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Sample records for liver disease analysis

  1. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  2. Liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the liver ...

  3. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  4. Patients with Chronically Diseased Livers Have Lower Incidence of Colorectal Liver Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Liao, Kai; Song, Xian-qing; Wei, Wei-yuan; Zhuang, Yuan; Zhang, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Background 70 years ago, it was put forward that the diseased liver was not a favorable soil for metastatic tumor cells. In addition, a few studies have demonstrated that rare occurrence of colorectal liver metastases among patients with fatty liver, cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection. We performed a meta-analysis to verify the association between the incidences of colorectal liver metastases with chronically diseased livers. Methods Relevant studies were identified by a search of electronic database PubMed, Cochrane Library, OVID, Web of Science and CNKI (up to February 24, 2014). Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Meta-analysis and publication bias (Bgger's test) was evaluated with STATA 12.0. Results A total of 10,349 colorectal cancer patients from 10 studies were included. The meta-analysis result showed there was a significant difference in the incidences of colorectal liver metastases between patients with normal and chronically diseased livers (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 95%: 0.26–0.38, P = 0.000 fixed-effects model). The result of Begg's test (Pr>|z| = 0.089; P>0.05) revealed no publication bias. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that patients with chronically diseased livers had significantly lower incidences of colorectal liver metastases than those with normal livers. PMID:25265536

  5. Protein-protein interaction network analysis of cirrhosis liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akram; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouei, Afsaneh; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Nikzamir, Abdol Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of biological characteristics of 13 identified proteins of patients with cirrhotic liver disease is the main aim of this research. Background: In clinical usage, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis. Evaluation and confirmation of liver fibrosis stages and severity of chronic diseases require a precise and noninvasive biomarkers. Since the early detection of cirrhosis is a clinical problem, achieving a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarkers is an important task. Methods: Essential analysis, such as gene ontology (GO) enrichment and protein-protein interactions (PPI) was undergone EXPASy, STRING Database and DAVID Bioinformatics Resources query. Results: Based on GO analysis, most of proteins are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, intracellular organelle lumen, membrane-enclosed lumen, and extracellular region. The relevant molecular functions are actin binding, metal ion binding, cation binding and ion binding. Cell adhesion, biological adhesion, cellular amino acid derivative, metabolic process and homeostatic process are the related processes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis introduced five proteins (fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, tropomyosin 4, tropomyosin 2 (beta), lectin, Lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein and apolipoprotein A-I) as hub and bottleneck proteins. Conclusion: Our result indicates that regulation of lipid metabolism and cell survival are important biological processes involved in cirrhosis disease. More investigation of above mentioned proteins will provide a better understanding of cirrhosis disease. PMID:27099671

  6. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services -- www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  7. Domain Analysis of Integrated Data to Reduce Cost Associated with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Tasneem; Kite, Bobbie; Regan, Kelly; Gascon, Gregg M.; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer, the fifth most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death among men worldwide, is plagued by not only lack of clinical research, but informatics tools for early detection. Consequently, it presents a major health and cost burden. Among the different types of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common and deadly form, arising from underlying liver disease. Current models for predicting risk of HCC and liver disease are limited to clinical data. A domain analysis of existing research related to screening for HCC and liver disease suggests that metabolic syndrome (MetS) may present oppportunites to detect early signs of liver disease. The purpose of this paper is to (i) provide a domain analysis of the relationship between HCC, liver disease, and metabolic syndrome, (ii) a review of the current disparate sources of data available for MetS diagnosis, and (iii) recommend informatics solutions for the diagnosis of MetS from available administrative (Biometrics, PHA, claims) and laboratory data, towards early prediction of liver disease. Our domain analysis and recommendations incorporate best practices to make meaningful use of available data with the goal of reducing cost associated with liver disease. PMID:26262083

  8. Analysis of the Serum Bile Acid Composition for Differential Diagnosis in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Tomonori; Amano, Katsushi; Nakano, Masanori; Masubuchi, Noriko; Sugihara, Masahiro; Matsuura, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the serum bile acid (BA) composition in patients with liver diseases and healthy volunteers to investigate the relationship between the etiologies of liver disease and BA metabolism. Material and Methods. Sera from 150 patients with liver diseases and 46 healthy volunteers were obtained. The serum concentrations of the 16 different BAs were determined according to the LC-MS/MS method and were compared between the different liver diseases. Results. A total of 150 subjects, including patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (n = 44), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (n = 23), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 21), biliary tract disease (n = 20), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 13), and other liver diseases (n = 29), were recruited. The levels of UDCA and GUDCA were significantly higher in the ALD group, and the levels of DCA and UDCA were significantly lower in the biliary tract diseases group than in viral hepatitis group. In the UDCA therapy (−) subgroup, a significantly lower level of TLCA was observed in the ALD group, with lower levels of CDCA, DCA, and GLCA noted in biliary tract diseases group compared to viral hepatitis group. Conclusions. Analysis of the BA composition may be useful for differential diagnosis in liver disease. PMID:25821461

  9. Metabolic liver disease.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Diagnosis of metabolic liver disease requires a high level of diagnostic suspicion. Diet is usually the primary treatment for metabolic liver disease. Where indicated, liver transplantation provides lifelong functional correction of liver-based metabolic defects. Liver cell therapy warrants further study for the future treatment of metabolic liver disease. All families should receive genetic advice and pre-emptive management of future affected siblings. PMID:22521124

  10. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider diagnose ...

  11. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  12. Liver disease in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. PMID:26167064

  13. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  14. Diet - liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002441.htm Diet - liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some people with liver disease must eat a special diet. This diet helps ...

  15. Functional pitch of a liver: fatty liver disease diagnosis with photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuoxian; Lin, Jiandie; Carson, Paul; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    To provide more information for classification and assessment of biological tissues, photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) moves beyond the quantification of the intensities of the photoacoustic (PA) signals by the use of the frequency-domain power distribution, namely power spectrum, of broadband PA signals. The method of PASA quantifies the linear-fit to the power spectrum of the PA signals from a biological tissue with 3 parameters, including intercept, midband-fit and slope. Intercept and midband-fit reflect the total optical absorption of the tissues whereas slope reflects the heterogeneity of the tissue structure. Taking advantage of the optical absorption contrasts contributed by lipid and blood at 1200 and 532 nm, respectively and the heterogeneous tissue microstructure in fatty liver due to the lipid infiltration, we investigate the capability of PASA in identifying histological changes of fatty livers in mouse model. 6 and 9 pairs of normal and fatty liver tissues from rat models were examined by ex vivo experiment with a conventional rotational PA measurement system. One pair of rat models with normal and fatty livers was examined non-invasively and in situ with our recently developed ultrasound and PA parallel imaging system. The results support our hypotheses that the spectrum analysis of PA signals can provide quantitative measures of the differences between the normal and fatty liver tissues and that part of the PA power spectrum can suffice for characterization of microstructures in biological tissues. Experimental results also indicate that the vibrational absorption peak of lipid at 1200nm could facilitate fatty liver diagnosis.

  16. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood count (CBC) Liver biopsy Liver function tests Coagulation studies Tests to rule out other diseases include: ... over-the-counter medicines. MEDICINES FROM YOUR DOCTOR "Water pills" (diuretics) to get rid of fluid build- ...

  17. The effect of green tea intake on risk of liver disease: a meta analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xueru; Yang, Jiqiao; Li, Tony; Song, Liyan; Han, Tinglu; Yang, Mei; Liao, Huihua; He, Jianjun; Zhong, Xiaozhu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: There have been many reports on the reduction of liver disease with green tea consumption. This study aims to evaluate the body of evidence related to green tea consumption on the risk of liver disease and determine the effectiveness. Methods: Electronic searches were conducted in PubMed, CNKI, Wanfang and Weipu databases. Statistical analysis was performed using the software Revman 5.2 and Stata 12.0. Results: Meta-analysis revealed that among green tea drinkers, there was a significant reduction in the risk of liver disease (RR=0.68, 95% CI=0.56-0.82, P=0.000). This trend extends to a broad spectrum of liver conditions including hepatocellular carcinoma (RR=0.74, 95% CI=0.56-0.97, P=0.027), liver steatosis (RR=0.65, 95% CI=0.44-0.98, P=0.039), hepatitis (RR=0.57, 95% CI=0.45-0.73, P=0.000), liver cirrhosis (RR=0.56, 95% CI=0.31-1.01, P=0.053) and chronic liver disease (RR=0.49, 95% CI=0.29-0.82, P=0.007). This trend is also observed regardless of the race of the individual concerned where the Asian, American and European subgroups all demonstrated a reduced risk of liver disease. Conclusions: Green tea intake reduces the risk of liver disease. However, more long term randomized clinical trials are needed to comprehensively evaluate the health benefits of green tea. PMID:26309486

  18. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality. PMID:27194895

  19. Large-scale analysis of factors influencing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its relationship with liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bi, W R; Yang, C Q; Shi, Q; Xu, Y; Cao, C P; Ling, J; Wang, X Y

    2014-01-01

    Serum liver enzyme levels are often used effectively for the evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to investigate the associations between serum liver enzyme levels and risks for NAFLD in over 8000 cases in a large-scale analysis. A cross-sectional survey with multiple stages and random samplings was performed from May 2007 to May 2009 on 8102 workers at Tongji University. A questionnaire was given, assessments of physical measurements, plasma glucose, lipid profiles, and liver enzymes were made, and real-time liver ultrasounds conducted. The prevalence of NAFLD in Tongji University was 22.2%. It was higher in males than in females (P = 0.0023). The body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, serum total triglycerides, serum total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) values were all higher in the NAFLD group than in the control group. For moderate and severe NAFLD patients, the ALT, AST and GGT values were significantly increased, high density lipoprotein cholesterol was decreased, and drinking much, heavy entertainment and less exercise were more prevalent (P < 0.001). There were strong correlations between serum liver enzyme levels and NAFLD (P < 0.001), with GGT being a more sensitive marker for NAFLD than ALT or AST. ALT and GGT were independent predictors for NAFLD, and GGT was a better predictor than ALT for NAFLD. PMID:25117346

  20. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  1. An Improved Method for Liver Diseases Detection by Ultrasound Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Owjimehr, Mehri; Danyali, Habibollah; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a popular and noninvasive tool frequently used in the diagnoses of liver diseases. A system to characterize normal, fatty and heterogeneous liver, using textural analysis of liver Ultrasound images, is proposed in this paper. The proposed approach is able to select the optimum regions of interest of the liver images. These optimum regions of interests are analyzed by two level wavelet packet transform to extract some statistical features, namely, median, standard deviation, and interquartile range. Discrimination between heterogeneous, fatty and normal livers is performed in a hierarchical approach in the classification stage. This stage, first, classifies focal and diffused livers and then distinguishes between fatty and normal ones. Support vector machine and k-nearest neighbor classifiers have been used to classify the images into three groups, and their performance is compared. The Support vector machine classifier outperformed the compared classifier, attaining an overall accuracy of 97.9%, with a sensitivity of 100%, 100% and 95.1% for the heterogeneous, fatty and normal class, respectively. The Acc obtained by the proposed computer-aided diagnostic system is quite promising and suggests that the proposed system can be used in a clinical environment to support radiologists and experts in liver diseases interpretation. PMID:25709938

  2. Nutrition and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Teran, J C

    1999-08-01

    Malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are common in patients with liver diseases. The pathogenesis of protein-energy malnutrition in cirrhosis involves many factors, including poor oral intake, malabsorption, and metabolic abnormalities similar to stress. Encephalopathy may complicate cirrhosis but is usually not caused by diet. Protein restriction is only necessary in rare patients with refractory encephalopathy. The use of branched-chain amino-acid solutions is not supported by the literature. Chronic liver diseases without cirrhosis are not usually associated with protein-energy malnutrition, but vitamin and mineral deficiencies are common, especially with significant cholestasis. Fatty liver may result from excessive triglyceride uptake and production by the liver or by a secretory defect. Therapy for fatty liver depends on its cause. Chronic total parenteral nutrition may induce fatty liver and inflammation especially in patients with short-bowel syndrome. Deficiency of choline in parenteral nutrition has been proposed as the mechanism for liver disease. Acute liver diseases such as fulminant hepatic failure or alcoholic hepatitis are considered hypercatabolic diseases and thus require prompt nutritional intervention with a high-calorie enteral or parenteral formula. In fulminant hepatic failure, low-protein, fluid-restricted formulas are recommended. PMID:10980970

  3. Alcohol induced liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, K A; McGee, J O

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol induces a variety of changes in the liver: fatty change, hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The histopathological appearances of these conditions are discussed, with special attention to differential diagnosis. Many forms of alcoholic liver disease are associated with Mallory body formation and fibrosis. Mallory bodies are formed, at least in part, from intermediate filaments. Associated changes in intermediate filament organisation in alcoholic liver disease also occur. Their significance in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte death may be related to abnormalities in messenger RNA function. The mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrogenesis are also discussed. Images PMID:6086722

  4. Infections in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Nanchal, Rahul S; Ahmad, Shahryar

    2016-07-01

    Infectious complications are common occurrences in end-stage liver disease (ESLD). Frequent infections precipitate decompensation of liver disease leading to acute or chronic liver failure, organ dysfunction, de-listing from transplant, and major morbidity and mortality. The spectrum of microorganisms has shifted with the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains, which has major implications for both therapy and prophylaxis. Cirrhosis is often associated with an underlying noninfectious systemic inflammatory state that makes diagnosis of infections particularly challenging. Adequate resuscitation and timely administration of appropriate antibiotics are pivotal to improved outcomes from infections in ESLD. PMID:27339680

  5. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. PMID:27373614

  6. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. PMID:24951302

  7. Managing alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease continues to be a significant cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality throughout the world. A number of diagnostic and prognostic models have been developed in the management of this condition, although specific roles for liver biopsy still remain particularly in the setting of alcoholic hepatitis. Despite a large number of recent treatment trials, the ideal pharmacotherapy approach remains undefined. Most essential is the supportive care and focus on abstinence and nutrition. Owing in part to a great deal of attention from governmental funding sources, a number of new treatment approaches are undergoing rigorous evaluation, hopefully providing future treatment options in this very severe condition. PMID:26523266

  8. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  9. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  10. Fatty liver disease induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate: Novel insight from transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Fai Tse, William Ka; Li, Jing Woei; Kwan Tse, Anna Chung; Chan, Ting Fung; Hin Ho, Jeff Cheuk; Sun Wu, Rudolf Shiu; Chu Wong, Chris Kong; Lai, Keng Po

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a hepato-toxicant and potential non-genotoxic carcinogen, was widely used in industrial and commercial products. Recent studies have revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of PFOS in the environment and in humans worldwide. The widespread contamination of PFOS in human serum raised concerns about its long-term toxic effects and its potential risks to human health. Using fatty liver mutant foie gras (fgr(-/-))/transport protein particle complex 11 (trappc11(-/-)) and PFOS-exposed wild-type zebrafish embryos as the study model, together with RNA sequencing and comparative transcriptomic analysis, we identified 499 and 1414 differential expressed genes (DEGs) in PFOS-exposed wild-type and trappc11 mutant zebrafish, respectively. Also, the gene ontology analysis on common deregulated genes was found to be associated with different metabolic processes such as the carbohydrate metabolic process, glycerol ether metabolic process, mannose biosynthetic process, de novo' (Guanosine diphosphate) GDP-l-fucose biosynthetic process, GDP-mannose metabolic process and galactose metabolic process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis further highlighted that these deregulated gene clusters are closely related to hepatitis, inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis of liver cells, suggesting that PFOS can cause liver pathogenesis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in zebrafish. The transcriptomic alterations revealed may serve as biomarkers for the hepatotoxic effect of PFOS. PMID:27289203

  11. EGFR Signaling in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Komposch, Karin; Sibilia, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by several ligands leading to the activation of diverse signaling pathways controlling mainly proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The EGFR signaling axis has been shown to play a key role during liver regeneration following acute and chronic liver damage, as well as in cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) highlighting the importance of the EGFR in the development of liver diseases. Despite the frequent overexpression of EGFR in human HCC, clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have so far shown only modest results. Interestingly, a recent study has shown that in human HCC and in mouse HCC models the EGFR is upregulated in liver macrophages where it plays a tumor-promoting function. Thus, the role of EGFR in liver diseases appears to be more complex than what anticipated. Further studies are needed to improve the molecular understanding of the cell-specific signaling pathways that control disease development and progression to be able to develop better therapies targeting major components of the EGFR signaling network in selected cell types. In this review, we compiled the current knowledge of EGFR signaling in different models of liver damage and diseases, mainly derived from the analysis of HCC cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs). PMID:26729094

  12. Liver disease in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Mavis, Alisha M; Alonso, Estella M

    2015-02-01

    This article discusses common liver diseases in the adolescent. Briefly reviewed is the evaluation of the adolescent with new-onset liver enzyme elevation. Then the article discusses common liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatitis, metabolic disease, biliary atresia, cystic fibrosis, and inherited disorders of cholestasis. Finally, a management approach to the adolescent with liver disease is outlined, noting the challenges that must be addressed to effectively care for not only liver disease in the adolescent but also the patient as a whole. PMID:25454303

  13. Liver fibrosis markers in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Chrostek, Lech; Panasiuk, Anatol

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the main factors of liver damage. The evaluation of the degree of liver fibrosis is of great value for therapeutic decision making in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Staging of liver fibrosis is essential to define prognosis and management of the disease. Liver biopsy is a gold standard as it has high sensitivity and specificity in fibrosis diagnostics. Taking into account the limitations of liver biopsy, there is an exigency to introduce non-invasive serum markers for fibrosis that would be able to replace liver biopsy. Ideal serum markers should be specific for the liver, easy to perform and independent to inflammation and fibrosis in other organs. Serum markers of hepatic fibrosis are divided into direct and indirect. Indirect markers reflect alterations in hepatic function, direct markers reflect extracellular matrix turnover. These markers should correlate with dynamic changes in fibrogenesis and fibrosis resolution. The assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in alcoholic liver disease has diagnostic and prognostic implications, therefore noninvasive assessment of fibrosis remains important. There are only a few studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic values of noninvasive biomarkers of fibrosis in patients with ALD. Several noninvasive laboratory tests have been used to assess liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease, including the hyaluronic acid, FibroTest, FibrometerA, Hepascore, Forns and APRI indexes, FIB4, an algorithm combining Prothrombin index (PI), α-2 macroglobulin and hyaluronic acid. Among these tests, Fibrotest, FibrometerA and Hepascore demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy in identifying advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis, and additionally, Fibrotest was independently associated with survival. Therefore, the use of biomarkers may reduce the need for liver biopsy and permit an earlier treatment of alcoholic patients. PMID:25009372

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Elizabeth M; Wong, Vincent W-S; Nobili, Valerio; Day, Christopher P; Sookoian, Silvia; Maher, Jacquelyn J; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Sirlin, Claude B; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Rinella, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a disorder characterized by excess accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL)); in up to 40% of individuals, there are additional findings of portal and lobular inflammation and hepatocyte injury (which characterize nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). A subset of patients will develop progressive fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis. Hepatocellular carcinoma and cardiovascular complications are life-threatening co-morbidities of both NAFL and NASH. NAFLD is closely associated with insulin resistance; obesity and metabolic syndrome are common underlying factors. As a consequence, the prevalence of NAFLD is estimated to be 10-40% in adults worldwide, and it is the most common liver disease in children and adolescents in developed countries. Mechanistic insights into fat accumulation, subsequent hepatocyte injury, the role of the immune system and fibrosis as well as the role of the gut microbiota are unfolding. Furthermore, genetic and epigenetic factors might explain the considerable interindividual variation in disease phenotype, severity and progression. To date, no effective medical interventions exist that completely reverse the disease other than lifestyle changes, dietary alterations and, possibly, bariatric surgery. However, several strategies that target pathophysiological processes such as an oversupply of fatty acids to the liver, cell injury and inflammation are currently under investigation. Diagnosis of NAFLD can be established by imaging, but detection of the lesions of NASH still depend on the gold-standard but invasive liver biopsy. Several non-invasive strategies are being evaluated to replace or complement biopsies, especially for follow-up monitoring. PMID:27188459

  15. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Bataller, Ramón; Burra, Patrizia; DiMartini, Andrea; Graziadei, Ivo; Lucey, Michael R; Mathurin, Philippe; OʼGrady, John; Pageaux, Georges; Berenguer, Marina

    2016-05-01

    Alcohol-related liver disease is the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation (LT), yet as many as 90% to 95% of patients with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease are never formally evaluated for LT. Furthermore, despite its significance as a cause of chronic liver disease and indication for LT, it has received little attention in recent years for several reasons, including the good posttransplant short-term results, and the lack of specific "drugs" used for this disease. A writing group, endorsed by the International Liver Transplant Society, was convened to write guidelines on Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease to summarize current knowledge and provide answers to controversial and delicate ethical as well as clinical problems. We report here a short version of the guidelines (long version available at www.ilts.org) with the final recommendations graded for level of evidence. The writing group membership is expected to remain active for 5 years, reviewing the guideline annually, and updating the online version when appropriate. PMID:26985744

  16. Metabolomic analysis of human cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis diseases.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Akram; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Peyvandi, Maryam; Okhovatian, Farshad; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Metabolome analysis is used to evaluate the characteristics and interactions of low molecular weight metabolites under a specific set of conditions. In cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatotic hepatitis (NASH) the liver does not function thoroughly due to long-term damage. Unfortunately the early detection of cirrhosis, HCC, NAFLD and NASH is a clinical problem and determining a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarker discovery is an important task. On the other hand, metabolomics has been reported as a new and powerful technology in biomarker discovery and dynamic field that cause global comprehension of system biology. In this review, it has been collected a heterogeneous set of metabolomics published studies to discovery of biomarkers in researches to introduce diagnostic biomarkers for early detection and the choice of patient-specific therapies. PMID:27458508

  17. Metabolomic analysis of human cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akram; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Peyvandi, Maryam; Okhovatian, Farshad; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Metabolome analysis is used to evaluate the characteristics and interactions of low molecular weight metabolites under a specific set of conditions. In cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatotic hepatitis (NASH) the liver does not function thoroughly due to long-term damage. Unfortunately the early detection of cirrhosis, HCC, NAFLD and NASH is a clinical problem and determining a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarker discovery is an important task. On the other hand, metabolomics has been reported as a new and powerful technology in biomarker discovery and dynamic field that cause global comprehension of system biology. In this review, it has been collected a heterogeneous set of metabolomics published studies to discovery of biomarkers in researches to introduce diagnostic biomarkers for early detection and the choice of patient-specific therapies. PMID:27458508

  18. [Dietotherapy children with liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaia, E V; Strokova, T V; Topil'skaia, N V; Isakova, V A

    2009-01-01

    In children with liver diseases disorders of the nutritional status appear more quickly and delay normal growth and development. Administration of the nutritional support based on nosological and syndromal approaches lets provide optimal conditions for normalization of the liver functions, improves efficiency of therapy and prognosis of the disease. The article contents modern recommendations on the organization of nutrition in children with different liver diseases, correction of metabolic disorders during complications of liver pathology. PMID:20120964

  19. Expression patterns and action analysis of genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases during rat liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Qian-Ji; Qin, Shao-Wei; Xu, Cun-Shuan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of the genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases at the gene transcriptional level during liver regeneration (LR) in rats. METHODS: The genes associated with drug-induced liver diseases were obtained by collecting the data from databases and literature, and the gene expression changes in the regenerating liver were checked by the Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. RESULTS: The initial and total expression numbers of genes occurring in phases of 0.5-4 h after partial hepatectomy (PH), 4-6 h after PH (G0/G1 transition), 6-66 h after PH (cell proliferation), 66-168 h after PH (cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction) were 21, 3, 9, 2 and 21, 9, 19, 18, respectively. It is illustrated that the associated genes were mainly triggered at the initial stage of LR and worked at different phases. According to their expression similarity, these genes were classified into 5 types: only up-regulated (12 genes), predominantly up-regulated (4 genes), only down-regulated (11 genes), predominantly down-regulated (3 genes), and approximately up-/down-regulated (2 genes). The total times of their up- and down-expression were 130 and 79, respectively, demonstrating that expression of most of the genes was increased during LR, while a few decreased. The cell physiological and biochemical activities during LR were staggered according to the time relevance and were diverse and complicated in gene expression patterns. CONCLUSION: Drug metabolic capacity in regenerating liver was enhanced. Thirty-two genes play important roles during liver regeneration in rats. PMID:17109518

  20. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan; Dick, Travis B; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is prevalent in the general population and a growing indication for liver transplant. Longer wait times and challenges with pretransplant survivorship are expected, underscoring the need for improved management of attendant comorbidities. Recognition with potential modification of obesity, sarcopenia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in patients with NAFLD may have important implications in the pretransplant and posttransplant periods. Although patients with NAFLD have generally favorable postoperative outcomes, they are at risk for developing recurrent disease in their allograft, driving the need for pharmacotherapies and dietary innovations appropriate for use in the posttransplant period. PMID:27063277

  1. Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease There are a ... liver that can be treated with nonsurgical, interventional radiology techniques. Portal Hypertension Seen most frequently in patients ...

  2. Kidney Injury in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Regner, Kevin R; Singbartl, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in patients with liver disease and increases morbidity and mortality. Hepatorenal syndrome is a common cause of AKI in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and is due to alterations in systemic and renal hemodynamics. Serum creatinine-based estimation of kidney function is a key component of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease score in liver transplant candidates. Continuous renal replacement therapy is used in critically ill patients with liver failure and AKI. Simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK) may be required in patients with liver failure and prolonged AKI. Identification of appropriate candidates for SLK remains controversial. PMID:27339675

  3. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Can Use April May Calendar Liver Lowdown Mar 2014 Calendar of Events In The News Academic ... 2016 Calendar Jan Feb 2016 recipe Liver Lowdown Mar/Apr 2016 Liver Lowdown August 2016 Know Your ...

  4. Association between caffeine consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huafeng; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; Shiani, Ashok; Lipka, Seth; Shahzad, Ghulamullah; Kumar, Ambuj; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Caffeine consumption is reported to be associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the association between caffeine consumption and prevalence or hepatic fibrosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in observational studies. Methods: We searched the literature of all languages from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library from 1 January 1980 through 10 January 2015. Total caffeine consumption was defined as the daily intake of caffeine (mg/day) from all caffeine-containing products. Combined and subgroup analyses stratified by study designs, study locations, and type of caffeine intake were performed. Results: Four cross-sectional and two case control studies with a total of 20,064 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Among these, three studies with 18,990 subjects were included in the analysis for prevalence of NAFLD while the other three studies with 1074 subjects were for hepatic fibrosis. Total caffeine consumption (mg/day) was not significantly associated with either the prevalence [pooled mean difference (MD) 2.36; 95% confidence interval (CI) −35.92 to 40.64] or hepatic fibrosis (higher versus lower stages; pooled MD −39.95; 95% CI −132.72 to 52.82) of NAFLD. Subgroup analyses stratified by study designs and locations were also not significant. However, after stratifying by type of caffeine intake, regular coffee caffeine intake (mg/day) was significantly associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis of NAFLD (pooled MD −91.35; 95% CI −139.42 to −43.27; n = 2 studies). Conclusion: Although total caffeine intake is not associated with the prevalence or hepatic fibrosis of NAFLD, regular coffee caffeine consumption may significantly reduce hepatic fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26770272

  5. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases. PMID:26447962

  6. Screening in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  7. Metabolomic analysis of the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xue; Wahlang, Banrida; Wei, Xiaoli; Yin, Xinmin; Falkner, K Cameron; Prough, Russell A; Kim, Seong Ho; Mueller, Eugene G; McClain, Craig J; Cave, Matthew; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants and have been associated with abnormal liver enzymes and suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity, and the metabolic syndrome in epidemiological studies. In epidemiological surveys of human PCB exposure, PCB 153 has the highest serum levels among PCB congeners. To determine the hepatic effects of PCB 153 in mice, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control diet (CD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks, with or without PCB 153 coexposure. The metabolite extracts from mouse livers were analyzed using linear trap quadrupole-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (LTQ-FTICR MS) via direct infusion nanoelectrospray ionization (DI-nESI) mass spectrometry. The metabolomics analysis indicated no difference in the metabolic profile between mice fed the control diet with PCB 153 exposure (CD+PCB 153) and mice fed the control diet (CD) without PCB 153 exposure. However, compared with CD group, levels of 10 metabolites were increased and 15 metabolites were reduced in mice fed HFD. Moreover, compared to CD+PCB 153 group, the abundances of 6 metabolites were increased and 18 metabolites were decreased in the mice fed high fat diet with PCB 153 exposure (HFD+PCB 153). Compared with HFD group, the abundances of 2 metabolites were increased and of 12 metabolites were reduced in HFD+PCB 153 group. These observations agree with the histological results and indicate that the metabolic effects of PCB 153 were highly dependent on macronutrient interactions with HFD. Antioxidant depletion is likely to be an important consequence of this interaction, as this metabolic disturbance has previously been implicated in obesity and NAFLD. PMID:22686559

  8. Liver Transplantation for Cholestatic Liver Diseases in Adults.

    PubMed

    Khungar, Vandana; Goldberg, David Seth

    2016-02-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an established lifesaving therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, including primary cholestatic diseases, namely primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as secondary forms of cholestatic liver disease, including those with cholestatic complications of LT needing a retransplant. Patients with cholestatic liver diseases can be transplanted for complications of end-stage liver disease or for disease-specific symptoms before the onset of end-stage liver disease. These patients should be regularly assessed. Patient survival after LT for cholestatic liver diseases is generally better than for other indications. PMID:26593299

  9. Association of homocysteine level with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yining; Zhu, Jinzhou; Meng, Di; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between plasmatic higher of homocysteine level and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We aimed to investigate this association by conducting a meta-analysis. Literature was searched on PubMed from inception to January 2015. Eight studies evaluating plasma level of homocysteine in biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease subjects compared to healthy controls were included. Compared with the controls, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients witnessed a higher level of homocysteine [standard mean difference (SMD): 0.66 µmol/L, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.92 µmol/L], and were associated with a significant increased risk for hyperhomocysteinemia [odds ratio (OR) 5.09, 95% CI: 1.69, 15.32]. In addition, patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver presented 0.45 µmol/L higher levels of homocysteine compared to healthy controls (95% CI: 0.09, 0.82 µmol/L), whereas non-alcoholic steatohepatitis patients had 1.02 µmol/L higher levels of homocysteine (95% CI: 0.28, 1.76 µmol/L). There was neither difference of folate level nor vitamin B12 level between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease subjects and healthy controls. This study revealed that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients presented an increased serum concentration of homocysteine, and were associated with an increased risk of hyperhomocysteinemia. Further studies are needed to demonstrate a causal role of hyperhomocysteinemia in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26798201

  10. Association of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Subclinical Cardiovascular Changes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bonci, Enea; Chiesa, Claudio; Versacci, Paolo; Anania, Caterina; Silvestri, Lucia; Pacifico, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, primarily as a result of the epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is strongly associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia and is currently regarded as the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a highly atherogenic condition even at a very early age. Patients with NAFLD including pediatric subjects have a higher prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as shown by impaired flow-mediated vasodilation, increased carotid artery intima-media thickness, and arterial stiffness, which are independent of obesity and other established risk factors. More recent work has identified NAFLD as a risk factor not only for premature coronary heart disease and cardiovascular events, but also for early subclinical abnormalities in myocardial structure and function. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that NAFLD is associated with evidence of subclinical cardiac structural and functional abnormalities. PMID:26273598

  11. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  12. Effects of pentoxifylline on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Ma, Yan-Yan; Yu, Chao-Hui; Li, You-Ming

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline therapy in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: We searched PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biomedicine Database for all relevant controlled trials of pentoxifylline in patients with NAFLD from 1997 to July 2013. Five studies (3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials and 2 prospective cohort studies with concurrent controls) were included in this meta-analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.0 software. RESULTS: Five randomized trials of 147 patients with NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) were included. The results showed that compared to placebo, pentoxifylline therapy resulted in a significant decrease in body weight (P = 0.04), alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.00001), aspartate transaminase (P = 0.0006), glucose (P = 0.0008) and tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.007), but did not significantly affect body mass index (P = 0.28), total cholesterol (P = 0.80), triglyceride (P = 0.98), alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.29), γ-glutamyl transferase (P = 0.39) and interleukin-6 (P = 0.38). With regard to histological changes, pentoxifylline only reduced the NAFLD activity score (P < 0.00001) and improved lobular inflammation (P < 0.0001). Improvements in steatosis grade (P = 0.11), ballooning (P = 0.10) and fibrosis (P = 0.50) were not obvious. CONCLUSION: Pentoxifylline therapy results in weight loss, improved liver function and histological changes in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, pentoxifylline may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:24574727

  13. Polycystic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Onori, P.; Franchitto, A.; Mancinelli, R.; Carpino, G.; Alvaro, D.; Francis, H.; Alpini, G.; Gaudio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PCLDs) are genetic disorders with heterogeneous etiologies and a range of phenotypic presentations. PCLD exhibits both autosomal or recessive dominant pattern of inheritance and is characterized by the progressive development of multiple cysts, isolated or associated with polycystic kidney disease, that appear more extensive in women. Cholangiocytes have primary cilia, functionally important organelles (act as mechanosensors) that are involved in both normal developmental and pathological processes. The absence of polycystin-1, 2, and fibrocystin/polyductin, normally localized to primary cilia, represent a potential mechanism leading to cyst formation, associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, enhanced fluid secretion, abnormal cell–matrix interactions, and alterations in cell polarity. Proliferative and secretive activities of cystic epithelium can be regulated by estrogens either directly or by synergizing growth factors including nerve growth factor, IGF1, FSH and VEGF. The abnormalities of primary cilia and the sensitivity to proliferative effects of estrogens and different growth factors in PCLD cystic epithelium provide the morpho-functional basis for future treatment targets, based on the possible modulation of the formation and progression of hepatic cysts. PMID:20138815

  14. Effects of probiotics on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan-Yan; Li, Lin; Yu, Chao-Hui; Shen, Zhe; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, You-Ming

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the gut-liver axis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of probiotic therapy in NAFLD. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and Chinese Biomedicine Database for all relevant randomized controlled trials on probiotics in patients with NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). A statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.0 software. RESULTS: Four randomized trials involving 134 NAFLD/NASH patients were included. The results showed that probiotic therapy significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), total-cholesterol (T-chol), high density lipoprotein (HDL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) [ALT: weighted mean difference (WMD) -23.71, 95%CI: -33.46--13.95, P < 0.00001; AST: WMD -19.77, 95%CI: -32.55--7.00, P = 0.002; T-chol: WMD -0.28, 95%CI: -0.55--0.01, P = 0.04; HDL: WMD -0.09, 95%CI: -0.16-0.01, P = 0.03; TNF-α: WMD -0.32, 95%CI: -0.48--0.17, P < 0.0001; HOMA-IR: WMD -0.46, 95%CI: -0.73--0.19, P = 0.0008]. However, the use of probiotics was not associated with changes in body mass index (BMI), glucose (GLU) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) (BMI: WMD 0.05, 95%CI: -0.18-0.29, P = 0.64; GLU: WMD 0.05, 95%CI: -0.25-0.35, P = 0.76; LDL: WMD -0.38, 95%CI: -0.78-0.02, P = 0.06). CONCLUSION:Probiotic therapies can reduce liver aminotransferases, total-cholesterol, TNF-α and improve insulin resistance in NAFLD patients. Modulation of the gut microbiota represents a new treatment for NAFLD. PMID:24187469

  15. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While the ...

  16. Liver transplantation for polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pirenne, J; Aerts, R; Yoong, K; Gunson, B; Koshiba, T; Fourneau, I; Mayer, D; Buckels, J; Mirza, D; Roskams, T; Elias, E; Nevens, F; Fevery, J; McMaster, P

    2001-03-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) may provoke massive hepatomegaly and severe physical and social handicaps. Data on orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for PLD are rare and conflicting. Conservative surgery (resection or fenestration) is indicated for large single cysts, but its value for small diffuse cysts is questionable. In addition, conservative surgery is not devoid of morbidity and mortality. OLT offers the prospect of a fully curative treatment, but controversy remains because those patients usually have preserved liver function. Thus, we reviewed our experience with OLT for PLD. Sixteen adult women underwent OLT for small diffuse PLD between 1990 and 1999. Mean age was 45 years (range, 34 to 56 years). Fourteen patients had combined liver and kidney cystic disease, but only 1 patient required combined liver and kidney transplantation, whereas 13 patients underwent OLT alone. Two patients had isolated PLD. Indications for transplantation were massive hepatomegaly causing physical handicaps (n = 16), social handicaps (n = 16), malnutrition (n = 4), and cholestasis and/or portal hypertension (n = 5). OLT caused no technical difficulty in 15 of 16 patients (surgery duration, 6.8 hours; range, 5 to 8 hours), with blood transfusions of 7.9 units (range, 0 to 22 units). One patient who underwent attempted liver-mass reduction pre-OLT died of bleeding and pulmonary emboli. Native liver weight was 10 to 20 kg. Posttransplantation immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine or FK506, azathioprine, and steroids (discontinued at 3 months). Morbidity included biliary stricture (2 patients), revision for bleeding and hepatitis (1 patient), pneumothorax and subphrenic collection (1 patient), and tracheostomy (1 patient). One patient died of lung cancer 6 years posttransplantation. Both patient and graft survival rates are 87.5% (follow-up, 3 months to 9 years). Of 15 patients who underwent OLT alone, only 1 patient needed a kidney transplant 4 years after OLT. Kidney

  17. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  18. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  19. Nitric oxide in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko; Kim, Moon Young

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Despite its diverse and complicated roles, certain patterns of the effect of NO on the pathogenesis and progression of liver diseases are observed. In general, NO derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) is protective against disease development, while inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO contributes to pathological processes. This review addresses the roles of NO in the development of various liver diseases with a focus on recently published articles. We present here two recent advances in understanding NO-mediated signaling - nitrated fatty acids (NO2-FAs) and S-guanylation - and conclude with suggestions for future directions in NO-related studies on the liver. PMID:26027855

  20. Hemochromatosis gene and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernaez, Ruben; Yeung, Edwina; Clark, Jeanne M.; Kowdley, Kris V.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Kao, Wen Hong Linda

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Previous studies examining the relationship between the C282Y and H63D HFE mutations and presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have yielded conflicting results. The goal of this study was to systematically evaluate and summarize data on the association between these two variants and the presence of NAFLD. Methods The authors searched EMBASE and PUBMED from August 1, 1996 to August 12, 2010. Two investigators independently conducted data abstraction. Ethnic specific weighted prevalence was calculated, and pooled odds ratios were estimated using random effects model. Results From 2,542 references, the authors included 16 case-control studies and 14 case-only studies, or 2,610 cases and 7,298 controls. The majority of the studies came from Caucasian populations (2,287 cases and 4,275 controls). The weighted prevalence of HFE mutations in cases was comparable to controls. The meta-analysis was restricted to Caucasians only because the small sample size of non Caucasian participants. The pooled odds ratio for the presence of any HFE genetic variant in cases was 1.03 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.17; I2: 65.8%, 95% CI: 38.5, 81.0). The presence of other genotypes, and secondary analyses yielded similar non significant findings. Conclusion Our systematic review does not support an association between the HFE genetic variants and the presence of NAFLD. PMID:21354231

  1. Sleep Duration and the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Na; Wang, Peng; Yan, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between sleep duration and the risk of fatty liver disease (FLD). Thus, we quantitatively evaluated this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, based on a comprehensive electronic search in databases of PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, Wanfangdata and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (updated to April 2016). Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were extracted and pooled by using a random-effects model. Eight eligible studies involving 97,371 participants were included. We found that neither short nor long sleep duration was significantly related with FLD risk. For short sleep duration, the pooled OR was 1.17 (95% CI = 0.98-1.38), and for long sleep duration, the pooled OR was 1.01 (95% CI = 0.72-1.41). Subgroup analyses by sex, outcome, and exposure reference also did not identify any effect of sleep duration on FLD onset. In summary, our findings suggested that short or long sleep duration was not significantly associated with FLD risk. Further cohort studies with refined designs are still warranted to validate our results. PMID:27549512

  2. Sleep Duration and the Risk of Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Na; Wang, Peng; Yan, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported inconsistent results on the association between sleep duration and the risk of fatty liver disease (FLD). Thus, we quantitatively evaluated this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis, based on a comprehensive electronic search in databases of PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, Wanfangdata and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (updated to April 2016). Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were extracted and pooled by using a random-effects model. Eight eligible studies involving 97,371 participants were included. We found that neither short nor long sleep duration was significantly related with FLD risk. For short sleep duration, the pooled OR was 1.17 (95% CI = 0.98–1.38), and for long sleep duration, the pooled OR was 1.01 (95% CI = 0.72–1.41). Subgroup analyses by sex, outcome, and exposure reference also did not identify any effect of sleep duration on FLD onset. In summary, our findings suggested that short or long sleep duration was not significantly associated with FLD risk. Further cohort studies with refined designs are still warranted to validate our results. PMID:27549512

  3. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  4. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis ... linked to biliary atresia in newborn animals Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  5. Loss of brain function - liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chronic liver damage. Common causes of chronic liver disease in the United States are: Chronic hepatitis B ... hepatitis Bile duct disorders Some medicines Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Once you have ...

  6. Based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of serum albumin in different stages of liver disease for early screening primary liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Lin, Juqiang; Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Liu, Nenrong; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Despite the introduction of high-technology methods of detection and diagnosis, screening of primary liver cancer (PLC) remains imperfect. To diagnosis PLC earlier, Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) coupled with cellulose-acetate membrane electrophoresis were introduced to separate human serum albumin and SERS spectra. Three groups (15 normal persons' samples, 17 hepatitis/cirrhosis samples, 15 cases of PLC) of serum albumin were tested. Silver colloid was used to obtain SERS spectra of human serum albumin. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were also employed for statistical analysis. The mean Raman spectra of three groups and the difference spectra of any two suggested that the albumin has changed in liver patients. Compared to normal groups, some Raman peaks have shifted or even disappeared in hepatitis/cirrhosis and PLCs groups. The sensitivity and specificity between PLCs and normal groups is 80% and 93.3%. Among hepatitis/cirrhosis and normal groups, the sensitivity is 88.2% and specificity is also 93.3%. Besides, the sensitivity and specificity between PLCs and hepatitis/cirrhosis groups is 86.7% and 76.5%. All the above data and results indicated that early screening of PLC is potential by SERS in different stages of liver disease before cancer occurs.

  7. Liver diseases in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Majid; Vakilian, Farveh; Amin, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing public health concern as a consequence of the ageing of the population and the improved survival of patients with HF. HF is defined as impaired organ perfusion and/or high filling pressure. It is a systemic and chronic disease and as such involves many organs, not least the liver and kidney. The complex vascular system of the liver and its high metabolic activity render it vulnerable to circulation disturbances and trigger many molecular and haemodynamic changes in patients. There are many studies describing the impact of liver disease on patient outcomes. Hepatic dysfunction is commonly seen in HF patients and is closely correlated with a poor outcome. Knowledge about the mechanisms and impacts of liver disease in HF helps us to know the stage of the disease and treat it properly. Moreover, many drugs and toxins that are metabolised in the liver and contribute to drug interactions should also be taken into account when prescribing medication for HF patients. In light of the above-mentioned points, the authors have compiled this review on congestive hepatopathy with the aim of providing physicians and cardiologists with a succinct and useful guide on the role of the liver in HF. PMID:27326014

  8. Spectrum of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Kristina Rachel; Reinus, John

    2016-08-01

    Liver disease from excessive alcohol consumption is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a clear relationship between alcohol and a variety of health and socioeconomic problems. According to the World Health Organization, 3.3 million people die of alcohol-related causes annually. Despite public knowledge of its potential adverse effects, alcohol consumption and the morbidity and mortality from alcoholic liver disease (ALD) have increased. ALD comprises a spectrum of injury, including simple steatosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis, and cirrhosis. Rather than being distinct disease entities, these pathologic processes frequently overlap. PMID:27373606

  9. Association of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Tabibian, James H.; Ekstedt, Mattias; Kechagias, Stergios; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Hagström, Hannes; Yoon, Seung Kew; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; George, Jacob; Barrera, Francisco; Hafliðadóttir, Svanhildur; Björnsson, Einar Stefan; Armstrong, Matthew J.; Hopkins, Laurence J.; Gao, Xin; Francque, Sven; Verrijken, An; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Lindor, Keith D.; Charlton, Michael; Haring, Robin; Lerch, Markus M.; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Ryu, Seungho; Li, Guolin; Wong, Linda L.; Machado, Mariana; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Cassader, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent, under-recognized condition and a risk factor for renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence connects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to CKD. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine whether the presence and severity of NAFLD are associated with the presence and severity of CKD. Methods and Findings English and non-English articles from international online databases from 1980 through January 31, 2014 were searched. Observational studies assessing NAFLD by histology, imaging, or biochemistry and defining CKD as either estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or proteinuria were included. Two reviewers extracted studies independently and in duplicate. Individual participant data (IPD) were solicited from all selected studies. Studies providing IPD were combined with studies providing only aggregate data with the two-stage method. Main outcomes were pooled using random-effects models. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses were used to explore sources of heterogeneity and the effect of potential confounders. The influences of age, whole-body/abdominal obesity, homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and duration of follow-up on effect estimates were assessed by meta-regression. Thirty-three studies (63,902 participants, 16 population-based and 17 hospital-based, 20 cross-sectional, and 13 longitudinal) were included. For 20 studies (61% of included studies, 11 cross-sectional and nine longitudinal, 29,282 participants), we obtained IPD. NAFLD was associated with an increased risk of prevalent (odds ratio [OR] 2.12, 95% CI 1.69–2.66) and incident (hazard ratio [HR] 1.79, 95% CI 1.65–1.95) CKD. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was associated with a higher prevalence (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.58–4.05) and incidence (HR 2.12, 95% CI 1.42–3.17) of CKD than simple steatosis. Advanced fibrosis was associated with a higher prevalence (OR 5.20, 95% CI 3.14–8

  10. The Therapeutic Effect of Berberine in the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoyun; Wang, Chunyan; Hao, Shijun; Song, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the efficacy of berberine in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through meta-analysis. Method. We searched Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and so forth, until March 2016 for randomized controlled trials using berberine to treat NAFLD. Result. Six randomized controlled trials involving 501 patients were included in this study. The results showed that the efficacy of reducing TC, LDL, ALT, 2hPG, and HbA1c in NAFLD patients of the berberine group were significantly higher than that of control group. The subgroup analyses on TG, AST, and FBG indicated that treatment combined with berberine decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. Compared with other drugs, berberine alone decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. We also conducted a descriptive analysis on insulin resistance and radiography results that berberine can improve NAFLD patients' insulin resistance and fatty liver. Conclusion. According to analysis result, berberine has positive efficacy on blood lipids, blood glucose, liver function, insulin resistance, and fatty liver condition of NAFLD patients. However, due to the limitation of number and quality of trials included, more clinical randomized controlled trials with high quality are needed for further verification of the efficacy of berberine on NAFLD patients. PMID:27446224

  11. The Therapeutic Effect of Berberine in the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoyun; Wang, Chunyan; Hao, Shijun; Song, Haiyan; Yang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the efficacy of berberine in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through meta-analysis. Method. We searched Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and so forth, until March 2016 for randomized controlled trials using berberine to treat NAFLD. Result. Six randomized controlled trials involving 501 patients were included in this study. The results showed that the efficacy of reducing TC, LDL, ALT, 2hPG, and HbA1c in NAFLD patients of the berberine group were significantly higher than that of control group. The subgroup analyses on TG, AST, and FBG indicated that treatment combined with berberine decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. Compared with other drugs, berberine alone decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. We also conducted a descriptive analysis on insulin resistance and radiography results that berberine can improve NAFLD patients' insulin resistance and fatty liver. Conclusion. According to analysis result, berberine has positive efficacy on blood lipids, blood glucose, liver function, insulin resistance, and fatty liver condition of NAFLD patients. However, due to the limitation of number and quality of trials included, more clinical randomized controlled trials with high quality are needed for further verification of the efficacy of berberine on NAFLD patients. PMID:27446224

  12. Nuclear receptor variants in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Vincent; Liebe, Roman; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This snapshot reviews the current state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in regulating various aspects of liver metabolism. Interindividual differences in responses to diet and other 'in-' and environmental stressors can be caused by variants in components of the NR regulatory gene network. We recapitulate recent evidence for the application of NRs in genetic diagnosis of monogenic liver disease. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes mellitus, pinpoints key players in disease predisposition and progression. In particular, NR1H4 variants have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and gallstone disease. Other examples include studies of NR1I2 and NR1I3 polymorphisms in patients with drug-induced liver injury and NR5A2 variation in cholangiocarcinoma. Associations of NR gene variants have been identified in patients with dyslipidemia and other metabolic syndrome-associated traits by genome-wide studies. Evidence from these analyses confirms a role for NR variation in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. These new insights into the impact of NR variants offer perspectives for their future use in diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. PMID:26045277

  13. Liver Disease and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... 34% of Crohn’s patients with disease of the terminal ileum (the last segment of the small intestine). ... increased risk for developing gallstones because the diseased terminal ileum cannot absorb bile salts, which are necessary ...

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    MedlinePlus

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease What is Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)? FAT N AFLD is a name that is given to a ... and under “Liver Health Information view ‘Nonalcoholic fatty liver Disease (NAFLD/NASH)’ IMPORTANT REMINDER: This information from the ...

  15. Pulmonary Vascular Complications of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jason S.; Fallon, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome and portopulmonary hypertension are two pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease. The pathophysiology underlying each disorder is distinct, but patients with either condition may be limited by dyspnea. A careful evaluation of concomitant symptoms, the physical examination, pulmonary function testing and arterial blood gas analysis, and echocardiographic, imaging, and hemodynamic studies is crucial to establishing (and distinguishing) these diagnoses. Our understanding of the pathobiology, natural history, and treatment of these disorders has advanced considerably over the past decade; however, the presence of either still increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with underlying liver disease. There is no effective medical treatment for hepatopulmonary syndrome. Although liver transplantation can resolve hepatopulmonary syndrome, there appears to be worse survival even with transplantation. Liver transplantation poses a very high risk of death in those with significant portopulmonary hypertension, where targeted medical therapies may improve functional status and allow successful transplantation in a small number of select patients. PMID:23155142

  16. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental alcoholic liver disease. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship and consequences for alcoholic liver disease. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota. PMID:25872593

  17. Cordyceps sinensis protects against liver and heart injuries in a rat model of chronic kidney disease: a metabolomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Zhong, Fang; Tang, Xu-long; Lian, Fu-lin; Zhou, Qiao; Guo, Shan-mai; Liu, Jia-fu; Sun, Peng; Hao, Xu; Lu, Ying; Wang, Wei-ming; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Nai-xia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that the traditional Chinese medicine Cordyceps sinensis could improve the metabolic function of extrarenal organs to achieve its anti-chronic kidney disease (CKD) effects. Methods: Male SD rats were divided into CKD rats (with 5/6-nephrectomy), CKD rats treated with Cordyceps sinensis (4 mg•kg-1•d-1, po), and sham-operated rats. After an 8-week treatment, metabolites were extracted from the hearts and livers of the rats, and then subjected to 1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis. Results: Oxidative stress, energy metabolism, amino acid and protein metabolism and choline metabolism were considered as links between CKD and extrarenal organ dysfunction. Within the experimental period of 8 weeks, the metabolic disorders in the liver were more pronounced than in the heart, suggesting that CKD-related extrarenal organ dysfunctions occurred sequentially rather than simultaneously. Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis exerted statistically significant rescue effects on the liver and heart by reversely regulating levels of those metabolites that are typically perturbed in CKD. Conclusion: Oral administration of Cordyceps sinensis significantly attenuates the liver and heart injuries in CKD rats. The 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach has provided a systematic view for understanding of CKD and the drug treatment, which can also be used to elucidate the mechanisms of action of other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:24632844

  18. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care ... anti-mitochondrial antibodies, you are likely to have primary biliary cirrhosis. If the immune proteins are high and albumin ...

  19. Polycystic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Salustio, Raquel; Ribeiro, José Vaz

    2014-01-01

    A widespread use of ultrasound (US) examination is contributing to an increase in the diagnosis of renal and hepatic cysts. However, the vast majority of these lesions are benign with an indolent course during the patient's lifespan. Adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) is one of the most common diagnosed entities. APKD is a genetic disease defined by the presence of multiple kidney cysts, occasionally accompanied by hepatic cysts. The presence of hepatic cysts sparing kidneys is very rare and thereby must be assumed as a different clinical entity. This article describes a case of an exuberant hepatomegaly due to the presence of isolated multiple hepatic cysts without renal involvement. PMID:24443335

  20. Hematological Issues in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Shanholtz, Carl B; Sachdeva, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic liver failure are associated with numerous alterations in different features of the coagulation system. Consequently, there is widespread confusion regarding the potential for both bleeding and thrombosis in patients with liver disease. The risk of bleeding is related to the hemodynamic changes in portal pressures and venous congestion whereas the thrombotic risk stems from changes in the coagulation system. Antithrombotic prophylaxis and treatment of patients with hemorrhage and thrombosis requires careful assessment, interpretation of laboratory workup, and attention to coexistent morbidities. A framework for the management of these conditions is presented for clinicians. PMID:27339678

  1. Liver Transplantation for Alcohol-Related Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Narendra S; Kumar, Naveen; Saigal, Sanjiv; Rai, Rahul; Saraf, Neeraj; Soin, Arvinder S

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common indication for liver transplantation. It is a much debated indication for deceased donor liver transplantation due to organ shortage and potential of alcohol relapse after liver transplantation. A six-month abstinence before liver transplantation is required at most centers to decrease chances of alcohol relapse after liver transplantation. However, this rule is not relevant for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis or severely decompensated patients who are unlikely to survive till 6 months. Long-term care of these patients after liver transplantation includes assessment of relapse, smoking, and surveillance of de novo malignancies. Current review discusses role of abstinence, factors affecting alcohol relapse, liver transplantation for alcoholic hepatitis, role of living donor liver transplantation, and long-term care of ALD patients who undergo liver transplantation. PMID:27194896

  2. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk increased as weight went ... obese could be at increased risk for severe liver disease later in life, a new study suggests. The ...

  3. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed. PMID:25523277

  4. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  5. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Elizabeth M; Tiniakos, Dina G

    2010-01-01

    Histological analysis of liver biopsies remains a standard against which other methods of assessment for the presence and amount of hepatic injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are measured. Histological evaluation remains the sole method of distinguishing steatosis from advanced forms of NAFLD, i.e. nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Included in the lesions of NAFLD are steatosis, lobular and portal inflammation, hepatocyte injury in the forms of ballooning and apoptosis, and fibrosis. However, patterns of these lesions are as distinguishing as the lesions themselves. Liver injury in adults and children due to NAFLD may have different histological patterns. In this review, the rationale for liver biopsy, as well as the histopathological lesions, the microscopically observable patterns of injury, and the differential diagnoses of NAFLD and NASH are discussed. PMID:21072891

  6. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  7. Osteoporosis in liver disease: pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Holecki, Michał; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Duława, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects a substantial proportion of patients with chronic liver disease. Pathologic fracture in osteoporosis significantly affects quality of life and life expectancy. By some estimates, 40% of patients with chronic liver disease may experience osteoporotic fracture. In this study we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of specific liver disease entities and their relation to osteoporosis. PMID:27293541

  8. Alcohol Consumption and Liver Disease in Australia: A Time Series Analysis of the Period 1935–2006

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Heng; Livingston, Michael; Room, Robin; Dietze, Paul; Norström, Thor; Kerr, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to examine for Australia whether the link between population alcohol consumption and liver disease mortality varies over time, using 71 years of data. Methods: Overall and gender-specific rates of liver disease mortality were analysed in relation to total alcohol consumption as well as for different beverage types by using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) time series methods. Separate models were developed for the entire time period and for two sub-periods (1935–1975, 1976–2006). Results: A 1-l increase in adult per capita consumption of pure alcohol led to a rise of ∼10% in overall liver disease mortality rates and a 11 and 9% increase in female and male liver disease mortality, respectively. The strength of the relationship between per capita consumption and liver disease mortality diminished over time. Spirits consumption was found to be the main driving factor in liver mortality rates between 1935 and 1975, while beer consumption was found to be the most significant predictor in liver diseases in the last three decades. In a comparative perspective, the effect of per capita alcohol consumption on liver disease in Australia is similar to the USA, Southern and Eastern Europe countries, but weaker than in Canada and western European countries. Conclusion: An increase in per capita alcohol consumption in Australia is likely to lead to an increase in liver disease. Changes in the most important beverage over the study period suggest substantial shifts in drinking patterns and preferences among the heaviest Australian drinkers. PMID:24052533

  9. Therapy for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaurigue, Maryconi M; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism results in about 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide, representing 4% of all mortality. Although alcoholism is associated with more than 60 diseases, most mortality from alcoholism results from alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD includes alcoholic steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, in order of increasing severity. Important scoring systems of ALD severity include: Child-Pugh, a semi-quantitative scoring system useful to roughly characterize clinical severity; model for end-stage liver disease, a quantitative, objective scoring system used for prognostication and prioritization for liver transplantation; and discriminant function, used to determine whether to administer corticosteroids for alcoholic hepatitis. Abstinence is the cornerstone of ALD therapy. Psychotherapies, including twelve-step facilitation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and motivational enhancement therapy, help support abstinence. Disulfiram decreases alcohol consumption by causing unpleasant sensations after drinking alcohol from accumulation of acetaldehyde in serum, but disulfiram can be hepatotoxic. Adjunctive pharmacotherapies to reduce alcohol consumption include naltrexone, acamprosate, and baclofen. Nutritional therapy helps reverse muscle wasting, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies, and trace element deficiencies associated with ALD. Although reduced protein intake was previously recommended for advanced ALD to prevent hepatic encephalopathy, a diet containing 1.2-1.5 g of protein/kg per day is currently recommended to prevent muscle wasting. Corticosteroids are first-line therapy for severe alcoholic hepatitis (discriminant function ≥ 32), but proof of their efficacy in decreasing mortality remains elusive. Pentoxifylline is an alternative therapy. Complications of advanced ALD include ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, esophageal variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and

  10. Pregnancy and vascular liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd-Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  11. Pregnancy and Vascular Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd–Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  12. Analysis of LIF-Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of normal and liver diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Yu, Ting; Sun, Ruomin; Li, Siqi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, 514.5nm argon ion laser induced human serum Raman and auto-fluorescence spectra of normal, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer were measured and analyzed. The spectral differences between these three types of serums were observed and given brief explanations. Three parameters α, φ and Δλ were introduced to describe characteristics of each type of spectrum. Experimental results showed that these parameters might be applicable for discrimination of normal, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer, which will provide some reference values to explore the method of laser spectral diagnosis of cancer.

  13. Alcoholic liver disease and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig J; Barve, Shirish S; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy. Aggressive nutritional support is indicated in inpatients with ALD, and patients often need to be fed through an enteral feeding tube to achieve protein and calorie goals. Enteral nutritional support clearly improves nutrition status and may improve clinical outcome. Moreover, late-night snacks in outpatient cirrhotics improve nutritional status and lean body mass. Thus, with no FDA-approved therapy for ALD, careful nutritional intervention should be considered as frontline therapy. PMID:21284673

  14. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy. Aggressive nutritional support is indicated in inpatients with ALD, and patients often need to be fed through an enteral feeding tube to achieve protein and calorie goals. Enteral nutritional support clearly improves nutrition status and may improve clinical outcome. Moreover, late-night snacks in outpatient cirrhotics improve nutritional status and lean body mass. Thus, with no FDA-approved therapy for ALD, careful nutritional intervention should be considered as frontline therapy. PMID:21284673

  15. Analysis of normal and diseased liver tissue using auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Jia, Chunde; Lin, Junxiu; Kang, Youping

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, laser induced human serum Raman spectra of liver cancer are measured. The spectra differences in serum from normal people and liver cancer patients are analyzed. For the typical spectrum of normal serum, there are three sharp Raman peaks and relative intensity of Raman peaks excited by 514.5 nm is higher than that excited by 488.0 nm. However, for the Raman spectrum of liver cancer serum there are no peaks or very weak Raman peaks at the same positions. Results from more than two hundred case measurements show that clinical diagnostic accuracy is 92.86%. And then, the liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis are studied applying the technology of LIF. To liver cirrhosis, the shape of Raman peak is similar to normal and fluorescence spectrum is similar to that of liver cancer from statistic data. The experiment indicates that there is notable fluorescence difference between the abnormal and normal liver tissue and have blue shift in fluorescence peak. These results have important reference values to explore the method of laser spectrum diagnosis.

  16. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Nabiha; Renner, Eberhard L

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment modality for end stage liver disease caused by many etiologies including autoimmune processes. That said, the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreased over the years due to the availability of effective medical treatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superior transplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. While AIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limited clinical significance in most, but not all cases. Recurrent PSC, however, often progresses over years to a stage requiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence and the predisposing factors of disease recurrence remain debated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseases is required to develop preventive measures. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatment of recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC) following LT. PMID:26689244

  17. An association between dietary habits and traffic accidents in patients with chronic liver disease: A data-mining analysis

    PubMed Central

    KAWAGUCHI, TAKUMI; SUETSUGU, TAKURO; OGATA, SHYOU; IMANAGA, MINAMI; ISHII, KUMIKO; ESAKI, NAO; SUGIMOTO, MASAKO; OTSUYAMA, JYURI; NAGAMATSU, AYU; TANIGUCHI, EITARO; ITOU, MINORU; ORIISHI, TETSUHARU; IWASAKI, SHOKO; MIURA, HIROKO; TORIMURA, TAKUJI

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of traffic accidents in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) is high in the USA. However, the characteristics of patients, including dietary habits, differ between Japan and the USA. The present study investigated the incidence of traffic accidents in CLD patients and the clinical profiles associated with traffic accidents in Japan using a data-mining analysis. A cross-sectional study was performed and 256 subjects [148 CLD patients (CLD group) and 106 patients with other digestive diseases (disease control group)] were enrolled; 2 patients were excluded. The incidence of traffic accidents was compared between the two groups. Independent factors for traffic accidents were analyzed using logistic regression and decision-tree analyses. The incidence of traffic accidents did not differ between the CLD and disease control groups (8.8 vs. 11.3%). The results of the logistic regression analysis showed that yoghurt consumption was the only independent risk factor for traffic accidents (odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.16–0.85; P=0.0197). Similarly, the results of the decision-tree analysis showed that yoghurt consumption was the initial divergence variable. In patients who consumed yoghurt habitually, the incidence of traffic accidents was 6.6%, while that in patients who did not consume yoghurt was 16.0%. CLD was not identified as an independent factor in the logistic regression and decision-tree analyses. In conclusion, the difference in the incidence of traffic accidents in Japan between the CLD and disease control groups was insignificant. Furthermore, yoghurt consumption was an independent negative risk factor for traffic accidents in patients with digestive diseases, including CLD. PMID:27123257

  18. Fibrosis in autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Penz-Österreicher, Melitta; Österreicher, Christoph H; Trauner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease account for a significant part of end-stage liver disease and are leading indications for liver transplantation. Especially cholestatic liver diseases (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis) appear to be different from other chronic liver diseases with regards to pathogenesis. Portal fibroblasts located in the connective tissue surrounding bile ducts appear to be different from hepatic stellate cells with regards to expression of marker proteins and response the profibrogenic and mitogenic stimuli. In addition there is increasing evidence for a cross talk between activated cholangiocytes and portal myofibroblasts. Several animal models have improved our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these chronic liver diseases. In the present review, we discuss the current concepts and ideas with regards to myofibroblastic cell populations, mechanisms of fibrosis, summarize characteristic histological findings and currently employed animal models of autoimmune and cholestatic liver disease. PMID:21497742

  19. Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or indexes of liver health: a systematic review and meta-analysis1234

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mei; Ma, Jiantao; Patel, Kamal; Berger, Samantha; Lau, Joseph; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the concurrent temporal trend between simple sugar intakes, especially of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), and rates of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the United States. Objective: We examined the effect of different amounts and forms of dietary fructose on the incidence or prevalence of NAFLD and indexes of liver health in humans. Design: We conducted a systematic review of English-language, human studies of any design in children and adults with low to no alcohol intake and that reported at least one predetermined measure of liver health. The strength of the evidence was evaluated by considering risk of bias, consistency, directness, and precision. Results: Six observational studies and 21 intervention studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall strength of evidence for observational studies was rated insufficient because of high risk of biases and inconsistent study findings. Of 21 intervention studies, 19 studies were in adults without NAFLD (predominantly healthy, young men) and 1 study each in adults or children with NAFLD. We found a low level of evidence that a hypercaloric fructose diet (supplemented by pure fructose) increases liver fat and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations in healthy men compared with the consumption of a weight-maintenance diet. In addition, there was a low level of evidence that hypercaloric fructose and glucose diets have similar effects on liver fat and liver enzymes in healthy adults. There was insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion for effects of HFCS or sucrose on NAFLD. Conclusions: On the basis of indirect comparisons across study findings, the apparent association between indexes of liver health (ie, liver fat, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, alanine aminotransferase, AST, and γ-glutamyl transpeptase) and fructose or sucrose intake appear to be confounded by excessive energy intake. Overall, the available evidence is not sufficiently robust

  20. Screening analysis of candidate gene mutations in a kindred with polycystic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song; Cui, Kai; Sun, Zi-Qiang; Shen, Yang-Yang; Li, Pang; Wang, Zhen-Dan; Li, Fei-Fei; Gong, Ke-Nan; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To find potential mutable sites by detecting mutations of the candidate gene in a kindred with polycystic liver disease (PCLD). METHODS: First, we chose a kindred with PCLD and obtained five venous blood samples of this kindred after the family members signed the informed consent form. In the kindred two cases were diagnosed with PCLD, and the left three cases were normal individuals. All the blood samples were preserved at -85 °C. Second, we extracted the genomic DNA from the venous blood samples of the kindred using a QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and then performed long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with different primers. The exons of PKD1 were all sequenced with the forward and reverse primers to ensure the accuracy of the results. Next, we purified the PCR products and directly sequenced them using Big Dye Terminator Chemistry version 3.1. The sequencing reaction was conducted with BiomekFX (Beckman). Finally, we analyzed the results. RESULTS: A total of 42 normal exons were identified in detecting mutations of the PKD1 gene. A synonymous mutation occurred in exon 5. The mutation was a homozygous T in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the third codon and did not change the amino acid encoded by the codon. Missense mutations occurred in exons 11 and 35. These mutations were located in the second codon; they changed the amino acid sequence and existed in the dbSNP library. A nonsense mutation occurred in exon 15. The mutation was a heterozygous CT in the proband and was C in the reference sequence. This mutation was located in the first codon and resulted in a termination codon. This mutation had an obvious influence on the encoded protein and changed the length of the protein from 4303 to 2246 amino acids. This was a new mutation that was not present in the dbSNP library. CONCLUSION: The nonsense mutation of exon 15 existed in the proband and in the third individual. Additionally, the proband was heterozygous

  1. White liver disease in goats.

    PubMed

    Black, H; Hutton, J B; Sutherland, R J; James, M P

    1988-03-01

    Three field cases of ill-thrift, hepatic lipodystrophy and low tissue levels of vitamin B12 in young angora cross goats are reported. The cases meet the criteria for the diagnosis of white liver disease (WLD) described for sheep. The hypothesis that WLD is a metabolic consequence of cobalt/vit B12 deficiency in sheep and goats on a diet rich in propionate is developed, together with possible reasons for its occurrence in these species but not in cattle or red deer. PMID:16031425

  2. Liver disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J; Clark, M L; Sloane, J P; Powles, R L; McElwain, T J

    1982-01-01

    Liver dysfunction occurs after bone marrow transplantation but the relative importance of graft versus host disease and other factors, such as infection, radiation, and drugs, has not been clearly established. We have studied liver status before and after bone marrow transplantation in 43 consecutive patients and have related this to survival and factors that are recognised to cause liver injury. Minor abnormalities of liver tests occurred in 21% of patients before grafting but this did not influence survival or the development of liver disease after transplantation. During the first 50 days after grafting, 83% of patients had abnormal liver tests which were more severe in patients who subsequently died. Alanine transaminase was significantly higher in non-survivors and appeared to predict survival early after transplantation. Only non-survivors developed clinical signs of liver disease. Severe liver disease was always associated with graft versus host disease and atypia of the small bile ducts was the most useful histological marker of hepatic involvement with this disease. Two of the patients with hepatic graft versus host disease also has hepatic veno-occlusive disease and three fatalities had opportunistic infection of the liver, although, in the latter, death was not due primarily to liver dysfunction. Previous hepatitis and androgen therapy could not be implicated as important causes of hepatic damage but chemotherapy for acute leukaemia and conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation appear to be the most important factors in the development of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7042484

  3. Living donor liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mekeel, Kristin L; Moss, Adyr A; Reddy, Kunam S; Douglas, David D; Vargas, Hugo E; Carey, Elizabeth J; Byrne, Thomas J; Harrison, M E; Rakela, Jorge; Mulligan, David C

    2008-05-01

    In the current Model for End-Stage Liver Disease system, patients with polycystic liver disease (PCLD) who have a poor quality of life secondary to their massive hepatomegaly are no longer competitive for a deceased donor liver transplant if their liver function is well preserved. Traditionally, a caval resection has been advocated in these patients because of the difficulty of the hepatectomy with hepatomegaly, which makes living donation impossible. This series looks at 3 patients who underwent a caval sparing hepatectomy and subsequent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) for PCLD. Graft and patient survival was 100%, and there were few complications in either donors or recipients. LDLT is an ideal option for patients with PCLD and preserved liver function but poor quality of life. PMID:18433036

  4. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  5. Distinctly altered gut microbiota in the progression of liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Liu, Ping; Wei, Runmin; Chen, Wenlian; Rajani, Cynthia; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Alegado, Rosanna; Dong, Bing; Li, Defa; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies underscore important roles of intestinal microbiota and the bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) production in the pathogenesis of liver disease. However, how gut microbiota alters in response to the development of steatosis and subsequent progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. We aimed to study the gut microbial changes over liver disease progression using a streptozotocin-high fat diet (STZ-HFD) induced NASH-HCC C57BL/6J mouse model that is highly relevant to human liver disease. The fecal microbiota at various liver pathological stages was analyzed by 16S rDNA gene pyrosequencing. Both UniFrac analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed significant structural alterations in gut microbiota during the development of liver disease. Co-abundance network analysis highlighted relationships between genera. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the bacterial species, Atopobium spp., Bacteroides spp., Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides acidifaciens, Bacteroides uniformis, Clostridium cocleatum, Clostridium xylanolyticum and Desulfovibrio spp., markedly increased in model mice, were positively correlated with LPS levels and pathophysiological features. Taken together, the results showed that the gut microbiota was altered significantly in the progression of liver disease. The connection between the gut microbial ecology and the liver pathology may represent potential targets for the prevention and treatment of chronic liver disease and HCC. PMID:27036035

  6. Distinctly altered gut microbiota in the progression of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Liu, Ping; Wei, Runmin; Chen, Wenlian; Rajani, Cynthia; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Alegado, Rosanna; Dong, Bing; Li, Defa; Jia, Wei

    2016-04-12

    Recent studies underscore important roles of intestinal microbiota and the bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) production in the pathogenesis of liver disease. However, how gut microbiota alters in response to the development of steatosis and subsequent progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. We aimed to study the gut microbial changes over liver disease progression using a streptozotocin-high fat diet (STZ-HFD) induced NASH-HCC C57BL/6J mouse model that is highly relevant to human liver disease. The fecal microbiota at various liver pathological stages was analyzed by 16S rDNA gene pyrosequencing. Both UniFrac analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed significant structural alterations in gut microbiota during the development of liver disease. Co-abundance network analysis highlighted relationships between genera. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the bacterial species, Atopobium spp., Bacteroides spp., Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides acidifaciens, Bacteroides uniformis, Clostridium cocleatum, Clostridium xylanolyticum and Desulfovibrio spp., markedly increased in model mice, were positively correlated with LPS levels and pathophysiological features. Taken together, the results showed that the gut microbiota was altered significantly in the progression of liver disease. The connection between the gut microbial ecology and the liver pathology may represent potential targets for the prevention and treatment of chronic liver disease and HCC. PMID:27036035

  7. Quantitative Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Multiple Reaction Monitoring (LC-MS-MRM) Analysis of Site-specific Glycoforms of Haptoglobin in Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Sanda, Miloslav; Pompach, Petr; Brnakova, Zuzana; Wu, Jing; Makambi, Kepher; Goldman, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Development of liver disease is associated with the appearance of multiply fucosylated glycoforms of haptoglobin. To analyze the disease-related haptoglobin glycoforms in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, we have optimized an LC-MS-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) workflow for glycopeptide quantification. The final quantitative analysis included 24 site-specific glycoforms generated by treatment of a tryptic digest of haptoglobin with α(2–3,6,8)-neuraminidase and β(1–4)-galactosidase. The combination of LC-MS-MRM with exoglycosidase digests allowed resolution of isobaric glycoforms of the haptoglobin-T3 glycopeptide for quantification of the multiply fucosylated Lewis Y-containing glycoforms we have identified in the context of liver disease. Fourteen multiply fucosylated glycoforms of the 20 examined increased significantly in the liver disease group compared with healthy controls with an average 5-fold increase in intensity (p < 0.05). At the same time, two tri-antennary glycoforms without fucoses did not increase in the liver disease group, and two tetra-antennary glycoforms without fucoses showed a marginal increase (at most 40%) in intensity. Our analysis of 30 individual patient samples (10 healthy controls, 10 cirrhosis patients, and 10 hepatocellular carcinoma patients) showed that these glycoforms were substantially increased in a small subgroup of liver disease patients but did not significantly differ between the groups of hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis patients. The tri- and tetra-antennary singly fucosylated glycoforms are associated with a MELD score and low platelet counts (p < 0.05). The exoglycosidase-assisted LC-MS-MRM workflow, optimized for the quantification of fucosylated glycoforms of haptoglobin, can be used for quantification of these glycoforms on other glycopeptides with appropriate analytical behavior. PMID:23389048

  8. Genetic diseases that predispose to early liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Scorza, Manuela; Elce, Ausilia; Zarrilli, Federica; Liguori, Renato; Amato, Felice; Castaldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Inherited liver diseases are a group of metabolic and genetic defects that typically cause early chronic liver involvement. Most are due to a defect of an enzyme/transport protein that alters a metabolic pathway and exerts a pathogenic role mainly in the liver. The prevalence is variable, but most are rare pathologies. We review the pathophysiology of such diseases and the diagnostic contribution of laboratory tests, focusing on the role of molecular genetics. In fact, thanks to recent advances in genetics, molecular analysis permits early and specific diagnosis for most disorders and helps to reduce the invasive approach of liver biopsy. PMID:25132997

  9. Genetic Diseases That Predispose to Early Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Inherited liver diseases are a group of metabolic and genetic defects that typically cause early chronic liver involvement. Most are due to a defect of an enzyme/transport protein that alters a metabolic pathway and exerts a pathogenic role mainly in the liver. The prevalence is variable, but most are rare pathologies. We review the pathophysiology of such diseases and the diagnostic contribution of laboratory tests, focusing on the role of molecular genetics. In fact, thanks to recent advances in genetics, molecular analysis permits early and specific diagnosis for most disorders and helps to reduce the invasive approach of liver biopsy. PMID:25132997

  10. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  11. Animal models of chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meyer, Christoph; Xu, Chengfu; Weng, Honglei; Hellerbrand, Claus; ten Dijke, Peter; Dooley, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases are frequent and potentially life threatening for humans. The underlying etiologies are diverse, ranging from viral infections, autoimmune disorders, and intoxications (including alcohol abuse) to imbalanced diets. Although at early stages of disease the liver regenerates in the absence of the insult, advanced stages cannot be healed and may require organ transplantation. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms is mandatory for the design of new drugs to be used in clinic. Therefore, rodent models are being developed to mimic human liver disease. However, no model to date can completely recapitulate the "corresponding" human disorder. Limiting factors are the time frame required in humans to establish a certain liver disease and the fact that rodents possess a distinct immune system compared with humans and have different metabolic rates affecting liver homeostasis. These features account for the difficulties in developing adequate rodent models for studying disease progression and for testing new pharmaceuticals to be translated into the clinic. Nevertheless, traditional and new promising animal models that mimic certain attributes of chronic liver diseases are established and being used to deepen our understanding in the underlying mechanisms of distinct liver diseases. This review aims at providing a comprehensive overview of recent advances in animal models recapitulating different features and etiologies of human liver diseases. PMID:23275613

  12. Metabolic therapy: lessons from liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Marí, Montserrat; Colell, Anna; Morales, Albert; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C

    2011-12-01

    Fatty liver disease is one of most prevalent metabolic liver diseases, which includes alcoholic (ASH) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Its initial stage is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver, that can progress to steatohepatitis, a stage of the disease in which steatosis is accompanied by inflammation, hepatocellular death, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Recent evidence in experimental models as well as in patients with steatohepatitis have uncovered a role for cholesterol and sphingolipids, particularly ceramide, in the transition from steatosis to steatohepatitis, insulin resistance and hence disease progression. Cholesterol accumulation and its trafficking to mitochondria sensitizes fatty liver to subsequent hits including inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF/Fas, in a pathway involving ceramide generation by acidic sphingomyelinase (ASMase). Thus, targeting both cholesterol and/or ASMase may represent a novel therapeutic approach of relevance in ASH and NASH, two of the most common forms of liver diseases worldwide. PMID:21933146

  13. Alcoholic Liver Disease in Asia, Europe, and North America.

    PubMed

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Haber, Paul; McCaughan, Geoffrey W

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholic liver diseases comprise a spectrum of clinical disorders and changes in liver tissue that can be detected by pathology analysis. These range from steatosis to more severe signs and symptoms of liver disease associated with inflammation, such as those observed in patients with alcoholic hepatitis or cirrhosis. Although the relationship between alcohol consumption and liver disease is well established, severe alcohol-related morbidities develop in only a minority of people who consume alcohol in excess. Inter-individual differences in susceptibility to the toxic effects of alcohol have been studied extensively-they include pattern of alcohol consumption, sex, environmental factors (such as diet), and genetic factors, which vary widely among different parts of the world. Alcoholic liver disease is becoming more common in many parts of Asia, but is decreasing in Western Europe. Treatment approaches, including availability of medications, models of care, and approach to transplantation, differ among regions. PMID:26924091

  14. Liver diseases and aging: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Di Biase, Stefano; Koonen, Debby; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-12-01

    The liver is the only internal human organ capable of natural regeneration of lost tissue, as little as 25% of a liver can regenerate into a whole liver. The process of aging predisposes to hepatic functional and structural impairment and metabolic risk. Therefore, understanding how aging could affect the molecular pathology of liver diseases is particularly important, and few studies to date have tackled this complex process. The most common liver disease, affecting one-third of the overall population, is nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by an intrahepatic accumulation of lipids. NAFLD can evolve into nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation. NASH is a serious risk factor for disabling and deadly liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Old age seems to favor NAFLD, NASH, and ultimately HCC, in agreement with the inflamm-aging theory, according to which aging accrues inflammation. However, the incidence of HCC drops significantly in the very elderly (individuals aged more than 70) and the relationship between the progression of NAFLD/NASH/HCC and very old age is obscure. In this review, we discuss the literature and we argue that there might be an age window in which the liver becomes resistant to the development of injury; this needs to be studied to understand fully the interaction between age and liver diseases from a therapeutic perspective. PMID:23815295

  15. Vitamin E reduces liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Aiko; Kawabe, Naoto; Hashimoto, Senju; Murao, Michihito; Nakano, Takuji; Shimazaki, Hiroaki; Kan, Toshiki; Nakaoka, Kazunori; Ohki, Masashi; Takagawa, Yuka; Takamura, Tomoki; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E treatment on liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Thirty-eight NAFLD patients were administered vitamin E for > 1 year. The doses of vitamin E were 150, 300, or 600 mg; three times per day after each meal. Responses were assessed by liver enzyme levels [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotranferease (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP)], noninvasive scoring systems of hepatic fibrosis-4 [FIB-4 index and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet index (APRI)], and liver stiffness [velocity of shear wave (Vs)] measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. Vs measurements were performed at baseline and 12 mo after baseline. The patients were genotyped for the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) polymorphisms and then divided into either the CC/CG or GG group to examine each group’s responses to vitamin E treatment. RESULTS: We found marked differences in the platelet count, serum albumin levels, alkaline phosphatase levels, FIB-4 index, APRI, and Vs at baseline depending on the PNPLA3 polymorphism. AST, ALT, and γ-GTP levels (all P < 0.001); FIB-4 index (P = 0.035); APRI (P < 0.001); and Vs (P < 0.001) significantly decreased from baseline to 12 mo in the analysis of all patients. In the subset analyses of PNPLA3 genotypes, AST levels (P = 0.011), ALT levels (P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.005), APRI (P = 0.036), and Vs (P = 0.029) in genotype GG patients significantly improved, and AST and ALT levels (both P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.003), FIB-4 index (P = 0.017), and APRI (P < 0.001) in genotype CC/CG patients. CONCLUSION: One year of vitamin E treatment improved noninvasive fibrosis scores and liver stiffness in NAFLD patients. The responses were similar between different PNPLA3 genotypes. PMID:26644818

  16. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders Among Asian Americans, chronic liver disease is ... women. At a glance – Cancer Rates for Asian/Pacific Islanders (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  17. The Pathology of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Lindsay; Hart, John

    2016-08-01

    The term "alcoholic liver disease" encompasses a spectrum of pathologic conditions ranging from isolated steatosis to established cirrhosis. Within this spectrum, varying degrees of inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning degeneration, hepatocyte necrosis, cholestasis, and fibrosis may be encountered. This article reviews the characteristic histologic features of the many forms of alcoholic liver disease. Histologic scoring systems are described, and diseases with overlapping morphologic features and comorbid conditions are also discussed. PMID:27373610

  18. GFR Estimating Equations and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beben, Tomasz; Rifkin, Dena E.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to accurately assess the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of patients with liver disease in order to deliver care and allocate organs for transplantation in a way that improves outcomes. The most commonly used methods to estimate GFR in this population are based on creatinine, which is biased by these patients’ low creatinine production and potentially by elevated serum bilirubin and decreased albumin levels. None of the creatinine based estimated GFR (eGFR) equations have been specifically modified for a population with liver disease, and even measurement of a 24 hour creatinine clearance has limitations. In liver disease, all creatinine based estimates of GFR overestimate gold standard measured GFR (mGFR), and the degree of overestimation is highest at lower mGFR values and in more severe liver disease. Cystatin C based eGFR has shown promise in general population studies by demonstrating less bias than creatinine based eGFR and improved association with clinically important outcomes, but results in the liver disease population have been mixed and further studies are necessary. Ultimately, specific eGFR equations for liver disease or novel methods for estimating GFR may be necessary. However, for now, the limitations of currently available methods need to be appreciated to understand renal function in liver disease. PMID:26311594

  19. Cutaneous Manifestations of Common Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Jindal, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Skin functions as a window to our overall health and a number of systemic diseases result in various cutaneous changes. Knowledge of these manifestations helps in suspecting an underlying systemic illness. Cutaneous abnormalities are quite common in patients with liver diseases and this article aims to focus on these dermatoses. Cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with liver disease though common are nonspecific. They can also be seen in patients without liver diseases and generally do not indicate about a specific underlying hepatic disorder. The presence of a constellation of signs and symptoms is more useful in pointing toward an underlying hepatobiliary condition. The commonest symptom in patients with liver disease is pruritus which is often protracted and disabling. Other common features include spider angiomas, palmar erythema, paper money skin, xanthelasmas, pigmentary changes, and nutritional deficiencies. In this article, first the common cutaneous manifestations that may be associated with liver disorders are discussed and then common liver diseases with their specific cutaneous findings are discussed. Cutaneous abnormalities may be the first clue to the underlying liver disease. Identifying them is crucial for early diagnosis and better management. PMID:25755383

  20. Noninvasive Measures of Liver Fibrosis and Severity of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Catherine; Brown, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the degree of fibrosis is an important step in the assessment of disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. Liver biopsy has been the gold standard for estimating the extent of inflammation and fibrosis, although the procedure has limitations such as sampling error and variability. Noninvasive testing has been shown to be equally predictive in ruling out fibrosis or ruling in advanced fibrosis. Serum biomarkers and imaging-based tests have more limited predictive ability when classifying intermediate stages, but these tools can help identify which patients should receive antiviral treatment sooner and require ongoing cancer surveillance without the need for biopsy. Using a combination of serum markers and imaging tests may also be helpful in providing functional assessment of portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease.

  1. Cell and Tissue Engineering for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous hurdles presented by the complexity of the liver’s structure and function, advances in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and devices are accelerating the development of cell-based therapies for treating liver disease and liver failure. This State of the Art Review discusses both the near and long-term prospects for such cell-based therapies and the unique challenges for clinical translation. PMID:25031271

  2. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  3. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  4. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Vikas; Mansoor, Sana; Furuya, Katryn N

    2016-05-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and by 2012, more than one third of American children were overweight or obese. As a result, increasingly, children are developing complications of obesity including liver disease. In fact, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common form of chronic liver disease seen in children today. Recently, there has been a burgeoning literature examining the pathogenesis, genetic markers, and role of the microbiome in this disease. On the clinical front, new modalities of diagnosing hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis are being developed to provide non-invasive methods of surveillance in children. Lastly, the mainstay of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been largely through lifestyle interventions, namely, dieting and exercise. Currently, there are a number of clinical trials examining novel lifestyle and drug therapies for NAFLD that are registered with the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov website. PMID:27086005

  5. MicroRNAs in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Gyongyi; Bala, Shashi

    2014-01-01

    Small, noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological functions in the liver and increasing evidence suggests that they have a role in liver pathology. This Review summarizes advances in the field of miRNAs in liver diseases, inflammation and cirrhosis. MicroRNA-122, the most abundant miRNA in hepatocytes, has well-defined roles in HCV replication, and data indicate that it also serves as a viable therapeutic target. The role of miR-122 is also emerging in other liver diseases. Ample evidence exists for the important regulatory potential of other miRNAs in conditions associated with liver inflammation related to alcohol use, the metabolic syndrome or autoimmune processes. In addition, a broad array of miRNAs have been associated with the development of liver fibrosis both in animal models and human studies. The significance of the function and cellular distribution of miRNAs in the liver and the potential of miRNAs as a means of communication between cells and organs is discussed as well as the emerging utility of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of different forms of liver damage and as early markers of disease and progression in hepatocellular carcinoma. Importantly, miRNA modulation in the liver represents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment armamentarium of hepatologists in the future. PMID:23689081

  6. TGF-β signalling and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Isabel; Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Dooley, Steven; Dewidar, Bedair; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family signalling pathways play essential roles in the regulation of different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration or cell death, which are essential for the homeostasis of tissues and organs. Because of the diverse and pleiotropic TGF-β functions, deregulation of its pathways contributes to human disease. In the case of the liver, TGF-β signalling participates in all stages of disease progression, from initial liver injury through inflammation and fibrosis, to cirrhosis and cancer. TGF-β has cytostatic and apoptotic effects in hepatocytes, promoting liver differentiation during embryogenesis and physiological liver regeneration. However, high levels of TGF-β, as a consequence of chronic liver damage, result in activation of stellate cells to myofibroblasts and massive hepatocyte cell death, which contributes to the promotion of liver fibrosis and later cirrhosis. During liver tumorigenesis, TGF-β may behave as a suppressor factor at early stages; however, there is strong evidence that overactivation of TGF-β signalling might contribute to later tumour progression, once cells escape from its cytostatic effects. For these reasons, targeting the TGF-β signalling pathway is being explored to counteract liver disease progression. In this review, we aim to shed light on the state-of-the-art in the signalling pathways induced by TGF-β that are involved in different stages of liver physiology and pathology. PMID:26807763

  7. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  8. Top-down and bottom-up identification of proteins by liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry of healthy and diseased human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Martin, Nicholas J; Lalor, Patricia F; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2014-11-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA MS) has the potential to become a useful tool in the spatially-resolved profiling of proteins in substrates. Here, the approach has been applied to the analysis of thin tissue sections from human liver. The aim was to determine whether LESA MS was a suitable approach for the detection of protein biomarkers of nonalcoholic liver disease (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), with a view to the eventual development of LESA MS for imaging NASH pathology. Two approaches were considered. In the first, endogenous proteins were extracted from liver tissue sections by LESA, subjected to automated trypsin digestion, and the resulting peptide mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (bottom-up approach). In the second (top-down approach), endogenous proteins were extracted by LESA, and analyzed intact. Selected protein ions were subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. The bottom-up approach resulted in the identification of over 500 proteins; however identification of key protein biomarkers, liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), and its variant (Thr→Ala, position 94), was unreliable and irreproducible. Top-down LESA MS analysis of healthy and diseased liver tissue revealed peaks corresponding to multiple (~15-25) proteins. MS/MS of four of these proteins identified them as FABP1, its variant, α-hemoglobin, and 10 kDa heat shock protein. The reliable identification of FABP1 and its variant by top-down LESA MS suggests that the approach may be suitable for imaging NASH pathology in sections from liver biopsies. PMID:25183224

  9. Top-Down and Bottom-Up Identification of Proteins by Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry of Healthy and Diseased Human Liver Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Martin, Nicholas J.; Lalor, Patricia F.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2014-09-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA MS) has the potential to become a useful tool in the spatially-resolved profiling of proteins in substrates. Here, the approach has been applied to the analysis of thin tissue sections from human liver. The aim was to determine whether LESA MS was a suitable approach for the detection of protein biomarkers of nonalcoholic liver disease (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), with a view to the eventual development of LESA MS for imaging NASH pathology. Two approaches were considered. In the first, endogenous proteins were extracted from liver tissue sections by LESA, subjected to automated trypsin digestion, and the resulting peptide mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (bottom-up approach). In the second (top-down approach), endogenous proteins were extracted by LESA, and analyzed intact. Selected protein ions were subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. The bottom-up approach resulted in the identification of over 500 proteins; however identification of key protein biomarkers, liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), and its variant (Thr→Ala, position 94), was unreliable and irreproducible. Top-down LESA MS analysis of healthy and diseased liver tissue revealed peaks corresponding to multiple (~15-25) proteins. MS/MS of four of these proteins identified them as FABP1, its variant, α-hemoglobin, and 10 kDa heat shock protein. The reliable identification of FABP1 and its variant by top-down LESA MS suggests that the approach may be suitable for imaging NASH pathology in sections from liver biopsies.

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Wu, Jun; Hernaez, Ruben; Kim, Lauren J; Palmer, Cameron D; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E; Launer, Lenore J; Nalls, Michael A; Clark, Jeanne M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; Butler, Johannah L; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; Voight, Benjamin F; Carr, J Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F; Harris, Tamara B; Fox, Caroline S; Smith, Albert V; Kao, W H Linda; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2011-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (∼26%-27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ∼2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10(-8)) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT-assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits. PMID:21423719

  11. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies Variants Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease That Have Distinct Effects on Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Cameron D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E.; Launer, Lenore J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Butler, Johannah L.; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic steatosis, a non-invasive measure of NAFLD, in large population based samples. Using variance components methods, we show that CT hepatic steatosis is heritable (∼26%–27%) in family-based Amish, Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies (n = 880 to 3,070). By carrying out a fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results between CT hepatic steatosis and ∼2.4 million imputed or genotyped SNPs in 7,176 individuals from the Old Order Amish, Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study (AGES), Family Heart, and Framingham Heart Studies, we identify variants associated at genome-wide significant levels (p<5×10−8) in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, and PPP1R3B. We genotype these and 42 other top CT hepatic steatosis-associated SNPs in 592 subjects with biopsy-proven NAFLD from the NASH Clinical Research Network (NASH CRN). In comparisons with 1,405 healthy controls from the Myocardial Genetics Consortium (MIGen), we observe significant associations with histologic NAFLD at variants in or near NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and PNPLA3, but not PPP1R3B. Variants at these five loci exhibit distinct patterns of association with serum lipids, as well as glycemic and anthropometric traits. We identify common genetic variants influencing CT–assessed steatosis and risk of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis associated variants are not uniformly associated with NASH/fibrosis or result in abnormalities in serum lipids or glycemic and anthropometric traits, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in the pathways influencing these traits. PMID:21423719

  12. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptome suggests divergent liver function among human, mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Ping, Jie; Chen, Hui; Jiao, Longxian; Zheng, Siyuan; Han, Ze-Guang; Hao, Pei; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    The human liver plays a vital role in meeting the body's metabolic needs and maintaining homeostasis. To address the molecular mechanisms of liver function, we integrated multiple gene expression datasets from microarray, MPSS, SAGE and EST platforms to generate a transcriptome atlas of the normal human liver. Our results show that 17396 genes are expressed in the human liver. 238 genes were identified as liver enrichment genes, involved in the functions of immune response and metabolic processes, from the MPSS and EST datasets. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptomes was performed in humans, mice and rats with microarray datasets shows that the expression profile of homologous genes remains significantly different between mouse/rat and human, suggesting a functional variance and regulation bias of genes expressed in the livers. The integrated liver transcriptome data should provide a valuable resource for the in-depth understanding of human liver biology and liver disease. PMID:20800674

  13. Telomeres, NAFLD and Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Donati, Benedetta; Valenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres consist of repeat DNA sequences located at the terminal portion of chromosomes that shorten during mitosis, protecting the tips of chromosomes. During chronic degenerative conditions associated with high cell replication rate, progressive telomere attrition is accentuated, favoring senescence and genomic instability. Several lines of evidence suggest that this process is involved in liver disease progression: (a) telomere shortening and alterations in the expression of proteins protecting the telomere are associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; (b) advanced liver damage is a feature of a spectrum of genetic diseases impairing telomere function, and inactivating germline mutations in the telomerase complex (including human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) and human Telomerase RNA Component (hTERC)) are enriched in cirrhotic patients independently of the etiology; and (c) experimental models suggest that telomerase protects from liver fibrosis progression. Conversely, reactivation of telomerase occurs during hepatocarcinogenesis, allowing the immortalization of the neoplastic clone. The role of telomere attrition may be particularly relevant in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver, an emerging cause of advanced liver disease. Modulation of telomerase or shelterins may be exploited to prevent liver disease progression, and to define specific treatments for different stages of liver disease. PMID:26999107

  14. Telomeres, NAFLD and Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Benedetta; Valenti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres consist of repeat DNA sequences located at the terminal portion of chromosomes that shorten during mitosis, protecting the tips of chromosomes. During chronic degenerative conditions associated with high cell replication rate, progressive telomere attrition is accentuated, favoring senescence and genomic instability. Several lines of evidence suggest that this process is involved in liver disease progression: (a) telomere shortening and alterations in the expression of proteins protecting the telomere are associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; (b) advanced liver damage is a feature of a spectrum of genetic diseases impairing telomere function, and inactivating germline mutations in the telomerase complex (including human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) and human Telomerase RNA Component (hTERC)) are enriched in cirrhotic patients independently of the etiology; and (c) experimental models suggest that telomerase protects from liver fibrosis progression. Conversely, reactivation of telomerase occurs during hepatocarcinogenesis, allowing the immortalization of the neoplastic clone. The role of telomere attrition may be particularly relevant in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver, an emerging cause of advanced liver disease. Modulation of telomerase or shelterins may be exploited to prevent liver disease progression, and to define specific treatments for different stages of liver disease. PMID:26999107

  15. [Treatment of parasitic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Lecuna, V

    1989-01-01

    Most of primary and secondary parasitic liver diseases, at present can be property treated with drugs. Venezuelan pharmaceutic market has some peculiarities that have determined the disappearance from the market of many drugs such as emetine, thiabendazole, quinacrine and niclosamide. Diloxanide never appeared. Venezuela has no commercial international treatises that protect international patents in the pharmaceutical area. In addition, government regulation of cost of drugs is very strict. This is particularly true with old drugs (such as emetine or quinacrine) which had such a low price that is non-commercial for the maker of the drug, usually a large transnational, and is withdrawn from the market. Flexibility of prices is quite easy for new antibiotics which are very expensive. Frequently small national companies import the drug from Italy and Japan which sell the drug independently from international treats. Such companies frequently produce the drug for the government social system, but are unreliable and also frequently they withdraw the drug a variable period of time. The government, through the Ministry of Public Health administer free treatment with drugs for malaria, tuberculosis and leprosy. The severe economic crisis of the country has severely impaired the preventive programs and there is an increase of malaria due to gold mining in the south of the country and falciparum chloroquine resistance and an increase of schistosomiasis in a previous free area. Also administration of drugs for malaria has been severely impaired, mainly for economic reasons. The establishment of a National Government Laboratory is an old (as far as 1946) political goal, but has remained in the political intention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2535455

  16. Quantitative analysis of site-specific N-glycans on sera haptoglobin β chain in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Kai; Sun, Chun; Lu, Haojie; Liu, Yinkun

    2013-12-01

    The site-specific characterization of N-glycans in glycoproteins with the potential of clinical application is important. In our previous report, the overall N-glycans of sera haptoglobin (Hp) β chain were found to be different in liver diseases. Hp β chain contains four potential sites of N-glycosylation. In this study, we investigated the potential change of N-glycans on Hp β chain in a site-specific fashion. Sera Hp β chain in healthy individuals as well as patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV), liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were purified, digested and subjected to liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-higher energy collision dissociation mass spectrometry, which allowed identification and structure determination of the glycopeptide, as well as the relative quantification of glycans present on each glycopeptide. The quantitative results revealed that the sialylation of NLFLN(207)HSEN(211)ATAK and the fucosylated structure at all glycopeptides increased significantly in LC and HCC patients compared with those in HBV patients and healthy individuals. A set of different N-glycan patterns of Hp β chain in various liver diseases has been determined. Thus, the sialylated and fucosylated glycoforms of Hp β chain might be related to early hepatocarcinogenesis and also might be useful as novel differential markers for LC and HCC patients. PMID:24103369

  17. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

  18. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk ... Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according ...

  19. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism. PMID:26447960

  20. Liver diseases in pregnancy: liver transplantation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-11-21

    Pregnancy in patients with advanced liver disease is uncommon as most women with decompensated cirrhosis are infertile and have high rate of anovulation. However, if gestation ensued; it is very challenging and carries high risks for both the mother and the baby such as higher rates of spontaneous abortion, prematurity, pulmonary hypertension, splenic artery aneurysm rupture, postpartum hemorrhage, and a potential for life-threatening variceal hemorrhage and hepatic decompensation. In contrary, with orthotopic liver transplantation, menstruation resumes and most women of childbearing age are able to conceive, give birth and lead a better quality of life. Women with orthotopic liver transplantation seeking pregnancy should be managed carefully by a team consultation with transplant hepatologist, maternal-fetal medicine specialist and other specialists. Pregnant liver transplant recipients need to stay on immunosuppression medication to prevent allograft rejection. Furthermore, these medications need to be monitored carefully and continued throughout pregnancy to avoid potential adverse effects to mother and baby. Thus delaying pregnancy 1 to 2 years after transplantation minimizes fetal exposure to high doses of immunosuppressants. Pregnant female liver transplant patients have a high rate of cesarean delivery likely due to the high rate of prematurity in this population. Recent reports suggest that with close monitoring and multidisciplinary team approach, most female liver transplant recipient of childbearing age will lead a successful pregnancy. PMID:24282354

  1. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders were seven times ... At a glance – Cancer Rates for Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Liver & IBD Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  2. Gut-liver axis in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) has been among the leading causes of cirrhosis and liver-related death worldwide for decades. Early discoveries in alcoholic liver disease identified increased levels of bacterial endotoxin in the portal circulation, suggesting a role for gut-derived toxins in ALD. Indeed, alcohol consumption can disrupt the intestinal epithelial barrier and result in increased gut permeability that increasingly is recognized as a major factor in ALD. Bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide, is a prototypic microbe-derived inflammatory signal that contributes to inflammation in ALD through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4. Recent studies also have shown that alcohol consumption is associated with alterations in the gut microbiome, and the dysbalance of pathogenic and commensal organisms in the intestinal microbiome may contribute to the abnormal gut-liver axis in ALD. Indeed, bacterial decontamination improves ALD both in human and animal models. This short review summarizes recent findings and highlights emerging trends in the gut-liver axis relevant to ALD. PMID:25447847

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a multi-systemic disease

    PubMed Central

    Fotbolcu, Hakan; Zorlu, Elçin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD includes a wide spectrum of liver conditions ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and advanced hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD has been recognized as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome linked with insulin resistance. NAFLD should be considered not only a liver specific disease but also an early mediator of systemic diseases. Therefore, NAFLD is usually associated with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD is highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The underlying mechanisms and pathogenesis of NAFLD with regard to other medical disorders are not yet fully understood. This review focuses on pathogenesis of NAFLD and its relation with other systemic diseases. PMID:27122660

  4. Glycerol clearance in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D G; Alberti, K G; Wright, R; Blain, P G

    1982-01-01

    Glycerol clearance was studied by a primed dose-constant infusion technique in 14 patients with alcoholic liver disease and six normal control subjects. Fasting blood glycerol concentrations were raised in the alcoholic subjects (0.09 +/- 0.01 vs 0.06 +/- 0.01 mumol/l, p less than 0.05) and glycerol clearance was impaired (24.5 +/- 1.9 vs 37.5 +/- 3.2 ml/kg/min, p less than 0.005). Endogenous production rate of glycerol and distribution space at steady state were similar in alcoholic and control subjects. The metabolic clearance rate of glycerol correlated negatively with basal glycerol concentrations. Thus tissue uptake of glycerol is impaired in liver disease. As glycerol is metabolised primarily in the liver by conversion to glucose, these data suggest a defect of gluconeogenesis in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:7076002

  5. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanliang; Ni, Yinhua; Nagata, Naoto; Xu, Liang; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin. PMID:27563875

  6. Natural History of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Goh, George Boon-Bee; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains among the most common liver diseases worldwide, with increasing prevalence in concert with the obesity and metabolic syndrome epidemic. The evidence on the natural history, albeit with some ambiguity, suggests the potential for some subsets of NAFLD to progress to cirrhosis, liver-related complications and mortality with fibrosis being the most important predictor of hard long-term endpoints such as mortality and liver complications. In this setting, NAFLD proves to be a formidable disease entity, with considerable clinical burden, for both the present and the future. Our understanding of the natural history of NAFLD is constantly evolving, with nascent data challenging current dogma. Further clarification of the natural history is required with well-designed, well-defined studies using prospectively collected data. Identifying the predictors of long-term outcomes should be used to direct development of clinical trial endpoints in NAFLD. PMID:27003142

  7. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  8. [MRT of the liver in Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Steiner, S; Hammerstingl, R; Schwarz, S; Kraft, E; Weinzierl, M; Felix, R

    1994-01-01

    To show that Wilson's disease is one likely cause of multiple low-intensity nodules of the liver we obtained MR images in 16 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Wilson's disease. Corresponding to morphological changes MRI enabled the subdivision of the patients into two groups. Using a T2-weighted spin-echo sequence (TR/TE = 2000/45-90) liver parenchyma showed multiple tiny low-intensity-nodules surrounded by high-intensity septa in 10 out of 16 patients. 5 patients had also low-intensity nodules in T1-weighted images (TR/TE = 600/20). In patients of this group histopathology revealed liver cirrhosis (n = 7) and fibrosis (n = 2). Common feature of this patient group was marked inflammatory cell infiltration into fibrous septa, increase of copper concentration in liver parenchyma and distinct pathological changes of laboratory data. In the remaining 6 patients no pathological change of liver morphology was demonstrated by MRI corresponding to slight histopathological changes of parenchyma and normal laboratory data. As low-intensity nodules surrounded by high intensity septa can be demonstrated in patients with marked inflammatory infiltration of liver parenchyma MRI may help to define Wilson patients with poorer prognosis. In patients with low-intensity nodules of the liver and unknown cause of liver cirrhosis laboratory data and histopathology should be checked when searching for disorders of copper metabolism. PMID:8305691

  9. Cardiac manifestations in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Milić, Sandra; Lulić, Davorka; Štimac, Davor; Ružić, Alen; Zaputović, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is the most prevalent cause of progressive liver disease in Europe. Alcoholic cirrhosis occurs in 8%-20% of cases of alcoholic liver disease. It has significant influence on cardiovascular system and haemodynamics through increased heart rate, cardiac output, decreased systemic vascular resistance, arterial pressure and plasma volume expansion. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is characterised by systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysiological abnormalities, if no other underlying cardiac disease is present. It is often unmasked only during pharmacological or physiological stress, when compensatory mechanisms of the heart become insufficient to maintain adequate cardiac output. Low-to-moderate intake of alcohol can be cardioprotective. However, heavy drinking is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, such as alcoholic cardiomyopathy, arterial hypertension, atrial arrhythmias as well as haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is characterised by dilated left ventricle (LV), increased LV mass, normal or reduced LV wall thickness and systolic dysfunction. PMID:26850503

  10. How to Diagnose Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    de Alwis, Nimantha M W; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are asymptomatic and present with either unexplained abnormal liver blood tests or a bright liver on ultrasonography. Some patients will have normal liver blood tests raising the issue of whether patients with risk factors for NAFLD (diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome [MS]) should be screened for its presence with biomarkers, such as the fatty liver index (FLI). The diagnosis of NAFLD requires the exclusion of other causes of chronic liver disease and steatosis, especially heavy alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis particularly HCV genotype 3. Diagnostic work-up should include evaluation of family and personal history of components of the MS and assessment of liver tests, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and HDL levels. A drug history is important due to a number being associated with steatosis. To confirm the diagnosis of NAFLD and quantify steatosis, ultrasound (US) and MRI-based techniques are available but none are in routine use outside clinical trials. Standard US is no more accurate than biomarkers such as FLI. The accurate staging of NAFLD requires liver biopsy; however, this is clearly impractical for such a prevalent disease. Accordingly, a number of imaging and blood-based biomarker tests have been evaluated. While none have proved reliable for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, several have proved accurate in diagnosing the presence of stage 3 or 4 fibrosis, including the NAFLD fibrosis score, fibrosis-4 and the enhanced liver fibrosis test. Of the imaging techniques, elastography has received the most attention and is being used in routine clinical practice. US acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and MR-based elastography have recently been described but none are sufficiently accurate to replace liver biopsy for clinical trials as yet or are cost effective for use in routine clinical settings. PMID:27547937

  11. New Approaches for Studying Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Bin; Karin, Michael; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Brenner, David

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is major cause of chronic liver injury which results in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. According to the surveillance report published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, liver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States with 48 % of these deaths being attributed to excessive alcohol consumption. ALD includes a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several mechanisms play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. These include ethanol–induced oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione, pathological methionine metabolism, increased gut permeability and release of endotoxins into the portal blood, recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells including bone marrow-derived and liver resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Chronic alcohol consumption results in liver damage and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and myofibroblasts, leading to liver fibrosis. Here we discuss the current view on factors that are specific for different stages of ALD and those that regulate its progression, including cytokines and chemokines, alcohol-responsive intracellular signaling pathways, and transcriptional factors. We also review recent studies demonstrating that alcohol-mediated changes can be regulated on an epigenetic level, including microRNAs. Finally, we discuss the reversibility of liver fibrosis and inactivation of HSCs as a potential strategy for treating alcohol-induced liver damage. PMID:26594598

  12. Telomere length in human liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Y; Nouso, K; Higashi, T; Nakatsukasa, H; Hino, N; Ashida, K; Kinugasa, N; Yoshida, K; Uematsu, S; Tsuji, T

    1996-10-01

    To determine the role of telomere-mediated gene stability in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined the telomere length of human liver with or without chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). The mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length of normal liver (n = 13), chronic hepatitis (n = 11), liver cirrhosis (n = 24) and HCC (n = 24) was 7.8 +/- 0.2, 7.1 +/- 0.3, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.2 kb, respectively (mean +/- standard error). TRF length decreased with a progression of chronic liver diseases and that in HCC was significantly shorter than that in other chronic liver diseases (p < 0.05). The ratios of TRF length of HCC to that of corresponding surrounding liver of well differentiated (n = 7), moderately differentiated (n = 10) and poorly differentiated (n = 4) HCCs were 0.83 +/- 0.06, 0.75 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.09, respectively. The ratio of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly higher than that of moderately differentiated HCC (p < 0.05). A comparison between the size and telomere length ratio of moderately differentiated HCCs revealed a decrease of the ratio with size until it reached 50 mm in diameter. In contrast, the ratio increased as the size enlarged over 50 mm. These findings suggest that the gene stability of the liver cells mediated by the telomere is reduced as chronic liver disease progresses and that telomerase is activated in poorly differentiated HCC and moderately differentiated HCC over 50 mm in diameter. PMID:8938628

  13. Associations between Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) Polymorphisms and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Man-Yi; Zhang, Li; Shi, Song-Li; Lin, Jing-Na

    2016-01-01

    Background C677T and A1298C are the most common allelic variants of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) gene. The association between MTHFR polymorphisms and the occurrence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains controversial. This study was thus performed to examine whether MTHFR mutations are associated with the susceptibility to NAFLD. Methods A first meta-analysis on the association between the MTHFR polymorphisms and NAFLD risks was carried out via Review Manager 5.0 and Stata/SE 12.0 software. The on-line databases, such as PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, WOS, Scopus and EBSCOhost (updated to April 1st, 2016), were searched for eligible case-control studies. The odd radio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) and P value were calculated through Mantel-Haenszel statistics under random- or fixed-effect model. Results Eight articles (785 cases and 1188 controls) contributed data to the current meta-analysis. For C677T, increased NAFLD risks were observed in case group under homozygote model (T/T vs C/C, OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.03~2.15, P = 0.04) and recessive model (T/T vs C/C+C/T, OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.07~1.88, P = 0.02), but not the other genetics models, compared with control group. For A1298C, significantly increased NAFLD risks were detected in allele model (C vs A, OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.13~2.07, P = 0.006), homozygote model (C/C vs A/A, OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.63~4.85, P = 0.0002), dominant model (A/C+C/C vs A/A, OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.06~2.41, P = 0.03) and recessive model (C/C vs A/A+A/C, OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.45~3.00, P<0.0001), but not heterozygote model. Conclusion T/T genotype of MTHFR C677T polymorphism and C/C genotype of MTHFR A1298C are more likely to be associated with the susceptibility to NAFLD. PMID:27128842

  14. The gut microbiota and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Cristina; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The leaky gut hypothesis links translocating microbial products with the onset and progression of liver disease, and for a long time was considered one of its major contributors. However, a more detailed picture of the intestinal microbiota contributing to liver disease started to evolve. The gut is colonized by trillions of microbes that aid in digestion, modulate immune response, and generate a variety of products that result from microbial metabolic activities. These products together with host-bacteria interactions influence both normal physiology and disease susceptibility. A disruption of the symbiosis between microbiota and host is known as dysbiosis and can have profound effects on health. Qualitative changes such as increased proportions of harmful bacteria and reduced levels of beneficial bacteria, and also quantitative changes in the total amount of bacteria (overgrowth) have been associated with liver disease. Understanding the link between the pathophysiology of liver diseases and compositional and functional changes of the microbiota will help in the design of innovative therapies. In this review, we focus on factors resulting in dysbiosis, and discuss how dysbiosis can disrupt intestinal homeostasis and contribute to liver disease. PMID:26090511

  15. MicroRNA signatures in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an emerging class of highly conserved non-coding small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. It is now clear that miRNAs can potentially regulate every aspect of cellular activity, including differentiation and development, metabolism, proliferation, apoptotic cell death, viral infection and tumorigenesis. Recent studies provide clear evidence that miRNAs are abundant in the liver and modulate a diverse spectrum of liver functions. Deregulation of miRNA expression may be a key pathogenetic factor in many liver diseases including viral hepatitis, hepatocellular cancer and polycystic liver diseases. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms involved in miRNA deregulation will offer new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to treat liver diseases. Moreover, better understanding of miRNA regulation and identification of tissue-specific miRNA targets employing transgenic/knockout models and/or modulating oligonucleotides will improve our knowledge of liver physiology and diseases. PMID:19360909

  16. [Function of zinc in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Zinc deficiency is highly prevalent in cirrhotic patients, and contributes to several clinical symptoms such as hepatic encephalopathy and liver fibrosis. Ammonia is detoxified in liver to urea through urea cycle, and is also detoxified in extrahepatic tissue to glutamine through glutamine synthetase. The reduced ability of ammonia detoxification in liver cirrhosis is ascribed to zinc deficiency, because a member of urea cycle, ornithine transcarbamylase is a zinc enzyme. In this condition, glutamine synthesis is enhanced, which enables the body, at least temporarily, to suppress the increase of ammonia. However, the glutamine is metabolized predominantly in enterocyte to ammomia and glutamate, indicating that a vicious cycle in glutamine synthesis and glutamine breakdown occurs in liver cirrhosis. Attention should be given to the clinical significance of zinc in liver diseases. PMID:27455801

  17. Hepatocyte cell therapy in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, David Christopher; Newsome, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Liver transplantation remains the only proven treatment for end-stage liver failure but is limited by the availability of donor organs. Hepatocyte cell therapy, either with bioartificial liver devices or hepatocyte transplantation, may help address this by delaying or preventing liver transplantation. Early clinical studies have shown promising results, however in most cases, the benefit has been short lived and so further research into these therapies is required. Alternative sources of hepatocytes, including stem cell-derived hepatocytes, are being investigated as the isolation of primary human hepatocytes is limited by the same shortage of donor organs. This review summarises the current clinical experience of hepatocyte cell therapy together with an overview of possible alternative sources of hepatocytes. Current and future areas for research that might lead towards the realisation of the full potential of hepatocyte cell therapy are discussed. PMID:26212798

  18. Global publication trends and research hotspots of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a bibliometric analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Shuo; Qin, Hua-Lei; Wang, Tong; Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Hai; Xia, Shi-Hai; Xiang, Xiao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With the globally increasing prevalence, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) becomes the predominant cause of chronic liver disease. A global look at the publication trends and the research hotspots of NAFLD are urgently needed to assess the situation of NAFLD research. The global scientific research in the Science Citation Index-Expanded covered articles relevant to NAFLD was retrieved and its bibliometric parameters and research hotspots of NAFLD were systematically evaluated. To sum up, 6356 articles were published in 994 different journals covering 93 SCI subject categories during 1986-2013, in which English was the most predominant language used. Starting from the late 1980s, the publication on NAFLD grew slowly and entered into a highly developing period in the 21st century, especially in the last decade. Besides hepatic steatosis, metabolic syndrome and its combination of symptoms such as obesity, insulin resistance are listed as the top frequent keywords. Bibliometric results suggest that the obviously rapid growth of the articles in recent years appears to be associated with the accelerating incidence of NAFLD and its cofactors such as metabolic syndrome. In addition, epidemiology focusing on comparing different regions and population is attracting ever-growing attention. Meantime, pathology plays an important role in NAFLD research. PMID:26697286

  19. Circadian rhythms in liver physiology and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Yin, Lei

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms function to coordinate a diverse panel of physiological processes with environmental conditions such as food and light. As the driving force for circadian rhythmicity, the molecular clock is a self-sustained transcription-translational feedback loop system consisting of transcription factors, epigenetic modulators, kinases/phosphatases, and ubiquitin E3 ligases. The molecular clock exists not only in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus but also in the peripheral tissues to regulate cellular and physiological function in a tissue-specific manner. The circadian clock system in the liver plays important roles in regulating metabolism and energy homeostasis. Clock gene mutant animals display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and are susceptible to diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction, providing strong evidence for the connection between the circadian clock and metabolic homeostasis. Circadian-controlled hepatic metabolism is partially achieved by controlling the expression and/or activity of key metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, signaling molecules, and transporters. Reciprocally, intracellular metabolites modulate the molecular clock activity in response to the energy status. Although still at the early stage, circadian clock dysfunction has been implicated in common chronic liver diseases. Circadian dysregulation of lipid metabolism, detoxification, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell-cycle control might contribute to the onset and progression of liver steatosis, fibrosis, and even carcinogenesis. In summary, these findings call for a comprehensive study of the function and mechanisms of hepatic circadian clock to gain better understanding of liver physiology and diseases. PMID:23720334

  20. The epidemiology of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mann, Robert E; Smart, Reginald G; Govoni, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the various forms of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), with particular emphasis on cirrhosis, the form of liver disease that often is most associated with alcohol abuse and about which the most information is available. Epidemiological research has evaluated the prevalence of ALD and the factors that often contribute to the disease. Although the most potent factor in ALD is the excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages, gender and ethnic differences also account for some important variations in rates of liver disease. Mortality rates from cirrhosis have declined in the United States and some other countries since the 1970s. A number of factors may have contributed to this decline, including increased participation in treatment for alcohol problems and Alcoholics Anonymous membership, decreases in alcohol consumption, and changes in the consumption of certain types of alcoholic beverages. PMID:15535449

  1. Gut Microbiota of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Reham M; Zhu, Lixin; Baker, Robert D; Baker, Susan S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been rapidly increasing worldwide. It has become a leading cause of liver transplantation. Accumulating evidence suggests a significant role for gut microbiota in its development and progression. Here we review the effect of gut microbiota on developing hepatic fatty infiltration and its progression. Current literature supports a possible role for gut microbiota in the development of liver steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. We also review the literature on possible interventions for NAFLD that target the gut microbiota. PMID:26898658

  2. Ascorbic acid deficiency in liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, A D; Sherlock, S

    1976-01-01

    Leucocyte ascorbic acid (LAA) levels were measured in 138 patients with liver disease. Significantly reduced levels were found in 37 patients with alcoholic liver disease (P less than 0-01) and 25 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (P less than 0-05). In the primary biliary cirrhosis patients, cholestyramine therapy was associated with significantly lower levels of the vitamin (P less than 0-05). Liver ascorbic acid measured in Menghini needle biopsies in 20 patients was significantly correlated with LAA (r=0-807, P less than 0-001). No significant correlation was found between LAA and haematological indices, conventional liver function tests, or cholesterol levels in any group of patients. Patients with LAA levels below 100 nM/10(8) WBC had significantly higher antipyrine half-lives (mean=28-3 h) than patients with LAA levels above this level (mean=18-6 h) (P less than 0-05). Delayed drug metabolism related to low LAA should be considered when drugs metabolised by the liver are prescribed for patients with alcoholic liver disease or primary biliary cirrhosis. PMID:976794

  3. Predicting utility of a model for end stage liver disease in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Soultati, Aspasia S; Dourakis, Spyridon P; Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Deutsch, Melanie; Vasilieva, Larissa; Archimandritis, Athanasios J

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To validate the statistic utility of both the Maddrey Discriminant Function score and the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease as predictors of short term (30 d and 90 d) mortality in patients with alcoholic hepatitis and to assess prognostic factors among clinical characteristics and laboratory variables of patients with alcoholic hepatitis. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with the diagnosis of alcoholic hepatitis admitted to Hippokration University Hospital of Athens from 2000 to 2005 were assessed in the current retrospective study and a statistical analysis was conducted. RESULTS: 30- and 90-d mortality rates were reported at 5.9% (2/34) and 14.7% (5/34), respectively. Significant correlation was demonstrated for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (P30 = 0.094, P90 = 0.046) and the Maddrey Discriminant Function score (P30 = 0.033, P90 = 0.038) with 30- and 90-d mortality whereas a significant association was also established for alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.057), fibrin degradation products (P = 0.048) and C-reactive protein (P = 0.067) with 90-d mortality. For 30-d mortality the Area Under the Curve was 0.969 (95%CI: 0.902-1.036, P = 0.028) for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and 0.984 (95%CI: 0.942-1.027, P = 0.023) for the Maddrey Discriminant Function score with the optimal cut off point of 30.5 (sensitivity 1, specificity 0.937) and 108.68 (sensitivity 1, specificity 0.969), respectively. Accordingly, for 90-d mortality the Area Under the Curve was 0.762 (95%CI: 0.559-0.965, P = 0.065) for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and 0.752 (95%CI: 0.465-1.038, P = 0.076) for the Maddrey Discriminant Function score with the optimal cut off point of 19 (sensitivity 0.6, specificity 0.6) and 92 (sensitivity 0.6, specificity 0.946), respectively. The observed Kaplan Meier survival rates for different score-categories were compared with log-rank tests and higher score values were correlated with a lower survival. CONCLUSION: Equivalency of

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26356792

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-06-28

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26356792

  6. Performing a percutaneous liver biopsy in parenchymal liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Karamshi, Mina

    There are many ways of obtaining a liver biopsy sample but the percutaneous method is deemed as one of the simplest and safest methods. Percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB) is a commonly performed procedure carried out for the diagnosis and management of patients with parenchymal liver diseases. It plays a central role in providing histological assessment for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. This article describes how PLB is performed at the Royal Free Hospital radiology department, London, under ultrasound guidance, along with indications, contraindications, complications and advantages/disadvantages this method offers. Nursing implications are discussed in terms of assisting, caring and managing for these patients safely. This article aims to raise awareness of PLB and inform the reader how this tissue sample is taken, thus enabling further understanding of this procedure. It is concluded that the percutaneous route of obtaining a liver biopsy enables a good size and quality of sample to be taken in a safe and effective manner, with usually one pass being required with minimal associated complications. PMID:18825849

  7. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  8. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Reenam S; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-08-01

    Cirrhosis secondary to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common indication for liver transplant. In comparison to other cirrhotic patients, patients with NASH cirrhosis are more likely to be older and have the metabolic syndrome. Pre-transplant, patients require careful evaluation of cardiovascular risk. As the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising, a greater proportion of donor grafts have steatosis greater than 30%, which is associated with poor outcomes. Grafts with steatosis greater than 60% are unsuitable for transplant. Overall, post-transplant survival outcomes for patients with NASH cirrhosis are similar to those with cirrhosis without NASH. However, NASH cirrhosis is associated with a higher 30-day mortality, predominantly from an increase in cardiovascular events and infections. Following liver transplant, there is a significant risk of NASH recurrence, although this seldom results in allograft loss. Furthermore, a significant number of patients who had a liver transplant for other reasons develop NASH de novo. When patients with NASH cirrhosis are considered for transplant, one of the major challenges lies in identifying which patients are too high risk for surgery. This review aims to provide information to aid this decision making process, and to provide guidance on the peri-operative care strategies that can modify risk. PMID:26997540

  9. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects.

    PubMed

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inês

    2015-10-21

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  10. Diphenhydramine disposition in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Meredith, C G; Christian, C D; Johnson, R F; Madhavan, S V; Schenker, S

    1984-04-01

    Diphenhydramine (DPHM) disposition was examined in nine patients with chronic alcohol-related liver disease and in eight normal subjects. Sleep of 1 to 2 hr duration was induced in all subjects by a 0.8 mg/kg iv dose without an apparent increase in cerebral sensitivity in the patients with cirrhosis. Protein binding as determined by equilibrium dialysis (3H-DPHM) revealed a 15% decrease in the cirrhotic patients, while recovery of unchanged DPHM in urine (2%) was of the same order in the two groups. Computerized biexponential curve analysis was used to compare the plasma profiles for five of the patients and six of the normal subjects. Monoexponential curve analysis of the terminal beta-phase, including all subjects, was also used to compare the two groups. The means of plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution in cirrhotic patients were respectively less and greater than in normal subjects, but these differences were not significant. The t1/2 for the beta-phase (t1/2 beta), which reflects this reciprocal trend, was increased in the patients (15.2 +/- 1.5 and 9.3 +/- 0.9 hr). This correlated in part with severity of disease, with r = 0.723 between t1/2 beta and the serum bilirubin levels. In conclusion, a single intravenous dose of DPHM provided safe and effective sedation in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:6705445

  11. Gastrointestinal and liver disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Geethanjali; Shehata, Hassan A

    2013-12-01

    This chapter on the gastrointestinal and hepatic systems in pregnancy focusses on those conditions that are frequent and troublesome (gastro-oesophageal reflux and constipation), distressing (hyperemesis gravidarum) or potentially fatal (obstetric cholestasis, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome). It also highlights the clinical challenge obstetricians may face in managing rare conditions such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome, liver transplantation, primary biliary cirrhosis and Wilson disease. The clinical presentation of liver and gastrointestinal dysfunction in pregnancy is not specific, and certain 'abnormalities' may represent physiological changes of pregnancy. Diagnosis and management are often difficult because of atypical symptoms, a reluctance to use invasive investigations and concerns about the teratogenicity of the medications. The best available evidence to manage these conditions is discussed in the chapter. PMID:24207084

  12. Role of Osteopontin in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yankai; Jeong, Seogsong; Xia, Qiang; Kong, Xiaoni

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN), a multifunctional protein, is involved in numerous pathological conditions including inflammation, immunity, angiogenesis, fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in various tissues. Extensive studies have elucidated the critical role of OPN in cell signaling such as regulation of cell proliferation, migration, inflammation, fibrosis and tumor progression. In the liver, OPN interacts with integrins, CD44, vimentin and MyD88 signaling, thereby induces infiltration, migration, invasion and metastasis of cells. OPN is highlighted as a chemoattractant for macrophages and neutrophils during injury in inflammatory liver diseases. OPN activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to exert an enhancer in fibrogenesis. The role of OPN in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has also generated significant interests, especially with regards to its role as a diagnostic and prognostic factor. Interestingly, OPN acts an opposing role in liver repair under different pathological conditions. This review summarizes the current understanding of OPN in liver diseases. Further understanding of the pathophysiological role of OPN in cellular interactions and molecular mechanisms associated with hepatic inflammation, fibrosis and cancer may contribute to the development of novel strategies for clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapy of liver diseases. PMID:27570486

  13. Neural net classification of liver ultrasonogram for quantitative evaluation of diffuse liver disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Kim, JongHyo; Kim, Hee C.; Lee, Yong W.; Min, Byong Goo

    1997-04-01

    There have been a number of studies on the quantitative evaluation of diffuse liver disease by using texture analysis technique. However, the previous studies have been focused on the classification between only normal and abnormal pattern based on textural properties, resulting in lack of clinically useful information about the progressive status of liver disease. Considering our collaborative research experience with clinical experts, we judged that not only texture information but also several shape properties are necessary in order to successfully classify between various states of disease with liver ultrasonogram. Nine image parameters were selected experimentally. One of these was texture parameter and others were shape parameters measured as length, area and curvature. We have developed a neural-net algorithm that classifies liver ultrasonogram into 9 categories of liver disease: 3 main category and 3 sub-steps for each. Nine parameters were collected semi- automatically from the user by using graphical user interface tool, and then processed to give a grade for each parameter. Classifying algorithm consists of two steps. At the first step, each parameter was graded into pre-defined levels using neural network. in the next step, neural network classifier determined disease status using graded nine parameters. We implemented a PC based computer-assist diagnosis workstation and installed it in radiology department of Seoul National University Hospital. Using this workstation we collected 662 cases during 6 months. Some of these were used for training and others were used for evaluating accuracy of the developed algorithm. As a conclusion, a liver ultrasonogram classifying algorithm was developed using both texture and shape parameters and neural network classifier. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed algorithm is useful for evaluation of diffuse liver disease.

  14. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Disease Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Timothy; Oakley, Fiona; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2016-05-23

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver dysfunction in the Western world and is increasing owing to its close association with obesity and insulin resistance. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease that, in a minority of patients, can lead to progressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. NAFLD is a complex trait resulting from the interaction between environmental exposure and a susceptible polygenic background and comprising multiple independent modifiers of risk, such as the microbiome. The molecular mechanisms that combine to define the transition to NASH and progressive disease are complex, and consequently, no pharmacological therapy currently exists to treat NASH. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD is critical if new treatments are to be discovered. PMID:26980160

  15. Diagnosis of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Key Foundations and New Developments.

    PubMed

    Childers, Ryan E; Ahn, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a spectrum of conditions that include alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, and chronic alcoholic liver disease. The diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease remains founded in an accurate patient history and detailed physical examination. Concurrent with the physical examination, objective data from laboratory, imaging, and histologic studies are helpful to confirm a diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. Novel biomarkers, scoring systems, and imaging modalities are improving the ability to diagnose and manage alcoholic liver disease, but for most practicing clinicians, these have not been adopted widely because of their cost, but also because of limitations and uncertainty in their performance characteristics. PMID:27373609

  16. Nutritional therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Lanti, Claudia; Riso, Patrizia; Valenti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Following the epidemics of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of liver disease in western countries. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of NAFLD, and the main clinical recommendation is lifestyle modification, including increase of physical activity and the adoption of a healthy eating behavior. In this regard, studies aimed to elucidate the effect of dietary interventions and the mechanisms of action of specific food bioactives are urgently needed. The present review tries to summarize the most recent data evidencing the effects of nutrients and dietary bioactive compounds intake (i.e., long-chain PUFA, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, minerals and polyphenols) on the modulation of molecular mechanisms leading to fat accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:26895659

  17. NADPH Oxidases in Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Joy X.; Török, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature observed in a wide spectrum of chronic liver diseases including viral hepatitis, alcoholic, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) are emerging as major sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several major isoforms are expressed in the liver, including NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4. While the phagocytic NOX2 has been known to play an important role in Kupffer cell and neutrophil phagocytic activity and inflammation, the nonphagocytic NOX homologues are increasingly recognized as key enzymes in oxidative injury and wound healing. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in knowledge on the regulatory pathways of NOX activation, their cellular distribution, and their role in the modulation of redox signaling in liver diseases. PMID:26436133

  18. Thrombotic Venous Diseases of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sabol, Timothy P.; Molina, Marco; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems. PMID:26623265

  19. Genetic susceptibility to autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mattner, Jochen

    2011-01-27

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are considered as putative autoimmune diseases of the liver. Whereas strong evidence that bacterial infection may trigger PBC exists, the etiologies for PSC and AIH remain unknown. Although there have been significant discoveries of genetic polymorphisms that may underlie the susceptibility to these liver diseases, their associations with environmental triggers and the subsequent implications have been difficult to elucidate. While single nucleotide polymorphisms within the negative costimulatory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) have been suggested as genetic susceptibility factors for all three disorders, we discuss the implications of CTLA-4 susceptibility alleles mainly in the context of PBC, where Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, an ubiquitous alphaproteobacterium, has recently been specifically associated with the pathogenesis of this devastating liver disease. Ultimately, the discovery of infectious triggers of PBC may expand the concept of genetic susceptibility in immune-mediated liver diseases from the concept of aberrant immune responses against self-antigens to insufficient and/or inappropriate immunological defense mechanisms allowing microbes to cross natural barriers, establish infection and damage respective target organs. PMID:21307981

  20. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, Jessica M.; Chiang, John Y.L.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease. PMID:26579436

  1. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-03-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease. PMID:26579436

  2. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. PMID:25595571

  3. Adipose tissue-liver axis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Dou, Xiao-Bing; Zhou, Zhan-Xiang; Song, Zhen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains an important health problem worldwide. The disease spectrum is featured by early steatosis, steatohepatitis (steatosis with inflammatory cells infiltration and necrosis), with some individuals ultimately progressing to fibrosis/cirrhosis. Although the disease progression is well characterized, no effective therapies are currently available for the treatment in humans. The mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of ALD are multifactorial and complex. Emerging evidence supports that adipose tissue dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD. In the first part of this review, we discuss the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol exposure contributed to adipose tissue dysfunction, including cell death, inflammation and insulin resistance. It has been long known that aberrant hepatic methionine metabolism is a major metabolic abnormality induced by chronic alcohol exposure and plays an etiological role in the pathogenesis of ALD. The recent studies in our group documented the similar metabolic effect of chronic alcohol drinking on methionine in adipose tissue. In the second part of this review, we also briefly discuss the recent research progress in the field with a focus on how abnormal methionine metabolism in adipose tissue contributes to adipose tissue dysfunction and liver damage. PMID:26909225

  4. Adipose tissue-liver axis in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Dou, Xiao-Bing; Zhou, Zhan-Xiang; Song, Zhen-Yuan

    2016-02-15

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains an important health problem worldwide. The disease spectrum is featured by early steatosis, steatohepatitis (steatosis with inflammatory cells infiltration and necrosis), with some individuals ultimately progressing to fibrosis/cirrhosis. Although the disease progression is well characterized, no effective therapies are currently available for the treatment in humans. The mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of ALD are multifactorial and complex. Emerging evidence supports that adipose tissue dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD. In the first part of this review, we discuss the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol exposure contributed to adipose tissue dysfunction, including cell death, inflammation and insulin resistance. It has been long known that aberrant hepatic methionine metabolism is a major metabolic abnormality induced by chronic alcohol exposure and plays an etiological role in the pathogenesis of ALD. The recent studies in our group documented the similar metabolic effect of chronic alcohol drinking on methionine in adipose tissue. In the second part of this review, we also briefly discuss the recent research progress in the field with a focus on how abnormal methionine metabolism in adipose tissue contributes to adipose tissue dysfunction and liver damage. PMID:26909225

  5. S-adenosylmethionine metabolism and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mato, José M; Martínez-Chantar, M Luz; Lu, Shelly C

    2014-01-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid that is metabolized mainly by the liver where it is converted to S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) by the enzyme methionine adenosyltransferase. Although all mammalian cells synthesize SAMe, the liver is where the bulk of SAMe is generated as it is the organ where about 50% of all dietary methionine is metabolized. SAMe is mainly needed for methylation of a large variety of substrates (DNA, proteins, lipids and many other small molecules) and polyamine synthesis, so if the concentration of SAMe falls below a certain level or rises too much the normal function of the liver will be also affected. There are physiological conditions that can affect the hepatic content of SAMe. Consequently, to control these fluctuations, the rate at which the liver both synthesizes and catabolizes SAMe is tightly regulated. In mice, failure to do this can lead to fatty liver disease and to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, maintaining SAMe homeostasis may be a therapeutic target in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic- and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and for the chemoprevention of HCC formation. PMID:23396728

  6. Autophagy in alcohol-induced liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Thomes, Paul G; Ding, Wen-Xing; Lemasters, John J; Donohue, Terrence M

    2012-08-01

    Alcohol is the most abused substance worldwide and a significant source of liver injury; the mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease are not fully understood. Significant cellular toxicity and impairment of protein synthesis and degradation occur in alcohol-exposed liver cells, along with changes in energy balance and modified responses to pathogens. Autophagy is the process of cellular catabolism through the lysosomal-dependent machinery, which maintains a balance among protein synthesis, degradation, and recycling of self. Autophagy is part of normal homeostasis and it can be triggered by multiple factors that threaten cell integrity, including starvation, toxins, or pathogens. Multiple factors regulate autophagy; survival and preservation of cellular integrity at the expense of inadequately folded proteins and damaged high-energy generating intracellular organelles are prominent targets of autophagy in pathological conditions. Coincidentally, inadequately folded proteins accumulate and high-energy generating intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria, are damaged by alcohol abuse; these alcohol-induced pathological findings prompted investigation of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver damage. Our review summarizes the current knowledge about the role and implications of autophagy in alcohol-induced liver disease. PMID:22551004

  7. Medical therapy for polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Dennison, A; Garcea, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin analogues and rapamycin inhibitors are two classes of drugs available for the management of polycystic liver disease but their overall impact is not clearly established. This article systematically reviews the literature on the medical management of polycystic liver disease. The outcomes assessed include reduction in liver volume and the impact on quality of life. Methods The English language literature published between 1966 and August 2014 was reviewed from a MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase™ and Cochrane Library search. Search terms included 'polycystic', 'liver', 'sirolimus', 'everolimus', 'PCLD', 'somatostatin', 'octreotide', 'lanreotide' and 'rapamycin'. Both randomised trials and controlled studies were included. References of the articles retrieved were also searched to identify any further eligible publications. The studies included were appraised using the Jadad score. Results Seven studies were included in the final review. Five studies, of which three were randomised trials, investigated the role of somatostatin analogues and the results showed a mean reduction in liver volume ranging from 2.9% at six months to 4.95 ±6.77% at one year. Only one randomised study examined the influence of rapamycin inhibitors. This trial compared dual therapy with everolimus and octreotide versus octreotide monotherapy. Liver volume reduced by 3.5% and 3.8% in the control and intervention groups respectively but no statistical difference was found between the two groups (p=0.73). Two randomised trials investigating somatostatin analogues assessed quality of life using SF-36(®). Only one subdomain score improved in one of the trials while two subdomain scores improved in the other with somatostatin analogue therapy. Conclusions Somatostatin analogues significantly reduce liver volumes after six months of therapy but have only a modest improvement on quality of life. Rapamycin inhibitors do not confer any additional advantage. PMID:26688394

  8. Hepatocarcinogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Kodama, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-01

    In Japan, there has been a gradual increase in cases of non-viral chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), occurring with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). First, a national survey investigating the etiology of HCC in Japan was performed. Among HCCs based on non-viral disease, alcoholic liver disease with HCC accounted for 7.2% of all HCCs, followed by chronic liver disease of unknown etiology with HCC (5.1%) and NAFLD with HCC (2.0%). The clinical characteristics of these three HCC groups were clearly different. In our second analysis, the HCC development rates among liver cirrhosis with NAFLD, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis with hepatitis C virus (HCV) were compared. HCC development rates were 11.3%/5 years in NAFLD cirrhosis, 30.5%/5 years in HCV cirrhosis, and 12.5%/5 years in alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting that the hepatocarcinogenesis in NAFLD and alcoholic liver disease were similar but were lower than that in HCV. Using Cox hazards analysis, older age, higher serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase level, and higher Child-Pugh score as risk factors of HCC were identified. Finally, clinical data of NAFLD-HCC with the data for HCC with HCV (HCV-HCC) were compared. The percentage of NAFLD-HCC patients with des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin-positive was higher than that with α-fetoprotein-positive. The 5-year survival and recurrence rates for NAFLD-HCC were almost similar to those for HCV-HCC. In Asian countries, the prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. Therefore, elucidating the pathogenesis and clinical features of HCC in patients with NAFLD is indeed an urgent problem. PMID:24251711

  9. Serum neopterin levels in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    González-Reimers, E; Santolaria-Fernández, F; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E; Rodríguez-Moreno, F; Martínez-Riera, A; Milena-Abril, A; González-García, C

    1993-09-01

    Serum neopterin levels have been determined by RIA in 105 patients affected by chronic alcoholic liver disease, 68 of them cirrhotics, and in 12 controls. Serum Neopterin was significantly higher in patients than in controls, correlated with Pughs' score and Child's classification, and also with serum laminin and type III collagen N-terminal propeptide, and with histomorphometrically determined liver fibrosis. Serum neopterin levels were higher in patients who died than in survivors, serum neopterin levels over 19.15 nmol/l being associated with higher mortality rates. PMID:8261879

  10. [Liver, bile ducts and pancreatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kanno, T

    1995-06-01

    A fundamental guideline for the use of test results concerning liver, bile duct and pancreatic diseases was proposed in 1991 from the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). This guideline was principally based on the document of 1988 from the Committee on liver function tests of the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSG). The document from the JSG was revised in May, 1994. Also a guideline for selection of markers of hepatitis virus in hepatic disorders, was proposed in January, 1994 from the same Committee of JSG. Here, we reevaluated and discussed the JSCP guideline as taking into consideration the two 1994 JSG documents. PMID:7602802

  11. Pediatric liver diseases: current challenges and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Claudia; Mosca, Antonella; Vania, Andrea; Alterio, Arianna; Alisi, Anna; Nobili, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases in children represent a rising problem with significant effects on public health. In fact, several pediatric liver diseases are precursors of adult chronic hepatopathies, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The prevalence of liver diseases in children is unknown. In the USA, every year, 15,000 children are hospitalized for liver diseases, but these disorders continue to be under-recognized or diagnosed late. The main reason is due to the frequent absence of symptoms in the vast majority of liver diseases, especially in the early stages. In the last few decades several advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of liver diseases, permitting the discovery of new therapeutic targets to treat liver diseases, thus improving the natural history of these disorders. In this article we discuss the most recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the most frequent pediatric liver diseases. PMID:26641319

  12. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  13. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  14. Efficacy of Resveratrol Supplementation against Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongyang; Yuan, Weigang; Fang, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqing; He, Pei; Lei, Jiahui; Wang, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease with rising prevalence. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that resveratrol, a dietary phytochemical, is capable of attenuating NAFLD development and progression; however, results from clinical studies are inconsistent and inconclusive. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of resveratrol on NAFLD, using several parameters to provide new insights for clinical application. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, Science Citation Index, Elsevier, and Cochrane Library databases for studies published up to date (July 2016), in English, to identify and screen eligible, relevant studies. Either a fixed-effect model or random model was used to estimate mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the effect of resveratrol on NAFLD. Four randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials involving 156 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Levels of low-density lipoprotein (MD = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.74, P < 0.05) and total cholesterol (MD = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.80, P < 0.05) were higher in the resveratrol treatment groups than in placebo control groups, whereas other parameters were not altered. Overall, this study indicates that resveratrol treatment has negligible effects on attenuating NAFLD, given the small improvement in NAFLD features. More high-quality clinical trials of resveratrol for NAFLD are required to confirm these results. PMID:27560482

  15. Efficacy of Resveratrol Supplementation against Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jianguo; Wang, Wenqing; He, Pei; Lei, Jiahui; Wang, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease with rising prevalence. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that resveratrol, a dietary phytochemical, is capable of attenuating NAFLD development and progression; however, results from clinical studies are inconsistent and inconclusive. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of resveratrol on NAFLD, using several parameters to provide new insights for clinical application. We systematically searched EMBASE, PubMed, Science Citation Index, Elsevier, and Cochrane Library databases for studies published up to date (July 2016), in English, to identify and screen eligible, relevant studies. Either a fixed-effect model or random model was used to estimate mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the effect of resveratrol on NAFLD. Four randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials involving 156 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Levels of low-density lipoprotein (MD = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.74, P < 0.05) and total cholesterol (MD = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.18, 0.80, P < 0.05) were higher in the resveratrol treatment groups than in placebo control groups, whereas other parameters were not altered. Overall, this study indicates that resveratrol treatment has negligible effects on attenuating NAFLD, given the small improvement in NAFLD features. More high-quality clinical trials of resveratrol for NAFLD are required to confirm these results. PMID:27560482

  16. Surgery in a Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Nagral, Sanjay; Nagral, Aabha

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is often needed in patients with concurrent liver disease. The multiple physiological roles of the liver places these patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Diseases necessitating surgery like gallstones and hernia are more common in patients with cirrhosis. Assessment of severity of liver dysfunction before surgery is important and the risk benefit of the procedure needs to be carefully assessed. The disease severity may vary from mild transaminase rise to decompensated cirrhosis. Surgery should be avoided if possible in the emergency setting, in the setting of acute and alcoholic hepatitis, in a patient of cirrhosis who is child class C or has a MELD score more than 15 or any patient with significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction. In this subset of patients, all possible means to manage these patients conservatively should be attempted. Modified Child–Pugh scores and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores can predict mortality after surgery fairly reliably including nonhepatic abdominal surgery. Pre-operative optimization would include control of ascites, correction of electrolyte imbalance, improving renal dysfunction, cardiorespiratory assessment, and correction of coagulation. Tests of global hemostasis like thromboelastography and thrombin generation time may be more predictive of the risk of bleeding compared with the conventional tests of coagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Correction of international normalized ratio with fresh frozen plasma does not necessarily mean reduction of bleeding risk and may increase the risk of volume overload and lung injury. International normalized ratio liver may better reflect the coagulation status. Recombinant factor VIIa in patients with cirrhosis needing surgery needs further study. Intra-operatively, safe anesthetic agents like isoflurane and propofol with avoidance of hypotension are advised. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) and benzodiazepines should

  17. Infection and Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christine; Levitsky, Josh

    2016-08-01

    Acute and chronic alcohol use leads to an impaired immune response and dysregulated inflammatory state that contributes to a markedly increased risk of infection. Via shared mechanisms of immune-mediated injury, alcohol can alter the clinical course of viral infections such as hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency virus. These effects are most evident in patients with alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. This article provides an overview of alcohol's effect on the immune system and contribution to the risks and outcomes of specific infectious diseases. PMID:27373619

  18. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Role of Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M.; Melzer, Ehud; Mell, Haim; Opris, Mihai; Cohen, Lawrence; Malnick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical and translational research. It focuses on the role of the immune system and the signaling pathways of cytokines in the pathogenesis of ALD. An additional factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which plays a central role in the induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. LPS derived from the intestinal microbiota enters the portal circulation, and is recognized by macrophages (Kupffer cells) and hepatocytes. In individuals with ALD, excessive levels of LPS in the liver affect immune, parenchymal, and non-immune cells, which in turn release various inflammatory cytokines and recruit neutrophils and other inflammatory cells. In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to the activation of Kupffer cells and the inflammatory cascade. The role of the stellate cells in fibrogenesis is also discussed. PMID:26343741

  19. Treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Siebler, Juergen; Galle, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause for elevated liver enzymes in the developed nations. Beyond prevention programs which are of particular interest because of the increasing number of overweight children, treatment should be focussed on the most important risk factors, obesity and insulin resistance. As a consequence of elucidating the pathomechanisms of NAFLD, the number of potential therapeutic options increased. However, many studies investigating the therapeutic effect show shortcomings in at least one of the following points: lack of a serial liver biopsy, short term of treatment and limited number of included patients. The second generation insulin sensitizer pioglitazone and rosiglitazone show the most promising improvements in NAFLD, but weight gain and potential hepatotoxicity calls for attention. In conclusion, a general recommendation for the application of specific drugs cannot be given. Besides controlled clinical trials, weight reduction and physical activity to improve insulin sensitivity in obese patients should be the priority objective. PMID:16610015

  20. [Fractal analysis of liver fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Soda, G; Nardoni, S; Bosco, D; Grizzi, F; Dioguardi, N; Melis, M

    2003-04-01

    This study realized by two different study groups use of Fractal geometry to quantify the complex collagen deposition during chronic liver disease. Thirty standard needle liver biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with chronic HCV-related disease. Three mu-thick sections were cut and stained by means of Picrosirius stain, in order to visualise collagen matrix. The degree of fibrosis was measured using a quantitative scoring system based on the computer-assisted evaluation of the fractal dimension of the deposited collagen surface. The obtained results by both study groups, show that the proposed method is reproducible, rapid and inexpensive. The complex distribution of its collagenous components can be quantified using a single numerical score. This study demonstrated that it is possible to quantify the collagen's irregularity in an objective manner, and that the study of the fractal properties of the collagen shapes is likely to reveal more about its structure and the complex behaviour of its development. PMID:12768879

  1. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  2. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factors as molecular targets for liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Ju, Cynthia; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Liver disease is a growing global health problem, as deaths from end-stage liver cirrhosis and cancer are rising across the world. At present, pharmacologic approaches to effectively treat or prevent liver disease are extremely limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates diverse signaling pathways enabling adaptive cellular responses to perturbations of the tissue microenvironment. HIF activation through hypoxia-dependent and hypoxia-independent signals have been reported in liver disease of diverse etiologies, from ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute liver injury to chronic liver diseases caused by viral infection, excessive alcohol consumption, or metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the evidence for HIF stabilization in liver disease, discusses the mechanistic involvement of HIFs in disease development, and explores the potential of pharmacological HIF modifiers in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:27094811

  4. Current views on liver diseases in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tsega, E

    1977-04-01

    The chief causes of liver disease in Ethiopia are reviewed, considering hospital data on admissions for hepatitis, cirrhosis, ascites and hepatoma. Liver diseases account for 11.4% of all medical admissions in 3 medical wards in Addis Ababa. The causes are viral hepatitis, post- hepatic and post necrotic and mixed cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Alcoholic cirrhosis is rare. Viral hepatitis with shivering, rigor and fever and elevated direct bilirubin levels are common in Ethiopians, especially in child-bearing women. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is often associated with hepatitis. The disease may be transmitted by several species of mosquitoes, placental transmission, or feces, urine, saliva or semen. Blood products are not screened for hepatitis B. Cirrhosis is common, and causes significant mortality, usually from esophageal varices and hepatic coma. Chronic active hepatitis patients may live for a time, especially if they are near a hospital and are treated with steroids. In Ethiopia presenting symptoms for hepatoma are anorexia, weight loss, persistent, burning, right upper quadrant pain, and a hard, nodular, tender RUQ mass. Over 5% of malignancies seen are primary hepatocellular carcinomas. 50% have HBsAG, compared to 3.8% of controls. 65% have alpha-fetoglobulins. It is suggested that some viral hepatitis cases progress to cirrhosis, of which some go on to hepatocellular carcinoma. Herbal medicines, aflatoxins and other toxins may also contribute to liver disease. PMID:201462

  5. Treatment options for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Brian; Younossi, Zobair M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become increasingly recognized as the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes in the last few decades and is among the most common forms of chronic liver disease in the Western world and across the globe. With the growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, NAFLD is estimated to affect about one-quarter of the US population. Although most patients with NAFLD have nonprogressive bland steatosis, a minority of patients develop the histological subtype of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related death. This is especially true when NASH patients have type 2 diabetes. Treatment of NAFLD should therefore be directed towards patients with established NASH. Sustained weight loss seems to improve insulin resistance and associated NASH. In fact, weight loss with bariatric surgery leads to biochemical and histological improvement in morbidly obese patients with NASH. Several pharmacologic agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and pro-inflammatory mediators potentially responsible for the development and progression of NASH. While some studies have shown initial promise, none has established long-term efficacy using randomized clinical trials. This paper briefly reviews the epidemiology, natural history, and pathophysiology of NAFLD and NASH and then focuses on the clinical trials of various therapeutic modalities for NAFLD. These include weight loss agents, bariatric surgery, insulin-sensitizing agents, lipid-lowering agents, antioxidants, probiotics, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, cytoprotective and other novel agents. PMID:21180596

  6. [Variability of the clinical and laboratory aspects in the presentation of chronic liver diseases in relation to their etiology. Analysis of a case study and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, G; Francica, G; Lonardo, A; Cerini, R; Cacciatore, L

    1985-04-14

    247 cases of patients suffering from chronic liver diseases were reviewed. These cases were divided according to "risk areas" (viral, alcoholic, viral and alcoholic, cryptogenic) and diagnosis (CAH, compensated cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis). Differences found in clinical and laboratory aspects of liver diseases from different risk areas are described but it is concluded that no single aetiology affects the liver functional reserve more than the others. Laboratory tests give more information in the early stages of chronic liver diseases while clinical analysis is more varied in the terminal ones. Literature on the subject is reviewed. Our data neither confirm nor disprove that HBsAg+ Alcohol+ patients display a characteristic clinical picture and this hypothesis should be further investigated. PMID:2582312

  7. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-07-01

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist's assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the key

  8. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist’s assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient’s pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the

  9. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  10. Characteristics and outcomes of chronic liver disease patients with acute deteriorated liver function by severity of underlying liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun Soo; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Cho, Juhee; Kang, Danbee; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze characteristics and outcome of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) according to the severity of underlying liver disease. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-seven adult patients with chronic liver disease and acute deteriorated liver function, defined by jaundice and coagulopathy, were analyzed. Predisposition, type of injury, response, organ failure, and survival were analyzed and compared between patients with non-cirrhosis (type A), cirrhosis (type B) and cirrhosis with previous decompensation (type C). RESULTS: The predisposition was mostly hepatitis B in type A, while it was alcoholic liver disease in types B and C. Injury was mostly hepatic in type A, but was non-hepatic in type C. Liver failure, defined by CLIF-SOFA, was more frequent in types A and B, and circulatory failure was more frequent in type C. The 30-d overall survival rate (85.3%, 81.1% and 83.7% for types A, B and C, respectively, P = 0.31) and the 30-d transplant-free survival rate (55.9%, 65.5% and 62.5% for types A, B and C, respectively P = 0.33) were not different by ACLF subtype, but 1-year overall survival rate were different (85.3%, 71.7% and 58.7% for types A, B and C, respectively, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: There were clear differences in predisposition, type of injury, accompanying organ failure and long-term mortality according to spectrum of chronic liver disease, implying classifying subtype according to the severity of underlying liver disease is useful for defining, clarifying and comparing ACLF. PMID:27076763

  11. Bile acid synthetic defects and liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Bove, Kevin E; Heubi, James E; Balistreri, William F; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2004-01-01

    Bile acid synthetic defects (BASD), uncommon genetic disorders that are responsible for approximately 2% of persistent cholestasis in infants, are reviewed with emphasis on morphology of associated liver disease. The associated liver diseases may be life threatening, and are treatable, usually by replacement of deficient primary bile acids. Specific diagnosis is made by analysis of body fluids (bile, blood, and urine) using fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy (FAB-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Inborn errors have been demonstrated for four single enzymes involved in modification of the sterol nucleus and in five steps in modification of the side-chain to form cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids, the primary bile acids. With few exceptions, BASD cause liver diseases that vary from severe to mild depending on the defect. In three of four known defects of sterol nucleus modification, liver disease is progressive. Progression of liver disease is most rapid when the defect results in accumulation of toxic monohydroxy and unsaturated oxo-bile acids. Liver disease may be transient, delayed in onset and mild. Reduced bile flow caused by atypical bile acids contributes to cholestasis and may be the dominant factor in defects of side-chain synthesis, peroxisomal abiogenesis and S-L-O syndrome. Pathological findings may include intralobular cholestasis with giant cell transformation, prevalence of necrotic hepatocytes including giant cell forms, and hepatitic injury confined to the portal limiting plate where the smallest bile ductules may be injured and where fibrosis typically develops. Interlobular bile ducts are usually spared. Ultrastructure of liver reveals nonspecific changes with the possible exception of unusual canalicular morphology in some defects. The course of BASD may be modified by replacement of deficient primary bile acids, which produces beneficial feedback inhibition of abnormal bile acid production and enhances choluresis. Giant

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Tilg, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    The fastest growing cause of cancer-related death is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is at least partly attributable to the rising prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a broad spectrum of conditions, ranging from non-progressive bland steatosis to malignant transformation into hepatocellular cancer. The estimated annual HCC incidence in the progressive form of NAFLD - non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) - is about 0.3%. The risk of HCC development is higher in men and increases with age, more advanced fibrosis, progressive obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Studies on the molecular mechanism of HCC development in NAFLD have shown that hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with complex changes at the immunometabolic interface. In line with these clinical risk factors, administration of a choline-deficient high-fat diet to mice over a prolonged period results in spontaneous HCC development in a high percentage of animals. The role of altered insulin signaling in tumorigenesis is further supported by the observation that components of the insulin-signaling cascade are frequently mutated in hepatocellular cancer cells. These changes further enhance insulin-mediated growth and cell division of hepatocytes. Furthermore, studies investigating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling and HCC development allowed dissection of the complex links between inflammation and carcinogenesis. To conclude, NAFLD reflects an important risk factor for HCC, develops also in non-cirrhotic livers and is a prototypic cancer involving inflammatory and metabolic pathways. STRENGTHS/WEAKNESSES AND SUMMARY OF THE TRANSLATIONAL POTENTIAL OF THE MESSAGES IN THE PAPER: The systematic review summarizes findings from unbiased clinical and translational studies on hepatocellular cancer in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This provides a concise overview on the epidemiology, risk factors and molecular

  13. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  14. Treatment Options for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease comprises a range of disorders from steatosis and steatohepatitis through to cirrhosis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and liver-related death. Therefore, managing this common disorder is becoming an important public health issue. Lifestyle measures are commonly suggested but robust data are lacking. Trials with antioxidants (vitamin E, betaine) as well as cytoprotectants (ursodeoxycholic acid) have been disappointing. While data for insulin sensitizers such as metformin are less conclusive, thiazolidinediones appear promising. However, not all patients respond to thiazolidinediones. Moreover, issues related to weight gain, cardiovascular risk need to be addressed. The use of endocannabinoid antagonists and insulin secretagogues are novel strategies to combat this disorder. PMID:21180527

  15. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  16. Autonomic dysfunction in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Frith, James; Newton, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that quality of life (QOL) is impaired in those with chronic liver disease (CLD). One of the most important contributors to impaired QOL is the symptomatic burden which can range from slight to debilitating. Autonomic dysfunction accounts for a significant proportion of these symptoms, which can be common, non-specific and challenging to treat. Investigating the autonomic nervous system can be straight forward and can assist the clinician to diagnose and treat specific symptoms. Evidence-based treatment options for autonomic symptoms, specifically in CLD, can be lacking and must be extrapolated from other studies and expert opinion. For those with severely impaired quality of life, liver transplantation may offer an improvement; however, more research is needed to confirm this. PMID:24367224

  17. Liver diseases in pregnancy: diseases unique to pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khulood T; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-11-21

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. This review summarizes liver diseases that are unique to pregnancy. We discuss clinical conditions that are seen only in pregnant women and involve the liver; from Hyperemesis Gravidarum that happens in 1 out of 200 pregnancies and Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (0.5%-1.5% prevalence), to the more frequent condition of preeclampsia (10% prevalence) and its severe form; hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and a low platelet count syndrome (12% of pregnancies with preeclampsia), to the rare entity of Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy (incidence of 1 per 7270 to 13000 deliveries). Although pathogeneses behind the development of these aliments are not fully understood, theories have been proposed. Some propose the special physiological changes that accompany pregnancy as a precipitant. Others suggest a constellation of factors including both the mother and her fetus that come together to trigger those unique conditions. Reaching a timely and accurate diagnosis of such conditions can be challenging. The timing of the condition in relation toward which trimester it starts at is a key. Accurate diagnosis can be made using specific clinical findings and blood tests. Some entities have well-defined criteria that help not only in making the diagnosis, but also in classifying the disease according to its severity. Management of these conditions range from simple medical remedies to measures such as immediate termination of the pregnancy. In specific conditions, it is prudent to have expert obstetric and medical specialists teaming up to help improve the outcomes. PMID:24282353

  18. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  19. Computed tomography of the liver in von Gierke's disease.

    PubMed

    Biondetti, P R; Fiore, D; Muzzio, P C

    1980-10-01

    The computed tomography findings in the liver of a patient with von Gierke's disease are presented. Precontrast scans demonstrated diffuse decreased density throughout the liver. In the postcontrast scans, a focal right sided hyperdense area was visualized. PMID:6931833

  20. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. METHODS: Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0

  1. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  2. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Rachel H.; Porsche, Cara E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1), CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27454769

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-04-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are sensed by the binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The accumulation of unfolded proteins sequesters BiP so it dissociates from three ER-transmembrane transducers leading to their activation. These transducers are inositol requiring (IRE) 1α, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α. PERK phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) resulting in global mRNA translation attenuation, and concurrently selectively increases the translation of several mRNAs, including the transcription factor ATF4, and its downstream target CHOP. IRE1α has kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) activities. IRE1α autophosphorylation activates the RNase activity to splice XBP1 mRNA, to produce the active transcription factor sXBP1. IRE1α activation also recruits and activates the stress kinase JNK. ATF6α transits to the Golgi compartment where it is cleaved by intramembrane proteolysis to generate a soluble active transcription factor. These UPR pathways act in concert to increase ER content, expand the ER protein folding capacity, degrade misfolded proteins, and reduce the load of new proteins entering the ER. All of these are geared toward adaptation to resolve the protein folding defect. Faced with persistent ER stress, adaptation starts to fail and apoptosis occurs, possibly mediated through calcium perturbations, reactive oxygen species, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. The UPR is activated in several liver diseases; including obesity associated fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-induced liver injury, all of which are associated with steatosis, raising the possibility that ER stress-dependent alteration in lipid homeostasis is the mechanism that underlies the steatosis. Hepatocyte apoptosis is a pathogenic event in several liver

  4. Alcoholic liver disease: Clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Manuela G; Malnick, Stephen; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M; Melzer, Ehud; Ferenci, Peter; Seitz, Helmut K; Mueller, Sebastian; Mell, Haim; Samuel, Didier; Cohen, Lawrence B; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Osna, Natalia A; Ganesan, Murali; Thompson, Kyle J; McKillop, Iain H; Bautista, Abraham; Bataller, Ramon; French, Samuel W

    2015-12-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical research, translational research, pathogenesis and therapies. A special accent is placed on alcohol misuse, as alcohol is a legally commercialized and taxable product. Drinking alcohol, particularly from a young age, is a major health problem. Alcoholism is known to contribute to morbidity and mortality. A systematic literature search was performed in order to obtain updated data (2008-2015). The review is focused on genetic polymorphisms of alcohol metabolizing enzymes and the role of cytochrome p450 2E1 and iron in ALD. Alcohol-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is also discussed in the presence or absence of co-morbidities such as viral hepatitis C as well as therapeutic the role of innate immunity in ALD-HCV. Moreover, emphasis was placed on alcohol and drug interactions, as well as liver transplantation for end-stage ALD. Finally, the time came to eradicate alcohol-induced liver and intestinal damage by using betaine. PMID:26342547

  5. Mechanisms of disease progression in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jou, Janice; Choi, Steve S; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2008-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis (also called nonalcoholic fatty liver or NAFL) in its most benign form, to cirrhosis in its most advanced form. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an intermediate level of hepatic pathology. Hepatocyte accumulation of triglyceride is a hallmark of NAFL and NASH, but this sometimes subsides once cirrhosis has developed. Triglyceride storage per se is not hepatotoxic. Rather, it is a marker of increased exposure of hepatocytes to potentially toxic fatty acids. NAFL progresses to NASH when adaptive mechanisms that protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-mediated lipotoxicity become overwhelmed and rates of hepatocyte death begin to outstrip mechanisms that normally regenerate dead hepatocytes. This triggers repair responses that involve activation of hepatic stellate cells to myofibroblasts. The myofibroblasts generate excessive matrix and produce factors that stimulate expansion of liver progenitor populations. The progenitor cells produce chemokines to attract various kinds of inflammatory cells to the liver. They also differentiate to replace the dead hepatocytes. The intensity of these repair responses generally parallel the degree of hepatocyte death, resulting in variable distortion of the hepatic architecture with fibrosis, infiltrating immune cells, and regenerating epithelial nodules. As in other types of chronic liver injury, cirrhosis ensues in patients with NAFLD when repair is extreme and sustained, but ultimately unsuccessful, at reconstituting healthy hepatic epithelia. PMID:18956293

  6. The Effects of Alcohol on Other Chronic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine C; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-08-01

    Alcohol consumption is often a comorbid condition in other chronic liver diseases. It has been shown to act in synergy to increase liver injury in viral hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related mortality. Data suggest that modest alcohol consumption may be inversely related to the risk of developing NAFLD and lower rates of progression of NAFLD to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This article reviews data on the relationship between alcohol consumption and other chronic liver diseases. PMID:27373618

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  8. The Impact of Liver Cell Injury on Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Yvonne; Grimm, Anna; Schlegel, Liesa; Grambihler, Annette; Kittner, Jens M.; Wiltink, Jörg; Galle, Peter R.; Wörns, Marcus A.; Schattenberg, Jörn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic liver disease often suffer from unspecific symptoms and report severe impairment in the quality of life. The underlying mechanisms are multifactorial and include disease-specific but also liver related causes. The current analysis evaluated the association of hepatocellular apoptosis in non-viral chronic liver disease and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Furthermore we examined factors, which influence patient's physical and mental well-being. Methods A total of 150 patients with non-infectious chronic liver disease were included between January 2014 and June 2015. The German version of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ-D), a liver disease specific instrument to assess HRQL, was employed. Hepatocellular apoptosis was determined by measuring Cytokeratin 18 (CK18, M30 Apoptosense ELISA). Results Female gender (5.24 vs. 5.54, p = 0.04), diabetes mellitus type II (4.75 vs. 5.46, p<0.001) and daily drug intake (5.24 vs. 6.01, p = 0.003) were associated with a significant impairment in HRQL. HRQL was not significantly different between the examined liver diseases. Levels of CK18 were the highest in patients with NASH compared to all other disease entities (p<0.001). Interestingly, CK18 exhibited significant correlations with obesity (p<0.001) and hyperlipidemia (p<0.001). In patients with cirrhosis levels of CK18 correlated with the MELD score (r = 0.18, p = 0.03) and were significantly higher compared to patients without existing cirrhosis (265.5 U/l vs. 186.9U/l, p = 0.047). Additionally, CK18 showed a significant correlation with the presence and the degree of hepatic fibrosis (p = 0.003) and inflammation (p<0.001) in liver histology. Finally, there was a small negative association between CLDQ and CK18 (r = -0.16, p = 0.048). Conclusion Different parameters are influencing HRQL and CK18 levels in chronic non-viral liver disease and the amount of hepatocellular apoptosis correlates with the impairment in HRQL in

  9. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  10. Application of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Wang, Xuehao; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Tens of millions of patients are affected by liver disease worldwide. Many of these patients can benefit from therapy involving hepatocyte transplantation. Liver transplantation is presently the only proven treatment for many medically refractory liver diseases including end-stage liver failure and inherited metabolic liver disease. However, the shortage in transplantable livers prevents over 40% of listed patients per year from receiving a liver transplant; many of these patients die before receiving an organ offer or become too sick to transplant. Therefore, new therapies are needed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation and reduce mortality on waiting lists worldwide. Furthermore, the remarkable regenerative capacity of hepatocytes in vivo is exemplified by the increasing number of innovative cell-based therapies and animal models of human liver disorders. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have similar properties to those of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but bypass the ethical concerns of embryo destruction. Therefore, generation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using iPSC technology may be beneficial for the treatment of severe liver diseases, screening of drug toxicities, basic research of several hepatocytic disorders, and liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize the growing number of potential applications of iPSCs for treatment of liver disease. PMID:26858888

  11. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  12. Fatigue in liver disease: Pathophysiology and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Mark G

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue is the most commonly encountered symptom in patients with liver disease, and it has a significant impact on their quality of life. However, although some progress has been made with regard to the understanding of the processes which may generate fatigue in general, the underlying cause(s) of liver disease-associated fatigue remain incompletely understood. The present review describes recent advances which have been made in our ability to measure fatigue in patients with liver disease in the clinical setting, as well as in our understanding of potential pathways which are likely important in the pathogenesis of fatigue associated with liver disease. Specifically, experimental findings suggest that fatigue associated with liver disease likely occurs as a result of changes in neurotransmission within the brain. In conclusion, a reasonable approach to help guide in the management of the fatigued patient with liver disease is presented. PMID:16550262

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Impact of HIV on HCV Immune Responses and Its Association with Liver Disease Progression in a Unique Plasma Donor Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Ushani S.; Lawrence, Tessa M.; Peng, Yan-Chun; Liu, Jinghua; Xu, Keyi; Hu, Ke; Qin, Ling; Liu, Ning; Sun, Huanqin; Yan, Hui-Ping; Repapi, Emmanouela; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; McKeating, Jane A.; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV-1 infected patients. Our understanding of the impact of HIV infection on HCV specific immune responses and liver disease outcome is limited by the heterogeneous study populations with genetically diverse infecting viruses, varying duration of infection and anti-viral treatment. Methods Viral-specific immune responses in a cohort of 151 HCV mono- and HIV co-infected former plasma donors infected with a narrow source of virus were studied. HCV and HIV specific T cell responses were correlated with clinical data. Results HIV-1 accelerated liver disease progression and decreased HCV specific T cell immunity. The magnitude of HCV specific T cell responses inversely correlated with lower HCV RNA load and reduced liver injury as assessed by non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis. HIV co-infection reduced the frequency of HCV specific CD4+ T cells with no detectable effect on CD8+ T cells or neutralizing antibody levels. Conclusion Our study highlights the impact of HIV co-infection on HCV specific CD4+ T cell responses in a unique cohort of patients for both HCV and HIV and suggests a crucial role for these cells in controlling chronic HCV replication and liver disease progression. PMID:27455208

  14. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  15. Pharmacological management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Barb, Diana; Portillo-Sanchez, Paola; Cusi, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one-third of the population and two-thirds of patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Its more aggressive form is known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and is characterized by hepatocyte necrosis, inflammation and often fibrosis. The presence of fibrosis indicates a more aggressive course and may lead to cirrhosis. Premature mortality in NASH is related to both hepatic (cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic complications, largely cardiovascular disease (CVD). Many therapeutic agents have been tested, but still none approved specifically for NASH. Treatment of NAFLD includes aggressive management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors, although the role of controlling hyperglycemia per se in patients with T2DM and NASH remains unknown. Agents tested with some success in non-diabetic patients with NASH include pioglitazone, liraglutide, vitamin E and to a lesser degree, pentoxiphylline. In patients with T2DM and NASH only pioglitazone has shown to significantly improve liver histology, with only a handful of patients with diabetes having been studied with other modalities. This review focuses on available agents for NASH to assist clinicians in the management of these complex patients. Many novel compounds are being studied and will likely make combination therapy for NASH a reality in the future. PMID:27301803

  16. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  17. [Factors influencing development and progression of alcoholic liver disease].

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, K; Marot, A; Deltenre, P

    2015-09-01

    Only a minority ot excessive drinkers develop cirrhosis. The main cofactors implicated in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease are obesity, diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Several genetic polymorphisms have been associated with a higher risk of alcoholic cirrhosis. Recent data indicate that gut microbiota could play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the factors that influence development and progression of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26502621

  18. Nutraceuticals for canine liver disease: assessing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Cambier, Carole; Gustin, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    Nutraceuticals, or nutritional supplements, have been promoted for the ancillary treatment of liver disease in dogs. However, minimal information is available in the scientific literature about commonly used nutraceuticals, such as S-adenosylmethionine, silymarin, and vitamin E. No strong clinical evidence exists regarding the efficacy of these compounds as hepatoprotectants in canine liver disease. Until this evidence exists, individual veterinarians must assume responsibility for their decision to use nutritional supplements in their canine patients with liver disease. PMID:23890245

  19. Liver diseases in pregnancy: Diseases not unique to pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. Few challenges arise in reaching an accurate diagnosis in light of such physiological changes. Laboratory test results should be carefully interpreted and the knowledge of what normal changes to expect is prudent to avoid clinical misjudgment. Other challenges entail the methods of treatment and their safety for both the mother and the baby. This review summarizes liver diseases that are not unique to pregnancy. We focus on viral hepatitis and its mode of transmission, diagnosis, effect on the pregnancy, the mother, the infant, treatment, and breast-feeding. Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, Wilson’s disease, Budd Chiari and portal vein thrombosis in pregnancy are also discussed. Pregnancy is rare in patients with cirrhosis because of the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with cirrhosis. Variceal bleeding can happen in up to 38% of cirrhotic pregnant women. Management of portal hypertension during pregnancy is discussed. Pregnancy increases the pathogenicity leading to an increase in the rate of gallstones. We discuss some of the interventions for gallstones in pregnancy if symptoms arise. Finally, we provide an overview of some of the options in managing hepatic adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma during pregnancy. PMID:24282352

  20. Impact of hepatic function on serum procalcitonin for the diagnosis of bacterial infections in patients with chronic liver disease: A retrospective analysis of 324 cases.

    PubMed

    Qu, Junyan; Feng, Ping; Luo, Yan; Lü, Xiaoju

    2016-07-01

    Although procalcitonin (PCT) is a valid marker for early diagnosis of bacterial infections, it is unclear whether its accuracy in predicting bacterial infections is affected by impaired liver function. This study aimed to assess the impact of compromised liver function on the diagnostic value of PCT.This retrospective study was conducted between January 2013 and May 2015. A total of 324 patients with chronic liver disease were enrolled. Routine laboratory measurements and PCT were performed. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to clinical diagnosis: chronic hepatitis (group 1), decompensated cirrhosis (group 2), and acute-on-chronic liver failure/chronic liver failure (group 3). The correlation between PCT and liver function was analyzed. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUCROC) curve of PCT was analyzed according to infection status and liver function.PCT was more accurate than white blood cell count (P < 0.001) and percentage of neutrophils (P < 0.001) in detecting bacterial infections in patients with impaired liver function. In patients without infection, PCT had a moderate positive correlation with serum total bilirubin (TBIL) (r = 0.592), and a weak correlation with model for end-stage liver disease score (r = 0.483) and international normalized ratio (r = 0.389). The AUCROC and optimum thresholds of PCT and for predicting bacterial infections at different levels of TBIL were 0.907 (95% CI 0.828-0.958) and 0.38 ng/mL, respectively, for TBIL <5 mg/dL, 0.927 (95% CI 0.844-0.974) and 0.54 ng/mL (5 mg/dL ≤TBIL<10 mg/dL), 0.914 (95% CI 0.820-0.968) and 0.61 ng/mL (10 mg/dL ≤TBIL<20 mg/dL), 0.906 (95% CI 0.826-0.958) and 0.94 ng/mL (TBIL ≥20 mg/dL), respectively.This study demonstrated that PCT was a valuable marker of bacterial infection in patients with chronic liver diseases. TBIL affected PCT threshold, so different cut-offs should be used according to different TBIL values. PMID

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  2. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  3. GENETIC MODIFIERS OF LIVER DISEASE IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jaclyn R.; Friedman, Kenneth J.; Ling, Simon C.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Bell, Scott C.; Bourke, Billy; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Castellani, Carlo; Cipolli, Marco; Colombo, Carla; Colombo, John L.; Debray, Dominique; Fernandez, Adriana; Lacaille, Florence; Macek, Milan; Rowland, Marion; Salvatore, Francesco; Taylor, Christopher J.; Wainwright, Claire; Wilschanski, Michael; Zemková, Dana; Hannah, William B.; Phillips, M. James; Corey, Mary; Zielenski, Julian; Dorfman, Ruslan; Wang, Yunfei; Zou, Fei; Silverman, Lawrence M.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Wright, Fred A.; Lange, Ethan M.; Durie, Peter R.; Knowles, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Context A subset (~3–5%) of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) develops severe liver disease (CFLD) with portal hypertension. Objective To assess whether any of 9 polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes (SERPINA1, ACE, GSTP1, MBL2, and TGFB1) are associated with severe liver disease in CF patients. Design, Setting, and Participants A 2-stage design was used in this case–control study. CFLD subjects were enrolled from 63 U.S., 32 Canadian, and 18 CF centers outside of North America, with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) as the coordinating site. In the initial study, we studied 124 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/1999–12/2004) and 843 CF controls (patients without CFLD) by genotyping 9 polymorphisms in 5 genes previously implicated as modifiers of liver disease in CF. In the second stage, the SERPINA1 Z allele and TGFB1 codon 10 genotype were tested in an additional 136 CFLD patients (enrolled 1/2005–2/2007) and 1088 CF controls. Main Outcome Measures We compared differences in distribution of genotypes in CF patients with severe liver disease versus CF patients without CFLD. Results The initial study showed CFLD to be associated with the SERPINA1 (also known as α1-antiprotease and α1-antitrypsin) Z allele (P value=3.3×10−6; odds ratio (OR) 4.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.31–9.61), and with transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFB1) codon 10 CC genotype (P=2.8×10−3; OR 1.53, CI 1.16–2.03). In the replication study, CFLD was associated with the SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.4×10−3; OR 3.42, CI 1.54–7.59), but not with TGFB1 codon 10. A combined analysis of the initial and replication studies by logistic regression showed CFLD to be associated with SERPINA1 Z allele (P=1.5×10−8; OR 5.04, CI 2.88–8.83). Conclusion The SERPINA1 Z allele is a risk factor for liver disease in CF. Patients who carry the Z allele are at greater odds (OR ~5) to develop severe liver disease with portal hypertension. PMID:19738092

  4. Nutrition and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Effects of Alcoholism on Nutrition, Effects of Nutrition on Alcoholic Liver Disease, and Nutritional Therapies for Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2016-08-01

    Malnutrition is the most frequent and nearly universal consequence in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) that adversely affects clinical outcomes. Sarcopenia or skeletal muscle loss is the major component of malnutrition in liver disease. There are no effective therapies to prevent or reverse sarcopenia in ALD because the mechanisms are not well understood. Consequences of liver disease including hyperammonemia, hormonal perturbations, endotoxemia and cytokine abnormalities as well as the direct effects of alcohol and its metabolites contribute to sarcopenia in ALD. This article focuses on the prevalence, methods to quantify malnutrition, specifically sarcopenia and potential therapies including novel molecular targeted treatments. PMID:27373615

  5. Fatty liver disease in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Harikrashna B.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), likely reflecting the frequent occurrence of obesity and insulin resistance in T2DM. NAFLD also can occur in type 1 DM (T1DM), but must be distinguished from the more common glycogen hepatopathy as a cause of hepatomegaly and liver function abnormalities in T1DM. Weight reduction achieved by diet and exercise is effective in preventing and treating NAFLD in obese diabetic subjects. Bariatric surgery also has been shown to reverse NAFLD in T2DM, and recently approved weight loss medications should be evaluated for their impact on the development and progression of NAFLD. There is limited evidence suggesting that specific drugs used for blood glucose control in T2DM [thiazolidinediones (TZDs), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] and also statins may have a role in preventing or treating NAFLD in patients with diabetes. PMID:26005676

  6. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Maria Chiara; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Businaro, Luca; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA) supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes. Results The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely. Conclusions Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid

  7. Cardiovascular Disease and Myocardial Abnormalities in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alessandro; Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in many developed countries, affecting an estimated 30 % of the adult population. In this updated clinical review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the strong association between NAFLD and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and other functional, structural, and arrhythmic cardiac complications (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction, heart valve diseases and atrial fibrillation). We also briefly discuss the putative biological mechanisms linking NAFLD with these important extra-hepatic complications. To date, a large body of evidence has suggested that NAFLD is not simply a marker of CHD and other functional, structural, and arrhythmic cardiac complications, but also may play a part in the development and progression of these cardiac complications. The clinical implication of these findings is that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions aimed at decreasing the risk of CHD and other cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:26809873

  8. Metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver surgery: The new scourges?

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, François; Fuks, David; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban; Belghiti, Jacques; Costi, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this topic highlight is to review relevant evidence regarding the influence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its associated liver manifestation, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), on the development of liver cancer as well as their impact on the results of major liver surgery. MS and NAFLD, whose incidences are significantly increasing in Western countries, are leading to a changing profile of the patients undergoing liver surgery. A MEDLINE search was performed for relevant articles using the key words “metabolic syndrome”, “liver resection”, “liver transplantation”, “non alcoholic fatty liver disease”, “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis” and “liver cancer”. On one hand, the MS favors the development of primary liver malignancies (hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma) either through NAFLD liver parenchymal alterations (steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis) or in the absence of significant underlying liver parenchyma changes. Also, the existence of NAFLD may have a specific impact on colorectal liver metastases recurrence. On the other hand, the postoperative period following partial liver resection and liver transplantation is at increased risk of both postoperative complications and mortality. These deleterious effects seem to be related to the existence of liver specific complications but also higher cardio-vascular sensitivity in a setting of MS/NAFLD. Finally, the long-term prognosis after curative surgery joins that of patients operated on with other types of underlying liver diseases. An increased rate of patients with MS/NAFLD referred to hepatobiliary units has to be expected. The higher operative risk observed in this subset of patients will require specific improvements in their perioperative management. PMID:24868324

  9. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression. PMID:26876265

  10. Zebrafish Models of Human Liver Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a large number of essential synthetic and regulatory functions that are acquired during fetal development and persist throughout life. Their disruption underlies a diverse group of heritable and acquired diseases that affect both pediatric and adult patients. Although experimental analyses used to study liver development and disease are typically performed in cell culture models or rodents, the zebrafish is increasingly used to complement discoveries made in these systems. Forward and reverse genetic analyses over the past two decades have shown that the molecular program for liver development is largely conserved between zebrafish and mammals, and that the zebrafish can be used to model heritable human liver disorders. Recent work has demonstrated that zebrafish can also be used to study the mechanistic basis of acquired liver diseases. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of how the zebrafish has contributed to our understanding of human liver development and disease. PMID:23897685