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Sample records for liver dose estimation

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of {sup 166}Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, Peter R.; Maat, Gerrit H. van de; Wit, Tim C. de; Vente, Maarten A.D.; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Bakker, Chris J.G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in {sup 166}Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere ({sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials: MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the {sup 166}Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results: Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS in an ex vivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dose

  2. Quantitative simulation of intracellular signaling cascades in a Virtual Liver: estimating dose dependent changes in hepatocellular proliferation and apoptosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is developing an approach to predict dose-dependent hepatotoxicity as an in vivo tissue level response using in vitro data. The v-Liver accomplishes this using an in silico agent-based systems model that dynamically integrates environmental exp...

  3. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  4. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  5. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  6. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  7. Estimation of liver glucose metabolism after refeeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rognstad, R.

    1987-05-01

    Refeeding or infusing glucose to rats fasted for 24 hr or more causes rapid liver glycogen synthesis, the carbon source now considered to be largely from gluconeogenesis. While substrate cycling between plasma glucose and liver glucose-6P is known to occur, this cycling has apparently been ignored when calculations are made of % contribution of direct and indirect pathways to liver glycogen synthesis, or when hepatic glucose output is calculated from glucose turnover minus the glucose infusion rate. They show that, isotopically, an estimate of the fluxes of liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase is required to quantitate sources of carbon for liver glycogen synthesis, and to measure hepatic glucose output (or uptake). They propose a method to estimate these fluxes, involving a short infusion of a /sup 14/C labelled gluconeogenic precursor plus (6T)glucose, with determination of isotopic yields in liver glycogen and total glucose. Given also the rate of liver glycogen synthesis, this procedure permits the estimation of net gluconeogenesis and hepatic glucose output or uptake. Also, in vitro evidence against the notion of a drastic zonation of liver carbohydrate metabolism is presented, e.g. raising the glucose concentration from 10 to 25 mM increases the /sup 14/C yield from H/sup 14/CO/sub 3//sup -/ in lactate, with the increased pyruvate kinase flux and decreased gluconeogenesis occurring in the same cell type, not opposing pathways in different hepatocyte types (as has been postulated by some to occur in vivo after refeeding.

  8. GFR Estimating Equations and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beben, Tomasz; Rifkin, Dena E.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to accurately assess the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of patients with liver disease in order to deliver care and allocate organs for transplantation in a way that improves outcomes. The most commonly used methods to estimate GFR in this population are based on creatinine, which is biased by these patients’ low creatinine production and potentially by elevated serum bilirubin and decreased albumin levels. None of the creatinine based estimated GFR (eGFR) equations have been specifically modified for a population with liver disease, and even measurement of a 24 hour creatinine clearance has limitations. In liver disease, all creatinine based estimates of GFR overestimate gold standard measured GFR (mGFR), and the degree of overestimation is highest at lower mGFR values and in more severe liver disease. Cystatin C based eGFR has shown promise in general population studies by demonstrating less bias than creatinine based eGFR and improved association with clinically important outcomes, but results in the liver disease population have been mixed and further studies are necessary. Ultimately, specific eGFR equations for liver disease or novel methods for estimating GFR may be necessary. However, for now, the limitations of currently available methods need to be appreciated to understand renal function in liver disease. PMID:26311594

  9. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  10. The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

  11. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  12. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-03-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  13. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants.

    PubMed

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C; Rogan, Walter J

    2011-05-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however, little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1-377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this sample of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this sample of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects. PMID:21449579

  14. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C.; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1–377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this population of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this population of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects. PMID:21449579

  15. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ERDEM is a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with a graphical user interface (GUI) front end. Such a mathematical model was needed to make reliable estimates of the chemical dose to organs of animals or humans because of uncertainties of making route-to route, lo...

  16. Variation in lunar neutron dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Clowdsley, Martha S

    2011-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Moon includes albedo neutrons produced by primary particles interacting with the lunar surface. In this work, HZETRN2010 is used to calculate the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose as a function of shielding thickness for four different space radiation environments and to determine to what extent various factors affect such estimates. First, albedo neutron spectra computed with HZETRN2010 are compared to Monte Carlo results in various radiation environments. Next, the impact of lunar regolith composition on the albedo neutron spectrum is examined, and the variation on effective dose caused by neutron fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients is studied. A methodology for computing effective dose in detailed human phantoms using HZETRN2010 is also discussed and compared. Finally, the combined variation caused by environmental models, shielding materials, shielding thickness, regolith composition and conversion coefficients on the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is determined. It is shown that a single percentage number for characterizing the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose can be misleading. In general, the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is found to vary between 1-32%, with the environmental model, shielding material and shielding thickness being the driving factors that determine the exact contribution. It is also shown that polyethylene or other hydrogen-rich materials may be used to mitigate the albedo neutron exposure. PMID:21859325

  17. Generalized Spearman estimators of relative dose.

    PubMed

    Morton, R

    1981-06-01

    In a biological assay the expected response may be transformed to a variable bounded between 0 and 1. If the transformed response is regarded as analogous to the tolerance distribution function, the mean of that distribution may be estimated for the standard and test preparations, and a simple estimator of the relative potency obtained. The special case where the identity transformation is used for a quantal response corresponds to Spearman's estimator, and our generalization has similar unbiasedness properties to that estimator. Asymptotic results are derived when the intervals between dose levels decrease and the sample of each dose level simultaneously increases. These results are evaluated for the case with equal sample sizes at regularly spaced values of the dose metameter. An approximate test for similarity is proposed. If the tolerance distribution is known up to a scale parameter, then the transformation may be chosen so that the estimator is asymptotically fully efficient. An application to the thermal disinfestation of wheat is given. PMID:7272411

  18. Estimates of doses from global fallout.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L; Miller, Charles W; Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    This paper summarizes information about external and internal doses resulting from global fallout and presents preliminary estimates of doses resulting from intermediate fallout in the contiguous United States. Most of the data on global fallout were extracted from the reports of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, in which the radiation exposures from fallout have been extensively reviewed at regular intervals. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation estimated the average effective doses received by the world's population before 2000 to be about 0.4 mSv from external irradiation and 0.6 mSv from internal irradiation, the main radionuclide contributing to the effective dose being 137Cs. Effective doses received beyond 2000 result mainly from the environmentally mobile, long-lived 14C and amount to about 2.5 mSv summed over present and future generations. Specific information about the doses from fallout received by the United States population is based on the preliminary results of a study requested by the U.S. Congress and conducted jointly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. Separate calculations were made for the tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site and for the high-yield tests conducted mainly by the United States and the former Soviet Union at sites far away from the contiguous United States (global tests). The estimated average doses from external irradiation received by the United States population were about 0.5 mGy for Nevada Test Site fallout and about 0.7 mGy for global fallout. These values vary little from one organ or tissue of the body to another. In contrast, the average doses from internal irradiation vary markedly from one organ or tissue to another; estimated average thyroid doses to children born in 1951 were about 30 mGy from Nevada Test Site fallout and about 2 mGy from global fallout. PMID:12003019

  19. Radiation dose estimation of patients undergoing lumbar spine radiography

    PubMed Central

    Gyekye, Prince Kwabena; Simon, Adu; Geoffrey, Emi-Reynolds; Johnson, Yeboah; Stephen, Inkoom; Engmann, Cynthia Kaikor; Samuel, Wotorchi-Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose to organs of 100 adult patients undergoing lumbar spine (LS) radiography at a University Hospital have been assessed. Free in air kerma measurement using an ionization chamber was used for the patient dosimetry. Organ and effective dose to the patients were estimated using PCXMC (version 1.5) software. The organs that recorded significant dose due to LS radiography were lungs, stomach, liver, adrenals, kidney, pancreas, spleen, galbladder, and the heart. It was observed that the stomach recorded the highest dose (48.2 ± 1.2 μGy) for LS anteroposterior (AP). The spleen also recorded the highest dose (41.2 ± 0.5 μGy) for LS lateral (LAT). The mean entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) of LS LAT (122.2 μGy) was approximately twice that of LS AP (76.3 μGy), but the effective dose for both examinations were approximately the same (LS LAT = 8.6 μSv and LS AP = 10.4 μSv). The overall stochastic health effect of radiation to patients due to LS radiography in the University Hospital is independent of the projection of the examination (AP or LAT). PMID:24672153

  20. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Measurement of entrance skin dose and estimation of organ dose during pediatric chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, M; Kumar, Rajesh; Biju, K; Choubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S

    2011-06-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) was measured to calculate the organ doses from the anteroposterior (AP) and posteroanterior (PA) chest x-ray projections for pediatric patients in an Indian hospital. High sensitivity tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD, LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips) were used for measuring entrance skin dose. The respective organ doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNP 3.1) to simulate the examination set-up and a three-dimensional mathematical phantom for representing an average 5-y-old Indian child. Using this method, conversion coefficients were derived for translating the measured ESD to organ doses. The average measured ESDs for the chest AP and PA projections were 0.305 mGy and 0.171 mGy, respectively. The average calculated organ doses in the AP and the PA projections were 0.196 and 0.086 mSv for the thyroid, 0.167 and 0.045 mSv for the trachea, 0.078 and 0.043 mSv for the lungs, 0.110 and 0.013 mSv for the liver, 0.002 and 0.016 mSv for the bone marrow, 0.024 and 0.002 mSv for the kidneys, and 0.109 and 0.023 mSv for the heart, respectively. The ESD and organ doses can be reduced significantly with the proper radiological technique. According to these results, the chest PA projection should be preferred over the AP projection in pediatric patients. The estimated organ doses for the chest AP and PA projections can be used for the estimation of the associated risk. PMID:22004934

  2. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dose estimate reporting standards. 218.4 Section... ATMOSPHERIC NUCLEAR TEST PROGRAM (1945-1962) § 218.4 Dose estimate reporting standards. The following minimum standards for reporting dose estimates shall be uniformly applied by the Military Services when...

  3. Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L.; Haught, C.F.; Yamamoto, T.; Hopper, C.M.

    1995-08-01

    Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

  4. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  5. Determination of Radiation Absorbed Dose to Primary Liver Tumors and Normal Liver Tissue Using Post-Radioembolization 90Y PET

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Shyam M.; Natarajan, Navin; Kuroiwa, Joshua; Gallagher, Sean; Nasr, Elie; Shah, Shetal N.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Obuchowski, Nancy; Bazerbashi, Bana; Yu, Naichang; McLennan, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 (90 Y) microspheres is becoming a more widely used transcatheter treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using post-treatment 90 Y positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scans, the distribution of microspheres within the liver can be determined and quantitatively assessed. We studied the radiation dose of 90 Y delivered to liver and treated tumors. Methods: This retrospective study of 56 patients with HCC, including analysis of 98 liver tumors, measured and correlated the dose of radiation delivered to liver tumors and normal liver tissue using glass microspheres (TheraSpheres®) to the frequency of complications with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). 90 Y PET/CT and triphasic liver CT scans were used to contour treated tumor and normal liver regions and determine their respective activity concentrations. An absorbed dose factor was used to convert the measured activity concentration (Bq/mL) to an absorbed dose (Gy). Results: The 98 studied tumors received a mean dose of 169 Gy (mode 90–120 Gy; range 0–570 Gy). Tumor response by mRECIST criteria was performed for 48 tumors that had follow-up scans. There were 21 responders (mean dose 215 Gy) and 27 non-responders (mean dose 167 Gy). The association between mean tumor absorbed dose and response suggests a trend but did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.099). Normal liver tissue received a mean dose of 67 Gy (mode 60–70 Gy; range 10–120 Gy). There was a statistically significant association between absorbed dose to normal liver and the presence of two or more severe complications (p = 0.036). Conclusion: Our cohort of patients showed a possible dose–response trend for the tumors. Collateral dose to normal liver is non-trivial and can have clinical implications. These methods help us understand whether patient adverse events, treatment success, or

  6. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  7. Chemical warfare agents: estimating oral reference doses.

    PubMed

    Opresko, D M; Young, R A; Faust, R A; Talmage, S S; Watson, A P; Ross, R H; Davidson, K A; King, J

    1998-01-01

    Health risk assessments for sites contaminated with chemical warfare agents require a comparison of the potential levels of exposure with a characterization of the toxic potency of each chemical. For noncancer health effects, toxic potency is expressed in terms of Reference Doses (RfD). A RfD is a daily exposure level or dose (usually expressed in units of milligrams of chemical per kilogram body weight per day) for the human population, including sensitive subpopulations, that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious effects. A daily exposure at or below the RfD is not likely to be associated with health risks, but as the amount of chemical that an individual is exposed to increases above the RfD, the probability that an adverse effect will occur also increases. A RfD is derived by first examining the available human or animal toxicity data to identify a dose or exposure that corresponds to a no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) or a lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL). The NOAEL is the exposure level at which there are no statistically or biologically significant increases in frequency or severity of adverse effects between the exposed population and its appropriate control. Effects may be produced at this level, but they are not considered to be adverse if they do not result in functional impairment or pathological lesions that affect the performance of the whole organism or which reduce an organism's ability to cope with additional challenge. The LOAEL is the lowest exposure level at which there are statistically or biologically significant increases in frequency or severity of adverse effects between the exposed population and its appropriate control. If only a LOAEL is identified by the toxicity data, a NOAEL is estimated by dividing the LOAEL by a factor no greater than 10. This extrapolation factor of 10 or less is termed the LOAEL-to-NOAEL Uncertainty Factor (UFL). The NOAEL is also adjusted by the application of other

  8. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  9. Dose estimates of alternative plutonium pyrochemical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D. E.; Jackson, J. W.; Boerigter, S. T.; Averill, W. A.; Fasel, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have coupled our dose calculation tool Pandemonium with a discrete-event, object-oriented, process-modeling system ProMosO to analyze a set of alternatives for plutonium purification operations. The results follow expected trends and indicate, from a dose perspective, that an experimental flowsheet may warrant further research to see if it can be scaled to industrial levels. Flowsheets that include fluoride processes resulted in the largest doses.

  10. Deformable Dose Reconstruction to Optimize the Planning and Delivery of Liver Cancer Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velec, Michael

    The precise delivery of radiation to liver cancer patients results in improved control with higher tumor doses and minimized normal tissues doses. A margin of normal tissue around the tumor requires irradiation however to account for treatment delivery uncertainties. Daily image-guidance allows targeting of the liver, a surrogate for the tumor, to reduce geometric errors. However poor direct tumor visualization, anatomical deformation and breathing motion introduce uncertainties between the planned dose, calculated on a single pre-treatment computed tomography image, and the dose that is delivered. A novel deformable image registration algorithm based on tissue biomechanics was applied to previous liver cancer patients to track targets and surrounding organs during radiotherapy. Modeling these daily anatomic variations permitted dose accumulation, thereby improving calculations of the delivered doses. The accuracy of the algorithm to track dose was validated using imaging from a deformable, 3-dimensional dosimeter able to optically track absorbed dose. Reconstructing the delivered dose revealed that 70% of patients had substantial deviations from the initial planned dose. An alternative image-guidance technique using respiratory-correlated imaging was simulated, which reduced both the residual tumor targeting errors and the magnitude of the delivered dose deviations. A planning and delivery strategy for liver radiotherapy was then developed that minimizes the impact of breathing motion, and applied a margin to account for the impact of liver deformation during treatment. This margin is 38% smaller on average than the margin used clinically, and permitted an average dose-escalation to liver tumors of 9% for the same risk of toxicity. Simulating the delivered dose with deformable dose reconstruction demonstrated the plans with smaller margins were robust as 90% of patients' tumors received the intended dose. This strategy can be readily implemented with widely

  11. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. {sup 131}I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided.

  12. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site fallout: internal dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Whicker, F W; Kirchner, T B; Anspaugh, L R; Ng, Y C

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a very few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. 131I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (< 3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided. PMID:8830749

  13. Comparison of premortem and postmortem estimates of plutonium deposited in the skeleton and liver of six individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Kathren, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    Assessment of organ burdens after internal exposures to radionuclides is often necessary to evaluate the health and regulatory implications of the exposure. The assessment of plutonium activity in skeleton and liver is usually estimated from measurements of plutonium excreted via urine. As part of the overall evaluation of internal dose assessment techniques, it is useful to compare the results of organ burden estimates made from evaluation of urinary excretion data with those made at death from tissue samples collected posthumously from the individual. Estimates of plutonium in the skeleton and liver, based on postmortem analysis of tissue samples for six individuals, were obtained from the US Transuranium Registry (USTR). Bioassay data and other radiation exposure information obtained from the individuals' files were used to estimate their skeleton and liver burdens at the times of their deaths, and these estimates were compared to those obtained through tissue analysis. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Dose-response involvement of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by triazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Irie, Kaoru; Kodama, Yukio; Ozawa, Shogo; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Yoshida, Midori

    2013-07-31

    To clarify the dose-response relationship between constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activity and induction of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) expression and hypertrophy by triazole fungicides in mouse liver, three dose levels of cyproconazole (Cypro), tebuconazole (Teb), fluconazole (Flu), and phenobarbital (PB), a typical CYP2B inducer, were administrated in diet to male wild-type (WT) and CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice for one week. In WT mice, all compounds dose-dependently induced liver weight increases and hepatocellular hypertrophy accompanied by CYP2B expression. In CARKO mice, these effects were not induced by PB, while Cypro or Flu induced these effects only at the highest dose. Dose-dependent liver hypertrophy was detected in CARKO mice treated with Teb, but at the lowest dose the intensity was weakened compared to WT mice. The present results indicate that Cypro and Flu mainly induced CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy, while Teb slightly involved CAR. The involvement of CAR in triazole-induced liver hypertrophy was dose-responsive. In addition, all three triazoles have non-CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy pathways, indicating that the hypertrophy induced by these triazoles differs from that of PB. PMID:23721867

  15. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures. PMID:26581473

  16. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-07-21

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output.

  17. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  18. The estimation of galactic cosmic ray penetration and dose rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrell, M. O.; Wright, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    This study is concerned with approximation methods that can be readily applied to estimate the absorbed dose rate from cosmic rays in rads - tissue or rems inside simple geometries of aluminum. The present work is limited to finding the dose rate at the center of spherical shells or behind plane slabs. The dose rate is calculated at tissue-point detectors or for thin layers of tissue. This study considers cosmic-rays dose rates for both free-space and earth-orbiting missions.

  19. radir package: an R implementation for cytogenetic biodosimetry dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Moriña, David; Higueras, Manuel; Puig, Pedro; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Rothkamm, Kai

    2015-09-01

    The Bayesian framework has been shown to be very useful in cytogenetic dose estimation. This approach allows description of the probability of an event in terms of previous knowledge, e.g. its expectation and/or its uncertainty. A new R package entitled radir (radiation inverse regression) has been implemented with the aim of reproducing a recent Bayesian-type dose estimation methodology. radir adopts the method of dose estimation under the Poisson assumption of the responses (the chromosomal aberrations counts) for the required dose-response curve (typically linear or quadratic). The individual commands are described in detail and relevant examples of the use of the methods and the corresponding radir software tools are given. The suitability of this methodology is highlighted and its application encouraged by providing a user-friendly command-type software interface within the R statistical software (version 3.1.1 or higher), which includes a complete manual. PMID:26160852

  20. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  1. Estimates of bias and uncertainty in recorded external dose

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.; Gilbert, E.S.; Baumgartner, W.V.

    1994-10-01

    A study is underway to develop an approach to quantify bias and uncertainty in recorded dose estimates for workers at the Hanford Site based on personnel dosimeter results. This paper focuses on selected experimental studies conducted to better define response characteristics of Hanford dosimeters. The study is more extensive than the experimental studies presented in this paper and includes detailed consideration and evaluation of other sources of bias and uncertainty. Hanford worker dose estimates are used in epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers. A major objective of these studies is to provide a direct assessment of the carcinogenic risk of exposure to ionizing radiation at low doses and dose rates. Considerations of bias and uncertainty in the recorded dose estimates are important in the conduct of this work. The method developed for use with Hanford workers can be considered an elaboration of the approach used to quantify bias and uncertainty in estimated doses for personnel exposed to radiation as a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons between 1945 and 1962. This approach was first developed by a National Research Council (NRC) committee examining uncertainty in recorded film badge doses during atmospheric tests (NRC 1989). It involved quantifying both bias and uncertainty from three sources (i.e., laboratory, radiological, and environmental) and then combining them to obtain an overall assessment. Sources of uncertainty have been evaluated for each of three specific Hanford dosimetry systems (i.e., the Hanford two-element film dosimeter, 1944-1956; the Hanford multi-element film dosimeter, 1957-1971; and the Hanford multi-element TLD, 1972-1993) used to estimate personnel dose throughout the history of Hanford operations. Laboratory, radiological, and environmental sources of bias and uncertainty have been estimated based on historical documentation and, for angular response, on selected laboratory measurements.

  2. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2002-04-22

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  3. Estimation of food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  4. Threshold doses and prediction of visually apparent liver dysfunction after stereotactic body radiation therapy in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Hiroya; Masai, Norihisa; Tatsumi, Daisaku; Igura, Takumi; Imai, Yasuharu; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the threshold dose for focal liver damage after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 64 patients who underwent SBRT for liver tumors, including 54 cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 10 non-cirrhotic patients with liver metastases, were analyzed. MRI was performed 3−6 months after SBRT, using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted sequences. All MRI datasets were merged with 3D dosimetry data. All dose distributions were corrected to the biologically effective dose using the linear–quadratic model with an assumed α/β ratio of 2 Gy. The development of liver dysfunction was validly correlated with isodose distribution. The median biologically effective dose (BED2) that provoked liver dysfunction was 57.3 (30.0−227.9) and 114.0 (70.4−244.9) Gy in cirrhotic and normal livers, respectively (P = 0.0002). The BED2 associated with a >5% risk of liver dysfunction was 38.5 in cirrhotic livers and 70.4 Gy in normal livers. The threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction was not significantly different between Child−Pugh A and B patients (P = 0.0719). Moreover, the fractionation schedule was not significantly correlated with threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction in the cirrhotic liver (P = 0.1019). In the cirrhotic liver, fractionation regimen and Child−Pugh classification did not significantly influence the threshold BED2 for focal liver damage after SBRT. We suggest that the threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction after SBRT is 40 and 70 Gy in the cirrhotic and normal liver, respectively. PMID:26983986

  5. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  6. Estimated ultraviolet radiation doses in wetlands in six national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, S.A.; Trenham, P.C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hossack, B.R.; Knapp, R.A.; Stark, L.; Bradford, D.; Corn, P.S.; Czarnowski, K.; Brooks, P.D.; Fagre, D.B.; Breen, B.; Dentenbeck, N.E.; Tonnessen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–320-nm wavelengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands in six national parks: Acadia (Acadia), Glacier (Glacier), Great Smoky Mountains (Smoky), Olympic (Olympic), Rocky Mountain (Rocky), and Sequoia/Kings Canyon (Sequoia). Estimates were made using ground-based UV-B data (Brewer spectrophotometers), solar radiation models, GIS tools, field characterization of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates were made for the summer solstice, at a depth of 1 cm in each wetland. The mean dose across all wetlands and parks was 19.3 W-h m−2 (range of 3.4–32.1 W-h m−2). The mean dose was lowest in Acadia (13.7 W-h m−2) and highest in Rocky (24.4 W-h m−2). Doses were significantly different among all parks. These wetland doses correspond to UV-B flux of 125.0 μW cm−2 (range 21.4–194.7 μW cm−2) based on a day length, averaged among all parks, of 15.5 h. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a key determinant of water-column UV-B flux, ranged from 0.6 (analytical detection limit) to 36.7 mg C L−1 over all wetlands and parks, and reduced potential maximal UV-B doses at 1-cm depth by 1%–87 %. DOC concentration, as well as its effect on dose, was lowest in Sequoia and highest in Acadia (DOC was equivalent in Acadia, Glacier, and Rocky). Landscape reduction of potential maximal UV-B doses ranged from zero to 77% and was lowest in Sequoia. These regional differences in UV-B wetland dose illustrate the importance of considering all aspects of exposure in evaluating the potential impact of UV-B on aquatic organisms.

  7. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing.

  8. Evaluation of S-values and dose distributions for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re in seven lobes of the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Rats have been widely used in radionuclide therapy research for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This has created the need to assess rat liver absorbed radiation dose. In most dose estimation studies, the rat liver is considered as a homogeneous integrated target organ with a tissue composition assumed to be similar to that of human liver tissue. However, the rat liver is composed of several lobes having different anatomical and chemical characteristics. To assess the overall impact on rat liver dose calculation, the authors use a new voxel-based rat model with identified suborgan regions of the liver. Methods: The liver in the original cryosectional color images was manually segmented into seven individual lobes and subsequently integrated into a voxel-based computational rat model. Photon and electron particle transport was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate absorbed fractions and S-values for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re for the seven liver lobes. The effect of chemical composition on organ-specific absorbed dose was investigated by changing the chemical composition of the voxel filling liver material. Radionuclide-specific absorbed doses at the voxel level were further assessed for a small spherical hepatic tumor. Results: The self-absorbed dose for different liver lobes varied depending on their respective masses. A maximum difference of 3.5% was observed for the liver self-absorbed fraction between rat and human tissues for photon energies below 100 keV. {sup 166}Ho and {sup 188}Re produce a uniformly distributed high dose in the tumor and relatively low absorbed dose for surrounding tissues. Conclusions: The authors evaluated rat liver radiation doses from various radionuclides used in HCC treatments using a realistic computational rat model. This work contributes to a better understanding of all aspects influencing radiation transport in organ-specific radiation dose evaluation for

  9. Radiation dose estimates for copper-64 citrate in man

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, J.E.; Carlton, J.E.; Stabin, M.; Watson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Tumor imaging agents suitable for use with positron emission tomographs are constantly sought. We have performed studies with animal-tumor-bearing models that have demonstrated the rapid uptake of copper-64. The radiation dose estimates for man indicate that the intravenous administration of 7.0 mCi would result in radiation doses to the kidney of 9.8 to 10.5 rads with other organs receiving substantially less radiation. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for estimating patient-specific dose from abdomen-pelvis CT examinations and to investigate dose variation across patients in the same weight group. Our study consisted of seven pediatric patients in the same weight/protocol group, for whom full-body computer models were previously created based on the patients' CT data obtained for clinical indications. Organ and effective dose of these patients from an abdomen-pelvis scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120-kVp, 85-90 mA, 0.4-s gantry rotation period, 1.375-pitch, 40-mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for the same CT system. The seven patients had effective dose of 2.4-2.8 mSv, corresponding to normalized effective dose of 6.6-8.3 mSv/100mAs (coefficient of variation: 7.6%). Dose variations across the patients were small for large organs in the scan coverage (mean: 6.6%; range: 4.9%-9.2%), larger for small organs in the scan coverage (mean: 10.3%; range: 1.4%-15.6%), and the largest for organs partially or completely outside the scan coverage (mean: 14.8%; range: 5.7%-27.7%). Normalized effective dose correlated strongly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r = -0.94). Normalized dose to the kidney and the adrenal gland correlated strongly with mid-liver equivalent diameter (kidney: r = -0.97; adrenal glands: r = -0.98). Normalized dose to the small intestine correlated strongly with mid-intestine equivalent diameter (r = -0.97). These strong correlations suggest that patient-specific dose may be estimated for any other child in the same size group who undergoes the abdomen-pelvis scan.

  11. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  12. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs. PMID:24768639

  13. Analytic estimates of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anferov, V.

    2010-12-01

    Proton beam losses in various components of a treatment nozzle generate secondary neutrons, which bring unwanted out of field dose during treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytic method for estimating neutron dose to a distant organ at risk during proton therapy. Based on radiation shielding calculation methods proposed by Sullivan, we developed an analytical model for converting the proton beam losses in the nozzle components and in the treatment volume into the secondary neutron dose at a point of interest. Using the MCNPx Monte Carlo code, we benchmarked the neutron dose rates generated by the proton beam stopped at various media. The Monte Carlo calculations confirmed the validity of the analytical model for simple beam stop geometry. The analytical model was then applied to neutron dose equivalent measurements performed on double scattering and uniform scanning nozzles at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI). Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the data measured at MPRI. This work provides a method for estimating analytically the neutron dose equivalent to a distant organ at risk. This method can be used as a tool for optimizing dose delivery techniques in proton therapy.

  14. Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John

    2009-08-01

    The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

  15. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  16. The prediction of radiation-induced liver dysfunction using a local dose and regional venous perfusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R; Balter, James M.; Pan, Charlie; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haken, Randall K. ten; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2007-02-15

    We have shown that high dose conformal radiation combined with chemotherapy appears to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers. The ability to safely deliver higher doses is primarily limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease, characterized by venous occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether portal venous perfusion measured prior to the end of radiation therapy (RT) together with dose could predict liver venous perfusion dysfunction after treatment. Ten patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancer participated in an IRB-approved computer tomography (CT) perfusion study. Hepatic arterial and portal vein perfusion distributions were estimated by using dynamic contrast enhanced CT and the single compartmental model. Scans were obtained at four time points: prior to treatment, after 15 and 30 fractions of 1.5 Gy treatments, and one month following the completion of RT. Multivariant linear regression was used to determine covariances among the first three time point measurements plus dose for prediction of the post RT measurement. The reduction in the regional venous perfusion one month following RT was predicted by the local accumulated dose and the change in the regional venous perfusion after {approx}30 fractions (F=90.6,p<0.000 01). Each Gy produced an approximately 1.2% of reduction in the venous perfusion. This local dose and venous perfusion model has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to radiation. This is the first step toward developing a method to deliver higher and potentially more curative radiation doses to the patients who can safely receive these higher doses.

  17. Estimating Functional Liver Reserve Following Hepatic Irradiation: Adaptive Normal Tissue Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and Methods From 2005–2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1−(ICG-R15pre-RT/ICG-R15post-RT)] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ≥78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p<0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation. PMID:24813090

  18. Respiratory liver motion estimation and its effect on scanned proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Boye, D.; Tanner, C.; Lomax, A. J.; Knopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    Proton therapy with active scanning beam delivery has significant advantages compared to conventional radiotherapy. However, so far only static targets have been treated in this way, since moving targets potentially lead to interplay effects. For 4D treatment planning, information on the target motion is needed to calculate time-resolved dose distributions. In this study, respiratory liver motion has been extracted from 4D CT data using two deformable image registration algorithms. In moderately moving patient cases (mean motion range around 6 mm), the registration error was no more than 3 mm, while it reached 7 mm for larger motions (range around 13 mm). The obtained deformation fields have then been used to calculate different time-resolved 4D treatment plans. Averaged over both motion estimations, interplay effects can increase the D5-D95 value for the clinical target volume (CTV) from 8.8% in a static plan to 23.4% when motion is considered. It has also been found that the different deformable registration algorithms can provide different motion estimations despite performing similarly for the selected landmarks, which in turn can lead to differing 4D dose distributions. Especially for single-field treatments where no motion mitigation is used, a maximum (mean) dose difference (averaged over three cases) of 32.8% (2.9%) can be observed. However, this registration ambiguity-induced uncertainty can be reduced if rescanning is applied or if the treatment plan consists of multiple fields, where the maximum (mean) difference can decrease to 15.2% (0.57%). Our results indicate the necessity to interpret 4D dose distributions for scanned proton therapy with some caution or with error bars to reflect the uncertainties resulting from the motion estimation. On the other hand, rescanning has been found to be an appropriate motion mitigation technique and, furthermore, has been shown to be a robust approach to also deal with these motion estimation uncertainties.

  19. Histopathological changes in rat liver after a single high dose of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Milka; Janeva, Ana Begić; Bulat, Petar

    2008-06-01

    Aluminium (Al) exposure may affect the liver of experimental animals. This investigation aimed at evaluating morphological changes in rat liver after a single high dose of Al (as metallic powder suspension). A total of forty female Wistar rats were divided in one exposed and one control group, 20 rats each. The exposed rats received 0.5 mL of sterile physiological suspension of fine Al powder in the concentration of 100 mg mL-1 intraperitoneally (50 mg Al per rat). After 7 weeks all animals were killed (by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta in ether anaesthesia). Liver aluminium was analysed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. For light microscopy the liver tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and for histochemical analysis with aurin threecarbocsillic acid (aluminon). Liver Al level was markedly higher in the exposed (37.1 microg g-1) than in control rats (0.71 microg g-1). The exposed rats showed crystalloid Al inclusions in the capsular, subcapsular, and portal liver tissue. The basic liver structure remained intact. Slightly multiplied bile ductuli were found in 16 of 20 exposed and in 8 of 20 control rats. Three exposed rats had mycrovesicular steatosis. The peritoneum and Glisson's capsule showed strong macrophage infiltration and a foreign-body-like reaction with multiple giant macrophages containing Al crystalloid inclusions. Although this reaction was a defense against the metal, some Al passed this barrier and entered the liver tissue, exerting toxic effects in bile ductuli and hepatocytes. PMID:18573746

  20. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1990-08-01

    The Langley cosmic ray transport code and the Langley nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are used to quantify the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar proton flares through the Martian atmosphere. Surface doses are estimated using both a low density and a high density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere which, in the vertical direction, provides a total of 16 g/sq cm and 22 g/sq cm of protection, respectively. At the Mars surface during the solar minimum cycle, a blood-forming organ (BFO) dose equivalent of 10.5 to 12 rem/yr due to galactic cosmic ray transport and attenuation is calculated. Estimates of the BFO dose equivalents which would have been incurred from the three large solar flare events of August 1972, November 1960, and February 1956 are also calculated at the surface. Results indicate surface BFO dose equivalents of approximately 2 to 5, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10 rem per event, respectively. Doses are also estimated at altitudes up to 12 km above the Martian surface where the atmosphere will provide less total protection.

  1. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The Langley cosmic ray transport code and the Langley nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are used to quantify the transport and attenuation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar proton flares through the Martian atmosphere. Surface doses are estimated using both a low density and a high density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere which, in the vertical direction, provides a total of 16 g/sq cm and 22 g/sq cm of protection, respectively. At the Mars surface during the solar minimum cycle, a blood-forming organ (BFO) dose equivalent of 10.5 to 12 rem/yr due to galactic cosmic ray transport and attenuation is calculated. Estimates of the BFO dose equivalents which would have been incurred from the three large solar flare events of August 1972, November 1960, and February 1956 are also calculated at the surface. Results indicate surface BFO dose equivalents of approximately 2 to 5, 5 to 7, and 8 to 10 rem per event, respectively. Doses are also estimated at altitudes up to 12 km above the Martian surface where the atmosphere will provide less total protection.

  2. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L; DuFrain, R.J.

    1983-10-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between the yield of dicentric chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The dicentric yields follow the Poisson distribution, and the expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose for low LET radiation. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been obtained by Kellerer and Rossi using the theory of dual radiation action. The yield of elementary lesions is kappa(..gamma..d + g(t, tau)d/sup 2/), where t is the time and d is dose. The coefficient of the d/sup 2/ term is determined by the recovery function and the temporal mode of irradiation. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described and illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  3. Effect of radon measurement methods on dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kávási, Norbert; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kovács, Tibor; Somlai, János; Jobbágy, Viktor; Nagy, Katalin; Deák, Eszter; Berhés, István; Bender, Tamás; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Vaupotic, Janja; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2011-05-01

    Different radon measurement methods were applied in the old and new buildings of the Turkish bath of Eger, Hungary, in order to elaborate a radon measurement protocol. Besides, measurements were also made concerning the radon and thoron short-lived decay products, gamma dose from external sources and water radon. The most accurate results for dose estimation were provided by the application of personal radon meters. Estimated annual effective doses from radon and its short-lived decay products in the old and new buildings, using 0.2 and 0.1 measured equilibrium factors, were 0.83 and 0.17 mSv, respectively. The effective dose from thoron short-lived decay products was only 5 % of these values. The respective external gamma radiation effective doses were 0.19 and 0.12 mSv y(-1). Effective dose from the consumption of tap water containing radon was 0.05 mSv y(-1), while in the case of spring water, it was 0.14 mSv y(-1). PMID:21450699

  4. A study on the correlation between patients' physical characteristics and effective dose of liver computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Joo, Young-Cheol; Lim, Chung-Hwan; Lee, Chun-Yong; Jung, Hong-Ryang

    2014-01-01

    This suggests indicators to be considered in the protocol for setting up equipment and minimizing patient doses by identifying the effective dose and correlations of each equipment company according to a patient's body characteristics in liver CT. The study was conducted with 445 patients who went to the hospital and received liver CT at the diagnostic radiology department of S medical center from 2010 January to June. As the statistical methods, t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation analysis were used. The study results show that as height, weight, and BMI increased, the effective dose increased with all equipment vendors. Correlations between a patient's body characteristics and the effective dose were shown to be positive with all equipment vendors in regard to weight, BMI, and height, in order. PMID:24704655

  5. [Changes in the rat liver after exposure to high doses of bromex].

    PubMed

    Krustev, L; Kaloianova-Simeonova, F

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out with male albino rats treated with the phosphorous-organic compound--bromex. The pesticide was perorally administered to one of the experimental groups--a single dose of 1/2 LD50. The same quantity bromex was administered to the other experimental group after a previous 20-day treatment with the same preparation but with a dose of 1/20 LD50. The changes, not particularly well manifested, progressing the organelles of the liver cells were followed up. The changes were established (in mitochondria, endoplasmatic reticulum, lysozoymes and some other organelles) to be better manifested in the group under a single effect of bromex. In this case they are interpreted as manifestation of one initial alterative process. In the group with the 20-day low doses, followed up by one high dose, the changes were gradual, lighter and considered a manifestation of a sort of adaptation or a form of subcellular liver regeneration. PMID:7178067

  6. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  7. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays for quinoline in rats.

    PubMed

    Uno, Fuyumi; Tanaka, Jin; Ueda, Maya; Nagai, Miho; Fukumuro, Masahito; Natsume, Masakatsu; Oba, Michiyo; Akahori, Ayaka; Masumori, Shoji; Takami, Shigeaki; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kougo, Yuriko; Ohyama, Wakako; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Okada, Emiko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-dose liver, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays that use young adult rats were evaluated in a collaborative study that was organized by the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group. A genotoxic hepatocarcinogen quinoline was orally administered to independent groups of five Crl:CD (SD) male rats at doses of 30, 60 and 120mg/kg for 14 days and at doses of 15, 30 and 60mg/kg for 28 days. After treatment, the livers were harvested and hepatocytes were isolated by collagenase treatment. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated dose studies. However, the frequency of micronucleated cells did not increase in the bone marrow, stomach or colon cells, which were not quinoline-induced carcinogenic target organs in the rats. These results indicate that a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats is capable of detecting the genotoxicity of quinoline at the target organ of carcinogenicity. The protocol may also permit the integration of the genotoxic endpoint into general repeated-dose toxicity studies. Furthermore, we elucidated that conducting the micronucleus assay in multiple organs could potentially assess organ specificity. PMID:25892622

  8. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Joshua; Celler, Anna

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  9. Influence of DTPA Treatment on Internal Dose Estimates.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Peleau, Bernadette; Correze, Philippe; Bohand, Sandra; Franck, Didier

    2016-06-01

    In case of internal contamination with plutonium materials, a treatment with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be administered in order to reduce plutonium body burden and consequently avoid some radiation dose. DTPA intravenous injections or inhalation can start almost immediately after intake, in parallel with urinary and fecal bioassay sampling for dosimetric follow-up. However, urine and feces excretion will be significantly enhanced by the DTPA treatment. As internal dose is calculated from bioassay results, the DTPA effect on excretion has to be taken into account. A common method to correct bioassay data is to divide it by a factor representing the excretion enhancement under DTPA treatment by intravenous injection. Its value may be based on a nominal reference or observed after a break in the treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of this factor on internal dose by comparing the dose estimated using default or upper and lower values of the enhancement factor for 11 contamination cases. The observed upper and lower values of the enhancement factor were 18.7 and 63.0 for plutonium and 24.9 and 28.8 for americium. For americium, a default factor of 25 is proposed. This work demonstrates that the use of a default DTPA enhancement factor allows the determination of the magnitude of the contamination because dose estimated could vary by a factor of 2 depending on the value of the individual DTPA enhancement factor. In case of significant intake, an individual enhancement factor should be determined to obtain a more reliable dose assessment. PMID:27115221

  10. Estimation of Secondary Neutron Dose during Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Tomas; Klusoň, Jaroslav

    2014-06-01

    During proton radiotherapy, secondary neutrons are produced by nuclear interactions in the material along the beam path, in the treatment nozzle (including the fixed scatterer, range modulator, etc.) and, of course, after entering the patient. The dose equivalent deposited by these neutrons is usually not considered in routine treatment planning. In this study, there has been estimated the neutron dose in patient (in as well as around the target volume) during proton radiotherapy using scattering and scanning techniques. The proton induced neutrons (and photons) have been simulated in the simple geometry of the single scattering and the pencil beam scanning universal nozzles and in geometry of the plastic phantom (made of tissue equivalent material - RW3 - imitate the patient). In simulations of the scattering nozzle, different types of brass collimators have been used as well. Calculated data have been used as an approximation of the radiation field in and around the chosen/potential target volume in the patient (plastic phantom). For the dose equivalent evaluation, fluence-to-dose conversion factors from ICRP report have been employed. The results of calculated dose from neutrons in various distances from the spot for different treatment technique and for different energies of incident protons have been compared and evaluated in the context of the dose deposited in the target volume. This work was supported by RVO: 68407700 and Grant Agency of the CTU in Prague, grant No. SGS12/200/OHK4/3T/14.

  11. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy ( BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  12. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  13. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study. PMID:25892624

  14. The feasibility of a regional CTDIvol to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    PubMed Central

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In AAPM Task Group 204, the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was developed by providing size adjustment factors which are applied to the Computed Tomography (CT) standardized dose metric, CTDIvol. However, that work focused on fixed tube current scans and did not specifically address tube current modulation (TCM) scans, which are currently the majority of clinical scans performed. The purpose of this study was to extend the SSDE concept to account for TCM by investigating the feasibility of using anatomic and organ specific regions of scanner output to improve accuracy of dose estimates. Methods: Thirty-nine adult abdomen/pelvis and 32 chest scans from clinically indicated CT exams acquired on a multidetector CT using TCM were obtained with Institutional Review Board approval for generating voxelized models. Along with image data, raw projection data were obtained to extract TCM functions for use in Monte Carlo simulations. Patient size was calculated using the effective diameter described in TG 204. In addition, the scanner-reported CTDIvol (CTDIvol,global) was obtained for each patient, which is based on the average tube current across the entire scan. For the abdomen/pelvis scans, liver, spleen, and kidneys were manually segmented from the patient datasets; for the chest scans, lungs and for female models only, glandular breast tissue were segmented. For each patient organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo Methods. To investigate the utility of regional measures of scanner output, regional and organ anatomic boundaries were identified from image data and used to calculate regional and organ-specific average tube current values. From these regional and organ-specific averages, CTDIvol values, referred to as regional and organ-specific CTDIvol, were calculated for each patient. Using an approach similar to TG 204, all CTDIvol values were used to normalize simulated organ doses; and the ability of each normalized dose to correlate with patient size

  15. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Baumgardner, January N; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Ferguson, Matthew; Tong, Yudong; Wu, Xianli; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been shown to protect against steatosis and alcoholic liver injury. The current study was designed to determine if a similar beneficial effect of MCT occurs in a rat model of NAFLD. Groups of male rats were isocalorically overfed diets containing 10%, 35% or 70% total energy as corn oil or a 70% fat diet in which corn oil was replaced with increasing concentrations of saturated fat (18:82, beef tallow:MCT oil) from 20% to 65% for 21 days using total enteral nutrition (TEN). As dietary content of corn oil increased, hepatic steatosis and serum alanine amino transferases were elevated (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by greater expression of cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2E1 (P < 0.05) and higher concentrations of polyunsaturated 18:2 and 20:4 fatty acids (FA) in the hepatic lipid fractions (P < 0.05). Keeping the total dietary fat at 70%, but increasing the proportion of MCT-enriched saturated fat resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steatosis and necrosis without affecting CYP2E1 induction. There was no incorporation of C8-C10 FAs into liver lipids, but increasing the ratio of MCT to corn oil: reduced liver lipid 18:2 and 20:4 concentrations; reduced membrane susceptibility to radical attack; stimulated FA β- and ω-oxidation as a result of activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α, and appeared to increase mitochondrial respiration through complex III. These data suggest that replacing unsaturated fats like corn oil with MCT oil in the diet could be utilized as a potential treatment for NAFLD. PMID:23576797

  16. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-12-15

    calculated to be 0.124 mSv (ICRP60) [0.134 mSv (ICRP103)]. This is less than 75% of that predicted by scaling of the PA mA s ratio. This lower dose was due to changes in the focal-spot-to-skin distance, effective changes in collimation with projection angle, rounding down of the mA s step, and variations in organ exposure to the primary x-ray beam for each view. Large errors in dose estimation can occur if these factors are not accurately modeled. Conclusions: The effective dose of a chest examination with this chest tomosynthesis system is about twice that of a two-view chest examination and less than 2% of the published average values for thoracic CT. It is shown that complete consideration of the tomosynthesis acquisition technique and geometry is required for accurate determination of the effective dose to the patient. Tomosynthesis provides three-dimensional imaging at a dose level comparable to a two-view chest x-ray examination and may provide a low dose alternative to thoracic CT for obtaining depth information in chest imaging.

  17. Radiation Dose Estimation Using Realistic Postures with PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Wiarda, Dorothea; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-12-01

    For correct radiation dose assessment, it is important to take the posture into account. A computational phantom with moving arms and legs was previously developed to address this need. Further, an accompanying graphical user interface (GUI), called PIMAL, was developed to enable dose estimation using realistic postures in a user-friendly manner such that the analyst's time could be substantially reduced. The importance of the posture for correct dose estimation has been demonstrated with a few case studies in earlier analyses. The previous version of PIMAL was somewhat limited in its features (i.e., it contained only a hermaphrodite phantom model and allowed only isotropic source definition). Currently GUI is being further enhanced by incorporating additional phantom models, improving the features, and increasing the user friendliness in general. This paper describes recent updates to the PIMAL software. In this summary recent updates to the PIMAL software, which aims to perform radiation transport simulations for phantom models in realistic postures in a user-friendly manner, are described. In future work additional phantom models, including hybrid phantom models, will be incorporated. In addition to further enhancements, a library of input files for the case studies that have been analyzed to date will be included in the PIMAL.

  18. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1990-01-01

    A future goal of the U.S. space program is a commitment to the manned exploration and habitation of Mars. An important consideration of such missions is the exposure of crew members to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation from high-energy galactic cosmic ray fluxes and solar proton flares. The crew will encounter the most harmful radiation environment in transit to Mars from which they must be adequately protected. However, once on the planet's surface, the Martian environment should provide a significant amount of protection from free-space radiative fluxes. In current Mars scenario descriptions, the crew flight time to Mars is estimated to be anywhere from 7 months to over a year each way, with stay times on the surface ranging from 20 days to 2 years. To maintain dose levels below established astronaut limits, dose estimates need to be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations on the surface anticipated, the characterization of the Mars radiation environment is important in assessing all radiation protection requirements. This synopsis focuses on the probable doses incurred by surface inhabitants from the transport of galactic cosmic rays and solar protons through the Mars atmosphere. PMID:11537609

  19. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5°, 57° and 90°) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5° orbital inclination.

  20. Four-Dimensional Patient Dose Reconstruction for Scanned Ion Beam Therapy of Moving Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Daniel; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Härtig, Martin; Ellerbrock, Malte; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the actual delivered 4-dimensional (4D) dose in treatments of patients with mobile hepatocellular cancer with scanned carbon ion beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Six patients were treated with 4 fractions to a total relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted dose of 40 Gy (RBE) using a single field. Respiratory motion was addressed by dedicated margins and abdominal compression (5 patients) or gating (1 patient). 4D treatment dose reconstructions based on the treatment records and the measured motion monitoring data were performed for the single-fraction dose and a total of 17 fractions. To assess the impact of uncertainties in the temporal correlation between motion trajectory and beam delivery sequence, 3 dose distributions for varying temporal correlation were calculated per fraction. For 3 patients, the total treatment dose was formed from the fractional distributions using all possible combinations. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was analyzed using the volumes receiving at least 95% (V{sub 95}) and 107% (V{sub 107}) of the planned doses. Results: 4D dose reconstruction based on daily measured data is possible in a clinical setting. V{sub 95} and V{sub 107} values for the single fractions ranged between 72% and 100%, and 0% and 32%, respectively. The estimated total treatment dose to the CTV exhibited improved and more robust dose coverage (mean V{sub 95} > 87%, SD < 3%) and overdose (mean V{sub 107} < 4%, SD < 3%) with respect to the single-fraction dose for all analyzed patients. Conclusions: A considerable impact of interplay effects on the single-fraction CTV dose was found for most of the analyzed patients. However, due to the fractionated treatment, dose heterogeneities were substantially reduced for the total treatment dose. 4D treatment dose reconstruction for scanned ion beam therapy is technically feasible and may evolve into a valuable tool for dose assessment.

  1. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  2. Estimation of mean glandular dose for mammography of augmented breasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckett, J. R.; Kotre, C. J.

    2000-11-01

    The standard quantity used to relate breast surface exposure to radiation risk is the mean dose received by the radiation sensitive tissue contained within the female breast, the mean glandular dose (MGD). At present, little is known about the MGD received by women with breast implants as there is no technique available to facilitate its calculation. The present work has involved modification of the conventional method for MGD estimation to make it applicable to women with augmented breasts. The technique was used to calculate MGDs for a cohort of 80 women with breast implants, which were compared with similar data calculated for a total of 1258 non-augmented women. Little difference was found in median MGD at low compressed breast thickness. At high breast thickness, however, the MGDs received by women with augmented breasts were found to be considerably lower than those relating to their non-augmented counterparts.

  3. Low-dose photons modify liver response to simulated solar particle event protons.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Rizvi, Asma; Bayeta, Erben J M; Luo-Owen, Xian; Makinde, Adeola Y; Baqai, Farnaz; Koss, Peter; Slater, James M; Pecaut, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The health consequences of exposure to low-dose radiation combined with a solar particle event during space travel remain unresolved. The goal of this study was to determine whether protracted radiation exposure alters gene expression and oxidative burst capacity in the liver, an organ vital in many biological processes. C57BL/6 mice were whole-body irradiated with 2 Gy simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons over 36 h, both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate photons ((57)Co, 0.049 Gy total at 0.024 cGy/h). Livers were excised immediately after irradiation (day 0) or on day 21 thereafter for analysis of 84 oxidative stress-related genes using RT-PCR; genes up or down-regulated by more than twofold were noted. On day 0, genes with increased expression were: photons, none; simulated SPE, Id1; photons + simulated SPE, Bax, Id1, Snrp70. Down-regulated genes at this same time were: photons, Igfbp1; simulated SPE, Arnt2, Igfbp1, Il6, Lct, Mybl2, Ptx3. By day 21, a much greater effect was noted than on day 0. Exposure to photons + simulated SPE up-regulated completely different genes than those up-regulated after either photons or the simulated SPE alone (photons, Cstb; simulated SPE, Dctn2, Khsrp, Man2b1, Snrp70; photons + simulated SPE, Casp1, Col1a1, Hspcb, Il6st, Rpl28, Spnb2). There were many down-regulated genes in all irradiated groups on day 21 (photons, 13; simulated SPE, 16; photons + simulated SPE, 16), with very little overlap among groups. Oxygen radical production by liver phagocytes was significantly enhanced by photons on day 21. The results demonstrate that whole-body irradiation with low-dose-rate photons, as well as time after exposure, had a great impact on liver response to a simulated solar particle event. PMID:18302490

  4. Effect of dose of metoprolol on its elimination by isolated perfused rat liver in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, G S; Zhang, Y D; Li, M Y; Shen, J P; Ding, Y; Huang, D K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of dose of metoprolol (Met) on hepatic elimination was studied in isolated rat liver perfused at a flow of 25 ml.min-1. The results showed that Met was eliminated by rat liver in accordance with one-compartment model. Linear kinetic eliminating processes (apparent first-order kinetics) were found in doses of Met 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg, T1/2 were 8.3, 8.8, 9.6, and 10.6 min and the clearance rate were 11.7, 11.8, 9.6, and 8.6 ml.min-1, respectively. Nonlinear eliminating processes were found in doses of Met 4, 8, and 12 mg. Vm and Km were 0.98, 1.05, and 0.94 microgram/min-1.ml-1 and 15.6, 16.9, and 14.6 micrograms.ml-1, respectively. It is concluded that hepatic Met elimination is independent on lower doses, but rested upon high doses. PMID:8010054

  5. Randomized dose-finding clinical trial of oncolytic immunotherapeutic vaccinia JX-594 in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jeong; Reid, Tony; Ruo, Leyo; Breitbach, Caroline J; Rose, Steven; Bloomston, Mark; Cho, Mong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Chang Won; Burke, James; Lencioni, Riccardo; Hickman, Theresa; Moon, Anne; Lee, Yeon Sook; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Dubois, Kara; Longpre, Lara; Ngo, Minhtran; Rooney, Cliona; Bell, John C; Rhee, Byung-Geon; Patt, Richard; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Kirn, David H

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses and active immunotherapeutics have complementary mechanisms of action (MOA) that are both self amplifying in tumors, yet the impact of dose on subject outcome is unclear. JX-594 (Pexa-Vec) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus. To determine the optimal JX-594 dose in subjects with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we conducted a randomized phase 2 dose-finding trial (n = 30). Radiologists infused low-or high-dose JX-594 into liver tumors (days 1, 15 and 29); infusions resulted in acute detectable intravascular JX-594 genomes. Objective intrahepatic Modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) (15%) and Choi (62%) response rates and intrahepatic disease control (50%) were equivalent in injected and distant noninjected tumors at both doses. JX-594 replication and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expression preceded the induction of anticancer immunity. In contrast to tumor response rate and immune endpoints, subject survival duration was significantly related to dose (median survival of 14.1 months compared to 6.7 months on the high and low dose, respectively; hazard ratio 0.39; P = 0.020). JX-594 demonstrated oncolytic and immunotherapy MOA, tumor responses and dose-related survival in individuals with HCC. PMID:23396206

  6. Randomized dose-finding clinical trial of oncolytic immunotherapeutic vaccinia JX-594 in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong; Reid, Tony; Ruo, Leyo; Breitbach, Caroline J; Rose, Steven; Bloomston, Mark; Cho, Mong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Chang Won; Burke, James; Lencioni, Riccardo; Hickman, Theresa; Moon, Anne; Lee, Yeon Sook; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Dubois, Kara; Longpre, Lara; Ngo, Minhtran; Rooney, Cliona; Bell, John C; Rhee, Byung-Geon; Patt, Richard; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Kirn, David H

    2013-03-01

    Oncolytic viruses and active immunotherapeutics have complementary mechanisms of action (MOA) that are both self amplifying in tumors, yet the impact of dose on subject outcome is unclear. JX-594 (Pexa-Vec) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus. To determine the optimal JX-594 dose in subjects with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we conducted a randomized phase 2 dose-finding trial (n=30). Radiologists infused low- or high-dose JX-594 into liver tumors (days 1, 15 and 29); infusions resulted in acute detectable intravascular JX-594 genomes. Objective intrahepatic Modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) (15%) and Choi (62%) response rates and intrahepatic disease control (50%) were equivalent in injected and distant noninjected tumors at both doses. JX-594 replication and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expression preceded the induction of anticancer immunity. In contrast to tumor response rate and immune endpoints, subject survival duration was significantly related to dose (median survival of 14.1 months compared to 6.7 months on the high and low dose, respectively; hazard ratio 0.39; P=0.020). JX-594 demonstrated oncolytic and immunotherapy MOA, tumor responses and dose-related survival in individuals with HCC. PMID:23396206

  7. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Analysis program based on finite element method, MULTI(FEM), for evaluation of dose-dependent local disposition of drug in liver.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, K; Yamaoka, K; Higashimori, M; Nakagawa, T

    1999-05-01

    A curve-fitting program based on the Finite Element Method, MULTI(FEM), was developed to model nonlinear local disposition of a drug in the liver under non-steady-state conditions. The program was written in FORTRAN on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The validity of MULTI(FEM) was confirmed by analyzing the outflow kinetics of oxacillin (a model drug) following a pulse input to isolated, perfused rat livers, according to both linear and nonlinear dispersion models. Four dose levels (300, 1000, 3000, and 5000 microg) of oxacillin were administered to observe the dose-dependency in the hepatic local disposition. First, the individual outflow time-profiles at the same dose were averaged, and the average time-profile was analyzed by MULTI(FEM) based on linear dispersion models to yield a single curve fit. The fitted parameters at each dose level were compared with parameters estimated using MULTI(FILT), a program based on fast inverse Laplace transform, to analyze linear pharmacokinetics. The estimated parameters by MULTI(FEM) were in good agreement with those by MULTI(FILT). The apparent elimination rate constant (ke) decreased with an increase in dose, whereas other parameters showed no discernible dependency on an increase of dose. Second, the average outflow time-profiles at the four dose levels were simultaneously analyzed by MULTI(FEM) based on dispersion models featuring Michaelis-Menten elimination. The outflow time-profiles of oxacillin were well approximated by a two-compartment dispersion model with central Michaelis-Menten elimination. The maximum elimination rate constant (Vmax) and the Michaelis constant (Km) were estimated to be 1520 microg/mL/min and 41.3 microg/mL, respectively. Thus, the capability of MULTI(FEM) was demonstrated in evaluating capacity-limited local disposition in the liver. PMID:10229646

  9. Measuring radon concentrations and estimating dose in tourist caves.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Ruano Sánchez, A B; Naranjo Correa, F L

    2015-11-01

    Caves and mines are considered to be places of especial risk of exposure to (222)Rn. This is particularly important for guides and workers, but also for visitors. In the Extremadura region (Spain), there are two cave systems in which there are workers carrying out their normal everyday tasks. In one, visits have been reduced to maintain the conditions of temperature and humidity. The other comprises several caves frequently visited by school groups. The caves were radiologically characterised in order to estimate the dose received by workers or possible hazards for visitors. PMID:25948834

  10. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nat; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (Ptrend<0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95%CI: 3.49–15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5–9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95%CI: 3.21–15.96), 34.30 (95%CI: 16.94–69.44), and 47.33 (95%CI: 23.50–95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95%CI: 0.25–7.47) to 3.81 (95%CI: 1.09–13.28), 7.36 (95%CI: 2.41–22.46), and 16.86 (95%CI: 7.24–39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. PMID:26990915

  11. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-07-15

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (ptrend  < 0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95% CI: 3.49-15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5-9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95% CI: 3.21-15.96), 34.30 (95% CI: 16.94-69.44), and 47.33 (95% CI: 23.50-95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95% CI: 0.25-7.47), 3.81 (95% CI: 1.09-13.28), 7.36 (95% CI: 2.41-22.46) and 16.86 (95% CI: 7.24-39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. PMID:26990915

  12. High dose of buprenorphine in terminally ill patient with liver failure: efficacy and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Alessandra; Angeletti, Chiara; Baldascino, Giada; Petrucci, Emiliano; Bonetti, Cristina; De Santis, Stefania; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino; Marinangeli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Pain in terminally ill patients with cancer can be often hard to manage, due to the unpredictable kinetics of drugs caused by progressive kidney and liver dysfunction. Plasma concentrations of active metabolites-also a cause of dangerous side effects--could be difficult to estimate. This case report holds the idea that buprenorphine, a partial agonist of m-receptors, even at high dosage, may be effective and safe to use in terminally ill patients with significant liver and kidney impairment. PMID:22941853

  13. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  14. 324 Building life cycle dose estimates for planned work

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.; Peterson, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a tool for use by organizational management teams to plan, manage, and oversee personnel exposures within their organizations. The report encompasses personnel radiation exposures received from activities associated with the B-Cell Cleanout Project, Surveillance and Maintenance Project, the Mk-42 Project, and other minor activities. It is designed to provide verifiable Radiological Performance Reports. The primary area workers receive radiation exposure is the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. Entry to the airlock is necessary for maintenance of cranes and other equipment, and to set up the rail system used to move large pieces of equipment and shipping casks into and out of the airlock. Transfers of equipment and materials from the hot cells in the complex to the airlock are required to allow dose profiles of waste containers, shuffling of waste containers to allow grouting activities to go on, and to allow maintenance of in-cell cranes. Both DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are currently investing in state-of-the-art decontamination equipment. Challenging goals for exposure reduction were established for several broad areas of activity. Exposure estimates and goals developed from these scheduled activities will be compared against actual exposures for scheduled and unscheduled activities that contributed to exposures received by personnel throughout the year. Included in this report are life cycle exposure estimates by calendar year for the B-Cell Cleanout project, a three-year estimate of exposures associated with Surveillance and Maintenance, and known activities for Calendar Year (CY) 1995 associated with several smaller projects. These reports are intended to provide a foundation for future dose estimates, by year, requiring updating as exposure conditions change or new avenues of approach to performing work are developed.

  15. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  16. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  17. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  18. Recent Updates to Radiation Organ Dose Estimation Tool PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Wiarda, Dorothea; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    A computational phantom with moving arms and legs and an accompanying graphical user interface, PIMAL, was previously developed to enable radiation dose estimation for different postures in a user-friendly manner. This initial version of the software was useful in adjusting the posture, generating the corresponding MCNP input file, and performing the radiation transport simulations for dose calculations using MCNP5 or MCNPX. However, it only included one mathematical phantom model (hermaphrodite) and allowed only isotropic point sources. Recently, the software was enhanced by adding two more mathematical phantom models, a male and female, and the source features were enhanced significantly by adding internal and external source options in a pull-down menu. Although the initial version of the software included only a mathematical hermaphrodite phantom, the features and models in the software are constantly being enhanced by adding more phantoms as well as other options to enable dose assessment for different configurations/cases in a user-friendly manner. In this latest version of the software, ICRP's recently released reference male and female voxel phantoms are included in a pull-down menu. The male and female models are described using 7 and 14 million voxels, respectively. Currently, the software is being modified further to include the International Commission on Radiation Protection's (ICRP) reference male and female voxel phantoms. Additionally, some case studies are being implemented and included in a library of input files. This paper describes recent updates to the software.

  19. [Study on radiation dose estimation and monitor in TBI using an anthropomorphic phantom].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y B; Yang, Y

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed doses and the dose distributions at important tissues and organs in an anthropomorphic phantom are measured using TLD under the TBI conditions. The dose for each tissue or organ is also estimated and monitored for TBI treatment. PMID:12583267

  20. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors. PMID:16302199

  1. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  2. Delivered dose estimate to standardize airway hyperresponsiveness assessment in mice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Annette; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Schuessler, Thomas F

    2015-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness often constitutes a primary outcome in respiratory studies in mice. The procedure commonly employs aerosolized challenges, and results are typically reported in terms of bronchoconstrictor concentrations loaded into the nebulizer. Yet, because protocols frequently differ across studies, especially in terms of aerosol generation and delivery, direct study comparisons are difficult. We hypothesized that protocol variations could lead to differences in aerosol delivery efficiency and, consequently, in the dose delivered to the subject, as well as in the response. Thirteen nebulization patterns containing common protocol variations (nebulization time, duty cycle, particle size spectrum, air humidity, and/or ventilation profile) and using increasing concentrations of methacholine and broadband forced oscillations (flexiVent, SCIREQ, Montreal, Qc, Canada) were created, characterized, and studied in anesthetized naïve A/J mice. A delivered dose estimate calculated from nebulizer-, ventilator-, and subject-specific characteristics was introduced and used to account for protocol variations. Results showed that nebulization protocol variations significantly affected the fraction of aerosol reaching the subject site and the delivered dose, as well as methacholine reactivity and sensitivity in mice. From the protocol variants studied, addition of a slow deep ventilation profile during nebulization was identified as a key factor for optimization of the technique. The study also highlighted sensitivity differences within the lung, as well as the possibility that airway responses could be selectively enhanced by adequate control of nebulizer and ventilator settings. Reporting results in terms of delivered doses represents an important standardizing element for assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness in mice. PMID:25637610

  3. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  4. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  5. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  6. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F; Segars, Paul W; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  7. Effectiveness of external respiratory surrogates for in vivo liver motion estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kai-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Chien; Lian, Feng-Li; Lin, Win-Li; Yen, Jia-Yush; Chen, Yung-Yaw

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Due to low frame rate of MRI and high radiation damage from fluoroscopy and CT, liver motion estimation using external respiratory surrogate signals seems to be a better approach to track liver motion in real-time for liver tumor treatments in radiotherapy and thermotherapy. This work proposes a liver motion estimation method based on external respiratory surrogate signals. Animal experiments are also conducted to investigate related issues, such as the sensor arrangement, multisensor fusion, and the effective time period. Methods: Liver motion and abdominal motion are both induced by respiration and are proved to be highly correlated. Contrary to the difficult direct measurement of the liver motion, the abdominal motion can be easily accessed. Based on this idea, our study is split into the model-fitting stage and the motion estimation stage. In the first stage, the correlation between the surrogates and the liver motion is studied and established via linear regression method. In the second stage, the liver motion is estimated by the surrogate signals with the correlation model. Animal experiments on cases of single surrogate signal, multisurrogate signals, and long-term surrogate signals are conducted and discussed to verify the practical use of this approach. Results: The results show that the best single sensor location is at the middle of the upper abdomen, while multisurrogate models are generally better than the single ones. The estimation error is reduced from 0.6 mm for the single surrogate models to 0.4 mm for the multisurrogate models. The long-term validity of the estimation models is quite satisfactory within the period of 10 min with the estimation error less than 1.4 mm. Conclusions: External respiratory surrogate signals from the abdomen motion produces good performance for liver motion estimation in real-time. Multisurrogate signals enhance estimation accuracy, and the estimation model can maintain its accuracy for at least 10 min. This

  8. Estimation of Organ Absorbed Doses in Patients from 99mTc-diphosphonate Using the Data of MIRDose Software

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Cheki, Mohsen; Moslehi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare estimation of radiation absorbed doses to patients following bone scans with technetium-99m-labeled methylene diphosphonate (MDP) with the estimates given in MIRDose software. In this study, each patient was injected 25 mCi of 99mTc-MDP. Whole-body images from thirty patients were acquired by gamma camera at 10, 60, 90, 180 minutes after 99mTc-MDP injection. To determine the amount of activity in each organ, conjugate view method was applied on images. MIRD equation was then used to estimate absorbed doses in different organs of patients. At the end, absorbed dose values obtained in this study were compared with the data of MIRDose software. The absorbed doses per unit of injected activity (mGy/MBq × 10–4) for liver, kidneys, bladder wall and spleen were 3.86 ± 1.1, 38.73 ± 4.7, 4.16 ± 1.8 and 3.91 ± 1.3, respectively. The results of this study may be useful to estimate the amount of activity that can be administered to the patient and also showed that methods used in the study for absorbed dose calculation is in good agreement with the data of MIRDose software and it is possible to use by a clinician. PMID:23724374

  9. Mean scatterer spacing estimation in normal and thermally coagulated ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-04-01

    The liver has been hypothesized to have a unique arrangement of microvasculature that presents as an arrangement of quasiperiodic scatterers to an interrogating ultrasound pulse. The mean scatterer spacing (MSS) of these quasiperiodic scatterers has been proposed as a useful quantitative ultrasound biomarker for characterizing liver tissue. Thermal ablation is an increasingly popular method for treating hepatic tumors, and ultrasonic imaging approaches for delineating the extent of thermal ablation are in high demand. In this work, we examine the distribution of estimated MSS in thermally coagulated bovine liver and normal untreated bovine liver ex vivo. We estimate MSS by detecting local maxima in the spectral coherence function of radio frequency echoes from a clinical transducer, the Siemens VFX 9L4 transducer operating on an S2000 scanner. We find that normal untreated bovine liver was characterized by an MSS of approximately 1.3 mm. We examined regions of interest 12 mm wide laterally, and ranging from 12 mm to 18 mm axially, in 2 mm increments. Over these parameters, the mode of the MSS estimates was between 1.25 and 1.37 mm. On the other hand, estimation of MSS in thermally coagulated liver tissue yields a distribution of MSS estimates whose mode varied between 0.45 and 1.0 mm when examining regions of interest over the same sizes. We demonstrate that the estimated MSS in thermally coagulated liver favors small spacings because the randomly positioned scatterers in this tissue are better modeled as aperiodic scatterers. The submillimeter spacings result from the fact that this was the most probable spacing to be estimated if the discretely sampled spectral coherence function was a uniformly random two-dimensional function. PMID:24554290

  10. Mean Scatterer Spacing Estimation in Normal and Thermally Coagulated Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    The liver has been hypothesized to have a unique arrangement of microvasculature that presents as an arrangement of quasiperiodic scatterers to an interrogating ultrasound pulse. The mean scatterer spacing (MSS) of these quasiperiodic scatterers has been proposed as a useful quantitative ultrasound biomarker for characterizing liver tissue. Thermal ablation is an increasingly popular method for treating hepatic tumors, and ultrasonic imaging approaches for delineating the extent of thermal ablation are in high demand. In this work, we examine the distribution of estimated MSS in thermally coagulated bovine liver and normal untreated bovine liver ex vivo. We estimate MSS by detecting local maxima in the spectral coherence function of radio frequency echoes from a clinical transducer, the Siemens VFX 9L4 transducer operating on an S2000 scanner. We find that normal untreated bovine liver was characterized by an MSS of approximately 1.3 mm. We examined regions of interest 12 mm wide laterally, and ranging from 12 mm to 18 mm axially, in 2 mm increments. Over these parameters, the mode of the MSS estimates was between 1.25 and 1.37 mm. On the other hand, estimation of MSS in thermally coagulated liver tissue yields a distribution of MSS estimates whose mode varied between 0.45 and 1.0 mm when examining regions of interest over the same sizes. We demonstrate that the estimated MSS in thermally coagulated liver favors small spacings because the randomly positioned scatterers in this tissue are better modeled as aperiodic scatterers. The submillimeter spacings result from the fact that this was the most probable spacing to be estimated if the discretely sampled spectral coherence function was a uniformly random two-dimensional function. PMID:24554290

  11. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon Fd

    2015-09-28

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net. PMID:26435777

  12. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon FD

    2015-01-01

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net. PMID:26435777

  13. A Phase I clinical and pharmacology study using amifostine as a radioprotector in dose-escalated whole liver radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Smith, David E.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Knol, James A.; Pan, Charlie C.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Lu, Zheng; Feng, Meihua R.; Chen, Jun; Ensminger, William; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Diffuse intrahepatic tumors are difficult to control. Whole liver radiotherapy has been limited by toxicity, most notably radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Amifostine is a prodrug free-radical scavenger that selectively protects normal tissues and, in a preclinical model of intrahepatic cancer, systemic amifostine reduced normal liver radiation damage without compromising tumor effect.(1) We hypothesized that amifostine would permit escalation of whole liver radiation dose to potentially control microscopic disease. We also aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 to optimize timing of radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS We conducted a radiation dose escalation trial for patients with diffuse, intrahepatic cancer treated with whole liver radiation and intravenous amifostine. Radiation dose was assigned using the Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method. A companion pharmacokinetic study was performed. RESULTS 23 patients were treated, with a maximum dose of 40 Gy. Using a logistical regression model, compared to our previously treated patients, amifostine increased liver tolerance by 3.3 ± 1.1 Gy (p=0.007) (approximately 10%) with similar response rates. Peak concentrations of WR-1065 were 25 μM with an elimination half life of 1.5 hours; these levels are consistent with radioprotective effects of amifostine in patients. CONCLUSION These findings demonstrate for the first time that amifostine is a normal liver radioprotector. They further suggest that it may be useful to combine amifostine with fractionated or stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with focal intrahepatic cancer. PMID:22440042

  14. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotemberg, V.; Palmeri, M.; Nightingale, R.; Rouze, N.; Nightingale, K.

    2012-01-01

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0-35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s-1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively.

  15. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D’Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  16. Optimization of the dosing regimen of mycophenolate mofetil in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barau, Caroline; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Hemerziu, Bogdan; Habes, Dalila; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Debray, Dominique; Furlan, Valérie

    2011-10-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is now commonly used in pediatric liver transplant recipients, but no clear recommendations about the dosing regimen have been made for this population. The aim of this study was to determine the MMF dosage required for pediatric liver transplant recipients to achieve an area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12) ) for mycophenolic acid (MPA) greater than 30 mg hour/L. A pharmacokinetic study of 15 children (median age = 8.3 years, range = 1.1-15.2 years) was performed at a median of 11.0 months (range = 0.5-88.0 months) after liver transplantation. MMF was initially introduced at a median starting dose of 300 mg/m(2) twice a day (range = 186-554 mg/m(2) twice a day). Thirteen of the 15 patients had an MPA AUC(0-12) value less than 30 mg hour/L. The MMF dosage had to be increased in all patients except 1. The MMF dosage required to reach an MPA AUC(0-12) value greater than the defined target of 30 mg hour/L ranged from 371 to 1014 mg/m(2) /day. For 2 patients who received rifampin in addition to MMF, the MPA AUC(0-12) value remained low despite a 2-fold increase in the MMF dosage. In conclusion, an initial MMF dose of 600 mg/m(2) twice a day led to MPA AUC(0-12) values greater than the 30 mg hour/L threshold except when rifampin was coadministered. Because of the important interindividual variability of MPA pharmacokinetics, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended for optimizing the daily MMF dosage. Furthermore, these results suggest that the coadministration of MPA with rifampin should be avoided. PMID:21695772

  17. Fetal position and size data for dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Osei, E K; Faulkner, K

    1999-04-01

    In order to establish both positional and size data for estimation of fetal absorbed dose from radiological examinations, the depth from the mother's anterior surface to the mid-line of the fetal head and abdomen were measured from ultrasound scans in 215 pregnant women. Depths were measured along a ray path projected in the anteroposterior (AP) direction from the mother's abdomen. The fetal size was estimated from measurements of the fetal abdominal and head circumference, femur length and the biparietal diameter. The effects of fetal presentation, maternal bladder volume, placenta location, gestational age and maternal AP thickness on fetal depth and size were analysed. The fetal position from the anterior surface of the mother's abdomen is shorter for posterior placenta and empty bladder volume, but longer for anterior placenta and full bladder volume. Mean fetal depth (MFD) observed for all bladder volumes, fetal presentations and placenta locations increased from 6.5 +/- 0.5 cm to 10.2 +/- 0.7 cm over the duration of pregnancy. Similarly, mean fetal skull depth (FSD) increased from 6.6 +/- 0.6 cm to 9.8 +/- 0.6 cm over the period of pregnancy, but only from about 6.6 cm to 7.8 cm over the period (8-25 weeks) when damage to the developing brain has been observed to result in mental retardation. Using the range of mean fetal depth (4.7-13.9 cm) observed in this study and depth dose data at 75 kVp and 3.0 mmAl half value thickness (HVT), fetal absorbed dose would be overestimated by up to 66% or underestimated by up to 77% if the mean value of MFD (8.1 cm) is used rather than actual individual values. These errors increase with lower tube potential and filtration up to over 90% overestimation and up to 100% underestimation at 60 kVp and 1.0 mmAl filtration. PMID:10474497

  18. Identification of bound nitro musk-protein adducts in fish liver by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: biotransformation, dose-response and toxicokinetics of nitro musk metabolites protein adducts in trout liver as biomarkers of exposure.

    PubMed

    Mottaleb, M Abdul; Osemwengie, Lantis I; Islam, M Rafiq; Sovocool, G Wayne

    2012-01-15

    Ubiquitous occurrences of synthetic nitro musks are evident in the literature. The in vivo analysis of musk xylene (MX) and musk ketone (MK)-protein adducts in trout liver has been performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring (GC-SIM-MS). Biotransformation, dose-response and toxicokinetics studies of 2-amino-MX (2-AMX), 2-amino-MK (2-AMK) and 4-amino-MX (4-AMX) metabolites, covalently bound to cysteine amino acids in proteins in fish liver, formed by enzymatic nitro-reduction of MX and MK, have been described. Trouts were exposed to single exposures of 0.010, 0.030, 0.10, and 0.30 mg/g MX and/or MK. Forty-two fish liver samples were collected from exposed- and control-fish subsequent to exposure intervals of 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days and were composited as per exposure schedules and times. Alkaline hydrolysis released bound metabolites from exposed liver composites that were extracted into n-hexane and then concentrated and analyzed by GC-SIM-MS. The presence of the metabolites in liver extracts was confirmed based on agreement of similar mass spectral properties and retention times with standards. In the dose-response study, the maximum adduct formation was 492.0 ng/g for 2-AMX, 505.5 ng/g for 2-AMK and 12588.5 ng/g for 4-AMX in liver at 0.03 mg/g MX and MK fish in 1 day after exposure. For toxicokinetics investigation, the highest amount of the target metabolites was found to be the same concentration as observed in the dose-response study for 1 day after exposure with 0.03 mg/g MX and MK fish and the half-lives of the metabolites were estimated to be 2-9 days based on assumption of first-order kinetics. Average recoveries exceeded 95% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) around 9%, and the limit of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.91 to 3.8 ng/g based on a signal to noise ratio of 10 (S/N=10) could be achieved for the metabolites. No metabolites were detected in the controls and exposed non-hydrolyzed liver extracts. This is

  19. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is often associated with a cluster of increased health risks collectively known as "Metabolic Syndrome" (MS). MS is often accompanied by development of fatty liver. Sometimes fatty liver results in damage leading to reduced liver function, and need for a transplant. This condition is known...

  20. Antioxidative responses in zebrafish liver exposed to sublethal doses Aphanizomenon flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Lu; Liu, Si Yi; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Chun Xiang; Li, Dun Hai; Liu, Yong Ding

    2015-03-01

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae secretes paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs), termed aphantoxins, and endangers environmental and human health via eutrophication of water worldwide. Although the molecular mechanism of neuronal PSP toxicity has been well studied, several issues remain unresolved, notably the in vivo hepatic antioxidative responses to this neurotoxin. Aphantoxins extracted from a natural isolate of A. flos-aquae DC-1 were resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. The primary components were gonyautoxins 1 and 5 and neosaxitoxin. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were treated intraperitoneally with either 5.3 or 7.61 (low and high doses, respectively) μg saxitoxin (STX) equivalents (eq)/kg of A. flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins. Antioxidative responses in zebrafish liver were examined at different timepoints 1-24h post-exposure. Aphantoxin administration significantly enhanced hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content 1-12h post-exposure, indicative of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. By contrast, levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in zebrafish liver declined significantly after 3-24h exposure, suggesting that GSH participates in MDA metabolism. A significant upregulation of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was observed, suggesting that aphantoxins induce lipid peroxidation in zebrafish liver and are likely to be hepatotoxic. Hepatic levels of MDA and GSH, and of the three enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GPx), therefore provide potential biomarkers for studying environmental exposure to aphantoxins/PSPs from cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:25544652

  1. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50μM PFOA for 48h and 96h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50-100μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200-400μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure. PMID:27045622

  2. Impacts of low doses of pesticide mixtures on liver cell defence systems.

    PubMed

    Rouimi, Patrick; Zucchini-Pascal, Nathalie; Dupont, Gwendoline; Razpotnik, Andrej; Fouché, Edwin; De Sousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Low amounts of residual pesticides are present in the environment, often as mixtures of chemicals which contaminate drinking water and food, being a source of chronic exposure for humans and a growing matter of concern in public health policy. Despite of the needs and growing investigation, little is known about the impact of low doses and mixtures of these chemicals on human health. The purpose of this study was to enlighten if modifications of liver cell metabolic- and/or defence-related capacities could occur under such exposures. In vitro perturbations of several metabolic, stress and survival pathways in human and mice cultured hepatocytes and liver cells were evaluated under exposure to low doses of single molecules or equimolecular combinations of the three pesticides, atrazine, chlorpyrifos and endosulfan. Mainly phases I and II enzymes of detoxification were found modulated, together with apoptotic process deregulation. Hence, CYP3A4 and CYP3A11 were upregulated in primary cultured human and mouse hepatocytes, respectively. These inductions were correlated to an anti-apoptotic process (increased Bcl-xL/Bax ratio, inhibition of the PARP protein cleavage). Such disturbances in pathways involved in cell protection may possibly account for initiation of pathologies or decrease in drugs efficiency in humans exposed to multiple environmental contaminants. PMID:22515965

  3. Use of two dosimeters for better estimation of effective dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chan-Hyeong

    Obviously, a single dosimeter on the chest can underestimate effective dose (E) and effective dose equivalent (HE) significantly when radiation comes from the back because the dosimeter on the chest is shielded by the body of a radiation worker. This problem can be solved by using an extra dosimeter on the back so that at least one dosimeter is always directly exposed to radiation. In this work, the use of two dosimeters was studied using the MCNP code and mathematical phantoms. First, an optimal combination of dosimeter weighting factors was found to be 0.58 and 0.42 for chest and back dosimeters, respectively, through a systematic optimization process. The optimal algorithm, which uses these weighting factors, was superior to other algorithms reported in the literature. The underestimation problem when using a single-dosimeter approach for posterior incident radiation was completely solved by using two dosimeters and the optimal algorithm. The two-dosimeter approach also estimated E and HE very well for a broad range of frontal incident photon beams, neither underestimating E or HE by more than 11%, nor overestimating by more than about 50%. Although the use of two dosimeters effectively solved the underestimation problem of the single-dosimeter approach for posterior incident radiation, this approach overestimated E and HE for lateral, overhead, and underfoot beam directions. However, this overestimation can be reduced by using suitably selected anisotropic-responding dosimeters. To study the effect of anisotropic-responding properties of personal dosimeters on the estimation of E and HE, this work considered several types of anisotropic-responding dosimeters. In practical exposure situations, radiation workers move during exposure, which results in less overestimation of E and HE than static lateral, overhead, and underfoot exposures. To quantify the reduction of the overestimation by the movement of radiation workers, we averaged photon beam results over

  4. Estimation of Nuclear Reaction Effects in Proton-Tissue-Dose Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1983-01-14

    Version 00 REPC reviews calculational methods for the estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies and presents the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue. The effects of nuclear reactions, especially in relation to the dose equivalent, are retained. REPC subroutines can be used to convert existing computer programs which neglect nuclear reaction effects to include them.

  5. Protracted low-dose radiation priming and response of liver to acute gamma and proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Mao, X W; Cao, J D; Bayeta, E J M; Pecaut, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated liver from C57BL/6 mice irradiated with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays (0.01 Gy, 0.03 cGy/h), with and without subsequent exposure to acute 2 Gy gamma or proton radiation. Analyses were performed on day 56 post-exposure. Expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes were strikingly different among irradiated groups compared with 0 Gy (p < 0.05). Two genes were affected in the Gamma group, whereas 10 were modified in the LDR + Gamma group. In Proton and LDR + Proton groups, there were six and 12 affected genes, respectively. Expression of genes in the Gamma (Traf3) and Proton (Bak1, Birc2, Birc3, Mcl1) groups was no longer different from 0 Gy control group when mice were pre-exposed to LDR γ-rays. When each combined regimen was compared with the corresponding group that received acute radiation alone, two genes in the LDR + Gamma group and 17 genes in the LDR + Proton group were modified; greatest effect was on Birc2 and Nol3 (> 5-fold up-regulated by LDR + Protons). Oxygen radical production in livers from the LDR + Proton group was higher in LDR, Gamma, and LDR + Gamma groups (p < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy), but there were no differences in phagocytosis of E. coli. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) suggested more inflammation, with and without necrosis, in some irradiated groups. The data demonstrate that response to acute radiation is dependent on radiation quality and regimen and that some LDR γ-ray-induced modifications in liver response were still evident nearly 2 months after exposure. PMID:23869974

  6. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  7. DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benchmark dose (BMD) has been proposed as an alternative basis for reference value calculations. A large data base of 246 developmental toxicity experiments compiled for use in comparing alternative approaches to developmental toxicity risk assessment. BMD estimates derived w...

  8. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

  9. The estimation of low-dose hazards by extrapolation from high doses.

    PubMed

    Rossi, H H

    1981-01-01

    Empirical information on the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is beset by severe limitations. Theoretical considerations of biophysics can guide the analysis of epidemiological data by indicating certain dose-response relations or eliminating others. Thus, it can be shown that at low doses there must be proportionality between dose and effect on non-interacting cells and that one must anticipate different dose-effect relations upon exposure to markedly different types of radiation. PMID:7336764

  10. BNCT dose distribution in liver with epithermal D-D and D-T fusion-based neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Bleuel, D L; Nastasi, U; Lou, T P; Reijonen, J; Leung, K-N

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a new application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment has been introduced. Results have indicated that liver tumors can be treated by BNCT after removal of the liver from the body. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compact neutron generators based on (2)H(d,n)(3)He (D-D) or (3)H(t,n)(4)He (D-T) fusion reactions are being developed. Preliminary simulations of the applicability of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion and 14.1 MeV D-T fusion neutrons for in vivo liver tumor BNCT, without removing the liver from the body, have been carried out. MCNP simulations were performed in order to find a moderator configuration for creating a neutron beam of optimal neutron energy and to create a source model for dose calculations with the simulation environment for radiotherapy applications (SERA) treatment planning program. SERA dose calculations were performed in a patient model based on CT scans of the body. The BNCT dose distribution in liver and surrounding healthy organs was calculated with rectangular beam aperture sizes of 20 cm x 20 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm. Collimator thicknesses of 10 and 15 cm were used. The beam strength to obtain a practical treatment time was studied. In this paper, the beam shaping assemblies for D-D and D-T neutron generators and dose calculation results are presented. PMID:15308157

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid and dose optimization with limited sampling strategy in liver transplant children

    PubMed Central

    Barau, Caroline; Furlan, Valérie; Debray, Dominique; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    AIMS The aims were to estimate the mycophenolic acid (MPA) population pharmacokinetic parameters in paediatric liver transplant recipients, to identify the factors affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and to develop a limited sampling strategy to estimate individual MPA AUC(0,12 h). METHODS Twenty-eight children, 1.1 to 18.0 years old, received oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) therapy combined with either tacrolimus (n= 23) or ciclosporin (n= 5). The population parameters were estimated from a model-building set of 16 intensive pharmacokinetic datasets obtained from 16 children. The data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed effect modelling, using a one compartment model with first order absorption and first order elimination and random effects on the absorption rate (ka), the apparent volume of distribution (V/F) and apparent clearance (CL/F). RESULTS Two covariates, time since transplantation (≤ and >6 months) and age affected MPA pharmacokinetics. ka, estimated at 1.7 h−1 at age 8.7 years, exhibited large interindividual variability (308%). V/F, estimated at 64.7 l, increased about 2.3 times in children during the immediate post transplantation period. This increase was due to the increase in the unbound MPA fraction caused by the low albumin concentration. CL/F was estimated at 12.7 l h−1. To estimate individual AUC(0,12 h), the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained with the final model, including covariates, were coded in Adapt II® software, using the Bayesian approach. The AUC(0,12 h) estimated from concentrations measured 0, 1 and 4 h after administration of MMF did not differ from reference values. CONCLUSIONS This study allowed the estimation of the population pharmacokinetic MPA parameters. A simple sampling procedure is suggested to help to optimize pediatric patient care. PMID:22329639

  12. CT radiation dose optimization and estimation: an update for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with the increasing utilization of CT examinations, the greater concern about radiation hazards from examinations has been addressed. In this regard, CT radiation dose optimization has been given a great deal of attention by radiologists, referring physicians, technologists, and physicists. Dose-saving strategies are continuously evolving in terms of imaging techniques as well as dose management. Consequently, regular updates of this issue are necessary especially for radiologists who play a pivotal role in this activity. This review article will provide an update on how we can optimize CT dose in order to maximize the benefit-to-risk ratio of this clinically useful diagnostic imaging method. PMID:22247630

  13. Concentration dependence of biotransformation in fish liver S9: Optimizing substrate concentrations to estimate hepatic clearance for bioaccumulation assessment.

    PubMed

    Lo, Justin C; Allard, Gayatri N; Otton, S Victoria; Campbell, David A; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2015-12-01

    In vitro bioassays to estimate biotransformation rate constants of contaminants in fish are currently being investigated to improve bioaccumulation assessments of hydrophobic contaminants. The present study investigates the relationship between chemical substrate concentration and in vitro biotransformation rate of 4 environmental contaminants (9-methylanthracene, pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fractions and methods to determine maximum first-order biotransformation rate constants. Substrate depletion experiments using a series of initial substrate concentrations showed that in vitro biotransformation rates exhibit strong concentration dependence, consistent with a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. The results indicate that depletion rate constants measured at initial substrate concentrations of 1 μM (a current convention) could underestimate the in vitro biotransformation potential and may cause bioconcentration factors to be overestimated if in vitro biotransformation rates are used to assess bioconcentration factors in fish. Depletion rate constants measured using thin-film sorbent dosing experiments were not statistically different from the maximum depletion rate constants derived using a series of solvent delivery-based depletion experiments for 3 of the 4 test chemicals. Multiple solvent delivery-based depletion experiments at a range of initial concentrations are recommended for determining the concentration dependence of in vitro biotransformation rates in fish liver fractions, whereas a single sorbent phase dosing experiment may be able to provide reasonable approximations of maximum depletion rates of very hydrophobic substances. PMID:26077187

  14. ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    Linskey, C.F.1, Harrison, R.A.2., Zhao, G.3., Barton, H.A., Lipscomb, J.C4., and Evans, M.V2., 1UNC, ESE, Chapel Hill, NC ; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 3 UN...

  15. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, A A; Larijani, B; Mokhlesian, N; Hasanzadeh, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Results There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 µGy and 1.81 µGy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 µGy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry. PMID:18385556

  16. Low-dose propranolol for multiple hepatic and cutaneous hemangiomas with deranged liver function.

    PubMed

    Tan, Swee Thong; Itinteang, Tinte; Leadbitter, Philip

    2011-03-01

    We report here the case of an infant with multiple hepatic and cutaneous infantile hemangiomas (IHs) associated with deranged liver function who was treated successfully with low-dose propranolol. We also discuss our recent data that show that IH is a developmental anomaly of hemogenic endothelium derived from primitive mesoderm with a neural crest-cell phenotype. We previously presented evidence that this hemogenic endothelium is governed by the renin-angiotensin system, which we propose can account for both the action of propranolol and the process of spontaneous involution of IH. We further speculate on the possibility of using inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and that of angiotensin II receptor 2 as potential alternative therapies. PMID:21357335

  17. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MISCELLANEOUS GUIDANCE FOR THE DETERMINATION AND REPORTING OF NUCLEAR RADIATION DOSE FOR DOD PARTICIPANTS IN THE... of the radiation environment to which the veteran was exposed and shall include inhaled, ingested... claimant's reconstructed dose? (e) Is there any recorded radiation exposure for the individual? Does...

  18. A Phase I Clinical and Pharmacology Study Using Amifostine as a Radioprotector in Dose-escalated Whole Liver Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Smith, David E.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Knol, James A.; Pan, Charlie C.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Lu Zheng; Feng, Meihua R.; Chen Jun; Ensminger, William; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Diffuse intrahepatic tumors are difficult to control. Whole-liver radiotherapy has been limited by toxicity, most notably radiation-induced liver disease. Amifostine is a prodrug free-radical scavenger that selectively protects normal tissues and, in a preclinical model of intrahepatic cancer, systemic amifostine reduced normal liver radiation damage without compromising tumor effect. We hypothesized that amifostine would permit escalation of whole-liver radiation dose to potentially control microscopic disease. We also aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 to optimize timing of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We conducted a radiation dose-escalation trial for patients with diffuse, intrahepatic cancer treated with whole-liver radiation and intravenous amifostine. Radiation dose was assigned using the time-to-event continual reassessment method. A companion pharmacokinetic study was performed. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated, with a maximum dose of 40 Gy. Using a logistical regression model, compared with our previously treated patients, amifostine increased liver tolerance by 3.3 {+-} 1.1 Gy (p = 0.007) (approximately 10%) with similar response rates. Peak concentrations of WR-1065 were 25 {mu}M with an elimination half-life of 1.5 h; these levels are consistent with radioprotective effects of amifostine in patients. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate for the first time that amifostine is a normal liver radioprotector. They further suggest that it may be useful to combine amifostine with fractionated or stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with focal intrahepatic cancer.

  19. Does motion affect liver stiffness estimates in shear wave elastography? Phantom and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Chami, Linda; Correas, Jean Michel; Lefort, Muriel; Lucidarme, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of free-breathing (FB) vs. Apnea on Shear-wave elastography (SWE) measurements. Quantitative liver-stiffness measurements were obtained during FB and Apnea for 97 patients with various body-morphologies and liver textures. Quality indexes of FB and Apnea elasticity maps (percentage of non-filling (PNF), temporal (TV) and spatial (SV) variabilities) were computed. SWE measurements were also obtained from an homogeneous phantom at rest and during a mechanically-induced motion. Liver-stiffness values estimated from FB and Apnea acquisitions were correlated, particularly for homogeneous livers (r=0.76, P<0.001) and favorable body-morphologies (r=0.68, P<0.001). However FB values were consistently 20-25% lower than Apnea ones (P<0.001). FB also systematically resulted in degradation of TV (P<0.005) and PNF (P<0.001) compared to Apnea but had no impact on SV. With the phantom, no differences between SWE measurements at rest and during motion were observed. Apnea and FB measurements are highly correlated, although FB data quality is degraded compared to Apnea and estimated stiffness in FB is systematically lower than in Apnea. These discrepancies between rest and motion states were observed for patients but not for phantom data, suggesting that patient breath-holding impacts liver stiffness. PMID:27501901

  20. Estimating Annual Individual Doses for Evacuees Returning Home to Areas Affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Takada, Masashi; Omori, Yasutaka; Akahane, Keiichi; Kim, Eunjoo; Torikoshi, Masami; Yonehara, Hidenori; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    To contribute to the reconstruction and revitalization of Fukushima Prefecture following the 2011 nuclear power disaster, annual individual doses were estimated for evacuees who will return home to Tamura City, Kawauchi Village, and Iitate Village in Fukushima. Ambient external dose rates and individual doses obtained with personal dosimeters were measured at many residential and occupational sites throughout the study areas to obtain fundamental data needed for the estimation. The measurement results indicated that the ratio of individual dose based on a personal dosimeter to the ambient external dose measurement was 0.7 with 10% uncertainty. Multiplying the ambient external dose by 0.7 may be an appropriate measure of the effective dose to an individual in the investigated area. Annual individual doses were estimated for representative lifestyles and occupations based on the ambient external dose rates at the measurement sites, taking into account the relationship between the ambient external dose and individual dose. The results were as follows: 0.6-2.3 mSv y in Tamura, 1.1-5.5 mSv y in Kawauchi, and 3.8-17 mSv y in Iitate. For all areas investigated, the estimated dose to outdoor workers was higher than that to indoor workers. Identifying ways to reduce the amount of time that an outdoor worker spends outdoors would provide an effective measure to reduce dose. PMID:26107433

  1. Optimal dose of gemcitabine for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancer in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Maeda, Osamu; Mitsuma, Ayako; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nagino, Masato; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into three groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 or 1000 mg/m(2) was given as an i.v. infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine, were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in one patient, moderate in six, and severe in eight. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in one patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1000 mg/m(2). No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and difluorodeoxyuridine were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005363.) PMID:26595259

  2. Radiation dose dependent risk of liver cancer mortality in the German uranium miners cohort 1946-2003.

    PubMed

    Dufey, F; Walsh, L; Sogl, M; Tschense, A; Schnelzer, M; Kreuzer, M

    2013-03-01

    An increased risk of mortality from primary liver cancers among uranium miners has been observed in various studies. An analysis of the data from a German uranium miner cohort (the 'Wismut cohort') was used to assess the relationship with ionising radiation. To that end the absorbed organ dose due to high and low linear energy transfer radiation was calculated for 58 987 miners with complete information on radiation exposure from a detailed job-exposure matrix. 159 deaths from liver cancer were observed in the follow-up period from 1946 to 2003. Relative risk models with either linear or categorical dependence on high and low linear energy transfer radiation liver doses were fitted by Poisson regression, stratified on age and calendar year. The linear trend of excess relative risk in a model with both low and high linear transfer radiation is -0.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.7, 2.1) Gy(-1) and 48.3 (95% CI: -32.0, 128.6) Gy(-1) for low and high linear energy transfer radiation, respectively, and thus not statistically significant for either dose. The increase of excess relative risk with equivalent liver dose is 0.57 (95% CI: -0.69, 1.82) Sv(-1). Adjustment for arsenic only had a negligible effect on the radiation risk. In conclusion, there is only weak evidence for an increase of liver cancer mortality with increasing radiation dose in the German uranium miners cohort considered. However, both a lack of statistical power and potential misclassification of primary liver cancer are issues. PMID:23295324

  3. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W Paul; Dixon, Robert L; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-21

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ([Formula: see text]) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate [Formula: see text] values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying [Formula: see text] with the organ dose coefficients ([Formula: see text]). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The discrepancy between the estimated organ dose and dose simulated using TCM Monte Carlo program was quantified. We further compared the

  4. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled

  5. Radiation Leukemogenesis: Applying Basic Science of Epidemiological Estimates of Low Dose Risks and Dose-Rate Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D. G.

    1998-11-01

    The next stage of work has been to examine more closely the A-bomb leukemia data which provides the underpinnings of the risk estimation of CML in the above mentioned manuscript. The paper by Hoel and Li (Health Physics 75:241-50) shows how the linear-quadratic model has basic non-linearities at the low dose region for the leukemias including CML. Pierce et. al., (Radiation Research 123:275-84) have developed distributions for the uncertainty in the estimated exposures of the A-bomb cohort. Kellerer, et. al., (Radiation and Environmental Biophysics 36:73-83) has further considered possible errors in the estimated neutron values and with changing RBE values with dose and has hypothesized that the tumor response due to gamma may not be linear. We have incorporated his neutron model and have constricted new A-bomb doses based on his model adjustments. The Hoel and Li dose response analysis has also been applied using the Kellerer neutron dose adjustments for the leukemias. Finally, both Pierce's dose uncertainties and Kellerer neutron adjustments are combined as well as the varying RBE with dose as suggested by Rossi and Zaider and used for leukemia dose-response analysis. First the results of Hoel and Li showing a significantly improved fit of the linear-quadratic dose response by the inclusion of a threshold (i.e. low-dose nonlinearity) persisted. This work has been complete for both solid tumor as well as leukemia for both mortality as well as incidence data. The results are given in the manuscript described below which has been submitted to Health Physics.

  6. Estimation of organ and effective doses resulting from cone beam CT imaging for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, L J; Whittle, S A; Matthews, E S; Starritt, H C; Jupp, T P

    2009-07-01

    In this study, organ doses were measured for various kilovoltage cone beam CT exposures on the Varian Acuity simulator and an alternative method of dose estimation was also assessed. Organ doses were measured by distributing thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) throughout an anthropomorphic phantom, and effective doses were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 60 and ICRP 103 tissue-weighting factors. The ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator was also used to estimate doses for comparison with the TLD results. Effective doses of 15.3 mSv (19.4 mSv), 14.3 mSv (9.7 mSv) and 2.8 mSv (3.2 mSv) were calculated from the TLD measurements and ICRP 60 (ICRP 103) weighting factors for breast, pelvis and head acquisitions, respectively. When a 10 cm pencil ionisation chamber was used to measure the CT dose index, the ImPACT calculator was found to provide an adequate estimation of dose when compared with the TLD results. However, the doses for half-fan exposures were found to be overestimated, with the extent of overestimation depending on the radiosensitive organs irradiated. The organ and effective doses reported provide information for justification and optimisation of cone beam CT procedures, and are compared with doses delivered by other imaging devices. The ImPACT calculator may be used to estimate doses from cone beam CT procedures, if the potential for overestimation is acknowledged. PMID:19255115

  7. A framework for analytical estimation of patient-specific CT dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Kim, Jin Woo; Jeon, Hosang; Nam, Jiho; Yun, Seungman; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-03-01

    The authors introduce an algorithm to estimate the spatial dose distributions in computed tomography (CT) images. The algorithm calculates dose distributions due to the primary and scattered photons separately. The algorithm only requires the CT data set that includes the patient CT images and the scanner acquisition parameters. Otherwise the scanner acquisition parameters are extracted from the CT images. Using the developed algorithm, the dose distributions for head and chest phantoms are computed and the results show the excellent agreements with the dose distributions obtained using a commercial Monte Carlo code. The developed algorithm can be applied to a patient-specific CT dose estimation based on the CT data.

  8. Computer subroutines for the estimation of nuclear reaction effects in proton-tissue-dose calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Calculational methods for estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies are briefly reviewed. All the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue is presented. Special emphasis is placed on retaining the effects of nuclear reaction, especially in relation to the dose equivalent. Computer subroutines to evaluate all of the relevant functions are discussed. Nuclear reaction contributions for standard space radiations are in most cases found to be significant. Many of the existing computer programs for estimating dose in which nuclear reaction effects are neglected can be readily converted to include nuclear reaction effects by use of the subroutines described herein.

  9. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv. PMID:23591638

  10. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  11. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  12. The feasibility of a regional CTDI{sub vol} to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In AAPM Task Group 204, the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was developed by providing size adjustment factors which are applied to the Computed Tomography (CT) standardized dose metric, CTDI{sub vol}. However, that work focused on fixed tube current scans and did not specifically address tube current modulation (TCM) scans, which are currently the majority of clinical scans performed. The purpose of this study was to extend the SSDE concept to account for TCM by investigating the feasibility of using anatomic and organ specific regions of scanner output to improve accuracy of dose estimates. Methods: Thirty-nine adult abdomen/pelvis and 32 chest scans from clinically indicated CT exams acquired on a multidetector CT using TCM were obtained with Institutional Review Board approval for generating voxelized models. Along with image data, raw projection data were obtained to extract TCM functions for use in Monte Carlo simulations. Patient size was calculated using the effective diameter described in TG 204. In addition, the scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} (CTDI{sub vol,global}) was obtained for each patient, which is based on the average tube current across the entire scan. For the abdomen/pelvis scans, liver, spleen, and kidneys were manually segmented from the patient datasets; for the chest scans, lungs and for female models only, glandular breast tissue were segmented. For each patient organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo Methods. To investigate the utility of regional measures of scanner output, regional and organ anatomic boundaries were identified from image data and used to calculate regional and organ-specific average tube current values. From these regional and organ-specific averages, CTDI{sub vol} values, referred to as regional and organ-specific CTDI{sub vol}, were calculated for each patient. Using an approach similar to TG 204, all CTDI{sub vol} values were used to normalize simulated organ doses; and the ability of each normalized

  13. Dose estimation for different skin models in interstitial breast brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Skin is a major organ at risk in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations require monitoring of maximum dose received, however, there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring provided. The purpose of this study was to compare the doses received by the skin in different models. Material and methods Standard treatment plans of 20 patients who underwent interstitial breast brachytherapy were analyzed. Every patient had a new treatment plan prepared according to Paris system and had skin contoured in three different ways. The first model, Skin 2 mm, corresponds to the dermatological breast skin thickness and is reaching 2 mm into an external patient contour. It was rejected in a further analysis, because of distinct discontinuities in contouring. The second model, Skin 4 mm, replaced Skin 2 mm, and is reaching 2 mm inside and 2 mm outside of the External contour. The third model, Skin EXT, is created on the External contour and it expands 4 mm outside. Doses received by the most exposed 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and the maximum doses for Skin 4 mm and Skin EXT were compared. Results Mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation of percentage dose difference between Skin EXT and Skin 4 mm for the most exposed 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of skin were 18.01%, 17.20%, 27.84%, and 4.01%, respectively. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions Monitoring of doses received by skin is necessary to avoid complications and obtain a satisfactory cosmetic effect. It is difficult to assess the compatibility of treatment plans with recommendations, while there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring. Especially, if a mean difference of doses between two models of skin contouring is 18% for the most exposed 0.1 cc and can reach almost 28% in some cases. Differences of this magnitude can result in skin complications during BCT. PMID:25097562

  14. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L. Kaufman, Robert A.; Mirro, Amy E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  15. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff. PMID:26975735

  16. A Bayesian Estimation Framework for Pharmacogenomics Driven Warfarin Dosing: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Öztaner, Serdar Murat; Temizel, Tuğba Taşkaya; Erdem, S Remzi; Özer, Mahmut

    2015-09-01

    The incorporation of pharmacogenomics information into the drug dosing estimation formulations has been shown to increase the accuracy in drug dosing and decrease the frequency of adverse drug effects in many studies in the literature. In this paper, an estimation framework based on the Bayesian structural equation modeling, which is driven by pharmacogenomics, is proposed. The results show that the model compares favorably with the linear models in terms of prediction and explaining the variations in warfarin dosing. PMID:25020183

  17. Estimated neutron dose to embryo and foetus during commercial flight.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Green, A R; Tracy, B L

    2005-01-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the radiation exposure from cosmic-ray neutrons to the embryo and foetus of pregnant aircrew and air travellers in consideration of the radiation exposure from cosmic-ray neutrons to the embryo and foetus. A Monte Carlo analysis was performed to determine the equivalent dose from neutrons to the brain and body of an embryo at 8 weeks and to the foetus at the 3, 6 and 9 month periods. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetal brain and for the entire foetal body (isotropic irradiation geometry) have been determined at the four developmental stages. The equivalent dose rate to the foetus during commercial flights has been further evaluated considering the fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients, a neutron spectrum measured at an altitude of 11.3 km and an ICRP-92 radiation-weighting factor for neutrons. This study indicates that the foetus can exceed the annual dose limit of 1 mSv for the general public after, for example, 15 round trips on commercial trans-Atlantic flights. PMID:15860538

  18. Estimation of radiation-induced cancer from three-dimensional dose distributions: Concept of organ equivalent dose

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Uwe . E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Zwahlen, Daniel; Ross, Dieter; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Estimates of secondary cancer risk after radiotherapy are becoming more important for comparative treatment planning. Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate three-dimensional dose distributions for each individual patient. These data open up new possibilities for more precise estimates of secondary cancer incidence rates in the irradiated organs. We report a new method to estimate organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates. The concept of an organ equivalent dose (OED) for radiation-induced cancer assumes that any two dose distributions in an organ are equivalent if they cause the same radiation-induced cancer incidence. Methods and Materials: The two operational parameters of the OED concept are the organ-specific cancer incidence rate at low doses, which is taken from the data of the atomic bomb survivors, and cell sterilization at higher doses. The effect of cell sterilization in various organs was estimated by analyzing the secondary cancer incidence data of patients with Hodgkin's disease who were treated with radiotherapy in between 1962 and 1993. The radiotherapy plans used at the time the patients had been treated were reconstructed on a fully segmented whole body CT scan. The dose distributions were calculated in individual organs for which cancer incidence data were available. The model parameter that described cell sterilization was obtained by analyzing the dose and cancer incidence rates for the individual organs. Results: We found organ-specific cell radiosensitivities that varied from 0.017 for the mouth and pharynx up to 1.592 for the bladder. Using the two model parameters (organ-specific cancer incidence rate and the parameter characterizing cell sterilization), the OED concept can be applied to any three-dimensional dose distribution to analyze cancer incidence. Conclusion: We believe that the concept of OED presented in this investigation represents a first step in assessing the potential risk of secondary

  19. Laboratory measurement error in external dose estimates and its effects on dose-response analyses of Hanford worker mortality data

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Fix, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    This report addresses laboratory measurement error in estimates of external doses obtained from personnel dosimeters, and investigates the effects of these errors on linear dose-response analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers. These errors have the distinguishing feature that they are independent across time and across workers. Although the calculations made for this report were based on Hanford data, the overall conclusions are likely to be relevant for other epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to external radiation.

  20. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  1. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  2. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  3. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv 94.0%, <2 mSv 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected.

  4. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment. PMID:21969661

  5. Repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shoji; Ikeda, Naohiro; Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kasamatsu, Toshio; Nishiyama, Naohiro

    2015-03-01

    The in vivo genotoxicity of CI Solvent Yellow 14 (Sudan I) was examined using repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats. Sudan I is a mono-azo dye based on aniline and 1-amino-2-hydroxynaphthalene. This dye was demonstrated as a rat liver carcinogen in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay, and genotoxicity was noted in a rat bone marrow micronucleus (BMMN) assay. In the present study, Sudan I was administered orally to rats for 14-days, and the MN frequency in the liver, stomach, colon, and bone marrow were analyzed. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was not significantly increased by the administration of the Sudan I. Gastrointestinal tract MNs were also not induced. However, in the BMMN assay, a significant increase in micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) was observed in a dose-dependent manner. While Sudan I has been reported to lack hepatic genotoxicity, it has also exhibited tumor-promoting activities. These results are consistent with the lack of induction of MN in the hepatocytes. The lack of MN induction in cells of the gastrointestinal tract was also logical because azo-compounds are reported to be unlikely to induce DNA damage in the rat gut. The repeated-dose rat liver and gastrointestinal tract MN assays have the potential to be used in the evaluation of the genotoxicity of a chemical in each organ in accordance with its mode of action. PMID:25892626

  6. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  7. SU-E-T-330: To Analyze the Calculation Error of Live Dose-Volume Indices Applying 4D-CT in Radiotherapy for PTVs Within the Liver Completely

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the variation rule of normal liver dose-volume indices calculation for the liver malignancy patients whose plan target volumes were in the liver completely in all breath phases. Methods: Ten patients who accepted radiotherapy for malignant tumor were selected in our study. All patients underwent 4D-CT simulation and 3D-CT simulation in free breathing(FB). 4D-CT was sorted into 10 series CT images according to breath phase, named CT0, CT10 to CT90, respectively. And GTVs were contoured on different CT series, and the individual target volume(ITV) was obtained by merging 10 GTVs from 4D-CT. The PTVs were obtained from ITV applying margins. The PTVs were not beyond the boundary of liver in all breath phase observed by dynamic 4D-CT. The radiotherapy plans were designed and irradiation dose was calculated on 3D-CT images, and the livers were contoured on different series CT images and mapped to 3D-CT images applying rigid registration. To compare the dose-volume difference of livers based on distinct CT images. Results: (1)The liver volumes were similar on 4D-CT and 3D-CT images(CTFB 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT0 1413±377cm{sup 3}, CT10 1409±396cm{sup 3}, CT20 1419±418cm{sup 3},CT30 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT40 1438±392cm{sup 3}, CT50 1437±404cm{sup 3}, CT60 1439±409cm{sup 3}, CT70 1408±393cm{sup 3}, CT80 1384±397cm{sup 3}, CT90 1398±397cm{sup 3}; F=0.064,p=1.00) (2) The PTVs volume were 30.17±14.62cm{sup 3};(3) The mean dose and V5 to V10 of liver were similar among 4D-CT different series CT images(p>0.05), and the indices varied less than ±4% refer to liver on CT50. Conclusion: The calculation affection of liver dose-volume indices induced by breath motion were not significant for the PTV within liver completely as estimation before. And more objective prediction indices for radiation induced l.

  8. Estimates of radiation dose and health risks to the United States population following the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Broadway, J.A.; Smith, J.M.; Norwood, D.L.; Porter, C.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates of both individual and collective doses received by the United States population following the Chernobyl accident have been made by using the data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System. Radionuclides associated with the debris first were measured in precipitation and surface air particulates at Portland, OR and Olympia, WA on 5 May 1986. Iodine-131 was the most consistently measured nuclide in all media, although several Cs and Ru isotopes also were observed. Strontium and any actinides notably were absent from the samples at the lower level of detection. The highest calculated individual-organ dose due to intake during May and June 1986 was 0.52 mSv to the infant thyroid in the state of Washington. This was predominantly (98%) from the ingestion of milk. The maximum U.S. collective dose equivalent to any organ was calculated to be 3,300 person-Sv to the thyroid. Risk estimates project three excess lung cancer deaths and an additional four deaths due to cancers of thyroid, breast and leukemia in the U.S. population over the next 45 y from exposure during the May-June 1986 interval. The only long-lived radionuclide measured in milk samples following the accident was 137Cs. We estimate 20 excess fatalities from the ingestion of 137Cs in milk during all subsequent years, with six of these due to lung cancer and the majority of the remainder distributed approximately equally among cancers of the thyroid, breast, liver and leukemia. A total of 100 excess fatalities from all dietary components was estimated. Because of the uncertainty of risk estimates from data such as those available for this study, all calculated values carry a range of uncertainty from a minimum of one-half the calculated value to a maximum of two times the calculated value.

  9. Estimation Of Organ Doses From Solar Particle Events For Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major organ sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of the effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. If sufficient protection is not provided near solar maximum, the radiation risk can be significant due to exposure to sporadic solar particle events (SPEs) as well as to the continuous galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) on future exploratory-class and long-duration missions. For accurate estimates of overall fatal cancer risks from SPEs, the specific doses at various blood forming organs (BFOs) were considered, because proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions. Previous estimates of BFO doses from SPEs have used an average body-shielding distribution for the bone marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). With the development of an 82-point body-shielding distribution at BFOs, the mean and variance of SPE doses in the major active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) will be presented. Consideration of the detailed distribution of bone marrow sites is one of many requirements to improve the estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks.

  10. Towards a comprehensive CT image segmentation for thoracic organ radiation dose estimation and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Ruppertshofen, Heike; Vik, Torbjörn; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Administered dose of ionizing radiation during medical imaging is an issue of increasing concern for the patient, for the clinical community, and for respective regulatory bodies. CT radiation dose is currently estimated based on a set of very simplifying assumptions which do not take the actual body geometry and organ specific doses into account. This makes it very difficult to accurately report imaging related administered dose and to track it for different organs over the life of the patient. In this paper this deficit is addressed in a two-fold way. In a first step, the absorbed radiation dose in each image voxel is estimated based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of X-ray absorption and scattering. In a second step, the image is segmented into tissue types with different radio sensitivity. In combination this allows to calculate the effective dose as a weighted sum of the individual organ doses. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of automatic organ specific dose estimation. With respect to a commercially applicable solution and respective robustness and efficiency requirements, we investigated the effect of dose sampling rather than integration over the organ volume. We focused on the thoracic anatomy as the exemplary body region, imaged frequently by CT. For image segmentation we applied a set of available approaches which allowed us to cover the main thoracic radio-sensitive tissue types. We applied the dose estimation approach to 10 thoracic CT datasets and evaluated segmentation accuracy and administered dose and could show that organ specific dose estimation can be achieved.

  11. Local Response and Impact on Survival After Local Ablation of Liver Metastases From Colorectal Carcinoma by Computed Tomography-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ricke, Jens; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Seidensticker, Max; Ruehl, Ricarda; Wieners, Gero; Gaffke, Gunnar; Kropf, Siegfried; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy at various dose levels and the prognostic impact of extensive cytoreduction in colorectal liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients were treated on a single-center prospective trial that was initially designed to be randomized to three dose levels of 15 Gy, 20 Gy, or 25 Gy per lesion, delivered in a single fraction. However, because there was a high rate of cross-over of subjects from higher to lower dose levels, this study is better understood as a prospective trial with three dose levels. No upper size limit for the metastases was applied. We assessed time to local progression, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Results: According to safety constraints cross-over was performed. The final assignment was n = 98, n = 68, and n = 33 in the 15-Gy, 20-Gy, and 25-Gy groups, respectively. Median diameter of the largest tumor lesion in each patient was 5 cm (range, 1-13.5 cm). Estimated mean local recurrence-free survival for all lesions was 34 months (median not reached). The group assigned to 15 Gy after cross-over displayed 34 local recurrences out of 98 lesions; 20 Gy, 15 out of 68 lesions; 25 Gy, 1 out of 33 lesions. The difference between the 25-Gy and the 20-Gy or 15-Gy group was significant (p < 0.05). Repeated local tumor ablations were the most prominent factor for increased survival and dominated additional systemic antitumor treatments. Conclusions: Local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases demonstrated a strong dose dependency. The role of extensive minimally invasive tumor ablation in metastatic colorectal cancer needs to be further established.

  12. Accuracy of patient specific organ-dose estimates obtained using an automated image segmentation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat-Schmidt, Taly; Wang, Adam; Coradi, Thomas; Haas, Benjamin; Star-Lack, Josh

    2016-03-01

    The overall goal of this work is to develop a rapid, accurate and fully automated software tool to estimate patient-specific organ doses from computed tomography (CT) scans using a deterministic Boltzmann Transport Equation solver and automated CT segmentation algorithms. This work quantified the accuracy of organ dose estimates obtained by an automated segmentation algorithm. The investigated algorithm uses a combination of feature-based and atlas-based methods. A multiatlas approach was also investigated. We hypothesize that the auto-segmentation algorithm is sufficiently accurate to provide organ dose estimates since random errors at the organ boundaries will average out when computing the total organ dose. To test this hypothesis, twenty head-neck CT scans were expertly segmented into nine regions. A leave-one-out validation study was performed, where every case was automatically segmented with each of the remaining cases used as the expert atlas, resulting in nineteen automated segmentations for each of the twenty datasets. The segmented regions were applied to gold-standard Monte Carlo dose maps to estimate mean and peak organ doses. The results demonstrated that the fully automated segmentation algorithm estimated the mean organ dose to within 10% of the expert segmentation for regions other than the spinal canal, with median error for each organ region below 2%. In the spinal canal region, the median error was 7% across all data sets and atlases, with a maximum error of 20%. The error in peak organ dose was below 10% for all regions, with a median error below 4% for all organ regions. The multiple-case atlas reduced the variation in the dose estimates and additional improvements may be possible with more robust multi-atlas approaches. Overall, the results support potential feasibility of an automated segmentation algorithm to provide accurate organ dose estimates.

  13. Integrated Codes for Estimating Environmental Accumulation and Individual Dose from Past Hanford Atmospheric Releases: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T. A.; Burnett, R. A.; Napier, B. A.; Reitz, N. A.; Shipler, D. B.

    1992-02-01

    Preliminary radiation doses were estimated and reported during Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. As the project has progressed, additional information regarding the magnitude and timing of past radioactive releases has been developed, and the general scope of the required calculations has been enhanced. The overall HEDR computational model for computing doses attributable to atmospheric releases from Hanford Site operations is called HEDRIC (Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes). It consists of four interrelated models: source term, atmospheric transport, environmental accumulation, and individual dose. The source term and atmospheric transport models are documented elsewhere. This report describes the initial implementation of the design specifications for the environmental accumulation model and computer code, called DESCARTES (Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments), and the individual dose model and computer code, called CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides). The computations required of these models and the design specifications for their codes were documented in Napier et al. (1992). Revisions to the original specifications and the basis for modeling decisions are explained. This report is not the final code documentation but gives the status of the model and code development to date. Final code documentation is scheduled to be completed in FY 1994 following additional code upgrades and refinements. The user's guide included in this report describes the operation of the environmental accumulation and individual dose codes and associated pre- and post-processor programs. A programmer's guide describes the logical structure of the programs and their input and output files.

  14. Estimating and reducing dose received by cardiac devices for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bourgouin, Alexandra; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Archambault, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to quantify the dose reduction effect provided by a lead shield for patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) during a clinically realistic radiation treatment on phantom and to provide a simple model of dose estimation to predict dose received by CIED in a wide range of situations. The shield used in this project is composed of a lead sheet wrapped in thermoplastic. Dose measurements were made with a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). The phantom was treated with ten different plans. Three of these cases were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and the others received standard 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT). Lateral dose measurement for photon fields was made to establish a dose prediction model. On average, the use of the lead shield reduced the dose to CIEDs by 19% ± 13%. Dose reduction was most important for breast cases, with a mean reduction of 31% ± 15%. In three cases, the total dose reduction was more than 25 cGy over the complete treatment. For the three IMRT cases, the mean dose reduction was 11% ± 9%. On average, the difference between the TPS prediction and the measurement was 71%, while it was only 14% for the dose prediction model. It was demonstrated that a lead shield can be efficiently used for reducing doses to CIED with a wide range of clinical plans. In patients treated with IMRT modality treatment, the shielding should be used only for those with more than two anterior fields over seven fields. In the case of 3D CRT patients, the shielding should be used for those with a dose on the CIED higher than 50 cGy and with a reduction of dose higher than 10 cGy. The dose prediction model developed in this study can be an easy way to have a better estimation of the out-of-field dose than the TPS. PMID:26699550

  15. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  16. Dose estimation of animal experiments at the THOR BNCT beam by NCTPlan and Xplan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lee, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chou, Fong-In; Chen, Wei-Lin; Huang, Yu-Shiang; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    Dose estimation of animal experiments affects many subsequent derived quantities, such as RBE and CBE values. It is important to ensure the trustiness of calculated dose of the irradiated animals. However, the dose estimation was normally calculated using simplified geometries and tissue compositions, which led to rough results. This paper introduces the use of treatment planning systems NCTplan and Xplan for the dose estimation. A mouse was taken as an example and it was brought to hospital for micro-PET/CT scan. It was found that the critical organ doses of an irradiated mouse calculated by simplified model were unreliable in comparison to Xplan voxel model. The difference could reach the extent of several tenths percent. It is recommended that a treatment planning system should be introduced to future animal experiments to upgrade the data quality. PMID:24630758

  17. Effects of the loss of correlation structure on Phase 1 dose estimates. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    In Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, a step-by-step (modular) calculational structure was used. This structure was intended (1) to simplify the computational process, (2) to allow storage of intermediate calculations for later analyses, and (3) to guide the collection of data by presenting understandable structures for its use. The implementation of this modular structure resulted in the loss of correlation among inputs and outputs of the code, resulting in less accurate dose estimates than anticipated. The study documented in this report investigated two types of correlations in the Phase I model: temporal and pathway. Temporal correlations occur in the simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a previous time are used in a subsequent calculation. If the various portions of the calculation do not use the same realization of the earlier estimate, they are no longer correlated with respect to time. Similarly, spatial correlations occur in a simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a particular location are used in estimates for other locations. If the various calculations do not use the same value for the original location, they are no longer correlated with respect to location. The loss of the correlation structure in the Phase I code resulted in dose estimates that are biased. It is recommended that the air pathway dose model be restructured and the intermediate histograms eliminated. While the restructured code may still contain distinct modules, all input parameters to each module and all out put from each module should be retained in a database such that subsequent modules can access all the information necessary to retain the correlation structure.

  18. Use of in vivo counting measurements to estimate internal doses from (241)Am in workers from the Mayak production association.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Alexandra B; Suslova, Klara G; Efimov, Alexander V; Miller, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Comparisons between results of in vivo counting measurements of americium burden and results from radiochemical analyses of organ samples taken at autopsy of 11 cases of former Mayak workers were made. The in vivo counting measurements were performed 3-8 y before death. The best agreement between in vivo counting measurements for americium and autopsy data was observed for the skull. For lungs and liver, the ratios of burden measured by in vivo counting to those obtained from radiochemical analyses data ranged from 0.7-3.8, while those for the skull were from 1.0-1.1. There was a good correlation between the estimates of americium burden in the entire skeleton obtained from in vivo counting with those obtained from autopsy data. Specifically, the skeletal burden ratio, in vivo counting/autopsy, averaged 0.9 ± 0.1. The prior human americium model, D-Am2010, used in vivo counting measurements for americium in the skeleton to estimate the contents of americium and plutonium at death. The results using this model indicate that in vivo counting measurements of the skull can be used to estimate internal doses from americium in the Mayak workers. Additionally, these measurements may also be used to provide a qualitative assessment of internal doses from plutonium. PMID:24978284

  19. Quantitative liver function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with low-dose methotrexate: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, C; Reichen, J; Thomann, S R; Lauterburg, B H; Gerber, N J

    1997-03-01

    The objectives were to determine quantitative liver function prospectively in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with low-dose methotrexate (MTX), to search for risk factors for a loss of quantitative liver function and to assess the relationship between quantitative liver function and histological staging. A total of 117 patients with RA (ACR criteria, 85 women, mean age 59 yr) had measurements of galactose elimination capacity (GEC), aminopyrine breath test (ABT) and liver enzymes [aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (AP), 7-glutamyl transferase (GGT), bile acids, bilirubin, albumin] before treatment with weekly i.m. MTX injections and every year thereafter. In 16 patients, liver biopsies were performed. Before the introduction of MTX, mean GEC was 6.6 mg/min/kg [5th to 95th percentile (5-95 PC) 5.1-8.5; reference range 6.0-9.1] and mean ABT was 0.80% kg/mmol (5-95 PC 0.42-1.30: reference range 0.6-1.0). During treatment with MTX [mean weekly dose 11.8 mg (5-95 PC 5.4-20.2), mean observation period 3.8 yr (5-95 PC 0.4-6.9)], significant declines of GEC (-0.12 mg/min/kg per year. t = 3.30, P < 0.002) and ABT (-0.06% kg/mmol per year, t = 4.81, P < 0.001) were observed. Negative correlations were found between the annual change in GEC and GEC at baseline (Rs = -0.40, P < 0.0001), and the annual change in ABT and ABT at baseline (Rs = -0.43, P < 0.0001). No correlations were found between the annual change in GEC or ABT and weekly MTX dose, age or percentage of increased liver enzymes, and no effect of a history of alcohol consumption > 30 g/week became evident. Two patients with Roenigk grade III had impaired quantitative liver function, while 14 patients with Roenigk grades I and II exhibited a high variability of GEC and ABT from normal to abnormal values. The continuous declines in GEC and ABT observed deserve attention in patients with prolonged treatment. Patients with a low GEC or ABT at

  20. Estimation of background radiation doses for the Peninsular Malaysia's population by ESR dosimetry of tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Rodzi, Mohd; Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ohtaki, Megu; Ivannikov, Alexander; Bhattacharjee, Deborshi; Fukumura, Akifumi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2011-08-01

    Background radiation dose is used in dosimetry for estimating occupational doses of radiation workers or determining radiation dose of an individual following accidental exposure. In the present study, the absorbed dose and the background radiation level are determined using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method on tooth samples. The effect of using different tooth surfaces and teeth exposed with single medical X-rays on the absorbed dose are also evaluated. A total of 48 molars of position 6-8 were collected from 13 district hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia. Thirty-six teeth had not been exposed to any excessive radiation, and 12 teeth had been directly exposed to a single X-ray dose during medical treatment prior to extraction. There was no significant effect of tooth surfaces and exposure with single X-rays on the measured absorbed dose of an individual. The mean measured absorbed dose of the population is 34 ± 6.2 mGy, with an average tooth enamel age of 39 years. From the slope of a regression line, the estimated annual background dose for Peninsular Malaysia is 0.6 ± 0.3 mGy y(-1). This value is slightly lower than the yearly background dose for Malaysia, and the radiation background dose is established by ESR tooth measurements on samples from India and Russia. PMID:21404066

  1. ORERP (Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project) internal dose estimates for individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Cederwall, R.T. )

    1990-11-01

    A method was developed to reconstruct the internal radiation dose to off-site individuals who were exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). By this method, committed absorbed doses can be estimated for 22 target organs of persons in four age groups and for selected organs of the fetus. Ingestion doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and intakes specific for age group, test event, and location as calculated by the PATHWAY food-chain model. Inhalation doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and breathing rates, and time-integrated air concentrations that are derived from the ORERP Air-Quality Data Base. Dose estimates are calculated for the radionuclides that contribute significantly to the total dose; these number 20 via the ingestion pathway and 46 via the inhalation pathway. Internal doses to nonspecified individuals and nonspecified fetuses are being reconstructed for each location in the ORERP Town Data Base for which exposure rates and cloud-arrival times are listed. Examples of reconstructing internal dose are presented. This method will also be adapted to reconstruct internal doses from NTS fallout to specific individuals in accordance with the person's age, past residence, life-style, and living pattern.

  2. ORERP (Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project) internal dose estimates for individuals.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y C; Anspaugh, L R; Cederwall, R T

    1990-11-01

    A method was developed to reconstruct the internal radiation dose to off-site individuals who were exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). By this method, committed absorbed doses can be estimated for 22 target organs of persons in four age groups and for selected organs of the fetus. Ingestion doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and intakes specific for age group, test event, and location as calculated by the PATHWAY food-chain model. Inhalation doses are calculated by combining age-group dose factors and breathing rates, and time-integrated air concentrations that are derived from the ORERP Air-Quality Data Base. Dose estimates are calculated for the radionuclides that contribute significantly to the total dose; these number 20 via the ingestion pathway and 46 via the inhalation pathway. Internal doses to nonspecified individuals and nonspecified fetuses are being reconstructed for each location in the ORERP Town Data Base for which exposure rates and cloud-arrival times are listed. Examples of reconstructing internal dose are presented. This method will also be adapted to reconstruct internal doses from NTS fallout to specific individuals in accordance with the person's age, past residence, life-style, and living pattern. PMID:2211124

  3. Pediatric Chest and Abdominopelvic CT: Organ Dose Estimation Based on 42 Patient Models

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Paulson, Erik K.; Frush, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate organ dose from pediatric chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations and evaluate the dependency of organ dose coefficients on patient size and CT scanner models. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA–compliant study and did not require informed patient consent. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to perform simulations in 42 pediatric patient models (age range, 0–16 years; weight range, 2–80 kg; 24 boys, 18 girls). Multidetector CT scanners were modeled on those from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wis; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Organ doses were estimated for each patient model for routine chest and abdominopelvic examinations and were normalized by volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The relationships between CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients and average patient diameters were evaluated across scanner models. Results For organs within the image coverage, CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients largely showed a strong exponential relationship with the average patient diameter (R2 > 0.9). The average percentage differences between the two scanner models were generally within 10%. For distributed organs and organs on the periphery of or outside the image coverage, the differences were generally larger (average, 3%–32%) mainly because of the effect of overranging. Conclusion It is feasible to estimate patient-specific organ dose for a given examination with the knowledge of patient size and the CTDIvol. These CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients enable one to readily estimate patient-specific organ dose for pediatric patients in clinical settings. This dose information, and, as appropriate, attendant risk estimations, can provide more substantive information for the individual patient for both clinical and research applications and can yield more expansive information on dose profiles

  4. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  5. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  6. Proteomics analysis of liver tissues from C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose 137Cs radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lan; Li, Linwei; Yin, Jie; Hu, Nan; Li, Guangyue; Ding, Dexin

    2016-02-01

    Differentially expressed proteins in liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose (137)Cs radiation were examined by proteomics analysis. Compared with the control group, 80 proteins were differentially expressed in the irradiated group. Among the 40 randomly selected proteins used for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis and bioinformatics, 24 were meaningful. These proteins were related to antioxidant defense, amino acid metabolism, detoxification, anti-tumor development, amino acid transport, anti-peroxidation, and composition of respiratory chain. Western blot analysis showed that catalase (CAT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) were up-regulated in the irradiated group; these results were in agreement with qPCR results. These results show that CAT, GNMT, and GSTP1 may be related to stress response induced by low-dose irradiation in mice liver. The underlying mechanism however requires further investigation. PMID:26429139

  7. Radiation dose from MDCT using Monte Carlo simulations: estimating fetal dose due to pulmonary embolism scans accounting for overscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, E.; Wellnitz, C.; Goodsitt, M.; DeMarco, J.; Cagnon, C.; Ghatali, M.; Cody, D.; Stevens, D.; McCollough, C.; Primak, A.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant women with shortness of breath are increasingly referred for CT Angiography to rule out Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While this exam is typically focused on the lungs, extending scan boundaries and overscan can add to the irradiated volume and have implications on fetal dose. The purpose of this work was to estimate radiation dose to the fetus when various levels of overscan were encountered. Two voxelized models of pregnant patients derived from actual patient anatomy were created based on image data. The models represent an early (< 7 weeks) and late term pregnancy (36 weeks). A previously validated Monte Carlo model of an MDCT scanner was used that takes into account physical details of the scanner. Simulated helical scans used 120 kVp, 4x5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1, and varying beam-off locations (edge of the irradiated volume) were used to represent different protocols plus overscan. Normalized dose (mGy/100mAs) was calculated for each fetus. For the early term and the late term pregnancy models, fetal dose estimates for a standard thoracic PE exam were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.3 mGy/100mAs, respectively, increasing to 9 mGy/100mAs when the beam-off location was extended to encompass the fetus. When performing PE exams to rule out PE in pregnant patients, the beam-off location may have a large effect on fetal dose, especially for late term pregnancies. Careful consideration of ending location of the x-ray beam - and not the end of image data - could result in significant reduction in radiation dose to the fetus.

  8. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13-52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  9. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  10. A Computer Code to Estimate Environmental Concentration and Dose Due to Airborne Release of Radioactive Material.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-03-15

    Version 00 ORION-II was developed to estimate environmental concentration and dose due to airborne release of radioactive material from multiple sources of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. ORION-II is an updated version of ORION and is applicable to the sensitivity study of dose assessment at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  11. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  12. Model Uncertainty and Bayesian Model Averaged Benchmark Dose Estimation for Continuous Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benchmark dose (BMD) approach has gained acceptance as a valuable risk assessment tool, but risk assessors still face significant challenges associated with selecting an appropriate BMD/BMDL estimate from the results of a set of acceptable dose-response models. Current approa...

  13. Estimation of organ dose equivalents from residents of radiation-contaminated buildings with Rando phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Dong, S L; Wu, T H

    1999-05-01

    Since August 1996, a dose reconstruction model has been conducted with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-embedded chains, belts and badges for external dose measurements on the residents in radiation-contaminated buildings. The TLD dosimeters, worn on the front of the torso, would not be adequate for dose measurement in cases when the radiation is anisotropic or the incident angles of radiation sources are not directed in the front-to-back direction. The shielding and attenuation by the body would result in the dose equivalent estimation being somewhat skewed. An organ dose estimation method with a Rando phantom under various exposure geometries is proposed. The conversion factors, obtained from the phantom study, may be applicable to organ dose estimations for residents in the contaminated buildings if the incident angles correspond to the phantom simulation results. There is a great demand for developing a mathematical model or Monte Carlo calculation to deal with complicated indoor layout geometry problems involving ionizing radiation. Further research should be directed toward conducting laboratory simulation by investigating the relationship between doses delivered from multiple radiation sources. It is also necessary to collaborate with experimental biological dosimetry, such as chromosome aberration analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and retrospective ESR-dosimetry with teeth, applied to the residents, so that the organ dose equivalent estimations may be more reliable for radio-epidemiological studies. PMID:10214706

  14. Estimation of dose-response models for discrete and continuous data in weed science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response analysis is widely used in biological sciences and has application to a variety of risk assessment, bioassay, and calibration problems. In weed science, dose-response methodologies have typically relied on least squares estimation under an assumption of normality. Advances in computati...

  15. Answers to questions about updated estimates of occupational radiation doses at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this question and answer report is to provide a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of revised radiation dose estimates which workers are likely to receive over the course of the cleanup at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, and of the possible health consequences to workers of these new estimates. We will focus primarily on occupational dose, although pertinent questions about public health and safety will also be answered.

  16. Is there any vindication for low dose nonselective β-blocker medication in patients with liver cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Wan; Chon, Chang Uk; Won, Hyun Sun; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Nonselective β-blockers (NSBBs), such as propranolol, reportedly exert a pleiotropic effect in liver cirrhosis. A previous report suggested that survival was higher in patients receiving adjusted doses of NSBBs than in ligation patients. This study investigated whether low-dose NSBB medication has beneficial effects in patients with liver cirrhosis, especially in terms of overall survival. Methods We retrospectively studied 273 cirrhotic patients (199 males; age 53.6±10.2 years, mean±SD) who visited our institution between March 2003 and December 2007; follow-up data were collected until June 2011. Among them, 138 patients were given a low-dose NSBB (BB group: propranolol, 20-60 mg/day), and the remaining 135 patients were not given an NSBB (NBB group). Both groups were stratified randomly according to Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) classification and age. Results The causes of liver cirrhosis were alcohol (n=109, 39.9%), hepatitis B virus (n=125, 45.8%), hepatitis C virus (n=20, 7.3%), and cryptogenic (n=19, 7.0%). The CTP classes were distributed as follows: A, n=116, 42.5%; B, n=126, 46.2%; and C, n=31, 11.4%. Neither the overall survival (P=0.133) nor the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-free survival (P=0.910) differed significantly between the BB and NBB groups [probability of overall survival at 4 years: 75.1% (95% CI=67.7-82.5%) and 81.2% (95% CI=74.4-88.0%), respectively; P=0.236]. In addition, the delta CTP score did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions Use of low-dose NSBB medication in patients with liver cirrhosis is not indicated in terms of overall and HCC-free survival. PMID:22893871

  17. Sensitivity and uncertainty investigations for Hiroshima dose estimates and the applicability of the Little Boy mockup measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.; Cacuci, D.G.

    1983-09-13

    This paper describes sources of uncertainty in the data used for calculating dose estimates for the Hiroshima explosion and details a methodology for systematically obtaining best estimates and reduced uncertainties for the radiation doses received. (ACR)

  18. External dose estimates for Dolon village: application of the U.S./Russian joint methodology.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Beck, Harold L; Gordeev, Konstantin; Bouville, André; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Land, Charles E; Luckyanov, Nicholas; Shinkarev, Sergey

    2006-02-01

    Methods to estimate external dose from radioactive fallout from nuclear tests have for many years depended on two types of data: measurements of exposure rate in air and an empirically derived power function to describe the change in exposure rate with time, Over the last four years, a working group with American and Russian participation has developed a bi-national joint methodology that offers an improved capability for estimating external dose. In this method, external dose is estimated using exposure rate functions derived from data from American nuclear tests similar in construction to SNTS (Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site) devices. For example, in this paper, we derive doses for test #1 (August 29, 1949) at the SNTS using an exposure rate function for the U.S. TRINITY test. For the case of test #1, the average external dose for a person in Dolon is estimated to have been about 0.5 Gy compared to 1 to 2 Gy estimated in other work. This prediction agrees better with reported EPR measurements in teeth from village residents and with measurements of TL signals in bricks from Dolon buildings. This report presents the basic elements of the joint methodology model for estimation of external dose received from SNTS fallout. PMID:16571929

  19. Estimating the Radiation Dose to the Fetus in Prophylactic Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kentaro; Hamada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Akitoshi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nasu, Kaei; Narahara, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although radiation exposure is of great concern to expecting patients, little information is available on the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO). Here we estimated the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic IIABO in Caesarean section (CS). Cases. We report our experience with the IIABO procedure in three consecutive patients with suspected placenta previa/accreta. Fetal radiation dose measurements were conducted prior to each CS by using an anthropomorphic phantom. Based on the simulated value, we calculated the fetal radiation dose as the absorbed dose. We found that the fetal radiation doses ranged from 12.88 to 31.6 mGy. The fetal radiation dose during the prophylactic IIABOs did not exceed 50 mGy. Conclusion. The IIABO procedure could result in a very small increase in the risk of harmful effects to the fetus. PMID:26180648

  20. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. PMID:25848117

  1. Slide Rule for Rapid Response Estimation of Radiological Dose from Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B L; Childs, R L; Hopper, C M; Parks, C V

    1999-09-20

    This paper describes a functional slide rule that provides a readily usable "in-hand" method for estimating nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete shields.

  2. Military Participants at U.S. Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing— Methodology for Estimating Dose and Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Till, John E.; Beck, Harold L.; Aanenson, Jill W.; Grogan, Helen A.; Mohler, H. Justin; Mohler, S. Shawn; Voillequé, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Methods were developed to calculate individual estimates of exposure and dose with associated uncertainties for a sub-cohort (1,857) of 115,329 military veterans who participated in at least one of seven series of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests or the TRINITY shot carried out by the United States. The tests were conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds and the Nevada Test Site. Dose estimates to specific organs will be used in an epidemiological study to investigate leukemia and male breast cancer. Previous doses had been estimated for the purpose of compensation and were generally high-sided to favor the veteran's claim for compensation in accordance with public law. Recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to digitize the historical records supporting the veterans’ compensation assessments make it possible to calculate doses and associated uncertainties. Our approach builds upon available film badge dosimetry and other measurement data recorded at the time of the tests and incorporates detailed scenarios of exposure for each veteran based on personal, unit, and other available historical records. Film badge results were available for approximately 25% of the individuals, and these results assisted greatly in reconstructing doses to unbadged persons and in developing distributions of dose among military units. This article presents the methodology developed to estimate doses for selected cancer cases and a 1% random sample of the total cohort of veterans under study. PMID:24758578

  3. Estimation of radiation absorbed doses to the red marrow in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, D.A.; Sui Shen

    1995-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor in radioimmunotherapy. Traditional methods most commonly used to estimate the radiation adsorbed dose to the bone marrow of patients consider contribution from radionuclide in the blood and/or total body. Targeted therapies, such as radioimmunotherapy, add a third potential source for radiation to the bone marrow because the radiolabeled targeting molecules can accumulate specifically on malignant target cells infiltrating the bone marrow. A non-invasive method for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the red marrow of patients who have received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) has been developed and explored. The method depends on determining the cumulated activity in three contributing sources: (1) marrow; (2) blood; and (3) total body. The novel aspect of this method for estimating marrow radiation dose is derivation of the radiation dose for the entire red marrow from radiation dose estimates obtained by detection of cumulated activity in three lumbar vertebrae using a gamma camera. Contributions to the marrow radiation dose form marrow, blood, and total body cumulated activity were determined for patients who received an I-131 labeled MoAb, Lym-1, that reacts with malignant B-lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nonHodgkin`s lymphoma. Six patients were selected for illustrative purposes because their vertebrae were readily visualized on lumbar images. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Estimation of Delivered Dose in Radiotherapy: The Influence of Registration Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Risholm, Petter; Balter, James; Wells, William M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a probabilistic framework to estimate the accumulated radiation dose and the corresponding dose uncertainty that is delivered to important anatomical structures, e.g. the primary tumor and healthy surrounding organs, during radiotherapy. The dose uncertainty we report is a direct result of uncertainties in the estimates of the deformation which aligns the daily cone-beam CT images with the planning CT. The accumulated radiation dose is an important measure to monitor during treatment, in particular to see if it significantly deviates from the planned dose which might indicate that either the patient was not properly positioned before treatment or that the anatomy has changed due to the treatment. In the case of the latter, the treatment plan should be adaptively changed to align with the current patient anatomy. We estimate the accumulated dose distribution, and its uncertainty, retrospectively on a dataset acquired during treatment of cancer in the neck and show the dose distributions in the form of dose volume histograms. PMID:22003661

  5. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  6. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  7. Estimation of foetal brain dose from I-131 in the foetal thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, N. J.; Gilligan, P.; Murphy, D.; Malone, J. F.

    1997-09-01

    The ingestion of I-131 by pregnant women can have consequences for the developing foetus, in particular brain function. As the foetal thyroid accumulates iodine from the twelfth week of gestation onwards, the determination of foetal brain dose resulting from such I-131 accumulation is essential. Normal dosimetric methods fail to treat the case of the foetus. Using an approximation method based on the MIRD approach, a foetal dose estimation scheme is developed to allow the determination of foetal brain dose from foetal thyroid irradiation. Dose values are obtained for the foetus based on the maternal intake of I-131. It was found that the choice of biokinetic model for the mother/foetus has a large impact on the determined dose estimate.

  8. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  9. Estimation of Accumulated Dose to Residents due to Tritium Release from Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masahiro

    2005-07-15

    The computer program TriStat (Tritium dose assessment for stationary release) was used to estimate the human dose under stationary release and to obtain a conservative estimate of the dose after an accidental release as well. The atmospheric behavior of tritium is described by a Gaussian dispersion model. The tritium concentration in the atmosphere, soil, vegetables and cereals were estimated on the basis of tritium inventory of the facility and the release rate of tritium. In the model description, the specific tritium concentrations for the free water component and the organic component are essential. The food chain for humans was modeled by assuming a forage compartment, a plant compartment and an animal compartment. In the model, a virtual plant and a virtual animal were defined.The calculation revealed that the exchange of HTO between atmosphere and plant leaves has a critical role for increasing the human dose both for stationary and accidental release of tritium.

  10. Estimation of the Dose of Radiation Received by Patient and Physician During a Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yoshiaki; Chida, Koichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is considered the standard diagnostic imaging technique to investigate swallowing disorders and dysphagia. Few studies have been reported concerning the dose of radiation a patient receives and the scattering radiation dose received by a physician during VFSS. In this study, we investigated the dose of radiation (entrance skin dose, ESD) estimated to be received by a patient during VFSS using a human phantom (via a skin-dose monitor sensor placed on the neck of the human phantom). We also investigated the effective dose (ED) and dose equivalent (DE) received by a physician (wearing two personal dosimeters) during an actual patient procedure. One dosimeter (whole body) was worn under a lead apron at the chest, and the other (specially placed to measure doses received by the lens of the eye) outside the lead apron on the neck collar to monitor radiation doses in parts of the body not protected by the lead apron. The ESD for the patient was 7.8 mGy in 5 min. We estimated the average patient dose at 12.79 mGy per VFSS procedure. The physician ED and DE during VFSS were 0.9 mSv/year and 2.3 mSv/year, respectively. The dose of radiation received by the physician in this study was lower than regulatory dose limits. However, in accordance with the principle that radiation exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable, every effort should be made (e.g., wearing lead glasses) to reduce exposure doses. PMID:27318941

  11. Dose-response of five bile acids on serum and liver bile Acid concentrations and hepatotoxicty in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Peizhen; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2011-10-01

    Feeding bile acids (BAs) to rodents has been used to study BA signaling and toxicity in vivo. However, little is known about the effect of feeding BAs on the concentrations of BAs in serum and liver as well as the dose of the fed BAs that causes liver toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the relative hepatotoxicity of individual BAs by feeding mice cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3% in their diet for 7 days. The data demonstrate that (1) the ability of the fed BAs to produce hepatotoxicity is UDCAdose-dependent increase in the total serum BA concentrations but had little effect on liver total BA concentrations; (4) hepatotoxicity of the fed BAs does not simply depend on the concentration or hydrophobicity of total BAs in the liver; and (5) liver BA-conjugation enzymes are saturated by feeding UDCA at concentrations higher than 0.3%. In conclusion, the findings of the present study provide guidance for choosing the feeding concentrations of BAs in mice and will aid in interpreting BA hepatotoxicity as well as BA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21747115

  12. Estimating Toxicity-Related Biological Pathway Altering Doses for High-Throughput Chemical Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a framework for estimating the human dose at which a chemical significantly alters a biological pathway in vivo, making use of in vitro assay data and an in vitro derived pharmacokinetic model, coupled with estimates of population variability and uncertainty. The q...

  13. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  14. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  15. Estimation of radionuclide ingestion: Lessons from dose reconstruction for fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    The United States conducted atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1963. In 1979 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project to compile a data base related to health effects from nuclear testing and to reconstruct doses to public residing off of the Nevada Test Site. This project is the most comprehensive dose reconstruction project to date, and, since similar assessments are currently underway at several other locations within and outside the U.S., lessons from ORERP can be valuable. A major component of dose reconstruction is estimation of dose from radionuclide ingestion. The PATHWAY food-chain model was developed to estimate the amount of radionuclides ingested. For agricultural components of the human diet, PATHWAY predicts radionuclide concentrations and quantities ingested. To improve accuracy and model credibility, four components of model analysis were conducted: estimation of uncertainty in model predictions, estimation of sensitivity of model predictions to input parameters, and testing of model predictions against independent data (validation), and comparing predictions from PATHWAY with those from other models. These results identified strengths and weaknesses in the model and aided in establishing the confidence associated with model prediction, which is a critical component risk assessment and dose reconstruction. For fallout from the Nevada Test Site, by far, the largest internal doses were received by the thyroid. However, the predicted number of fatal cancers from ingestion dose was generally much smaller than the number predicted from external dose. The number of fatal cancers predicted from ingestion dose was also orders of magnitude below the normal projected cancer rate. Several lessons were learned during the study that are relevant to other dose reconstruction efforts.

  16. Application of computational models to estimate organ radiation dose in rainbow trout from uptake of molybdenum-99 with comparison to iodine-131.

    PubMed

    Martinez, N E; Johnson, T E; Pinder, J E

    2016-01-01

    This study compares three anatomical phantoms for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the purpose of estimating organ radiation dose and dose rates from molybdenum-99 ((99)Mo) uptake in the liver and GI tract. Model comparison and refinement is important to the process of determining accurate doses and dose rates to the whole body and the various organs. Accurate and consistent dosimetry is crucial to the determination of appropriate dose-effect relationships for use in environmental risk assessment. The computational phantoms considered are (1) a geometrically defined model employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, (2) voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging, and (3) a new model utilizing NURBS surfaces to refine the model in (2). Dose Conversion Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling and combined with empirical models for predicting activity concentration to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (μGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of (99)Mo. The computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between all models). Values in the empirical model as well as the 14 day cumulative organ doses determined from (99)Mo uptake are compared to similar models developed previously for (131)I. Finally, consideration is given to treating the GI tract as a solid organ compared to partitioning it into gut contents and GI wall, which resulted in an order of magnitude difference in estimated dose for most organs. PMID:26048012

  17. A method for estimating occupational radiation dose to individuals, using weekly dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.J.; Ostrouchov, G.; Frome, E.L.; Kerr, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses. It is usually assumed that the annual dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. We propose the use of a probability distribution to describe an individual`s dose during a specific period of time. Statistical methods for estimating this dose distribution are developed. The methods take into account the ``measurement error`` that is produced by the dosimetry system, and the bias that was introduced by policies that lead to right censoring of small doses as zero. The method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The result of this evaluation raises serious questions about the validity of the historical personnel dosimetry data that is currently being used in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. In particular, it appears that there was a systematic underestimation of doses for ORNL workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors.

  18. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  19. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  20. Biologically based pesticide dose estimates for children in an agricultural community.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, R A; Kissel, J C; Lu, C; Kalman, D A; Simcox, N J; Allen, E H; Keifer, M C

    2000-01-01

    Current pesticide health risk assessments in the United States require the characterization of aggregate exposure and cumulative risk in the setting of food tolerances. Biologic monitoring can aggregate exposures from all sources and routes, and can integrate exposures for chemicals with a common mechanism of action. Its value was demonstrated in a recent study of organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure among 109 children in an agricultural community in Washington State; 91 of the children had parents working in agriculture. We estimated individual OP pesticide doses from urinary metabolite concentrations with a deterministic steady state model, and compared them to toxicologic reference values. We evaluated doses by assuming that metabolites were attributable entirely to either azinphos-methyl or phosmet, the two OP pesticides used most frequently in the region. Creatinine-adjusted average dose estimates during the 6- to 8-week spraying season ranged from 0 to 36 microg/kg/day. For children whose parents worked in agriculture as either orchard applicators or as fieldworkers, 56% of the doses estimated for the spray season exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chronic dietary reference dose, and 19% exceeded the World Health Organization acceptable daily intake values for azinphos-methyl. The corresponding values for children whose parents did not work in agriculture were 44 and 22%, respectively. The percentage of children exceeding the relevant reference values for phosmet was substantially lower (< 10%). Single-day dose estimates ranged from 0 to 72 microg/kg/day, and 26% of these exceeded the EPA acute reference dose for azinphos-methyl. We also generated dose estimates by adjustment for total daily urine volume, and these estimates were consistently higher than the creatinine-adjusted estimates. None of the dose estimates exceeded the empirically derived no-observable-adverse-effect levels for these compounds. The study took place in an

  1. Biologically based pesticide dose estimates for children in an agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A; Kissel, J C; Lu, C; Kalman, D A; Simcox, N J; Allen, E H; Keifer, M C

    2000-06-01

    Current pesticide health risk assessments in the United States require the characterization of aggregate exposure and cumulative risk in the setting of food tolerances. Biologic monitoring can aggregate exposures from all sources and routes, and can integrate exposures for chemicals with a common mechanism of action. Its value was demonstrated in a recent study of organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure among 109 children in an agricultural community in Washington State; 91 of the children had parents working in agriculture. We estimated individual OP pesticide doses from urinary metabolite concentrations with a deterministic steady state model, and compared them to toxicologic reference values. We evaluated doses by assuming that metabolites were attributable entirely to either azinphos-methyl or phosmet, the two OP pesticides used most frequently in the region. Creatinine-adjusted average dose estimates during the 6- to 8-week spraying season ranged from 0 to 36 microg/kg/day. For children whose parents worked in agriculture as either orchard applicators or as fieldworkers, 56% of the doses estimated for the spray season exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chronic dietary reference dose, and 19% exceeded the World Health Organization acceptable daily intake values for azinphos-methyl. The corresponding values for children whose parents did not work in agriculture were 44 and 22%, respectively. The percentage of children exceeding the relevant reference values for phosmet was substantially lower (< 10%). Single-day dose estimates ranged from 0 to 72 microg/kg/day, and 26% of these exceeded the EPA acute reference dose for azinphos-methyl. We also generated dose estimates by adjustment for total daily urine volume, and these estimates were consistently higher than the creatinine-adjusted estimates. None of the dose estimates exceeded the empirically derived no-observable-adverse-effect levels for these compounds. The study took place in an

  2. Average fetal depth in utero: data for estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozzino, M.W.; Breckle, R.; Hill, L.M.; Gray, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    To estimate fetal absorbed dose from radiographic examinations, the depth from the anterior maternal surface to the midline of the fetal skull and abdomen was measured by ultrasound in 97 pregnant women. The relationships between fetal depth, fetal presentation, and maternal parameters of height, weight, anteroposterior (AP) thickness, gestational age, placental location, and bladder volume were analyzed. Maternal AP thickness (MAP) can be estimated from gestational age, maternal height, and maternal weight. Fetal midskull and abdominal depths were nearly equal. Fetal depth normalized to MAP was independent or nearly independent of maternal parameters and fetal presentation. These data enable a reasonable estimation of absorbed dose to fetal brain, abdomen, and whole body.

  3. Sinogram smoothing techniques for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Modgil, Dimple; Alessio, Adam M.; Bindschadler, Michael D.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) could provide an accurate and widely available technique for myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimation to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. However, one of its primary limitations is the radiation dose imparted to the patient. We are exploring techniques to reduce the patient dose by either reducing the tube current or by reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. Both of these dose reduction techniques result in noisy data. In order to extract the MBF information from the noisy acquisitions, we have explored several data-domain smoothing techniques. In this work, we investigate two specific smoothing techniques: the sinogram restoration technique in both the spatial and temporal domains and the use of the Karhunen–Loeve (KL) transform to provide temporal smoothing in the sinogram domain. The KL transform smoothing technique has been previously applied to dynamic image sequences in positron emission tomography. We apply a quantitative two-compartment blood flow model to estimate MBF from the time-attenuation curves and determine which smoothing method provides the most accurate MBF estimates in a series of simulations of different dose levels, dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiac CT acquisitions. As measured by root mean square percentage error (% RMSE) in MBF estimates, sinogram smoothing generally provides the best MBF estimates except for the cases of the lowest simulated dose levels (tube current=25  mAs, 2 or 3 s temporal spacing), where the KL transform method provides the best MBF estimates. The KL transform technique provides improved MBF estimates compared to conventional processing only at very low doses (<7  mSv). Results suggest that the proposed smoothing techniques could provide high fidelity MBF information and allow for substantial radiation dose savings. PMID:25642441

  4. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantomsMethods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for different

  5. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantoms Methods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen∕pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen∕pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for

  6. Technical note: gold marker implants and high-frequency jet ventilation for stereotactic, single-dose irradiation of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, P; Kraus, H-J; Dölken, W; Mühlnickel, W; Müller-Nolte, F; Hering, W

    2006-02-01

    With reference to radiosurgery of the liver, we describe techniques designed to solve the methodological problem of striking targets subject to respiratory motion with the necessary precision. Implanting a gold marker in the vicinity of the liver tumor was the first step in ensuring the reproducibility of the isocenter's position. An 18-karat gold rod measuring 1.9 x 3 mm was implanted approximately 2 cm from the edge of the tumor as this was displayed in the spiral, thin-slice CT with contrast media. Both the implantation of the marker and the required, CT-controlled biopsy of the liver tumor can be achieved simultaneously with the same puncture needle. The efficiency of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in neutralizing the targeted organ's respiratory motion during stereotactic single-dose irradiation was evaluated. The procedure was carried out on ten patients without any complications. In the time between treatment planning and irradiation (3 days), no significant marker migration was observable. In all cases, the gold marker (volume: 7.5 mm(3)) was readily observable in the treatment beam using portal imaging. HFJV provided reliable immobilization. The liver motion in each anesthetized patient was limited to under 3.0 mm in all directions. Thus, the correct field settings and target reproducibility were able to be analyzed and documented during the irradiation. The combination of marker and HFJV enables the determination of stereotactic coordinates directly related to the liver itself and, in this way, stereotactic radiation treatment of liver tumors is freed from the uncertainties involved in orientation to bony landmarks, in respiratory motion, and in changes of position in the stereotactic body frame. The method is feasible and can improve the accuracy of stereotactic body radiation therapy. PMID:16417397

  7. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  8. [Estimation of the committed effective dose of radioactive cesium and potassium by the market basket method].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster after the Great East Japan Earthquake has caused radioactive contamination in food. Using the market basket method, total diet samples in Tokyo, Miyagi prefecture and Fukushima prefecture were analyzed for cesium-134 and -137 (radioactive cesium) and naturally occurring potassium-40 (radioactive potassium) in order to estimate the committed effective doses of these radioactive materials from food. Doses were calculated on the assumption that "not detected" corresponded to zero or to half the limit of detection (values in brackets). The estimated doses of radioactive cesium in Tokyo, Miyagi and Fukushima were 0.0021 (0.0024), 0.017 (0.018) and 0.019 (0.019) mSv/year, respectively. Although the doses in Miyagi and Fukushima were more than 8 times the dose in Tokyo, they were significantly lower than the maximum permissible dose (1 mSv/year) determined by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. The estimated doses of naturally occurring radioactive potassium in these areas were in the range of 0.17-0.20 (0.18-0.20) mSv/year, and there were no significant differences between the areas. PMID:23470869

  9. Chronic Liver Disease: Noninvasive Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation of Hepatic Venous Pressure Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Merton, Daniel A.; Miller, Cynthia; Gonzalez, José M.; Machado, Priscilla; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Kim, Christopher E.; Baliff, Jeffrey P.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Navarro, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) with pressure catheter–based measurements in human patients with chronic liver disease undergoing transjugular liver biopsy. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study had U.S. Food and Drug Administration and institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Forty-five patients completed this study between December 2010 and December 2011. A clinical ultrasonography (US) scanner was modified to obtain SHAPE data. After transjugular liver biopsy with pressure measurements as part of the standard of care, 45 patients received an infusion of a microbubble US contrast agent and saline. During infusion, SHAPE data were collected from a portal and hepatic vein and were compared with invasive measurements. Correlations between data sets were determined by using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and statistical significance between groups was determined by using the Student t test. Results:- The 45 study patients included 27 men and 18 women (age range, 19–71 years; average age, 55.8 years). The SHAPE gradient between the portal and hepatic veins was in good overall agreement with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) (R = 0.82). Patients at increased risk for variceal hemorrhage (HVPG ≥ 12 mm Hg) had a significantly higher mean subharmonic gradient than patients with lower HVPGs (1.93 dB ± 0.61 [standard deviation] vs −1.47 dB ± 0.29, P < .001), with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 81%, indicating that SHAPE may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clinically important portal hypertension. Conclusion: Preliminary results show SHAPE to be an accurate noninvasive technique for estimating portal hypertension. © RSNA, 2013 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13121769/-/DC1 PMID:23525208

  10. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Leinders, Suzanne M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Schaart, Dennis; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  11. RADTRAD: A simplified model for RADionuclide Transport and Removal And Dose estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, S.L.; Miller, L.A.; Monroe, D.K.; Heames, T.J.

    1998-04-01

    This report documents the RADTRAD computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to estimate transport and removal of radionuclides and dose at selected receptors. The document includes a users` guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, the quality assurance and code acceptance testing documentation, and a programmers` guide. The RADTRAD code can be used to estimate the containment release using either the NRC TID-14844 or NUREG-1465 source terms and assumptions, or a user-specified table. In addition, the code can account for a reduction in the quantity of radioactive material due to containment sprays, natural deposition, filters, and other natural and engineered safety features. The RADTRAD code uses a combination of tables and/or numerical models of source term reduction phenomena to determine the time-dependent dose at user-specified locations for a given accident scenario. The code system also provides the inventory, decay chain, and dose conversion factor tables needed for the dose calculation. The RADTRAD code can be used to assess occupational radiation exposures, typically in the control room; to estimate site boundary doses; and to estimate dose attenuation due to modification of a facility or accident sequence.

  12. Estimation of organ and effective dose due to Compton backscatter security scans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate organ and effective radiation doses due to backscatter security scanners using Monte Carlo simulations and a voxelized phantom set. Methods: Voxelized phantoms of male and female adults and children were used with the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a backscatter security scan. The backscatter system was modeled based on specifications available in the literature. The simulations modeled a 50 kVp spectrum with 1.0 mm-aluminum-equivalent filtration and a previously measured exposure of approximately 4.6 {mu}R at 30 cm from the source. Photons and secondary interactions were tracked from the source until they reached zero kinetic energy or exited from the simulation's boundaries. The energy deposited in the phantoms' respective organs was tallied and used to calculate total organ dose and total effective dose for frontal, rear, and full scans with subjects located 30 and 75 cm from the source. Results: For a full screen, all phantoms' total effective doses were below the established 0.25 {mu}Sv standard, with an estimated maximum total effective dose of 0.07 {mu}Sv for full screen of a male child. The estimated maximum organ dose due to a full screen was 1.03 {mu}Gy, deposited in the adipose tissue of the male child phantom when located 30 cm from the source. All organ dose estimates had a coefficient of variation of less than 3% for a frontal scan and less than 11% for a rear scan. Conclusions: Backscatter security scanners deposit dose in organs beyond the skin. The effective dose is below recommended standards set by the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) assuming the system provides a maximum exposure of approximately 4.6 {mu}R at 30 cm.

  13. Estimated radiation dose to the newborn in FDG-PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruotsalainen, U.; Suhonen-Polvi, H.; Eronen, E.; Kinnala, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the radiation dose due to intravenous injection of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for infants studied with PET. The radioactivity concentration in the brain and bladder content was measured with PET to determine the cumulated activity in these organs in 21 infant FDG studies. The individual organ masses were estimated according to the whole-body and brain masses, and they were used to calculate the absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity (S values). For organs other than brain and bladder, the cumulated activity was defined from adult studies. For each individual patient, the absorbed dose to the brain, bladder wall and selected organs were calculated. An estimation of the effective dose was determined. Whole-body distribution of FDG in the infants differed from adults: a greater proportion of the injected activity accumulated into the brain (9% versus 7%) and less was excreted to urine (7% versus 20% respectively). The measured cumulated activity in the brain was 0.25 MBq {center_dot} h/MBq and in the bladder content 0.04 MBq {center_dot}h/MBq with a large individual variation in latter. The calculated absorbed dose was 0.24 mGy/MBq to the brain and 1.03 mGy/MBq to the bladder wall. The estimated effective dose was 0.43 mSv/MBq. The dose to the bladder wall was lower in infants as compared to adults with ordinary amounts of injected activity. The greater amount of activity remaining in the body may increase the dose to other organs. The effective dose was lower compared to adults and conventional nuclear medicine studies of infants. PET can be a valuable tool in pediatric nuclear medicine because of good resolution images, sensitive radiation measurement and a variety of tracers labeled with short-lived isotopes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. In vivo dosimetry for estimation of effective doses in multislice CT coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.; Severgnini, M.; De Guarrini, F.

    2007-10-15

    In vivo dosimetry represents a technique that has been widely employed to evaluate the dose to the patient mainly in radiotherapy. Considering the increment in dose to the population due to new high-dose multislice CT examinations, such as coronary angiography, it is becoming important to more accurately know the dose to the patient. The desire to know patient dose extends even to radiological examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are considered the gold standard for in vivo dosimetry, but their use is time consuming. A rapid, less labor-intensive method has been developed to perform in vivo dosimetry using radiochromic film positioned next to the patient's skin. Multislice CT scanners allow the estimation of the effective dose to the patient from the dose length product (DLP) parameter, the value of which is displayed on the acquisition console, simply multiplying the DLP by published conversion factors. The method represents only an approximation based on standard size circular phantoms and neglects the actual size of the patient. More accurate evaluations can be carried out using software-based Monte Carlo simulations. However, these methods do not consider possible dose reduction techniques, such as automatic tube-current modulation. For 22 patients effective doses measured by in vivo dosimetry and calculated by software were compared. The technique of using in vivo dosimetry measured with radiochromic film appears a promising procedure for improving the assessment of the effective dose to the patient.

  15. Redox status in liver of rats following subchronic exposure to the combination of low dose dichlorvos and deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Yuan; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wang, Hui-Ping; Liang, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Li; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Organophosphates and pyrethroids are widely used pesticides with prominent toxicity to humans. However, their joint toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we investigated the oxidative damages induced by low dose dichlorvos (DDVP) and deltamethrin (DM), the representative organophosphate and pyrethroid, respectively, and their mixtures in the liver of rats for 90 consecutive days. Two oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PCO) levels, were measured to reflect the extent of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, respectively. DDVP, DM, and their mixtures induced levels of MDA and PCO dose-dependently, although no toxic signs and pathological changes of liver were found in the rats following 90-day exposure. DDVP and DM induced greater increase of MDA than PCO, which indicated that lipids were particularly sensitive to the oxidative damage. We found that DDVP, DM and their mixtures could inhibit the activity of two antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The effects of DM on SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were greater than those of DDVP. The combined effect of DDVP and DM was lower than the sum of their individual effects. Thus the interaction between dichlorvos and deltamethrin may be antagonistic on the induction of oxidative stress in rat liver. PMID:26453231

  16. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion. PMID:25539270

  17. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  18. [Effects of low doses of essential oil on the antioxidant state of the erythrocytes, liver, and the brains of mice].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Fatkullina, L D; Alinkina, E S; Kozachenko, A I; Nagler, L G; Medvedeva, I B; Goloshchapov, A N; Burlakova, E B

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of essential oil from oregano and clove and a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract on the antioxidant state of organs in intact and three experimental groups of Bulb mice. We found that the essential oil was an efficient in vivo bioantioxidant when mice were treated with it for 6 months even at very low doses, such as 300 ng/day. All essential oil studied inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the membranes of erythrocytes that resulted in increased membrane resistance to spontaneous hemolysis, decreased membrane microviscosity, maintenance of their structural integrity, and functional activity. The essential oil substantially decreased the LPO intensity in the liver and the brains of mice and increased the resistance of liver and brain lipids to oxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver. The most expressed bioantioxidant effect on erythrocytes was observed after clove oil treatment, whereas on the liver and brain, after treatment with a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract. PMID:25272759

  19. Observation of a Dose-Control Relationship for Lung and Liver Tumors After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McCammon, Robert Schefter, Tracey E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Zaemisch, Rebekah; Gravdahl, Daniel; Kavanagh, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for local control of primary or metastatic tumors within the lung or liver treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) within a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 141 consecutive patients with 246 lesions treated with three-fraction SBRT from Oct 1999 through Aug 2005 were reviewed. Local control was assessed radiographically. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the influence of the following factors on local control: total dose, expressed as either nominal prescription dose or equivalent uniform dose (EUD); gross tumor volume; primary site; treatment site (lung vs. other); histologic characteristics (adenocarcinoma vs. other); gender; age; and primary vs. metastatic tumor. Results: On univariate analysis, increased dose (either nominal or EUD) and smaller gross tumor volume were significant predictors of higher local control. Lesions treated to a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater had a 3-year actuarial local control rate of 89.3% compared with 59.0% and 8.1% for those treated to 36-53.9 Gy and less than 36 Gy. On multivariate analysis, only increased nominal dose and EUD retained statistical significance. Treatment was well tolerated; 5.7% of patients experienced Grade 3 or higher toxicity. Conclusions: This large single-institution series suggests a dose-control relationship within the range of SBRT doses applied. Excellent local control rates are achieved with a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater, corresponding to an EUD greater than 65.3 Gy. These results support the use of aggressive SBRT regimens when durable tumor control is the primary objective.

  20. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, K; Maria Das, K J; Balasubramanian, K; Deka, A C; Patil, B R

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV)-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i) EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV) and (ii) EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV). The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Mean dose, D30%, and D5% were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR). Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm(3). The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DV plans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DV plans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DV plans was higher than in EUDWithout DV plans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV) inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV). Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume. PMID:27217624

  1. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, K.; Maria Das, K. J.; Balasubramanian, K.; Deka, A. C.; Patil, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV)-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i) EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV) and (ii) EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV). The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Mean dose, D30%, and D5% were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR). Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm3. The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DV plans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DV plans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DV plans was higher than in EUDWithout DV plans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV) inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV). Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume. PMID:27217624

  2. Use of prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyada, P.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of using measured prompt gamma emissions from polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent is explored theoretically. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of a high density polyethylene cylinder to emit prompt gammas from interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of hydrogen and carbon present in polyethylene. The neutron energy dependent responses of hydrogen and carbon nuclei are combined appropriately to match the energy dependent neutron fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients. The proposed method is tested initially with simulated spectra and then validated using experimental measurements with an Am-Be neutron source. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations have established the feasibility of estimating neutron ambient dose equivalent using measured neutron induced prompt gammas emitted from polyethylene with an overestimation of neutron dose at very low energies.

  3. [Nationwide survey of nuclear medicine practice and estimation of collective effective dose in Japan.].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masaki; Nishizawa, Kanae; Iwai, Kazuo; Akahane, Keiichi; Maruyama, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    For the estimation of collective effective dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine diagnosis, a national survey was carried out in Japan. The survey contents covered radiopharmaceutical use, sex, age, activity, and so on of each patient in October 1997 and the monthly number of examinations in 1997. The annual number of diagnostic examinations using radiopharmaceuticals was 0.82 million for males and 0.74 million for females. The frequency of examination was about 3% for patients less than 17 years old and about 60% for those more than 60 years old. Effective dose was calculated on the basis of such literature as ICRP publications. The dose used most frequently was 5-6mSv per examination. The collective effective doses from diagnostic nuclear medicine examinations were estimated to be 13100 man .Sv for males and 20200 man .Sv for females. PMID:17164536

  4. MAXINE: An improved methodology for estimating maximum individual dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-02-01

    An EXCEL{reg_sign} spreadsheet has been developed that, when combined with the PC version of XOQDOQ, will generate estimates of maximum individual dose from routine atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The spreadsheet, MAXINE, utilizes a variety of atmospheric dispersion factors to calculate radiation dose as recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Regulatory Guide 1.109 [USNRC 1977a]. The methodology suggested herein includes use of both the MAXINE spreadsheet and the PC version of XOQDOQ.

  5. Rapid internal dose magnitude estimation in emergency situations using annual limits on intake (ALI) comparisons.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Stephen L; Toohey, Richard; Goans, Ronald; Christensen, Doran; Wiley, Albert

    2010-06-01

    It is crucial to integrate health physics into the medical management of radiation illness or injury. The key to early medical management is not necessarily radiation dose calculation and assignment, but radiation dose magnitude estimation. The magnitude of the dose can be used to predict potential biological consequences and the corresponding need for medical intervention. It is, therefore, imperative that physicians and health physicists have the necessary tools to help guide this decision making process. All internal radiation doses should be assigned using proper dosimetry techniques, but the formal internal dosimetry process often takes time that may delay treatment, thus reducing the efficacy of some medical countermeasures. Magnitudes of inhalation or ingestion intakes or intakes associated with contaminated wounds can be estimated by applying simple rules of thumb to sample results or direct measurements and comparing the outcome to known limits for a projection of dose magnitude. Although a United States regulatory unit, the annual limit on intake (ALI) is based on committed dose, and can therefore be used as a comparison point. For example, internal dose magnitudes associated with contaminated wounds can be estimated by comparing a direct wound measurement taken soon after the injury to the product of the ingestion ALI and the associated f1 value (the fractional uptake from the small intestine to the blood). International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication 96, as well as other resources, recommends treatment based on ALI determination. Often, treatment decisions have to be made with limited information. However, one can still perform dose magnitude estimations in order to help effectively guide the need for medical treatment by properly assessing the situation and appropriately applying basic rules of thumb. PMID:20445387

  6. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  7. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  8. Childhood leukaemia incidence around French nuclear installations using geographic zoning based on gaseous discharge dose estimates

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, A-S; Hémon, D; Morin, A; Laurier, D; Tirmarche, M; Backe, J-C; Chartier, M; Clavel, J

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated for the first time the incidence of childhood leukaemia (1990–2001) around French nuclear installations using a geographic zoning based on estimated doses to the red bone marrow due to gaseous radioactive discharges. The observed number of cases of acute leukaemia (O=750) in 40 km2 centred on 23 French nuclear installations between 1990 and 2001 was lower than expected (E=795.01), although not significantly so (standardised incidence ratio SIR=0.94, 95% confidence interval=(0.88–1.01)). In none of the five zones defined on the basis of the estimated doses was the SIR significantly >1. There was no evidence of a trend in SIR with the estimated doses for all the children or for any of the three age groups studied. This study confirmed that there was no evidence of an increased incidence of childhood leukaemia around the 23 French nuclear sites. PMID:16622448

  9. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-31

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of {approx}10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate.

  10. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  11. Solutions that enable ablative radiotherapy for large liver tumors: Fractionated dose painting, simultaneous integrated protection, motion management, and computed tomography image guidance.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H; Koay, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and success of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of lung cancer have led to its rapid adoption for liver cancers. SBRT can achieve excellent results for small liver tumors. However, the vast majority of physicians interpret SBRT as meaning doses of radiation (range, 4-20 Gray [Gy]) that may not be ablative but are delivered within about 1 week (ie, in 3-6 fractions). Adherence to this approach has limited the effectiveness of SBRT for large liver tumors (>7 cm) because of the need to reduce doses to meet organ constraints. The prognosis for patients who present with large liver tumors is poor, with a median survival ≤12 months, and most of these patients die from tumor-related liver failure. Herein, the authors present a comprehensive solution to achieve ablative SBRT doses for patients with large liver tumors by using a combination of classic, modern, and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, dose painting, motion management, image guidance, and simultaneous integrated protection. The authors discuss these concepts in the context of large, inoperable liver tumors and review how this approach can substantially prolong survival for patients, most of whom otherwise have a very poor prognosis and few effective treatment options. Cancer 2016;122:1974-86. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950735

  12. Repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Tomomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hori, Hisako; Fujii, Wataru; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) is a direct-acting mutagen that induces tumors in the glandular stomach, but not in the liver or colon, of rats after oral administration. To evaluate the performance of repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats, MNNG was administered by oral gavage to male CD (SD) rats aged 6 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle; 2.5% DMSO aqueous solution), 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25mg/kg/day once daily for 14 and 28 days, and the MN frequencies were examined in the hepatocytes, glandular stomach cells, and colonic cells. The MN induction in immature erythrocytes in the bone marrow of these animals was also simultaneously evaluated. The frequencies of micronucleated (MNed) glandular stomach cells were significantly increased in all MNNG treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner in both repeated dose studies. In contrast, the frequencies of MNed hepatocytes and colonic cells were not significantly increased compared to the vehicle control. In the bone marrow, a small but significant increase in the frequency of MNed immature erythrocytes was observed only at the highest dose in the 28-day study. Since a clear positive result in the glandular stomach agrees with the tissue specificity of tumor induction by this chemical, the MN assay with the glandular stomach, which is a direct contact site with high concentrations of test substances administered by oral gavage, may be useful for detecting genotoxic compounds that are short-lived in vivo, such as MNNG. PMID:25892628

  13. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  14. Fetal radiation dose estimates for I-131 sodium iodide in cases where conception occurs after administration

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    After administration of I-131 to the female patient, the possibility of radiation exposure of the embryo/fetus exists if the patient becomes pregnant while radioiodine remains in the body. Fetal radiation dose estimates for such cases were calculated. Doses were calculated for various maternal thyroid uptakes and time intervals between administration and conception, including euthyroid and hyperthyroid cases. The maximum fetal dose calculating was about 9.8E-03 mGy/MBq, which occurred with 100% maternal thyroid uptake and a 1 week interval between administration and conception. Placental crossover of the small amount of radioiodine remaining 90 days after conception was also considered. Such crossover could result in an additional fetal dose of 9.8E-05 mGy/MBq and a maximum fetal thyroid self dose of 3.5E-04 mGy/MBq.

  15. Estimation of absorbed dose in the covering skin of human melanoma treated by neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hiratsuka, J.; Karashima, H.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Ichihashi, M.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    A patient with malignant melanoma was treated by thermal neutron capture therapy using 10B-paraboronophenylalanine. The compound was injected subcutaneously into ten locations in the tumor-surrounding skin, and the patient was then irradiated with thermal neutrons from the Musashi Reactor at reactor power of 100 KW and neutron flux of 1.2 X 10(9) n/cm{sup 2}/s. Total absorbed dose to the skin was 11.7-12.5 Gy in the radiation field. The dose equivalents of these doses were estimated as 21.5 and 24.4 Sv, respectively. Early skin reaction after irradiation was checked from day 1 to day 60. The maximum and mean skin scores were 2.0 and 1.5, respectively, and the therapy was safely completed as far as skin reaction was concerned. Some factors influencing the absorbed dose and dose equivalent to the skin are discussed.

  16. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references.

  17. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation. PMID:27000514

  18. Internal thyroid doses to Fukushima residents-estimation and issues remaining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Enormous quantities of radionuclides were released into the environment following the disastrous accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011. It is of great importance to determine the exposure doses received by the populations living in the radiologically affected areas; however, there has been significant difficulty in estimating the internal thyroid dose received through the intake of short-lived radionuclides (mainly, (131)I), because of the lack of early measurements on people. An estimation by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences for 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013 was thus performed using a combination of the following three sources: thyroid measurement data ((131)I) for 1080 children examined in the screening campaign, whole-body counter measurement data ((134)Cs, (137)Cs) for 3000 adults, and atmospheric transport dispersion model simulations. In this study, the residents of Futaba town, Iitate village and Iwaki city were shown to have the highest thyroid equivalent dose, and their doses were estimated to be mostly below 30 mSv. However, this result involved a lot of uncertainties and provided only representative values for the residents. The present paper outlines a more recent dose estimation and preliminary analyses of personal behavior data used in the new method. PMID:27538842

  19. Estimates of Columbia River radionuclide concentrations: Data for Phase 1 dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, M.C.; Walters, W.H.

    1991-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project to estimate the radiation doses people may have received from historical Hanford Site operations. Under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel, the project is being conducted in phases. The objective of the first phase is to assess the feasibility of the project-wide technical approach for acquiring data and developing models needed to calculate potential radiation doses. This report summarizes data that were generated for the Phase 1 dose calculations. These included monthly average concentrations of specific radionuclides in Columbia River water and sediments between Priest Rapids Dam and McNary Dam for the years 1964 to 1966. Nine key radionuclides were selected for analysis based on estimation of their contribution to dose. Concentrations of these radionuclides in the river were estimated using existing measurements and hydraulic calculations based on the simplifying assumption that dilution and decay were the primary processes controlling the fate of radionuclides released to the river. Five sub-reaches between Priest Rapids Dam and McNary Dam, corresponding to population centers and tributary confluences, were identified and monthly average radionuclide concentrations were calculated for each sub-reach. The hydraulic calculations were performed to provide radionuclide concentration estimates for time periods and geographic locations where measured data were not available. The validity of the calculation method will be evaluated in Phase 2. 12 refs., 13 figs., 49 tabs.

  20. Internal thyroid doses to Fukushima residents—estimation and issues remaining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Enormous quantities of radionuclides were released into the environment following the disastrous accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011. It is of great importance to determine the exposure doses received by the populations living in the radiologically affected areas; however, there has been significant difficulty in estimating the internal thyroid dose received through the intake of short-lived radionuclides (mainly, 131I), because of the lack of early measurements on people. An estimation by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences for 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013 was thus performed using a combination of the following three sources: thyroid measurement data (131I) for 1080 children examined in the screening campaign, whole-body counter measurement data (134Cs, 137Cs) for 3000 adults, and atmospheric transport dispersion model simulations. In this study, the residents of Futaba town, Iitate village and Iwaki city were shown to have the highest thyroid equivalent dose, and their doses were estimated to be mostly below 30 mSv. However, this result involved a lot of uncertainties and provided only representative values for the residents. The present paper outlines a more recent dose estimation and preliminary analyses of personal behavior data used in the new method. PMID:27538842

  1. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other. PMID:24849678

  2. Dose-dependent compensation responses of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-liver axis of zebrafish exposed to the fungicide prochloraz.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yao; Giesy, John P; Wang, Jianghua; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-03-01

    Compensation responses and adaptability of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have been reported in fish exposed to model chemicals, however due to its importance in predictive toxicology further study was needed to elucidate details of the integrated responses to model chemicals. Transcriptional profiles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) in plasma were measured in male and female zebrafish that had been exposed to one of seven concentrations of the fungicide, prochloraz: low (1, 3 or 10μg/L), medium (30 or 100μg/L) or high concentrations (300 or 1000μg/L) for 4 days. In zebrafish exposed to the low and medium concentrations of prochloraz, compensation responses of the HPG axis through transcription, occurred in brain (up-regulation of gnrh, gnrhr and lhβ) and both brain and gonad (up-regulation of steroidogenic genes), respectively. Concentrations of E2 in plasma and expression of estrogen receptor 1 (er1) and vitellogenins (vtgs) in liver did not change. This result suggested that compensatory responses were successful in maintaining homeostasis. In zebrafish exposed to the two greatest concentrations, compensatory responses occurred in brain, gonad and liver through up-regulation of er2β, but it failed to maintain concentration of E2 in blood plasma and expression of er1 and vtgs in liver. Collectedly, the results observed in this study allowed characterization of dose-dependent compensatory responses along the HPG axis and liver and identified key linkages between compensatory responses occurring in brain, gonad and liver after exposure to prochloraz. PMID:25625521

  3. Accidental embryo irradiation during barium enema examinations: An estimation of absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Grammatikakis, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibility of an embryo to receive a dose of more than 10 cGy, the threshold of malformation induction in embryos reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, during barium enema examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were place in a phantom to calculate the depth-to-skin conversion coefficient needed for dose estimation at the average embryo depth in patients. Barium enema examinations were performed in 20 women of childbearing age with diagnostic problems demanding longer fluoroscopy times. Doses at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, were determined by measurements at the patients` skin followed by dose calculation at the site of interest. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for patients was 1.9 to 8.2 cGy. The dose always exceeded 5 cGy when fluoroscopy time was longer than 7 minutes. The dose at the embryo depth never exceeded 10 cGy. This study indicates that fluoroscopy time should not exceed 7 minutes in childbearing-age female patients undergoing barium enema examinations. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Estimated limits of IMRT dose escalation using varied planning target volume margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Christopher C.; Herman, Michael G.; Hillman, David W.; Davis, Brian J.

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the limits of dose escalation for prostate cancer as a function of planning target volume (PTV) margins, the maximum achievable dose (MAD) was determined through iterative plan optimizations from data sets of 18 patients until the dose constraints for rectum, bladder and PTV could no longer be met. PTV margins of 10, 5 and 3 mm yielded a mean MAD of 83.0 Gy (range, 73.8-108.0 Gy), 113.1 Gy (range, 90.0-151.2 Gy) and 135.9 Gy (range, 102.6-189.0 Gy), respectively. All comparisons of MAD among margin groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Comparison of prostate volumes of 30-50 mL (n = 8) with volumes of 51-70 mL (n = 7) and 71-105 mL (n = 3) showed an inverse relationship with MAD. Decreases in PTV margin significantly decreased the PTV overlap of the rectum (P < 0.001 for all margin comparisons). With decreases in the PTV margin and maintenance of identical dose constraints, doses well above those currently prescribed for treatment of localized prostate cancer appear feasible. However, the dose escalation suggested by these findings is a theoretical estimate, and additional dose constraints will likely be necessary to limit toxicity to normal tissue.

  5. Gold nanoparticle-aided brachytherapy with vascular dose painting: Estimation of dose enhancement to the tumor endothelial cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical microdosimetry at the subcellular level is employed in this study to estimate the dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cell nuclei, caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) targeting the tumor endothelium, during brachytherapy. Methods: A tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) is modeled as a slab of 2 {mu}m (thickness) x 10 {mu}m (length) x 10 {mu}m (width). The EC contains a nucleus of 5 {mu}m diameter and thickness of 0.5-1 {mu}m, corresponding to nucleus size 5%-10% of cellular volume, respectively. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the dose enhancement to the nucleus caused by photo/Auger electrons from AuNPs attached to the exterior surface of the EC. The nucleus dose enhancement factor (nDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the nucleus with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations. The investigated concentration range considers the potential for significantly higher local concentration near the EC due to preferential accumulation of AuNP in the tumor vasculature. Four brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, and 50 kVp x-rays were investigated. Results: For nucleus size of 10% of the cellular volume and AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, brachytherapy sources Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 5.6-73, 4.8-58.3, 4.7-56.6, and 3.2-25.8, respectively. Meanwhile, for nucleus size 5% of the cellular volume in the same concentration range, Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 6.9-79.2, 5.1-63.2, 5.0-61.5, and 3.3-28.3, respectively. Conclusions: The results predict that a substantial dose boost to the nucleus of endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs in combination with brachytherapy. Such vascular dose boosts could induce tumor vascular shutdown, prompting

  6. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzler, B.G. ); Borowski, S.K. . Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  8. EFFECT OF SINGLE VERSUS SPLIT DOSES OF DIETHYINITROSAMINE ON THE INDUCTION OF GAMMA-GLUTAMYLTRANSPEPTIDASE-FOCI IN THE LIVERS OF ADULT AND JUVENILE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The induction of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT)-foci by single and by split doses of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) was evaluated in the livers of juvenile and young adult male, Sprague-Dawley rats. A single dose of DENA was administered at either 32, 41 or 52 days of age and foll...

  9. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Dey, H.M.; Siebyl, I.B.

    1994-05-01

    SPECT imaging of the brain with I-123 iomazenil has shown avid uptake of the radioligand in a distribution consistent with benzodiazepine receptor binding. It was desirable to radiolabel this compound with a positron emitting radionuclide so that quantitation of the receptor density could be assessed with PET imaging. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil were calculated prior to obtaining Institutional Review Board approval of this procedure. A previously published multicompartmental model was used as the biological model for estimating residence times associated with the C-11 labeled iomazenil. According to this model, 85-90% is excreted in the urine and 10-15% in the feces. A dynamic, voiding urinary bladder model was utilized for activity excreted renally and the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract kinetic model was used for activity excreted via the hepatobiliary system. Absorbed doses from C-11 (I-123) iomazenil to the urinary bladder were calculated to be 0.099 mGy/MBq (0.19 mGy/MBq) for a 4.8 hour bladder voiding interval. Shortening the bladder voiding interval to 2.0 hours had little effect on the bladder wall dose (0.095 mGy/MBq). However, a 30-minute void interval was estimated to lower the bladder wall dose substantially (0.045 mGy/MBq). Absorbed dose to the kidney was higher for C-11 iomazenil (0.054 vs 0.031 mGy/MBq) than for I-123 iomazenil due to rapid, early renal excretion of this very short-lived positron emitter. Doses to the gastrointestinal tract were estimated to be 4- to 20-fold lower for C-11 iomazenil compared to I-123 iomazenil. Overall, labeling iomazenil with C-11 rather than I-123 greatly reduces the radiation dose, per unit administered, to all organs except the kidneys.

  10. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer

  11. Estimation of organ and effective doses from newborn radiography of the chest and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hillgan; Elbakri, Idris A; Reed, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Neonatal intensive care patients undergo frequent chest and abdomen radiographic imaging. In this study, the organ doses and the effective dose resulting from combined chest-abdomen radiography of the newborn child are determined. These values are calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation software PCXCM 2.0 and compared with direct dose measurements obtained from thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) in a physical phantom. The effective dose obtained from PCXMC is 21.2 ± 0.7 μSv and that obtained from TLD measurements is 22.0 ± 0.5 μSv. While the two methods are in close agreement with regard to the effective dose, there is a wide range of variation in organ doses, ranging from 85 % difference for the testes to 1.4 % for the lungs. Large organ dose variations are attributed to organs at the edge of the field of view, or organs with large experimental error or simulation uncertainty. This study suggests that PCXMC can be used to estimate organ and effective doses for newborn patients. PMID:23520199

  12. A Microarray Analysis of the Temporal Response of Liver to Methylprednisolone: A Comparative Analysis of Two Dosing Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Almon, Richard R.; DuBois, Debra C.; Jusko, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Microarray analyses were performed on livers from adrenalectomized male Wistar rats chronically infused with methylprednisolone (MPL) (0.3 mg/kg·h) using Alzet mini-osmotic pumps for periods ranging from 6 h to 7 d. Four control and 40 drug-treated animals were killed at 10 different times during drug infusion. Total RNA preparations from the livers of these animals were hybridized to 44 individual Affymetrix REA230A gene chips, generating data for 15,967 different probe sets for each chip. A series of three filters were applied sequentially. These filters were designed to eliminate probe sets that were not expressed in the tissue, were not regulated by the drug, or did not meet defined quality control standards. These filters eliminated 13,978 probe sets (87.5%) leaving a remainder of 1989 probe sets for further consideration. We previously described a similar dataset obtained from animals after administration of a single dose of MPL (50 mg/kg given iv). That study involved 16 time points over a 72-h period. A similar filtering schema applied to the single-bolus-dose data-set identified 1519 probe sets as being regulated by MPL. A comparison of datasets from the two different dosing regimens identified 358 genes that were regulated by MPL in response to both dosing regimens. Regulated genes were grouped into 13 categories, mainly on gene product function. The temporal profiles of these common genes were subjected to detailed scrutiny. Examination of temporal profiles demonstrates that current perspectives on the mechanism of glucocorticoid action cannot entirely explain the temporal profiles of these regulated genes. PMID:17303664

  13. SU-C-12A-05: Radiation Dose in High-Pitch Pediatric Cardiac CTA: Correlation Between Lung Dose and CTDIvol, DLP, and Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kino, A; Newman, B; Chan, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiation dose for pediatric high pitch cardiac CTA Methods: A total of 14 cases were included in this study, with mean age of 6.2 years (ranges from 2 months to 15 years). Cardiac CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens). Tube voltage (70, 80 and 100kV) was chosen based on patient weight. All patients were scanned using a high-pitch spiral mode (pitch ranges from 2.5 to 3) with tube current modulation technique (CareDose4D, Siemens). For each case, the three dimensional dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo software package (IMPACT-MC, CT Image GmbH). Scanning parameters of each exam, including tube voltage, tube current, beamshaping filters, beam collimation, were defined in the Monte Carlo calculation. Tube current profile along projection angles was obtained from projection data of each tube, which included data within the over-scanning range along z direction. The volume of lungs was segmented out with CT images (3DSlicer). Lung doses of all patients were calculated and compared with CTDIvol, DLP, and SSDE. Results: The average (range) of CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE of all patients was 1.19 mGy (0.58 to 3.12mGy), 31.54 mGy*cm (12.56 to 99 mGy*cm), 2.26 mGy (1.19 to 6.24 mGy), respectively. Radiation dose to the lungs ranged from 0.83 to 4.18 mGy. Lung doses correlated with CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE with correlation coefficients(k) at 0.98, 0.93, and 0.99. However, for the cases with CTDIvol less than 1mGy, only SSDE preserved a strong correlation with lung doses (k=0.83), while much weaker correlations were found for CTDIvol (k=0.29) and DLP (k=-0.47). Conclusion: Lung doses to pediatric patients during Cardiac CTA were estimated. SSDE showed the most robust correlation with lung doses in contrast to CTDIvol and DLP.

  14. Allowance for random dose estimation errors in atomic bomb survivor studies: a revision.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Donald A; Vaeth, Michael; Cologne, John B

    2008-07-01

    Allowing for imprecision of radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors followed up by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation can be improved through recent statistical methodology. Since the entire RERF dosimetry system has recently been revised, it is timely to reconsider this. We have found that the dosimetry revision itself does not warrant changes in these methods but that the new methodology does. In addition to assumptions regarding the form and magnitude of dose estimation errors, previous and current methods involve the apparent distribution of true doses in the cohort. New formulas give results conveniently and explicitly in terms of these inputs. Further, it is now possible to use assumptions about two components of the dose errors, referred to in the statistical literature as "classical" and "Berkson-type". There are indirect statistical indications, involving non-cancer biological effects, that errors may be somewhat larger than assumed before, in line with recommendations made here. Inevitably, methods must rely on uncertain assumptions about the magnitude of dose errors, and it is comforting to find that, within the range of plausibility, eventual cancer risk estimates are not very sensitive to these. PMID:18582151

  15. Estimates of radiation doses in space on the basis of current data.

    PubMed

    Foelsche, T

    1963-01-01

    A gross survey of data on Van Allen belt radiations, galactic cosmic radiation, and solar cosmic radiation is presented. On the basis of these data that are, in part, fragmentary and uncertain, upper and lower limits of rad doses under different amounts of mass shielding are estimated. The estimates are preliminary especially in the cases of chance encounter with solar flare protons. Generally, the relative biological effectiveness of the high energetic space radiations and their secondaries appear insufficiently known to give detailed biological or rem doses. The overall ionization dosage of the low level galactic cosmic radiation in free space is estimated to be even in solar minimum years equivalent to less than 50 rem/year or 1 rem/week. Mass shielding up to 80 g/cm2 would not reduce the ionization dosage but would shield against heavy primaries and heavy ionizing secondaries, thus reducing the biological dose. The flux of energetic protons in the maximum intensity zone of the inner Van Allen belt is by about four orders of magnitude higher, their energy and penetration power, of course, lower. A shield of 25 g/cm2 would reduce the dose rate from 20 rad/hour under 2 g/cm2 to 5 rad/hour. These proton dose rates and also the electron and X-radiation dose rates under some g/cm2 shielding of low z-number material will not constitute a radiation hazard for flights straight through the inner and outer belt in about two hours. Staying within the maximum of the inner belt for two days would, however, lead even within 25 g/cm2 depth of outer shield and body itself to a dose of 200 rad which is on the permissible limit. Extreme solar cosmic ray events or proton showers of high intensity and a duration of days occurred with a frequency of 1-4 per year during the last highly active cycle. For the penetrating, most intense high energy event of February 23, 1956, the dose within 25 g/cm2 is estimated to have been in the order of 50 rad. In most cases the dose decreased more

  16. Monte Carlo estimation of photoneutrons spectra and dose equivalent around an 18 MV medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem-Bezoubiri, A.; Bezoubiri, F.; Badreddine, A.; Mazrou, H.; Lounis-Mokrani, Z.

    2014-04-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of an 18 MV Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator, lodged at Blida Anti-Cancer Centre in Algeria, was developed during this study to estimate the photoneutrons spectra and doses at the patient table in a radiotherapy treatment room, for radiation protection purposes.

  17. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  18. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars sprint mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Qualls, Garry D.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flame environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  19. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars SPRINT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flare environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  20. Morphologic changes in livers of hamsters treated with high doses of ursodeoxycholic acid: correlation with bile acids in bile.

    PubMed

    Mamianetti, A; Konopka, H F; Lago, N; Vescina, C; Scarlato, E; Carducci, C N

    1994-01-01

    The effects of high doses of ursodeoxycholic acid on bile acid composition and the liver morphology was examined in 60 male Syrian golden hamsters. The animals were allocated to five groups: I, control; II and IV received 0.5 g and 1 g of ursodeoxycholic acid per 100 g of standard diet respectively over 30 days and III and V received 0.5 g and 1 g of ursodeoxycholic acid per 100 g of standard diet respectively over 60 days. Bile acids were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. In all treated groups there was a significant increase in chenodeoxycholic and lithocholic acid in the bile. The mean glyco/tauro ratio was significantly higher than in the control group, reaching values > 1 for individual bile acids, except for lithocholic acid values which remained < 1. Under light microscopy, the livers of the hamsters showed damage which was dose/time related, namely portal inflammatory infiltrate, bile duct proliferation, cholestasis, fat infiltration and necrosis. Electron microscopy revealed pronounced changes starting with microvilli edema and extending to canalicular membrane destruction and necrosis. The changes observed in the relation glyco/tauro lithocholic acids, may be due to defence mechanisms to avoid hepatotoxicity. The hepatotoxicity resulting from ursodeoxycholic acid administration is presumed to be due primarily to lithocholic acid or some lithocholic acid metabolite. PMID:8058592

  1. Antioxidative effect of Rajgira leaf extract in liver of Swiss albino mice after exposure to different doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Maharwal, J; Samarth, R M; Saini, M R

    2005-08-01

    The radioprotective effect of Rajgira leaf extract (800 mg/kg b.wt.) was studied in the liver of Swiss albino mice at various post-irradiation intervals between day 1 and 30 after its oral administration for 15 consecutive days prior to whole body gamma irradiation with 6, 8 and 10 Gy of gamma rays. In this study, abnormal and binucleated hepatocytes were counted in both the control and experimental sets because these hepatocytes are good indicators of radiation-induced damage. In the experimental (RLE + irradiation) sets, the percentage of abnormal and binucleated hepatocytes was lower compared with their respective control (irradiation alone) sets at each autopsy interval with all three radiation doses studied. The increase in the percentage of these hepatocytes was also found to be dose-dependent in the control as well as in the RLE treated (experimental) sets. Thus, Rajgira leaf extract (RLE) treatment given before irradiation protects mouse liver against radiation-induced lesions by increasing the GSH content and decreasing the LPO level. PMID:16177977

  2. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C; Eldib, A; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  3. Radiation doses and estimated risk from angiographic projections during coronary angiography performed using novel flat detector.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna; Livingstone, Roshan S; Varghese, Lijo; Kumar, Parveen; Srinath, Sirish Chandra; George, Oommen K; George, Paul V

    2016-01-01

    Coronary angiography (CA) procedure uses various angiographic projections to elicit detailed information of the coronary arteries with some steep projections involving high radiation dose to patients. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses and estimated risk from angiographic projections during CA procedure performed using novel flat detector (FD) system with improved image processing and noise reduction techniques. Real-time monitoring of radiation doses using kerma-area product (KAP) meter was performed for 140 patients using Philips Clarity FD system. The CA procedure involved seven standard projections, of which five were extensively selected by interventionalists. Mean fluoroscopic time (FT), KAP, and reference air kerma (Ka,r) for CA procedure were 3.24 min (0.5-10.51), 13.99Gycm2 (4.02-37.6), and 231.43 mGy (73.8-622.15), respectively. Effective dose calculated using Monte Carlo-based PCXMC software was found to be 4.9mSv. Left anterior oblique (LAO) 45° projection contributed the highest radiation dose (28%) of the overall KAP. Radiation-induced risk was found to be higher in females compared to males with increased risk of lung cancer. An increase of 10%-15% in radiation dose was observed when one or more additional projections were adopted along with the seven standard projections. A 14% reduction of radiation dose was achieved from novel FD system when low-dose protocol during fluoroscopy and medium-dose protocol during cine acquisitions were adopted, compared to medium-dose protocol. PMID:27167263

  4. Review of methods of dose estimation for epidemiological studies of the radiological impact of nevada test site and global fallout.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2006-07-01

    Methods to assess radiation doses from nuclear weapons test fallout have been used to estimate doses to populations and individuals in a number of studies. However, only a few epidemiology studies have relied on fallout dose estimates. Though the methods for assessing doses from local and regional compared to global fallout are similar, there are significant differences in predicted doses and contributing radionuclides depending on the source of the fallout, e.g. whether the nuclear debris originated in Nevada at the U.S. nuclear test site or whether it originated at other locations worldwide. The sparse historical measurement data available are generally sufficient to estimate external exposure doses reasonably well. However, reconstruction of doses to body organs from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides is significantly more complex and is almost always more uncertain than are external dose estimates. Internal dose estimates are generally based on estimates of the ground deposition per unit area of specific radionuclides and subsequent transport of radionuclides through the food chain. A number of technical challenges to correctly modeling deposition of fallout under wet and dry atmospheric conditions still remain, particularly at close-in locations where sizes of deposited particles vary significantly over modest changes in distance. This paper summarizes the various methods of dose estimation from weapons test fallout and the most important dose assessment and epidemiology studies that have relied on those methods. PMID:16808609

  5. Preoperative single-dose methylprednisolone versus placebo after major liver resection in adults: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Alexsander K; Roberts, Derek J; Bhatti, Sana U; Dixon, Elijah; Sutherland, Francis R; Bathe, Oliver F; Ball, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although randomised controlled trials have demonstrated that preoperative glucocorticoids may improve postoperative surrogate outcomes among patients undergoing major liver resection, evidence supporting improved patient-important outcomes is lacking. This superiority trial aims to evaluate the effect of administration of a bolus of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone versus placebo during induction of anaesthesia on postoperative morbidity among adults undergoing elective major liver resection. Methods and analysis This will be a randomised, dual-arm, parallel-group, superiority trial. All consecutive adults presenting to a large Canadian tertiary care hospital who consent to undergo major liver resection will be included. Patients aged <18 years and those currently receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy will be excluded. We will randomly allocate participants to a preoperative 500 mg intravenous bolus of methylprednisolone versus placebo. Surgical team members and outcome assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation status. The primary outcome measure will be postoperative complications. Secondary outcome measures will include mortality, the incidence of several specific postoperative complications, and blood levels of select proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and laboratory liver enzymes or function tests on postoperative days 0, 1, 2 and 5. The incidence of postoperative complications and mortality will be compared using Fisher's exact test, while the above laboratory measures will be compared using mixed-effects models with a subject-specific random intercept. Ethics and dissemination This trial will evaluate the protective effect of a single preoperative dose of methylprednisolone on the hazard of postoperative complications. A report releasing study results will be submitted for publication in an appropriate journal, approximately 3 months after finishing the data collection. Trial registration number NCT01997658

  6. Estimating the population dose from nuclear medicine examinations towards establishing diagnostic reference levels

    PubMed Central

    Niksirat, Fatemeh; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Amiri, Mehrangiz; Gholami, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study conducted a review on nuclear medicine (NM) services in Mazandaran Province with a view to establish adult diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and provide updated data on population radiation exposure resulting from diagnostic NM procedures. Materials and Methods: The data were collected from all centers in all cities of Mazandaran Province in the North of Iran from March 2014 to February 2015. The 75th percentile of the distribution and the average administered activity (AAA) were calculated and the average effective dose per examination, collective effective dose to the population and annual effective dose per capita were estimated using dose conversion factors. The gathered data were analyzed via SPSS (version 18) software using descriptive statistics. Results: Based on the data of this study, the collective effective dose was 95.628 manSv, leading to a mean effective dose of 0.03 mSv per capita. It was also observed that the myocardial perfusion was the most common procedure (50%). The 75th percentile of the distribution of administered activity (AA) represents the DRL. The AAA and the 75th percentile of the distribution of AA are slightly higher than DRL of most European countries. Conclusions: Myocardial perfusion is responsible for most of the collective effective dose and it is better to establish national DRLs for myocardial perfusion and review some DRL values through the participation of NM specialists in the future. PMID:26917891

  7. Estimation of radiation doses for atomic-bomb survivors in the Hiroshima University Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, M.; Matsuura, M.; Hayakawa, N.; Kamada, N.; Ito, C.

    1996-05-01

    The present study presents the Hiroshima University Registry of atomic bomb survivors, of which the total number is about 270,000, and application of absorbed doses. From this registry, we picked up 49,102 survivors and applied organ doses based on the dosimetry system 1986 (DS86), which is named the Atomic Bomb Survivor 1993 Dose (ABS93D). The applied dose data are based on the tables listed in the DS86 final report such as the free-in-air kermas, the house shielding factors, and organ dose factors for the active bone marrow and the breast. Calculations for the 13 other organs provided in DS86 are possible. To obtained the organ doses for each survivor, it is necessary to obtain information concerning (1) place exposed, (2) whether they were shielded or not, and (3) age. ABS93D body transmission factors for active bone marrow for neutrons and gamma rays agreed with DS 86 to within a few percent. Of the survivors studied, 35, 123 of them were used for the relative risk estimation of leukemia mortality, adopting the same method as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) for comparison. For the observation period from 1968 to 1989, the analyzed relative risks for leukemia mortality at 1 Gy by shielded kerm and by active bone marrow dose are 2.01 and 2.37, respectively, which are consistent with the RERF results. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  9. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients (horgan) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3) to account

  10. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI{sub vol}-normalized-organ dose coefficients (h{sub organ}) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3

  11. Stability evaluation of parameter estimation of multi-Rayleigh model for ultrasound B-mode image of liver fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shohei; Ohashi, Minori; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    A diagnosis of liver fibrosis using an ultrasound B-mode image has the advantages of real-time observation and noninvasive properties. In our previous study, a multi-Rayleigh model was proposed to express a probability density function (PDF) of echo amplitudes from a fibrotic liver. From the multi-Rayleigh model, fibrosis parameters, such as the amount of fibrotic tissue and its progressive ratio, can be extracted. To quantitatively evaluate liver fibrosis using the multi-Rayleigh model, it is important to evaluate the stability of the estimation method of multi-Rayleigh model parameters. In this study, a numerical simulation using random variables following the multi-Rayleigh model was performed and the estimation stability of the parameters of the multi-Rayleigh model with two components was examined. From the simulation results, it was found that estimation becomes unstable under a certain condition owing to statistical variations of moments, which are inputs in the estimation algorithm. The instability of estimated parameters could be evaluated by focusing on changes in moments upon changes in multi-Rayleigh model parameters. It was indicated that we can evaluate the reliability of the estimated parameters of the multi-Rayleigh model only from the estimated values.

  12. Effect of Volume-of-Interest Misregistration on Quantitative Planar Activity and Dose Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Song, N.; He, B.; Frey, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), dose estimation is essential for treatment planning and tumor dose response studies. Dose estimates are typically based on a time series of whole body conjugate view planar or SPECT scans of the patient acquired after administration of a planning dose. Quantifying the activity in the organs from these studies is an essential part of dose estimation. The Quantitative Planar (QPlanar) processing method involves accurate compensation for image degrading factors and correction for organ and background overlap via the combination of computational models of the image formation process and 3D volumes of interest defining the organs to be quantified. When the organ VOIs are accurately defined, the method intrinsically compensates for attenuation, scatter, and partial volume effects, as well as overlap with other organs and the background. However, alignment between the 3D organ volume of interest (VOIs) used in QPlanar processing and the true organ projections in the planar images is required. The goal of this research was to study the effects of VOI misregistration on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained using the QPlanar method. In this work, we modeled the degree of residual misregistration that would be expected after an automated registration procedure by randomly misaligning 3D SPECT/CT images, from which the VOI information was derived, and planar images. Mutual information based image registration was used to align the realistic simulated 3D SPECT images with the 2D planar images. The residual image misregistration was used to simulate realistic levels of misregistration and allow investigation of the effects of misregistration on the accuracy and precision of the QPlanar method. We observed that accurate registration is especially important for small organs or ones with low activity concentrations compared to neighboring organs. In addition, residual misregistration gave rise to a loss of precision

  13. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  14. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  15. Estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, E; Vardalaki, E; Hourdakis, C J; Dimitriou, P

    2001-01-01

    This study deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) within the process of optimisation of patients' exposure in Greece. Six large hospitals in Athens were selected and 385 patients made up the sample. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undertaking five common X ray examinations (chest, cervical spine, lumbar spine AP and LAT, pelvis) were estimated using both thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) attached to the patient's skin and an ionisation chamber for air kerma measurements. Exposure settings and patient's data were recorded. Results concerning the kilovoltage and focus-to-film-distance (FFD) settings and the ESD values were analysed and compared to those recommended by the EU. Discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examinations studied were found among the different hospitals denoting the importance of establishing a national quality assurance programme and examination protocols to ensure patient doses are kept as low as possible. All the examinations studied fulfilled the EU recommendations except that for the chest where the doses were considerably higher due to the use of low kVP settings. PMID:11548324

  16. Dose estimation for atomic bomb survivor studies: its evolution and present status.

    PubMed

    Cullings, Harry M; Fujita, Shoichiro; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Grant, Eric J; Kerr, George D; Preston, Dale L

    2006-07-01

    In the decade after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, several large cohorts of survivors were organized for studies of radiation health effects. The U.S. Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its U.S./Japan successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), have performed continuous studies since then, with extensive efforts to collect data on survivor locations and shielding and to create systems to estimate individual doses from the bombs' neutrons and gamma rays. Several successive systems have been developed by extramural working groups and collaboratively implemented by ABCC and RERF investigators. We describe the cohorts and the history and evolution of dose estimation from early efforts through the newest system, DS02, emphasizing the technical development and use of DS02. We describe procedures and data developed at RERF to implement successive systems, including revised rosters of survivors, development of methods to calculate doses for some classes of persons not fitting criteria of the basic systems, and methods to correct for bias arising from errors in calculated doses. We summarize calculated doses and illustrate their change and elaboration through the various systems for a hypothetical example case in each city. We conclude with a description of current efforts and plans for further improvements. PMID:16808610

  17. Molybdenum target specifications for cyclotron production of 99mTc based on patient dose estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, X.; Tanguay, J.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Bénard, F.; Ruth, T. J.; Celler, A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the recognized fragility of reactor-produced 99Mo supply, direct production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction using medical cyclotrons has been investigated. However, due to the existence of other Molybdenum (Mo) isotopes in the target, in parallel with 99mTc, other technetium (Tc) radioactive isotopes (impurities) will be produced. They will be incorporated into the labeled radiopharmaceuticals and result in increased patient dose. The isotopic composition of the target and beam energy are main factors that determine production of impurities, thus also dose increases. Therefore, they both must be considered when selecting targets for clinical 99mTc production. Although for any given Mo target, the patient dose can be predicted based on complicated calculations of production yields for each Tc radioisotope, it would be very difficult to reverse these calculations to specify target composition based on dosimetry considerations. In this article, a relationship between patient dosimetry and Mo target composition is studied. A simple and easy algorithm for dose estimation, based solely on the knowledge of target composition and beam energy, is described. Using this algorithm, the patient dose increase due to every Mo isotope that could be present in the target is estimated. Most importantly, a technique to determine Mo target composition thresholds that would meet any given dosimetry requirement is proposed.

  18. Estimation of external dose by car-borne survey in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nair, Raghu Ram; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathy Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Akata, Naofumi; Kudo, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A car-borne survey was carried out in Kerala, India to estimate external dose. Measurements were made with a 3-in × 3-in NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer from September 23 to 27, 2013. The routes were selected from 12 Panchayats in Karunagappally Taluk which were classified into high level, mid-level and low level high background radiation (HBR) areas. A heterogeneous distribution of air kerma rates was seen in the dose rate distribution map. The maximum air kerma rate, 2.1 μGy/h, was observed on a beach sand surface. 232Th activity concentration for the beach sand was higher than that for soil and grass surfaces, and the range of activity concentration was estimated to be 0.7-2.3 kBq/kg. The contribution of 232Th to air kerma rate was over 70% at the measurement points with values larger than 0.34 μGy/h. The maximum value of the annual effective dose in Karunagappally Taluk was observed around coastal areas, and it was estimated to be 13 mSv/y. More than 30% of all the annual effective doses obtained in this survey exceeded 1 mSv/y. PMID:25885680

  19. Estimation of External Dose by Car-Borne Survey in Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nair, Raghu Ram; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathy Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Akata, Naofumi; Kudo, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A car-borne survey was carried out in Kerala, India to estimate external dose. Measurements were made with a 3-in × 3-in NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer from September 23 to 27, 2013. The routes were selected from 12 Panchayats in Karunagappally Taluk which were classified into high level, mid-level and low level high background radiation (HBR) areas. A heterogeneous distribution of air kerma rates was seen in the dose rate distribution map. The maximum air kerma rate, 2.1 μGy/h, was observed on a beach sand surface. 232Th activity concentration for the beach sand was higher than that for soil and grass surfaces, and the range of activity concentration was estimated to be 0.7–2.3 kBq/kg. The contribution of 232Th to air kerma rate was over 70% at the measurement points with values larger than 0.34 μGy/h. The maximum value of the annual effective dose in Karunagappally Taluk was observed around coastal areas, and it was estimated to be 13 mSv/y. More than 30% of all the annual effective doses obtained in this survey exceeded 1 mSv/y. PMID:25885680

  20. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  1. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-03-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

  2. Estimating internal dose due to ingestion of radionuclides from Nevada Test Site fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Radiation Exposure Review Project to provide a critical reexamination of radiation doses to people resulting from testing nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site. One part of this effort focused on the dose resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food. The PATHWAY radionuclide transport model was developed to provide estimates of food concentrations for 20 radionuclides for each of 86 test events and 15 agricultural scenarios. These results were then used as input to the Human Ingestion model to provide dose estimates for individuals and populations in 9 western states. The model considered the life-style and age of the people, and accounted for the transport of milk between locations. Estimates of uncertainty were provided for all doses using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Propagation of uncertainty between the PATHWAY model and the Human Ingestion model required the development of special strategies to ensure that the inherent correlations between concentrations of the radionuclides in foods were handled properly. In addition, the size of the input data base (60 megabytes), the number of cases to consider (over 30,000), and the number of Monte Carlo simulations (over 6 million) required the development of efficient and reliable methods of data access and storage while running simulations concurrently on up to 14 UNIX workstations. The problems encountered in this effort are likely to be typical of any dose reconstruction involving geographically heterogeneous environmental conditions. This paper documents the methods used to disaggregate the system to achieve computation efficiency, the methods used to propagate uncertainty through the model system, and the techniques used to manage data in a distributed computing environment. The radionuclide and age specific dose factors used in the analysis are also provided.

  3. Estimating internal dose due to ingestion of radionuclides from Nevada Test Site fallout.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, T B; Whicker, F W; Anspaugh, L R; Ng, Y C

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Radiation Exposure Review Project to provide a critical reexamination of radiation doses to people resulting from testing nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site. One part of this effort focused on the dose resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food. The PATHWAY radionuclide transport model was developed to provide estimates of food concentrations for 20 radionuclides for each of 86 test events and 15 agricultural scenarios. These results were then used as input to the Human Ingestion model to provide dose estimates for individuals and populations in 9 western states. The model considered the life-style and age of the people, and accounted for the transport of milk between locations. Estimates of uncertainty were provided for all doses using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Propagation of uncertainty between the PATHWAY model and the Human Ingestion model required the development of special strategies to ensure that the inherent correlations between concentrations of the radionuclides in foods were handled properly. In addition, the size of the input data base (60 megabytes), the number of cases to consider (over 30,000), and the number of Monte Carlo simulations (over 6 million) required the development of efficient and reliable methods of data access and storage while running simulations concurrently on up to 14 UNIX workstations. The problems encountered in this effort are likely to be typical of any dose reconstruction involving geographically heterogeneous environmental conditions. This paper documents the methods used to disaggregate the system to achieve computation efficiency, the methods used to propagate uncertainty through the model system, and the techniques used to manage data in a distributed computing environment. The radionuclide- and age-specific dose factors used in the analysis are also provided. PMID:8830750

  4. Estimation of β-ray dose in air and soil from Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Thanh, Nguyen Tat; Otaki, Joji M.; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident of 2011, which deposited radionuclides across Tohoku and northern Kanto, β-ray dose evaluation has been performed to estimate radiation exposure for small creatures like insects as well as human skin. Using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C, we calculated the β-ray dose for 129mTe, 129Te, 131I, 132Te, 132I, 134Cs and 137Cs in air as a function of altitude and in soil. These calculations of β-dose rate for each radionuclide were conducted for the conditions following the FDNPP accident, with 137Cs deposition assumed to be 1000 kBq/m2. Beta-ray dose rate was found to be ∼10-fold (resp. 5-fold) higher than the γ-ray dose rate in the soil (resp. on the ground surface) at ∼20 days after deposition, and ∼4-fold (resp. 1.7-fold) higher after 6 months or more. For convenience, the height dependence of the ratio for 0, 10, 30, 90, 180 and 365 days after deposition was obtained by a fitting function. The cumulative 70 µm β-ray dose at 30, 60 and 90 days after deposition was estimated to be 35, 45 and 53 mGy for the ground surface, and 61, 79 and 92 mGy in the soil, respectively. These results can be used to estimate the external β-ray exposure for small creatures as well as for human skin. PMID:24504671

  5. Estimation of β-ray dose in air and soil from Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Thanh, Nguyen Tat; Otaki, Joji M; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2014-05-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident of 2011, which deposited radionuclides across Tohoku and northern Kanto, β-ray dose evaluation has been performed to estimate radiation exposure for small creatures like insects as well as human skin. Using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C, we calculated the β-ray dose for (129m)Te, (129)Te, (131)I, (132)Te, (132)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in air as a function of altitude and in soil. These calculations of β-dose rate for each radionuclide were conducted for the conditions following the FDNPP accident, with (137)Cs deposition assumed to be 1000 kBq/m(2). Beta-ray dose rate was found to be ∼10-fold (resp. 5-fold) higher than the γ-ray dose rate in the soil (resp. on the ground surface) at ∼20 days after deposition, and ∼4-fold (resp. 1.7-fold) higher after 6 months or more. For convenience, the height dependence of the ratio for 0, 10, 30, 90, 180 and 365 days after deposition was obtained by a fitting function. The cumulative 70 µm β-ray dose at 30, 60 and 90 days after deposition was estimated to be 35, 45 and 53 mGy for the ground surface, and 61, 79 and 92 mGy in the soil, respectively. These results can be used to estimate the external β-ray exposure for small creatures as well as for human skin. PMID:24504671

  6. Estimating radiation effective doses from whole body computed tomography scans based on U.S. soldier patient height and weight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to explore how a patient's height and weight can be used to predict the effective dose to a reference phantom with similar height and weight from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan when machine-based parameters are unknown. Since machine-based scanning parameters can be misplaced or lost, a predictive model will enable the medical professional to quantify a patient's cumulative radiation dose. Methods One hundred mathematical phantoms of varying heights and weights were defined within an x-ray Monte Carlo based software code in order to calculate organ absorbed doses and effective doses from a chest abdomen pelvis scan. Regression analysis was used to develop an effective dose predictive model. The regression model was experimentally verified using anthropomorphic phantoms and validated against a real patient population. Results Estimates of the effective doses as calculated by the predictive model were within 10% of the estimates of the effective doses using experimentally measured absorbed doses within the anthropomorphic phantoms. Comparisons of the patient population effective doses show that the predictive model is within 33% of current methods of estimating effective dose using machine-based parameters. Conclusions A patient's height and weight can be used to estimate the effective dose from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan. The presented predictive model can be used interchangeably with current effective dose estimating techniques that rely on computed tomography machine-based techniques. PMID:22004072

  7. A new online detector for estimation of peripheral neutron equivalent dose in organ

    SciTech Connect

    Irazola, L. Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pola, A.; Bedogni, R.; Terrón, J. A.; Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Expósito, M. R.; Lagares, J. I.; Sansaloni, F.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Peripheral dose in radiotherapy treatments represents a potential source of secondary neoplasic processes. As in the last few years, there has been a fast-growing concern on neutron collateral effects, this work focuses on this component. A previous established methodology to estimate peripheral neutron equivalent doses relied on passive (TLD, CR39) neutron detectors exposed in-phantom, in parallel to an active [static random access memory (SRAMnd)] thermal neutron detector exposed ex-phantom. A newly miniaturized, quick, and reliable active thermal neutron detector (TNRD, Thermal Neutron Rate Detector) was validated for both procedures. This first miniaturized active system eliminates the long postprocessing, required for passive detectors, giving thermal neutron fluences in real time. Methods: To validate TNRD for the established methodology, intrinsic characteristics, characterization of 4 facilities [to correlate monitor value (MU) with risk], and a cohort of 200 real patients (for second cancer risk estimates) were evaluated and compared with the well-established SRAMnd device. Finally, TNRD was compared to TLD pairs for 3 generic radiotherapy treatments through 16 strategic points inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The performed tests indicate similar linear dependence with dose for both detectors, TNRD and SRAMnd, while a slightly better reproducibility has been obtained for TNRD (1.7% vs 2.2%). Risk estimates when delivering 1000 MU are in good agreement between both detectors (mean deviation of TNRD measurements with respect to the ones of SRAMnd is 0.07 cases per 1000, with differences always smaller than 0.08 cases per 1000). As far as the in-phantom measurements are concerned, a mean deviation smaller than 1.7% was obtained. Conclusions: The results obtained indicate that direct evaluation of equivalent dose estimation in organs, both in phantom and patients, is perfectly feasible with this new detector. This will open the door to an

  8. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  9. Virtual Liver: Estimating Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes Exposed to Environmental Chemicals Using ToxCastTM Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCastTM program has screened over a thousand chemicals for potential toxicity using hundreds of high-throughput, in vitro assays. The U.S. EPA’s Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is a cellular systems model of hepatic tissues that enables the estimation of in vivo effects...

  10. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  11. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  12. Estimation of the Scatterer Distribution of the Cirrhotic Liver using Ultrasonic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    1998-05-01

    In the B-mode image of the liver obtained by an ultrasonic imaging system, the speckled pattern changes with the progression of the disease such as liver cirrhosis.In this paper we present the statistical characteristics of the echo envelope of the liver, and the technique to extract information of the scatterer distribution from the normal and cirrhotic liver images using constant false alarm rate (CFAR) processing.We analyze the relationship between the extracted scatterer distribution and the stage of liver cirrhosis. The ratio of the area in which the amplitude of the processing signal is more than the threshold to the entire processed image area is related quantitatively to the stage of liver cirrhosis.It is found that the proposed technique is valid for the quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis.

  13. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  14. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. Materials and Methods In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45–60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. Results The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R2 of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Conclusion Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer. PMID:27104169

  15. Effect of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide dosing in rats on GSH levels in liver and ovaries.

    PubMed

    Devine, P J; Sipes, I G; Hoyer, P B

    2001-08-01

    Repeated daily dosing of rats with the occupational chemical 4- vinylcyclohexene or its diepoxide metabolite (VCD) for 15 days destroys the smallest ovarian follicles. VCD acutely reduced hepatic levels of the antioxidant, glutathione (GSH); therefore, these studies were designed to evaluate whether GSH concentrations mediate VCD-induced ovotoxicity. Immature female Fischer 344 rats were dosed once or daily for 15 days with VCD (0.57 mmol/kg, ip) or the GSH synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 2 mmol/kg, ip). Animals were euthanized 2, 6, or 26 h following a single dose, and 2 or 26 h following 15 days of daily dosing. Reduced (p < 0.05) hepatic GSH was seen within 2 h of a single dose of either VCD (51 +/- 5% of control) or BSO (42 +/- 9%), but only BSO reduced ovarian GSH (71 +/- 5% at 6 h, p = 0.05) as measured by HPLC. Within 26 h, GSH levels had returned to control levels with either treatment. Hepatic GSH levels were reduced (< 0.05) 2 h after 15 daily doses with BSO (42 +/- 5%) or VCD (70 +/- 4%), but only BSO decreased ovarian GSH (64 +/- 3%). GSH levels in 15-day tissues were similar to controls 26 h after the final dose. Neither BSO nor VCD increased hepatic or ovarian concentrations of the oxidized dimer of GSH (GSSG) or thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), indicators of oxidative stress. These results suggest these treatments did not cause an oxidative stress. Histological counts of ovarian small follicle numbers were reduced (p < 0.05) in 15-day VCD-treated rats, whereas BSO did not affect follicle numbers, even though BSO reduced ovarian GSH content. These results support the conclusion that alterations in ovarian GSH levels are not involved in VCD-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:11452144

  16. Dose-response studies of interferon-alpha 2b on liver fibrosis and cholestasis induced by biliary obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Muriel, P; Castro, V

    1997-04-01

    Interferons have been utilized widely in chronic liver diseases for their antiviral properties. In addition, there is evidence for their antifibrogenic actions. In this work we studied effects of various doses of interferon-alpha 2b on experimental liver fibrosis and cholestasis induced in the rat by biliary obstruction. Collagen was measured as hepatic hydroxyproline content. Cholestasis was determined by serum alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activities and by bilirubin content. Glycogen was measured in the liver. Interestingly, the best effects (antifibrotic and anticholestatic) were observed in the group receiving the lowest dose of interferon. These results suggest that interferon-alpha 2b may be used at low doses, thereby decreasing side effects and costs. PMID:9211563

  17. A Monte Carlo Study for Photoneutron Dose Estimations around the High-Energy Linacs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, N; Miri-Hakimabad, S H; Rafat-Motavalli, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: High-energy linear accelerator (linac) is a valuable tool and the most commonly used device for external beam radiation treatments in cancer patients. In the linac head, high-energy photons with energies above the threshold of (γ,n) interaction produce photoneutrons. These photoneutrons deliver the extra dose to the patients undergoing radiation treatment and increase the risk of secondary cancer. Objective: In this study, a simplified model of the linac head was simulated and photoneutron dose equivalent was calculated at the isocenter and maze in the sphere detector. In addition, the absorbed and equivalent dose of photoneutron were estimated in the some organs of the phantom. Methods: The simulations were made using the Monte Carlo code. The ICRP reference adult male voxel phantom was used as the human body model for dosimetry calculations. Results: The results of dose calculations at the isocenter and maze showed that photoneutron dose decreases as the function of distance from the isocenter and increases with increasing the distance from the entrance maze. Conclusion: It is concluded that the simplified model of linac head is a useful and reliable method in dosimetry calculations. Calculations illustrated that the photoneutron dose is not negligible and duo to its harmful biological effects on body, it should be considered in the treatment plans. PMID:25599059

  18. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be

  19. Estimation of Rectal Dose Using Daily Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Fukuda, Shoichi; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The actual dose delivered to critical organs will differ from the simulated dose because of interfractional organ motion and deformation. Here, we developed a method to estimate the rectal dose in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy with consideration to interfractional organ motion using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT). Methods and Materials: Under exemption status from our institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed 231 series of MVCBCT of 8 patients with prostate cancer. On both planning CT (pCT) and MVCBCT images, the rectal contours were delineated and the CT value within the contours was replaced by the mean CT value within the pelvis, with the addition of 100 Hounsfield units. MVCBCT images were rigidly registered to pCT and then nonrigidly registered using B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) with Velocity AI software. The concordance between the rectal contours on MVCBCT and pCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The dose distributions normalized for 1 fraction were also deformed and summed to estimate the actual total dose. Results: The DSC of all treatment fractions of 8 patients was improved from 0.75±0.04 (mean ±SD) to 0.90 ±0.02 by DIR. Six patients showed a decrease of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from total dose compared with treatment plans. Although the rectal volume of each treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the change in gEUD (R{sup 2}=0.18±0.13), the displacement of the center of gravity of rectal contours in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction showed an intermediate relationship (R{sup 2}=0.61±0.16). Conclusion: We developed a method for evaluation of rectal dose using DIR and MVCBCT images and showed the necessity of DIR for the evaluation of total dose. Displacement of the rectum in the AP direction showed a greater effect on the change in rectal dose compared with the rectal volume.

  20. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  1. Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Warren

    2006-12-01

    An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a hypothetical maximally

  2. Estimation of organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging used during radiotherapy patient position verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a practical method for estimating organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) that can be performed with readily available phantoms and dosimeters. The accuracy of organ dose estimates made using the ImPACT patient dose calculator was also evaluated. Methods: A 100 mm pencil chamber and standard CT dose index (CTDI) phantoms were used to measure the cone-beam dose index (CBDI). A weighted CBDI (CBDI{sup w}) was then calculated from these measurements to represent the average volumetric dose in the CTDI phantom. By comparing CBDI{sup w} to the previously published organ doses, organ dose conversion coefficients were developed. The measured CBDI values were also used as inputs for the ImPACT calculator to estimate organ doses. All CBDI dose measurements were performed on both the Elekta XVI and Varian OBI at three clinically relevant locations: Head, chest, and pelvis. Results: The head, chest, and pelvis protocols yielded CBDI{sup w} values of 0.98, 16.62, and 24.13 mGy for the XVI system and 5.17, 6.14, and 21.57 mGy for the OBI system, respectively. Organ doses estimated with the ImPACT CT dose calculator showed a large range of variation from the previously measured organ doses, demonstrating its limitations for use with CBCT. Conclusions: The organ dose conversion coefficients developed in this work relate CBDI{sup w} values to organ doses previously measured using the same clinical protocols. Ultimately, these coefficients will allow for the quick estimation of organ doses from routine measurements performed using standard CTDI phantoms and pencil chambers.

  3. Decommissioning of a 60Co unit and estimation of personal doses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K H; Lin, J P; Liu, M T; Chu, T C

    2003-01-01

    Chang-hua Christian Hospital needs to uninstall the 60Co unit. The mode of this 60Co teletherapy unit is SHIMADZU RTGS-10. The original lead head was taken as the source container of this 60Co unit. The source head was dismantled and put into the prepared wooden box, after the source was sealed. This study describes the planning and dismantling of the retirement and transport of the 60Co unit, and personal doses measured during the procedure. This work estimates the doses of radiation received by exposed workers during the dismantling of the machine. The workers received doses of approximately 53 microSv. This study shows that the original lead head can be used as the source container of this 60Co unit. The 60Co machine was smoothly dismantled and transported by conscientious and careful workers, using planned and controlled radiation protection, following the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) rule. PMID:14653329

  4. Thyroid Dose Estimates for a Cohort of Belarusian Children Exposed to Radiation from the Chernobyl Accident

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Victor; Khrouch, Valeri; Leshcheva, Svetlana; Gavrilin, Yury; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Kutsen, Semion; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Shinkarev, Sergey; Tretyakevich, Sergey; Trofimik, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Cancer Institute, in collaboration with the Belarusian Ministry of Health, is conducting a study of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in a cohort of about 12,000 persons who were exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. The study subjects were 18 years old or younger at the time of exposure and resided in Belarus in the most contaminated areas of the Gomel and Mogilev Oblasts, as well as in the city of Minsk. All cohort members had at least one direct thyroid measurement made in April–June 1986. Individual data on residential history, consumption of milk, milk products and leafy vegetables as well as administration of stable iodine were collected for all cohort members by means of personal interviews conducted between 1996 and 2007. Based on the estimated 131I activities in the thyroids, which were derived from the direct thyroid measurements, and on the responses to the questionnaires, individual thyroid doses from intakes of 131I were reconstructed for all cohort members. In addition, radiation doses to the thyroid were estimated for the following minor exposure pathways: (a) intake of short-lived 132I, 133I and 132Te by inhalation and ingestion; (b) external irradiation from radionuclides deposited on the ground; and (c) ingestion intake of 134Cs and 137Cs. Intake of 131I was the major pathway for thyroid exposure; its mean contribution to the thyroid dose was 92%. The thyroid doses from 131I intakes varied from 0.5 mGy to almost 33 Gy; the mean was estimated to be 0.58 Gy, while the median was 0.23 Gy. The reconstructed doses are being used to evaluate the risk of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in the cohort. PMID:23560632

  5. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  6. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Rayno, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  7. Estimate of whole body doses for Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-02-27

    Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth are decendents whose relatives are litigants in Timothy vs US. The litigants allege that the decendents were harmed by radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the whole body dose received by each decendent from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. In each case the dose via ingestion is trivial compared to the external dose. For Lynette Tew the dose estimate is 0.28 rads. For Becky Farnsworth it is 0.0035 rads. 23 references, 4 tables.

  8. Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conazole-Induced Liver Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode of action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous transcription-based microarra...

  9. Biodistribution in rats and estimates of doses to humans from (64)CuCl2, a potential theranostic tracer.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Arias, Juan C; Carrasco-Hernández, Jhonatan; Reyes, Pedro G; Ávila-Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain data on the biodistribution of (64)CuCl2 in rats and to obtain estimates of the radiation doses to humans by extrapolating the animal data. MicroPET imaging and biodistribution studies were carried out with Wistar rats, and the doses were estimated with OLINDA/EXM. The lower large intestine wall was found to be the critical organ with an absorbed dose of 139±34 and 125±32µGy/MBq for females and males, respectively. The corresponding effective doses were estimated as 47±4 and 39±4µSv/MBq. PMID:27295514

  10. HASCAL -- A system for estimating contamination and doses from incidents at worldwide nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, A.L.; Sykes, R.I.

    1995-04-01

    The Hazard Assessment System for Consequence Analysis (HASCAL) is being developed to support the analysis of radiological incidents anywhere in the world for the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). HASCAL is a component of the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC), which is a comprehensive nuclear, biological, and chemical hazard effects planning and forecasting modeling system that is being developed by DNA. HASCAL computes best-guess estimates of the consequences of radiological incidents. HASCAL estimates the amount of radioactivity released, its atmospheric transport and deposition, and the resulting radiological doses.

  11. Long-lasting morphofunctional remodelling of liver parenchyma and stroma after a single exposure to low and moderate doses of cadmium in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Marli C; Costa, Kyvia L C; Santos, Daiane C M; Novaes, Rômulo D; Condessa, Suellen S; Neves, Ana C; Oliveira, Juraci A; Matta, Sérgio L P

    2013-01-01

    Frequent exposure to cadmium (Cd) in low doses is common; however, the long-lasting effects of this exposure are still poorly understood. Therefore in this study we have evaluated long-lasting hepatic morphofunctional adaptations in rats exposed to low and moderate doses of Cd. Five experimental groups were tested: control (0.9% saline) and other four receiving single intraperitoneal doses of 0.67, 0.74, 0.86 and 1.1 mg of Cd/kg. The animals were killed after eight weeks and the following parameters were analysed: biometrics, oedema, Cd bio-accumulation, collagen, glycogen, lipid droplets, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), serum transaminases, liver histopathology and stereology. In all groups exposed to Cd there was significant increase in SOD and CAT activities, ALP levels, proportion of binucleated hepatocytes, nuclei/cytoplasm ratio, macrophages (Kupffer cells) and collagen fibres. In these groups, glycogen accumulation by hepatocytes and the proportion of sinusoidal capillaries were significantly reduced compared with controls. The liver somatic index was increased, and liver oedema was evident in animals exposed to higher dose of Cd. Areas of necrosis were found in animals exposed to the three highest doses. These results indicate that Cd is an extremely toxic bioactive heavy metal, which even at low doses is able to disrupt liver homeostasis. At low and moderate doses, Cd exposure induces morphofunctional pathological remodelling of the hepatic stroma and parenchyma, which remain active after eight weeks. In response to injury, the liver tissue triggers a reactive process by enhancing activation of antioxidant enzymes and collagenogenesis. PMID:24020407

  12. Estimating doses and risks associated with decontamination and decommissioning activities using the CRRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Cotter, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) is applicable to determining doses and risks from a variety of decontamination and decommissioning activities. For example, concentrations in air from resuspended radionuclides initially deposited on the ground surface and the concentrations of deposited radionuclides in various soil layers can be obtained. The CRRIS will estimate exposure to radon and its progeny in terms of working-level months, and will compute the resulting health risks. The CRRIS consists of seven integrated computer codes that stand alone or are run as a system to calculate environmental transport, doses, and risks. PRIMUS output provides other CRRIS codes the capability to handle radionuclide decay chains. ANEMOS and RETADD-II calculate atmospheric dispersion and deposition for local and regional distances, respectively. Multiple ANEMOS runs for sources within a small area are combined on a master grid by SUMIT. MLSOIL is used to estimate effective ground surface concentrations for dose computations. TERRA calculates food chain transport, and ANDROS calculates individual or population exposures, doses, and risks. Applications of the CRRIS to decontamination problems are discussed. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 131I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively. PMID:26770031

  14. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Ha, Wi-Ho; Seo, Songwon; Jin, Young Woo; Jeong, Kyu Hwan; Yoon, Hae-Jung; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (131)I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively. PMID:26770031

  15. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, L. T. N.; Søyland, E.; Krogstad, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6-10.3 SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3-210.1 SED). The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  16. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  17. A comparison of analytic models for estimating dose equivalent rates in shielding with beam spill measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, S.C.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Macek, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.A.

    1992-12-31

    A comparison of 800-MeV proton beam spill measurements at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) with analytical model calculations of neutron dose equivalent rates (DER) show agreement within factors of 2-3 for simple shielding geometries. The DER estimates were based on a modified Moyer model for transverse angles and a Monte Carlo based forward angle model described in the proceeding paper.

  18. Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) of high dose mitomycin and epirubicin combined with caval chemofiltration versus prolonged low doses in liver metastases from colorectal cancer: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, G; Poddie, D B; Cantore, M; Rossi, S; Tumolo, S; Dentico, P; Bernardeschi, P; Guadagni, S; Rossi, G; Valori, V M; De Simone, M

    2004-11-01

    A multicenter randomized study comparing high dose of mitomycin and epirubicin given as hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) combined with caval chemofiltration (CF) versus low doses of the same drugs in unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer showed a significant improvement in the survival rate of the 20 patients treated with high dose compared to the 22 patients treated with low doses with a 1 year survival of 69% vs 39%. The median survival was 17 vs 11 months and the responses were 65% vs 33%. Toxicity was colangitis in 50% of patients considered. The extrahepatic progression was similar in the two groups (7/20 vs 8/22). PMID:15675479

  19. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  20. Early Dose Response to Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatment of Metastatic Liver Cancer by a Patient-Specific Method Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Janice M. Wong, C. Oliver; Muzik, Otto; Marples, Brian; Joiner, Michael; Burmeister, Jay

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based method of dose calculation for treatment planning of yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen consecutive {sup 90}Y SIRTs for colorectal liver metastasis were retrospectively analyzed. Absorbed dose to tumor and normal liver tissue was calculated by partition methods with two different tumor/normal liver vascularity ratios: an average 3:1 and a patient-specific ratio derived from pretreatment technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT. Tumor response was quantitatively evaluated from fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans. Results: Positron emission tomography showed a significant decrease in total tumor standardized uptake value (average, 52%). There was a significant difference in the tumor absorbed dose between the average and specific methods (p = 0.009). Response vs. dose curves fit by linear and linear-quadratic modeling showed similar results. Linear fit r values increased for all tumor response parameters with the specific method (+0.20 for mean standardized uptake value). Conclusion: Tumor dose calculated with the patient-specific method was more predictive of response in liver-directed {sup 90}Y SIRT.

  1. A revised burial dose estimation procedure for optical dating of youngand modern-age sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.J.; Roberts, R.G.; Galbraith, R.F.; DeLong, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of genuinely zero-age or near-zero-age grains in modern-age and very young samples poses a problem for many existing burial dose estimation procedures used in optical (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL) dating. This difficulty currently necessitates consideration of relatively simplistic and statistically inferior age models. In this study, we investigate the potential for using modified versions of the statistical age models of Galbraith et??al. [Galbraith, R.F., Roberts, R.G., Laslett, G.M., Yoshida, H., Olley, J.M., 1999. Optical dating of single and multiple grains of quartz from Jinmium rock shelter, northern Australia: Part I, experimental design and statistical models. Archaeometry 41, 339-364.] to provide reliable equivalent dose (De) estimates for young and modern-age samples that display negative, zero or near-zero De estimates. For this purpose, we have revised the original versions of the central and minimum age models, which are based on log-transformed De values, so that they can be applied to un-logged De estimates and their associated absolute standard errors. The suitability of these 'un-logged' age models is tested using a series of known-age fluvial samples deposited within two arroyo systems from the American Southwest. The un-logged age models provide accurate burial doses and final OSL ages for roughly three-quarters of the total number of samples considered in this study. Sensitivity tests reveal that the un-logged versions of the central and minimum age models are capable of producing accurate burial dose estimates for modern-age and very young (<350??yr) fluvial samples that contain (i) more than 20% of well-bleached grains in their De distributions, or (ii) smaller sub-populations of well-bleached grains for which the De values are known with high precision. Our results indicate that the original (log-transformed) versions of the central and minimum age models are still preferable for most routine dating applications

  2. Dose rate estimation of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus, in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Fuma, Shoichi; Ihara, Sadao; Kawaguchi, Isao; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Yoshito; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Sato, Youji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Aono, Tatsuo; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Soeda, Haruhi; Matsui, Kumi; Une, Yumi; Minamiya, Yukio; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    The radiological risks to the Tohoku hynobiid salamanders (class Amphibia), Hynobius lichenatus due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident were assessed in Fukushima Prefecture, including evacuation areas. Aquatic egg clutches (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 4 in total), overwintering larvae (n = 1-5 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total), and terrestrial juveniles or adults (n = 1 or 3 for each sampling date and site; n = 12 in total) of H. lichenatus were collected from the end of April 2011 to April 2013. Environmental media such as litter (n = 1-5 for each sampling date and site; n = 30 in total), soil (n = 1-8 for each sampling date and site; n = 31 in total), water (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total), and sediment (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total) were also collected. Activity concentrations of (134)Cs + (137)Cs were 1.9-2800, 0.13-320, and 0.51-220 kBq (dry kg) (-1) in the litter, soil, and sediment samples, respectively, and were 0.31-220 and <0.29-40 kBq (wet kg)(-1) in the adult and larval salamanders, respectively. External and internal absorbed dose rates to H. lichenatus were calculated from these activity concentration data, using the ERICA Assessment Tool methodology. External dose rates were also measured in situ with glass dosimeters. There was agreement within a factor of 2 between the calculated and measured external dose rates. In the most severely contaminated habitat of this salamander, a northern part of Abukuma Mountains, the highest total dose rates were estimated to be 50 and 15 μGy h(-1) for the adults and overwintering larvae, respectively. Growth and survival of H. lichenatus was not affected at a dose rate of up to 490 μGy h(-1) in the previous laboratory chronic gamma-irradiation experiment, and thus growth and survival of this salamander would not be affected, even in the most severely contaminated habitat in Fukushima Prefecture. However, further

  3. Effect of dose and plasma concentration on liver uptake and pharmacologic activity of a 2'-methoxyethyl modified chimeric antisense oligonucleotide targeting PTEN.

    PubMed

    Geary, Richard S; Wancewicz, Ed; Matson, John; Pearce, Megan; Siwkowski, Andrew; Swayze, Eric; Bennett, Frank

    2009-08-01

    The role of dose and plasma concentration on liver tissue uptake and resulting antisense pharmacology using a chemically modified antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeting PTEN was assessed in mice. A single bolus s.c. dose of 60 mg/kg in mice showed a time-dependent reduction in liver PTEN mRNA that was maximal at 48-72 h and returned to near control levels by 20 days after administration. These pharmacodynamics are in good agreement with liver concentrations of ASO and are consistent with slow elimination (t(1/2)=8 days) of the PTEN ASO from Balb/C mouse liver. As expected, highest ASO concentrations in liver resulted from the s.c. slow infusion at all doses tested. Unexpectedly, the liver EC(50) for the 24-h s.c. slow infusion was approximately twofold higher than the two bolus routes of administration. Based on plasma concentration analysis it appears that 1-2 microg/mL ASO plasma concentration is a threshold that, if exceeded, results in robust antisense effects and below which there is reduced or complete loss of antisense pharmacology in liver even though bulk uptake in the organ is improved. Co-administration of a nonsense ASO competed for liver uptake, but unexpectedly increased pharmacodynamic response for the active oligonucleotide (ISIS 116847) supporting inhibition of a nonproductive bulk uptake pathway while simultaneously improving productive uptake (pharmacodynamics). This competition effect was similar whether the nonsense oligonucleotide was co-administered with ASO or administered up to 24 h prior to active ASO injection. PMID:19393225

  4. The chornobyl accident: estimation of radiation doses received by the Baltic and Ukrainian cleanup workers.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Chumak, Vadim V; Inskip, Peter D; Kryuchkov, Viktor; Luckyanov, Nickolas

    2006-07-01

    During the first day after the explosion, the Chornobyl accident of April 26, 1986 exposed a few hundred emergency workers to high dose levels ranging up to 16 Gy, resulting in acute radiation syndrome. Subsequently, several hundred thousand cleanup workers were sent to the Chornobyl power plant to mitigate the consequences of the accident. Depending on the nature of the work to be carried out, the cleanup workers were sent for periods ranging from several minutes to several months. The average dose from external radiation exposure that was received by the cleanup workers was about 170 mGy in 1986 and decreased from year to year. The radiation exposure was mainly due to external irradiation from gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides and was relatively homogeneous over all organs and tissues of the body. To assess the possible health consequences of external irradiation at relatively low dose rates, the U.S. National Cancer Institute is involved in two studies of Chornobyl cleanup workers: (1) a study of cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian workers, and (2) a study of leukemia and other related blood diseases among Ukrainian workers. After an overview of the sources of exposure and of the radiation doses received by the cleanup workers, a description of the efforts made to estimate individual doses in the Baltic and Ukrainian studies is presented. PMID:16808604

  5. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  6. An estimation of radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from sediments collected near a Canadian uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Liber, K

    2001-10-01

    A new method is described for calculating radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from radionuclide concentrations in freshwater sediment. Both internal and external radiation doses were estimated for all 14 principal radionuclides of the uranium-238 decay series. Sediments were collected from three sites downstream of a uranium mining operation in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Sediments from two sites, located approximately 1.6 and 4.4 km downstream from mining operations, yielded absorbed doses to both larval midges, Chironomus tentans, and adult amphipods, Hyalella azteca, of 59-60 and 19 mGy/year, respectively, compared to 3.2 mGy/year for a nearby control site. External beta radiation from protactinium-234 (234Pa) and alpha radiation from uranium (U) contributed most of the dose at the impacted sites, whereas polonium-210 (210Po) was most important at the control site. If a weighting factor of 20 was employed for the greater biological effect of alpha vs. beta and gamma radiation, then total equivalent doses rose to 540-560 mGy/year at the site closest to uranium operations. Such equivalent doses are above the 360-mGy/year no-observed-effect level for reproductive effects in vertebrates from gamma radiation exposure. Data are not available to determine the effect of such doses on benthic organisms, but they are high enough to warrant concern. Detrimental effects have been observed in H. azteca at similar uranium concentration in laboratory toxicity tests, but it remains unclear whether the radiotoxicity or the chemotoxicity of uranium is responsible for these effects. PMID:11686646

  7. Effects of dose, flow rate, and bile acid on diclofenac disposition in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Uraki, Misato; Kawase, Atsushi; Matsushima, Yuka; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    An in situ perfused rat liver system is useful for studying the hepatic disposition of drugs and their metabolites. However, the effects of the perfusion conditions on drug disposition are unclear. We examined the effects of conditions such as flow rate (13 or 26 mL/min) and bile acid on disposition of diclofenac (DF) as a model drug and DF metabolites [diclofenac-1-O-acyl glucuronide (DF-Glu) or 4'-hydroxydiclofenac (DF-4'OH)] in the absence of albumin. DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH concentrations in the perfusate and cumulative amounts of DF-Glu excreted in bile were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography methods. DF in the perfusate was rapidly eliminated as the perfusate flow rate increased. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 60 min (AUC0-60) for DF-Glu and DF-4'OH in a perfusate containing bile acid was lower at a flow rate of 26 and 13 mL/min, respectively. The bile flow rate at 26 mL/min with 24 μM of bile acid in the perfusate was significantly higher (ca. 3.5 times) compared with that at 13 mL/min without bile acid. Cumulative biliary DF-Glu excretion was also dramatically affected by the flow rate and addition of bile acid. This study indicated that the flow rate and bile acid in the perfused rat liver were key factors for bile flow rate and DF, DF-Glu, and DF-4'OH disposition in the absence of albumin. PMID:25656736

  8. A pharmacometric case study regarding the sensitivity of structural model parameter estimation to error in patient reported dosing times.

    PubMed

    Knights, Jonathan; Rohatagi, Shashank

    2015-12-01

    Although there is a body of literature focused on minimizing the effect of dosing inaccuracies on pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter estimation, most of the work centers on missing doses. No attempt has been made to specifically characterize the effect of error in reported dosing times. Additionally, existing work has largely dealt with cases in which the compound of interest is dosed at an interval no less than its terminal half-life. This work provides a case study investigating how error in patient reported dosing times might affect the accuracy of structural model parameter estimation under sparse sampling conditions when the dosing interval is less than the terminal half-life of the compound, and the underlying kinetics are monoexponential. Additional effects due to noncompliance with dosing events are not explored and it is assumed that the structural model and reasonable initial estimates of the model parameters are known. Under the conditions of our simulations, with structural model CV % ranging from ~20 to 60 %, parameter estimation inaccuracy derived from error in reported dosing times was largely controlled around 10 % on average. Given that no observed dosing was included in the design and sparse sampling was utilized, we believe these error results represent a practical ceiling given the variability and parameter estimates for the one-compartment model. The findings suggest additional investigations may be of interest and are noteworthy given the inability of current PK software platforms to accommodate error in dosing times. PMID:26209956

  9. Development of dose response to Y-90 microsphere treatment of metastatic liver cancer by quantitative analysis of SPECT and PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Janice M.

    Y-90 microsphere radiotherapy is an option for treating inoperable metastatic liver tumors. This takes advantage of the differing vascular supply of the tumor and normal liver. The radiation dosimetry can be complex due to the non-uniform distribution of the particles. Because of this difficulty, the recorded treatment absorbed dose is often calculated assuming a uniform distribution throughout the entire liver segment. This work represents a retrospective analysis of twelve consecutive patients treated with Y-90 microspheres for colorectal liver metastasis. Absorbed dose to tumor and normal liver tissue was calculated by two methods for comparison. Both were partition methods, one using an average tumor to normal liver vascularity ratio and the other a patient specific vascularity ratio derived from SPECT scans performed pre-treatment. Tumor response was quantitatively evaluated from pre and post treatment PET scans. Site-specific thresholding ROI volumes were used to determine tumor SUV in the image analysis. PET analysis showed a significant response as a whole with an average of 52% +/- 22% decrease in total tumor burden. The range of decrease, representing tumor response in size and metabolism was 17-91%. Dose versus response curves were generated based on the above calculations. The results and statistical analysis indicate that there is a significant difference in the tumor absorbed dose value when calculated by the traditional partition method using an average tumor to normal liver ratio as compared to use of a patient specific tumor to normal liver ratio derived from SPECT images. The paired t-test result demonstrated a significant difference with the t value of 3.06 corresponding to a P of 0.009. A linear regression analysis of each dose response curve allowed a comparison of each dose calculation method as well. There was an increase in the r value for the absorbed dose calculated by the patient specific method in all response parameters. The best fits

  10. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  11. Estimation of Diagnosis and Treatment Costs of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Two-Year Observation

    PubMed Central

    Ghamar Chehreh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Vahedi, Mohsen; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Ashtari, Sara; Khedmat, Hossein; Amin, Mohsen; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2013-01-01

    Background There are insufficient data available on utilization and health care costs of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The cost data for different health conditions and services is a major gap in Iranian health system. So this study is the primary or first step towards filling this gap. Objectives This study aims to estimate the diagnosis and treatment costs of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 528 subjects. The subjects had been diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver. All the subjects had been referred to the Tehran Fatty Liver Clinic, a clinic of the Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, in 2009 and they had been observed for 2 years to determine the frequency of health care utilization (physician visit, laboratory tests, medication and cost of sonography). The costs of diagnosis and treatment for each person were estimated in Purchasing Power Parity dollars (PPP$). Results The average total cost was 5,043 PPP$ per person in the 2 years of observation. Majority of these 528 patients (87.9%) had a BMI ≥ 25 (kg/m2). Also, 33.9% were diagnosed with comorbid diseases such as Diabetes Mellitus (DM), Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), hypertension (HTN) and hypothyroidism (HYPO). Conclusions The results confirmed that the total costs for non-alcoholic fatty liver among the Iranian adult urban population alone exceeded 1 billion PPP$ per year. These costs can be saved or reduced by effective disease management and early prevention. PMID:23914227

  12. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDI{sub vol} (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  13. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    PubMed Central

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDIvol (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  14. Estimating the Hepatic Effects of Xenobiotic Perturbations in a Virtual Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals and hundreds of new ones are introduced each year. Human health risk assessments for this number of chemicals is a challenge, and have been completed for only a fraction of these chemicals. The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-LiverTM) projec...

  15. Size-specific dose estimates: Localizer or transverse abdominal computed tomography images?

    PubMed Central

    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Saini, Akshay; Blake, Michael A; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effect of body dimensions obtained from localizer radiograph and transverse abdominal computed tomography (CT) images on Size Specific Dose Estimate. METHODS: This study was approved by Institutional Review Board and was compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Fifty patients with abdominal CT examinations (58 ± 13 years, Male:Female 28:22) were included in this study. Anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (Lat) diameters were measured at 5 cm intervals from the CT exam localizer radiograph (simple X-ray image acquired for planning the CT exam before starting the scan) and transverse CT images. Average of measured AP and Lat diameters, as well as maximum, minimum and mid location AP and Lat were measured on both image sets. In addition, off centering of patients from the gantry iso-center was calculated from the localizers. Conversion factors from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report 204 were obtained for AP, Lat, AP + Lat, and effective diameter (√ AP * Lat) to determine size specific dose estimate (SSDE) from the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) recorded from the dose reports. Data were analyzed using SPSS v19. RESULTS: Total number of 5376 measurements was done. In some patients entire body circumference was not covered on either projection radiograph or transverse CT images; hence accurate measurement of AP and Lat diameters was not possible in 11% (278/2488) of locations. Forty one patients were off-centered with mean of 1.9 ± 1.8 cm (range: 0.4-7 cm). Conversion factors for attained diameters were not listed on AAPM look-up tables in 3% (80/2488) of measurements. SSDE values were significantly different compared to CTDIvol, ranging from 32% lower to 74% greater than CTDIvol. CONCLUSION: There is underestimation and overestimation of dose comparing SSDE values to CTDIvol. Localizer radiographs are associated with overestimation of patient size and therefore underestimation of SSDE. PMID

  16. Measurement of natural radioactivity in bottled drinking water in Pakistan and consequent dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Fatima, I; Zaidi, J H; Arif, M; Tahir, S N A

    2007-01-01

    Natural radioactivity was determined in 11 different brands of commonly sold bottled drinking water in the federal capital Islamabad and Rawalpindi city of Pakistan using gamma spectrometry technique. Mean concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and (40)K were found to be 11.3 +/- 2.3, 5.2 +/- 0.4 and 140.9 +/- 30.6 mBq l(-1), respectively. The annual cumulative effective doses due to all three natural radionuclides for different age groups of 1-5 y, 5-10 y, 10-15 y and adults (>or=18 y) were estimated to be 4.0, 3.4, 3.1 and 4.1 microSv y(-1), respectively. Among the three natural radionuclides, annual effective doses for all age groups from 226Ra were significant. Children in the age group of 1-5 y appeared to be at risk with respect to the annual effective doses from 226Ra as compared to the other age groups. Results obtained in this study are compared with the reported values from other countries of the world and it was observed that measured activity concentrations of three natural radionuclides in the bottled drinking water were lower than these values. Annual estimated effective doses for all four age groups from the intake of natural radionuclides in bottled drinking water were also found below the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended limit of 0.1 mSv y(-1) as well as the average radiation dose of 0.29 mSv y(-1) received per head worldwide due to ingestion of natural radionuclides assessed by UNSCEAR (2000). PMID:16877468

  17. Development of a method to estimate thyroid dose from fallout radioiodine in a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Simon, S L; Lloyd, R D; Till, J E; Hawthorne, H A; Gren, D C; Rallison, M L; Stevens, W

    1990-11-01

    A cohort of 4831 persons aged 11-18 y in 1965 was identified among students in the schools of Washington County, UT; Lincoln County, NV; and Graham County, AZ. These children who had potentially been exposed to radioiodine from atomic weapons test fallout from the Nevada Test Site during 1951-1962 were selected for participation in a study of thyroid disease. The entire cohort was first examined during 1965-1968 for thyroid abnormalities. A total of 3,085 of these people were again reexamined during 1985-1986 to determine any subsequent occurrence of thyroid disease. In order to determine the relationship of the radiation dose to the thyroid with incidence of thyroid disease, we have developed a suite of models to calculate estimates of the internal dose received by the thyroid from fallout radioiodines. For completeness, the exposure to the thyroid from external radiation is also estimated. Dose estimates are made specific to each individual in the study using individual residential histories, the locality-specific exposure rate and radionuclide deposition, descriptions of dairy management for identified milk producers, and the subjects' sources of foods and intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables determined by interview. Other data such as the relationship of radioiodine deposition to measured exposure rate, environmental transfer parameters, and age-dependent factors for the conversion of radioiodine intake to thyroid dose were taken from work of other investigators. Dairy management information, milk distribution practices, the milk source for each study subject, as well as age-specific intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables, were determined by interview. PMID:2211123

  18. Validity of the size-specific dose estimate in adults undergoing coronary CT angiography: comparison with the volume CT dose index.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Kai, Noriyuki; Nozaki, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) takes into account the patient size but remains to be fully validated for adult coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We investigated the appropriateness of SSDE for accurate estimation of patient dose by comparing the SSDE and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) in adult CCTA. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. We enrolled 37 adults who underwent CCTA with a 320-row CT. High-sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters were placed on the anterior chest. CTDIvol reported by the scanner based on a 32-cm phantom was recorded. We measured chest diameter to convert CTDIvol to SSDE. Using linear regression, we then correlated SSDE with the mean measured skin dose. We also performed linear regression analyses between the skin dose/CTDIvol and the body mass index (BMI), and the skin dose/SSDE and BMI. There was a strong linear correlation (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) between SSDE (mean 37 ± 22 mGy) and mean skin dose (mean 17.7 ± 10 mGy). There was a moderate negative correlation between the skin dose/CTDIvol and BMI (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). The skin dose/SSDE was not affected by BMI (r = 0.06, P > 0.76). SSDE yields a more accurate estimation of the radiation dose without estimation errors attributable to the body size of adult patients undergoing CCTA. PMID:26440660

  19. Optimal dosing of cancer chemotherapy using model predictive control and moving horizon state/parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Kirkby, Norman F; Jena, Raj

    2012-12-01

    Model predictive control (MPC), originally developed in the community of industrial process control, is a potentially effective approach to optimal scheduling of cancer therapy. The basis of MPC is usually a state-space model (a system of ordinary differential equations), whereby existing studies usually assume that the entire states can be directly measured. This paper aims to demonstrate that when the system states are not fully measurable, in conjunction with model parameter discrepancy, MPC is still a useful method for cancer treatment. This aim is achieved through the application of moving horizon estimation (MHE), an optimisation-based method to jointly estimate the system states and parameters. The effectiveness of the MPC-MHE scheme is illustrated through scheduling the dose of tamoxifen for simulated tumour-bearing patients, and the impact of estimation horizon and magnitude of parameter discrepancy is also investigated. PMID:22739208

  20. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR ROUTE TO ROUTE DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  1. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  2. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  3. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, A.; Gialousis, G.; Makri, T.; Karlatira, M.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Papaodysseas, S.; Yakoumakis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  4. Assessment of retrospective dose estimation, with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), of six victims previously exposed to accidental ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Lu, Xue; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lü, Yu-Min; Jiang, En-Hai; Zhang, Shu-Lan; Chen, De-Qing; Jia, Ting-Zhen; Liang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the use of the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay for retrospective dose estimation of acute accidental exposure to radiation in the past. Reciprocal translocation analysis by FISH with three whole-chromosome probes was performed on normal peripheral blood samples. Samples were irradiated with 0-5Gy (60)Co γ-rays in vitro, and dose-effect curves were established. FISH-based translocation analyses for six accident victims were then performed, and biological doses were estimated retrospectively by comparison with the dose-effect curves. Reconstructed doses by FISH were compared with estimated doses obtained by analysis of di-centrics performed soon after exposure, or with dose estimates from tooth-enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data obtained at the same time as the FISH analysis. Follow-up FISH analyses for an adolescent victim were performed. Results showed that dose-effect curves established in the present study follow a linear-quadratic model, regardless of the background translocation frequency. Estimated doses according to two dose-effect curves for all six victims were similar. FISH dose estimations of three adult victims exposed to accidental radiation less than a decade prior to analysis (3, 6, or 7 years ago) were consistent with those estimated with tooth-enamel EPR measurements or analyses of di-centrics. Estimated doses of two other adult victims exposed to radiation over a decade prior to analysis (16 or 33 years ago) were underestimated and two to three times lower than the values obtained from analysis of di-centrics or tooth-enamel EPR. Follow-up analyses of the adolescent victim showed that doses estimated by FISH analysis decrease rapidly over time. Therefore, the accuracy of dose estimates by FISH is acceptable only when analysis is performed less than 7 years after exposure. Measurements carried out more than a decade after exposure through FISH analysis resulted in

  5. Estimating Patient Dose from X-ray Tube Output Metrics: Automated Measurement of Patient Size from CT Images Enables Large-scale Size-specific Dose Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Ichiro; Warden, Graham I.; Andriole, Katherine P.; Khorasani, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that patient size can be accurately calculated from axial computed tomographic (CT) images, including correction for the effects of anatomy truncation that occur in routine clinical CT image reconstruction. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant study, with waiver of informed consent. Water-equivalent diameter (DW) was computed from the attenuation-area product of each image within 50 adult CT scans of the thorax and of the abdomen and pelvis and was also measured for maximal field of view (FOV) reconstructions. Linear regression models were created to compare DW with the effective diameter (Deff) used to select size-specific volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) conversion factors as defined in report 204 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Linear regression models relating reductions in measured DW to a metric of anatomy truncation were used to compensate for the effects of clinical image truncation. Results In the thorax, DW versus Deff had an R2 of 0.51 (n = 200, 50 patients at four anatomic locations); in the abdomen and pelvis, R2 was 0.90 (n = 150, 50 patients at three anatomic locations). By correcting for image truncation, the proportion of clinically reconstructed images with an extracted DW within ±5% of the maximal FOV DW increased from 54% to 90% in the thorax (n = 3602 images) and from 95% to 100% in the abdomen and pelvis (6181 images). Conclusion The DW extracted from axial CT images is a reliable measure of patient size, and varying degrees of clinical image truncation can be readily corrected. Automated measurement of patient size combined with CT radiation exposure metrics may enable patient-specific dose estimation on a large scale. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:24086075

  6. RETROSPECTIVE ESTIMATION OF PATIENT DOSE-AREA PRODUCT IN THORACIC SPINE TOMOSYNTHESIS PERFORMED USING VOLUMERAD.

    PubMed

    Båth, Magnus; Söderman, Christina; Svalkvist, Angelica

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a recently developed method of retrospectively estimating the patient dose-area product (DAP) of a chest tomosynthesis examination, performed using VolumeRAD, in thoracic spine tomosynthesis and to determine the necessary field-size correction factor. Digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data for the projection radiographs acquired during a thoracic spine tomosynthesis examination were retrieved directly from the modality for 17 patients. Using the previously developed method, an estimated DAP for the tomosynthesis examination was determined from DICOM data in the scout image. By comparing the estimated DAP with the actual DAP registered for the projection radiographs, a field-size correction factor was determined. The field-size correction factor for thoracic spine tomosynthesis was determined to 0.92. Applying this factor to the DAP estimated retrospectively, the maximum difference between the estimated DAP and the actual DAP was <3 %. In conclusion, the previously developed method of retrospectively estimating the DAP in chest tomosynthesis can be applied to thoracic spine tomosynthesis. PMID:26590395

  7. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  8. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  9. Aircrew radiation dose estimates during recent solar particle events and the effect of particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Al Anid, H; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Takada, M; Duldig, M

    2014-01-01

    A model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX, to estimate the additional radiation exposure to aircrew members during solar particle events. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to aircraft altitudes. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during ground level enhancements (GLEs) 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis. PMID:24084521

  10. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  11. Pharmacogenetic considerations for optimizing tacrolimus dosing in liver and kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Provenzani, Alessio; Santeusanio, Andrew; Mathis, Erin; Notarbartolo, Monica; Labbozzetta, Manuela; Poma, Paola; Provenzani, Ambra; Polidori, Carlo; Vizzini, Giovanni; Polidori, Piera; D’Alessandro, Natale

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of tacrolimus in clinical practice has improved patient survival after organ transplant. However, despite the long use of tacrolimus in clinical practice, the best way to use this agent is still a matter of intense debate. The start of the genomic era has generated new research areas, such as pharmacogenetics, which studies the variability of drug response in relation to the genetic factors involved in the processes responsible for the pharmacokinetics and/or the action mechanism of a drug in the body. This variability seems to be correlated with the presence of genetic polymorphisms. Genotyping is an attractive option especially for the initiation of the dosing of tacrolimus; also, unlike phenotypic tests, the genotype is a stable characteristic that needs to be determined only once for any given gene. However, prospective clinical studies must show that genotype determination before transplantation allows for better use of a given drug and improves the safety and clinical efficacy of that medication. At present, research has been able to reliably show that the CYP3A5 genotype, but not the CYP3A4 or ABCB1 ones, can modify the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus. However, it has not been possible to incontrovertibly show that the corresponding changes in the pharmacokinetic profile are linked with different patient outcomes regarding tacrolimus efficacy and toxicity. For these reasons, pharmacogenetics and individualized medicine remain a fascinating area for further study and may ultimately become the face of future medical practice and drug dosing. PMID:24409044

  12. Feasibility of using the computed tomography dose indices to estimate radiation dose to partially and fully irradiated brains in pediatric neuroradiology examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Frush, Donald P.; Hoang, Jenny K.; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to measure the dose to the brain using clinical protocols at our institution, and (b) to develop a scanner-independent dosimetry method to estimate brain dose. Radiation dose was measured with a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and MOSFET detectors. Six current neuroradiology protocols were used: brain, sinuses, facial bones, orbits, temporal bones, and craniofacial areas. Two different CT vendor scanners (scanner A and B) were used. Partial volume correction factors (PVCFs) were determined for the brain to account for differences between point doses measured by the MOSFETs and average organ dose. The CTDIvol and DLP for each protocol were recorded. The dose to the brain (mGy) for scanners A and B was 10.7 and 10.0 for the brain protocol, 7.8 and 3.2 for the sinus, 10.2 and 8.6 for the facial bones, 7.4 and 4.7 for the orbits and 1.6 and 1.9 for the temporal bones, respectively. On scanner A, the craniofacial protocol included a standard and high dose option; the dose measured for these exams was 3.9 and 16.9 mGy, respectively. There was only one craniofacial protocol on scanner B; the brain dose measured on this exam was 4.8 mGy. A linear correlation was found between DLP and brain dose with the conversion factors: 0.049 (R2 = 0.87), 0.046 (R2 = 0.89) for scanner A and B, and 0.048 (R2 = 0.89) for both scanners. The range of dose observed was between 1.8 and 16.9 mGy per scan. This suggests that brain dose estimates may be made from DLP.

  13. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota: an extended intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Vives i Batlle, J; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Horyna, J; Hosseini, A; Johansen, M; Kamboj, S; Keum, D-K; Kurosawa, N; Newsome, L; Olyslaegers, G; Vandenhove, H; Ryufuku, S; Vives Lynch, S; Wood, M D; Yu, C

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of ±20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota. PMID:21113609

  14. Evaluation of Simplified Models for Estimating Public Dose from Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Kevin J.; Radulescu, Georgeta

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dose rate as a function of distance from a representative high-capacity SNF rail-type transportation cask. It uses the SCALE suite of radiation transport modeling and simulation codes to determine neutron and gamma radiation dose rates. The SCALE calculated dose rate is compared with simplified analytical methods historically used for these calculations. The SCALE dose rate calculation presented in this paper employs a very detailed transportation cask model (e.g., pin-by-pin modeling of fuel assembly) and a new hybrid computational transport method. Because it includes pin-level heterogeneity and models ample air and soil outside the cask to simulate scattering of gamma and neutron radiation, this detailed SCALE model is expected to yield more accurate results than previously used models which made more simplistic assumptions (e.g., fuel assembly treated as a point or line source, simple 1-D model of environment outside of cask). The results in this paper are preliminary and, as progress is made on developing and validating improved models, results may be subject to change as models and estimates become more refined and better information leads to more accurate assumptions.

  15. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota : an extended inter-comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Batlle, J. V. I.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N. A.; Copplestone, D.; Horyna, J.; Hosseini, A.; Johansen, M.; Kamboj, S.; Keum, D.-K.; Kurosawa, N.; Newsome, L.; Olyslaegers, G.; Vandenhove, H.; Ryufuku, S.; Lynch, S. V.; Wood, M. D.; Yu, C.

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of {+-}20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota.

  16. Methods for estimating doses to organisms from radioactive materials released into the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy recently published an interim dose limit of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} for controlling the radiation exposure of nature aquatic organisms. A computer program named CRITR, developed previously for calculating radiation doses to aquatic organisms and their predators, has been updated as an activity of the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project to facilitate demonstration of compliance with this limit. This report presents the revised models and the updated computer program, CRITR2, for the assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and their predators; tables of the required input parameters are also provided. Both internal and external doses to fish, crustacea, mollusks, and algae, as well as organisms that subsist on them, such as muskrats, raccoons, and ducks, may be estimated using CRITR2. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water to which the organisms are exposed may be entered directly into the user-input file or may be calculated from a source term and standard dilution models developed for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  17. A practical method for skin dose estimation in interventional cardiology based on fluorographic DICOM information.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lucy; Dixon, Matthew; Rowles, Nick; Stevens, Greg

    2016-03-01

    A practical method for skin dose estimation for interventional cardiology patients has been developed to inform pre-procedure planning and post-procedure patient management. Absorbed dose to the patient skin for certain interventional radiology procedures can exceed thresholds for deterministic skin injury, requiring documentation within the patient notes and appropriate patient follow-up. The primary objective was to reduce uncertainty associated with current methods, particularly surrounding field overlap. This was achieved by considering rectangular field geometry incident on a spherical patient model in a polar coordinate system. The angular size of each field was quantified at surface of the sphere, i.e. the skin surface. Computer-assisted design software enabled the modelling of a sufficient dataset that was subsequently validated with radiochromic film. Modelled overlap was found to agree with overlap measured using film to within 2.2° ± 2.0°, showing that the overall error associated with the model was < 1 %. Mathematical comparison against exposure data extracted from procedural Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine files was used to generate a graphical skin dose map, demonstrating the dose distribution over a sphere centred at the interventional reference point. Dosimetric accuracy of the software was measured as between 3.5 and 17 % for different variables. PMID:25994848

  18. Monte Carlo estimation of dose difference in lung from 192Ir brachytherapy due to tissue inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gialousis, G; Dimitriadis, A; Yakoumakis, E

    2011-09-01

    Lung brachytherapy using high-dose rate (192)Ir technique is a well-established technique of radiation therapy. However, many commercial treatment planning systems do not have the ability to consider the inhomogeneity of lung in relation to normal tissue. Under such circumstances dose calculations for tissues and organs at risk close to the target are inaccurate. The purpose of the current study was to estimate the dose difference due to tissue inhomogeneity using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP-5. Results showed that there was a relative sub dosage by treatment planning systems calculations in neighbouring tissues around the radioactive source due to inhomogeneity ignorance. The presence of lung instead of normal tissue resulted in an increase in relative dose, which approached 8 % at 4-cm distance from the source. Additionally, the relative increase was small for the lung (2.1 %) and larger for organs at risk such as the heart (6.8 %) and bone marrow (7.6 %). PMID:21831865

  19. Dose-finding study of hepatic arterial infusion of irinotecan-based treatment in patients with advanced cancers metastatic to the liver

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Kurzrock, Razelle; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S.; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Kee, Bryan K; Bidyasar, Savita; Lim, Joann; Wallace, Michael; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Liver metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. We investigated the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of irinotecan combination therapy in patients with liver metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with histologically confirmed advanced cancer with liver metastases that was refractory to standard therapy were eligible. A standard “3+3” phase I study design was used to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Three cohorts were evaluated: HAI of irinotecan with systemic intravenous (IV) (a) bevacizumab, (b) oxaliplatin and bevacizumab, or (c) bevacizumab and cetuximab. RESULTS From October 2009 through December 2013, 98 patients with various tumor types were enrolled (median age, 62 years, range, 34–85; and median number of prior therapies, 4, range, 1–11). In cohorts A and C, dose escalation continued until the highest dose level—considered the MTD—was reached. In cohort B, dose escalation continued until dose level 3, and dose level 2 was considered the MTD. Rates of grade 3/4 adverse events were as follows: diarrhea, 8%; fatigue, 4%; neutropenia, 4%; thrombocytopenia, 2%; and skin rash, 2%. Seventy-seven patients were evaluable for response. Partial response was noted in 5 (6.5%) patients (neuroendocrine cancer, n=2; CRC, n=2; NSCLC, n=1); and stable disease ≥ 6 months in 17 (22.1%) patients (CRC, n=13; breast, n=1; neuroendocrine, n=1; NSCLC, n=1; pancreatic, n=1). CONCLUSIONS HAI irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab; oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab; or cetuximab plus bevacizumab was safe and may be a treatment option for selected patients with advanced cancer and liver involvement. PMID:25990659

  20. Effects of ursodeoxycholic acid on serum liver enzymes and bile acid metabolism in chronic active hepatitis: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, A; Battezzati, P M; Setchell, K D; Camisasca, M; Bertolini, E; Roda, A; Zuin, M; Podda, M

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ursodeoxycholic acid administration on liver function tests and on bile acid metabolism was investigated in 18 patients with chronic active hepatitis. Three different doses of ursodeoxycholic acid--250 mg, 500 mg and 750 mg--were administered daily to each patient for consecutive 2-mo periods. The order of doses was randomly assigned according to a replicated Latin-square design. A significant decrease in serum transaminases and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase occurred with the lowest dose of ursodeoxycholic acid, which corresponded to 4 mg/kg body wt/day, and no further significant decrease with the higher doses was seen. Biliary bile acid composition was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. At entry the relative proportions of major bile acids were similar to those observed in normal individuals. During treatment the mean percentage of ursodeoxycholic acid in bile (22% with the 250 mg dose, 32% with the 500 mg dose and 34% with the 750 mg dose) was lower than values previously reported for patients with gallstones and normal liver function. The major bile acids were cholic, chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids. A number of unusual bile acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, but these accounted for only 3% to 5% of the total and did not change during ursodeoxycholic acid therapy. No correlation between the improvement in liver function tests and the percentage of ursodeoxycholic acid in bile existed. These data suggest that even a slight enrichment of bile with ursodeoxycholic acid, as is attained with 250 mg/day, is effective in improving biochemical markers of liver function in patients with chronic active hepatitis. PMID:1671665

  1. Study of the Phototransference in GR-200 Dosimetric Material and its Convenience for Dose Re-estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Baly, L.; Otazo, M. R.; Molina, D.; Pernas, R.

    2006-09-08

    A study of the phototransference of charges from deep to dosimetric traps in GR-200 material is presented and its convenience for dose re-estimation in the dose range between 2 and 100mSv is also analyzed. The recovering coefficient (RC) defined as the ratio between the phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) and the original thermoluminescence (TL) of the dosimetric trap was used to evaluate the ratio of phototransferred charges from deep traps and the original charges in the dosimetric traps. The results show the convenience of this method for dose re-estimation for this material in the selected range of doses.

  2. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  3. [Personal computer interactive algorithm for estimating radiologic contamination and doses after a nuclear accident in Europe].

    PubMed

    Tabet, E

    2001-01-01

    The algorithm RANA (radiological assessment of nuclear accidents) is a tool which can be exploited to estimate the space and time structure of the radiological consequences of a radioactive release following a nuclear accident in Europe. The algorithm, formulated in the language of Mathematica, can be run on a personal computer. It uses simplified physical assumptions as for the the diffusion of the cloud and the transfer of the contamination to the food chain. The user gets the needed information by means of interactive windows that allow a fast evaluation of dose and contamination profiles. Calculations are performed either starting from the source terms or from the knowledge of experimental contamination data. Radiological consequences, such as individual or collective doses from several exposure paths, are parametrized in terms of the atmospheric diffusion categories. PMID:11758278

  4. Environmental radioactivity in the UK: the airborne geophysical view of dose rate estimates.

    PubMed

    Beamish, David

    2014-12-01

    This study considers UK airborne gamma-ray data obtained through a series of high spatial resolution, low altitude surveys over the past decade. The ground concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides Potassium, Thorium and Uranium are converted to air absorbed dose rates and these are used to assess terrestrial exposure levels from both natural and technologically enhanced sources. The high resolution airborne information is also assessed alongside existing knowledge from soil sampling and ground-based measurements of exposure levels. The surveys have sampled an extensive number of the UK lithological bedrock formations and the statistical information provides examples of low dose rate lithologies (the formations that characterise much of southern England) to the highest sustained values associated with granitic terrains. The maximum dose rates (e.g. >300 nGy h(-1)) encountered across the sampled granitic terrains are found to vary by a factor of 2. Excluding granitic terrains, the most spatially extensive dose rates (>50 nGy h(-1)) are found in association with the Mercia Mudstone Group (Triassic argillaceous mudstones) of eastern England. Geological associations between high dose rate and high radon values are also noted. Recent studies of the datasets have revealed the extent of source rock (i.e. bedrock) flux attenuation by soil moisture in conjunction with the density and porosity of the temperate latitude soils found in the UK. The presence or absence of soil cover (and associated presence or absence of attenuation) appears to account for a range of localised variations in the exposure levels encountered. The hypothesis is supported by a study of an extensive combined data set of dose rates obtained from soil sampling and by airborne geophysical survey. With no attenuation factors applied, except those intrinsic to the airborne estimates, a bias to high values of between 10 and 15 nGy h(-1) is observed in the soil data. A wide range of

  5. Distribution of carbon-14 and associated radiation dose in rat fetal brain and liver after maternal injection of [{sup 14}C]thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Hatashita, Shizuo

    1994-10-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with [{sup 14}C]thymidine on day 13.5 of gestation, and the concentrations and radiation doses of {sup 14}C in the fetal brain and liver were determined by liquid scintillation counting were 1.01% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 h after injection and decreased to 0.39% g{sup {minus}1} at 48 h after injection. A significant accumulation of {sup 14}C was observed in the fetal liver: 3.8 and 0.51% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 and 48 h after injection, respectively. Autoradiography showed that, especially at earlier periods after injection, there was remarkable concentration of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the brain and the central region of the liver. With increasing time after injection, the distribution of {sup 14}C became relatively uniform. The concentrations of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the fetal brain, determined by autoradiography, were much higher than those in the whole brain as determined by liquid scintillation counting. Cumulative radiation doses for 6-48 h after injection were 1.27 mGy for the whole fetus and 1.45 mGy for the whole brain. In contrast, the cumulative radiation dose for the ventricular zone of the brain which was determined by autoradiography was approximately 2.2 times that for the whole brain. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Analgesia dose prescribing and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline: a general practice database linkage cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Doos, Lucy; Strauss, Vicky Y; Lambie, Mark; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to quantify the short-term effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and paracetamol analgesia dose prescribing on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline in the general practice population. Design A population-based longitudinal clinical data linkage cohort study. Setting Two large general practices in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Patients aged 40 years and over with ≥2 eGFR measurements spaced ≥90 days apart between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 were selected. Exposure Using WHO Defined Daily Dose standardised cumulative analgesia prescribing, patients were categorised into non-user, normal and high-dose groups. Outcome measure The primary outcome was defined as a >5 mL/min/1.73 m2/year eGFR decrease between the first and last eGFR. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, baseline chronic kidney disease (CKD) status, renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors and other analgesia prescribing. Results There were 4145 patients (mean age 66 years, 55% female) with an analgesia prescribing prevalence of 17.2% for NSAIDs, 39% for aspirin and 22% for paracetamol and stage 3–5 CKD prevalence was 16.1% (n=667). Normal or high-dose NSAID and paracetamol prescribing was not significantly associated with eGFR decline. High-dose aspirin prescribing was associated with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in patients with a baseline (first) eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2; OR=0.52 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.77). Conclusions NSAID, aspirin and paracetamol prescribing over 2 years did not significantly affect eGFR decline with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in high-dose aspirin users with well-preserved renal function. However, the long-term effects of analgesia use on eGFR decline remain to be determined. PMID:25138808

  7. Improvement of the quality of effective dose estimation by interlaboratory comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katarzyna, Ciszewska; Malgorzata, Dymecka; Tomasz, Pliszczynski; Jakub, Osko

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Protection Measurements Laboratory (RPLM) of the Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM determines radionuclides in human urine to estimate the effective dose. Being an accredited laboratory, RPLM participated in interlaboratory comparisons in order to assure the quality of services concerning monitoring of internal contamination. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of interlaboratory comparisons on the accuracy of the provided measurements. The results regarding tritium (3H) and strontium (90Sr) determination, obtained within the radiotoxicological intercomparison exercises, organized by PROCORAD, in 2005-2010, were analyzed and the methods used by the laboratory were verified and improved.

  8. A simplified model to estimate radiological doses from incineration of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, L.E.; Ma, C.W.; Wheeler, T.; Nimmagadda, M.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Owens, K.W.

    1995-06-01

    A simplified calculational model permits a rapid yet realistic estimate of small, but potential radiological doses to onsite workers and the offsite public as a result of transportation, handling, storage, incineration, and maintenance of waste containing trace amount of radioactive materials which is to be processed at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility. The model was developed on the basis of previous detailed studies of eight TSD facilities and builds in the essential features of a TSD facility. The model would provide an understanding of the potential human exposure associated with the radioactive contents in the chemical wastes.

  9. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J.; Koren, S.; Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target

  10. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  11. SU-E-T-163: Evaluation of Dose Distributions Recalculated with Per-Field Measurement Data Under the Condition of Respiratory Motion During IMRT for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J; Yoon, M; Nam, T; Ahn, S; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dose distributions within the real volumes of tumor targets and critical organs during internal target volume-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ITV-IMRT) for liver cancer were recalculated by applying the effects of actual respiratory organ motion, and the dosimetric features were analyzed through comparison with gating IMRT (Gate-IMRT) plan results. Methods: The 4DCT data for 10 patients who had been treated with Gate-IMRT for liver cancer were selected to create ITV-IMRT plans. The ITV was created using MIM software, and a moving phantom was used to simulate respiratory motion. The period and range of respiratory motion were recorded in all patients from 4DCT-generated movie data, and the same period and range were applied when operating the dynamic phantom to realize coincident respiratory conditions in each patient. The doses were recalculated with a 3 dose-volume histogram (3DVH) program based on the per-field data measured with a MapCHECK2 2-dimensional diode detector array and compared with the DVHs calculated for the Gate-IMRT plan. Results: Although a sufficient prescription dose covered the PTV during ITV-IMRT delivery, the dose homogeneity in the PTV was inferior to that with the Gate-IMRT plan. We confirmed that there were higher doses to the organs-at-risk (OARs) with ITV-IMRT, as expected when using an enlarged field, but the increased dose to the spinal cord was not significant and the increased doses to the liver and kidney could be considered as minor when the reinforced constraints were applied during IMRT plan optimization. Conclusion: Because Gate-IMRT cannot always be considered an ideal method with which to correct the respiratory motional effect, given the dosimetric variations in the gating system application and the increased treatment time, a prior analysis for optimal IMRT method selection should be performed while considering the patient's respiratory condition and IMRT plan results.

  12. Hepatic arterial phase and portal venous phase computed tomography for dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy plans in liver cancer: a dosimetric comparison study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) using hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) contrast on dose calculation of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver cancer. Methods Twenty-one patients with liver cancer were studied. HAP, PVP and non-enhanced CTs were performed on subjects scanned in identical positions under active breathing control (ABC). SBRT plans were generated using seven-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (7 F-3D-CRT), seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7 F-IMRT) and single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on the PVP CT. Plans were copied to the HAP and non-enhanced CTs. Radiation doses calculated from the three phases of CTs were compared with respect to the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR) using the Friedman test and the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results SBRT plans calculated from either PVP or HAP CT, including 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT plans, demonstrated significantly lower (p <0.05) minimum absorbed doses covering 98%, 95%, 50% and 2% of PTV (D98%, D95%, D50% and D2%) than those calculated from non-enhanced CT. The mean differences between PVP or HAP CT and non-enhanced CT were less than 2% and 1% respectively. All mean dose differences between the three phases of CTs for OARs were less than 2%. Conclusions Our data indicate that though the differences in dose calculation between contrast phases are not clinically relevant, dose underestimation (IE, delivery of higher-than-intended doses) resulting from CT using PVP contrast is larger than that resulting from CT using HAP contrast when compared against doses based upon non-contrast CT in SBRT treatment of liver cancer using VMAT, IMRT or 3D-CRT. PMID:24209300

  13. Campylobacteriosis outbreak associated with consumption of undercooked chicken liver pâté in the East of England, September 2011: identification of a dose-response risk.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D S; Milne, L M; Morrow, K; Sheridan, P; Verlander, N Q; Mulla, R; Richardson, J F; Pender, A; Lilley, M; Reacher, M

    2014-02-01

    A foodborne outbreak with 49 cases (22 culture positive for Campylobacter sp.) following a wedding party in the East of England was investigated. A retrospective cohort study identified an association between consumption of chicken liver pâté and infection with Campylobacter jejuni/coli. There was a statistically significant association between dose (amount of chicken liver pâté eaten) and the risk of disease ['tasted': odds ratio (OR) 1·5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·04-∞; 'partly eaten': OR 8·4, 95% CI 1·4-87·5; 'most or all eaten': OR 36·1, 95% CI 3·3-2119). The local authority found evidence that the preparation of chicken livers breached Food Standards Agency's guidelines. This epidemiological investigation established a clear dose-response relationship between consumption of chicken liver pâté and the risk of infection with Campylobacter. The continuing need to raise public awareness of the risk to human health posed by undercooked chicken liver is evident. PMID:23711104

  14. Repair of sublethal radiation injury after multiple small doses in mouse kidney: an estimate of flexure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, F.A.; Oussoren, Y.; Luts, A.; Begg, A.C.; Dewit, L.; Lebesque, J.; Bartelink, H.

    1987-05-01

    Functional kidney damage in mice was measured after a series of fractionated X-irradiations. Doses per fraction of 0.75-12.5 Gy were given as 2, 5, 10, 30, 40, 60, or 80 equal doses in a total treatment time of 4 weeks. Renal function (measured by clearance of /sup 51/CrEDTA or hematocrit levels) deteriorated progressively, in a dose related manner, from 20 to 46 weeks after the start of treatment. The changes in renal function versus time were fitted by a polynomial regression through all data and interpolated values for /sup 51/CrEDTA clearance were then calculated at 30 and 40 weeks after treatment. Steep dose response curves were obtained and these were used to calculate isoeffective doses for the different fractionation schedules. There was a marked increase in total isoeffective doses from 2-30 fractions and these data were well described by a linear quadratic (L.Q.) expression for damage with an alpha/beta ratio of 2.3 +/- 0.2 Gy. There was only a slight increase in the total isoeffect dose as the size of the dose per fraction was decreased below 2 Gy and the measured isoeffect doses after 40 to 80 fractions were lower than predicted on the basis of an L.Q. model assuming complete repair between successive irradiations. The flexure dose for mouse kidneys irradiated 3 times per day was, effectively, 1 to 2 Gy and hyperfractionation using lower doses per fraction did not lead to significant, additional repair.

  15. Estimation of the rate of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx in perfused rat liver using the multiple indicator dilution technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The multiple indicator dilution technique provides a useful mechanism for the determination of the rates of processes involved in the uptake and subsequent release of substances between an organ, such as the liver, and the vasculature. They have used this technique to investigate the uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ into the perfused rat liver at a number of different perfusate Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. Each perfused liver is calibrated using reference injections of a mixture of /sup 3/H-sucrose and /sup 14/C-urea to determine parameters of a microcirculatory model of the liver, such as the characteristic transit times through vascular spaces and the ratio of tissue volume to extracellular volume. Using a single injection of a mixture of /sup 3/H-sucrose and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, the profiles of the efflux of the injected tracers are analyzed to estimate the rate constant for uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. The estimated rate constant for uptake decreases with increasing perfusate Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration (kin = 0.155 +/- 0.036, 0.0896 +/- 0.024, 0.0713 +/- 0.009 for (Ca/sup 2 +/) = 0.05, 0.5, 1.25 mM; n=5). From these data, estimates for the maximum velocity of uptake of Ca/sup 2 +/ and the Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration for half maximal uptake are calculated to be 0.1208 mM/sec and 0.7278 mM respectively.

  16. Estimation of thyroid doses received by the population of Belarus as a result of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilin, Y.; Khrouch, V.; Shinkarev, S.; Drozdovitch, V.; Minenko, V.; Shemyakina, E.; Bouville, A.; Anspaugh, L.

    1996-02-01

    Within weeks of the Chernobyl accident ABOUT 300,000 measurements of human thyroidal iodine-131 content were conducted in the more contaminated areas of Belarus. Results of these and other measurements form the basis of thyroid-dose reconstruction for the residents. For Class 1 (measured dose), individual doses are estimated directly from measured thyroidal iodine content plus information on life style and dietary habits. Such estimates are available for about 130,000 individuals from Gomel and Mogilev Oblasts and Minsk City. For Class 2 (passport doses), every settlement with a sufficient number of residents with measured doses, individual thyroid-dose distributions were determined for several age groups and levels of milk consumption. A population of about 2.7 million resides in the passport settlements.

  17. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. PMID:19889800

  18. Optimal cut-off value of alanine aminotransferase level to precisely estimate the presence of fatty liver in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akihito; Tatsumi, Fuminori; Okauchi, Seizo; Yabe, Hiroki; Tsuda, Tomohiro; Okutani, Kazuma; Yamashita, Kazuki; Nakashima, Koji; Kaku, Kohei; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Optimal cut-off value of ALT level to precisely estimate the presence of fatty liver was as low as 28.0 U/L. We should consider the possibility of fatty liver even when ALT level is within normal range in subjects with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. PMID:27373695

  19. Estimation of collective effective dose due to natural background radiation in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henaish, B. A.; Tawfik, A. A.; Abu Zaid, H.; Gomaa, M. A.

    1994-07-01

    During the last few years, worldwide attention has been directed towards the estimation of natural background radiation levels. Several environmental monitoring networks have been established for systematic data collection and exchange of information.In the present study, measurements of annual effective dose from terrestrial γ-rays are carried out at pre-selected sites within several Egyptian governorates by using a calibrated gas-filled GM-detector connected to a microcomputer system. Contribution of the secondary cosmic-rays, which is of prime importance at sea level, is achieved by carrying out computation based on theoretical considerations.Terrestrial effective dose in Egypt is found to be between 106 and 371 μSv/yr, meanwhile the computed cosmic rays contribution is 260-296 μSv/yr. Accordingly, the annual collective effective dose due to natural background radiation is about 27,253 Man Sv for the last Egyptian population count (1989) considering 0.8 and 0.2 indoor and outdoor occupancy factors.

  20. Chernobyl accident: retrospective and prospective estimates of external dose of the population of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Likhtarev, Ilya A; Kovgan, Leonila N; Jacob, Peter; Anspaugh, Lynn R

    2002-03-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident many activities were conducted in Ukraine in order to define the radiological impact. Considered here are gamma spectrometric analyses of soil-depth-profile samples taken in the years 1988-1999, gamma spectrometric measurements of radionuclide concentration in soil samples taken in 1986, and measurements of external gamma-exposure rate in air. These data are analyzed in this paper to derive a "reference" radionuclide composition and an attenuation function for the time-dependent rate of external gamma exposure that changes due to the migration of radiocesium into the soil column. An attenuation function for cesium is derived that consists of two exponential functions with half lives of 1.5 and 50 y. The dependencies of attenuation on direction and distance from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant are also demonstrated. On the basis of these analyses the average individual and collective external gamma doses for the population of Ukraine are derived for 1986, 1986-2000, and 1986-2055. For the 1.4 million persons living in rural areas with 137Cs contamination of >37 kBq m(-2), the collective effective dose from external exposure is estimated to be 7,500 person-Sv by the end of 2000. A critical group of 22,500 persons who received individual doses of >20 mSv is identified for consideration of increased social and medical attention. PMID:11845832

  1. Estimation of benchmark dose for micronucleus occurrence in Chinese vinyl chloride-exposed workers☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Tan, Hong-shan; Ma, Xiao-ming; Sun, Yuan; Feng, Nan-nan; Zhou, Li-fang; Ye, Yun-jie; Zhu, Yi-liang; Li, Yong-liang; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.; Tang, Nai-jun; Xia, Zhao-lin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the possibility of using benchmark dose (BMD) to assess the dose–response relationship between vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure and chromosome damage. A group of 317 workers occupationally exposed to vinyl chloride monomer and 166 normal, unexposed control in Shan-dong Province northern China were examined for chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) using the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CB-MN) assay of DNA damage. The exposed group (3.47 ± 2.65)‰ showed higher micronucleus frequency than the control (1.60 ± 1.30)‰ (P < 0.01). Occupational exposure level based on micronucleus occurrence in all individuals was analyzed with benchmark dose (BMD) methods. The benchmark dose lower limit of a one-sided 95% confidence interval (BMDL) for 10% excess risk was also determined. Results showed a dose–response relationship between cumulative exposure and MN frequency, and a BMDL of 0.54 mg/m3 and 0.23 mg/m3 for males and females, respectively. Female workers were more susceptible to MN damage than male workers. PMID:22425610

  2. Estimation of the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from granite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Srinuttrakul, W.; Kewsuwan, P.

    2015-05-01

    Inhalation of radon and thoron daughters increases the risk of lung cancer. The main sources of indoor radon are building materials. The aim of this research is to estimate the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from the building materials. Eighteen granite samples bought from the markets in Thailand were measured using an ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX) for the radon concentration in air. Radon exhalation rates were calculated from the radon concentration in chamber. The indoor radon from the granite samples ranged from 10.04 to 55.32 Bq·m-2·h-1 with an average value of 20.30 Bq·m-2·h-1 and the annual effective dose ranged from 0.25 to 1.39 mSv·y-1 with an average value of 0.48 mSv·y-1. The results showed that the annual effective doses of three granite samples were higher than the annual exposure limit for the general public (1 mSv·y-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the relationship between the colours and radon exhalation rates of granite samples was also explained.

  3. Developing historical food production and consumption data for {sup 131}I dose estimates: The Hanford experience

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Deonigi, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the methods used to reconstruct the movement of commercial foods in and through the study area of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. The most dose-relevant radionuclide released from Hanford separations plants was {sup 131}I via the atmospheric pathway. As a result of atmospheric deposition of {sup 131}I, commercial food supplies may have been contaminated. Because of the half-life of {sup 131}I is relatively short, foods consumed soon after production, such as milk and produce, presented the highest risk. For that reason, this paper deals primarily with the reconstruction of milk and produce production, marketing, and consumption from 1945-1951, the period with the highest known {sup 131}I releases. The reconstructed food production and consumption information was used as input to radiation dose estimates for representative individuals and as default values for real individuals who may not remember where they obtained food or how much they consumed during that period. Specific methods for tracing the movement of commercial milk and produce back from the point of human consumption, through commercial markets, to original production are presented. Results include the characteristics of food consumption exhibited by representative individuals, examples of commercial milk and produce market structures, and a review of commercial milk production and processing practices from 1945-1951.

  4. Development of In Vivo Tooth EPR for Individual Radiation Dose Estimation and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej; Burke, Greg; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David; Nicolalde, Roberto J; Sucheta, Artur; Lesniewski, Piotr; Swartz, Harold M

    2009-01-01

    The development of in vivo EPR has made it feasible to perform tooth dosimetry measurements in situ, greatly expanding the potential for using this approach for immediate screening after radiation exposures. The ability of in vivo tooth dosimetry to provide estimates of absorbed dose has been established through a series of experiments using unirradiated volunteers with specifically irradiated molar teeth placed in situ within gaps in their dentition and in natural canine teeth of patients who have completed courses of radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. Multiple measurements in patients who have received radiation therapy demonstrate the expected heterogeneous dose distributions. Dose response curves have been generated using both populations and, using the current methodology and instrument, the standard error of prediction based on single 4.5 minute measurements is approximately 1.5 Gy for inserted molar teeth and between 2.0 and 2.5 Gy in the more irregularly shaped canine teeth. Averaging of independent measurements can reduce this error significantly to values near 1 Gy. Developments to reduce these errors are underway, focusing on geometric optimization of the resonators, detector positioning techniques, and optimal data averaging approaches. In summary, it seems plausible that the EPR dosimetry techniques will have an important role in retrospective dosimetry for exposures involving large numbers of individuals. PMID:20065702

  5. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data

    SciTech Connect

    Fellman, A.

    1989-01-01

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations, were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrifice at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man.

  6. Estimation and uncertainty analysis of dose response in an inter-laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Rösslein, Matthias; Elliott, John T.; Petersen, Elijah J.

    2016-02-01

    An inter-laboratory experiment for the evaluation of toxic effects of NH2-polystyrene nanoparticles on living human cancer cells was performed with five participating laboratories. Previously published results from nanocytoxicity assays are often contradictory, mostly due to challenges related to producing a reliable cytotoxicity assay protocol for use with nanomaterials. Specific challenges include reproducibility preparing nanoparticle dispersions, biological variability from testing living cell lines, and the potential for nano-related interference effects. In this experiment, such challenges were addressed by developing a detailed experimental protocol and using a specially designed 96-well plate layout which incorporated a range of control measurements to assess multiple factors such as nanomaterial interference, pipetting accuracy, cell seeding density, and instrument performance. Detailed data analysis of these control measurements showed that good control of the experiments was attained by all participants in most cases. The main measurement objective of the study was the estimation of a dose response relationship between concentration of the nanoparticles and metabolic activity of the living cells, under several experimental conditions. The dose curve estimation was achieved by imbedding a three parameter logistic curve in a three level Bayesian hierarchical model, accounting for uncertainty due to all known experimental conditions as well as between laboratory variability in a top-down manner. Computation was performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The fit of the model was evaluated using Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities and found to be satisfactory.

  7. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  8. Application of RADTRAN to estimation of doses to persons in enclosed spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis can be used to estimate doses to persons in enclosed volumes. This application was developed in response to a need to examine consequences of a hypothetical container leak during accident-free transportation by cargo air. The original problem addressed tritium containers, but the method can be applied to any gaseous or suspended particulate material potentially released in an airplane or other enclosed area (e.g., warehouse) under accident-free conditions. Such leakage can occur during shipment of any radioactive gas or material with a gaseous phase. Atmospheric dispersion is normally modeled in RADTRAN as a series of downwind isopleths each of which is assigned a dilution factor (also known as time-integrated concentration or X/Q value). These values are located in look-up tables in RADTRAN and are normally taken from externally performed Gaussian dispersion calculations. The dilution factors are used to estimate inhalation dose to persons in the specified downwind areas.

  9. v-Liver: Simulating Hepatic Tissue Lesions as Virtual Cellular Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver) project is aimed at reducing the uncertainty in estimating the risk of toxic outcomes in humans by simulating the dose-dependent effects of environmental chemicals in silico. The v-Liver embodies an emerging field of research in computational ti...

  10. Over-dose insulin and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Attenuated gastric ulcers, seizures, brain lesions, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, breakdown of liver glycogen, profound hypoglycemia and calcification in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, S; Brcic, I; Mester, M; Filipovic, M; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Barisic, I; Radic, B; Zoricic, Z; Bilic, V; Berkopic, L; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Romic, Z; Pazanin, L; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    We focused on over-dose insulin (250 IU/kg i.p.) induced gastric ulcers and then on other disturbances that were concomitantly induced in rats, seizures (eventually fatal), severely damaged neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, increased AST, ALT and amylase serum values, breakdown of liver glycogen with profound hypoglycemia and calcification development. Calcium deposits were present in the blood vessel walls, hepatocytes surrounding blood vessels and sometimes even in parenchyma of the liver mainly as linear and only occasionally as granular accumulation. As an antidote after insulin, we applied the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg/kg) given (i) intraperitoneally or (ii) intragastrically immediately after insulin. Controls received simultaneously an equivolume of saline (5 ml/kg). Those rats that survived till the 180 minutes after over-dose application were further assessed. Interestingly, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, as an antiulcer peptide, may besides stomach ulcer consistently counteract all insulin disturbances and fatal outcome. BPC 157 rats showed no fatal outcome, they were mostly without hypoglycemic seizures with apparently higher blood glucose levels (glycogen was still present in hepatocytes), less liver pathology (i.e., normal liver weight, less fatty liver), decreased ALT, AST and amylase serum values, markedly less damaged neurons in brain and they only occasionally had small gastric lesions. BPC 157 rats exhibited mostly only dot-like calcium presentation. In conclusion, the success of BPC 157 therapy may indicate a likely role of BPC 157 in insulin controlling and BPC 157 may influence one or more causative process(es) after excessive insulin application. PMID:20388953

  11. A review of source term and dose estimation for the TMI-2 reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1990-09-01

    The TMI-2 nuclear reactor accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, produced environmental releases of noble gases and small quantities of radioiodine. The releases occurred over a roughly two week period with almost 90% of the noble gases being released during the first three days after the initiation of the accident. Meteorological conditions during the prolonged release period varied from strong synoptic driven flows that rapidly transported the radioactive gases out of the Harrisburg area to calm situations that allowed the radioactivity to accumulate within the low lying river area and to subsequently slowly disperse within the immediate vicinity of the reactor. The results reported by various analysts, revealed that approximately 2.4--10 million curies of noble gases (mainly Xe-133), and about 14 curies of I-131 were released. During the first two days, when most of the noble gas release occurred, the plume was transported in a northerly direction causing the most exposed area to lie within a northwesterly to northeasterly direction from TMI. Changing surface winds caused the plume to be subsequently transported in a southerly direction, followed by an easterly direction. The calculated maximum whole body dose due to plume passage exceeded 100 mrem over an area extending several kilometers north of the plant, although the highest measured dose was 75 mrem. The collective dose equivalent (within a radius of 80 km) due to the noble gas exposure ranged over several orders of magnitude with a central estimate of 3300 person-rem. The small I-131 release produced barely detectable levels of activity in air and milk samples. This may have produced thyroid doses of a few milirem to a small segment of the population. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Preliminary uncertainty analysis for the doses estimated using the Techa River dosimetry system - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Shagina, N. B.; Degteva, M. O.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.

    2001-10-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. As a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940?s and early 1950?s, members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 1017 Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River (1949-1956). Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the approaches being used to evaluate the uncertainty in the calculated individual doses and to provide example and representative results of the uncertainty analyses. The magnitude of the uncertainties varies depending on location and time of individual exposure, but the results from reference-individual calculations indicate that for external doses, the range of uncertainty is about factors of four to five. For internal doses, the range of uncertainty depends on village of residence, which is actually a surrogate for source of drinking water. For villages with single sources of drinking water (river or well), the ratio of the 97.5th percentile-to 2.5th percentile estimates can be a factor of 20 to 30. For villages with mixed sources of drinking water (river and well), the ratio of the range can be over two orders of magnitude.

  13. Preliminary uncertainty analysis for the doses estimated using the Techa River dosimetry system--2000.

    PubMed

    Napier, B A; Shagina, N B; Degteva, M O; Tolstykh, E I; Vorobiova, M I; Anspaugh, L R

    2001-10-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. As a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's, members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 10(17) Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River (1949-1956). Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the approaches being used to evaluate the uncertainty in the calculated individual doses and to provide example and representative results of the uncertainty analyses. The magnitude of the uncertainties varies depending on location and time of individual exposure, but the results from reference-individual calculations indicate that for external doses, the range of uncertainty is about a factor of four to five. For internal doses, the range of uncertainty depends on village of residence, which is actually a surrogate for source of drinking water. For villages with single sources of drinking water (river or well), the ratio of the 97.5th percentile-to 2.5th percentile estimates can be a factor of 20 to 30. For villages with mixed sources of drinking water (river and well), the ratio of the range can be over two orders of magnitude. PMID:11569634

  14. The Concentration Of Tritium In Urine And Internal Radiation Dose Estimation Of PTNBR Radiation Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Aisyah, Neneng Nur

    2010-12-23

    The operation of Triga 2000 reactor in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR BATAN) normally produce tritium radionuclide which is the activation product of deuterium atom in reactor primary cooling water. According to previous monitoring, tritium was detected with the concentration of 8.236{+-}0.677 kBq/L and 1.704{+-}0.046 Bq/L in the primary cooling water and in reactor hall air, respectively. The tritium in reactor hall air chronically can be inhaled by the workers. In this research, tritium content in radiation workers' urine was determined to estimate the internal radiation doses received by the workers. About 50-100 mL of urine samples were collected from 48 PTNBR workers that is classified as 24 radiation workers and 24 administration staffs as a control. Urine samples of 25 mL were then prepared by active charcoal and KMnO{sub 4} addition and followed with complete distillation. The 2 mL of distillate was added with 13 mL scintillator, shaked vigorously and remained in cool and dark condition for about 24 hours. The tritium in the samples was then measured using liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for 1 hour. From the measurement results it was obtained that the tritium concentration in the urine of radiation workers were in the range of not detected and 5.191 Bq/mL, whereas in the administration staffs the concentration were between not detected and 4.607 Bq/mL. Internally radiation doses were calculated using the tritium concentration data, and it was found the averages about 0.602 {mu}Sv/year and 0.532 {mu}Sv/year for radiation workers and administration staffs, respectively. The doses received by the workers were lower than that of the permissible doses from tritium, i.e. 40 {mu}Sv/year.

  15. The Concentration Of Tritium In Urine And Internal Radiation Dose Estimation Of PTNBR Radiation Workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Aisyah, Neneng Nur

    2010-12-01

    The operation of Triga 2000 reactor in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR BATAN) normally produce tritium radionuclide which is the activation product of deuterium atom in reactor primary cooling water. According to previous monitoring, tritium was detected with the concentration of 8.236±0.677 kBq/L and 1.704±0.046 Bq/L in the primary cooling water and in reactor hall air, respectively. The tritium in reactor hall air chronically can be inhaled by the workers. In this research, tritium content in radiation workers' urine was determined to estimate the internal radiation doses received by the workers. About 50-100 mL of urine samples were collected from 48 PTNBR workers that is classified as 24 radiation workers and 24 administration staffs as a control. Urine samples of 25 mL were then prepared by active charcoal and KMnO4 addition and followed with complete distillation. The 2 mL of distillate was added with 13 mL scintillator, shaked vigorously and remained in cool and dark condition for about 24 hours. The tritium in the samples was then measured using liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for 1 hour. From the measurement results it was obtained that the tritium concentration in the urine of radiation workers were in the range of not detected and 5.191 Bq/mL, whereas in the administration staffs the concentration were between not detected and 4.607 Bq/mL. Internally radiation doses were calculated using the tritium concentration data, and it was found the averages about 0.602 μSv/year and 0.532 μSv/year for radiation workers and administration staffs, respectively. The doses received by the workers were lower than that of the permissible doses from tritium, i.e. 40 μSv/year.

  16. Methodologies for the quantitative estimation of toxicant dose to cigarette smokers using physical, chemical and bioanalytical data.

    PubMed

    St Charles, Frank Kelley; McAughey, John; Shepperd, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Methodologies have been developed, described and demonstrated that convert mouth exposure estimates of cigarette smoke constituents to dose by accounting for smoke spilled from the mouth prior to inhalation (mouth-spill (MS)) and the respiratory retention (RR) during the inhalation cycle. The methodologies are applicable to just about any chemical compound in cigarette smoke that can be measured analytically and can be used with ambulatory population studies. Conversion of exposure to dose improves the relevancy for risk assessment paradigms. Except for urinary nicotine plus metabolites, biomarkers generally do not provide quantitative exposure or dose estimates. In addition, many smoke constituents have no reliable biomarkers. We describe methods to estimate the RR of chemical compounds in smoke based on their vapor pressure (VP) and to estimate the MS for a given subject. Data from two clinical studies were used to demonstrate dose estimation for 13 compounds, of which only 3 have urinary biomarkers. Compounds with VP > 10(-5) Pa generally have RRs of 88% or greater, which do not vary appreciably with inhalation volume (IV). Compounds with VP < 10(-7) Pa generally have RRs dependent on IV and lung exposure time. For MS, mean subject values from both studies were slightly greater than 30%. For constituents with urinary biomarkers, correlations with the calculated dose were significantly improved over correlations with mouth exposure. Of toxicological importance is that the dose correlations provide an estimate of the metabolic conversion of a constituent to its respective biomarker. PMID:23742081

  17. Methodologies for the quantitative estimation of toxicant dose to cigarette smokers using physical, chemical and bioanalytical data

    PubMed Central

    McAughey, John; Shepperd, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed, described and demonstrated that convert mouth exposure estimates of cigarette smoke constituents to dose by accounting for smoke spilled from the mouth prior to inhalation (mouth-spill (MS)) and the respiratory retention (RR) during the inhalation cycle. The methodologies are applicable to just about any chemical compound in cigarette smoke that can be measured analytically and can be used with ambulatory population studies. Conversion of exposure to dose improves the relevancy for risk assessment paradigms. Except for urinary nicotine plus metabolites, biomarkers generally do not provide quantitative exposure or dose estimates. In addition, many smoke constituents have no reliable biomarkers. We describe methods to estimate the RR of chemical compounds in smoke based on their vapor pressure (VP) and to estimate the MS for a given subject. Data from two clinical studies were used to demonstrate dose estimation for 13 compounds, of which only 3 have urinary biomarkers. Compounds with VP > 10−5 Pa generally have RRs of 88% or greater, which do not vary appreciably with inhalation volume (IV). Compounds with VP < 10−7 Pa generally have RRs dependent on IV and lung exposure time. For MS, mean subject values from both studies were slightly greater than 30%. For constituents with urinary biomarkers, correlations with the calculated dose were significantly improved over correlations with mouth exposure. Of toxicological importance is that the dose correlations provide an estimate of the metabolic conversion of a constituent to its respective biomarker. PMID:23742081

  18. Fetal dose estimates and the ICRP abdominal dose limit for occupational exposure of pregnant staff to technetium-99m and iodine-131 patients.

    PubMed

    Mountford, P J; Steele, H R

    1995-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently recommended a supplementary dose limit of 2 mSv to the abdominal surface of a pregnant member of staff in order to provide protection to her fetus comparable to that in members of the public, whose annual limit is recommended to be 1 mSv. In order to determine whether this apparent attenuation factor of 50% is appropriate for nursing and imaging staff exposed to nuclear medicine patients, estimates were made of the ratios of the maternal abdominal surface to fetal dose appropriately weighted for time, distance and dose rate. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements were made at various depths in an anthropomorphic phantom irradiated at different distances by a distributed source of either technetium-99m or iodine-131 in order to determine the corresponding attenuation factors at the average fetal midline depth. Dose estimates were based on these factors and on published values of dose rate and exposure times for nursing and imaging staff at these distances from the patient. Fetal doses to nursing staff caring for an adult 99mTc patient were estimated to vary from 86 microSv to 1.6 microSv, with the corresponding ratio of the abdominal surface to fetal dose varying from about 1.8:1 to 1.5:1 as the patient became less dependent on nursing care and the mean distance from the patient increased. Fetal doses to imaging staff varied from 1.12 microSv to 0.17 microSv for three types of 99mTc scan, but the ratio only varied from 1.4:1 to 1.3:1. Fetal doses to imaging staff were estimated to be 6.7 microSv and 9.0 microSv for a whole-body scan of a thyroid cancer patient after 131I ablation and therapy respectively, and the ratio was 1.3:1 for both types of scan. It was concluded that for a pregnant ward nurse or imaging technologist exposed to an adult or paediatric patient administered 99mTc or 131I, a dose limit of 1.3 mSv to the maternal abdominal surface will restrict their fetal dose to 1 mSv. A

  19. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  20. Estimation of intraoperative blood flow during liver RF ablation using a finite element method-based biomechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Ohdaira, Takeshi; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is increasingly being used for liver cancer because it is a minimally invasive treatment method. However, it is difficult for the operators to precisely control the formation of coagulation zones because of the cooling effect of capillary vessels. To overcome this limitation, we have proposed a model-based robotic ablation system using a real-time numerical simulation to analyze temperature distributions in the target organ. This robot can determine the adequate amount of electric power supplied to the organ based on real-time temperature information reflecting the cooling effect provided by the simulator. The objective of this study was to develop a method to estimate the intraoperative rate of blood flow in the target organ to determine temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose a simulation-based method to estimate the rate of blood flow. We also performed an in vitro study to validate the proposed method by estimating the rate of blood flow in a hog liver. The experimental results revealed that the proposed method can be used to estimate the rate of blood flow in an organ. PMID:22256059

  1. Estimation of Characteristics of Echo Envelope Using RF Echo Signal from the Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ikeda, Kazuki; Moriyasu, Norifumi

    2001-05-01

    To realize quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, we have been analyzing the probability density function (PDF) of echo amplitude using B-mode images. However, the B-mode image is affected by the various signal and image processing techniques used in the diagnosis equipment, so a detailed and quantitative analysis is very difficult. In this paper, we analyze the PDF of echo amplitude using RF echo signal and B-mode images of normal and cirrhotic livers, and compare both results to examine the validity of the RF echo signal.

  2. The Impact of Acquisition Dose on Quantitative Breast Density Estimation with Digital Mammography: Results from ACRIN PA 4006.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M; Pertuz, Said; McDonald, Elizabeth S; Conant, Emily F; Kontos, Despina

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of radiation dose on breast density estimation in digital mammography. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliance under waiver of consent, a cohort of women from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Pennsylvania 4006 trial was retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent breast screening with a combination of dose protocols, including standard full-field digital mammography, low-dose digital mammography, and digital breast tomosynthesis. A total of 5832 images from 486 women were analyzed with previously validated, fully automated software for quantitative estimation of density. Clinical Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density assessment results were also available from the trial reports. The influence of image acquisition radiation dose on quantitative breast density estimation was investigated with analysis of variance and linear regression. Pairwise comparisons of density estimations at different dose levels were performed with Student t test. Agreement of estimation was evaluated with quartile-weighted Cohen kappa values and Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Results Radiation dose of image acquisition did not significantly affect quantitative density measurements (analysis of variance, P = .37 to P = .75), with percent density demonstrating a high overall correlation between protocols (r = 0.88-0.95; weighted κ = 0.83-0.90). However, differences in breast percent density (1.04% and 3.84%, P < .05) were observed within high BI-RADS density categories, although they were significantly correlated across the different acquisition dose levels (r = 0.76-0.92, P < .05). Conclusion Precision and reproducibility of automated breast density measurements with digital mammography are not substantially affected by variations in radiation dose; thus, the use of low-dose techniques for the purpose of density estimation

  3. Estimate of thyroid doses for David A. Timothy and June Carrell from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-10-28

    David A. Timothy and June Rogers Carrell are litigants in Timothy vs US. They allege that their thyroid cancers have resulted from harm from radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the thyroid dose received by each litigant from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. For David Timothy, the dose estimate is 7.8 rads. For June Carrell, it is 2.6 rads. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Estimation of Effective Doses for Radiation Cancer Risks on ISS, Lunar, and Mars Missions with Space Radiation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) of NASA s Operational Radiation Protection Program has provided the actual flight measurements of active and passive dosimeters which were placed throughout the phantom on STS-91 mission for 10 days and on ISS Increment 2 mission. For the PTE, the variation in organ doses, which is resulted by the absorption and the changes in radiation quality with tissue shielding, was considered by measuring doses at many tissue sites and at several critical body organs including brain, colon, heart, stomach, thyroid, and skins. These measurements have been compared with the organ dose calculations obtained from the transport models. Active TEPC measurements of lineal energy spectra at the surface of the PTE also provided the direct comparison of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) or trapped proton dose and dose equivalent. It is shown that orienting the phantom body as actual in ISS is needed for the direct comparison of the transport models to the ISS data. One of the most important observations for organ dose equivalent of effective dose estimates on ISS is the fractional contribution from trapped protons and GCR. We show that for most organs over 80% is from GCR. The improved estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks will be made with the resultant tissue weighting factors and the modified codes.

  5. Thyroid Remnant Estimation by Diagnostic Dose 131I Scintigraphy or 99mTcO4− Scintigraphy after Thyroidectomy: A Comparison with Therapeutic Dose 131I Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this clinical study, we have compared routine diagnostic dose 131I scan and 99mTcO4− thyroid scintigraphy with therapeutic dose 131I imaging for accurate thyroid remnant estimation after total thyroidectomy. We conducted a retrospective review of the patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and subsequently receiving radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment to ablate remnant thyroid tissue. All patients had therapeutic dose RAI whole body scan, which was compared with that of diagnostic dose RAI, 99mTcO4− thyroid scan, and ultrasound examination. We concluded that therapeutic dose RAI scan reveals some extent thyroid remnant in all DTC patients following total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic RAI scan is much superior to ultrasound and 99mTcO4− thyroid scan for the postoperative estimation of thyroid remnant. Ultrasound and 99mTcO4− thyroid scan provide little information for thyroid remnant estimation and, therefore, would not replace diagnostic RAI scan. PMID:27034938

  6. NMR estimation of protective effect of insulin on mouse liver with epinephrine-induced metabolic lesions.

    PubMed

    Yushmanov, V E; Khristianovich, D S; Rozantseva, T V; Sibeldina, L A

    1991-08-01

    In order to study the effects of epinephrine and insulin on liver metabolism, measurements of cellular phosphates and intracellular pH by 31PNMR, of glycogen by 13C NMR and of lactate by 1H NMR were performed in freshly dissected mouse liver at 0-4 degrees C and in ethanolic liver extracts. The injection of epinephrine hydrochloride (0.1 mL of 0.1% solution i.p. per mouse) caused remarkable changes in liver metabolic profiles which were expressed most distinctly in 15-30 min and could not be attributed solely to epinephrine-induced hyperglycemia. Among these metabolic changes are falls in the levels of ATP and uridine diphosphate sugars by 60-70%, possibly related to glycogen depletion, and intracellular acidification by 0.5 units attributed to the release of protons during hydrolysis of ATP rather than to accumulation of lactate in anaerobic glycolysis. Insulin injected prior to epinephrine (4 units i.p.) markedly suppressed epinephrine-induced metabolic alterations, although the effect of the combination of insulin and epinephrine was not the sum of the separate effects of these hormones. The maximum protective effect of insulin was reached when insulin was injected 15 min prior to epinephrine. The results obtained demonstrate the applicability of NMR for evaluating the protective activity of modifiers at various extreme exposures. PMID:1931556

  7. Military participants at U.S. Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing--methodology for estimating dose and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Till, John E; Beck, Harold L; Aanenson, Jill W; Grogan, Helen A; Mohler, H Justin; Mohler, S Shawn; Voillequé, Paul G

    2014-05-01

    Methods were developed to calculate individual estimates of exposure and dose with associated uncertainties for a sub-cohort (1,857) of 115,329 military veterans who participated in at least one of seven series of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests or the TRINITY shot carried out by the United States. The tests were conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds and the Nevada Test Site. Dose estimates to specific organs will be used in an epidemiological study to investigate leukemia and male breast cancer. Previous doses had been estimated for the purpose of compensation and were generally high-sided to favor the veteran's claim for compensation in accordance with public law. Recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to digitize the historical records supporting the veterans' compensation assessments make it possible to calculate doses and associated uncertainties. Our approach builds upon available film badge dosimetry and other measurement data recorded at the time of the tests and incorporates detailed scenarios of exposure for each veteran based on personal, unit, and other available historical records. Film badge results were available for approximately 25% of the individuals, and these results assisted greatly in reconstructing doses to unbadged persons and in developing distributions of dose among military units. This article presents the methodology developed to estimate doses for selected cancer cases and a 1% random sample of the total cohort of veterans under study. PMID:24758578

  8. Liver Fat Measured by MR Spectroscopy: Estimate of Imprecision and Relationship with Serum Glycerol, Caeruloplasmin and Non-Esterified Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    France, Michael; Kwok, See; Soran, Handrean; Williams, Steve; Ho, Jan Hoong; Adam, Safwaan; Canoy, Dexter; Liu, Yifen; Durrington, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive method for quantitative estimation of liver fat. Knowledge of its imprecision, which comprises biological variability and measurement error, is required to design therapeutic trials with measurement of change. The role of adipocyte lipolysis in ectopic fat accumulation remains unclear. We examined the relationship between liver fat content and indices of lipolysis, and determine whether lipolysis reflects insulin resistance or metabolic liver disease. Imprecision of measurement of liver fat was estimated from duplicate measurements by MRS at one month intervals. Patients provided fasting blood samples and we examined the correlation of liver fat with indices of insulin resistance, lipolysis and metabolic liver disease using Kendall Tau statistics. The coefficient of variation of liver fat content was 14.8%. Liver fat was positively related to serum insulin (T = 0.48, p = 0.042), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B% (T = −0.48, p = 0.042), and body mass index (BMI) (T = 0.59, p = 0.012); and inversely related to HOMA-S% (T = −0.48, p = 0.042), serum glycerol (T = −0.59, p = 0.014), and serum caeruloplasmin (T = 0.055, p = 0.047). Our estimate of total variability in liver fat content (14.8%) is nearly twice that of the reported procedural variability (8.5%). We found that liver fat content was significantly inversely related to serum glycerol but not to non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), suggesting progressive suppression of lipolysis. Reduction of caeruloplasmin with increasing liver fat may be a consequence or a cause of hepatic steatosis. PMID:27399690

  9. Liver Fat Measured by MR Spectroscopy: Estimate of Imprecision and Relationship with Serum Glycerol, Caeruloplasmin and Non-Esterified Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    France, Michael; Kwok, See; Soran, Handrean; Williams, Steve; Ho, Jan Hoong; Adam, Safwaan; Canoy, Dexter; Liu, Yifen; Durrington, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive method for quantitative estimation of liver fat. Knowledge of its imprecision, which comprises biological variability and measurement error, is required to design therapeutic trials with measurement of change. The role of adipocyte lipolysis in ectopic fat accumulation remains unclear. We examined the relationship between liver fat content and indices of lipolysis, and determine whether lipolysis reflects insulin resistance or metabolic liver disease. Imprecision of measurement of liver fat was estimated from duplicate measurements by MRS at one month intervals. Patients provided fasting blood samples and we examined the correlation of liver fat with indices of insulin resistance, lipolysis and metabolic liver disease using Kendall Tau statistics. The coefficient of variation of liver fat content was 14.8%. Liver fat was positively related to serum insulin (T = 0.48, p = 0.042), homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B% (T = -0.48, p = 0.042), and body mass index (BMI) (T = 0.59, p = 0.012); and inversely related to HOMA-S% (T = -0.48, p = 0.042), serum glycerol (T = -0.59, p = 0.014), and serum caeruloplasmin (T = 0.055, p = 0.047). Our estimate of total variability in liver fat content (14.8%) is nearly twice that of the reported procedural variability (8.5%). We found that liver fat content was significantly inversely related to serum glycerol but not to non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), suggesting progressive suppression of lipolysis. Reduction of caeruloplasmin with increasing liver fat may be a consequence or a cause of hepatic steatosis. PMID:27399690

  10. [ESTIMATION OF IONIZING RADIATION EFFECTIVE DOSES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREWS BY THE METHOD OF CALCULATION MODELING].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of the radiation loading on cosmonauts requires calculation of absorbed dose dynamics with regard to the stay of cosmonauts in specific compartments of the space vehicle that differ in shielding properties and lack means of radiation measurement. The paper discusses different aspects of calculation modeling of radiation effects on human body organs and tissues and reviews the effective dose estimates for cosmonauts working in one or another compartment over the previous period of the International space station operation. It was demonstrated that doses measured by a real or personal dosimeters can be used to calculate effective dose values. Correct estimation of accumulated effective dose can be ensured by consideration for time course of the space radiation quality factor. PMID:26292419

  11. Estimating pediatric entrance skin dose from digital radiography examination using DICOM metadata: A quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L. Kaufman, R. A.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated methodology to estimate patient examination dose in digital radiography (DR) imaging using DICOM metadata as a quality assurance (QA) tool. Methods: Patient examination and demographical information were gathered from metadata analysis of DICOM header data. The x-ray system radiation output (i.e., air KERMA) was characterized for all filter combinations used for patient examinations. Average patient thicknesses were measured for head, chest, abdomen, knees, and hands using volumetric images from CT. Backscatter factors (BSFs) were calculated from examination kVp. Patient entrance skin air KERMA (ESAK) was calculated by (1) looking up examination technique factors taken from DICOM header metadata (i.e., kVp and mA s) to derive an air KERMA (k{sub air}) value based on an x-ray characteristic radiation output curve; (2) scaling k{sub air} with a BSF value; and (3) correcting k{sub air} for patient thickness. Finally, patient entrance skin dose (ESD) was calculated by multiplying a mass–energy attenuation coefficient ratio by ESAK. Patient ESD calculations were computed for common DR examinations at our institution: dual view chest, anteroposterior (AP) abdomen, lateral (LAT) skull, dual view knee, and bone age (left hand only) examinations. Results: ESD was calculated for a total of 3794 patients; mean age was 11 ± 8 yr (range: 2 months to 55 yr). The mean ESD range was 0.19–0.42 mGy for dual view chest, 0.28–1.2 mGy for AP abdomen, 0.18–0.65 mGy for LAT view skull, 0.15–0.63 mGy for dual view knee, and 0.10–0.12 mGy for bone age (left hand) examinations. Conclusions: A methodology combining DICOM header metadata and basic x-ray tube characterization curves was demonstrated. In a regulatory era where patient dose reporting has become increasingly in demand, this methodology will allow a knowledgeable user the means to establish an automatable dose reporting program for DR and perform patient dose related QA testing for

  12. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports.

    PubMed

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-21

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient's anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included. PMID:27008040

  13. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  14. Low-dose dioxins alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, lipogenesis, and glucose metabolism through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Haketa, Keiichi; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Tohkin, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2008-05-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a common environmental contaminant. TCDD binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), leading to adverse biological responses via the alteration of the expression of various AHR target genes. Although small amounts of TCDD are consumed via contaminated daily foodstuffs and environmental exposures, the effects of low-dose TCDD on gene expression in animal tissues have not been clarified, while a number of genes affected by high-dose TCDD were reported. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed gene expression profiles in livers of C57BL/6N mice that were orally administered relatively low doses of TCDD (5, 50, or 500 ng/kg body weight (bw) day{sup -1}) for 18 days. The hepatic TCDD concentrations, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were 1.2, 17, and 1063 pg toxicity equivalent quantity (TEQ)/g, respectively. The mRNA level of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 was significantly increased by treatment with only TCDD 500 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}. DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in the circadian rhythm, cholesterol biosynthesis, fatty acid synthesis, and glucose metabolism in the liver with at all doses of TCDD employed. However, repression of expression of genes involved in energy metabolism was not observed in the livers of Ahr-null mice that were administered the same dose of TCDD. These results indicate that changes in gene expression by TCDD are mediated by AHR and that exposure to low-dose TCDD could affect energy metabolism via alterations of gene expression.

  15. Evaluation of repeated dose micronucleus assays of the liver and gastrointestinal tract using potassium bromate: a report of the collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Okada, Emiko; Fujiishi, Yohei; Narumi, Kazunori; Kado, Shoichi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    The food additive potassium bromate (KBrO3) is known as a renal carcinogen and causes chromosomal aberrations in vitro without metabolic activation and in vivo in hematopoietic and renal cells. As a part of a collaborative study by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study group, which is a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, we administered KBrO3 to rats orally for 4, 14, and 28 days and examined the micronucleated (MNed) cell frequency in the liver, glandular stomach, colon, and bone marrow to confirm whether the genotoxic carcinogen targeting other than liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract was detected by the repeated dose liver and GI tract micronucleus (MN) assays. In our study, animals treated with KBrO3 showed some signs of toxicity in the kidney and/or stomach. KBrO3 did not increase the frequency of MNed cells in the liver and colon in any of the repeated dose studies. However, KBrO3 increased the frequency of MNed cells in the glandular stomach and bone marrow. Additionally, the MNed cell frequency in the glandular stomach was not significantly affected by the difference in the length of the administration period. These results suggest that performing the MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first tissue to contact agents after oral ingestion, is useful for evaluating the genotoxic potential of chemicals and that the glandular stomach MN assay could be integrated into general toxicity studies. PMID:24637080

  16. Thyroid Dose Estimates for a Cohort of Belarusian Children Exposed to 131I from the Chernobyl Accident: Assessment of Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Victor; Golovanov, Ivan; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Kutsen, Semion; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Trofimik, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André

    2015-01-01

    Deterministic thyroid radiation doses due to iodine-131 (131I) intake were reconstructed in a previous article for 11,732 participants of the Belarusian–American cohort study of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in individuals exposed during childhood or adolescence to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The current article describes an assessment of uncertainties in reconstructed thyroid doses that accounts for the shared and unshared errors. Using a Monte Carlo simulation procedure, 1,000 sets of cohort thyroid doses due to 131I intake were calculated. The arithmetic mean of the stochastic thyroid doses for the entire cohort was 0.68 Gy. For two-thirds of the cohort the arithmetic mean of individual stochastic thyroid doses was less than 0.5 Gy. The geometric standard deviation of stochastic doses varied among cohort members from 1.33 to 5.12 with an arithmetic mean of 1.76 and a geometric mean of 1.73. The uncertainties in thyroid dose were driven by the unshared errors associated with the estimates of values of thyroid mass and of the 131I activity in the thyroid of the subject; the contribution of shared errors to the overall uncertainty was small. These multiple sets of cohort thyroid doses will be used to evaluate the radiation risks of thyroid cancer and non-cancer thyroid diseases, taking into account the structure of the errors in the dose estimates. PMID:26207684

  17. Cancer risk estimates for gamma-rays with regard to organ-specific doses. Part I: All solid cancers combined.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Rühm, Werner; Kellerer, Albrecht M

    2004-09-01

    A previous analysis of the solid cancer mortality data for 1950-1990 from the Japanese life-span study of the A-bomb survivors has assessed the solid cancer risk coefficients for gamma-rays in terms of the low dose risk coefficient ERR/Gy, i.e. the initial slope of the ERR vs. dose relation, and also in terms of the more precisely estimated intermediate dose risk coefficient, ERR(D1)/D1, for a reference dose, D1, which was chosen to be 1 Gy. The computations were performed for tentatively assumed values 20-50 of the neutron RBE against the reference dose and in terms of organ-averaged doses, rather than the traditionally applied colon doses. The resulting risk estimate for a dose of 1 Gy was about half as large as the most recent UNSCEAR estimate. The present assessment repeats the earlier analysis with two major extensions. It parallels computations based on organ-average doses with computations based on organ-specific doses and it updates the previous results by using the cancer mortality data for 1950-1997 which have recently been made available. With an assumed neutron RBE of 35, the resulting intermediate dose estimate of the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for solid cancer mortality for a working population (ages 25-65 years) is 0.059/Gy with the attained-age model, and 0.044/Gy with the age-at-exposure model. For a population of all ages, 0.055/Gy is obtained with the attained-age model and 0.073/Gy with the age-at-exposure model. These values are up to about 20% higher than those obtained in the previous analysis with the 1950-1990 data. However, considerably more curvature in the dose-effect relation is now supported by the computations. A dose and dose-rate reduction factor DDREF=2 is now much more in line with the data than before. With this factor the LAR for a working population is--averaged over the age-at-exposure and the age-attained model--equal to 0.026/Gy. This is only half as large as the current ICRP estimate which is also based on the

  18. Dose of Phenobarbital and Age of Treatment at Early Life are Two Key Factors for the Persistent Induction of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Adult Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yun-Chen; Liu, Ke; Pope, Chad; Wang, Pengcheng; Ma, Xiaochao; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2015-12-01

    Drug treatment of neonates and infants and its long-term consequences on drug responses have emerged in recent years as a major challenge for health care professionals. In the current study, we use phenobarbital as a model drug and mouse as an in vivo model to demonstrate that the dose of phenobarbital and age of treatment are two key factors for the persistent induction of gene expression and consequential increases of enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult livers. We show that phenobarbital treatment at early life of day 5 after birth with a low dose (<100 mg/kg) does not change expression and enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult mouse liver, whereas phenobarbital treatment with a high dose (>200 mg/kg) significantly increases expression and enzyme activities of these P450s in adult liver. We also demonstrate that phenobarbital treatment before day 10 after birth, but not at later ages, significantly increases mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activities of the tested P450s. Such persistent induction of P450 gene expression and enzyme activities in adult livers by phenobarbital treatment only occurs within a sensitive age window early in life. The persistent induction in gene expression and enzyme activities is higher in female mice than in male mice for Cyp2b10 but not for Cyp2c29 and Cyp3a11. These results will stimulate studies to evaluate the long-term impacts of drug treatment with different doses at neonatal and infant ages on drug metabolism, therapeutic efficacy, and drug-induced toxicity throughout the rest of life. PMID:26400395

  19. Modulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in the normal and regenerating rat liver by various doses of the peptide morphogen of Hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Kazimirskii, A.N.; Kositskii, G.I.; Rubina, A.Yu.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Pylaev, A.S.

    1986-11-01

    In this investigation, changes in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in the normal and regenerating liver of rats receiving injections of various doses of Hydra peptide morphogen (HPM). Activity of ODC was determined by a radioisotope method based on liberation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)-ornithine. The results indicate in the author's opinion that HPM may have a role in the regulation of anabolic processes and, in particular, of regenerative processes in mammals.

  20. Long-lived gamma emitting radionuclides in palm dates and estimates of annual effective doses.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of long-lived gamma emitting radionuclides in palm dates was performed. The palm date samples originated from eight countries, namely India, Iran, Jordan, Libya, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. Among the samples were the palm date types Sukari, Wanana, Umkhuber, Rashudiya, Libana, Madjool, Gumaizi, Anbar, Braim, Ajwa, Khadri, Munafee, Mabroom, Daglanoor, Sulag, and Khalas. Gamma spectrometry revealed activity concentrations of (AVG ± STD) 0.983 ± 0.457, 0.469 ± 0.229, and 287.078 ± 41.871 Bq kg(-1) dry weight for 226Ra, 228Ra, and 40K, respectively. Annual average effective dose was estimated to be 32 μSv from the consumption of palm dates. Comparing these findings with values reported in the literature, it was concluded that consumption of palm dates is safe for the presence of the investigated radionuclides. PMID:25811152