary liver cancers and those who did not. These findings suggest that an anamnestic history of hepatitis and liver dysfunction are risks for development of thorotrast-induced liver cancer. On the basis of the above findings, early detection of liver dysfunction offers a possibility of early diagnosis of primary liver cancer.

  10. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  11. General Information about Childhood Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. The value of liver magnetic resonance imaging in patients with findings of resectable pancreatic cancer on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Cindy; O’Dwyer, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Accurate staging of patients with pancreatic cancer is important to avoid unnecessary operations. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the impact of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging on preoperative staging of liver in patients with findings of resectable pancreatic cancer on computed tomography (CT). METHODS All patients who presented to a tertiary referral centre with pancreatic cancer between April 2012 and December 2013 were included in the study. Patients with findings of resectable disease on CT underwent further liver diffusion-weighted MR imaging, using a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent. RESULTS A total of 583 patients with pancreatic cancer were referred. 69 (11.8%) had resectable disease on CT. Of these 69 patients, 16 (23.2%) had liver metastases on MR imaging, while 6 (8.7%) had indeterminate lesions. Of the 16 patients with positive MR imaging findings of liver metastases, 11 died of pancreatic cancer, with a mean survival time of nine months (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.22–14.05). The mean survival time of the 47 patients with negative MR imaging findings was 16 months (95% CI 14.33–18.10; p = 0.001). Subsequently, 22 of these patients underwent surgery, and only 1 (4.5%) patient was found to have liver metastasis at surgery. CONCLUSION The results of the present study indicate that MR imaging improves the staging of disease in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:27353741

  13. Hypoxia in relation to vasculature and proliferation in liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van . E-mail: h.vanlaarhoven@onco.umcn.nl; Kaanders, Johannes; Lok, Jasper; Peeters, Wenny J.M.; Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Wiering, Bastiaan; Ruers, Theo J.M.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Heerschap, Arend; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate hypoxia measured by pimonidazole binding, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA-IX) expression, proliferation, and vascularity in liver metastases of colorectal cancer and to compare GLUT1 and CA-IX expression in corresponding primary tumors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer, planned for metastasectomy, were included. The hypoxia marker pimonidazole and proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine were administered before surgery. After immunofluorescent staining of the frozen metastases, pimonidazole binding, vascularity, and proliferation were analyzed quantitatively. Thirteen paraffin-embedded primary tumors were stained immunohistochemically for GLUT1 and CA-IX expression, which was analyzed semiquantitatively in primary tumors and corresponding liver metastases. Results: In liver metastases, pimonidazole binding showed a pattern consistent with diffusion-limited hypoxia. The mean pimonidazole-positive fraction was 0.146; the mean distance from vessels to pimonidazole-positive areas was 80 {mu}m. When expressed, often co-localization was observed between pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression, but microregional areas of mismatch were also observed. No correlation between the level of pimonidazole binding and GLUT1 or CA-IX expression was observed. In some patients, a large fraction (up to 30%) of proliferating cells was present in pimonidazole-stained areas. Expression of CA-IX in primary tumors and metastases showed a significant correlation, which was absent for GLUT1 expression. Conclusions: Compared with other tumor types, liver metastases of colorectal cancer contain large amounts of hypoxic cells. The lack of correlation with pimonidazole binding brings into question the value of GLUT1 and CA-IX as endogenous markers of hypoxia.

  14. Complete and rapid response to FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab in a patient presenting with impaired liver function and poor performance status from colon cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Sáenz, Enrique Casado; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Hernández, Elena; Barón, Manuel González

    2009-04-01

    Impaired liver function is a final complication of hepatic metastases from colon cancer. This disease status is of critical importance at first clinical presentation because of the tight therapeutic window for chemotherapy. A rapid response to treatment is required as other means of supportive care for hepatic function are limited. New targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies directed against several proteins with key roles in colon cancer biology are now available, allowing new treatment options for this group of patients. Here, we present a patient with highly impaired liver function secondary to hepatic metastases from colon cancer that showed clinical and radiological improvement after systemic treatment including bevacizumab. PMID:19352108

  15. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of IV vinflunine in cancer patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Delord, J P; Ravaud, A; Bennouna, J; Fumoleau, P; Favrel, S; Pinel, M C; Ferré, P; Saliba, F

    2013-06-01

    Vinflunine is a novel tubulin-targeted agent that is currently indicated as a monotherapy in bladder cancer patients. The recommended dose of 320 mg/m(2) is given as an intravenous infusion once every 3 weeks. Vinflunine is metabolized through CYP3A4 and mainly eliminated via the feces. A phase I trial was designed to explore the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of vinflunine in cancer patients with ranging degrees of liver dysfunction (LD). A sequential design was used for patient accrual, with the objective of determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended dose (RD) of vinflunine in 3 groups of increasing LD levels. Vinflunine and its only active metabolite 4-O-deacetylvinflunine were quantified in serial whole blood samples. PK parameters were derived and compared between LD groups and with a reference PK database. Vinflunine and 4-O-deacetylvinflunine PK parameters were not affected in any of the explored LD levels. Geometric mean values for vinflunine total clearance were 47.8, 37.5 and 45.4 L/h in the 3 groups of increasing degrees of LD, as compared to 42.5 L/h in reference patients with no LD. No relationship was found between vinflunine clearance and the presence or absence of cirrhosis, nor was it found with the presence or absence of liver metastasis or with liver-related biochemical parameters. Based on the observed tolerability profile, the recommended doses of i.v. vinflunine are 320 mg/m(2), 250 mg/m(2) or 200 mg/m(2) for patients with increasing degrees of liver dysfunction. PMID:22996801

  16. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  17. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States than in other parts of the world. Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American ...

  18. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gene-hyuk; Kim, Kyung Ah; Hwang, Seong Su; Park, Soo Youn; Kim, Hyun A.; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Ji Woong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI. Methods We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2) of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI) and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Results All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471), while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI) was marginally significant (p = 0.0534). Conclusion The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis. PMID:26348217

  19. Management of a Patient with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastases are commonly encountered in patients presenting with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC); resection is the treatment of choice. A number of systemic treatment options are currently available for such patients, including the use of 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapies and oxaliplatin (e.g., FOLFOX) in combination with biologic agents that target angiogenesis (e.g., bevacizumab). For patients with progression following first-line treatment, current second-line options include a change in chemotherapy with bevacizumab (for patients who did or did not receive prior bevacizumab) or FOLFIRI in combination with aflibercept, a more recently approved antiangiogenesis therapy. Neurotoxicity is a well-established adverse event of oxaliplatin-based therapy. The current case details an mCRC patient with liver metastases who was treated with a capecitabine and oxaliplatin regimen (XELOX), and experienced two episodes of transient cortical blindness possibly related to oxaliplatin. After disease progression, the patient was switched to a regimen of FOLFIRI and aflibercept and did well on this second-line regimen. PMID:24744930

  20. Liver Metastases in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Folprecht, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases is a treatment standard because patients experience long-term disease-free survival or are even cured after undergoing this procedure. Improved surgical techniques for liver resection in combination with downsizing liver metastases by chemotherapy, interventions to induce liver hypertrophy before resection, and the use of ablative techniques have allowed us to expand the indications for liver surgery and local treatment in situations with limited metastatic colorectal cancer. Resectability and identification of patients who might benefit from liver surgery and local ablative techniques are key factors for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Despite the wide acceptance of liver surgery and ablative techniques, there are many open questions on the management of limited metastatic disease, such as which patients benefit from an aggressive surgical approach, what the indications for ablative and other local techniques are, and what the role of chemotherapy is for patients with resectable or resected disease. Unfortunately, results of randomized trials are only available for a limited number of these questions. PMID:27249722

  1. The Hepatitis Viral Status in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Study of 3843 Patients From Taiwan Liver Cancer Network

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Il-Chi; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Chi-Ling; Chen, Chao-Long; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Tsai, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Po-Huang; Chen, Miin-Fu; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Lo, Gin-Ho; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hong, Chih-Chen; Eng, Hock-Liew; Wang, John; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Yen, Tseng-Chang; Liaw, Yun-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cancer death in Taiwan. Chronic viral hepatitis infections have long been considered as the most important risk factors for HCC in Taiwan. The previously published reports were either carried out by individual investigators with small patient numbers or by large endemic studies with limited viral marker data. Through collaboration with 5 medical centers across Taiwan, Taiwan liver cancer network (TLCN) was established in 2005. All participating centers followed a standard protocol to recruit liver cancer patients along with their biosamples and clinical data. In addition, detailed viral marker analysis for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were also performed. This study included 3843 HCC patients with available blood samples in TLCN (recruited from November 2005 to April 2011). There were 2153 (56.02%) patients associated with HBV (HBV group); 969 (25.21%) with HCV (HCV group); 310 (8.07%) with both HBV and HCV (HBV+HCV group); and 411 (10.69%) were negative for both HBV and HCV (non-B non-C group). Two hundred two of the 2463 HBV patients (8.20%) were HBsAg(-), but HBV DNA (+). The age, gender, cirrhosis, viral titers, and viral genotypes were all significantly different between the above 4 groups of patients. The median age of the HBV group was the youngest, and the cirrhotic rate was lowest in the non-B non-C group (only 25%). This is the largest detailed viral hepatitis marker study for HCC patients in the English literatures. Our study provided novel data on the interaction of HBV and HCV in the HCC patients and also confirmed that the HCC database of TLCN is highly representative for Taiwan and an important resource for HCC research. PMID:27082566

  2. The Hepatitis Viral Status in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: a Study of 3843 Patients From Taiwan Liver Cancer Network.

    PubMed

    Chang, Il-Chi; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Chi-Ling; Chen, Chao-Long; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Tsai, Cheng-Chung; Lee, Po-Huang; Chen, Miin-Fu; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Lo, Gin-Ho; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hong, Chih-Chen; Eng, Hock-Liew; Wang, John; Tseng, Hui-Hwa; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Yen, Tseng-Chang; Liaw, Yun-Fan

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cancer death in Taiwan. Chronic viral hepatitis infections have long been considered as the most important risk factors for HCC in Taiwan. The previously published reports were either carried out by individual investigators with small patient numbers or by large endemic studies with limited viral marker data. Through collaboration with 5 medical centers across Taiwan, Taiwan liver cancer network (TLCN) was established in 2005. All participating centers followed a standard protocol to recruit liver cancer patients along with their biosamples and clinical data. In addition, detailed viral marker analysis for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) were also performed. This study included 3843 HCC patients with available blood samples in TLCN (recruited from November 2005 to April 2011). There were 2153 (56.02%) patients associated with HBV (HBV group); 969 (25.21%) with HCV (HCV group); 310 (8.07%) with both HBV and HCV (HBV+HCV group); and 411 (10.69%) were negative for both HBV and HCV (non-B non-C group). Two hundred two of the 2463 HBV patients (8.20%) were HBsAg(-), but HBV DNA (+). The age, gender, cirrhosis, viral titers, and viral genotypes were all significantly different between the above 4 groups of patients. The median age of the HBV group was the youngest, and the cirrhotic rate was lowest in the non-B non-C group (only 25%). This is the largest detailed viral hepatitis marker study for HCC patients in the English literatures. Our study provided novel data on the interaction of HBV and HCV in the HCC patients and also confirmed that the HCC database of TLCN is highly representative for Taiwan and an important resource for HCC research. PMID:27082566

  3. Clinical outcomes for patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer: Arguing the case for specialist hepatobiliary multidisciplinary assessment.

    PubMed

    Thillai, K; Repana, D; Korantzis, I; Kane, P; Prachalias, A; Ross, P

    2016-09-01

    In patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer, hepatic resection can offer a significant survival benefit over systemic therapy alone. Specialist hepatobiliary multidisciplinary meetings are currently believed to provide the best forum to discuss the management for these patients. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients diagnosed with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer over 6 months within a cancer network in the United Kingdom. In addition, patients who were diagnosed but not referred to the hepatobiliary meeting were discussed within a virtual multi-disciplinary setting. Contributors were blinded and proposed management recorded. 159 newly diagnosed patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer were identified. 68 (43%) were referred at initial diagnosis and 38 (24%) referred following systemic treatment. 35 (51%) who were discussed at baseline underwent a subsequent hepatectomy or radiofrequency ablation, as did 18 (47%) patients referred after chemotherapy. Of the remaining 53 (33%) patients not referred, imaging was available for 31 (58%). Decisions regarding potential liver-directed therapy were discussed within a multi-disciplinary setting. 13 (42%) were identified as resectable or potentially resectable and 11 (36%) may have been suitable for a clinical trial. In reality, none of these 31 patients (100%) underwent surgery or ablation. Whilst the majority of patients with liver-limited metastatic colorectal cancer were referred appropriately, this study demonstrates that a significant number with potentially resectable disease are not being discussed at specialist meetings. A review of all diagnosed cases would ensure that an increased number of patients are offered hepatic resection or ablation. PMID:27174600

  4. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  5. Involvement of serum retinoids and Leiden mutation in patients with esophageal, gastric, liver, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Mózsik, Gyula; Rumi, György; Dömötör, András; Figler, Mária; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Papp, Előd; Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella; Belágyi, József; Matus, Zoltán; Melegh, Béla

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the serum levels of retinoids and Leiden mutation in patients with esophageal, gastric, liver, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. METHODS: The changes in serum levels of retinoids (vitamin A, α- and β-carotene, α- and β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein) and Leiden mutation were measured by high liquid performance chromatography (HPLC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 107 patients (70 males/37 females) with esophageal (0/8), gastric (16/5), liver (8/7), pancreatic (6/4), and colorectal (30/21 including 9 patients suffering from in situ colon cancer) cancer. Fifty-seven healthy subjects (in matched groups) for controls of serum retinoids and 600 healthy blood donors for Leiden mutation were used. RESULTS: The serum levels of vitamin A and zeaxanthin were decreased significantly in all groups of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tumors except for vitamin A in patients with pancreatic cancer. No changes were obtained in the serum levels of α- and β-carotene, α- and β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, lutein in patients with GI cancer. The prevalence of Leiden mutation significantly increased in all groups of patients with GI cancer. CONCLUSION: Retinoids (as environmental factors) are decreased significantly with increased prevalence of Leiden mutation (as a genetic factor) in patients before the clinical manifestation of histologically different (planocellular and hepatocellular carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma) GI cancer. PMID:16437692

  6. Linkage Specific Fucosylation of Alpha-1-Antitrypsin in Liver Cirrhosis and Cancer Patients: Implications for a Biomarker of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Comunale, Mary Ann; Rodemich-Betesh, Lucy; Hafner, Julie; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously reported increased levels of protein-linked fucosylation with the development of liver cancer and identified many of the proteins containing the altered glycan structures. One such protein is alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT). To advance these studies, we performed N-linked glycan analysis on the five major isoforms of A1AT and completed a comprehensive study of the glycosylation of A1AT found in healthy controls, patients with hepatitis C- (HCV) induced liver cirrhosis, and in patients infected with HCV with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methodology/Principal Findings Patients with liver cirrhosis and liver cancer had increased levels of triantennary glycan-containing outer arm (α-1,3) fucosylation. Increases in core (α-1,6) fucosylation were observed only on A1AT from patients with cancer. We performed a lectin fluorophore-linked immunosorbent assay using Aleuria Aurantia lectin (AAL), specific for core and outer arm fucosylation in over 400 patients with liver disease. AAL-reactive A1AT was able to detect HCC with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 86%, which was greater than that observed with the current marker of HCC, alpha-fetoprotein. Glycosylation analysis of the false positives was performed; results indicated that these patients had increases in outer arm fucosylation but not in core fucosylation, suggesting that core fucosylation is cancer specific. Conclusions/Significance This report details the stepwise change in the glycosylation of A1AT with the progression from liver cirrhosis to cancer and identifies core fucosylation on A1AT as an HCC specific modification. PMID:20811639

  7. Overexpression of eIF4E in colorectal cancer patients is associated with liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Zong, Yuanyuan; Peng, Lipan; Kong, Shuai; Zhou, Mingliang; Zou, Jianqiang; Liu, Jinglei; Miao, Ruizheng; Sun, Xichao; Li, Leping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Liver metastasis is one of the leading causes of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the value of eIF4E as a prognostic marker of colorectal liver metastasis (CLM) and identify the functional role of eIF4E in CRC metastasis. Patients and methods The expression level of eIF4E in CRC tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Expression of eIF4E in CRC cell lines was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blot. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and Transwell assays were performed to assess the effects of eIF4E on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Western blot was further used to investigate the mechanism of eIF4E in tumor metastasis. Results The upregulation frequency of eIF4E in the CLM group (82.5%) was higher than that in the non-CLM group (65.0%). Of the 80 patients recruited for the follow-up study, 23 were in the low eIF4E group (ratio of tumor to nontumor tissue liver metastasis (47.4%) than the group exhibiting low eIF4E expression (13.0%). In CRC cell lines, the expression of eIF4E was higher than in the normal cells. In vitro functional studies indicated that eIF4E knockdown inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of Lovo and SW480 cells, and suppressed the expression of cyclin D1, VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Conclusion The results of the present study indicated that high eIF4E levels in CRC patients predicted a high risk of liver metastasis. Knockdown of eIF4E inhibited CRC cell metastasis in part through regulating the expression of cyclin D1, VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9. PMID:26929650

  8. De Novo Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chung-Sik; Yoo, Moon-Won; Kim, Beom-Su; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In South Korea, which has a high incidence of gastric cancer, the most common de novo malignancy associated with liver transplantation is gastric cancer. This study sought to identify clinicopathologic characteristics in gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation, and to help manage these cases. MATERIAL AND METHODS We investigated gastric cancer patients after liver transplantation at Asan Medical Center. We analyzed sex, age, cause of liver transplantation, initiating immunosuppressant, pre-transplantation gastric fibroscopy findings, time interval between transplantation and gastric cancer occurrence, follow-up period, existence of gastric cancer screening, Helicobacter pylori infection, family cancer history, gastric cancer treatment, cancer location, size of tumor, macroscopic gross type, WHO histologic type, Lauren's classification, TNM stage, and survival. RESULTS Of 2968 adult liver transplantation patients at our hospital, 19 were diagnosed with gastric cancer. The mean age at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis was 60.2±6.8 (46-71) years and mean time interval between liver transplantation and diagnosis of gastric cancer was 56.0±30.7 (3.20-113) months. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was done for 10 patients, 4 of whom underwent surgical resection. Surgical resection as an initial treatment was done in 8 patients. One patient received chemotherapy first. The standard incidence ratio of gastric cancer in these patients was 1036 per 100 000 persons (95% CI, 623.7-1,619) in men and 318.9 per 100 000 (95% CI, 4.170-1,774) in women. CONCLUSIONS For long-term survival of liver transplant patients, early detection of de novo cancer is necessary. Therefore, annual screening for gastric cancer after liver transplantation is needed, especially in areas where the incidence of gastric cancer is high, such as South Korea. PMID:27334929

  9. Effect of saffron on liver metastases in patients suffering from cancers with liver metastases: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Azar; Mousavi, Seyed Hamed; Ghanbari, Anis; Homaee Shandiz, Fatemeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cancer represents the second cause of mortality in the world. Saffron as a medicinal plant is known for its anti-cancer and anti-depressant properties. In this randomized double blind clinical trial, the effects of saffron on response to treatment in patients suffering from liver metastasis were evaluated. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients suffering from liver metastases who referred to Ghaem and Imam Reza hospital, Mashhad, Iran were included in this study and then divided into two different groups. Both groups received chemotherapy regimen. Patients in group one were treated with saffron capsule (50 mg, twice daily) during chemotherapy periods whereas patients in group two received placebo. A sum of the longest diameter were calculated and compared for all lesions in IV contrast CT scan before and after the treatment. Results: from 13 patients included in this study, six patients quit and seven continued until the end. In saffron-treated group, two patients showed partial and complete response (50%) whereas in placebo group, no response was seen. Also, two deaths in placebo and one in saffron group occurred. Conclusion: This research suggests that saffron might be useful in patients suffering from liver metastasis. However, further investigations with larger sample size are required. PMID:26468463

  10. Optimal dose of gemcitabine for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancer in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Maeda, Osamu; Mitsuma, Ayako; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nagino, Masato; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into three groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 or 1000 mg/m(2) was given as an i.v. infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine, were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in one patient, moderate in six, and severe in eight. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in one patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1000 mg/m(2). No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and difluorodeoxyuridine were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005363.) PMID:26595259

  11. Cancer incidence among alcoholic liver disease patients in Finland: A retrospective registry study during years 1996-2013.

    PubMed

    Sahlman, Perttu; Nissinen, Markku; Pukkala, Eero; Färkkilä, Martti

    2016-06-01

    Both alcohol abuse and liver cirrhosis are known risk factors for various cancers. This article was aimed to assess the long-term risk of malignancies among patients with severe alcoholic liver disease (ALD), i.e., alcoholic liver cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis. A cohort of 8,796 male and 3,077 female ALD patients from 1996 to 2012 was identified from the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register. This nationwide cohort was combined with the data from the Finnish Cancer Registry for incidence of malignancies during the years 1996-2013. The cancer cases diagnosed were compared with the number of cancers in the general population. The number of malignancies in our cohort was 1,052 vs. 368 expected. There was statistically significant excess of cancers of the liver, (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 59.20; 95% CI 53.11-65.61), pancreas (SIR 3.71; 95% CI 2.72-4.94), pharynx (SIR 9.25; 95% CI 6.05-13.56), mouth (SIR 8.31; 95% CI 4.84-13,29), oesophagus (SIR 7.92; 95% CI 5.49-11.07), tongue (SIR 7,21; 95% CI 3.60-12.89), larynx (SIR 5.20; 95% CI 2.77-8.89), lung (SIR 2.77; 95% CI 2.27-3.32), stomach (SIR 2.76; 95% CI 1.79-4.07), kidney (SIR 2.69; 95% CI 1.84-3.79) and colon (SIR 2.33; 95% CI 1.70-3.11). There was no decreased risk of any cancer among ALD patients. Severe ALD is associated with markedly increased risk of malignancies. The risk is especially high for hepatocellular carcinoma, but also significantly increased for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, pancreas and kidneys, and warrants cancer surveillance in selected cases. PMID:26756434

  12. Proteoglycans in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  13. Proteoglycans in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  14. Liquid biopsy in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Labgaa, Ismail; Villanueva, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Liver cancer has become the second cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Most patients are still diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stage, where potentially curative treatment options are not recommended. Unlike other solid tumors, there are no validated oncogenic addiction loops and the only systemic agent to improve survival in advanced disease is sorafenib. All phase 3 clinical trials testing molecular therapies after sorafenib have been negative, none of which selected patients based on predictive biomarkers of response. Theoretically, analysis of circulating cancer byproducts (e.g., circulating tumor cells, cell-free nucleic acids), namely "liquid biopsy," could provide easy access to molecular tumor information, improve patients' stratification and allow to assess tumor dynamics over time. Recent technical developments and preliminary data from other malignancies indicate that liquid biopsy might have a role in the future management of cancer patients. PMID:25977189

  15. Cetuximab and/or Dasatinib in Patients With Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  16. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  17. Long-term survival of a breast cancer patient with extensive liver metastases upon immune and virotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker; Stücker, Wilfried; Lulei, Maria; Bihari, Akos-Sigmund; Sprenger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Liver metastases in breast cancer are associated with a poor prognosis. We report long-term survival of a patient with breast cancer and liver metastases. After operation the patient declined further standard therapy. Instead, she was treated with local hyperthermia, Newcastle disease virus and dendritic cell vaccination at the Immunological and Oncological Center Cologne (IOZK), Germany. A continuous high quality of life was reported and the patient survived more than 66 months after initial diagnosis. No recurrence or further metastases developed under treatment. Following treatment, a long-lasting tumor-reactive memory T-cell responsiveness could be documented. This possibly explains the favorable course of disease. Since this combination of therapies is not restricted to a particular tumor type, further exploration is warranted. PMID:26020523

  18. Adjuvant sorafenib after heptectomy for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Feng; Wu, Li-Li; Lau, Wan-Yee; Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Ma, Kuan-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Wu; Bie, Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant sorafenib after curative resection for patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC)-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Thirty-four HCC patients, classified as BCLC-stage C, received adjuvant sorafenib for high-risk of tumor recurrence after curative hepatectomy at a tertiary care university hospital. The study group was compared with a case-matched control group of 68 patients who received curative hepatectomy for HCC during the study period in a 1:2 ratio. RESULTS: The tumor recurrence rate was markedly lower in the sorafenib group (15/34, 44.1%) than in the control group (51/68, 75%, P = 0.002). The median disease-free survival was 12 mo in the study group and 10 mo in the control group. Tumor number more than 3, macrovascular invasion, hilar lymph nodes metastasis, and treatment with sorafenib were significant factors of disease-free survival by univariate analysis. Tumor number more than 3 and treatment with sorafenib were significant risk factors of disease-free survival by multivariate analysis in the Cox proportional hazards model. The disease-free survival and cumulative overall survival in the study group were significantly better than in the control group (P = 0.034 and 0.016, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our study verifies the potential benefit and safety of adjuvant sorafenib for both decreasing HCC recurrence and extending disease-free and overall survival rates for patients with BCLC-stage C HCC after curative resection. PMID:27340354

  19. Volume change of segments II and III of the liver after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozutemiz, Can; Obuz, Funda; Taylan, Abdullah; Atila, Koray; Bora, Seymen; Ellidokuz, Hulya

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the relationship between gastrectomy and the volume of liver segments II and III in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS Computed tomography images of 54 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma were retrospectively evaluated by two blinded observers. Volumes of the total liver and segments II and III were measured. The difference between preoperative and postoperative volume measurements was compared. RESULTS Total liver volumes measured by both observers in the preoperative and postoperative scans were similar (P > 0.05). High correlation was found between both observers (preoperative r=0.99; postoperative r=0.98). Total liver volumes showed a mean reduction of 13.4% after gastrectomy (P = 0.977). The mean volume of segments II and III showed similar decrease in measurements of both observers (38.4% vs. 36.4%, P = 0.363); the correlation between the observers were high (preoperative r=0.97, P < 0.001; postoperative r=0.99, P < 0.001). Volume decrease in the rest of the liver was not different between the observers (8.2% vs. 9.1%, P = 0.388). Time had poor correlation with volume change of segments II and III and the total liver for each observer (observer 1, rseg2/3=0.32, rtotal=0.13; observer 2, rseg2/3=0.37, rtotal=0.16). CONCLUSION Segments II and III of the liver showed significant atrophy compared with the rest of the liver and the total liver after gastrectomy. Volume reduction had poor correlation with time. PMID:26899148

  20. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and family history.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wong, Vincent W S; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-02-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) are at higher risks but how they should be screened remains uncertain. Hence, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of CRC screening among patients with NAFLD and family history by different strategies. A hypothetical population of 100,000 subjects aged 40-75 years receive: (i) yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT) at 50 years; (ii) flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) every 5 years at 50 years; (iii) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years; (iv) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without; (v) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without and (vi) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those without. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was studied by Markov modeling. It was found that colonoscopy, FS and FIT reduced incidence of CRC by 49.5, 26.3 and 23.6%, respectively. Using strategies 4, 5 and 6, the corresponding reduction in CRC incidence was 29.9, 30.9 and 69.3% for family history, and 33.2, 34.7 and 69.8% for NAFLD. Compared with no screening, strategies 4 (US$1,018/life-year saved) and 5 (US$7,485) for family history offered the lowest ICER, whilst strategy 4 (US$5,877) for NAFLD was the most cost-effective. These findings were robust when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. These indicated that screening patients with family history or NAFLD by colonoscopy at 50 years was economically favorable. PMID:26289421

  1. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  3. The Preoperative Peripheral Blood Monocyte Count Is Associated with Liver Metastasis and Overall Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shidong; Zou, Zhenyu; Li, Hao; Zou, Guijun; Li, Zhao; Xu, Jian; Wang, Lingde; Du, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in males and the second most common in females worldwide. Distant metastases have a strong negative impact on the prognosis of CRC patients. The most common site of CRC metastases is the liver. Both disease progression and metastasis have been related to the patient’s peripheral blood monocyte count. We therefore performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between the preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count and colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Methods Clinical data from 117 patients with colon cancer and 93 with rectal cancer who were admitted to the Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital (Beijing, China) between December 2003 and May 2015 were analysed retrospectively, with the permission of both the patients and the hospital. Results Preoperative peripheral blood monocyte counts, the T and N classifications of the primary tumour and its primary site differed significantly between the two groups (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.002, P < 0.001), whereas there were no differences in the sex, age, degree of tumour differentiation or largest tumour diameter. Lymph node metastasis and a high preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count were independent risk factors for liver metastasis (OR: 2.178, 95%CI: 1.148~4.134, P = 0.017; OR: 12.422, 95%CI: 5.076~30.398, P < 0.001), although the risk was lower in patients with rectal versus colon cancer (OR: 0.078, 95%CI: 0.020~0.309, P < 0.001). Primary tumour site (P<0.001), degree of tumour differentiation (P = 0.009), T, N and M classifications, TNM staging and preoperative monocyte counts (P<0.001) were associated with the 5-year overall survival (OS) of CRC patients. A preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count > 0.505 × 109 cells/L, high T classification and liver metastasis were independent risk factors for 5-year OS (RR: 2.737, 95% CI: 1.573~ 4.764, P <0.001; RR: 2.687, 95%CI: 1.498~4.820, P = 0.001; RR: 4.928, 95

  4. Preoperative selection of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastasis for hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rafif E; Al-alem, Faisal; Simoneau, Eve; Hassanain, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) has a well-documented improvement in survival. To benefit from this intervention, proper selection of patients who would be adequate surgical candidates becomes vital. A combination of imaging techniques may be utilized in the detection of the lesions. The criteria for resection are continuously evolving; currently, the requirements that need be met to undergo resection of CRLM are: the anticipation of attaining a negative margin (R0 resection), whilst maintaining an adequate functioning future liver remnant. The timing of hepatectomy in regards to resection of the primary remains controversial; before, after, or simultaneously. This depends mainly on the tumor burden and symptoms from the primary tumor. The role of chemotherapy differs according to the resectability of the liver lesion(s); no evidence of improved survival was shown in patients with resectable disease who received preoperative chemotherapy. Presence of extrahepatic disease in itself is no longer considered a reason to preclude patients from resection of their CRLM, providing limited extra-hepatic disease, although this currently is an area of active investigations. In conclusion, we review the indications, the adequate selection of patients and perioperative factors to be considered for resection of colorectal liver metastasis. PMID:26811608

  5. Does the Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver MRI Impact on the Treatment of Patients with Colorectal Cancer? Comparison Study with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Won; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Joon Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Lee, Myung Ah; Yoo, Young-Kyung; Oh, Seong Taek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the value of Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer and estimated the clinical impact of liver MRI in the management plan of liver metastasis. Methods. We identified 108 patients who underwent PET/CT and liver MRI as preoperative evaluation of colorectal cancer, between January 2011 and December 2013. We evaluated the per nodule sensitivity of PET/CT and liver MRI for liver metastasis. Management plan changes were estimated for patients with metastatic nodules newly detected on liver MRI, to assess the clinical impact. Results. We enrolled 131 metastatic nodules (mean size 1.6 cm) in 41 patients (mean age 65 years). The per nodule sensitivities of PET/CT and liver MRI were both 100% for nodules measuring 2 cm or larger but were significantly different for nodules measuring less than 2 cm (59.8% and 95.1%, resp., P = 0.0001). At least one more metastatic nodule was detected on MRI in 16 patients. Among these, 7 patients indicated changes of management plan after performing MRI. Conclusions. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI detected more metastatic nodules compared with PET/CT, especially for small (<2 cm) nodules. The newly detected nodules induced management plan change in 43.8% (7/16) of patients. PMID:27022613

  6. Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Jonathan; Dawson, Laura A.; Jiang, Haiyan; Kim, John; Dinniwell, Rob; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Lockwood, Gina; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate quality of life (QoL), an important outcome owing to poor long-term survival, after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients (n=222) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), liver metastases, or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and Child-Pugh A liver function received 24-60 Gy of 6-fraction image-guided SBRT. Prospective QoL assessment was completed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) and/or Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep, version 4) questionnaires at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Ten HCC patients with Child-Pugh B liver function were also treated. Results: The QLQ-C30 was available for 205 patients, and 196 completed the FACT-Hep. No difference in baseline QoL (P=.17) or overall survival (P=.088) was seen between the HCC, liver metastases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patients. Appetite loss and fatigue measured by the QLQ-C30 clinically and statistically worsened by 1 month after treatment but recovered by 3 months. At 3 and 12 months after treatment, respectively, the FACT-Hep score had improved relative to baseline in 13%/19%, worsened in 36%/27%, and remained stable in 51%/54%. Using the QLQ-C30 Global Health score, QoL improved in 16%/23%, worsened in 34%/39%, and remained stable in 50%/38% at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.3-19.8 months). Higher baseline scores on both FACT-Hep and QLQ-C30 Global Health were associated with improved survival. Hazard ratios for death, per 10-unit decrease in QoL, were 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.98; P=.001) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.82-0.95; P=.001), respectively. Tumor size was inversely correlated with survival. Conclusions: Liver SBRT temporarily worsens appetite and fatigue, but not overall QoL. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is well tolerated and warrants

  7. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L; Black, Katherine; Jones, Lynnette M; McCormick, Sally P A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5'-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors. PMID:26807857

  8. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L.; Black, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5’-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors. PMID:26807857

  9. Lipids changes in liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing-ting; Xu, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Wu, Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism. Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver. It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs, these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed. Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide, and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries. In addition, liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases, which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer. PMID:17565510

  10. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation. PMID:26272183

  11. [A patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ichiro; Arai, Isao; Tamura, Chieko; Inoue, Shigeharu; Wakasa, Kenichi

    2012-11-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, who responded completely to S-1 therapy followed by open gastrectomy. A 72-year-old man with a chief complaint of occult blood in the feces was referred to our hospital and was diagnosed with rectal cancer by colonoscopy. In addition, we found concomitant gastric cancer by gastrointestinal fiberscopy. Abdominal plain computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In August 2010, we performed laparoscopic resection of the rectal cancer. However, at the time of discharge, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed multiple liver metastases. Then, we administered 4 courses of S-1 therapy. In December 2010, abdominal enhanced computed tomography showed no liver metastasis. In March 2011, because no other lesion without residual gastric cancer was detected, the patient underwent gastrectomy followed by S-1 therapy. As of January 2012, the patient is alive and disease free. S-1 therapy with laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer and gastrectomy may help prolong the survival of patients with multiple liver metastases of gastric and rectal cancers. PMID:23268031

  12. Clinical impact of c-MET expression and genetic mutational status in colorectal cancer patients after liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nagashima, Kengo; Okita, Natsuko; Takashima, Atsuo; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Kato, Ken; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    c-MET is implicated in the pathogenesis and growth of a wide variety of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between c-MET expression and tumor recurrence in CRC patients after curative liver resection, and to evaluate concordance in c-MET expression and various mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary CRC and paired liver metastases. A cohort of patients was tested for c-MET immunoreactivity (i.e. immunohistochemistry [IHC]) and KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. Analyses were performed both on primary tumors and paired liver metastases, and the association between IHC and mutations results were assessed. A total of 108 patients were eligible. A total of 53% of patients underwent simultaneous resection of primary tumors and metastases, and the others underwent metachronous resection. Levels of concordance between primary tumors and metastases were 65.7%, 87.7%, 100% and 95.2% for c-MET, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA, respectively. High levels of c-MET expression (c-MET-high) in the primary tumors were observed in 52% of patients. Relapse-free survival was significantly shorter for patients with c-MET-high primary tumors (9.7 months) than for those with c-MET-low primary tumors (21.1 months) (P = 0.013). These results suggest that a high level of genetic concordance in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary tumors and liver metastases, and c-MET-high in the primary tumors were associated with shorter relapse-free survival after hepatic metastasectomy. PMID:24863535

  13. Complete Response Obtained with S-1 Plus CDDP Therapy in a Patient with Multiple Liver Metastases from Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nonoshita, Takashi; Otsuka, Shinya; Inagaki, Masaru; Iwagaki, Hiromi

    2015-12-01

    A 58-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer underwent total gastrectomy in May 2012. The histological diagnosis was poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, cT4a (SE), pN1, cM0; fStage IIIA. Chemotherapy by S-1 was started after surgery. Six months after the operation, two metastatic nodules were noticed on the liver. Therefore, the chemotherapy was switched to S-1 plus cisplatin (CDDP) in November 2012. TS-1 (80 mg/body) was administrated from day 1 to 21 followed by 14 days rest as one course. CDDP (70 mg/body) was infused on day 1. After 3 courses of this combination chemotherapy, remarkable diminution of the metastatic lesions on CT images was observed. Because of the adverse event of Grade 2 nausea, the patient was forced to discontinue chemotherapy. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver (Hr-0: S8, S7) at 1 year after the first operation. The resected specimens showed no sign of malignancy, although uneven fatty deposition was observed more frequently than in the surroundings, and designated as histologically complete response (CR). The patient has been alive 30 months after the second operation without any recurrent sites. Thus, combined use of peroral S-1 and CDDP should be recommended for multiple liver metastases after gastrectomy. PMID:26964156

  14. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases by Irinotecan-Eluting Microspheres in a Salvage Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    Huppert, Peter; Wenzel, Thorsten; Wietholtz, Hubertus

    2013-05-14

    PurposeThis prospective study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of TACE using irinotecan loaded superabsorbent polymer (SAP) microspheres for treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CCLM) in a salvage setting of patients.MethodsA total of 71 TACE procedures were performed in 29 patients with liver only or liver-dominant CCLM. In all patients, systemic chemotherapy before TACE had failed. Two hundred milligrams of irinotecan were loaded into 50–100 mg of SAP microspheres (HepaSphere™ Microspheres) considering tumor size and vascularization. TACE was performed selectively with respect to tumor distribution. Response was evaluated following RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Median follow-up after last TACE was 8 (range 1–54) months. All patients had died at time of analysis.ResultsAll TACE procedures were performed successfully; 35–400 mg (mean 168.3 mg) of irinotecan loaded in 13–100 mg (mean 48.3 mg) SAP microspheres were injected during individual sessions. No major complications occurred. Three, 6, and 12 months after first TACE complete and partial response was present in 72, 32 %, 0 of patients by EASL criteria and stable disease was seen in 86, 48, and 8 % with no complete and no partial response by RECIST criteria. Median overall survival after first TACE was 8 months, and median time to progression was 5 months. Median overall survival was longer in patients with limited (<25 %) compared with extensive (>50 %) intrahepatic disease (21 vs. 5 months, p < 0.005).ConclusionsTACE using irinotecan loaded SAP microspheres is safe and effective in terms of tumor necrosis. Survival benefit in a salvage setting seems to be limited in patients with advanced intrahepatic tumor load.

  15. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  16. Prognostic Factors in Terms of the Number of Metastatic Nodules in Patients With Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ki Ung; Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Ki-Hun; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The hepatic resection is the gold-standard treatment for patients with colorectal-cancer liver metastases (CLM). This study aimed to identify prognostic factors in patients with synchronous CLM who underwent a surgical curative (R0) resection with respect to the number of metastatic nodules. Methods Of 1,261 CLM patients treated between January 1991 and December 2010, 339 who underwent a R0 resection for synchronous CLM were included in this retrospective analysis. Patients were grouped according to the number of CLM nodules: 1–2 CLM nodules, n = 272 (group 1) and 3–8 CLM nodules, n = 67 (group 2). Results The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate in group 1was better than that in group 2 (P = 0.020). The multivariate analysis identified lymph-node metastasis (N2), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and three or more CLM nodules as independent poor prognostic factors for PFS in all patients and lymph-node metastasis (N2) and LVI as independent poor prognostic factors for patients in group 1. No independent prognostic factors were identified for patients in group 2. CLM treatment method and neoadjuvant chemotherapy were not associated with survival. Conclusion Three or more metastatic nodules, lymph-node metastasis (N2), and LVI were independent poor prognostic factors for PFS in patients with synchronous CLM who underwent a R0 resection. The latter 2 factors were also independent prognostic factors for PFS in patients with less than 3 CLM nodules; however, in patients with three or more CLM nodules, the prognosis for PFS may be related only to liver metastasis. PMID:27437390

  17. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-Zhi; Li, Jia-Liang; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Based on the primary tumor site, liver cancer can be divided into two categories: (1) primary liver cancer and (2) metastatic cancer to the liver from a distant primary site. Guided cryoablation via many imaging methods induces iceball formation and tumor necrosisand is an attractive option for treating unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver cancer. There are several advantages to using cryoablation for the treatment of liver cancer: it can be performed percutaneously, intraoperatively, and laparoscopically; iceball formation can be monitored; it has little impact on nearby large blood vessels; and it induces a cryo-immunological response in situ. Clinically, primary research has shown that percutaneous cryoablation of liver cancer is relatively safe and efficient, and it can be combined with other methods, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunology, to control disease. Although research is preliminary, cryosurgery is fast becoming an alternative treatment method for HCC or liver tumors. Here, we review the mechanisms of liver tumor cryoablation, cryoablation program selection, clinical efficiency, and complications following treatment. PMID:26355719

  18. Heterogeneity of liver cancer and personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an extraordinarily heterogeneous malignant disease among the tumors that have so far been identified. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arises most frequently in the setting of chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis, and takes a variety of course in individual patients to process to tumor. The risk factors such as HBV and/or HCV infections, aflatoxin infection, abuse alcohol intake, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are closely related to the environmental and genetic susceptibilities to HCC. The consequent resulting genomic instability, molecular and signal transduction network disorders and microenvironmental discrepancies are characterized by the extraordinary heterogeneity of liver cancer. The histology-based definition of the morphological heterogeneity of liver cancer has been modified and refined to treat patients with targeted therapies, but this still cannot solve all the problems. Lack of consistent outcome for anticancer agents and conventional therapies in liver cancer treatment calls for assessing the benefits of new molecularly targeted drugs and combined therapy, under the heterogeneity condition of tumor. The present review article will provide the complex mechanism and phenotype of liver cancer heterogeneity, and help us to execute precision medicine in a really personalized manner. PMID:26213370

  19. Survival and tolerability of liver radioembolization: a comparison of elderly and younger patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Sukato, Daniel; Nace, Gary W; Zajko, Albert; Amesur, Nikhil; Orons, Philip; Chalhoub, Didier; Marsh, James W; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the outcomes among elderly (≥70 years) and younger patients (<70 years) with liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who received radioembolization (RE) as salvage therapy. Methods A retrospective review of 107 consecutive patients with unresectable mCRC treated with RE after failing first- and second-line chemotherapy. Results From 2002 to 2012, 44 elderly and 63 younger (<70 years) patients received RE. Patients had similar previous extensive chemotherapy and liver-directed interventions. Using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) criteria, either a stable or a partial radiographical response was seen in 65.8% of the younger compared with 76.5% of the elderly patients. RE was equally well tolerated in both groups and common procedure-related adverse events were predominantly grade 1–2 and of short duration. No significant difference was found with regard to overall median survival between younger [8.4 months; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.2–10.6] or elderly patients (8.2 months; 95% CI = 5.9–10.5, P = 0.667). The presence of extrahepatic disease at the time of RE was associated with a significantly worse median survival in both groups. Conclusion Radioembolization appears to be as well tolerated and effective for the elderly as it is for younger patients with mCRC. Age alone should not be a discriminating factor for the use of radioembolization in the management of mCRC patients. PMID:25123597

  20. Bevacizumab plus FOLFOX or FOLFIRI regimens on patients with unresectable liver-only metastases of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehrzad, Valiollah; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Peikar, Mohammad Saleh; Nouranian, Elham; Mokarian, Fariborz; Khani, Mohsen; Farzannia, Somaieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of at least three cycles of Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy regimens, FOLFIRI or FOLFOX to treat liver metastatic colorectal cancer and improved response rates in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this non-randomized clinical trial, 38 patients were enrolled and followed for 12-weeks period of chemotherapy. Fifteen patients under treated with FOLOFX (Group I), 15 patients under treated with FOLOFIRI (Group II), 4 patients under treated with FOLOFX + Bevacizumab (Group III), and 34 patients under treated with FOLOFIRI + Bevacizumab (Group IV). Response to treatment was assessed in all patients as main endpoint. Patients in groups I and II, who did not response to treatment after 12 weeks of chemotherapy, were followed by groups III and IV regimens, respectively, for 12 weeks. Results: Overall response rate was 35% (19 of 54), and complete response (CR), partial response (PR), progressive disease (PD), and stable disease (SD) rates in all patients were 18%, 17%, 35%, and 30%. PR, SD, and PD were different among groups, but no statistical significance was noted among groups (P-value >0.05). No patient achieved a CR in groups III and IV, although CR was observed in 4 patients (27%) and 6 patients (40%) in groups I and II, respectively. The rare of CR was statistically significant among studied groups (P-value = 0.013). Conclusion: Results showed that adding Bevacizumab to chemotherapy regimens, in patients who did not response to FOLFIRI or FOLFOX regimen, did not increase CR in these patients. PMID:26962512

  1. A patient who showed a pathologically complete response after undergoing treatment with XELOX plus bevacizumab for synchronous liver metastasis of grade H2 from sigmoid colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hisatsune, Yasuhito; Mihara, Yoshitaka; Tobe, Naotaka; Ishibashi, Kazuyoshi; Shimamura, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Kei-ichi; Aida, Yoshio; Otsubo, Takehito

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the case of a patient who showed a pathological complete response after undergoing chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab. The patient presented with synchronous solitary liver metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. The maximum diameter of the liver deposit was 5.7 cm and the grade of the liver metastasis was H2 according to the Japanese classification. Deferred hepatectomy after sigmoidectomy was performed, followed by the administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After undergoing sigmoidectomy, the patient received 1,000 mg/m2 of capecitabine and 130 mg/m2 of oxaliplatin without bevacizumab as the first cycle of chemotherapy followed by eight cycles of chemotherapy with bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg) every three weeks. The liver deposit was reduced to 2.2 cm in diameter and the patient showed a partial response to chemotherapy. The patient then underwent metastasectomy of segment 8 of the liver instead of the central hepatectomy that was possibly needed before chemotherapy. Histopathologically, the tumor consisted of fibrous tissue, and no cancer cells were detected in the resected specimen. A pathological complete response in a patient with H2 liver metastasis is considered rare and suggests that capecitabine, oxaliplatin and bevacizumab are efficacious as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23730524

  2. The surgical treatment of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in the setting of the “liver first” approach

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Patrlj, Masa Hrelec; Kolovrat, Marijan; Rakić, Mislav; Đuzel, Antonija

    2014-01-01

    A surgical resection is the only curative method in the therapy of colorectal carcinoma and liver metastases. Along with the development of interventional radiological techniques the indications for surgery widen. The number of metastases and patients age should not present a contraindication for surgical resection. However, there are still some doubts concerns what to resect first in cases of synchronous colorectal carcinoma and liver metastases and how to ensure the proper remnant liver volume in order to avoid postoperative liver failure and achieve the best results. Through this review the surgical therapy of colorectal carcinoma and liver metastases was revised in the setting of “liver-first” approach and the problem of ensuring of remnant liver volume. PMID:25392845

  3. Oral contraceptives and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    To date, nine case-control studies conducted in developed countries have identified an association between oral contraceptives (OCs) and liver cancer. The most recent population-based data from both developed and developing countries failed to confirm such an association, however. A study conducted by the World Health Organization in eight developing countries (Chile, China, Colombia, Israel, Kenya, Nigeria, Philippines, and Thailand), in which 122 women with liver cancer were matched with 802 controls, found no elevated risk for OC users compared with never-users (relative risk, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.2). This study is particularly significant since it was conducted in countries where hepatitis B virus infection, an important risk factor for primary liver cancer, is widespread. In addition, population mortality data from the US, UK, Japan, and Sweden have failed to document increases in liver cancer cases coincident with increases in OC use. Given that population statistics can detect changes on the magnitude of a 40-50% decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer related to OC use, they should be able to detect increases of two to 20 times the risk of liver cancer. The increased risk of liver cancer found in the case-control studies may reflect bias resulting from the small size of these studies. PMID:12348250

  4. Changes in Normal Liver and Spleen Volume after Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-Resin Microspheres in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Findings and Clinical Significance

    SciTech Connect

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Schmidt, G. P.; Trumm, C. G.; Hoffmann, R. T.; Reiser, M. F.; Jakobs, T. F.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In clinical trials with yttrium-90-resin-microspheres for the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases, it was observed that radioembolization might result in splenomegaly and an increase in portal vein size. Subclinical hepatitis in normal liver tissue as well as the effects of radioembolization and prior chemotherapy are suspected to be responsible for this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter after radioembolization. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with liver-dominant metastatic disease from breast cancer who had not responded to chemotherapy or had to abandon chemotherapy because of its toxic effects were evaluated. Changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter as well as liver tumor volume and diameter were quantified using computed tomography scans. Results: Radioembolization was associated with a significant mean decrease in the whole liver volume of 10.2% (median 16.7%; P = 0.0024), mainly caused by a reduction in the right lobe volume (mean 16.0%; P < 0.0001). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in the diameter of the main portal vein (mean 6.8%; P < 0.0001) as well as splenic volume (mean 50.4%; P < 0.0001). Liver-tumor volume and diameter decreased by a median of 24 and 39.7%. Conclusions: Radioembolization is an effective treatment for tumor size reduction in patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Treatment is associated with changes of hepatic parenchymal volume, splenic volume, and portal vein size that appear not to represent clinically important sequelae in this patient cohort.

  5. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Magnetic-Targeted Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Cancer Metastatic to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Metastases, Neoplasm; Colorectal Neoplasms; Esophageal Neoplasms; Stomach Neoplasms; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Breast Neoplasms; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Liver Neoplasms; Cholangiocarcinoma

  7. RASSF1A and DOK1 Promoter Methylation Levels in Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Cirrhotic and Non-Cirrhotic Liver, and Correlation with Liver Cancer in Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Oscar C.; Rosa, Agatha S.; Fernandes, Arlete; Niel, Christian; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Pannain, Vera; Araujo, Natalia M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Most cases of HCC are associated with cirrhosis related to chronic hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus infections. Hypermethylation of promoter regions is the main epigenetic mechanism of gene silencing and has been involved in HCC development. The aim of this study was to determine whether aberrant methylation of RASSF1A and DOK1 gene promoters is associated with the progression of liver disease in Brazilian patients. Methylation levels were measured by pyrosequencing in 41 (20 HCC, 9 cirrhotic, and 12 non-cirrhotic) liver tissue samples. Mean rates of methylation in RASSF1A and DOK1 were 16.2% and 12.0% in non-cirrhotic, 26.1% and 19.6% in cirrhotic, and 59.1% and 56.0% in HCC tissues, respectively, showing a gradual increase according to the progression of the disease, with significantly higher levels in tumor tissues. In addition, hypermethylation of RASSF1A and DOK1 was found in the vast majority (88%) of the HCC cases. Interestingly, DOK1 methylation levels in HCC samples were significantly higher in the group of younger (<40 years) patients, and higher in moderately differentiated than in poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.05). Our results reinforce the hypothesis that hypermethylation of RASSF1A and DOK1 contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis and is associated to clinicopathological characteristics. RASSF1A and DOK1 promoter hypermethylation may be a valuable biomarker for early diagnosis of HCC and a potential molecular target for epigenetic-based therapy. PMID:27078152

  8. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. MRI With Gadoxetate Disodium in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage 0 Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage A Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Localized Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma

  10. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:23428636

  11. Adenosine triphosphate infusion increases liver energy status in advanced lung cancer patients: an in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Leij-Halfwerk, Susanne; Agteresch, Hendrik J; Sijens, Paul E; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2002-02-01

    We recently observed inhibition of weight loss in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer after intravenous infusion of ATP. Because liver ATP levels were found to be decreased in lung cancer patients with weight loss, the present 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study was aimed at investigating whether ATP infusion restores liver energy status in these patients. Nine patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (stage IIIB/IV) were studied 1 week before (baseline) and at 22 to 24 hours of continuous ATP infusion (37-75 microg/kg/min). Localized hepatic 31P MR spectra (repetition time 15 seconds), obtained in the overnight-fasted state, were analyzed for ATP and P(i) content. Ten healthy subjects (without ATP infusion) served as control. Liver ATP levels in lung cancer patients increased from 8.8 +/- 0.7% (relative to total MR-detectable phosphate; mean +/- SE) at baseline to 12.2 +/- 0.9% during ATP infusion (P <.05), i.e., a level similar to that in healthy subjects (11.9 +/- 0.9%). The increase in ATP level during ATP infusion was most prominent in patients with > or = 5% weight loss (baseline: 7.9 +/- 0.7%, during ATP infusion: 12.8 +/- 1.0%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, ATP infusion restores hepatic energy levels in patients with advanced lung cancer, especially in weight-losing patients. These changes may contribute to the previously reported beneficial effects of ATP infusion on the nutritional status of lung cancer patients. PMID:11826418

  12. Immune evasion mechanisms in colorectal cancer liver metastasis patients vaccinated with TroVax (MVA-5T4).

    PubMed

    Elkord, Eyad; Dangoor, Adam; Burt, Deborah J; Southgate, Thomas D; Daayana, Sai; Harrop, Richard; Drijfhout, Jan W; Sherlock, David; Hawkins, Robert E; Stern, Peter L

    2009-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a phase II trial in which two TroVax [modified vaccinia ankara (MVA) encoding the tumour antigen 5T4] vaccinations were given to patients both pre- and post-surgical resection of liver metastases secondary to colorectal cancer (CRC). 5T4-specific cellular responses were assessed at the entry and 2 weeks after each vaccination by proliferation of fresh lymphocytes and ELISA for antibody responses; 18 from the 19 CRC patients mounted a 5T4-specific cellular and/or humoral response. Here, we present a comparison of individual and between patient responses over the course of the treatments using cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) samples from the baseline until after the fourth vaccination at 14 weeks. Assays used were proliferation assay with 5T4-Fc fusion protein, overlapping 32mer 5T4 peptides, MVA-LacZ and MVA-5T4 infected autologous monocytes. Responses to 5T4 protein or one or more peptide pools were pre-existing in 12/20 patients and subsequently 10 and 12 patients showed boosted and/or de novo responses, respectively. Cumulatively, 13/20 patients showed proliferative responses by week 14. We also assessed the levels of systemic T regulatory cells, plasma cytokine levels, phenotype of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes including T regulatory cells and tumour HLA class I loss of expression. More than half of the patients showed phenotypes consistent with relative immune suppression and/or escape highlighting the complexity of positive and negative factors challenging any simple correlation with clinical outcome. PMID:19221742

  13. Imaging of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ariff, Ben; Lloyd, Claire R; Khan, Sameer; Shariff, Mohamed; Thillainayagam, Andrew V; Bansi, Devinder S; Khan, Shahid A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Lim, Adrian KP

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in imaging technology allow exploitation of the dual blood supply of the liver to aid in the identification and characterisation of both malignant and benign liver lesions. Imaging techniques available include contrast enhanced ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This review discusses the application of several imaging techniques in the diagnosis and staging of both hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma and outlines certain characteristics of benign liver lesions. The advantages of each imaging technique are highlighted, while underscoring the potential pitfalls and limitations of each imaging modality. PMID:19294758

  14. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Fluorouracil Followed by Systemic Therapy Using Oxaliplatin Plus Fluorouracil and Leucovorin for Patients with Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi Ozaki, Toshirou; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the sequential treatment of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy followed by systemic therapy using oxaliplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, namely, FOLFOX, for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. We reviewed 20 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients were initially treated with HAI chemotherapy until disease progression (5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intra-arterial infusion, weekly) and then with FOLFOX thereafter (FOLFOX4, n = 13; modified FOLFOX6, n = 7). Adverse events, tumor response, and time to progression for each therapy were evaluated retrospectively, and overall survival was estimated. Toxicity of HAI chemotherapy was generally mild. Of 20 patients, adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in only 1 patient (5%) during initial therapy using HAI chemotherapy, while 9 patients (45%) exhibited adverse events during subsequent FOLFOX therapy. For HAI chemotherapy and FOLFOX, objective response rates were 85.0% and 35.0%, respectively, and median time to progression was 11.6 and 5.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30.1 months. In conclusion, the sequence of HAI chemotherapy followed by FOLFOX is a promising treatment strategy for the long-term use of active chemotherapeutic agents, leading to a superior tumor response and fewer toxic effects in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

  15. Should surveillance for liver cancer be modified in hepatitis C patients after treatment-related cirrhosis regression?

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Roberta; Colombo, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with abdominal ultrasound (US) is recommended for patients with advanced liver fibrosis because of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections who achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) to antiviral therapy. HCC, in fact, may still develop following SVR as a consequence of long-standing carcinogenic activity of either HCV or hepatic fibrosis, whereas HCC risk in non-viraemic patients may also be driven by cofactors like alcohol abuse or diabetes. This explains the debate on whether surveillance for HCC should be continued in patients with documented cirrhosis regression following a SVR too. While regression of cirrhosis was documented to occur in a majority of patients with compensated cirrhosis 5 years after an SVR to interferon, it should be noted that this clinical benefit could be the consequence of treating a selected population with well-compensated liver disease who in fact were interferon able. This may not be the case for most real-life patients with advanced cirrhosis receiving direct antivirals, in whom liver fibrosis may have reached a point of no-return thus potentially preventing the recovery of a normal liver architecture following SVR. Both invasive and non-invasive tools have suboptimal diagnostic accuracy for fibrosis regression in non-viraemic patients, and this prompts to follow international societies' recommendation to perform surveillance in patients with advanced liver fibrosis achieving a SVR, independently on liver histology outcome. PMID:26936383

  16. Liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gallinger, S.; Biagi, J.J.; Fletcher, G.G.; Nhan, C.; Ruo, L.; McLeod, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Questions Should surgery be considered for colorectal cancer (crc) patients who have liver metastases plus (a) pulmonary metastases, (b) portal nodal disease, or (c) other extrahepatic metastases (ehms)? What is the role of chemotherapy in the surgical management of crc with liver metastases in (a) patients with resectable disease in the liver, or (b) patients with initially unresectable disease in the liver that is downsized with chemotherapy (“conversion”)? What is the role of liver resection when one or more crc liver metastases have radiographic complete response (rcr) after chemotherapy? Perspectives Advances in chemotherapy have improved survival in crc patients with liver metastases. The 5-year survival with chemotherapy alone is typically less than 1%, although two recent studies with folfox or folfoxiri (or both) reported rates of 5%–10%. However, liver resection is the treatment that is most effective in achieving long-term survival and offering the possibility of a cure in stage iv crc patients with liver metastases. This guideline deals with the role of chemotherapy with surgery, and the role of surgery when there are liver metastases plus ehms. Because only a proportion of patients with crc metastatic disease are considered for liver resection, and because management of this patient population is complex, multidisciplinary management is required. Methodology Recommendations in the present guideline were formulated based on a prepublication version of a recent systematic review on this topic. The draft methodology experts, and external review by clinical practitioners. Feedback was incorporated into the final version of the guideline. Practice Guideline These recommendations apply to patients with liver metastases from crc who have had or will have a complete (R0) resection of the primary cancer and who are being considered for resection of the liver, or liver plus specific and limited ehms, with curative intent. 1(a). Patients with liver and lung

  17. Dose-finding study of hepatic arterial infusion of irinotecan-based treatment in patients with advanced cancers metastatic to the liver

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Kurzrock, Razelle; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S.; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Kee, Bryan K; Bidyasar, Savita; Lim, Joann; Wallace, Michael; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Liver metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. We investigated the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of irinotecan combination therapy in patients with liver metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with histologically confirmed advanced cancer with liver metastases that was refractory to standard therapy were eligible. A standard “3+3” phase I study design was used to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Three cohorts were evaluated: HAI of irinotecan with systemic intravenous (IV) (a) bevacizumab, (b) oxaliplatin and bevacizumab, or (c) bevacizumab and cetuximab. RESULTS From October 2009 through December 2013, 98 patients with various tumor types were enrolled (median age, 62 years, range, 34–85; and median number of prior therapies, 4, range, 1–11). In cohorts A and C, dose escalation continued until the highest dose level—considered the MTD—was reached. In cohort B, dose escalation continued until dose level 3, and dose level 2 was considered the MTD. Rates of grade 3/4 adverse events were as follows: diarrhea, 8%; fatigue, 4%; neutropenia, 4%; thrombocytopenia, 2%; and skin rash, 2%. Seventy-seven patients were evaluable for response. Partial response was noted in 5 (6.5%) patients (neuroendocrine cancer, n=2; CRC, n=2; NSCLC, n=1); and stable disease ≥ 6 months in 17 (22.1%) patients (CRC, n=13; breast, n=1; neuroendocrine, n=1; NSCLC, n=1; pancreatic, n=1). CONCLUSIONS HAI irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab; oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab; or cetuximab plus bevacizumab was safe and may be a treatment option for selected patients with advanced cancer and liver involvement. PMID:25990659

  18. Predictive Models of Liver Cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive models of chemical-induced liver cancer face the challenge of bridging causative molecular mechanisms to adverse clinical outcomes. The latent sequence of intervening events from chemical insult to toxicity are poorly understood because they span multiple levels of bio...

  19. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  20. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  1. [A Patient with Stage IV Advanced Gastric Cancer with Multiple Liver Metastases Living for More Than 6 Years after Treatment with TS-1 Alone].

    PubMed

    Hara, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Kazuya; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Akihiko; Hashiyata, Hiroshi; Nakamoto, Kenbu; Takeshige, Motohiro

    2016-07-01

    The patient was a 58-year-old man with advanced gastric cancer with multiple liver metastases. He received TXL/TS-1 therapy during February 2009, but treatment was stopped immediately when he developed anorexia, diarrhea, and numbness in his fingers. Therefore, only TS-1 was administered. Following treatment initiation, tumor marker levels promptly dropped. The gastric lesion disappeared and, to date, only a slight scar remains since April 2010. Similarly, liver metastases have not been detected since August 2011. There has been no lesion progression for 6 years since the start of the chemotherapy. PMID:27431636

  2. Clinical observation of liver cancer patients treated with axitinib and cabozantinib after failed sorafenib treatment: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xia; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Jiwei

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major pathological type of primary liver cancer. Sorafenib has demonstrated definite efficacy in targeted therapy for HCC. However, when treatment with sorafenib fails, suitable drugs must be found for further treatment. This article reports a case of an HCC patient who was treated with angiogenesis inhibitor axitinib and c-Met inhibitor cabozantinib following treatment with sorafenib. The report focuses on clinical treatment and toxicity. Rational application of targeted therapy is also explored. PMID:25668362

  3. Surgery for Liver Metastases From Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martella, Luca; Bertozzi, Serena; Londero, Ambrogio P.; Steffan, Agostino; De Paoli, Paolo; Bertola, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The role of surgical therapy in patients with liver metastases from gastric cancer is still controversial. In this study, we investigated the results obtained with local treatment of hepatic metastases in patients with gastric cancer, by performing a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies published between 1990 and 2014. These works included multiple studies that evaluated the different survival rate among patients who underwent local treatment, such as hepatectomy or radiofrequency ablation, for hepatic metastases derived from primary gastric cancer. The collected studies were evaluated for heterogeneity, publication bias, and quality, and a pooled hazard ratio (HR) was calculated with a confidence interval estimated at 95% (95% CI). After conducting a thorough research among all published works, 2337 studies were found and after the review process 11 observational studies were included in the analysis. The total amount of patients considered in the survival analysis was 1010. An accurate analysis of all included studies reported a significantly higher survival rate in the group of patients who underwent the most aggressive local treatment for hepatic metastases (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.46–0.95) as opposed to patients who underwent only palliation or systemic treatment. Furthermore, palliative local treatment of hepatic metastases had a higher survival rate if compared to surgical (without liver surgery) and systemic palliation (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.96). Considering the only 3 studies where data from multivariate analyses was available, we found a higher survival rate in the local treatment groups, but the difference was not significant (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.22–1.15). Curative and also palliative surgery of liver metastases from gastric cancer may improve patients’ survival. However, further trials are needed in order to better understand the role of surgery in this

  4. Pseudocirrhosis in a pancreatic cancer patient with liver metastases: A case report of complete resolution of pseudocirrhosis with an early recognition and management

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonmo Peter; Taddei, Tamar; McLennan, Bruce; Lacy, Jill

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of pseudocirrhosis arising in the setting of regression of liver metastases from pancreatic cancer. A 55-year-old asymptomatic woman presented to our clinic with newly diagnosed metastatic pancreatic cancer with extensive liver metastases. She underwent systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX). After 8 cycles of therapy, she had a remarkable response to the therapy evidenced by decline of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA19 by > 50% and nearly complete resolution of hepatic metastases in computed tomography (CT) scan. Shortly after, she developed increasing bilateral ankle edema and ascites, associated with dyspnea, progressive weight gain, and declining performance status. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin were discontinued as other causes of her symptoms such as congestive heart disease or venous thrombosis were ruled out. CT scan 6 mo after the initiation of GEMOX revealed worsening ascites with a stable pancreatic mass. However, it also revealed a lobular hepatic contour, segmental atrophy, and capsular retraction mimicking the appearance of cirrhosis. She was managed with aggressive diuresis and albumin infusions which eventually resulted in a resolution of the above-mentioned symptoms as well as complete resolution of pseudocirrhotic appearance of the liver and ascites in CT scan. This case demonstrates that pancreatic cancer patients can develop pseudocirrhosis. Clinicians and radiologist should be well aware of this entity as early recognition and management can lead to a near complete recovery of liver function and much improved quality of life as illustrated in this case. PMID:18330959

  5. Liver cancer mortality rate model in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwattanapongse, Wattanavadee; Prasitwattanaseree, Sukon

    2013-09-01

    Liver Cancer has been a leading cause of death in Thailand. The purpose of this study was to model and forecast liver cancer mortality rate in Thailand using death certificate reports. A retrospective analysis of the liver cancer mortality rate was conducted. Numbering of 123,280 liver cancer causes of death cases were obtained from the national vital registration database for the 10-year period from 2000 to 2009, provided by the Ministry of Interior and coded as cause-of-death using ICD-10 by the Ministry of Public Health. Multivariate regression model was used for modeling and forecasting age-specific liver cancer mortality rates in Thailand. Liver cancer mortality increased with increasing age for each sex and was also higher in the North East provinces. The trends of liver cancer mortality remained stable in most age groups with increases during ten-year period (2000 to 2009) in the Northern and Southern. Liver cancer mortality was higher in males and increase with increasing age. There is need of liver cancer control measures to remain on a sustained and long-term basis for the high liver cancer burden rate of Thailand.

  6. Liver Colonization Competence Governs Colon Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Tsong-Hong; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Furukawa, Toshiharu; Teramoto, Tatuso; Ishibiki, Kyuya; Kitajima, Masaki; Rahim Moosa, A.; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors that metastasize do so to preferred target organs. To explain this apparent specificity, Paget, >100 years ago, formulated his seed and soil hypothesis; i.e., the cells from a given tumor would "seed" only favorable "soil" offered by certain organs. The hypothesis implies that cancer cells must find a suitable "soil" in a target organ-i.e., one that supports colonization-for metastasis to occur. We demonstrate in this report that ability of human colon cancer cells to colonize liver tissue governs whether a particular colon cancer is metastatic. In the model used in this study, human colon tumors are transplanted into the nude mouse colon as intact tissue blocks by surgical orthotopic implantation. These implanted tumors closely simulate the metastatic behavior of the original human patient tumor and are clearly metastatic or nonmetastatic to the liver. Both classes of tumors were equally invasive locally into tissues and blood vessels. However, the cells from each class of tumor behave very differently when directly injected into nude mouse livers. Only cells from metastasizing tumors are competent to colonize after direct intrahepatic injection. Also, tissue blocks from metastatic tumors affixed directly to the liver resulted in colonization, whereas no colonization resulted from nonmetastatic tumor tissue blocks even though some growth occurred within the tissue block itself. Thus, local invasion (injection) and even adhesion to the metastatic target organ (blocks) are not sufficient for metastasis. The results suggest that the ability to colonize the liver is the governing step in the metastasis of human colon cancer.

  7. Radio Frequency Ablation for Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of radio frequency ablation (RFA) compared with other treatments for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Ontario. Background Liver cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer globally, although it is most prevalent in Asia and Africa. The incidence of liver cancer has been increasing in the Western world, primarily because of an increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C. Data from Cancer Care Ontario from 1998 to 2002 suggest that the age-adjusted incidence of liver cancer in men rose slightly from 4.5 cases to 5.4 cases per 100,000 men. For women, the rates declined slightly, from 1.8 cases to 1.4 cases per 100,000 women during the same period. Most people who present with symptoms of liver cancer have a progressive form of the disease. The rates of survival in untreated patients in the early stage of the disease range from 50% to 82% at 1 year and 26% to 32% at 2 years. Patients with more advanced stages have survival rates ranging from 0% to 36% at 3 years. Surgical resection and transplantation are the procedures that have the best prognoses; however, only 15% to 20% of patients presenting with liver cancer are eligible for surgery. Resection is associated with a 50% survival rate at 5 years. The Technology: Radio Frequency Ablation RFA is a relatively new technique for the treatment of small liver cancers that cannot be treated with surgery. This technique applies alternating high-frequency electrical currents to the cancerous tissue. The intense heat leads to thermal coagulation that can kill the tumour. RFA is done under general or local anesthesia and can be done percutaneously (through the skin with a small needle), laparoscopically (microinvasively, using a small video camera), or intraoperatively. Percutaneous RFA is usually a day procedure. Methods The leading international

  8. An MVA-based vaccine targeting the oncofetal antigen 5T4 in patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Elkord, Eyad; Dangoor, Adam; Drury, Noel L; Harrop, Richard; Burt, Deborah J; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hamer, Caroline; Andrews, Danielle; Naylor, Stuart; Sherlock, David; Hawkins, Robert E; Stern, Peter L

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the use of a therapeutic vaccine, TroVax in patients undergoing surgical resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases. Systemic immunity generated by vaccination before and after resection of metastases was measured in addition to assessing safety and analyzing the function and phenotype of tumor-associated lymphocytes. Twenty patients were scheduled to receive 2 TroVax vaccinations at 2-week intervals preoperatively and 2 postoperatively; if immune responses were detected, 2 further vaccinations were offered. Blood was taken at trial entry and 2 weeks after each vaccination; tumor biopsies were collected at surgery. 5T4-specific cellular responses were assessed by lymphocyte proliferation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot, with antibody responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemistry characterized the phenotype of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Seventeen of 19 colorectal cancer patients showed 5T4 expression in the liver metastases or surrounding stroma and 18 mounted a 5T4-specific cellular and/or humoral response. In patients who received at least 4 vaccinations and potentially curative surgery (n=15), those with above median 5T4-specific proliferative responses or T-cell infiltration into the resected tumor showed significantly longer survival compared with those with below median responses. Seven of 8 patients who had preexisting proliferative responses to 5T4 were longer-term survivors; these patients showed significantly higher proliferative responses after vaccination than those who subsequently died. These data suggest that the magnitude of 5T4 proliferative responses and the density of CD3 cells in colorectal cancer liver metastases are associated with longer survival. These observations warrant more studies to identify the precise underlying mechanisms. PMID:18833005

  9. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  10. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  11. Long Term Results (>5 Years) in Patients With Peritoneovenous Shunting for Intractable Ascites: Liver Function and Cancer Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Meakins, Jonathan L.; Wu, Andrew; Smadja, Claude; Bonnet, Patrick; Gouffier, Etienne; Campillo, Bernard

    1989-01-01

    This report is based on twenty-eight (26%) of 107 patients included in a protocol for prospective evaluation of elective peritoneo-venous shunting for intractable ascites in cirrhosis. These patients had no other procedures and survived more than 5 years after the operation. All patients were free of ascites except one in whom it was mild. One patient refused follow-up. Shunt patency was assessed in 23 patients. In 14 patients (60.9%), the shunt was obstructed and the superior vena cava was occluded in 5 of them. In 9 patients (39.1%), the shunt was still functioning. No clinical or biological parameters differentiated these two groups of patients. Of the 24 patients who were alcoholics, 2 abstained completely and 20 significantly reduced their drinking habits. In 25 patients, the Pugh's score improved and was A at the time of the study. Seven patients (25.9%) developed a malignant tumor of the oro-pharynx or digestive tract, all other patients were alive and in good health. This study suggests that patients with intractable ascites treated by a peritoneo-venous shunt may survive for a long period. In patients abstaining from heavy drinking, it may function as a therapeutic bridge permitting spontaneous improvement of liver function. The risk of supervening neoplasms suggests that a continuous follow-up of these patients is warranted. PMID:2487384

  12. Intra-patient Inter-metastatic Genetic Heterogeneity in Colorectal Cancer as a Key Determinant of Survival after Curative Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Sveen, Anita; Løes, Inger Marie; Høland, Maren; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Sorbye, Halfdan; Horn, Arild; Angelsen, Jon-Helge; Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per Eystein; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a well-defined hallmark of tumor aggressiveness and metastatic progression in colorectal cancer. The magnitude of genetic heterogeneity among distinct liver metastases from the same patient at the copy number level, as well as its relationship with chemotherapy exposure and patient outcome, remains unknown. We performed high-resolution DNA copy number analyses of 134 liver metastatic deposits from 45 colorectal cancer patients to assess: (i) intra-patient inter-metastatic genetic heterogeneity using a heterogeneity score based on pair-wise genetic distances among tumor deposits; and (ii) genomic complexity, defined as the proportion of the genome harboring aberrant DNA copy numbers. Results were analyzed in relation to the patients’ clinical course; previous chemotherapy exposure and outcome after surgical resection of liver metastases. We observed substantial variation in the level of intra-patient inter-metastatic heterogeneity. Heterogeneity was not associated with the number of metastatic lesions or their genomic complexity. In metachronous disease, heterogeneity was higher in patients previously exposed to chemotherapy. Importantly, intra-patient inter-metastatic heterogeneity was a strong prognostic determinant, stronger than known clinicopathological prognostic parameters. Patients with a low level of heterogeneity (below the median level) had a three-year progression-free and overall survival rate of 23% and 66% respectively, versus 5% and 18% for patients with a high level (hazard ratio0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2–0.8, P = 0.01; and hazard ratio0.3,95% confidence interval 0.1–0.7, P = 0.007). A low patient-wise level of genomic complexity (below 25%) was also a favorable prognostic factor; however, the prognostic association of intra-patient heterogeneity was independent of genomic complexity in multivariable analyses. In conclusion, intra-patient inter-metastatic genetic heterogeneity is a pronounced feature of

  13. Phase I clinical trial of hepatic arterial infusion of cisplatin in combination with intravenous liposomal doxorubicin in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, Stacy; Fu, Siqing; Wen, Sijin; Naing, Aung; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Daring, Shawn; Uehara, Cynthia; Ng, Chaan; Wallace, Michael; Camacho, Luis; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) cisplatin and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and dominant liver involvement. Methods Patients were treated with HAI cisplatin 100–125 mg/m2 (and 3,000 IU heparin) intraarterially and liposomal doxorubicin (doxil) 20–35 mg/m2 IV (day 1) every 28 days. A “3 + 3” study design was used. Results Thirty patients were treated (median age, 56 years). Diagnoses were breast cancer (n = 11), colorectal cancer (n = 8), ocular melanoma (n = 4), and other (n = 7). The median number of prior therapies was 5. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was at the 100/35 mg/m2 level. Dose-limiting toxicities were Grade 4 neutropenia (2 of 4 patients), and Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n = 1) at the cisplatin 125 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2 dose level. The most common toxicities were nausea/vomiting and fatigue. Of 24 patients evaluable for response, 4 (17%) had a partial response (PR) and 7 (29%) had stable disease (SD) for ≥4 months. Of the 11 patients with breast cancer, 3 (27%) had a PR and 5 (45%) had SD for ≥4 months. Of 4 patients with ocular melanoma, 1 had a PR and 1 SD for 4 months. One patient with hepatocellular carcinoma had SD for 4 months. Of 12 evaluable patients treated at the MTD, 2 (17%) had a PR and 5 (42%) had SD. Conclusion The MTD was HAI cisplatin 100 mg/m2 and systemic doxil 35 mg/m2. This regimen demonstrated anti-tumor activity, especially in breast cancer. PMID:20204368

  14. The prognostic value of functional and anatomical parameters for the selection of patients receiving yttrium-90 microspheres for the treatment of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesoloras, Geraldine

    Yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere therapy is being utilized as a treatment option for patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer due to its ability to target tumors within the liver. The success of this treatment is dependent on many factors, including the extent and type of disease and the nature of prior treatments received. Metabolic activity, as determined by PET imaging, may correlate with the number of viable cancer cells and reflect changes in viable cancer cell volume. However, contouring of PET images by hand is labor intensive and introduces an element of irreproducibility into the determination of functional target/tumor volume (FTV). A computer-assisted method to aid in the automatic contouring of FTV has the potential to substantially improve treatment individualization and outcome assessment. Commercial software to determine FTV in FDG-avid primary and metastatic liver tumors has been evaluated and optimized. Volumes determined using the automated technique were compared to those from manually drawn contours identified using the same cutoff in the standard uptake value (SUV). The reproducibility of FTV is improved through the introduction of an optimal threshold value determined from phantom experiments. Application of the optimal threshold value from the phantom experiments to patient scans was in good agreement with hand-drawn determinations of the FTV. It is concluded that computer-assisted contouring of the FTV for primary and metastatic liver tumors improves reproducibility and increases accuracy, especially when combined with the selection of an optimal SUV threshold determined from phantom experiments. A method to link the pre-treatment assessment of functional (PET based) and anatomical (CT based) parameters to post-treatment survival and time to progression was evaluated in 22 patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases treated using 90Y microspheres and chemotherapy. The values for pre-treatment parameters that were the best

  15. Risks of Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States than in other parts of the world. Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American ...

  16. [Four cases of 5-fluorouracil-related hyperammonemia in patients with large intestinal cancer and multiple liver metastases, including a case of hyperammonemia treated using hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Wagatsuma, Kohei; Tani, Motohiro; Sasaki, Hajime; Naganawa, Yumiko; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kayo; Satoh, Shuji; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Systemic chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a standard treatment for unresectable or recurrent large intestinal cancer. Although hyperammonemia is a known side effect of 5-FU that can cause serious pathological conditions, only a few cases have been reported. We describe 4 cases of 5-FU-related hyperammonemia with impairment of consciousness in patients who received 5-FU chemotherapy for large intestinal cancer with multiple liver metastases. Hemodialysis was effective in 1 severe case. There have been no detailed reports on the use of hemodialysis for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU. Renal dysfunction is considered to be a risk factor for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU and it is necessary to pay particular attention in patients with renal dysfunction who receive chemotherapy with 5-FU. Here we summarize our cases together with 16 previously reported cases of hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU in Japan. PMID:25748155

  17. Prognostic Value of Lymph Node Ratio in Patients Receiving Combined Surgical Resection for Gastric Cancer Liver Metastasis: Results from Two National Centers in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu-Xing; Jin, Zheng-Xiong; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ying, Jian-Ming; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Mao, Xin-Xin; Bi, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Ye-Fan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xu-Hui; Hu, Han-Jie; Zhao, Dong-Bing; Wang, Ying-Yi; Cai, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with gastric cancer liver metastasis (GCLM) who received combined surgical resection.A retrospective analysis of 46 patients from two hospitals was conducted. Patients were dichotomized into two groups (high LNR and low LNR) by the median value of LNR. The overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method with the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to carry out the subsequent multivariate analyses. And the relationship between LNR and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed.The cut-off value defining elevated LNR was 0.347. With a median follow-up of 67.5 months, the median OS and RFS of the patients were 17 and 9.5 months, respectively. Six patients survived for >5 years after surgery. Patients with higher LNR had significantly shorter OS and RFS than those with lower LNR. In the multivariate analyses, higher LNR and multiple liver metastatic tumors were identified as the independent prognostic factors for both OS and RFS. Elevated LNR was significantly associated with advanced pN stage (P <0.001), larger primary tumor size (P = 0.046), the presence of microvascular invasion (P = 0.008), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.004).LNR may be prognostic indicator for patients with GCLM treated by synchronous surgical resection. Patients with lower LNR and single liver metastasis may gain more survival benefits from the surgical resection. Further prospective studies with reasonable study design are warranted. PMID:27100426

  18. Prognostic Value of Lymph Node Ratio in Patients Receiving Combined Surgical Resection for Gastric Cancer Liver Metastasis: Results from Two National Centers in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Xing; Jin, Zheng-Xiong; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Ying, Jian-Ming; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Mao, Xin-Xin; Bi, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Li, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Ye-Fan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xu-Hui; Hu, Han-Jie; Zhao, Dong-Bing; Wang, Ying-Yi; Cai, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of lymph node ratio (LNR) in patients with gastric cancer liver metastasis (GCLM) who received combined surgical resection. A retrospective analysis of 46 patients from two hospitals was conducted. Patients were dichotomized into two groups (high LNR and low LNR) by the median value of LNR. The overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to carry out the subsequent multivariate analyses. And the relationship between LNR and clinicopathological characteristics was assessed. The cut-off value defining elevated LNR was 0.347. With a median follow-up of 67.5 months, the median OS and RFS of the patients were 17 and 9.5 months, respectively. Six patients survived for >5 years after surgery. Patients with higher LNR had significantly shorter OS and RFS than those with lower LNR. In the multivariate analyses, higher LNR and multiple liver metastatic tumors were identified as the independent prognostic factors for both OS and RFS. Elevated LNR was significantly associated with advanced pN stage (P <0.001), larger primary tumor size (P = 0.046), the presence of microvascular invasion (P = 0.008), and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.004). LNR may be prognostic indicator for patients with GCLM treated by synchronous surgical resection. Patients with lower LNR and single liver metastasis may gain more survival benefits from the surgical resection. Further prospective studies with reasonable study design are warranted. PMID:27100426

  19. Predictive value of immunogenic cell death biomarkers HMGB1, sRAGE, and DNase in liver cancer patients receiving transarterial chemoembolization therapy.

    PubMed

    Kohles, Nikolaus; Nagel, Dorothea; Jüngst, Dietrich; Stieber, Petra; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy is an effective locoregional anticancer treatment for liver cancer patients. Serum biomarkers involved in immunogenic cell death may be valuable for early predicting therapy response and estimating prognosis. Sera of 50 prospectively and consecutively included hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, undergoing TACE therapy, were taken before and 24 h after TACE application. In these samples, soluble biomarkers involved in immunogenic cell death, and among them, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), and DNase activity were measured. They were compared with radiological response to therapy. A total of 71 TACE therapies were evaluated, of which 32 were classified as "no progression," and 39, as "progression." While HMGB1 levels increased already 24 h after TACE, there was an early decrease of sRAGE and DNase activity. Pretherapeutic and 24-h values of sRAGE were significantly higher in the no progression group than those in the progression group. There was no difference with respect to treatment response for DNase and HMGB1. Soluble RAGE is a new parameter with predictive relevance in primary liver cancer patients undergoing TACE therapy. PMID:22965881

  20. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Jerzy; Hansson, Göran; Wallerstedt, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC), which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 65), cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 3), or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n = 18) or a benign disorder (n = 11). None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs of porphyry. Increased aminolevulinic acid or porphyrin values were common not only in patients with PLC (43%) but also in metastatic (50%) and benign (64%) liver disorders. The corresponding proportion for HCC patients with liver cirrhosis (55%) was higher (P < .05) than in those without cirrhosis (17%). We conclude that symptomatic porphyries are unusual in PLC, whereas elevated urinary and/or faecal porphyrins are common, primarily reflecting a parallel liver disease and not the PLC. PMID:19841684

  1. Oncogenic role of the Notch pathway in primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, JIE; XIA, YUJING; CHEN, KAN; ZHENG, YUANYUAN; WANG, JIANRONG; LU, WENXIA; YIN, QIN; WANG, FAN; ZHOU, YINGQUN; GUO, CHUANYONG

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, which includes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and fibrolamellar HCC, is one of the most common malignancies and the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortality, worldwide. Despite the development of novel therapies, the prognosis of liver cancer patients remains extremely poor. Thus, investigation of the genetic background and molecular mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this disease has gained significant attention. The Notch signaling pathway is a crucial determinant of cell fate during development and disease in several organs. In the liver, Notch signaling is involved in biliary tree development and tubulogenesis, and is also significant in the development of HCC and ICC. These findings suggest that the modulation of Notch pathway activity may have therapeutic relevance. The present review summarizes Notch signaling during HCC and ICC development and discusses the findings of recent studies regarding Notch expression, which reveal novel insights into its function in liver cancer progression. PMID:27347091

  2. Liver cancer: Approaching a personalized care

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Gores, Gregory; Llovet, Josep Maria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The knowledge and understanding of all aspects of liver cancer [this including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA)] have experienced a major improvement in the last decades. New laboratory technologies have identified several molecular abnormalities that, at the very end, should provide an accurate stratification and optimal treatment of patients diagnosed with liver cancer. The seminal discovery of the TP53 hotspot mutation [1,2] was an initial landmark step for the future classification and treatment decision using conventional clinical criteria blended with molecular data. At the same time, the development of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) has been instrumental for earlier diagnosis, accurate staging and treatment advances. Several treatment options with proven survival benefit if properly applied are now available. Major highlights include: i) acceptance of liver transplantation for HCC if within the Milan criteria [3], ii) recognition of ablation as a potentially curative option [4,5], iii) proof of benefit of chemoembolization (TACE), [6] and iv) incorporation of sorafenib as an effective systemic therapy [7]. These options are part of the widely endorsed BCLC staging and treatment model (Fig. 1) [8,9]. This is clinically useful and it will certainly keep evolving to accommodate new scientific evidence. This review summarises the data which are the basis for the current recommendations for clinical practice, while simultaneously exposes the areas where more research is needed to fulfil the still unmet needs (Table 1). PMID:25920083

  3. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Golas, Benjamin J.; Yeung, Vincent W.; Madoff, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed. PMID:25610708

  4. Minimally invasive local therapies for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Golas, Benjamin J; Yeung, Vincent W; Madoff, David C

    2014-12-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors are an increasing global health problem, with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) now being the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Systemic treatment options for HCC remain limited, with Sorafenib as the only prospectively validated agent shown to increase overall survival. Surgical resection and/or transplantation, locally ablative therapies and regional or locoregional therapies have filled the gap in liver tumor treatments, providing improved survival outcomes for both primary and metastatic tumors. Minimally invasive local therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. For patients with low volume disease, these therapies have now been established into consensus practice guidelines. This review highlights technical aspects and outcomes of commonly utilized, minimally invasive local therapies including laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), irreversible electroporation (IRE), and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In addition, the role of combination treatment strategies utilizing these minimally invasive techniques is reviewed. PMID:25610708

  5. Initial Study of Radiological and Clinical Efficacy Radioembolization Using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Microspheres in Patients with Progressive, Unresectable Primary or Secondary Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Mirosław L.; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.; Sankowski, Artur J.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Grimes, Josh; Celler, Anna; Buscombe, John R.; Bator, Andrzej; Pech, Maciej; Mikołajczak, Renata; Pawlak, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this initial study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological effectiveness of radioembolization (RE) using 188Re-Human Serum Albumin (HSA) microspheres in patients with advanced, progressive, unresectable primary or secondary liver cancers, not suitable to any other form of therapy. Material/Methods Overall, we included 13 patients with 20 therapy sessions. Clinical and radiological responses were assessed at 6 weeks after therapy, and then every 3 months. The objective radiological response was classified according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v.1.0 by sequential MRI. Adverse events were evaluated using NCI CTCAE v.4.03. Results There were 4 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 6 with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), 2 with neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), and 1 patient with ovarian carcinoma. Mean administered activity of 188Re HSA was 7.24 GBq (range 3.8–12.4) A high microspheres labeling efficacy of over 97±2.1% and low urinary excretion of 188Re (6.5±2.3%) during first 48-h follow-up. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 7.1 months (CI 6.2–13.3) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.1 months (CI 2.4–9.9). In those patients who had a clinical partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and disease progression (DP) as assessed 6 weeks after therapy, the median OS was 9/5/4 months, respectively, and PFS was 5/2/0 months, respectively. The treatment adverse events (toxicity) were at an acceptable level. Initially and after 6 weeks, the CTC AE was grade 2, while after 3 months it increased to grade 3 in 4 subjects. This effect was mostly related to rapid cancer progression in this patient subgroup. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study indicate that RE using 188Re HSA is feasible and a viable option for palliative therapy in patients with extensive progressive liver cancer. It was well tolerated by most patients, with a low level of toxicity during the 3 months of

  6. Surgical management of breast cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cassera, Maria A; Hammill, Chet W; Ujiki, Michael B; Wolf, Ronald F; Swanström, Lee L; Hansen, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Selected patients with isolated breast cancer liver metastases (BCLM) may benefit from surgical management; however, indications remain unclear and the risks may outweigh the benefits in patients with a generally poor prognosis. Methods Between 1998 and 2006, 17 patients diagnosed with BCLM were considered for surgical management (<4 tumours, tumour <4 cm in diameter and no/stable extrahepatic metastases). Peri-operative and outcomes data were analysed and compared. Results Eight patients were found to have extensive or untreatable disease on staging laparoscopy and intra-operative ultrasound (SL/IOUS). The remaining nine patients underwent surgical management [seven laparoscopic radiofrequency ablations (RFA) and two hepatic resections]. Median length of follow-up for patients treated surgically was 40.0 months, median disease-free survival (DFS) was 32.2 months and median time to disease progression was 17.7 months. Of the eight patients not amenable to surgery, median length of follow-up was 21.8 months. Conclusion SL/IOUS prevented unnecessary laparotomy in half of the patients taken to the operating room for surgical treatment of BCLM. In patients with BCLM, SL/IOUS should be considered standard of care before surgical intervention. The small number of patients and short follow-up may be inadequate to determine the true value of surgical management in this group of patients with BCLM. PMID:21418133

  7. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  8. Significant Shrinkage of Multifocal Liver Metastases and Long-Term Survival in a Patient With Rectal Cancer, After Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Bogdan Andrei; Gurzu, Simona; Marginean, Lucian; Milutin, Doina; Halmaciu, Ioana; Jung, Ioan; Branzaniuc, Klara; Molnar, Calin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present the successful therapeutic approach of unresectable liver metastases in a patient with rectal cancer.A 63-year-old male underwent endoscopic polypectomy followed by rectosigmoid resection for an adenocarcinoma of the rectum diagnosed in pT2N0 stage. The angio-computed tomography (CT) revealed four metastatic hepatic nodules ranging from 12 to 130 mm in diameter. After one cure of trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) with lipiodol and 5-fluorouracil, combined with FOLFOX4 + capecitabine systemic chemotherapy, the diameter of all hepatic nodules decreased to half size, at 6 months after TACE. Further curative surgical hepatic metastasectomy was done and complete pathologic response was obtained. The patient is free of recurrences and metastases after 26 months of follow-up.This representative case shows that an efficient trans-disciplinary approach could lead to successful therapeutic management even in patients with advanced-staged colorectal carcinomas. PMID:26496332

  9. Combined Chemotherapy with Mitomycin C, Folinic Acid, and 5-Fluorouracil (MiFoFU) as Salvage Treatment for Patients with Liver Metastases from Breast Cancer — a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, Michael H.R.; Gast, Anne-Sybil; Bruckner, Thomas; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to analyze the activity and tolerability of a combined chemotherapy with mitomycin C, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil (MiFoFU) in patients with hepatic metastases from breast cancer, and in particular in patients with impaired liver function. Patients and Methods We retrospectively studied the charts of 44 patients who were treated with a MiFoFU combination therapy because of progressive metastatic breast cancer. Predominant site of metastases was the liver. Primary endpoints were response and time to progression (TTP); secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and tolerability. Results Median age prior to treatment was 59 years. A median of 6 treatment cycles were administered per patient. Clinical benefit rate amounted to 64%. A mean TTP of 9 months and a mean OS of 14 months were found. Main clinical signs of nonhematological toxicity were stomatitis, nausea, and diarrhea. Grade III/IV hematotoxicity was seen in only 9 patients. 16 patients showed clinical signs of liver dysfunction. A clinical benefit could be achieved in 8 of these patients. Conclusion MiFoFU combination chemotherapy is a well-tolerated treatment alternative in the palliative therapy of patients with liver metastases from breast cancer. Particularly in patients with hepatic dysfunction, this regimen seems to represent a helpful treatment option. PMID:21076607

  10. Liver macrophages contribute to pancreatic cancer-related cachexia.

    PubMed

    Martignoni, Marc E; Dimitriu, Corneliu; Bachmann, Jeaninne; Krakowski-Rosen, Holger; Ketterer, Knut; Kinscherf, Ralf; Friess, Helmut

    2009-02-01

    Cachexia is a devastating process especially in pancreatic cancer patients and contributes to their poor survival. We attempted to clarify the pathological and molecular changes that occur in the liver during the development of cachexia. Using immunohistochemistry we investigated the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in liver biopsies of pancreatic cancer patients with or without cachexia, and the potential relevance of the cells for the nutritional and inflammatory status. Additionally, these findings were compared with the patients' clinical parameters. We found a significantly higher amount of CD68 immunoreactive macrophages in liver cross sections of patients with pancreatic cancer and cachexia. The number of CD68-positive macrophages was significantly inversely correlated with the nutritional status. Additionally, in these CD68-positive areas a significant increase in IL-6 and IL-1 immunoreactive cells was localized. Moreover, we found significantly increased areas of CD68-positive macrophages in liver biopsies of patients with a more dedifferentiated (aggressive) grading of the tumor. In conclusion, these results suggest that a crucial interaction between the tumor, PBMCs, and the liver may play a central role in the development and regulation of cachexia. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer may be able to alter systemic organ function even without obvious metastatic disease. PMID:19148509

  11. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masakazu; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Uemura, Hisashi; Okada, Kaoru; Nakane, Shigeru; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hirohito; Oka, Yoshio; Nezu, Riichiro

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with sigmoid colon cancer liver metastasis accompanied by multiple liver abscesses. The 59-year-old female patient presented with a fever at a body temperature of 39.0°C. On abdominal computed tomography (CT), multiple liver abscesses were detected, and percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) was performed. The day after the PTAD, the patient's fever subsided and her inflammatory response abated. A lower gastrointestinal examination, performed to identify the origin of her symptoms, revealed a type 1 tumor in the sigmoid colon. A biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Prior to surgery, a second abdominal CT scan was performed, and a single liver metastasis was detected. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and partial liver resection were simultaneously performed. The histopathological diagnosis of the colon cancer was tub2, pN1, pH1, P0, ly1, v1, stage IV. To date, the patient remains free from hepatic abscess and colon cancer recurrence. Gastrointestinal examinations should be performed as early as possible to identify the cause of hepatic abscesses. Moreover, therapeutic decisions should only be made after imaging and examinations have been performed, which will be sufficient to identify the presence of liver metastases. PMID:25731285

  12. Ganetespib radiosensitization for liver cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Malek, Reem; Annadanam, Anvesh; Nugent, Katriana M.; Kato, Yoshinori; Wang, Hailun; Cades, Jessica A.; Taparra, Kekoa; Belcaid, Zineb; Ballew, Matthew; Manmiller, Sarah; Proia, David; Lim, Michael; Anders, Robert A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapies for liver cancer particularly those including radiation are still inadequate. Inhibiting the stress response machinery is an appealing anti-cancer and radiosensitizing therapeutic strategy. Heat-shock-protein-90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is a prominent effector of the stress response machinery and is overexpressed in liver cancer cells. HSP90 client proteins include critical components of pathways implicated in liver cancer cell survival and radioresistance. The effects of a novel non-geldanamycin HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, combined with radiation were examined on 3 liver cancer cell lines, Hep3b, HepG2 and HUH7, using in vitro assays for clonogenic survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, γH2AX foci kinetics and client protein expression in pathways important for liver cancer survival and radioresistance. We then evaluated tumor growth delay and effects of the combined ganetespib-radiation treatment on tumor cell proliferation in a HepG2 hind-flank tumor graft model. Nanomolar levels of ganetespib alone exhibited liver cancer cell anti-cancer activity in vitro as shown by decreased clonogenic survival that was associated with increased apoptotic cell death, prominent G2-M arrest and marked changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MAPK client protein activity. Ganetespib caused a supra-additive radiosensitization in all liver cancer cell lines at low nanomolar doses with enhancement ratios between 1.33–1.78. These results were confirmed in vivo, where the ganetespib-radiation combination therapy produced supra-additive tumor growth delay compared with either therapy by itself in HepG2 tumor grafts. Our data suggest that combined ganetespib-radiation therapy exhibits promising activity against liver cancer cells, which should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:26980196

  13. Patients with Chronically Diseased Livers Have Lower Incidence of Colorectal Liver Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Liao, Kai; Song, Xian-qing; Wei, Wei-yuan; Zhuang, Yuan; Zhang, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Background 70 years ago, it was put forward that the diseased liver was not a favorable soil for metastatic tumor cells. In addition, a few studies have demonstrated that rare occurrence of colorectal liver metastases among patients with fatty liver, cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection. We performed a meta-analysis to verify the association between the incidences of colorectal liver metastases with chronically diseased livers. Methods Relevant studies were identified by a search of electronic database PubMed, Cochrane Library, OVID, Web of Science and CNKI (up to February 24, 2014). Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Meta-analysis and publication bias (Bgger's test) was evaluated with STATA 12.0. Results A total of 10,349 colorectal cancer patients from 10 studies were included. The meta-analysis result showed there was a significant difference in the incidences of colorectal liver metastases between patients with normal and chronically diseased livers (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 95%: 0.26–0.38, P = 0.000 fixed-effects model). The result of Begg's test (Pr>|z| = 0.089; P>0.05) revealed no publication bias. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that patients with chronically diseased livers had significantly lower incidences of colorectal liver metastases than those with normal livers. PMID:25265536

  14. Detection of liver cancer and abnormal liver tissue by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Ding, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiujun; Lin, Junxiu; Wang, Deli

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced human serum Raman spectra of liver cancer are measured. The spectra differences in serum from normal people and liver disease patients are analyzed. For the typical spectrum of normal serum, there are three sharp Raman peaks and relative intensity of Raman peaks excited by 514.5nm is higher than that excited by 488.0nm. For the Raman spectrum of liver cancer serum there are no peaks or very weak Raman peaks at the same positions. Results from more than two hundred case measurements show that clinical diagnostic accuracy is 92.86%. And then, the liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis are studied applying the technology of LIF. To liver cirrhosis, the shape of Raman peak is similar to normal and fluorescence spectrum is similar to that of liver cancer from statistic data. The experiment indicates that there is notable fluorescence difference between the abnormal and normal liver tissue and have blue shift in fluorescence peak. Except for human serum, we use rats serum for researching either. Compared with results of path al examination, we analyze the spectra of normal cases, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocirrhosis respectively in an attempt to find some difference between them. Red shift of fluorescence peak is observed with disease evolution using 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser. However, no distinct changes happen with 488.0nm excitation. These results have important reference values to explore the method of laser spectrum diagnosis.

  15. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator-Associated Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Improved Survival in Patients With Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiufan; Xu, Fei; Nie, Man; Xia, Wen; Qin, Tao; Qin, Ge; An, Xin; Xue, Cong; Peng, Roujun; Yuan, Zhongyu; Shi, Yanxia; Wang, Shusen

    2015-10-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) might be related to treatment efficacy in patients with breast cancer because of circulating estrogen antagonism. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and survival outcomes in patients with breast cancer who were treated with tamoxifen or toremifene. This single-center, retrospective, cohort study included 785 eligible patients who received tamoxifen or toremifene, after curative resection for breast cancer, at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 2005 and December 2009. Data were extracted from patient medical records. All patients underwent abdominal ultrasonography, at least once, at baseline and at the annual follow-up. Patients who were diagnosed with NAFLD on ultrasonography were classified into the NAFLD or the non-NAFLD arm at the 3-year follow-up visit. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were conducted to evaluate any associations between NAFLD and disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). One hundred fifty-eight patients were diagnosed with NAFLD. Patients who developed NAFLD had better DFS and OS compared with those who did not. Univariate analyses revealed that the 5-year DFS rates were 91.56% and 85.01% for the NAFLD and non-NAFLD arms, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.96; log-rank P = 0.032). The 5-year OS rates were 96.64% and 93.31% for the NAFLD and non-NAFLD arms, respectively (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.16-0.99; log-rank P = 0.039). Multivariate analysis revealed that NAFLD was an independent prognostic factor for DFS, improving the DFS rate by 41% compared with that in the non-NAFLD arm (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.96; P = 0.033). SERM-associated NAFLD was independently associated with improved DFS and might be useful for predicting treatment responses in breast cancer patients treated with SERMs. PMID:26448028

  16. Liver metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic; Colorectal cancer - liver metastases; Colon cancer - liver metastases; Esophageal cancer - liver metastases; Lung cancer - liver metastases; Melanoma - liver metastases

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  18. Assessment of adult patients with chronic liver failure for liver transplantation in 2015: who and when?

    PubMed

    McCaughan, G W; Crawford, M; Sandroussi, C; Koorey, D J; Bowen, D G; Shackel, N A; Strasser, S I

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, there are a few absolute contraindications to liver transplantation. In adult patients, survival post-liver transplant is excellent, with 1-year survival rate >90% and 5-year survival rates >80% and predicted median allograft survival beyond 20 years. Patients with a Child-Turcotte Pugh score ≥9 or a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15 should be referred for liver transplantation, with patients who have a MELD score >17 showing a 1-year survival benefit with liver transplantation. A careful selection of hepatocellular cancer patients results in excellent outcomes, while consideration of extra-hepatic disease (reversible vs irreversible) and social support structures are crucial to patient assessment. Alcoholic liver disease remains a challenge, and the potential to cure hepatitis C virus infection together with the emerging issue of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease-associated chronic liver failure will change the landscape of the who in the years ahead. The when will continue to be determined largely by the severity of liver disease based on the MELD score for the foreseeable future. PMID:27062203

  19. Radioembolization for primary and metastatic liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Lewandowski, Robert J; Kulik, Laura; Riaz, Ahsun; Mulcahy, Mary F; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is increasing. Most patients present beyond potentially curative options and are usually affected by underlying cirrhosis. In this scenario, trans-arterial therapies, such as radioembolization, are rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. Radioembolization is a catheter-based liver-directed therapy that involves injection of micron-sized embolic particles loaded with a radioisotope by use of percutaneous transarterial techniques. Cancer cells are preferentially supplied by arterial blood and normal hepatocytes by portal venous blood; radioembolization therefore specifically targets tumor cells with a high dose of lethal radiation and spares healthy hepatocytes. The antitumor effect mostly comes from radiation rather than embolization. The most commonly used radioisotope is Yttrium-90. The commercially available devices are TheraSphere® (glass-based) and SIR-Sphere® (resin-based). The procedure is performed on outpatient basis. The incidence of complications is generally less than other locoregional therapies and may include nausea, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatic dysfunction, biliary injury, fibrosis, radiation pneumonitis, gastrointestinal ulcers and vascular injury. However, these can be avoided by meticulous pretreatment assessment, careful patient selection and adequate dosimetry. This article focuses on both the technical and clinical aspects of radioembolization with emphasis on patient selection, uses and complications. PMID:21939859

  20. Extracorporeal liver support devices for listed patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karla C L; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Jalan, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    An alternative to liver transplantation for patients with liver failure remains an unmet need. In acute liver failure, the ideal extracorporeal liver support device (ELSD) would replace the functions of the failing liver in order to permit spontaneous recovery, given the incredible regenerative potential of the liver, negating the need for transplantation. In acute-on-chronic liver failure, an ELSD would ideally support hepatic function until a recovery to liver function before acute decompensation or until liver transplantation. In decompensated cirrhosis, an ELSD could again be used to support hepatic function until transplant. In addition, ELSDs may have the potential to treat the multiorgan failure that accompanies liver failure including hepatic encephalopathy, renal failure, and immune dysfunction or indeed potential to promote liver regeneration. Creation of an extracorporeal bioartificial liver able to completely replace liver function remains an unmet need. This review will describe a number of technologies suitable for clinical trials in humans, which have resulted from decades of engineering and biological research to develop a bioreactor able to adequately sustain functional hepatocytes. In addition, this review will describe artificial liver support devices that are primarily designed to replace the detoxifying functions of the liver and will consider the current data available or studies required to support their use in liver failure patients on the transplant waiting list. Liver Transplantation 22 839-848 2016 AASLD. PMID:26785141

  1. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases. PMID:27431631

  2. Primary liver tumors among Danish patients exposed to thorotrast

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M. Rigshospitalet Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen ); Carstensen, B.; Storm, H.H. ); Vyberg, M. ); Visfeldt, J. )

    1994-02-01

    The potential carcinogenic effects of internally deposited [alpha]-particle-emitting nuclides, notably plutonium, in the liver in humans are unknown but are of concern in relation to exposures from the nuclear industry. However, patients injected with the radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast are chronically exposed to [alpha]-particle radiation from [sup 232]ThO[sub 2] in the liver. Among 1003 patients injected with Thorotrast, 584 of whom were alive 15 years after the injection and 40 at the end of follow-up, a total of 127 liver cancers were diagnosed, 45 of which were hepatocellular carcinomas, 41 cholangiocarcinomas and 33 hemangiosarcomas. The median time from injection to diagnosis was 35 years (range 18-48) and the cumulative frequency was 55.4% after 48 years. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the cumulative frequency of liver cancer was best described as a function of the estimated mean cumulative [alpha]-particle radiation dose to the liver 15 years ago, being independent of age, gender and volume of injected Thorotrast. This may be interpreted to mean that the liver cancer rate is not related to the dose rate and that the period from malignant transformation to diagnosis of cancer is 15 years. The risk of liver carcinogenesis induced by [alpha]-particle radiation, assuming 15 years from induction to diagnosis, was estimated to be 712 cases/10[sup 4] persons per gray. This value is considerably higher than estimated earlier. 86 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. The state of regional therapy in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver.

    PubMed

    Cho, May; Gong, Jun; Fakih, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Most colorectal cancer patients die from advanced disease, and two-thirds of CRC deaths are due to liver metastases. Liver resection provides the best curative option for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), yet only 20% of those patients are eligible for liver metastases resection for curative intent. Loco-regional treatment of CRLM may provide additional benefits in terms of down-staging for resection and prolonged hepatic disease control. This review focusses on hepatic arterial infusion, radioembolization and chemoembolization. PMID:26652741

  4. Targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer using specific binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianfeng; Tan, Gewen; Sheng, Nengquan; You, Weiqiang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the first in China among all gastrointestinal cancers in terms of incidence, and liver metastasis is the leading cause of death for patients with advanced gastric cancer. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a cytokine commonly chosen as the target for gene therapy against cancers. The specific binding peptide pd20 of gastric cancer cells with a high potential for liver metastasis was fused with human TNF to obtain the pd20-TNF gene using DNA recombinant technique. The expression of the fusion protein was induced and the protein was purified. In vitro activity test showed that the fusion protein greatly improved the membrane permeability of liver cells in nude mice with liver metastasis from gastric cancer. The tumor implantation experiment in nude mice showed that the fusion protein effectively mitigated the cancer lesions. The results provide important clues for developing the drugs for targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer. PMID:27347305

  5. CT Perfusion Imaging Can Predict Patients' Survival and Early Response to Transarterial Chemo-Lipiodol Infusion for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Cheng, De-Lei; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Ni, Ming; Lu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the performance of computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTPI) in predicting the early response to transarterial chemo-lipiodol infusion (TACLI) and survival of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM). Materials and Methods Computed tomography perfusion imaging was performed before and 1 month after TACLI in 61 consecutive patients. Therapeutic response was evaluated on CT scans 1 month and 4 months after TACLI; the patients were classified as responders and non-responders based on 4-month CT scans after TACLI. The percentage change of CTPI parameters of target lesions were compared between responders and non-responders at 1 month after TACLI. The optimal parameter and cutoff value were determined. The patients were divided into 2 subgroups according to the cutoff value. The log-rank test was used to compare the survival rates of the 2 subgroups. Results Four-month images were obtained from 58 patients, of which 39.7% were responders and 60.3% were non-responders. The percentage change in hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) 1 month after TACLI was the optimal predicting parameter (p = 0.003). The best cut-off value was -21.5% and patients who exhibited a ≥ 21.5% decrease in HAP had a significantly higher overall survival rate than those who exhibited a < 21.5% decrease (p < 0.001). Conclusion Computed tomography perfusion imaging can predict the early response to TACLI and survival of patients with CRLM. The percentage change in HAP after TACLI with a cutoff value of -21.5% is the optimal predictor. PMID:26175580

  6. Significant Shrinkage of Multifocal Liver Metastases and Long-Term Survival in a Patient With Rectal Cancer, After Trans-Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE)

    PubMed Central

    Suciu, Bogdan Andrei; Gurzu, Simona; Marginean, Lucian; Milutin, Doina; Halmaciu, Ioana; Jung, Ioan; Branzaniuc, Klara; Molnar, Calin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we present the successful therapeutic approach of unresectable liver metastases in a patient with rectal cancer. A 63-year-old male underwent endoscopic polypectomy followed by rectosigmoid resection for an adenocarcinoma of the rectum diagnosed in pT2N0 stage. The angio-computed tomography (CT) revealed four metastatic hepatic nodules ranging from 12 to 130 mm in diameter. After one cure of trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) with lipiodol and 5-fluorouracil, combined with FOLFOX4 + capecitabine systemic chemotherapy, the diameter of all hepatic nodules decreased to half size, at 6 months after TACE. Further curative surgical hepatic metastasectomy was done and complete pathologic response was obtained. The patient is free of recurrences and metastases after 26 months of follow-up. This representative case shows that an efficient trans-disciplinary approach could lead to successful therapeutic management even in patients with advanced-staged colorectal carcinomas. PMID:26496332

  7. Pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of branched-chain amino acids for primary liver cancer patients for hepatic resection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianyuan; Zhong, Jianhong; Zhang, Hanguang; Zhong, Wenhe; Huang, Zhihong; Jin, Yuanming; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to patients with primary liver cancer (PLC) during hepatic resection (HR) remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this practice. Seven literature databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that reported pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of BCAA for PLC patients during HR. Three RCTs were included in a meta-analysis in which risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. The 2 groups showed similar recurrence rates (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.36) and similar overall survival (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.18). Adverse events related to oral administration of BCAA were more than the control group, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal distension, abdominal pain, and hypertension. However, all adverse reactions disappeared after symptomatic treatment. The available evidence suggests that although pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral BCAA for patients with PLC is safe, it is of questionable clinical value. More RCTs are warranted to explore this question definitively. PMID:24033366

  8. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  9. Surgical treatment of double primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aijun; Ma, Senlin; Pawlik, Timothy; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiaoyu; Cui, Longjiu; Wu, Mengchao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Double primary liver cancer (DPLC) is a special type of clinical situation. As such, a detailed analysis of the surgical management and prognosis of patients with DPLC is lacking. The objective of the current study was to define the management and outcome of patients undergoing surgery for DPLC at a major hepatobiliary center. A total of 87 patients treated by surgical resection at the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital from January 1st, 2007 to October 31st, 2013 who had DPLC demonstrated by final pathological diagnosis were identified. Among these, 50 patients had complete clinical and prognostic data. Demographic and tumor characteristics as well as the prognosis were analyzed. The proportion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (+) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) (+), HBsAg (+), and HBeAg (−) hepatocirrhosis in all patients was 21.84%, 67.82%, and 63.22%, respectively. Incidental findings accounted for 58.62% of patients; among those who had symptoms, the main symptom was abdominal pain (31.03%). Nonanatomic wedge resection was the main operative approach (62.07%). Postoperatively, the main complications included seroperitoneum (11.49%), hypoproteinemia (10.34%), and pleural effusion (8.05%). Factors associated with disease-free survival (DFS) included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) tumor size (P = 0.002) and use of postoperative prophylactic transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) treatment (P = 0.015). Meanwhile, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) size (P = 0.045), ICC size (P < 0.001), and liver function (including aspartate aminotransferase [P = 0.001] and r-glutamyl transferase [P < 0.001]) were associated with overall survival (OS). Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatitis or cirrhosis is also an important factor in the pathogenesis of DPLC and surgical treatment is safe for it with low complication rates. In addition, it is effective to prolong DFS that DPLC patients undergo postoperative

  10. [Diagnosis and therapy of liver metastasis of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Meshcheriakova, N G; Buianov, S S; Dobrovol'skaia, N I

    1994-01-01

    Thirty seven patients received different modalities of chemotherapy for breast cancer disseminated to the liver. Apparent effect was registered in 9 (24.3%) patients (full effect--3 (8.1%), stabilization--23 (62.1%) and tumor progression--5 (13.5%). The ECE modality proved the most effective. Treatment efficacy was relatively higher in cases of breast tumor removal. The study established a correlation between effectiveness of therapy and size and number of metastatic nodes. PMID:7610636

  11. What's New in Liver Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for liver cancer What`s new in liver cancer research and treatment? Because there ... being made in treating chronic hepatitis. Screening Several new blood tests are being studied to see if ...

  12. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivor What should you ask your health care team about liver cancer? As you cope with liver ... have honest, open discussions with your cancer care team . Ask any question, no matter how small it ...

  13. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  14. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called “isoprenoids”) are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  15. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-09-27

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called "isoprenoids") are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  16. Microcirculation of liver cancer, microenvironment of liver regeneration, and the strategy of Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-min

    2016-03-01

    Microcirculation of liver cancer is the micro-vascular system which comes from the tissue of liver cancer. It can offer the nutritional requirement for accelerating the cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. The intrinsic mechanism of angiogenesis is the key link in the formation of liver cancer microcirculation system. Liver regeneration microenvironment also plays an important role in the construction of liver cancer microcirculation, through the improvement of liver regeneration microenvironment affecting tumor microcirculation is the new strategy of prevention and treatment of liver cancer. In recent years, it is found that many kinds of Chinese medicine can inhibit angiogenesis, decrease the microvessel density, and delay or prevent the development of liver cancer. PMID:26919996

  17. S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE IN LIVER HEALTH, INJURY, AND CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, José M.

    2013-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet, also known as SAM and SAMe) is the principal biological methyl donor synthesized in all mammalian cells but most abundantly in the liver. Biosynthesis of AdoMet requires the enzyme methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). In mammals, two genes, MAT1A that is largely expressed by normal liver and MAT2A that is expressed by all extrahepatic tissues, encode MAT. Patients with chronic liver disease have reduced MAT activity and AdoMet levels. Mice lacking Mat1a have reduced hepatic AdoMet levels and develop oxidative stress, steatohepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In these mice, several signaling pathways are abnormal that can contribute to HCC formation. However, injury and HCC also occur if hepatic AdoMet level is excessive chronically. This can result from inactive mutation of the enzyme glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT). Children with GNMT mutation have elevated liver transaminases, and Gnmt knockout mice develop liver injury, fibrosis, and HCC. Thus a normal hepatic AdoMet level is necessary to maintain liver health and prevent injury and HCC. AdoMet is effective in cholestasis of pregnancy, and its role in other human liver diseases remains to be better defined. In experimental models, it is effective as a chemopreventive agent in HCC and perhaps other forms of cancer as well. PMID:23073625

  18. Studying liver cancer metastasis by in vivo imaging and flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wei, Xunbin

    2009-11-01

    Primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, or HCC) is associated with liver cirrhosis 60-80% of the time. Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. About 80% of people with primary liver cancer are male. Although two-thirds of people have advanced liver disease when they seek medical help, one third of the patients have cancer that has not progressed beyond the liver. HCC may metastasize to the lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of HCC cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern liver tumor cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo with real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess liver tumor cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating liver tumor cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  19. Liver transplantation: evolving patient selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, A S; Ahmed, A; Keeffe, E B

    2001-11-01

    The widespread recognition of the success of liver transplantation as a treatment for most types of acute and chronic liver failure has led to increased referrals for transplantation in the setting of a relatively fixed supply of cadaver donor organs. These events have led to a marked lengthening of the waiting time for liver transplantation, resulting in increased deaths of those on the waiting list and sicker patients undergoing transplantation. Nearly 5000 liver transplantations were performed in the United States in 2000, while the waiting list grew to over 17,000 patients. The mounting disparity between the number of liver transplant candidates and the limited supply of donor organs has led to reassessment of the selection and listing criteria for liver transplantation, as well as revision of organ allocation and distribution policies for cadaver livers. The development of minimal listing criteria for patients with chronic liver disease based on a specific definition for decompensation of cirrhosis has facilitated the more uniform listing of patients at individual centres across the United States. The United Network for Organ Sharing, under pressure from transplant professionals, patient advocacy groups and the federal government, has continuously revised allocation and distribution policies based on the ethical principles of justice for the individual patient versus optimal utility of the limited organ supply available annually. Beginning in 2002, it is likely that the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score will be implemented to determine disease severity and direct donor organs to the sickest patients rather than to those with the longest waiting times. PMID:11727003

  20. Donor transmitted and de novo cancer after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajeev; Neuberger, James

    2014-05-28

    Cancers in solid organ recipients may be classified as donor transmitted, donor derived, de novo or recurrent. The risk of donor-transmitted cancer is very low and can be reduced by careful screening of the donor but cannot be abolished and, in the United Kingdom series is less than 0.03%. For donors with a known history of cancer, the risks will depend on the nature of the cancer, the interventions given and the interval between diagnosis and organ donation. The risks of cancer transmission must be balanced against the risks of death awaiting a new graft and strict adherence to current guidelines may result increased patient death. Organs from selected patients, even with high-grade central nervous system (CNS) malignancy and after a shunt, can, in some circumstances, be considered. Of potential donors with non-CNS cancers, whether organs may be safely used again depends on the nature of the cancer, the treatment and interval. Data are scarce about the most appropriate treatment when donor transmitted cancer is diagnosed: sometimes substitution of agents and reduction of the immunosuppressive load may be adequate and the impact of graft removal should be considered but not always indicated. Liver allograft recipients are at increased risk of some de novo cancers, especially those grafted for alcohol-related liver disease and hepatitis C virus infection. The risk of lymphoproliferative disease and cancers of the skin, upper airway and bowel are increased but not breast. Recipients should be advised to avoid risk behavior and monitored appropriately. PMID:24876738

  1. Lessons Learned From a Case of Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Chong-Cheng; Wen, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Wei-Han; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xin-Zu; Guo, Dong-Jiao; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nowadays, de novo malignancies have become an important cause of death after transplantation. According to the accumulation of cases with liver transplantation, the incidence of de novo gastric cancer is anticipated to increase among liver transplant recipients in the near future, especially in some East Asian countries where both liver diseases requiring liver transplantation and gastric cancer are major burdens. Unfortunately, there is limited information regarding the relationship between de novo gastric cancer and liver transplantation. Herein, we report a case of stage IIIc gastric cancer after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma, who was successfully treated by radical distal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy but died 15 months later due to tumor progression. Furthermore, we extract some lessons to learn from the case and review the literatures. The incidence of de novo gastric cancer following liver transplantations is increasing and higher than the general population. Doctors should be vigilant in early detection and control the risk factors causing de novo gastric cancer after liver transplantation. Curative gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is still the mainstay of treatment for such patients. Preoperative assessments, strict postoperative monitoring, and managements are mandatory. Limited chemotherapy could be given to the patients with high risk of recurrence. Close surveillance, early detection, and treatment of posttransplant cancers are extremely important and essential to improve the survival. PMID:26886605

  2. Cholecystectomy in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadr-Azodi, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this population-based study was to describe characteristics of patients with liver cirrhosis undergoing cholecystectomy and evaluate the risk for perioperative and postoperative complications during the 30-day postoperative period. Method. All laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy procedures registered between 2006 and 2011 in the Swedish Registry for Gallstone Surgery and ERCP (GallRiks) were included. Patients with liver cirrhosis were identified by linking data to the Swedish National Patient Registry (NPR). Results. Of 62,488 patients undergoing cholecystectomy, 77 (0.12%) had cirrhosis, of which 29 patients (37.7%) had decompensated cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis were older and had more often gallstone complications at the time for surgery. Postoperative complications were registered in 13 (16.9%) patients with liver cirrhosis and in 5,738 (9.2%) patients in the noncirrhotic group (P < 0.05). Univariable analysis showed that patients with liver cirrhosis are more likely to receive postoperative blood transfusion (OR = 4.4, CI 1.08–18.0, P < 0.05) and antibiotic treatment >1 day (OR = 2.3, CI 1.11–4.84, P < 0.05) than noncirrhotic patients. Conclusion. Patients with cirrhosis undergoing cholecystectomy have a higher incidence of postoperative complications than patients without cirrhosis. However, cholecystectomy is safe and if presented with adequate indication, surgery should not be delayed due to fears of surgical complications. PMID:26788053

  3. Imaging and IGRT in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Kristy K.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging for radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery is a critical component of the radiation planning process for liver cancer. Due to the lack of inherent contrast between liver tumors and the surrounding liver, intravenous contrast is required for accurate target delineation on the planning CT. The appropriate phase of contrast is tumor specific, with arterial phase imaging usually used to define hepatocellular carcinoma, and venous phase imaging for vascular thrombosis related to hepatocellular carcinoma and most types of liver metastases. Breathing motion and changes in the liver position day-to-day may be substantial and need to be considered at the time of radiation planning and treatment. Many types of integrated imaging-radiation treatment systems and image guidance strategies are available to produce volumetric and/or planar imaging at the time of treatment delivery to reduce the negative impact of geometric changes that may occur. Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) can improve the precision of radiation therapy, so that the prescribed doses are more likely to represent those actually delivered. PMID:21939853

  4. Extracorporeal Liver Support and Liver Transplant for Patients with Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Chen, Harvey Shi-Hsien; Nyberg, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Recognition of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) as a unique entity is slowly evolving, as are therapies to improve survival of affected patients. Further investigation into its disease process and proper treatments with critical timing are important for improving patient survival. At this time, liver transplant is the only treatment known to improve survival in liver-failure patients. However, liver transplantation has its own disadvantages, such as organ shortage and the need for lifelong immunotherapy. Bridging therapies such as extracorporeal liver-support systems are attractive options to stabilize patients until transplantation or spontaneous recovery. The goals of these liver-support systems are to remove detoxification products, reduce systemic inflammation, and enhance regeneration of the injured liver. These devices have been under development for the past decade; a few are in clinical trials. At this time, there is no proven clearcut survival benefit in these devices, but they may improve the outcome of challenging cases and potentially avoid or postpone liver transplantation in some cases. PMID:27172357

  5. Radionuclide liver cancer therapies: from concept to current clinical status.

    PubMed

    Vente, Maarten A D; Hobbelink, Monique G G; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Nijsen, Johannes F W

    2007-07-01

    Primary and secondary liver cancer have longtime been characterized by an overall poor prognosis since the majority of patients are not candidates for surgical resection with curative intent, systemic chemotherapy alone has rarely resulted in long-term survival, and the role of conventional external beam radiation therapy has traditionally been limited due to the relative sensitivity of the liver parenchyma to radiation. Therefore, a host of new treatment options have been developed and clinically introduced, including radioembolization techniques, which are the main topic of this paper. In these locoregional treatments liver malignancies are passively targeted because, unlike the normal liver, the blood supply of intrahepatic tumors is almost uniquely derived from the hepatic artery. These internal radiation techniques consist of injecting either yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres, or iodine-131 ((131)I) or rhenium-188 ((188)Re) labeled lipiodol into the hepatic artery. Radioactive lipiodol is used exclusively for treatment of primary liver cancer, whereas (90)Y microsphere therapy is applied for treatment of both primary and metastatic liver cancers. Favorable clinical results have been achieved, particularly when (90)Y microspheres were used in conjunction with systemic chemotherapy. The main advantages of radiolabeled lipiodol treatment are that it is relatively inexpensive (especially (188)Re-HDD-lipiodol) and that the administration procedure is somewhat less complex than that of the microspheres. Holmium-166 ((166)Ho) loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres have also been developed and are about to be clinically introduced. Since (166)Ho is a combined beta-gamma emitter and highly paramagnetic as well, it allows for both (quantitative) scintigraphic and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:17630919

  6. Activins and follistatins: Emerging roles in liver physiology and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreidl, Emanuel; Öztürk, Deniz; Metzner, Thomas; Berger, Walter; Grusch, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Activins are secreted proteins belonging to the TGF-β family of signaling molecules. Activin signals are crucial for differentiation and regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in multiple tissues. Signal transduction by activins relies mainly on the Smad pathway, although the importance of crosstalk with additional pathways is increasingly being recognized. Activin signals are kept in balance by antagonists at multiple levels of the signaling cascade. Among these, follistatin and FLRG, two members of the emerging family of follistatin-like proteins, can bind secreted activins with high affinity, thereby blocking their access to cell surface-anchored activin receptors. In the liver, activin A is a major negative regulator of hepatocyte proliferation and can induce apoptosis. The functions of other activins expressed by hepatocytes have yet to be more clearly defined. Deregulated expression of activins and follistatin has been implicated in hepatic diseases including inflammation, fibrosis, liver failure and primary cancer. In particular, increased follistatin levels have been found in the circulation and in the tumor tissue of patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma as well as in animal models of liver cancer. It has been argued that up-regulation of follistatin protects neoplastic hepatocytes from activin-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis. The use of follistatin as biomarker for liver tumor development is impeded, however, due to the presence of elevated follistatin levels already during preceding stages of liver disease. The current article summarizes our evolving understanding of the multi-faceted activities of activins and follistatins in liver physiology and cancer. PMID:21160961

  7. Early Dose Response to Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatment of Metastatic Liver Cancer by a Patient-Specific Method Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Janice M. Wong, C. Oliver; Muzik, Otto; Marples, Brian; Joiner, Michael; Burmeister, Jay

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based method of dose calculation for treatment planning of yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen consecutive {sup 90}Y SIRTs for colorectal liver metastasis were retrospectively analyzed. Absorbed dose to tumor and normal liver tissue was calculated by partition methods with two different tumor/normal liver vascularity ratios: an average 3:1 and a patient-specific ratio derived from pretreatment technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT. Tumor response was quantitatively evaluated from fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans. Results: Positron emission tomography showed a significant decrease in total tumor standardized uptake value (average, 52%). There was a significant difference in the tumor absorbed dose between the average and specific methods (p = 0.009). Response vs. dose curves fit by linear and linear-quadratic modeling showed similar results. Linear fit r values increased for all tumor response parameters with the specific method (+0.20 for mean standardized uptake value). Conclusion: Tumor dose calculated with the patient-specific method was more predictive of response in liver-directed {sup 90}Y SIRT.

  8. Current treatment options for patients with initially unresectable isolated colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Kanat, Ozkan

    2016-02-10

    The development of liver metastases is a common clinical entity in the clinical course of colorectal cancer. For patients with isolated liver involvement, surgical resection is the only treatment that can provide a chance of prolonged survival and cure. However, most of these patients are not initially eligible for the surgery. Selected patients with initially considered to have unresectable disease may become resectable after systemic (chemotherapy ± biological therapy) and loco-regional treatment modalities including hepatic arterial infusion. Patients who have colorectal liver metastases ideally should be referred to a multidisciplinary cancer care team in order to identify the most optimal management approach. PMID:26862487

  9. Current treatment options for patients with initially unresectable isolated colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kanat, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    The development of liver metastases is a common clinical entity in the clinical course of colorectal cancer. For patients with isolated liver involvement, surgical resection is the only treatment that can provide a chance of prolonged survival and cure. However, most of these patients are not initially eligible for the surgery. Selected patients with initially considered to have unresectable disease may become resectable after systemic (chemotherapy ± biological therapy) and loco-regional treatment modalities including hepatic arterial infusion. Patients who have colorectal liver metastases ideally should be referred to a multidisciplinary cancer care team in order to identify the most optimal management approach. PMID:26862487

  10. Liver cancer oncogenomics: opportunities and dilemmas for clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary liver cancers are among the most rapidly evolving malignant tumors worldwide. An underlying chronic inflammatory liver disease, which precedes liver cancer development for several decades and frequently creates a pro-oncogenic microenvironment, impairs progress in therapeutic approaches. Molecular heterogeneity of liver cancer is potentiated by a crosstalk between epithelial tumor and stromal cells that complicate translational efforts to unravel molecular mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis with a drugable intend. Next-generation sequencing has greatly advanced our understanding of cancer development. With regards to liver cancer, the unprecedented coverage of next-generation sequencing has created a detailed map of genetic alterations and identified key somatic changes such as CTNNB1 and TP53 as well as several previously unrecognized recurrent disease-causing alterations that could contribute to new therapeutic approaches. Importantly, these investigations indicate that a classical oncogene addiction cannot be assumed for primary liver cancer. Therefore, hepatocarcinogenesis can be considered a paradigm suitable for individualized medicine. PMID:26257864

  11. [Tertiary syphilis of the pancreas and liver in 82-year-old patient: case study].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T L; Tiul'tiaeva, L A; Lipatova, T E; Bakulev, A L; Alipova, L N; Apanasevich, A V; Bezrodnaia, L A; Borisova, E A

    2013-01-01

    It has been described a clinical case of late diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver of elderly patients. Two years before that it was wrongly diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas with liver metastases, and the patient was operated on with the imposition of cholecystostomy. It was conducted appropriate therapy and reconstructive surgery after verification of the diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver. PMID:24772875

  12. Cancer Incidence among Heart, Kidney, and Liver Transplant Recipients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwai-Fong; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Ke, Hung-Yen; Lin, Yi-Chang; Lin, Feng-Yen; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Population-based evidence of the relative risk of cancer among heart, kidney, and liver transplant recipients from Asia is lacking. The Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a population-based cohort study of transplant recipients (n = 5396), comprising 801 heart, 2847 kidney, and 1748 liver transplant recipients between 2001 and 2012. Standardized incidence ratios and Cox regression models were used. Compared with the general population, the risk of cancer increased 3.8-fold after heart transplantation, 4.1-fold after kidney transplantation and 4.6-fold after liver transplantation. Cancer occurrence showed considerable variation according to transplanted organs. The most common cancers in all transplant patients were cancers of the head and neck, liver, bladder, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Male recipients had an increased risk of cancers of the head and neck and liver, and female kidney recipients had a significant risk of bladder and kidney cancer. The adjusted hazard ratio for any cancer in all recipients was higher in liver transplant recipients compared with that in heart transplant recipients (hazard ratio = 1.5, P = .04). Cancer occurrence varied considerably and posttransplant cancer screening should be performed routinely according to transplanted organ and sex. PMID:27196400

  13. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  14. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  15. Parenchymal-sparing liver surgery in patients with colorectal carcinoma liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando A; Sanchez Claria, Rodrigo; Oggero, Sebastian; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2016-06-27

    Liver resection is the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM). However, major resections are often required to achieve R0 resection, which are associated with substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Maximizing the amount of residual liver gained increasing significance in modern liver surgery due to the high incidence of chemotherapy-associated parenchymal injury. This fact, along with the progressive expansion of resectability criteria, has led to the development of a surgical philosophy known as "parenchymal-sparing liver surgery" (PSLS). This philosophy includes a variety of resection strategies, either performed alone or in combination with ablative therapies. A profound knowledge of liver anatomy and expert intraoperative ultrasound skills are required to perform PSLS appropriately and safely. There is a clear trend toward PSLS in hepatobiliary centers worldwide as current evidence indicates that tumor biology is the most important predictor of intrahepatic recurrence and survival, rather than the extent of a negative resection margin. Tumor removal avoiding the unnecessary sacrifice of functional parenchyma has been associated with less surgical stress, fewer postoperative complications, uncompromised cancer-related outcomes and higher feasibility of future resections. The increasing evidence supporting PSLS prompts its consideration as the gold-standard surgical approach for CLM. PMID:27358673

  16. Parenchymal-sparing liver surgery in patients with colorectal carcinoma liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Fernando A; Sanchez Claria, Rodrigo; Oggero, Sebastian; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Liver resection is the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM). However, major resections are often required to achieve R0 resection, which are associated with substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Maximizing the amount of residual liver gained increasing significance in modern liver surgery due to the high incidence of chemotherapy-associated parenchymal injury. This fact, along with the progressive expansion of resectability criteria, has led to the development of a surgical philosophy known as “parenchymal-sparing liver surgery” (PSLS). This philosophy includes a variety of resection strategies, either performed alone or in combination with ablative therapies. A profound knowledge of liver anatomy and expert intraoperative ultrasound skills are required to perform PSLS appropriately and safely. There is a clear trend toward PSLS in hepatobiliary centers worldwide as current evidence indicates that tumor biology is the most important predictor of intrahepatic recurrence and survival, rather than the extent of a negative resection margin. Tumor removal avoiding the unnecessary sacrifice of functional parenchyma has been associated with less surgical stress, fewer postoperative complications, uncompromised cancer-related outcomes and higher feasibility of future resections. The increasing evidence supporting PSLS prompts its consideration as the gold-standard surgical approach for CLM. PMID:27358673

  17. Liver cancer in Wisconsin: The potential for prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkin, I.R.; Remington, P.L.; Moss, M.; Anderson, H. )

    1990-02-01

    In this study liver cancer deaths that could be attributed to certain risk factors were calculated. Applying population attributable risk methodology, the attributable risk of liver cancer was estimated for alcohol use, hepatitis B viral exposure, and occupational and industrial exposures. We found that these three risk factors accounted for 38% of liver cancer mortality in Wisconsin; 29% was attributable to alcohol consumption, 7% to occupational exposures, and 2% to hepatitis B viral infection. More than half of liver cancer mortality, however, was not accounted for by the three risk factors studied.

  18. Surgery in a Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Nagral, Sanjay; Nagral, Aabha

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is often needed in patients with concurrent liver disease. The multiple physiological roles of the liver places these patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Diseases necessitating surgery like gallstones and hernia are more common in patients with cirrhosis. Assessment of severity of liver dysfunction before surgery is important and the risk benefit of the procedure needs to be carefully assessed. The disease severity may vary from mild transaminase rise to decompensated cirrhosis. Surgery should be avoided if possible in the emergency setting, in the setting of acute and alcoholic hepatitis, in a patient of cirrhosis who is child class C or has a MELD score more than 15 or any patient with significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction. In this subset of patients, all possible means to manage these patients conservatively should be attempted. Modified Child–Pugh scores and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores can predict mortality after surgery fairly reliably including nonhepatic abdominal surgery. Pre-operative optimization would include control of ascites, correction of electrolyte imbalance, improving renal dysfunction, cardiorespiratory assessment, and correction of coagulation. Tests of global hemostasis like thromboelastography and thrombin generation time may be more predictive of the risk of bleeding compared with the conventional tests of coagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Correction of international normalized ratio with fresh frozen plasma does not necessarily mean reduction of bleeding risk and may increase the risk of volume overload and lung injury. International normalized ratio liver may better reflect the coagulation status. Recombinant factor VIIa in patients with cirrhosis needing surgery needs further study. Intra-operatively, safe anesthetic agents like isoflurane and propofol with avoidance of hypotension are advised. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) and benzodiazepines should

  19. [Liver abscess formation after treatment of liver cancer by arterial injection using adriamycin/mitomycin C oil suspension (ADMOS)].

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Hori, A; Satake, M; Kanetsuki, I; Ueno, K; Nishida, H; Ikeda, K; Kobayashi, H; Nakajo, M

    1992-02-25

    Of 210 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 135), metastatic liver cancer (n = 71) and cholangiocarcinoma (n = 4) who underwent intra-arterial infusion of adriamycin and/or mitomycin C oil suspension (ADMOS) and cisplatin, and both regimens, pyogenic liver abscess occurred in seven (3.3%). The percentages of abscess formation in the respective types of liver cancer were 0.8, 7.0 and 25%. These differences among the three types of liver cancer were attributed to the volume of the tumor vascular beds to be embolized, which might determine the relative amount or regional Lipiodol retention in the tumor and normal liver tissue. Four of seven patients with hepatic abscess had received the intra-arterial infusion of ADMOS, and their angiographic findings showed sequential decreases in the vascular beds of the tumor in comparison with those of previous infusion procedures; all had hypovascular liver tumors angiographically. We have never experienced this complication in other treatments such as embolization of the hepatic arteries and intra-arterial infusion of water-soluble anticancer drugs alone. These results suggest that the most important factor leading to abscess formation is the ischemic destruction of the intrahepatic ducts secondary to occlusion of the peribiliary arterial plexus by Lipiodol and/or the direct effects of anticancer drugs on these vessels. To avoid this complication, the volume of Lipiodol used for intraarterial infusion therapy should be carefully determined, especially when the patient has hypovascular tumors of the liver and a history of multiple previous intraarterial infusion procedures of anticancer drug. The use of ADMOS should be avoided in patients with hypovascular tumors of the liver such as secondary deposits and cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:1313961

  20. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  1. Extra vascular interventional treatment of liver cancer, present and future.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenjing; Zhu, Xiaolin

    2015-10-01

    Interventional therapy for liver cancer is a new type of treatment, and its progress has been influenced by the development of the large scale imaging instrument and various therapeutic apparatus. This article, from these two aspects, discusses the status and progress of interventional treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26632542

  2. LiverCancerMarkerRIF: a liver cancer biomarker interactive curation system combining text mining and expert annotations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Wu, Johnny Chi-Yang; Lin, Wei-San; Reyes, Aaron James F.; dela Rosa, Mira Anne C.; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are biomolecules in the human body that can indicate disease states and abnormal biological processes. Biomarkers are often used during clinical trials to identify patients with cancers. Although biomedical research related to biomarkers has increased over the years and substantial effort has been expended to obtain results in these studies, the specific results obtained often contain ambiguities, and the results might contradict each other. Therefore, the information gathered from these studies must be appropriately integrated and organized to facilitate experimentation on biomarkers. In this study, we used liver cancer as the target and developed a text-mining–based curation system named LiverCancerMarkerRIF, which allows users to retrieve biomarker-related narrations and curators to curate supporting evidence on liver cancer biomarkers directly while browsing PubMed. In contrast to most of the other curation tools that require curators to navigate away from PubMed and accommodate distinct user interfaces or Web sites to complete the curation process, our system provides a user-friendly method for accessing text-mining–aided information and a concise interface to assist curators while they remain at the PubMed Web site. Biomedical text-mining techniques are applied to automatically recognize biomedical concepts such as genes, microRNA, diseases and investigative technologies, which can be used to evaluate the potential of a certain gene as a biomarker. Through the participation in the BioCreative IV user-interactive task, we examined the feasibility of using this novel type of augmented browsing-based curation method, and collaborated with curators to curate biomarker evidential sentences related to liver cancer. The positive feedback received from curators indicates that the proposed method can be effectively used for curation. A publicly available online database containing all the aforementioned information has been constructed at http

  3. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  4. Survival probability in patients with liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Buci, Skender; Kukeli, Agim

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the survival probability among patients with liver trauma injury using the anatomical and psychological scores of conditions, characteristics and treatment modes. Design/methodology/approach - A logistic model is used to estimate 173 patients' survival probability. Data are taken from patient records. Only emergency room patients admitted to University Hospital of Trauma (former Military Hospital) in Tirana are included. Data are recorded anonymously, preserving the patients' privacy. Findings - When correctly predicted, the logistic models show that survival probability varies from 70.5 percent up to 95.4 percent. The degree of trauma injury, trauma with liver and other organs, total days the patient was hospitalized, and treatment method (conservative vs intervention) are statistically important in explaining survival probability. Practical implications - The study gives patients, their relatives and physicians ample and sound information they can use to predict survival chances, the best treatment and resource management. Originality/value - This study, which has not been done previously, explores survival probability, success probability for conservative and non-conservative treatment, and success probability for single vs multiple injuries from liver trauma. PMID:27477933

  5. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  6. Care of the liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Al-Busafi, Said A; Deschênes, Marc; Ghali, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an approach to the care of liver transplant (LT) patients, a growing patient population with unique needs. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed for guidelines and review articles using the keywords “liver transplantation”, “long term complications” and “medical management” was conducted, resulting in 77 articles. RESULTS: As a result of being on immunosuppression, LT recipients are at increased risk of infections and must be screened regularly for metabolic complications and malignancies. DISCUSSION: Although immunosuppression is key to maintaining allograft health after transplantation, it comes with its own set of medical issues to follow. Physicians following LT recipients must be aware of the greater risk for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, renal failure, metabolic bone disease and malignancies in these patients, all of whom require regular monitoring and screening. Vaccination, quality of life, sexual function and pregnancy must be specifically addressed in transplant patients. PMID:24729996

  7. Aggressive surgical resection for concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Jin Hong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Aggressive surgical resection for hepatic metastasis is validated, however, concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer patients is equivocal. Methods Clinicopathologic data from January 2008 through December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed in 234 patients with colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis. Clinicopathologic factors and survival data were analyzed. Results Of the 234 patients, 129 (55.1%) had synchronous concomitant liver and lung metastasis from colorectal cancer and 36 (15.4%) had metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection was performed in 33 patients (25.6%) with synchronous and 6 (16.7%) with metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection showed better overall survival in both groups (synchronous, p=0.001; metachronous, p=0.028). In the synchronous metastatic group, complete resection of both liver and lung metastatic lesions had better survival outcomes than incomplete resection of two metastatic lesions (p=0.037). The primary site of colorectal cancer and complete resection were significant prognostic factors (p=0.06 and p=0.003, respectively). Conclusions Surgical resection for hepatic and pulmonary metastasis in colorectal cancer can improve complete remission and survival rate in resectable cases. Colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis is not a poor prognostic factor or a contraindication for surgical treatments, hence, an aggressive surgical approach may be recommended in well-selected resectable cases. PMID:27621747

  8. PKLR promotes colorectal cancer liver colonization through induction of glutathione synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Alexander; Loo, Jia Min; Mital, Rohit; Weinberg, Ethan M; Man, Fung Ying; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Paty, Philip B; Saltz, Leonard; Janjigian, Yelena Y; de Stanchina, Elisa; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver is a major cause of cancer-related death; however, the genes and pathways that govern this metastatic colonization event remain poorly characterized. Here, using a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen, we identified liver and red blood cell pyruvate kinase (PKLR) as a driver of metastatic liver colonization. PKLR expression was increased in liver metastases as well as in primary colorectal tumors of patients with metastatic disease. Evaluation of a murine liver colonization model revealed that PKLR promotes cell survival in the tumor core during conditions of high cell density and oxygen deprivation by increasing glutathione, the primary endogenous antioxidant. PKLR negatively regulated the glycolytic activity of PKM2, the major pyruvate kinase isoenzyme known to regulate cellular glutathione levels. Glutathione is critical for metastasis, and we determined that the rate-limiting enzyme of glutathione synthesis, GCLC, becomes overexpressed in patient liver metastases, promotes cell survival under hypoxic and cell-dense conditions, and mediates metastatic liver colonization. RNAi-mediated inhibition of glutathione synthesis impaired survival of multiple colon cancer cell lines, and pharmacological targeting of this metabolic pathway reduced colonization in a primary patient-derived xenograft model. Our findings highlight the impact of metabolic reprogramming within the niche as metastases progress and suggest clinical potential for targeting this pathway in colorectal cancer. PMID:26784545

  9. PKLR promotes colorectal cancer liver colonization through induction of glutathione synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander; Loo, Jia Min; Mital, Rohit; Weinberg, Ethan M.; Man, Fung Ying; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Paty, Philip B.; Saltz, Leonard; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver is a major cause of cancer-related death; however, the genes and pathways that govern this metastatic colonization event remain poorly characterized. Here, using a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen, we identified liver and red blood cell pyruvate kinase (PKLR) as a driver of metastatic liver colonization. PKLR expression was increased in liver metastases as well as in primary colorectal tumors of patients with metastatic disease. Evaluation of a murine liver colonization model revealed that PKLR promotes cell survival in the tumor core during conditions of high cell density and oxygen deprivation by increasing glutathione, the primary endogenous antioxidant. PKLR negatively regulated the glycolytic activity of PKM2, the major pyruvate kinase isoenzyme known to regulate cellular glutathione levels. Glutathione is critical for metastasis, and we determined that the rate-limiting enzyme of glutathione synthesis, GCLC, becomes overexpressed in patient liver metastases, promotes cell survival under hypoxic and cell-dense conditions, and mediates metastatic liver colonization. RNAi-mediated inhibition of glutathione synthesis impaired survival of multiple colon cancer cell lines, and pharmacological targeting of this metabolic pathway reduced colonization in a primary patient-derived xenograft model. Our findings highlight the impact of metabolic reprogramming within the niche as metastases progress and suggest clinical potential for targeting this pathway in colorectal cancer. PMID:26784545

  10. Evidence-based medical oncology and interventional radiology paradigms for liver-dominant colorectal cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Mandel, Nil Molinas

    2016-03-21

    Colorectal cancer metastasizes predictably, with liver predominance in most cases. Because liver involvement has been shown to be a major determinant of survival in this population, liver-directed therapies are increasingly considered even in cases where there is (limited) extrahepatic disease. Unfortunately, these patients carry a known risk of recurrence in the liver regardless of initial therapy choice. Therefore, there is a demand for minimally invasive, non-surgical, personalized cancer treatments to preserve quality of life in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of cancer therapy. This report aims to review evidence-based conceptual, pharmacological, and technological paradigm shifts in parenteral and percutaneous treatment strategies as well as forthcoming evidence regarding next-generation systemic, locoregional, and local treatment approaches for this patient population. PMID:27003990

  11. Evidence-based medical oncology and interventional radiology paradigms for liver-dominant colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Alan Alper; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Mandel, Nil Molinas

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasizes predictably, with liver predominance in most cases. Because liver involvement has been shown to be a major determinant of survival in this population, liver-directed therapies are increasingly considered even in cases where there is (limited) extrahepatic disease. Unfortunately, these patients carry a known risk of recurrence in the liver regardless of initial therapy choice. Therefore, there is a demand for minimally invasive, non-surgical, personalized cancer treatments to preserve quality of life in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of cancer therapy. This report aims to review evidence-based conceptual, pharmacological, and technological paradigm shifts in parenteral and percutaneous treatment strategies as well as forthcoming evidence regarding next-generation systemic, locoregional, and local treatment approaches for this patient population. PMID:27003990

  12. Combination of internal radiation therapy and hyperthermia to treat liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, E.D.; McLaren, J.; Auda, S.P.; McGinley, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    Sixteen patients were treated for liver cancer (primary and metastatic) by a combination of internal radiation therapy with intra-arterial yttrium 90 microspheres and regional hyperthermia with electromagnetic radiation. Four patients have their liver disease apparently controlled; two had a partial regression of more than 50%; and two had a partial regression of less than 50%. The complications consisted of one case of radiation hepatitis and one of peptic ulcer.

  13. Reproducibility of liver position using active breathing coordinator for liver cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia; Brock, Kristy K.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Hawkins, Maria; Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To measure the intrabreath-hold liver motion and the intrafraction and interfraction reproducibility of liver position relative to vertebral bodies using an active breathing coordinator (ABC) in patients with unresectable liver cancer treated with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Tolerability of ABC and organ motion during ABC was assessed using kV fluoroscopy in 34 patients. For patients treated with ABC, repeat breath-hold CT scans in the ABC breath-hold position were acquired at simulation to estimate the volumetric intrafraction reproducibility of the liver relative to the vertebral bodies. In addition, preceding each radiation therapy fraction, with the liver immobilized using ABC, repeat anteroposterior (AP) megavoltage verification images were obtained. Off-line alignments were completed to determine intrafraction reproducibility (from repeat images obtained before one treatment) and interfraction reproducibility (from comparisons of the final image for each fraction with the AP) of diaphragm position relative to vertebral bodies. For each image set, the vertebral bodies were aligned, and the resultant craniocaudal (CC) offset in diaphragm position was measured. Liver position during ABC was also evaluated from kV fluoroscopy acquired at the time of simulation, kV fluoroscopy at the time of treatment, and from MV beam's-eye view movie loops acquired during treatment. Results: Twenty-one of 34 patients were screened to be suitable for ABC. The average free breathing range of these patients was 13 mm (range, 5-1 mm). Fluoroscopy revealed that the average maximal diaphragm motion during ABC breath-hold was 1.4 mm (range, 0-3.4 mm). The MV treatment movie loops confirmed diaphragm stability during treatment. For a measure of intrafraction reproducibility, an analysis of 36 repeat ABC computed tomography (CT) scans in 14 patients was conducted. The average mean difference in the liver surface position was -0.9 mm, -0

  14. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  15. Perioperative monitoring in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  16. Liver steatosis in hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    González-Reimers, Emilio; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; Rodríguez-Gaspar, Melchor; Alemán-Valls, Remedios; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    There is controversy regarding some aspects of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-associated liver steatosis, and their relationship with body fat stores. It has classically been found that HCV, especially genotype 3, exerts direct metabolic effects which lead to liver steatosis. This supports the existence of a so called viral steatosis and a metabolic steatosis, which would affect HCV patients who are also obese or diabetics. In fact, several genotypes exert metabolic effects which overlap with some of those observed in the metabolic syndrome. In this review we will analyse the pathogenic pathways involved in the development of steatosis in HCV patients. Several cytokines and adipokines also become activated and are involved in “pure” steatosic effects, in addition to inflammation. They are probably responsible for the evolution of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, making it difficult to explain why such alterations only affect a proportion of steatosic patients. PMID:26052379

  17. Liver-directed therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern in the United States (US) with over 140,000 new cases diagnosed in 2012. The most common site for CRC metastases is the liver. Hepatic resection is the treatment of choice for colorectal liver metastases (CLM), with a 5-year survival rate ranging from 35% to 58%. Unfortunately, only about 20% of patients are eligible for resection. There are a number of options for extending resection to more advanced patients including systemic chemotherapy, portal vein embolization (PVE), two stage hepatectomy, ablation and hepatic artery infusion (HAI). There are few phase III trials comparing these treatment modalities, and choosing the right treatment is patient dependent. Treating hepatic metastases requires a multidisciplinary approach and knowledge of all treatment options as there continues to be advances in management of CLM. If a patient can undergo a treatment modality in order to increase their potential for future resection this should be the primary goal. If the patient is still deemed unresectable then treatments that lengthen disease-free and overall-survival should be pursued. These include chemotherapy, ablation, HAI, chemoembolization, radioembolization (RE) and stereotactic radiotherapy. PMID:25276410

  18. Radioembolization in the treatment of unresectable liver tumors: experience across a range of primary cancers.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, Douglas; Sangro, Bruno; Salem, Riad; Wasan, Harpreet; Kennedy, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Radioembolization is a proven treatment to slow disease progression and improve survival in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulating evidence supports its use in metastases from neuroendocrine tumors and breast cancer. Cancers with radiobiologic profiles similar to those of colorectal and breast cancer, including melanoma, lung cancer, and nodular cholangiocarcinoma, are being studied as candidates for radioembolization. This treatment modality has also been shown to downsize hepatic tumors for potentially curative ablation in patients with breast, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer. Radioembolization using either yttrium-90 ((90)Y)-labeled resin or glass microspheres represents a promising therapy for liver-only or liver-predominant tumors in patients with 1 or more variables, including adequate or sufficient functional liver reserve, good performance status, and absence of other significant comorbidities. Therapeutic efficacy and safety can be best achieved by use of careful dosimetric techniques and treatment planning. Radioembolization could be considered after progression of liver metastases during treatment hiatus, at an early therapeutic line in tumors that respond poorly to chemotherapy, or in treatment-refractory disease. PMID:21127414

  19. FOXFIRE protocol: an open-label, randomised, phase III trial of 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and folinic acid (OxMdG) with or without interventional Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as first-line treatment for patients with unresectable liver-only or liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in Europe and a leading cause of cancer-related death. Almost 50% of patients with CRC develop liver metastases, which heralds a poor prognosis unless metastases can be downsized to surgical resection or ablation. The FOXFIRE trial examines the hypothesis that combining radiosensitising chemotherapy (OxMdG: oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folic acid) with Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT or radioembolisation) using yttrium-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres®; Sirtex Medical Limited, North Sydney, Australia) as a first-line treatment for liver-dominant metastatic CRC will improve clinical outcomes when compared to OxMdG chemotherapy alone. Methods/Design FOXFIRE is an open-label, multicentre, randomised controlled trial of OxMdG with or without the addition of SIRT (1:1 randomisation). Eligible adult patients have histologically confirmed colorectal adenocarcinoma, liver metastases measurable on computed tomography scan and untreatable by either surgical resection or local ablation, and they may have limited extra-hepatic disease, defined as ≤5 nodules in the lung and/or one other metastatic site which is amenable to future definitive treatment. Eligible patients may have received adjuvant chemotherapy following resection of the primary tumour, but are not permitted to have previously received chemotherapy for metastatic disease, and must have a life expectancy of ≥3 months and a WHO performance status of 0–1. The primary outcome is overall survival. Secondary outcomes include progression free survival (PFS), liver-specific PFS, patient-reported outcomes, safety, response rate, resection rate and cost-effectiveness. FOXFIRE shares a combined statistical analysis plan with an international sister trial called SIRFLOX. Discussion This trial is establishing a network of SIRT centres and ‘feeder’ chemotherapy-only centres to standardise the delivery of SIRT across the whole of

  20. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  1. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  2. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  3. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  4. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  5. Lyn modulates Claudin-2 expression and is a therapeutic target for breast cancer liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Hsu, Brian E.; Tam, Christine E.; Savage, Paul; Park, Morag; Siegel, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Claudin-2 enhances breast cancer liver metastasis and promotes the development of colorectal cancers. The objective of our current study is to define the regulatory mechanisms controlling Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We evaluated the effect of several Src Family Kinase (SFK) inhibitors or knockdown of individual SFK members on Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. We also assessed the potential effects of pan-SFK and SFK-selective inhibitors on the formation of breast cancer liver metastases. This study reveals that pan inhibition of SFK signaling pathways significantly elevated Claudin-2 expression levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, our data demonstrate that pan-SFK inhibitors can enhance breast cancer metastasis to the liver. Knockdown of individual SFK members reveals that loss of Yes or Fyn induces Claudin-2 expression; whereas, diminished Lyn levels impairs Claudin-2 expression in breast cancer cells. The Lyn-selective kinase inhibitor, Bafetinib (INNO-406), acts to reduce Claudin-2 expression and suppress breast cancer liver metastasis. Our findings may have major clinical implications and advise against the treatment of breast cancer patients with broad-acting SFK inhibitors and support the use of Lyn-specific inhibitors. PMID:25823815

  6. Stabilization of LKB1 and Akt by neddylation regulates energy metabolism in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Delgado, Teresa C.; García-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Zubiete-Franco, Imanol; Fernández-Ramos, David; Buqué, Xabier; Cano, Ainara; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Fernández-Domínguez, Itziar; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Fernández-Tussy, Pablo; Boix, Loreto; Bruix, Jordi; Villa, Erica; Castro, Azucena; Lu, Shelly C.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Xirodimas, Dimitris; Varela-Rey, Marta; Mato, José M.; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, María L.

    2015-01-01

    The current view of cancer progression highlights that cancer cells must undergo through a post-translational regulation and metabolic reprogramming to progress in an unfriendly environment. In here, the importance of neddylation modification in liver cancer was investigated. We found that hepatic neddylation was specifically enriched in liver cancer patients with bad prognosis. In addition, the treatment with the neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 in Phb1-KO mice, an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma showing elevated neddylation, reverted the malignant phenotype. Tumor cell death in vivo translating into liver tumor regression was associated with augmented phosphatidylcholine synthesis by the PEMT pathway, known as a liver-specific tumor suppressor, and restored mitochondrial function and TCA cycle flux. Otherwise, in protumoral hepatocytes, neddylation inhibition resulted in metabolic reprogramming rendering a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation and concomitant tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, Akt and LKB1, hallmarks of proliferative metabolism, were altered in liver cancer being new targets of neddylation. Importantly, we show that neddylation-induced metabolic reprogramming and apoptosis were dependent on LKB1 and Akt stabilization. Overall, our results implicate neddylation/signaling/metabolism, partly mediated by LKB1 and Akt, in the development of liver cancer, paving the way for novel therapeutic approaches targeting neddylation in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25650664

  7. Analysis of clinical effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound on liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-Xing; Xu, Guo-Liang; Jiang, Zhen-You; Li, Jian-Jun; Luo, Guang-Yu; Shan, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of patients with liver cancer. METHODS: HIFU treatment was performed in 100 patients with liver cancer under general anesthesia and by a targeted ultrasound. Evaluation of efficacy was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, liver function tests, AFP, MRI or CT before and after the treatment. RESULTS: After HIFU treatment, clinical symptoms were relieved in 86.6%(71/82) of patients. The ascites disappeared in 6 patients. ALT (95 ± 44) U/L and AST (114 ± 58) U/L before HIFU treatment were reduced to normal in 83.3%(30/36) and 72.9%(35/48) patients, respectively, after the treatment. AFP was lowered by more than 50% in 65.3%(32/49) patients. After HIFU treatment, MRI or CT findings indicated coagulation necrosis and blood supply reduction or disappearance of tumor in the target region. CONCLUSION: HIFU can efficiently treat the patients with liver cancer. It will offer a significant noninvasive therapy for local treatment of liver tumor. PMID:15259065

  8. Water soluble fluorescence quantum dot probe labeling liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Baoxing; Yang, Xianjun; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yinsong; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Baiqi

    2013-11-01

    Water soluble quantum dots (QDs) have been prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by ultraviolet irradiation, XRD, TEM, UV-Vis absorption spectrometer and fluorescence spectrometer. Then the QD-antibody-AFP probes (QD-Ab-AFP) were synthesized by chemical process and specifically labeled AFP antigen in PLC/PRF/5 liver cancer cells. The results showed that the QDs were cubic structure and had excellent optical properties. Moreover, the QD-Ab-AFP with good stability could specifically label liver cancer cells. This work provides strong foundation for further studying and developing new approach to detect liver cancer at early stage. PMID:23888351

  9. Cancer of the Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 39,230 % of All New Cancer Cases 2.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 27,170 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 54,954 people living with liver and intrahepatic ...

  10. Expression of serum sCD163 in patients with liver diseases and inflammatory disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Ye; Yang, Ying; Wu, Shan Shan; Zhu, Hai Hong; Liu, Yan Ning; Liu, Wei Xia; Hu, Ying; Wu, Wei; Xia, Cai Xia; Chen, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic values of soluble cluster of differentiation 163 (sCD163) in patients with liver failure or various inflammations. Methods: Serum samples were collected from patients admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University from October 2013 to January 2015 for treatment of with liver diseases, including liver failure (n=38), hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cancer (HBsAg positive) (n=40), HBV-induced hepatic cirrhosis (HBsAg positive) (n=40), chronic hepatitis B (n=38), HBV carrier (n=40), fatty liver patients without HBV infection (n=40), chronic glomerulonephritis (n=38), community acquired pneumonia (n=38) and acute pancreatitis (n=38). The CD163/sCD163 was determined using commercial ELISA kits according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results: Significant decrease was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with fatty liver and HBV carrier compared with that of patients with chronic hepatitis B (P < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls, the level of sCD163 was remarkably increased in the other groups (P < 0.05). The serum sCD163 in patients with HBV-induced liver cancer showed statistical difference compared with those of the patients with fatty liver, HBV carrier, as well as those with liver failure (P < 0.05). The expression of sCD163 was remarkably elevated in patients with liver failure compared with the patients with liver cancer, HBV-induced hepatic cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis B, fatty liver, or HBV carrier (P < 0.05). No significant difference was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with chronic hepatitis B, community acquired pneumonia, chronic glomerulonephritis, and acute pancreatitis (P > 0.05). Conclusions: sCD163 is a sensitive marker protein for liver failure. The elevation of sCD163 was closely related to the progression of the liver failure. No statistical difference was noticed in the sCD163 in patients with inflammatory disorders, indicating sCD163 showed no organ specificity. PMID

  11. Liver transplantation and subsequent risk of cancer: findings from a Canadian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Villeneuve, Paul J; Fenton, Stanley S A; Schaubel, Douglas E; Lilly, Les; Mao, Yang

    2008-11-01

    Characterization of the long-term cancer risks among liver transplant patients has been hampered by the paucity of sufficiently large cohorts. The increase over time in the number of liver transplants coupled with improved survival underscores the need to better understand associated long-term health effects. This is a cohort study whose subjects were assembled with data from the population-based Canadian Organ Replacement Registry. Analyses are based on 2034 patients who received a liver transplant between June 1983 and October 1998. Incident cases of cancer were identified through record linkage to the Canadian Cancer Registry. We compared site-specific cancer incidence rates in the cohort and the general Canadian population by using the standardized incidence ratio (SIR). Stratified analyses were performed to examine variations in risk according to age at transplantation, sex, time since transplantation, and year of transplantation. Liver transplant recipients had cancer incidence rates that were 2.5 times higher than those of the general population [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.1, 3.0]. The highest SIR was observed for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR = 20.8, 95% CI = 14.9, 28.3), whereas a statistically significant excess was observed for colorectal cancer (SIR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4, 4.4). Risks were more pronounced during the first year of follow-up and among younger transplant patients. In conclusion, our findings indicate that liver transplant patients face increased risks of developing cancer with respect to the general population. Increased surveillance in this patient population, particularly in the first year following transplantation, and screening for colorectal cancer with modalities for which benefits are already well recognized should be pursued. PMID:18975293

  12. Web site construction for information and treatment on liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Sotiris; Ponirou, Paraskevi; Bizopoulou, Zoi; Diomidous, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Liver cancer requires a considerable attention of health care scientists worldwide. A holistic treatment includes patient information about risk factors, education on pragmatic evaluation of the symptoms, as well as presentation of best and individualized treatment methods. In this direction, Internet seems to be a powerful tool that has an essential role. The aim of this study is the development of a web site in order to inform and present treatment options on liver cancer, it consists of four parts. In the first part, the presentation of the disease's knowledge base is attempted, whereas in the second part this knowledge base is organized in two conceptual entities: (a) information and (b) treatment. In the third part the importance of internet in the health care sector is highlighted. In the fourth and last part the web site is presented and a brief illustration of several relevant theories and specific implementation tools. The critical success factor of the implementation phase is considered to be the selection of the appropriate methods and development tools. Finally, the constant need for ongoing site maintenance is discussed and thus, is proposed to formulate one of the main aspects for further research, along with several issues concerning site usability. PMID:23823432

  13. Surveillance, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome of Liver Cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common type of cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. HCC is most common in Asia, but its prevalence is rapidly increasing in Western countries; consequently, HCC is a global medical issue that urgently needs to be addressed. Japan is the only developed country that has experienced both hepatitis B-related and hepatitis C-related HCC and has a long history of innovation when it comes to new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, such as computed tomography angiography, anatomical resection, ablation, and transarterial chemoembolization. Among these innovations, a nationwide surveillance program was well established by the 1980s, and such a long-term national program does not exist anywhere else in the world. Summary More than 60% of the initially detected HCCs in Japan are Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage 0 or A, which can undergo curative therapies such as resection, ablation, or transplantation. The recent 5-year survival rate of HCC patients in Japan was 43% and the median survival time was 50 months. In addition, both incidence and mortality rates are drastically declining as a result of the successful surveillance program, careful diagnostic flow, and extensive repeated treatments. Key Message Japan's successful model in the surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment of HCC should be adopted as widely as possible to improve the survival of HCC patients worldwide. PMID:26020028

  14. Utility of the dual-specificity protein kinase TTK as a therapeutic target for intrahepatic spread of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ruoyu; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Haohai; Zhou, Huandi; Sun, Xiaofeng; Csizmadia, Eva; He, Lian; Zhao, Yi; Jiang, Chengyu; Miksad, Rebecca A; Ghaziani, Tahereh; Robson, Simon C; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Therapies for primary liver cancer, the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, remain limited. Following multi-omics analysis (including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing), we were able to identify the dual-specific protein kinase TTK as a putative new prognostic biomarker for liver cancer. Herein, we show that levels of TTK protein are significantly elevated in neoplastic tissues from a cohort of liver cancer patients, when compared with adjacent hepatic tissues. We also tested the utility of TTK targeted inhibition and have demonstrated therapeutic potential in an experimental model of liver cancer in vivo. Following lentiviral shRNA knockdown in several human liver cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that TTK boosts cell growth and promotes cell spreading; as well as protects against senescence and decreases autophagy. In an experimental animal model, we show that in vitro knockdown of TTK effectively blocks intrahepatic growth of human HCC xenografts. Furthermore, we note that, in vivo silencing of TTK, by systemically delivering TTK siRNAs to already tumor-bearing liver, limits intrahepatic spread of liver cancer cells. This intervention is associated with decreased tumor aggressiveness, as well as increased senescence and autophagy. Taken together, our data suggest that targeted TTK inhibition might have clinical utility as an adjunct therapy in management of liver cancer. PMID:27618777

  15. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231. PMID:27476518

  16. Insomnia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Joseph F

    2004-01-01

    Insomnia affects up to 50% of patients with cancer, but has received little attention from the oncology community compared with other symptoms such as pain and fatigue. Insomnia and subsequent sleep disturbances can lead to fatigue, mood disturbances, and contribute to immunosuppression, which can have a profound impact on quality of life and perhaps affect the course of disease. Insomnia in cancer patients must be distinguished from cancer-related fatigue. Although they are 2 distinct conditions, insomnia and fatigue are interrelated. Insomnia often leads to daytime fatigue that interferes with normal functioning. Conversely, daytime fatigue can lead to behaviors such as napping, which result in insomnia. The primary goal of insomnia treatment should first be to relieve any underlying disorder (eg, cancer pain, depression, anxiety) that may be causing the sleep disturbance. Because insomnia in this patient population may be due to a variety of causes, treatment must be multimodal and include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. A plan that combines attention to sleep hygiene and cognitive-behavioral therapy with prescription of hypnotic medications can help relieve the symptoms of insomnia in cancer patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:15675652

  17. What Asian Americans Should Know about Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asian Americans Should Know About Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B By the National Cancer Institute Liver cancer ... Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Certain types of hepatitis virus, including hepatitis B virus (also known as ...

  18. Prospective phase II trial of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation for numerous chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Choi, Doo Ho; Noh, Jae Myoung; Oh, Dongryul; Park, Jun Su; Chang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A prospective phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation (WLI) for numerous chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods Enrolled patients had numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. Five sessions of hyperthermia and seven fractions of 3-gray WLI were planned. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was determined using the Korean version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire C-30 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary version 4.0. Objective and pain response was evaluated. Results A total of 12 patients consented to the study and the 10 who received WLI and hyperthermia were analyzed. WLI was completed as planned in nine patients and hyperthermia in eight. Pain response was partial in four patients and stable in four. Partial objective response was achieved in three patients (30.0%) and stable disease was seen in four patients at the 1-month follow-up. One patient died 1 month after treatment because of respiratory failure related to pleural metastasis progression. Other grade III or higher toxicities were detected in three patients; however, all severe toxicities were related to disease progression rather than treatment. No significant difference in HRQoL was noted at the time of assessment for patients who were available for questionnaires. Conclusion Combined WLI and hyperthermia were well tolerated without severe treatment-related toxicity with a promising response from numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:27104165

  19. PCDH8 is Frequently Inactivated by Promoter Hypermethylation in Liver Cancer: Diagnostic and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Peng, Yunfei; Yang, Fan; Qin, Ruixi; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Cuijuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Protocadherin-8 (PCDH8) plays an important role in signaling pathways of cell adhesin, proliferation, and migration. It has been reported that PCDH8 is mutated or methylated in several human cancers. However, little is known about PCDH8 in liver cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression and promoter methylation status of PCDH8 in liver cancer and evaluate the association between PCDH8 methylation and the clinicopathological features. METHODS: The methylation status of PCDH8 in 42 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 8 Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) and 50 normal liver tissues were examined using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and the protein expression of PCDH8 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationships between PCDH8 methylation and clinicopathological features as well as overall survival of patients were evaluated. RESULTS: The PCDH8 methylation was more frequent in liver cancer tissues than that in the normal liver tissues (88% vs. 32%, P < 0.001), and is significantly associated with loss of its protein expression (P = 0.004). Moreover, there is a significant correlation between PCDH8 methylation and the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level (P = 0.008). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with PCDH8 methylation have shorter OS and PFS than those without PCDH8 methylation (P = 0.041 and P = 0.028, respectively). CONCLUSION: PCDH8 is often inactivated by promoter methylation in liver cancer. PCDH8 methylation can serve as a valuable diagnostic biomarker for early detection of liver cancer and might be useful to predict an unfavorable clinical feature. PMID:26918058

  20. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  1. Minnelide, a novel drug for pancreatic and liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 10th leading cause of all new cancer cases for men and the fourth leading cause of death across genders, having very poor prognosis and survival rates. The current standard of care Gemcitabine fails to add any survival benefit for this disease (www.cancer.gov). Though the incidence of pancreatic cancer is found to be higher in developed countries, the aggressive biology of the cancer, its high rate of recurrence and chemo-resistance make it a formidable disease in all parts of the globe. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver cancer, on the other hand affects almost 750,000 people world wide with 84% of the cases coming from underdeveloped or developing countries. Our studies show that Minnelide, a water soluble pro-drug of triptolide (active compound from a chinese herb) is very effective against a number of malignant diseases. The current study discusses the efficacy of this compound in pancreatic and liver cancer. PMID:26122306

  2. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  3. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  4. An integrated genomic and pharmacoepigenomic approach predicts therapeutic response of zebularine in human liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jesper B.; Factor, Valentina M.; Marquardt, Jens U.; Raggi, Chiara; Lee, Yun-Han; Seo, Daekwan; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenomic changes such as aberrant hypermethylation and subsequent atypical gene silencing are characteristic features of human cancer. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of epigenomic modulation caused by zebularine, an effective DNA methylation inhibitor, in human liver cancer. Using transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling, we identified a zebularine signature that classified liver cancer cell lines into two major subtypes with different drug-responses. In drug-sensitive cell lines, zebularine caused inhibition of proliferation coupled with increased apoptosis, whereas drug-resistant cell lines were associated with upregulation of oncogenic networks (e.g. E2F1, MYC, and TNF) driving liver cancer growth in vitro and in preclinical mouse models. Assessment of zebularine-based therapy in xenograft mouse models demonstrated potent therapeutic effects against tumors established from zebularine-sensitive but not zebularine-resistant liver cancer cells leading to increased survival and decreased pulmonary metastasis. Integration of zebularine gene expression and demethylation response signatures differentiated patients with HCC according to their survival and disease recurrence and identified a subclass of patients within the poor survivors likely to benefit from therapeutic agents that target the cancer epigenome. PMID:20962331

  5. Focused ultrasound as a local therapy for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Krisztina; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Jolesz, Ferenc A

    2010-01-01

    Conventional surgical treatments of liver cancer are invasive (including minimally invasive) with a high incidence of new metastasis and poor success, even after multiple resections or ablations. These limitations motivated research into new, less invasive solutions for liver cancer treatment.Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), or high-intensity focused ultrasound, has been recognized as a noninvasive technology for benign and malignant tumor treatment. Previously, FUS was guided with ultrasound that has limited target definition and monitoring capability of the ablation process. Combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with multiple-element phased-array transducers to create MRI-guided focused ultrasound thermal therapy provides more accurate targeting and real-time temperature monitoring. This treatment is hindered by the ribcage that limits the acoustic windows to the liver and the respiratory motion of the liver. New advances in MRI and transducer design will likely resolve these limitations and make MRI-guided FUS a powerful tool in local liver cancer therapy. This article reviews this technology and advances that can expand its use for cancer treatment in general and liver cancer in particular. PMID:20404608

  6. Lung, liver and bone cancer mortality in Mayak workers

    PubMed Central

    Sokolnikov, Mikhail E.; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Preston, Dale L.; Ron, Elaine; Shilnikova, Natalia S.; Khokhryakov, Victor V.; Vasilenko, Evgeny K.; Koshurnikova, Nina A.

    2014-01-01

    Workers at the Mayak nuclear facility in the Russian Federation offer the only adequate human data for evaluating cancer risks from exposure to plutonium. Risks of mortality from cancers of the lung, liver and bone, the organs receiving the largest doses from plutonium, were evaluated in a cohort of 17,740 workers initially hired 1948–1972 using, for the first time, recently improved individual organ dose estimates. Excess relative risk (ERR) models were used to evaluate risks as functions of internal (plutonium) dose, external (primarily gamma) dose, gender, attained age and smoking. By December 31, 2003, 681 lung cancer deaths, 75 liver cancer deaths and 30 bone cancer deaths had occurred. Of these 786 deaths, 239 (30%) were attributed to plutonium exposure. Significant plutonium dose-response relationships (p < 0.001) were observed for all 3 endpoints, with lung and liver cancer risks reasonably described by linear functions. At attained age 60, the ERRs per Gy for lung cancer were 7.1 for males and 15 for females; the averaged-attained age ERRs for liver cancer were 2.6 and 29 for males and females, respectively; those for bone cancer were 0.76 and 3.4. This study is the first to present and compare dose-response analyses for cancers of all 3 organs. The unique Mayak cohort with its high exposures and well characterized doses has allowed quantification of the plutonium dose-response for lung, liver and bone cancer risks based on direct human data. These results will play an important role in plutonium risk assessment. PMID:18528867

  7. Role of surgery in colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Özgür; Çetinkaya, Erdinç; Ersöz, Şiyar; Tez, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer, and approximately 35%-55% of patients with CRC will develop hepatic metastases during the course of their disease. Surgical resection represents the only chance of long-term survival. The goal of surgery should be to resect all metastases with negative histological margins while preserving sufficient functional hepatic parenchyma. Although resection remains the only chance of long-term survival, management strategies should be tailored for each case. For patients with extensive metastatic disease who would otherwise be unresectable, the combination of advances in medical therapy, such as systemic chemotherapy (CTX), and the improvement in surgical techniques for metastatic disease, have enhanced prognosis with prolongation of the median survival rate and cure. The use of portal vein embolization and preoperative CTX may also increase the number of patients suitable for surgical treatment. Despite current treatment options, many patients still experience a recurrence after hepatic resection. More active systemic CTX agents are being used increasingly as adjuvant therapy either before or after surgery. Local tumor ablative therapies, such as microwave coagulation therapy and radiofrequency ablation therapy, should be considered as an adjunct to hepatic resection, in which resection cannot deal with all of the tumor lesions. Formulation of an individualized plan, which combines surgery with systemic CTX, is a necessary task of the multidisciplinary team. The aim of this paper is to discuss different approaches for patients that are treated due to CRC liver metastasis. PMID:24876733

  8. Assessment of residual error in liver position using kV cone-beam computed tomography for liver cancer high-precision radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, Maria A.; Brock, Kristy K.; Eccles, Cynthia; Moseley, Douglas; Jaffray, David; Dawson, Laura A. . E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual error in liver position using breath-hold kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CT) following on-line orthogonal megavoltage (MV) image-guided breath-hold liver cancer conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with liver cancer treated with 6-fraction breath-hold conformal radiotherapy were investigated. Before each fraction, orthogonal MV images were obtained during exhale breath-hold, with repositioning for offsets >3 mm, using the diaphragm for cranio-caudal (CC) alignment and vertebral bodies for medial-lateral (ML) and anterior posterior (AP) alignment. After repositioning, repeat orthogonal MV images, orthogonal kV fluoroscopic movies, and kV cone-beam CTs were obtained in exhale breath-hold. The cone-beam CT livers were registered to the planning CT liver to obtain the residual setup error in liver position. Results: After repositioning, 78 orthogonal MV image pairs, 61 orthogonal kV image pairs, and 72 kV cone-beam CT scans were obtained. Population random setup errors ({sigma}) in liver position were 2.7 mm (CC), 2.3 mm (ML), and 3.0 mm (AP), and systematic errors ({sigma}) were 1.1 mm, 1.9 mm, and 1.3 mm in the superior, medial, and posterior directions. Liver offsets >5 mm were observed in 33% of cases; offsets >10 mm and liver deformation >5 mm were observed in a minority of patients. Conclusions: Liver position after radiation therapy guided with MV orthogonal imaging was within 5 mm of planned position in the majority of patients. kV cone-beam CT image guidance should improve accuracy with reduced dose compared with orthogonal MV image guidance for liver cancer radiation therapy.

  9. Effectiveness and Complications of Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration for Primary Liver Cancer in a Chinese Population with Serum α-Fetoprotein Levels ≤200 ng/ml - A Study Based on 4,312 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-yan; Vargulick, Sonya; Shen, Ye-hua; Hua, Yong-qiang; Xie, Jing; Shi, Wei-dong; Gao, Hui-feng; Xu, Li-tao; Feng, Lan-yun; Lin, Jun-hua; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Lu-ming; Ping, Bo; Meng, Zhi-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed by noninvasive approaches with serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels >200 ng/ml and/or a radiological imaging study of tumor mass >2 cm in patients with chronic liver disease. Percutaneous fine needle aspiration (FNA) under ultrasound (US) guidance has a diagnostic specificity of 95% and is superior to radiological imaging studies. Aim The aim of this study is to elucidate the effectiveness and complications of fine needle aspiration in a Chinese population with primary liver cancer and AFP levels ≤200 ng/ml. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted over a period of 28 years. This selection period included patients with a suspected diagnosis of primary liver cancer whose AFP levels were ≤200 ng/ml and who underwent US-FNA. This data was then analyzed with cytomorphological features correlating with medical history, radiological imaging, AFP, and follow-up information. Results Of the 1,929 cases with AFP ≤200 mg/ml, 1,756 underwent FNA. Of these, 1,590 cases were determined malignant and the remaining 166 were determined benign. Further, 1,478 malignant cases were diagnosed by FNA alone, and of these, 1,138 were diagnosed as PLC. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of the diagnoses were 92.96%, 100%, 100%, 59.71%, and 93.62% respectively. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV between the subgroups with tumor size<2 cm and ≥2 cm. Major complications included implantation metastasis and hemorrhage. Conclusion Patients with PLC, especially those who present with an AFP ≤200 ng/ml, should undergo FNA. If negative results are obtained by FNA, it still could be HCC and repeated FNA procedure may be needed if highly suspicious of HCC on imaging study. The superiority of FNA in overall accuracy may outweigh its potential complications, such like hemorrhage and implantation metastasis

  10. Ulinastatin Reduces the Resistance of Liver Cancer Cells to Epirubicin by Inhibiting Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng Hao; Li, Gang; Liu, An An; Jing, Wei; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Yi-Jie; Zhou, Ying-Qi; Hu, Xian-Gui; Jin, Gang

    2015-01-01

    During chemotherapy, drug resistance caused by autophagy remains a major challenge to successful treatment of cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to show that ulinastatin (UTI), a trypsin inhibitor, could reduce the resistance of liver cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agent epirubicin (EPI). We achieved this conclusion by analyzing the effect of EPI alone or UTI plus EPI on SMMC-7721 and MHCC-LM3 liver cancer cells. We also generated an EPI-resistant liver cancer cell line (MHCC-LM3er cells), and found that UTI could sensitize the LM3er cells to EPI. Autophagy usually functions to protect cancer cells during chemotherapy. Our study showed that UTI inhibited the autophagy induced by EPI in liver cancer cells, which promoted apoptosis, and therefore, reduced the resistance of the cancer cells to EPI. Further studies showed that the UTI-mediated inhibition on autophagy was achieved by inhibiting transcriptional factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. To verify our results in vivo, we injected MHCC-LM3 liver cancer cells or EPI-resistant LM3er cells into mice, and found that EPI could only effectively inhibit the growth of tumor in MHCC-LM3 cell-injected mice, but not in LM3er cell-injected mice. However, when UTI was also administered, the growth of tumor was inhibited in the MHCC-LM3er cell-injected mice as well. Our results suggest that UTI may be used in combination with anti-cancer drugs, such as EPI, to improve the outcome of cancer therapy. PMID:25815885

  11. Macrophage-secreted granulin supports pancreatic cancer metastasis by inducing liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Sebastian R; Quaranta, Valeria; Linford, Andrea; Emeagi, Perpetua; Rainer, Carolyn; Santos, Almudena; Ireland, Lucy; Sakai, Takao; Sakai, Keiko; Kim, Yong-Sam; Engle, Dannielle; Campbell, Fiona; Palmer, Daniel; Ko, Jeong Heon; Tuveson, David A; Hirsch, Emilio; Mielgo, Ainhoa; Schmid, Michael C

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating metastatic disease for which better therapies are urgently needed. Macrophages enhance metastasis in many cancer types; however, the role of macrophages in PDAC liver metastasis remains poorly understood. Here we found that PDAC liver metastasis critically depends on the early recruitment of granulin-secreting inflammatory monocytes to the liver. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that granulin secretion by metastasis-associated macrophages (MAMs) activates resident hepatic stellate cells (hStCs) into myofibroblasts that secrete periostin, resulting in a fibrotic microenvironment that sustains metastatic tumour growth. Disruption of MAM recruitment or genetic depletion of granulin reduced hStC activation and liver metastasis. Interestingly, we found that circulating monocytes and hepatic MAMs in PDAC patients express high levels of granulin. These findings suggest that recruitment of granulin-expressing inflammatory monocytes plays a key role in PDAC metastasis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for PDAC liver metastasis. PMID:27088855

  12. Pooled analysis of the surgical treatment for colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Veereman, G; Robays, J; Verleye, L; Leroy, R; Rolfo, C; Van Cutsem, E; Bielen, D; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; De Man, M; Demetter, P; Flamen, P; Hendlisz, A; Sinapi, I; Vanbeckevoort, D; Ysebaert, D; Peeters, M

    2015-04-01

    Liver metastases in colorectal cancer patients decreases the expected 5 year survival rates by a factor close to nine. It is generally accepted that resection of liver metastases should be attempted whenever feasible. This manuscript addresses the optimal therapeutic plan regarding timing of resection of synchronous liver metastases and the use of chemotherapy in combination with resection of synchronous metachronous liver metastases. The aim is to pool all published results in order to attribute a level of evidence to outcomes and identify lacking evidence areas. A systematic search of guidelines, reviews, randomised controlled, observational studies and updating a meta-analysis was performed. Data were extracted and analysed. Data failed to demonstrate an effect of timing of surgery or use of chemotherapy on overall survival. Concomitant resection of liver metastases and the primary tumour may result in lower postoperative morbidity. Systemic peri-operative chemotherapy may improve progression free survival compared to surgery alone. PMID:25666309

  13. Deformable Dose Reconstruction to Optimize the Planning and Delivery of Liver Cancer Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velec, Michael

    The precise delivery of radiation to liver cancer patients results in improved control with higher tumor doses and minimized normal tissues doses. A margin of normal tissue around the tumor requires irradiation however to account for treatment delivery uncertainties. Daily image-guidance allows targeting of the liver, a surrogate for the tumor, to reduce geometric errors. However poor direct tumor visualization, anatomical deformation and breathing motion introduce uncertainties between the planned dose, calculated on a single pre-treatment computed tomography image, and the dose that is delivered. A novel deformable image registration algorithm based on tissue biomechanics was applied to previous liver cancer patients to track targets and surrounding organs during radiotherapy. Modeling these daily anatomic variations permitted dose accumulation, thereby improving calculations of the delivered doses. The accuracy of the algorithm to track dose was validated using imaging from a deformable, 3-dimensional dosimeter able to optically track absorbed dose. Reconstructing the delivered dose revealed that 70% of patients had substantial deviations from the initial planned dose. An alternative image-guidance technique using respiratory-correlated imaging was simulated, which reduced both the residual tumor targeting errors and the magnitude of the delivered dose deviations. A planning and delivery strategy for liver radiotherapy was then developed that minimizes the impact of breathing motion, and applied a margin to account for the impact of liver deformation during treatment. This margin is 38% smaller on average than the margin used clinically, and permitted an average dose-escalation to liver tumors of 9% for the same risk of toxicity. Simulating the delivered dose with deformable dose reconstruction demonstrated the plans with smaller margins were robust as 90% of patients' tumors received the intended dose. This strategy can be readily implemented with widely

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Extra-Hepatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Claudia; Rosso, Chiara; Marietti, Milena; Bugianesi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease but the second cause of death among NAFLD patients are attributed to malignancies at both gastrointestinal (liver, colon, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas) and extra-intestinal sites (kidney in men, and breast in women). Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities are associated with increased incidence or mortality for a number of cancers. NAFLD has an intertwined relationship with metabolic syndrome and significantly contributes to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but recent evidence have fuelled concerns that NAFLD may be a new, and added, risk factor for extra-hepatic cancers, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. In this review we critically appraise key studies on NAFLD-associated extra-hepatic cancers and speculate on how NAFLD may influence carcinogenesis at these sites. PMID:27187365

  15. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Extra-Hepatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Claudia; Rosso, Chiara; Marietti, Milena; Bugianesi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a leading cause of chronic liver disease but the second cause of death among NAFLD patients are attributed to malignancies at both gastrointestinal (liver, colon, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas) and extra-intestinal sites (kidney in men, and breast in women). Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities are associated with increased incidence or mortality for a number of cancers. NAFLD has an intertwined relationship with metabolic syndrome and significantly contributes to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but recent evidence have fuelled concerns that NAFLD may be a new, and added, risk factor for extra-hepatic cancers, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. In this review we critically appraise key studies on NAFLD-associated extra-hepatic cancers and speculate on how NAFLD may influence carcinogenesis at these sites. PMID:27187365

  16. Proposal of new expanded selection criteria using total tumor size and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emission tomography/computed tomography for living donor liver transplantation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: The National Cancer Center Korea criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Duk; Lee, Bora; Kim, Seong Hoon; Joo, Jungnam; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Young-Kyu; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To expand the living donor liver transplantation (LT) pool of eligible patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using new morphological and biological criteria. METHODS: Patients with HCC who underwent living donor LT (LDLT) from March 2005 to May 2013 at the National Cancer Center Korea (NCCK) were enrolled. We performed the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) before LDLT. Overall and disease-free survival analysis was done in patients to evaluate the usefulness of new NCCK criteria using PET/CT and total tumor size (10 cm). RESULTS: We enrolled a total of 280 patients who pathologically confirmed to have HCC and performed the PET/CT before transplantation. Among them, 164 (58.6%) patients fulfilled the NCCK criteria and 132 patients (47.1%) met the Milan criteria. Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates for patients who fulfilled the NCCK criteria showed 85.2% and 84.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than those beyond the NCCK criteria (60.2% and 44.4%, respectively; P < 0.001). The correlation analysis between preoperative imaging tests and pathologic reports using Cohen’s Kappa demonstrated the better results in the NCCK criteria than those in the Milan criteria (0.850 vs 0.583). The comparison of disease-free analysis among the NCCK, Milan, and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) criteria using the receiver operating characteristics curves revealed the similar area under the curve value criteria (NCCK vs Milan, P = 0.484; NCCK vs UCSF, P = 0.189 at 5-years). CONCLUSION: The NCCK criteria using hybrid concept of both morphological and biological parameters showed an excellent agreement between preoperative imaging and pathological results, and favorable survival outcomes. These new criteria might select the optimal patients with HCC waiting LDLT and expand the selection pool. PMID:27358787

  17. [(Bio)artificial liver support: ready for the patient?].

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, R A F M

    2016-05-01

    In 2016, an intensive-care physician has at his disposal a number of artificial organs for the support of patients with organ failure. Examples are the artificial kidney and the heart-lung machine. Artificial livers are being developed for patients with severe liver failure whose lives can only be saved at the present time by a transplant with a donor liver. These artificial livers are based either on a device that removes toxic materials from the patient's blood with, for example, albumin dialysis, or make use of bio-reactors filled with functioning liver cells, the so-called bio-artificial liver. In theory, the bio-artificial liver has the greatest potential to increase life expectancy. The results of clinical studies are also very promising. They are not yet sufficient, however, to permit general clinical use. PMID:27166453

  18. Clinical short-term results of radiofrequency ablation in liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Lian-Xin; Piao, Da-Xun; Xu, Jun; Zheng, Min; Zhu, An-Long; Qi, Shu-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Hui; Wu, Lin-Feng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study local therapeutic efficacy, side effects, and complications of radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which is emerging as a new method for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis and metastatic liver cancer. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with primary and secondary liver cancers (21 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma, 12 with colorectal cancer liver metastases and 3 with other malignant liver metastases), which were considered not suitable for curative resection, were include in this study. They were treated either with RFA (RITA2000, Mountain View, California, USA) percutaneously (n = 20) or intraoperatively (n = 16). The procedures were performed using the ultrasound guidance. The quality of RFA were based on monitoring of equipments and subject feeling of the practitioners. Patients treated with RFA was followed according to clinical findings, radiographic images, and tumor markers. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients underwent RFA for 48 nodules. RFA was used to treat an average 1.3 lesions per patient, and the median size of treated lesions was 2.5 cm (range, 0.5-9 cm). The average hospital stay was 5.6 d overall (2.8 d for percutaneous cases and 7.9 d for open operations). Seven patients underwent a second RFA procedure (sequential ablations). Sixteen HCC patients with a high level of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and 9 colorectal cancer liver metastases patients with a high level of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have a great reduction benefited from RFA. Four (11.1%) patients had complications: one skin burn; one postoperative hemorrhage; one cholecystitis and one hepatic abscess associated with percutaneous ablations of a large lesion. There were 4 deaths: 3 patients died from local and system diseases (1 at 7 month, 1 at 9 month, and 1 at 12 month), 1 patients died from cardiovascular shock, but no RFA-related death. At a median follow-up of 10 mo (range, 1-24 mo), 6 patients (16.7%) had

  19. Gene Expression Profiling of Liver Cancer Stem Cells by RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chi Tat; Ng, Michael N. P.; Yu, Wan Ching; Lau, Joyce; Wan, Timothy; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yan, Zhixiang; Liu, Hang; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence supports that tumor growth and cancer relapse are driven by cancer stem cells. Our previous work has demonstrated the existence of CD90+ liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nevertheless, the characteristics of these cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we employed a more sensitive RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) to compare the gene expression profiling of CD90+ cells sorted from tumor (CD90+CSCs) with parallel non-tumorous liver tissues (CD90+NTSCs) and elucidate the roles of putative target genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings CD90+ cells were sorted respectively from tumor and adjacent non-tumorous human liver tissues using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The amplified RNAs of CD90+ cells from 3 HCC patients were subjected to RNA-Seq analysis. A differential gene expression profile was established between CD90+CSCs and CD90+NTSCs, and validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) on the same set of amplified RNAs, and further confirmed in an independent cohort of 12 HCC patients. Five hundred genes were differentially expressed (119 up-regulated and 381 down-regulated genes) between CD90+CSCs and CD90+NTSCs. Gene ontology analysis indicated that the over-expressed genes in CD90+CSCs were associated with inflammation, drug resistance and lipid metabolism. Among the differentially expressed genes, glypican-3 (GPC3), a member of glypican family, was markedly elevated in CD90+CSCs compared to CD90+NTSCs. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPC3 was highly expressed in forty-two human liver tumor tissues but absent in adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues. Flow cytometry indicated that GPC3 was highly expressed in liver CD90+CSCs and mature cancer cells in liver cancer cell lines and human liver tumor tissues. Furthermore, GPC3 expression was positively correlated with the number of CD90+CSCs in liver tumor tissues. Conclusions/Significance The identified genes

  20. Janus "nano-bullets" for magnetic targeting liver cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dan; Li, Jing; Zheng, Xiao; Pan, Yue; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi-Xian; Dong, Wen-Fei; Chen, Li

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs with controlled drug release function has been recognized as a promising strategy for pursuit of increased chemotherapeutic efficacy and reduced adverse effects. Development of magnetic nanoparticulates as delivery carriers to accommodate cytotoxic drugs for liver cancer treatment has evoked immense interest with respect to their convenience in biomedical application. Herein, we engineered multifunctional Janus nanocomposites, characterized by a head of magnetic Fe3O4 and a body of mesoporous SiO2 containing doxorubicin (DOX) as "nano-bullets" (M-MSNs-DOX). This nanodrug formulation possessed nanosize with controlled aspect-ratio, defined abundance in pore structures, and superior magnetic properties. M-MSN-DOX was determined to induce selective growth inhibition to the cancer cell under magnetic field rather than human normal cells due to its preferable endocytosis by the tumor cells and pH-promoted DOX release in the interior of cancer cells. Ultimately, both subcutaneous and orthotropic liver tumor models in mice have demonstrated that the proposed Janus nano-bullets imposed remarkable suppression of the tumor growth and significantly reduced systematic toxicity. Taken together, this study demonstrates an intriguing targeting strategy for liver cancer treatment based on a novel Janus nano-bullet, aiming for utilization of nanotechnology to obtain safe and efficient treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27258482

  1. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-06-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  2. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Ho; Maratovich, Mussin Nadiar; Lee, Kyoung-Bun

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is rare primary hepatic sarcoma and is known to occur in pediatric patients. This case is the UESL occurred in a 51-year old male patient. Multilocular cystic lesion was composed of primitive spindle cells without specific differentiation. This rare case would help to review differential diagnosis of primary sarcoma in liver and cystic neoplasm of the liver. PMID:27377912

  3. Application of stereotactic body radiation therapy to cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Yuan; Zhu, Guang-Ying; Li, Gong; Zhang, Yi-Bao; Geng, Jian-Hao

    2016-09-01

    As an accurate external beam irradiation method, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been increasingly used to deliver high dose in less fractions. The liver is one of the most common organs for cancer metastasis. Recently, there have been several trials applying SBRT to cancer liver metastasis and have proved to be effective and safe with local control (LC) rates ranging from 70% to 100% within one or two years and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates ranging from 30% to 38%. Many published studies indicate that SBRT for cancer liver metastasis results in good outcomes without severe toxicities. However, the validated contribution of SBRT to an improved progression-free survival is still missing and more randomized trials should be conducted. PMID:26704306

  4. Isoquercitrin inhibits the progression of liver cancer in vivo and in vitro via the MAPK signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guihong; Tang, Bo; Tang, Kun; Dong, Xiaomin; Deng, Jungang; Liao, Luqin; Liao, Zengzhen; Yang, Hua; He, Songqing

    2014-05-01

    Liver cancer is a malignant tumour with high morbidity and fatality rates that is common worldwide. At present, the clinical approaches to treating primary liver cancer include partial hepatectomy, systemic or local chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radiofrequency ablative surgery and liver transplantation. However, all of these approaches have shortcomings, including poor prognosis and numerous side-effects. A large number of studies have proven that many effective ingredients in traditional Chinese medicine, particularly the flavonoid compounds extracted from plants, have achieved breakthroughs in terms of enhancing the effects and reducing the toxicity of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, preventing tumour metastasis and relapse after surgery, alleviating the clinical symptoms of advanced tumours, improving the quality of life of the patient with tumours and extending patient long‑term survival. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of isoquercitrin, the flavonoid from Bidens bipinnata L. extract, on the progression of liver cancer and to achieve a deeper understanding of the biological characteristics of isoquercitrin's involvement in the progression of liver cancer. In the in vitro experiments, isoquercitrin was found to strongly inhibit the proliferation of human liver cancer cells, promote the apoptosis of human liver cancer cells, and block the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Isoquercitrin activated caspase-3, -8 and -9, inhibited the expression level of ERK and p38MAPK protein phosphorylation, and promoted the phosphorylation of JNK. Additionally, isoquercitrin reduced the expression level of PKC in human liver cancer cells. In the in vivo experiments, isoquercitrin was also found to significantly inhibit the growth of transplanted tumours in nude mice. The present study confirmed that isoquercitrin could inhibit the progression of human liver cancer in vivo and in vitro, and the molecular mechanism of isoquercitrin may be closely associated

  5. Biallelic inactivation of protoporphyrinogen oxidase and hydroxymethylbilane synthase is associated with liver cancer in acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Yin, Xiaoye; van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne-Moon; Siegesmund, Marko; Went, Philip; Barman-Aksözen, Jasmin; Bladergroen, Reno S; Komminoth, Paul; Cloots, Roy H E; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J; zur Hausen, Axel; Weber, Markus; Driessen, Ann; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; Bauer, Peter; Schroeder, Christopher; van Geel, Michel; Minder, Elisabeth I; Frank, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Variegate porphyria (VP) and acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the two most common types of acute porphyrias (AHPs), result from a partial deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), respectively. A rare but serious complication in the AHPs is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the underlying pathomechanisms are yet unknown. We performed DNA sequence analysis in cancerous and non-cancerous liver tissue of a VP and an AIP patient, both with HCC. In samples of both cancerous and non-cancerous liver tissues from the patients, we identified the underlying PPOX and HMBS germline mutations, c.1082dupC and p.G111R, respectively. Additionally, we detected a second somatic mutation, only in the cancer tissue i.e., p.L416X in the PPOX gene of the VP patient and p.L220X in the HMBS gene of the AIP patient, both located in trans to the respective germline mutations. Both somatic mutations were not detected in 10 non-porphyria-associated HCCs. Our data demonstrate that in the hepatic cancer tissue of AHP patients, somatic second-hit mutations result in nearly complete inactivation of the enzymes catalyzing major steps in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Both PPOX and HMBS, which might act as tumor suppressors, play a crucial role in the development of HCC in these individuals. PMID:25445397

  6. [Pain management in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Antonio; Moreno, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    Pain management in patients with liver cirrhosis is a real challenge and is often inadequate due to a lack of therapeutic efficacy or the high incidence of adverse effects. The focus of treatment differs depending on whether the pain is acute or chronic and involves understanding the causative pathophysiological mechanism. Analgesics should be started with the minimum effective dose and should be titrated slowly with avoidance of polypharmacy. Adverse effects must be monitored, especially sedation and constipation, which predispose the patient to the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The first-line drug is paracetamol, which is safe at doses of 2-3g/day. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents are contraindicated because they can cause acute renal failure and/or gastrointestinal bleeding. Tramadol is a safe option for moderate-severe pain. The opioids with the best safety profile are fentanyl and hydromorphone, with methadone as an alternative. Topical treatment can reduce oral drug consumption. In neuropathic pain the first-line therapeutic option is gabapentin. The use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline can be considered in some patients. Interventional techniques are a valuable tool in moderate to severe pain, since they allow a reduction in drug therapy and consequently its adverse effects. Psychological treatment, physical therapy and rehabilitation should be considered as part of multimodality therapy in the management of chronic pain. PMID:24309482

  7. Do We Know What Causes Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... only partially understood. Cancers develop when a cell’s DNA is damaged. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... tumor suppressor genes . Cancers can be caused by DNA changes that turn on oncogenes or turn off ...

  8. The nanomechanical signature of liver cancer tissues and its molecular origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Mengxin; Li, Yiran; Liu, Weiren; Jin, Lei; Jiang, Xifei; Wang, Xinyan; Ding, Zhenbin; Peng, Yuanfei; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yinghong

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus distribution of surgically removed liver cancer tissues can serve as a mechanical fingerprint to evaluate the malignancy of liver cancer. Cirrhotic tissues shared the same LEP as normal tissues. However, a noticeable downward shift in the LEP was detected when the cirrhotic tissues progressed to a malignant state, making the tumor tissues more prone to microvascular invasion. Cell-level mechanistic studies revealed that the expression level of a Rho-family effector (mDia1) was consistent with the mechanical trend exhibited by the tissue. Our findings indicate that the mechanical profiles of liver cancer tissues directly varied with tumor progression, providing an additional platform for the future diagnosis of HCC.Patients with cirrhosis are at higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths. Although HCC diagnosis based on conventional morphological characteristics serves as the ``gold standard'' in the clinic, there is a high demand for more convenient and effective diagnostic methods that employ new biophysical perspectives. Here, we show that the nanomechanical signature of liver tissue is directly correlated with the development of HCC. Using indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT-AFM), we demonstrate that the lowest elasticity peak (LEP) in the Young's modulus

  9. Combining Angiogenesis-Targeted Treatments for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who are ineligible for a liver transplant or other local therapies will be given oral sorafenib at the standard approved dose and intravenous TRC105.

  10. Can paracetamol (acetaminophen) be administered to patients with liver impairment?

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kelly L; Powell, Elizabeth E; Irvine, Katharine M; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-02-01

    Although 60 years have passed since it became widely available on the therapeutic market, paracetamol dosage in patients with liver disease remains a controversial subject. Fulminant hepatic failure has been a well documented consequence of paracetamol overdose since its introduction, while short and long term use have both been associated with elevation of liver transaminases, a surrogate marker for acute liver injury. From these reports it has been assumed that paracetamol use should be restricted or the dosage reduced in patients with chronic liver disease. We review the factors that have been purported to increase risk of hepatocellular injury from paracetamol and the pharmacokinetic alterations in different pathologies of chronic liver disease which may affect this risk. We postulate that inadvertent under-dosing may result in concentrations too low to enable efficacy. Specific research to improve the evidence base for prescribing paracetamol in patients with different aetiologies of chronic liver disease is needed. PMID:26460177