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Sample records for liver fluke clonorchis

  1. Egg-specific expression of protein with DNA methyltransferase activity in the biocarcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Hee; Cho, Hye-Jeong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kong, Yoon; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Bae, Young-An

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent reports regarding the biology of cytosine methylation in Schistosoma mansoni, the impact of the regulatory machinery remains unclear in diverse platyhelminthes. This ambiguity is reinforced by discoveries of DNA methyltransferase 2 (DNMT2)-only organisms and the substrate specificity of DNMT2 preferential to RNA molecules. Here, we characterized a novel DNA methyltransferase, named CsDNMT2, in a liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. The protein exhibited structural properties conserved in other members of the DNMT2 family. The native and recombinant CsDNMT2 exhibited considerable enzymatic activity on DNA. The spatiotemporal expression of CsDNMT2 mirrored that of 5-methylcytosine (5 mC), both of which were elevated in the C. sinensis eggs. However, CsDNMT2 and 5 mC were marginally detected in other histological regions of C. sinensis adults including ovaries and seminal receptacle. The methylation site seemed not related to genomic loci occupied by progenies of an active long-terminal-repeat retrotransposon. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that C. sinensis has preserved the functional DNA methylation machinery and that DNMT2 acts as a genuine alternative to DNMT1/DNMT3 to methylate DNA in the DNMT2-only organism. The epigenetic regulation would target functional genes primarily involved in the formation and/or maturation of eggs, rather than retrotransposons. PMID:26036304

  2. Liver fluke isolates: a question of provenance.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, I

    2011-02-28

    A survey of literature on experimental infections with the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica published between 2005 and 2009 has revealed a general lack of information on where fluke material (i.e. metacercariae) was sourced from. Even less information was given on the drug status of the fluke isolate used, which is a particular concern for those studies that involved anthelmintics. In these two respects, information on the liver fluke lags far behind that for nematodes, where such information is given almost as a matter of course. Of additional concern is that, at times, information about the source and drug history of fluke isolates was incorrect. The overall aim of the review is to demonstrate why it is important to provide as much information as possible on what fluke material is being used. It also attempts to correct some of the errors in the literature and gather together what information is available about the provenance of those isolates that have been used in recent experimental studies. PMID:21227593

  3. Opisthorchis viverrini: The carcinogenic human liver fluke

    PubMed Central

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Pengsaa, Prasit; Sripa, Banchob

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia, including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatomegaly, cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Multi-factorial etiology of cholangiocarcinoma, mechanical damage, parasite secretions, and immunopathology may enhance cholangiocarcinogenesis. Moreover, both experimental and epidemiological evidences strongly implicate liver fluke infection as the major risk factor in cholangiocarcinoma, cancer of the bile ducts. The liver fluke infection is induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas, of Thailand. The health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in the high-risk areas. PMID:18205254

  4. Schistosome and liver fluke derived catechol-estrogens and helminth associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Correia da Costa, José M.; Vale, Nuno; Gouveia, Maria J.; Botelho, Mónica C.; Sripa, Banchob; Santos, Lúcio L.; Santos, Júlio H.; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with helminth parasites remains a persistent public health problem in developing countries. Three of these pathogens, the liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini and the blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium, are of particular concern due to their classification as Group 1 carcinogens: infection with these worms is carcinogenic. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches, we identified steroid hormone like (e.g., oxysterol-like, catechol estrogen quinone-like, etc.) metabolites and related DNA-adducts, apparently of parasite origin, in developmental stages including eggs of S. haematobium, in urine of people with urogenital schistosomiasis, and in the adult stage of O. viverrini. Since these kinds of sterol derivatives are metabolized to active quinones that can modify DNA, which in other contexts can lead to breast and other cancers, helminth parasite associated sterols might induce tumor-like phenotypes in the target cells susceptible to helminth parasite associated cancers, i.e., urothelial cells of the bladder in the case of urogenital schistosomiasis and the bile duct epithelia or cholangiocytes, in the case of O. viverrini and C. sinensis. Indeed we postulate that helminth induced cancers originate from parasite estrogen-host epithelial/urothelial cell chromosomal DNA adducts, and here we review recent findings that support this conjecture. PMID:25566326

  5. Functional Analysis of the Unique Cytochrome P450 of the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis felineus

    PubMed Central

    Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Vavilin, Valentin A.; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Brindley, Paul J.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.

    2015-01-01

    The basic metabolic cytochrome P450 (CYP) system is essential for biotransformation of sterols and xenobiotics including drugs, for synthesis and degradation of signaling molecules in all living organisms. Most eukaryotes including free-living flatworms have numerous paralogues of the CYP gene encoding heme monooxygenases with specific substrate range. Notably, by contrast, the parasitic flatworms have only one CYP gene. The role of this enzyme in the physiology and biochemistry of helminths is not known. The flukes and tapeworms are the etiologic agents of major neglected tropical diseases of humanity. Three helminth infections (Opisthorchis viverrini, Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma haematobium) are considered by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as definite causes of cancer. We focused our research on the human liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus, an emerging source of biliary tract disease including bile duct cancer in Russia and central Europe. The aims of this study were (i) to determine the significance of the CYP activity for the morphology and survival of the liver fluke, (ii) to assess CYP ability to metabolize xenobiotics, and (iii) to localize the CYP activity in O. felineus tissues. We observed high constitutive expression of CYP mRNA (Real-time PCR) in O. felineus. This enzyme metabolized xenobiotics selective for mammalian CYP2E1, CYP2B, CYP3A, but not CYP1A, as determined by liquid chromatography and imaging analyses. Tissue localization studies revealed the CYP activity in excretory channels, while suppression of CYP mRNA by RNA interference was accompanied by morphological changes of the excretory system and increased mortality rates of the worms. These results suggest that the CYP function is linked to worm metabolism and detoxification. The findings also suggest that the CYP enzyme is involved in vitally important processes in the organism of parasites and is a potential drug target. PMID:26625139

  6. Functional Analysis of the Unique Cytochrome P450 of the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis felineus.

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, Mariya Y; Vavilin, Valentin A; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Brindley, Paul J; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2015-12-01

    The basic metabolic cytochrome P450 (CYP) system is essential for biotransformation of sterols and xenobiotics including drugs, for synthesis and degradation of signaling molecules in all living organisms. Most eukaryotes including free-living flatworms have numerous paralogues of the CYP gene encoding heme monooxygenases with specific substrate range. Notably, by contrast, the parasitic flatworms have only one CYP gene. The role of this enzyme in the physiology and biochemistry of helminths is not known. The flukes and tapeworms are the etiologic agents of major neglected tropical diseases of humanity. Three helminth infections (Opisthorchis viverrini, Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma haematobium) are considered by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as definite causes of cancer. We focused our research on the human liver fluke Opisthorchis felineus, an emerging source of biliary tract disease including bile duct cancer in Russia and central Europe. The aims of this study were (i) to determine the significance of the CYP activity for the morphology and survival of the liver fluke, (ii) to assess CYP ability to metabolize xenobiotics, and (iii) to localize the CYP activity in O. felineus tissues. We observed high constitutive expression of CYP mRNA (Real-time PCR) in O. felineus. This enzyme metabolized xenobiotics selective for mammalian CYP2E1, CYP2B, CYP3A, but not CYP1A, as determined by liquid chromatography and imaging analyses. Tissue localization studies revealed the CYP activity in excretory channels, while suppression of CYP mRNA by RNA interference was accompanied by morphological changes of the excretory system and increased mortality rates of the worms. These results suggest that the CYP function is linked to worm metabolism and detoxification. The findings also suggest that the CYP enzyme is involved in vitally important processes in the organism of parasites and is a potential drug target. PMID:26625139

  7. Liver fluke infection in horses and ponies.

    PubMed

    Owen, J M

    1977-01-01

    Thirty eight cases of Fasciola hepatica infection in horses with associated clinical signs are reported. A method of examining large amounts of faeces for fluke is described. A safe method of treatment for infected horses is given which involves oral medication with oxyclozanide at a dose rate of 15 ml/50 kg body weight. PMID:837900

  8. Infection with the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Gasser, Robin B.; Young, Neil D.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Brindley, Paul J.; Loukas, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary Throughout Southeast Asia there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium), particularly in people from rural settings in Laos and Northeast Thailand who are infected with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, one of only three carcinogenic eukaryotic pathogens. More ubiquitous carcinogenic microbes, such as Helicobacter pylori, induce cancer in less than 1% of infected people, while as many as one-sixth of people with opisthorchiasis will develop CCA. The mechanisms by which O. viverrini causes cancer are multi-factorial, involving mechanical irritation from the activities and movements of the flukes, immunopathology, dietary nitrosamines and the secretion of parasite proteins that promote a tumourigenic environment. Genomic and proteomic studies of the liver fluke secretome have accelerated the discovery of parasite proteins with known/potential roles in pathogenesis and tumourigenesis, establishing a framework towards understanding, and ultimately preventing, the morbidity and mortality attributed to this highly carcinogenic parasite. PMID:21311794

  9. Cathepsin F Cysteine Protease of the Human Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Morales, Maria E.; Mann, Victoria H.; Parriott, Sandi K.; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Robinson, Mark W.; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P.; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocalization, and functional characterization of the cathepsin F cysteine protease gene, here termed Ov-cf-1, from O. viverrini. The full length mRNA of 1020 nucleotides (nt) encoded a 326 amino acid zymogen consisting of a predicted signal peptide (18 amino acids, aa), prosegment (95 aa), and mature protease (213 aa). BLAST analysis using the Ov-CF-1 protein as the query revealed that the protease shared identity with cathepsin F-like cysteine proteases of other trematodes, including Clonorchis sinensis (81%), Paragonimus westermani (58%), Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum (52%), and with vertebrate cathepsin F (51%). Transcripts encoding the protease were detected in all developmental stages that parasitize the mammalian host. The Ov-cf-1 gene, of ?3 kb in length, included seven exons interrupted by six introns; the exons ranged from 69 to 267 bp in length, the introns from 43 to 1,060 bp. The six intron/exon boundaries of Ov-cf-1 were conserved with intron/exon boundaries in the human cathepsin F gene, although the gene structure of human cathepsin F is more complex. Unlike Ov-CF-1, human cathepsin F zymogen includes a cystatin domain in the prosegment region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fluke, human, and other cathepsin Fs branched together in a clade discrete from the cathepsin L cysteine proteases. A recombinant Ov-CF-1 zymogen that displayed low-level activity was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Although the recombinant protease did not autocatalytically process and activate to a mature enzyme, trans-processing by Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L cleaved the prosegment of Ov-CF-1, releasing a mature cathepsin F with activity against the peptide Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec >50 times that of the zymogen. Immunocytochemistry using antibodies raised against the recombinant enzyme showed that Ov-CF-1 is expressed in the gut of the mature hermaphroditic fluke and also in the reproductive structures, including vitelline glands, egg, and testis. Ov-CF-1 was detected in bile duct epithelial cells surrounding the flukes several weeks after infection of hamsters with O. viverrini and, in addition, had accumulated in the secondary (small) bile ducts where flukes cannot reach due to their large size. Conclusions/Significance A cathepsin F cysteine protease of the human liver fluke O. viverrini has been characterized at the gene and protein level. Secretion of this protease may contribute to the hepatobiliary abnormalities, including cholangiocarcinogenesis, observed in individuals infected with this parasite. PMID:19308250

  10. Liver Flukes: the Common Fluke (Distomum hepaticum). A New Species (Distomum texanicum). 

    E-print Network

    Francis, M. (Mark)

    1891-01-01

    flukes are found. These on exposure extend and retract their bodies like a leech and eject the dark content8 of their digestive tract per mouth. They curl and soon die. Their eggs are seen in the gall and gall bladder in great riumbers. Frequently a.... The gall and gall bladder of such livers are uaually normal and in several in- stances in whish I examined the entire quantity of bile, s very few egga were found. I think the greatest number was 5 in the entire quantity of bile; and these I Wa8...

  11. Apoptosis of cholangiocytes modulated by thioredoxin of carcinogenic liver fluke.

    PubMed

    Matchimakul, Pitchaya; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mann, Victoria H; Popratiloff, Anastas; Laha, Thewarach; Pimenta, Rafael N; Cochran, Christina J; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob; Brindley, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic infection with the food-borne liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, frequently induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma. Opisthorchiasis is endemic in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Vietnam, where eating undercooked freshwater fish carrying the juvenile stage of this pathogen leads to human infection. Because inhibition of apoptosis facilitates carcinogenesis, this study investigated modulation by thioredoxin from O. viverrini of apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, cholangiocytes. Cells of a cholangiocyte line were incubated with the parasite enzyme after which they were exposed hydrogen peroxide. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis was monitored using flow cytometry, growth in real time and imaging of living cells using laser confocal microscopy. Immunolocalization revealed liver fluke thioredoxin within cholangiocytes. Cells exposed to thioredoxin downregulated apoptotic genes in the mitogen activated protein kinases pathway and upregulated anti-apoptosis-related genes including apoptosis signaling kinase 1, caspase 9, caspase 8, caspase 3, survivin and others. Western blots of immunoprecipitates of cell lysates revealed binding of thioredoxin to apoptosis signaling kinase 1. Together the findings indicated that thioredoxin from O. viverrini inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells, which supports a role for this liver fluke oxidoreductase in opisthorchiasis-induced cholangiocarcinogenesis. PMID:26007234

  12. Retrotransposon OV-RTE-1 from the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini; potential target for DNA-based diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Luyen Thi; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach

    2014-01-01

    Infections by the fish-borne liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis can lead to bile duct cancer. These neglected tropical disease pathogens occur in East Asia, with O. viverrini primarily in Thailand and Laos and C. sinensis in Cambodia, Vietnam, and China. Genomic information about these pathogens holds the potential to improve disease treatment and control. Transcriptome analysis indicates that mobile genetic elements are active in O. viverrini, including a novel non-Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. A consensus sequence of this element, termed OV-RTE-1, was assembled from expressed sequence tags and PCR amplified genomic DNA. OV-RTE-1 was 3,330 bp in length, encoded 1,101 amino acid residues and exhibited hallmark structures and sequences of non-LTR retrotransposons including a single open reading frame encoding apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease (EN) and reverse transcriptase (RT). Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that OV-RTE-1 was member of the RTE clade of non-LTR retrotransposons. OV-RTE-1 is the first non-LTR retrotransposon characterized from the trematode family Opisthorchiidae. Sequences of OV-RTE-1 were targeted to develop a diagnostic tool for detection of infection by O. viverrini. PCR specific primers for detection of O. viverrini DNA showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for detection of as little as five femtograms of O. viverrini DNA whereas the PCR based approach showed 62% sensitivity and 100% specificity with clinical stool samples. The OV-RTE-1 specific PCR could be developed as a molecular diagnostic for Opisthorchis infection targeting parasite eggs in stool samples, especially in regions of mixed infection of O. viverrini and/or C. sinensis and minute intestinal flukes. PMID:24394447

  13. The characteristics of the expression of heat shock proteins and COX-2 in the liver of hamsters infected with Clonorchis sinensis, and the change of endocrine hormones and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Choi, WonHyung; Chu, JongPhil

    2012-12-01

    The liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis (Digenea) is a high-risk parasite that causes serious diseases such as cirrhosis, carcinogenic liver damage and clonorchiasis in East Asia. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between stress/endocrine hormones and inflammation induced by infection as well as the expression of heat shock proteins (hsp-27, hsp-90), cox-2 and cytokines in the livers of hamsters infected with C. sinensis. The average body weight of infected hamsters decreased up to 25% compared with that of the control group, and bile duct hyperplasia with inflammation, liver fibrosis and hepatic necrosis were observed in C. sinensis-infected livers. The expression of hsp-27, hsp-90, and cox-2 was significantly increased in the livers of C. sinensis-infected hamsters compared with the control group. Moreover, the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-2, TGF-beta2 and IFN-alpha1) were markedly increased in the livers of the infected group compared with those of the control group. Consistently, plasma IL-3 and IL-6 levels gradually increased during the infection period, and the concentration levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), corticosterone, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in C. sinensis-infected hamsters increased over 25%, compared with those of the uninfected normal group. These results demonstrate that C. sinensis infection may increase the expression of hsp27, hsp90 and cox-2 as well as it may cause periductal fibrosis, chronic inflammation and hepatic necrosis in the liver. Furthermore, the results indicate that C. sinensis infection induces not only stress-induced hormone imbalance but also the sustained secretion of inflammatory cytokines through chronic stress/stimuli. PMID:23327006

  14. Association between Liver Fluke Infection and Hepatobiliary Pathological Changes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Jiang, Shi-chen; Peng, Hong-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide information about the role of liver fluke infection as a risk factor for hepatobiliary pathological changes and promote awareness among the people living in endemic areas, a systematic review and meta-analysis based on published studies was conducted to examine the association between liver fluke infection and hepatobiliary pathological changes. Methods Relevant original literature was searched in multiple literature databases, including PubMed, Cochrane, Clinical Evidence, Trip Database, Clinical Trials, Current Controlled Trials, Web of Science, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database, and the Wanfang academic journal full-text database. Studies were selected based on strict screening with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Tests of heterogeneity, sensitivity and publication bias were performed with the Review Manager software, version 5.3, and meta-regression analyses were performed with the Stata software, version 11.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated and used to evaluate the risk of hepatobiliary pathological changes resulting from liver fluke infection. Linear trend analyses were conducted to determine the dose-response relationship using IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0. Result A total of 36 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Significant associations were found between liver fluke infection and cholangitis or cholecystitis (RR: 7.80, P<0.001; OR: 15.98, P<0.001), cholelithiasis (RR: 2.42, P = 0.03; OR: 4.96, P = 0.03), hepatocellular carcinoma (OR: 4.69, P<0.001) and cholangiocarcinoma (RR: 10.43, P<0.001; OR: 4.37, P<0.001). In addition, heavier infection was significantly associated with higher incidence of hepatobiliary pathological changes (P<0.05). However, cirrhosis was not significantly associated with liver fluke infection (RR: 3.50, P = 0.06; OR: 5.79, P = 0.08). The statistical heterogeneity was significant, no significant difference was observed in the sensitivity analysis, and no publication bias was found. Conclusion The meta-analysis found that liver fluke infection was significantly associated with cholangitis, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma and that more severe infection was associated with higher incidence. However, the association between liver fluke infection and cirrhosis was not significant. PMID:26186510

  15. Liver fluke prevention and control in the northeast of Thailand through action research.

    PubMed

    Wongba, N; Thaewnongiew, K; Phathee, K; Laithavewat, L; Duangsong, R; Promthet, S; Tangsawad, S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to enhance people's potential to prevent and control liver fluke infestation. The subjects were a total of 96 participants comprising 20 community leaders, 74 individuals handling and preparing food, and 2 officials from the Local Administration. Quantitative data were collected through questionnaire and the results of stool examination of the participants were recorded. The main methods used to collect qualitative data were focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. For qualitative data analysis, the researchers undertook a qualitative content analysis. For quantitative data, conventional descriptive statistics were used and the mean differences with the 95% CI before and after the study were compared. The results in the early stage found that the participants were not aware of the fact that eating raw fish might be the cause of developing cholangiocarcinoma. 94.8% of participants however knew that eating raw fish might be cause having liver fluke infection which can be treated be taking an antihelminthic drug. They perceived that it is way of life since their ancestors already consumed raw fish because they found it to be delicious. However, through participating in this study, it was realized how dangerous it is to get infected with the liver fluke. Participants also learned the life cycle of liver fluke. They talked about this within their families, and communicated as well as cooperated with others to strengthen a network of a club concentrating on not eating raw fish. The communities and the Sub-district Administrative Organization supported the project. In conclusion, it is advisable to improve the behavior of participants in villages so that they became aware how to prevent and control liver fluke infection and therefore the development of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:21875298

  16. Experimental infection of liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna, in Bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Foreyt, William J; Drew, M L

    2010-01-01

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the susceptibility of American bison (Bison bison) to liver flukes, Fascioloides magna and Fasciola hepatica. Six bison were each experimentally inoculated with 600 metacercariae of Fascioloides magna, and three were later treated with triclabendazole suspension at 40 mg/kg of body weight. Four additional bison were each experimentally inoculated with 600 metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica. Five control bison were placebo controls. Two controls and all inoculated bison were euthanized 10 mo (Fascioloides magna) and 7 mo (Fasciola hepatica) after inoculation. None of the control bison or the bison inoculated with Fascioloides magna had flukes or lesions characteristic of fluke infection at necropsy. All four bison inoculated with Fasciola hepatica had characteristic liver fluke lesions at necropsy, and three of four bison contained four, 103, and 111 adult flukes, respectively. Fluke eggs were detected in feces of all Fasciola hepatica-inoculated bison during the experiment, but not from the Fascioloides magna-infected bison or control bison. Clinical signs of infection were not observed during the experiment, but hemoglobin and packed cell volumes were lower in the Fasciola hepatica bison when compared to controls, and eosinophil levels were increased. Triclabendazole at 40 mg/kg of body weight appeared to be safe in bison because no toxic reactions were observed. Results from this study indicated bison are susceptible to infection with Fasciola hepatica and are efficient definitive hosts. Because no Fascioloides magna were recovered, bison may have a decreased susceptibility or innate resistance to Fascioloides magna infection, which may account for a lack of reported infections in this host. PMID:20090045

  17. Evolutionary Origins, Diversification, and Biogeography of Liver Flukes (Digenea, Fasciolidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lotfy, Wael M.; Brant, Sara V.; DeJong, Randy J.; Le, Thanh Hoa; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander; Rajapakse, R. P. V. Jayanthe; Perera, Vijitha B. V. P.; Laursen, Jeff R.; Loker, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Fasciolid flukes are among the largest and best known digenetic trematodes and have considerable historical and veterinary significance. Fasciola hepatica is commonly implicated in causing disease in humans. The origins, patterns of diversification, and biogeography of fasciolids are all poorly known. We have undertaken a molecular phylogenetic study using 28S, internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2 (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA, and mitochondrial nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) that included seven of the nine recognized species in the family. The fasciolids examined comprise a monophyletic group with the most basal species recovered from African elephants. We hypothesize fasciolids migrated from Africa to Eurasia, with secondary colonization of Africa. Fasciolids have been conservative in maintaining relatively large adult body size, but anatomical features of their digestive and reproductive systems are available. These flukes have been opportunistic, with respect to switching to new snail (planorbid to lymnaeid) and mammalian hosts and from intestinal to hepatic habitats within mammals. PMID:18689632

  18. Effects of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate in Thai women with liver fluke infestation: results after six months

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Richard A.; Assawasena, Vinich; Chalpati, Sopon; Taewtong, Dilok

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the three-monthly injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on liver and lipid function was assessed in Thai women with liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) infestation, DMPA administration being started in the immediate postpartum period. Immediate postpartum IUD and sterilization acceptors with fluke infestation were recruited as a comparison (control) group for the fluke-positiv DMPA acceptors. Comparable groups of fluke-negative acceptors were recruited in an area of Thailand free of liver fluke transmission. Results are presented for the first 6 follow-up months for 170 DMPA and 177 control fluke-positive subjects and for 153 DMPA and 150 control fluke-negative subjects. Small and similar increases occurred in each of the four groups for alanine amino transferase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin levels while aspartate amino transferase levels changed less in the DMPA groups than in their respective control groups. None of the subjects in either DMPA group had clearly abnormal results in these tests at 6 months. Alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, and triglycerides levels were markedly lower in each group at 6 months than in the puerperal specimens. There was a greater decrease in triglycerides levels in both DMPA groups than in their respective control groups. However, the decrease in the alkaline phosphatase and cholesterol levels was greater only in the fluke-positive DMPA group than in the fluke-positive control group. None of these biochemical results were related to differences in age, parity, or lactation status between the groups. The results indicate that DMPA did not cause any early deleterious effects in the metabolic factors studied in women with liver fluke infestation. PMID:302157

  19. Domestic sheep as a rare definitive host of the large American liver fluke Fascioloides magna.

    PubMed

    Foreyt, W J

    1990-10-01

    Two domestic sheep were inoculated orally with 250 metacercariae of Fascioloides magna. One sheep died 4 mo after inoculation and 22 immature F. magna were recovered. The second sheep remained healthy and was killed 8 mo after inoculation. Ten mature F. magna were recovered from hepatic parenchyma, and eggs of F. magna were observed in areas of the liver where flukes resided and from feces. Although F. magna is almost always lethal to sheep, this sheep was a rare definitive host. PMID:2213420

  20. RNAi Dynamics in Juvenile Fasciola spp. Liver Flukes Reveals the Persistence of Gene Silencing In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; McCammick, Erin M.; McCusker, Paul; Morphew, Russell M.; Mousley, Angela; Abidi, Abbas; Saifullah, Khalid M.; Muthusamy, Raman; Gopalakrishnan, Ravikumar; Spithill, Terry W.; Dalton, John P.; Brophy, Peter M.; Marks, Nikki J.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fasciola spp. liver fluke cause pernicious disease in humans and animals. Whilst current control is unsustainable due to anthelmintic resistance, gene silencing (RNA interference, RNAi) has the potential to contribute to functional validation of new therapeutic targets. The susceptibility of juvenile Fasciola hepatica to double stranded (ds)RNA-induced RNAi has been reported. To exploit this we probe RNAi dynamics, penetrance and persistence with the aim of building a robust platform for reverse genetics in liver fluke. We describe development of standardised RNAi protocols for a commercially-available liver fluke strain (the US Pacific North West Wild Strain), validated via robust transcriptional silencing of seven virulence genes, with in-depth experimental optimisation of three: cathepsin L (FheCatL) and B (FheCatB) cysteine proteases, and a ?-class glutathione transferase (Fhe?GST). Methodology/Principal Findings Robust transcriptional silencing of targets in both F. hepatica and Fasciola gigantica juveniles is achievable following exposure to long (200–320 nt) dsRNAs or 27 nt short interfering (si)RNAs. Although juveniles are highly RNAi-susceptible, they display slower transcript and protein knockdown dynamics than those reported previously. Knockdown was detectable following as little as 4h exposure to trigger (target-dependent) and in all cases silencing persisted for ?25 days following long dsRNA exposure. Combinatorial silencing of three targets by mixing multiple long dsRNAs was similarly efficient. Despite profound transcriptional suppression, we found a significant time-lag before the occurrence of protein suppression; Fhe?GST and FheCatL protein suppression were only detectable after 9 and 21 days, respectively. Conclusions/Significance In spite of marked variation in knockdown dynamics, we find that a transient exposure to long dsRNA or siRNA triggers robust RNAi penetrance and persistence in liver fluke NEJs supporting the development of multiple-throughput phenotypic screens for control target validation. RNAi persistence in fluke encourages in vivo studies on gene function using worms exposed to RNAi-triggers prior to infection. PMID:25254508

  1. Opisthorchis viverrini (liver fluke) as the lot of baleful parasite of tropical region-A replete synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gundamaraju, Rohit; Vemuri, Ravi Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Liver fluke disease is a chronic parasitic inflammatory disease of the bile ducts which is highly prominent in the tropical regions. Infection occurs through ingestion of fluke-infested fresh-water raw fish. Opisthorchis viverrini is the biggest causative organism for this disease. Adult flukes get into the body of humans and settle in the small intrahepatic bile ducts, and then they live there for few decades. The long-lived flukes cause long-lasting chronic inflammation of the bile ducts, and this produces epithelial hyperplasia, periductal fibrosis and bile duct dilatation. Major complications of the disease also include pancreatitis, bile duct obstruction etc. The majority of patients are asymptomatic, but the patients with heavy infection suffer from lassitude and nonspecific abdominal complaints. Approximately 35 million people are infected with liver flukes throughout the world and the exceptionally high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in some endemic areas is closely related with a high prevalence of liver fluke infection. Considering the appulse of this food-borne malady on accessible bloom and the astringent accessible analytic consequences, alarmist accident infection should not be abandoned or neglected. This review acts as a complete picture in elucidating the information regarding the parasite and disease condition thereby supporting the researchers worldwide.

  2. GIS-based spatial statistical analysis of risk areas for liver flukes in Surin Province of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rujirakul, Ratana; Ueng-arporn, Naporn; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Loyd, Ryan J; Kaewthani, Sarochinee; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2015-01-01

    It is urgently necessary to be aware of the distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, for proper allocation of prevention and control measures. This study aimed to investigate the human behavior, and environmental factors influencing the distribution in Surin Province of Thailand, and to build a model using stepwise multiple regression analysis with a geographic information system (GIS) on environment and climate data. The relationship between the human behavior, attitudes (<50%; X111), environmental factors like population density (148-169 pop/km2; X73), and land use as wetland (X64), were correlated with the liver fluke disease distribution at 0.000, 0.034, and 0.006 levels, respectively. Multiple regression analysis, by equations OV=-0.599+0.005(population density (148-169 pop/km2); X73)+0.040 (human attitude (<50%); X111)+0.022 (land used (wetland; X64), was used to predict the distribution of liver fluke. OV is the patients of liver fluke infection, R Square=0.878, and, Adjust R Square=0.849. By GIS analysis, we found Si Narong, Sangkha, Phanom Dong Rak, Mueang Surin, Non Narai, Samrong Thap, Chumphon Buri, and Rattanaburi to have the highest distributions in Surin province. In conclusion, the combination of GIS and statistical analysis can help simulate the spatial distribution and risk areas of liver fluke, and thus may be an important tool for future planning of prevention and control measures. PMID:25824758

  3. Raw fish consumption in liver fluke endemic areas in rural southern Laos.

    PubMed

    Xayaseng, Vilavanh; Phongluxa, Khampheng; van Eeuwijk, Peter; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia, and in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), in particular. We aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of villagers in liver fluke endemic areas related to raw fish preparation, consumption and its health consequences. In February 2010, eight focus group discussions (FGDs, 35 men and 37 women total) and direct observations were conducted in four randomly selected villages in Saravane District, Saravane Province (Lao PDR). FGDs distilled the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of adult community members on raw fish preparation, consumption and its consequences for health. Conversations were transcribed from notes and tape-recorders. MaxQDA software was used for content analysis. Knowledge regarding the health effects of raw fish consumption was heterogeneous. Some participants did not associate liver fluke infection with any ill health, while others linked it to digestive problems. Participants also associated vegetables and tree leave consumption with liver fluke infection. The majority of FGD participants considered fish flesh that had been prepared with weaver ant extract to be safe for consumption. Visual appearance, taste, smell and personal preference were given as reasons for consuming raw fish dishes. Moreover, participants considered it a traditional way of food preparation, practiced for generations in Laos. Ten different fish dishes that use raw or fermented fish were identified. All FGD participants reported consuming dishes with raw fish. This study reveals a low degree of knowledge among local people on the health risks related to frequent consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish. Fish dishes were considered to be 'well-prepared' (that is, 'cooked') even though the fish had not been heated. In future, successful health education campaigns will have to address the specific knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of the concerned population. PMID:23567553

  4. Multiple origins of European populations of the giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), a liver parasite of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Stefka, Jan; Spakulová, Marta; Vávrová, Silvia; Szemes, Tomáš; Tkach, Vasyl; Trudgett, Alan; Pybus, Margo

    2011-03-01

    The giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, a liver parasite of free-living and domestic ruminants of Europe and North America, was analysed in order to determine the origin of European populations and to reveal the biogeography of this originally North American parasite on the European continent. The variable fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1; 384bp) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit I (nad1; 405bp) were used. Phylogenetic trees and haplotype networks were constructed and the level of genetic structuring was evaluated using population genetic tools. In F. magna individuals originating from all European foci of infection (Italy, Czech Republic and Danube floodplain forests involving the territories of Slovakia, Hungary and Croatia) and from four of five major North American enzootic areas, 16 cox1 and 18 nad1 haplotypes were determined. The concatenated sequence set produced 22 distinct haplotypes. The European fluke populations were less diverse than those from North America in that they contained proportionately fewer haplotypes (eight), while a more substantial level of genetic diversity and a greater number of haplotypes (15) were recorded in North America. Only one haplotype was shared between the European (Italy) and North American (USA/Oregon and Canada/Alberta) flukes, supporting a western North American origin of the Italian F. magna population. Haplotypes found in Italy were distinct from those determined in the remaining European localities which indicates that introduction of F. magna to the European continent occurred more than once. In the Czech focus of infection, a south-eastern USA origin was revealed. Identical haplotypes, common to parasites from the Czech Republic and from an expanding focus in Danube floodplain forests, implies that the introduction of F. magna to the Danube region came from an already established Czech focus of infection. PMID:21172350

  5. Carcinogenic Liver Fluke Secretes Extracellular Vesicles That Promote Cholangiocytes to Adopt a Tumorigenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Sotillo, Javier; Smout, Michael; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jones, Malcolm K.; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Potriquet, Jeremy; Laohaviroj, Marut; Mulvenna, Jason; Brindley, Paul J.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Throughout Asia, there is an unprecedented link between cholangiocarcinoma and infection with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini. Multiple processes, including chronic inflammation and secretion of parasite proteins into the biliary epithelium, drive infection toward cancer. Until now, the mechanism and effects of parasite protein entry into cholangiocytes was unknown. Methods.?Various microscopy techniques were used to identify O. viverrini extracellular vesicles (EVs) and their internalization by human cholangiocytes. Using mass spectrometry we characterized the EV proteome and associated changes in cholangiocytes after EV uptake, and we detected EV proteins in bile of infected hamsters and humans. Cholangiocyte proliferation and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was measured to assess the impact of EV internalization. Results.?EVs were identified in fluke culture medium and bile specimens from infected hosts. EVs internalized by cholangiocytes drove cell proliferation and IL-6 secretion and induced changes in protein expression associated with endocytosis, wound repair, and cancer. Antibodies to an O. viverrini tetraspanin blocked EV uptake and IL-6 secretion by cholangiocytes. Conclusions.?This is the first time that EVs from a multicellular pathogen have been identified in host tissues. Our findings imply a role for O. viverrini EVs in pathogenesis and highlight an approach to vaccine development for this infectious cancer. PMID:25985904

  6. An expanding population of the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) in elk (Cervus canadensis) and other ungulates in Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Butterworth, Eric W; Woods, John G

    2015-04-01

    Giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) populations readily expand under suitable conditions. Although extirpated from the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in the early 1960s, the fluke reappeared following natural spread through mountain passes from British Columbia. Herein, we assessed epizootiology of the fluke population two decades later. Between 1984 and 1991, 534 ungulates, including 381 elk (Cervus canadensis), 68 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), 54 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and 31 moose (Alces alces) from adjacent areas of Alberta (AB) and British Columbia (BC), Canada, were examined for giant liver flukes. Prevalence in elk increased from 53% to 79% (1984-91) in Banff National Park (BNP) in AB and 77% to 100% (1985-89) in Kootenay National Park (KNP) in BC. Super-infections (>100 flukes) were more common in later years. Generally, prevalence increased over time and with increasing age of elk. Intensity was lowest in young-of-year (BNP 8±5, KNP 3), but similar in yearlings (BNP 36±11, KNP 23±8) and adults (BNP 33±5, KNP 32±6). Prevalence was similar in male and female elk. Intensity was higher in males (BNP 47±7, KNP 46±12) than in females (BNP 28±6, KNP 22±4), although the maximum number of flukes (545) occurred in a female elk. Prevalence and intensity differed among other species of ungulates but patterns were similar in each park. Prevalence was lower in mule deer (BNP 6%, KNP 4%) than in white-tailed deer (BNP 44%, KNP 28%) and moose (BNP 52%, KNP 63%). Intensity differed among these species but never exceeded 30 flukes. Gravid flukes occurred only in elk and white-tailed deer. Transmission occurred primarily in late summer-fall and in wet habitats. At least seven elk died as a direct result of fluke infection. In this region, elk and white-tailed deer maintain the F. magna population with spillover into moose and, rarely, mule deer. PMID:25647594

  7. Prevalence of liver fluke infections in slaughtered animals in Lorestan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ezatpour, Behrouz; Hasanvand, Ali; Azami, Mehdi; Anbari, Khatereh; Ahmadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola spp. and Dicrocoelium dendriticum as liver flukes, contaminate ruminants and other mammalian extensively and cause major diseases of livestock that create considerable economic losses. This retrospective study has been done to evaluate contamination rate of slaughtered animals with fasciolosis and dicrocoeliosis at Lorestan abattoirs. In this survey, prevalence rate of fasciolosis and dicrocoeliosis in slaughtered animals in a 3-year period (2010-2013) has been analyzed. A total of 356,605 livestock including 265,692 sheep and 90,913 goats were slaughtered in the 3-year period and overall 39,613 (11.1 %) livers were condemned. Fascioliasis and dicrocoeliosis were responsible for 6.3 and 4.8 % of total liver condemnations in this period, respectively. Fasciola spp. and D. dendriticum infection in sheep (7.1 and 5.6 %, respectively) were considerably higher than goats (3.9 and 2.6 %, respectively). The annual prevalence rates showed a significant decline in the fasciolosis and dicrocoeliosis infection in goats (p < 0.001). Data showed significant seasonal pattern for distomatosis in sheep and goats (p < 0.001). Liver condemnations due to fasciolosis were prevalent in sheep and goats slaughtered during spring and autumn, respectively, whereas dicrocoeliosis were common in spring season for both sheep and goats. This survey provides baseline data for the future monitoring of these potentially important parasitic infections in the region. PMID:26688642

  8. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths, lungworms and liver fluke in sheep and goats in Norway.

    PubMed

    Domke, Atle V Meling; Chartier, Christophe; Gjerde, Bjřrn; Leine, Nils; Vatn, Synnřve; Stuen, Snorre

    2013-05-01

    The present study describes the occurrence of various gastrointestinal helminths, lungworms and liver flukes in Norwegian sheep and goats as assessed from faecal samples and post mortem examinations performed between 2007 and 2010. Faecal samples for gastrointestinal nematode egg counts were collected from 77 sheep flocks and 30 dairy goat flocks from three geographical regions in Norway. Additionally, thirty-two lambs and 16 adult goats were euthanized for necropsy examination and for identification of adult gastrointestinal nematodes and tapeworms, lungworms and liver flukes. The survey showed that there was a higher mean excretion of trichostrongyle eggs in sheep than in goats at the individual level (392 EPG vs. 154 EPG, p<0.001). For both host species, the mean prevalence and intensity of excreted trichostrongyle eggs were significantly higher in the southern coastal region compared with the inland and northern regions (p<0.001). Third stage larvae of Trichostrongylus/Teladorsagia, Haemonchus and Nematodirus type were the most prevalent ones in the coprocultures from sheep, whereas larvae of Trichostrongylus/Teladorsagia and Nematodirus type dominated in goats. The most prevalent gastrointestinal nematode species found at necropsy was Teladorsagia circumcincta (75.0 and 81.2% respectively in sheep and goats), while the largest mean worm burdens were recorded for Haemonchus contortus in sheep (724±623) and T. circumcincta in goats (377±529). Other gastrointestinal nematode species were present at low prevalence or in low numbers. Fasciola hepatica was only found in necropsied sheep from the coastal region with a prevalence of 18.8%. The lungworm Mullerius capillaris was found from all regions in necropsied goats (31.2%) and from coastal area in sheep (3.1%). The present study indicates that H. contortus and Nematodirus battus have a wider geographical distribution to the north than expected, and describes to our knowledge the northernmost occurrence of H. contortus in the Nordic countries. PMID:23298563

  9. Wherefrom and whereabouts of an alien: the American liver fluke Fascioloides magna in Austria: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sattmann, Helmut; Hörweg, Christoph; Gaub, Larissa; Feix, Anna Sophia; Haider, Michaela; Walochnik, Julia; Rabitsch, Wolfgang; Prosl, Heinrich

    2014-04-01

    The giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna, an invasive species originating from North America, was recorded in Austria in the wild for the first time in 2000. Since then, various data concerning the epidemiology in snail intermediate hosts and cervid final hosts have been reported. Galba truncatula acts as snail intermediate host, and red deer, roe deer and fallow deer act as final hosts. G. truncatula is abundant throughout the region, especially along muddy shores of slow-flowing branches of the river system. Prevalence in deer (20-100?%) is much higher than in snails (0.03-0.2?%). Despite medical treatment of parts of the deer population, the parasite has successfully established itself on both sides of the Danube floodplain environments southeast of Vienna. Genetic analysis revealed that the infection of Austrian deer populations apparently originated from foci in the Czech Republic or from populations of Danube tributaries. Areas adjacent southwards, which will soon be joined through wildlife crossings, have not yet evidenced F. magna. Nonetheless, these environments are inhabited by host snails and deer and therefore constitute suitable habitats for F. magna. Invading alien parasites not only threaten native individual hosts but also influence host populations, thus potentially also modifying parasite communities and interactions. The host range of F. magna includes a variety of potential hosts, notably other Lymnaeidae as potential intermediate hosts and various ungulates, including sheep and cattle, as final hosts. Because eradication after medical treatment was unsuccessful, and due to the risk of further spread of the parasite into unaffected regions, enhanced control strategies need to be developed. We recommend assessment of introduction pathways and dispersal, continuous monitoring of host abundance and distribution and the prevalence of flukes in intermediate and final hosts, as well as coordinated and concerted actions with neighbouring countries. This strategy could help to reduce potential negative impacts of this and other invasive parasites on host populations in Europe. PMID:24535172

  10. [Bionomy, occurrence and importance of the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna), an important parasite of free-living ruminants].

    PubMed

    Spakulová, M; Corba, J; Várady, M; Rajský, D

    1997-05-01

    The paper summarizes the most important knowledge of the giant liver fluke of ruminants, Fascioloides magna, with respect to its occurrence throughout the Northern Hemisphere, its fenotypic and genetic discriminative characteristics, its pathogenicity in various obligatory and facultative hosts and possible prophylaxis and medical control. The paper emphasizes the fact that new natural foci with heavy F. magna infections of deer regularly occur in Europe. PMID:9265369

  11. Stage-specific expression and antigenicity of glycoprotein glycans isolated from the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Talabnin, Krajang; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Saichua, Prasert; Wongkham, Sopit; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Boons, Geert-Jan; Sripa, Banchob; Tiemeyer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Infection by Opisthorchis viverrini (liver fluke) is a major public health problem in southeastern Asia, resulting in hepatobiliary disease and cholangiocarcinoma. Fluke surface glycoconjugates are prominently presented to the host, thereby constituting a crucial immunological interface that can determine the parasite’s success in establishing infection. Therefore, N- and O-linked glycoprotein glycan profiles of the infective metacercarial stage and of the mature adult were investigated by nanospray ionization-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (NSI-MSn). Glycan immunogenicity was investigated by immunobloting with serum from infected humans. Metacercariae and adult parasites exhibit similar glycan diversity, although the prevalence of individual glycans and glycan classes varies by stage. The N-glycans of the metacercaria are mostly high mannose and monofucosylated, truncated-type oligosaccharides (62.7%), with the remainder processed to complex and hybrid type glycans (37.3%). The N-linked glycan profile of the adult is also dominated by high mannose and monofucosylated, truncated-type oligosaccharides (80.0%), with a smaller contribution from complex and hybrid type glycans (20.0%). At both stages, complex and hybrid type glycans are detected as mono-, bi-, tri-, or tetra-antennary structures. In metacercariae and adults, O-linked glycans are detected as mono- to pentasaccharides. The mucin type core 1 structure, Gal?1-3GalNAc, predominates in both stages but is less prevalent in the adult than in the metacercaria. Immunogenic recognition of liver fluke glycoproteins is reduced after deglycosylation but infected human serum was unable to recognize glycans released from peptides. Therefore, the most potent liver fluke antigenic epitopes are mixed determinants, comprised of glycan and polypeptide elements. PMID:23174105

  12. Evaluation of the comparative efficacy of a moxidectin plus triclabendazole pour-on solution against adult and immature liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, in cattle.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Thomas; Bartram, David; Van Brussel, Leen; Bo, Liu; Scott-Baird, Emer; Rugg, Douglas

    2012-10-26

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a pour-on solution containing moxidectin plus triclabendazole (MOX plus TCBZ) against immature and adult stages of the liver fluke in cattle and compare the efficacy with other commercially available preparations. To this end, 104 male Holstein-Friesian calves aged between 3 and 4 months, were randomly allocated to 13 groups of eight animals each, and infected with approximately 500 Fasciola hepatica metacercariae. One group remained untreated, four groups were treated with MOX plus TCBZ at a dose rate of 0.1 mL/kg, four other groups were treated with ivermectin (IVM) plus clorsulon injectable at a dose rate of 0.02 mL/kg, and the remaining four groups were treated with IVM plus closantel pour-on at a dose rate of 0.1 mL/kg. Each treatment was applied to one of the groups at 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after the experimental infection. At necropsy (99-102 days after infection), all untreated animals were infected with a minimum of 30 flukes. The MOX plus TCBZ treated animals had significantly (P<0.0001) lower fluke counts compared to the untreated control animals at all time points after treatment. Efficacy against 8-week old and adult flukes was >99.5%. For 6-week old immature fluke, the efficacy was 98.0% and for 4-week old immature fluke the efficacy was 90.9%. The IVM plus closantel pour-on treated animals had significantly lower fluke counts compared to the untreated control animals for adult and 8-week old flukes (P<0.0001), and for 6-week old flukes (P=0.002). The efficacy was 26.8%, 68.2%, 90.6% and 99.3% against 4-week, 6-week and 8-week old immature flukes, and adult flukes respectively. The IVM plus clorsulon treated animals had significantly lower fluke counts compared to the untreated control animals for adult (P<0.0001) and 8-week old (P<0.05) flukes. The efficacy was 29.7%, 43.4%, 53.2% and 99.2% against 4-week, 6-week and 8-week old immature flukes, and adult flukes respectively. For treatments at 4, 6 and 8 weeks after infection, the fluke counts were significantly (P<0.0001) lower for the MOX plus TCBZ treatment than for IVM plus closantel or IVM plus clorsulon. The results confirm the high efficacy (>90%) of the MOX plus TCBZ pour-on combination against 4-week old to adult liver fluke in cattle. The IVM plus closantel pour-on combination was effective (>90%) against 8-week old and adult flukes, but had low efficacy against 4- and 6-week old fluke. The IVM plus clorsulon injectable combination was effective (>90%) against adult fluke only. PMID:22579500

  13. The role of hepatic myofibroblasts in liver cirrhosis in fallow deer (Dama dama) naturally infected with giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper describes liver cirrhosis in 35 fallow deer infected with the giant liver fluke, as well as the distribution, origin, and role of myofibroblasts in its development. Results In liver of infected deer, stripes of connective tissue are wound around groups of degenerated and regenerated liver lobuli. In the connective tissue, lymphocytes and macrophages which often contain parasite hematin are also present. The walls of the bile ducts are thickened, the epithelium multiplied with mucous metaplasia, and desquamated cells, parasite eggs and brown pigment are present in their lumen. In the livers with cirrhosis, immunopositivity to ?-SMA and desmin was observed in cells in portal and septal spaces, at the edge between fibrotic septa and the surrounding parenchyma and in perisinusoidal spaces. These cells vary in size, they are round, oval, spindle-shaped or irregular in shape, similar to vascular smooth muscle cells. The derangement of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions detected in chronic cholangiopathies is most probably the pro-fibrogenic mechanism in liver cirrhosis of fallow deer (Dama dama) infected with the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna). Conclusion Myofibroblasts, especially hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), play an important role in the synthesis of extracellular matrix components in the development of parasitic fibrosis and cirrhosis in the liver of fallow deer. PMID:23497565

  14. Fine-scale mapping of vector habitats using very high resolution satellite imagery: a liver fluke case-study.

    PubMed

    De Roeck, Els; Van Coillie, Frieke; De Wulf, Robert; Soenen, Karen; Charlier, Johannes; Vercruysse, Jozef; Hantson, Wouter; Ducheyne, Els; Hendrickx, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The visualization of vector occurrence in space and time is an important aspect of studying vector-borne diseases. Detailed maps of possible vector habitats provide valuable information for the prediction of infection risk zones but are currently lacking for most parts of the world. Nonetheless, monitoring vector habitats from the finest scales up to farm level is of key importance to refine currently existing broad-scale infection risk models. Using Fasciola hepatica, a parasite liver fluke, as a case in point, this study illustrates the potential of very high resolution (VHR) optical satellite imagery to efficiently and semi-automatically detect detailed vector habitats. A WorldView2 satellite image capable of <5m resolution was acquired in the spring of 2013 for the area around Bruges, Belgium, a region where dairy farms suffer from liver fluke infections transmitted by freshwater snails. The vector thrives in small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds, ditches and other humid areas consisting of open water, aquatic vegetation and/or inundated grass. These water bodies can be as small as a few m2 and are most often not present on existing land cover maps because of their small size. We present a classification procedure based on object-based image analysis (OBIA) that proved valuable to detect SWBs at a fine scale in an operational and semi-automated way. The classification results were compared to field and other reference data such as existing broad-scale maps and expert knowledge. Overall, the SWB detection accuracy reached up to 87%. The resulting fine-scale SWB map can be used as input for spatial distribution modelling of the liver fluke snail vector to enable development of improved infection risk mapping and management advice adapted to specific, local farm situations. PMID:25599638

  15. Sequence analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes of the giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae): intraspecific variation and differentiation from Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Spakulová, Marta; Horácková, Eva; Turceková, Ludmila; Novobilský, Adam; Beck, Relja; Koudela, Bretislav; Marinculi?, Albert; Rajský, Dusan; Pybus, Margo

    2008-02-01

    Complete sequences of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes of the giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna are presented. In particular, small subunit (18S) and internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA), as well as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit I (nad1) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), were analyzed. The 18S and ITS sequences were compared with previously published sequences of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Fixed interspecific genetic differences were determined that allow molecular differentiation of F. magna and F. hepatica using either the PCR-RFLP method or PCR amplification of species-specific DNA regions. Additionally, intraspecific sequence polymorphism of the complete cox1 and nad1 mitochondrial genes in geographically distinct F. magna populations was determined. Based on the sequence divergences, short (< 500 bp) variable regions suitable for broader biogeographical studies of giant liver fluke were designed. PMID:18372622

  16. Efficacy of two formulations of albendazole against liver flukes in cattle.

    PubMed

    Craig, T M; Qureshi, T; Miller, D K; Wade, C G; Rogers, J A

    1992-07-01

    Albendazole (10 mg/kg of body weight) was administered as a drench suspension or as a feed additive to 24 cattle with naturally acquired infections of Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna. Cattle were euthanatized 16 to 30 days after treatment, and the number of viable flukes was counted. Viable F hepatica and F magna were decreased by 91.4% and 70.6% for drench administration and by 82.9% and 71.9% for the feed additive treatment, respectively. There was no significant difference between the efficacy of the 2 formulations in decreasing viable fluke numbers, compared with untreated controls. PMID:1497187

  17. The effects of farm management practices on liver fluke prevalence and the current internal parasite control measures employed on Irish dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Selemetas, Nikolaos; Phelan, Paul; O'Kiely, Padraig; de Waal, Theo

    2015-01-30

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica is responsible for major production losses in cattle farms. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of farm management practices on liver fluke prevalence on Irish dairy farms and to document the current control measures against parasitic diseases. In total, 369 dairy farms throughout Ireland were sampled from October to December 2013, each providing a single bulk tank milk (BTM) sample for liver fluke antibody-detection ELISA testing and completing a questionnaire on their farm management. The analysis of samples showed that cows on 78% (n=288) of dairy farms had been exposed to liver fluke. There was a difference (P<0.05) between farms where cows were positive or negative for liver fluke antibodies in (a) the total number of adult dairy cows in herds, (b) the number of adult dairy cows contributing to BTM samples, and (c) the size of the total area of grassland, with positive farms having larger numbers in each case. There was no difference (P>0.05) between positive and negative farms in (a) the grazing of dry cows together with replacement cows, (b) whether or not grazed grassland was mowed for conservation, (c) the type of drinking water provision system, (d) spreading of cattle manure on grassland or (e) for grazing season length (GSL; mean=262.5 days). Also, there were differences (P<0.001) between drainage statuses for GSL with farms on good drainage having longer GSL than moderately drained farms. The GSL for dairy cows on farms with good drainage was 11 days longer than for those with moderate drainage (P<0.001). The percentage of farmers that used an active ingredient during the non-lactating period against liver fluke, gastrointestinal nematodes, lungworm, and rumen fluke was 96%, 85%, 77% and 90%, respectively. Albendazole was the most frequently used active ingredient for treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes (57%), liver fluke (40%) and lungworm (47%), respectively. There was a difference (P<0.05) in the use of triclabendazole and albendazole between positive and negative farms, with triclabendazole use being more common in positive farms. This study highlighted differences in dairy management practices between Irish farms with dairy herds exposed or not exposed to liver fluke and stressed the need of fine-scale mapping of the disease patterns even at farm level to increase the accuracy of risk models. Also, comprehensive advice and professional support services to farmers on appropriate farm management practices are very important for an effective anthelmintic control strategy. PMID:25591405

  18. Low Genetic Diversity in Wide-Spread Eurasian Liver Fluke Opisthorchis felineus Suggests Special Demographic History of This Trematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Brusentsov, Ilja I.; Katokhin, Alexey V.; Brusentsova, Irina V.; Shekhovtsov, Sergei V.; Borovikov, Sergei N.; Goncharenko, Grigoriy G.; Lider, Lyudmila A.; Romashov, Boris V.; Rusinek, Olga T.; Shibitov, Samat K.; Suleymanov, Marat M.; Yevtushenko, Andrey V.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.

    2013-01-01

    Opisthorchis felineus or Siberian liver fluke is a trematode parasite (Opisthorchiidae) that infects the hepato-biliary system of humans and other mammals. Despite its public health significance, this wide-spread Eurasian species is one of the most poorly studied human liver flukes and nothing is known about its population genetic structure and demographic history. In this paper, we attempt to fill this gap for the first time and to explore the genetic diversity in O. felineus populations from Eastern Europe (Ukraine, European part of Russia), Northern Asia (Siberia) and Central Asia (Northern Kazakhstan). Analysis of marker DNA fragments from O. felineus mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 3 (cox1, cox3) and nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences revealed that genetic diversity is very low across the large geographic range of this species. Microevolutionary processes in populations of trematodes may well be influenced by their peculiar biology. Nevertheless, we suggest that lack of population genetics structure observed in O. felineus can be primarily explained by the Pleistocene glacial events and subsequent sudden population growth from a very limited group of founders. Rapid range expansion of O. felineus through Asian and European territories after severe bottleneck points to a high dispersal potential of this trematode species. PMID:23634228

  19. Liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) naturally infecting introduced European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) in northern Patagonia: phenotype, prevalence and potential risk.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Pablo F; Cataldo, Sophia Di; Fantozzi, M Cecilia; Deis, Erika; Isenrath, Gabriela Diaz; Viberti, Gabriela; Artigas, Patricio; Peixoto, Raquel; Valero, M Adela; Sierra, Roberto Mera Y; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Fascioliasis has recently been included in the WHO list of Neglected Zoonotic Diseases. Besides being a major veterinary health problem, fascioliasis has large underdeveloping effects on the human communities affected. Though scarcely considered in fascioliasis epidemiology, it is well recognized that both native and introduced wildlife species may play a significant role as reservoirs of the disease. The objectives are to study the morphological characteristics of Fasciola hepatica adults and eggs in a population of Lepus europaeus, to assess liver fluke prevalence, and to analyze the potential reservoir role of the European brown hare in northern Patagonia, Argentina, where fascioliasis is endemic. Measures of F. hepatica found in L. europaeus from northern Patagonia demonstrate that the liver fluke is able to fully develop in wild hares and to shed normal eggs through their faeces. Egg shedding to the environment is close to the lower limit obtained for pigs, a domestic animal whose epidemiological importance in endemic areas has already been highlighted. The former, combined with the high prevalence found (14.28%), suggest an even more important role in the transmission cycle than previously considered. The results obtained do not only remark the extraordinary plasticity and adaptability of this trematode species to different host species, but also highlight the role of the European brown hare, and other NIS, as reservoirs capable for parasite spillback to domestic and native cycle, representing a potentially important, but hitherto neglected, cause of disease emergence. PMID:26204194

  20. High Prevalence of Human Liver Infection by Amphimerus spp. Flukes, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopińa, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Kumazawa, Hideo; Eisenberg, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Amphimerus spp. flukes are known to infect mammals, but human infections have not been confirmed. Microscopy of fecal samples from 397 persons from Ecuador revealed Opisthorchiidae eggs in 71 (24%) persons. Light microscopy of adult worms and scanning electron microscopy of eggs were compatible with descriptions of Amphimerus spp. This pathogen was only observed in communities that consumed undercooked fish. PMID:22172165

  1. The giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna (Bassi 1875) in cervids in the Czech Republic and potential of its spreading to Germany.

    PubMed

    Novobilský, Adam; Horácková, Eva; Hirtová, Lenka; Modrý, David; Koudela, Bretislav

    2007-02-01

    The giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna is an important parasite of cervids in Europe. From September 2003 to December 2005, faecal samples and livers of red deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) were investigated to determine the current distribution of the fluke in the Czech Republic. Faecal samples were collected from 20 different areas, and livers of hunted deer were dissected from each locality to confirm F. magna infection. The prevalence of F. magna in examined areas determined by coprological examination varied from 4% to 95%. Moreover, new foci of F. magna infection were discovered in all localities in the Sumava mountains where F. magna was observed; this has epizootiological importance due to the possibility of the spread of F. magna into the German territory (Bavaria). PMID:17016724

  2. [Incidence and control of the American giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, in a population of wild ungulates in the Danubian wetlands east of Vienna].

    PubMed

    Ursprung, Josef; Joachim, Anja; Prosl, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Fascioloides magna,the giant liver fluke, is an introduced parasite imported to Europe with infected game which is endemic in the Austrian wetlands of the Danube from Vienna to the Slovakian border. Due to its pathogenicity (especially in roe deer) and its potential of transmission to domestic ruminants a project on the epidemiology and control of this parasite was carried out between 2000 and 2005. To assess distribution faecal droppings from red deer were collected in an area along the Danube and livers of red and roe deer shot or found dead were examined. Simultaneously, triclabendazole-medicated feed was offered repeatedly in several areas of known fluke presence from 2001. The average prevalence of infection as demonstrated by Fascioloides eggs in droppings (n = 145) was 6.3%, with > 50% in some areas. Infection rates decreased from 11.3% (01/2001) to 1.5% (04/2002) in the whole area. In Fischamend, a highly endemic area, prevalences in monthly samples (n = 25) decreased from 70% (01/2001) to less than 1% (01/2005). Similarly, the number of eggs per gram of faeces was significantly reduced. Of 457 red deer livers 15.8% were positive. In the Fischamend area, a reduction of positive livers was also found (2000:100%; 2005:13%), as well as a reduction of the numbers of flukes/liver. Control of F. magna in the Danubian wetlands by anthelmintic treatment proved to be successful although eradication was not achieved. PMID:17009716

  3. ClonorESTdb: a comprehensive database for Clonorchis sinensis EST sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis, which is primarily caused by liver fluke (Platyhelminthes), is a fatal infectious disease that is mainly associated with bile duct malignancy and the subsequent development of cholangiocarcinoma. Thus, a genomic approach now represents an important step to further our knowledge of biology and the pathology of these parasites. The results of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing need to be well organized into databases to provide an integrated set of tools and functional information. Findings Here, the ClonorESTdb database represents a collection of Clonorchis sinensis ESTs that is intended as a resource for parasite functional genomics. A total of 55,736 successful EST sequences, which are cleaned and clustered into non-redundant 13,305 C. sinensis assembled EST sequences (6,497 clusters and 6,808 singletons), were obtained from three in-house prepared cDNA libraries of C. sinensis at different developmental stages. The assembled consensus sequences were annotated using the BLAST algorithm or/and hmm against NCBI NR, UniProt, KEGG and InterProScan. The ClonorESTdb database provides functional annotation, their expression profiles, tandem repeats and putative single nucleotide polymorphisms with utility tools such as local BLAST search and text retrieval. Conclusions This resource enables the researcher to identify and compare expression signatures under different biological stages and promotes ongoing parasite drug and vaccine development and biological research. Database URL: http://pathod.cdc.go.kr/clonorestdb/ PMID:24957044

  4. Pharmacological and morphological characteristics of the muscular system of the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna - Bassi 1875).

    PubMed

    Trailovi?, Saša M; Marinkovi?, Darko; Trailovi?, Jelena Nedeljkovi?; Milovanovi?, Mirjana; Marjanovi?, Djordje S; Ani?i?, Milan R

    2015-12-01

    Motility is required for feeding, reproduction and maintenance of the fluke in the host's liver. According to that, the neuromuscular system can be an attractive drugable target for chemotherapy. Musculature of the Fascioloides magna is organized into three layers, an outer circular layer, beneath this layer the longitudinal layer, and third, the oblique, or diagonal layer underlies the longitudinal layer. In our study, the administration of atropine or caffeine did not cause classic muscle contractions of F. magna muscle strips. However, the Electrical Field Stimulation (EFS) induced stable and repeatable contractions, which enabled us to examine their sensitivity to the various substances. Acetylcholine (ACh) (300 ?M and 1 mM), caused only a slight relaxation, without affecting the amplitude of spontaneous contractions or the amplitude of contractions induced by EFS. Contrary to that, atropine (100 ?M) caused a significant increase in the basal tone and an increase of EFS-induced contractions. If acetylcholine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in trematodes, the described effects of atropine are achieved by the blockade of inhibitory neurotransmission. On the other hand, with respect to the process of excitation-contraction coupling, the plant alkaloid ryanodine (30 ?M) significantly reduced the basal tone, as well as EFS-induced contractions of F. magna muscle strips. Ryanodine inhibited the potentiating effect of atropine on the basal tone and contractions caused by EFS, which indicates that the contractile effect of atropine is dependent on Ca(++) release from intracellular stores. Caffeine (500 ?M) caused relaxation of fluke muscle strips and at the same time significantly enhanced the EFS-induced contractions. Both effects of caffeine can be explained by entry of extracellular Ca(++) into muscle cells. The muscle contractility of F. magna depends both on the entry of extracellular calcium, and calcium release from intracellular stores, which are under the control of RyRs. Our results also suggest that antitrematodal drugs could potentially be developed from substances with selective anti-cholinergic activity. PMID:26429130

  5. Characterisation of a novel panel of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, using a next generation sequencing approach?

    PubMed Central

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Allen, Katherine; LaCourse, James; Williams, Diana J.; Paterson, Steve; Hodgkinson, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica is an economically important pathogen of sheep and cattle and has been described by the WHO as a re-emerging zoonosis. Control is heavily reliant on the use of drugs, particularly triclabendazole and as a result resistance has now emerged. The population structure of F. hepatica is not well known, yet it can impact on host–parasite interactions and parasite control with drugs, particularly regarding the spread of triclabendazole resistance. We have identified 2448 potential microsatellites from 83 Mb of F. hepatica genome sequence using msatfinder. Thirty-five loci were developed and optimised for microsatellite PCR, resulting in a panel of 15 polymorphic loci, with a range of three to 15 alleles. This panel was validated on genomic DNA from 46 adult F. hepatica; 38 liver flukes sourced from a Northwest abattoir, UK and 8 liver flukes from an established isolate (Shrewsbury; Ridgeway Research). Evidence for null alleles was found at four loci (Fh_1, Fh_8, Fh_13 and Fh_14), which showed markedly higher levels of homozygosity than the remaining 11 loci. Of the 38 liver flukes isolated from cattle livers (n = 10) at the abattoir, 37 genotypes were identified. Using a multiplex approach all 15 loci could be amplified from several life cycle stages that typically yield low amounts of DNA, including metacercariae, the infective life cycle stage present on pasture, highlighting the utility of this multiplex microsatellite panel. This study reports the largest panel of microsatellite markers available to date for population studies of F. hepatica and the first multiplex panel of microsatellite markers that can be used for several life cycle stages. PMID:25796359

  6. Landscape influence on spatial patterns of meningeal worm and liver fluke infection in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Vanderwaal, Kimberly L; Windels, Steve K; Olson, Bryce T; Vannatta, J Trevor; Moen, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Parasites that primarily infect white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), such as liver flukes (Fascioloides magna) and meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis), can cause morbidity and mortality when incidentally infecting moose (Alces alces). Ecological factors are expected to influence spatial variation in infection risk by affecting the survival of free-living life stages outside the host and the abundance of intermediate gastropod hosts. Here, we investigate how ecology influenced the fine-scale distribution of these parasites in deer in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Deer pellet groups (N = 295) were sampled for the presence of P. tenuis larvae and F. magna eggs. We found that deer were significantly more likely to be infected with P. tenuis in habitats with less upland deciduous forest and more upland mixed conifer forest and shrub, a pattern that mirrored microhabitat differences in gastropod abundances. Deer were also more likely to be infected with F. magna in areas with more marshland, specifically rooted-floating aquatic marshes (RFAMs). The environment played a larger role than deer density in determining spatial patterns of infection for both parasites, highlighting the importance of considering ecological factors on all stages of a parasite's life cycle in order to understand its occurrence within the definitive host. PMID:25498206

  7. Development of high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for population studies of Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), the giant liver fluke of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Radvánský, Ján; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Minárik, Gabriel; Kádaši, Ludevít

    2011-01-01

    The high-resolution melting (HRM) technique was successfully optimized as fast and effective method for population study of digenetic fluke, Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), originally North American liver parasite of free-living and domestic ruminants. Previously selected variable region (439 bp) of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) of 249 fluke individuals from enzootic European and North American regions were sequenced and mutually compared. The sequence analysis of partial cox1 revealed presence of seven structurally different haplotypes. Based on the sequence structure and alignments of six of them (Ha1-Ha6), three internal probes were designed and applied in HRM-based haplotype determination of all F. magna specimens. HRM analysis, performed with three designed probes, resulted in classification of samples into the seven haplogroups, equally with their assortment according to the sequence analysis. The representative of the haplotype, which was not involved in probe design (Ha7), was characterized by a unique melting curve shape as well. This provided an evidence of optimally settled conditions in HRM assay and indicated a probability of successful discrimination of novel haplotypes in future population studies on F. magna. The successful optimization of HRM method stands for an opportunity of detection of genetically unknown North American variants of F. magna and promises its application as fast and cheap screening technique for phylogeography studies of the giant liver fluke on its original continent. PMID:20967463

  8. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection. PMID:26391171

  9. UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase from the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica: biochemical characterization of the enzyme and identification of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zinsser, Veronika L; Lindert, Steffen; Banford, Samantha; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Leloir pathway enzyme uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose 4'-epimerase from the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (FhGALE) was identified and characterized. The enzyme can be expressed in, and purified from, Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme is active: the K(m) (470 ?M) is higher than the corresponding human enzyme (HsGALE), whereas the k(cat) (2.3 s(-1)) is substantially lower. FhGALE binds NAD(+) and has shown to be dimeric by analytical gel filtration. Like the human and yeast GALEs, FhGALE is stabilized by the substrate UDP-galactose. Molecular modelling predicted that FhGALE adopts a similar overall fold to HsGALE and that tyrosine 155 is likely to be the catalytically critical residue in the active site. In silico screening of the National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Program library identified 40 potential inhibitors of FhGALE which were tested in vitro. Of these, 6 showed concentration-dependent inhibition of FhGALE, some with nanomolar IC50 values. Two inhibitors (5-fluoroorotate and N-[(benzyloxy)carbonyl]leucyltryptophan) demonstrated selectivity for FhGALE over HsGALE. These compounds also thermally destabilized FhGALE in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, the selectivity of 5-fluoroorotate was not shown by orotic acid, which differs in structure by 1 fluorine atom. These results demonstrate that, despite the structural and biochemical similarities of FhGALE and HsGALE, it is possible to discover compounds which preferentially inhibit FhGALE. PMID:25124392

  10. Oral delivery of Bacillus subtilis spore expressing enolase of Clonorchis sinensis in rat model: induce systemic and local mucosal immune responses and has no side effect on liver function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyun; Chen, Tingjin; Xie, Zhizhi; Liang, Pei; Qu, Honglin; Shang, Mei; Mao, Qiang; Ning, Dan; Tang, Zeli; Shi, Mengchen; Zhou, Lina; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2015-07-01

    Caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater fish containing infective metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensis, human clonorchiasis remains a major public health problem in China. In previous study, we had expressed enolase from C. sinensis (CsENO) on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore and the recombinant spore induced a pronounced protection in terms of reduced worm burden and eggs per gram feces, suggesting B. subtilis spore as an ideal vehicle for antigen delivery by oral treatment and CsENO as a promising vaccine candidate against clonorchiasis. In the current study, we detected CsENO-specific IgG and IgA levels both in serum and in intestinal mucus from rats orally administrated with B. subtilis spore surface expressing CsENO by ELISA. Lysozyme levels in serum and in intestinal mucus were analyzed too. In addition, IgA-secreting cells in intestine epithelium of the rats were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The intestinal villi lengths of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were also measured. Rats orally treated with B. subtilis spore or normal saline were used as controls. Our results showed that, compared with the control groups, oral administration of B. subtilis spore expressing CsENO induced both systemic and local mucosal immune response. The recombinant spores also enhanced non-specific immune response in rats. The spores had no side effect on liver function. Moreover, it might facilitate food utilization and digestion of the rats. Our work will pave the way to clarify the involved mechanisms of protective efficacy elicited by B. subtilis spore expressing CsENO and encourage us to carry out more assessment trails of the oral treated spore to develop vaccine against clonorchiasis. PMID:25877387

  11. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 ?g, 100 ?g and 150 ?g) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interferon-? (IFN-?); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-? and IFN-? (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 ?g) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to successfully ameliorate the pathology of CIA. PMID:25992888

  12. Liver Fluke Infection and Fish Consumption in Khon Kaen, Thailand: A Case Study on Negotiating the Middle Ground between Western Science and Eastern Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiphak, Sara

    This research investigates why typical strategies for promoting health, prolonging life, and preventing disease do not work in many communities. I use the liver fluke infection endemic in Khon Kaen, Thailand to explore the middle ground between Western science and Eastern culture. Prior work on the O.viverrini infection in Khon Kaen, Thailand has focused almost exclusively on developing effective medical treatment for the liver fluke infection. This dissertation employs a case study designed to explore the conditions that created and perpetuate the problem in the first place. In concrete terms, I analyze how the worldviews of local villagers shape their attitudes toward life (and death), which in turn determine if they engage in the high-risk behavior -- eating undercooked fish -- that makes them vulnerable to the infection. My research focuses on these people in-situ over a three-month period, and includes data from participant-observation, interviews, and video-recordings. This work seeks to illuminate how people's thinking and reasoning skills, and personal/cultural identities affect their abilities to learn and act on new health concepts. This potentially provides a window into future educational strategies in a complex world.

  13. Efficacy of treatment of cattle for liver fluke at housing: influence of differences in flukicidal activity against juvenile Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Forbes, A B; Reddick, D; Stear, M J

    2015-03-28

    Flukicides are commonly administered at housing to cattle that have grazed fluke-infected pastures or that have been purchased from endemic areas. The choice of product is determined by numerous factors, one of which is the stages of Fasciola hepatica that are killed. Flukicides can be categorised into three main groups: (A) those that kill all juvenile stages and adults; (B) those that kill juveniles from six to eight weeks of age and adults and (C) those that kill adults only. This study was conducted on a commercial beef farm in Scotland and was designed to compare the efficacy of flukicides from each of these three classes in terms of their effects on faecal egg output, coproantigen and liveweight gain. The majority of animals in the untreated control group were positive for coproantigen, fluke eggs or both throughout the study duration of 16?weeks. Egg reappearance interval following housing treatment was eight weeks for clorsulon and 13?weeks for nitroxynil, though patent infections in both groups developed in only a small minority of animals; no fluke eggs were recovered from cattle treated with triclabendazole. Coproantigen was detected four weeks before the reappearance of fluke eggs in the dung. Animals treated with flukicides had significantly fewer faecal samples positive for eggs (P<0.006) and coproantigen (P<0.05) following treatment compared with the controls. Despite differences in the efficacy profiles among the flukicide-treated groups, there were no significant differences (P>0.05) in growth rates among any of the four treatment groups. There was, however, a significant negative association (P<0.001) between fluke positivity at housing and subsequent growth performance, irrespective of treatment group. PMID:25549916

  14. Development and characterization of multiplex panels of polymorphic microsatellite loci in giant liver fluke Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae), using next-generation sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Minárik, Gabriel; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Zvijáková, Ludmila; Stefka, Jan; Pálková, Lenka; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica

    2014-06-01

    The microsatellite markers were designed for the giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, veterinary important liver parasite of free-living and domestic ruminants. Due to its geographic distribution (five enzootic regions across USA and Canada, three permanent European foci) and invasive character, F. magna is an interesting model for population genetics. Out of 667 amplicon candidates generated after NGS, 118 provided the best resolution and were tested with PCR analysis. In total, 56 yielded PCR products of expected size and in 36 of them the declared repetitive motif was identified by Sanger sequencing. After fragment analysis, 12 loci were proved to be polymorphic in individuals from one tested European and four North American populations. These loci were selected for setup of multiplex STR assays and utilized in genotyping of larger sample cohort. The outputs of statistical analyses indicate further global application of 11 conclusive loci in population genetics of the parasite. PMID:24959976

  15. Multiple microembolic brain infarctions in Clonorchis sinensis infestation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Chang, Dae-Il

    2012-08-15

    We report a case of multiple cerebral infarctions as the first symptom of hypereosinophilia with Clonorchis sinensis infestation. The patient showed hypereosinophilia and elevated cardiac enzyme, and the egg test of C. sinensis was positive. CT scans of the chest and the abdomen revealed eosinophilic infiltration in both lung and liver. Over a period of six weeks after praziquantel medication, he recovered. C. sinensis infestation which is endemic in East Asian countries should be considered as a cause of multiple microembolic stroke associated with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome. PMID:22656183

  16. A comparative study of karyotypes and chromosomal location of rDNA genes in important liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae).

    PubMed

    Reblánová, Marianna; Spakulová, Marta; Orosová, Martina; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Rajský, Dušan

    2011-10-01

    Chromosomal characteristics, i.e., number, size, morphology, and location of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters were examined in two medically important liver flukes, Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna (Fasciolidae), using conventional Giemsa staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with ribosomal 18S rDNA probe. A comparison of F. magna and F. hepatica karyotypes confirmed significant differences in all chromosomal features. Whilst the karyotype of F. hepatica comprised ten pairs of chromosomes (one metacentric and nine medium-sized subtelocentrics and submetacentrics; 2n?=?20, n?=?1 m?+?5 sm?+?4 st; TCL?=?49.9 ?m), the complement of F. magna was composed of 11 pairs of medium-sized subtelocentrics and submeta-metacentrics (2n?=?22, n?=?9 st?+?1 sm?+?1 sm-m; TCL?=?35.2 ?m). Noticeable differences were found mainly in length and morphology of first chromosome pair. It was metacentric and 9.0 ?m long in F. hepatica while subtelocentric and 4.7 ?m long in F. magna. Although FISH with rDNA probe revealed a single cluster of ribosomal genes in both species, conspicuous interspecific differences were displayed by chromosomal location of ribosomal loci (i.e., NORs). The signals were found on short arms of fifth homologous pair in F. hepatica; however, they were detected in pericentromeric regions of the long arms of tenth pair in F. magna. The observed cytogenetic differences were interpreted in terms of karyotype evolution of fasciolid flukes; F. hepatica may be regarded phylogenetically younger than F. magna. The present paper provides a pilot study on molecular cytogenetics within a group of hermaphroditic digenetic flukes. PMID:21509448

  17. In vitro evaluation of anthelmintic property of ethno-veterinary plant extracts against the liver fluke Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Jeyathilakan, N; Murali, K; Anandaraj, A; Abdul Basith, S

    2012-04-01

    The present study was envisaged to evaluate the efficacy of ethno-medicinal plant aqueous extracts such as Allium sativum, Lawsonia inermis, and Opuntia ficus indica in vitro in comparison with the chemotherapeutic agent, Oxyclozanide on Fasciola gigantica adults. The efficacy was evaluated by gross visual motility and mortality of F. gigantica with score index, light microscopic examination of carmine stained flukes and histopathology of treated flukes. Based on the in vitro trials conducted using above plant extracts at 1 percent, 2.5 percent and 5 percent concentration, the extracts of O. ficus indica showed flukicidal effect at 2.5 and 5% concentration. However A. sativum and L. inermis were effective at 5% concentration only. The study indicated the potential for developing herbal-based anthelmintics to control F. gigantica in livestock. PMID:23543611

  18. Cytokine/Chemokine Secretion and Proteomic Identification of Upregulated Annexin A1 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cocultured with the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Intuyod, Kitti; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cytokine/chemokine secretions and alteration of protein expression from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cocultured with adult liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini) for 6 to 24 h. PBMC-derived proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the cytokines/chemokines in the supernatant were assessed using a cytokine array. Exposure to O. viverrini induced increases in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, costimulating protein, adhesion molecules, and chemotactic chemokines relative to untreated controls. In contrast, secretion of the CD40 ligand, interleukin 16, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1? decreased. Proteomic analysis revealed that expression of 48 proteins was significantly altered in PBMCs stimulated with O. viverrini. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was selected for further study, and immunoblotting showed upregulation of ANXA1 expression in PBMCs after 12 and 24 h coculture with liver flukes. In an in vivo study, transcription and translation of ANXA1 significantly increased in livers of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at 21 days and from 3 months onwards compared to normal controls. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed that ANXA1 was present not only in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells but also in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes, which are in close contact with the parasite and its excretory/secretory products in the biliary system. Expression of ANXA1 increased with time concomitant with bile duct enlargement, bile duct formation, and epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, several cytokines/chemokines secreted by PBMCs and upregulation of ANXA1 in PBMCs and biliary epithelial cells might have a role in host defense against O. viverrini infection and tissue resolution of inflammation. PMID:24614660

  19. The origin of the giant liver fluke, Fascioloides magna (Trematoda: Fasciolidae) from Croatia determined by high-resolution melting screening of mitochondrial cox1 haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Radvánszky, Ján; Beck, Relja

    2013-07-01

    The high-resolution melting (HRM) method, recently optimized as a reliable technique for population study of the European Fascioloides magna populations, was applied to determine an origin of F. magna individuals from Croatia. The structure and frequency of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (439 bp; cox1) haplotypes of 200 Croatian flukes coming from 19 red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) livers were screened and compared with recently determined reference samples of F. magna from all European foci-Italy, Czech Republic, and Danube floodplain forests. While the reference haplotypes Ha1 and Ha2 were specific for flukes from the first European focus of fascioloidosis, the Natural Park La Mandria in Italy, the remaining three haplotypes (Ha3, Ha4, and Ha5) represented parasites from the second focus, Czech Republic. Besides, Ha3 and Ha4 were found also in the third, latest, and still expanding European focus, the Danube floodplain forests. The HRM screening of cox1 haplotypes of Croatian F. magna individuals resulted in classification of samples into the two mitochondrial haplogroups characterized by well-distinguished melting curves. They corresponded to Ha3 and Ha4 reference haplotypes that confirmed the Danube origin of F. magna from Croatia. The results support the theory that the Danube floodplain forests population of F. magna represents uniform genetic pool of the parasite. The spread of F. magna alongside the Danube River down to Croatia was possible due to suitable ecological conditions for definitive and intermediate hosts present in this unique biotope. PMID:23609601

  20. High Prevalence of the Liver Fluke Amphimerus sp. in Domestic Cats and Dogs in an Area for Human Amphimeriasis in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopińa, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Atherton, Richard; Saunders, Matthew; Small, Alexander; Kumazawa, Hideo; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Background Amphimerus sp. is a liver fluke which recently has been shown to have a high prevalence of infection among an indigenous group, Chachi, who reside in a tropical rainforest in the northwestern region of Ecuador. Since it is unknown which animals can act as a reservoir and/or definitive hosts for Amphimerus sp. in this endemic area, a study was done to determine the prevalence of infection in domestic cats and dogs. This information is important to understand the epidemiology, life cycle and control of this parasite. Methodology/Findings In July 2012, three Chachi communities located on Rio Cayapas, province of Esmeraldas, were surveyed. A total of 89 of the 109 registered households participated in the study. Of the 27 cats and 43 dogs found residing in the communities, stool samples were collected from 14 cats and 31 dogs (total of 45 animals) and examined microscopically for the presence of Amphimerus eggs. The prevalence of infection was 71.4% in cats and 38.7% in dogs, with similar rates of infection in all three communities. Significantly more cats were infected than dogs (p = 0.042). Conclusions/Significance The data show a high rate of Amphimerus sp. infection in domestic cats and dogs residing in Chachi communities. It can be concluded that these animals act as definitive and reservoir hosts for this liver fluke and that amphimeriasis is a zoonotic disease. These findings provide important epidemiological data which will aid in the development and implementation of control strategies against the transmission of Amphimerus. PMID:25647171

  1. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south-eastern Asia. PMID:26187786

  2. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune response and helminth infection.

  3. Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line supports in vitro miracidial transformation and early larval development of the deer liver fluke, Fascioloides magna.

    PubMed

    Laursen, J R; Yoshino, T P

    1999-02-01

    A Bge cell co-culture system, previously shown to support the in vitro production of daughter sporocysts from mother sporocysts of Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum, has proven capable of supporting the in vitro development of intramolluscan stages of the deer liver fluke, Fascioloides magna. Miracidia commenced transforming within 4 h of incubation with Bge cells, and had completely shed their epidermal plates within 18-24 h. Redial stages were visible inside in vitro-transformed mother sporocysts after 12-16 days of co-culture with Bge cells, and emerged as fully-developed larvae starting at 14-20 days post-cultivation. Rediae survived over 60 days of in vitro culture, and reached a maximum size of 150-170 microns. Although particulate material was visible in their cecae, rediae were not observed to actively feed on Bge cells. Bge cells did not attach to or encapsulate larval stages at any time throughout the incubation period. Unlike Schistosoma spp., in which a high percentage of miracidia spontaneously shed their ciliated epidermal plates and transformed into mother sporocysts in Chernin's balanced saline solution (CBSS), transformation of F. magna was dependent on Bge cell products. Less than 5% of F. magna miracidia transformed spontaneously in either CBSS or Bge medium with 10% fetal bovine serum (complete or C-Bge). However, incubation of miracidia in either Bge cell-conditioned C-Bge medium or a greater than 30 kDa fraction concentrated from conditioned CBSS increased transformation rates to 67 and 83%, respectively. This secretory Bge cell factor(s) appeared to be protein in nature since its activity was completely abrogated by heat or proteinase K treatments. Overall, these results demonstrate that Bge cells are required for stimulating in vitro miracidial transformation and supporting early larval development of a fasciolid trematode under culture conditions. This is the first report of in vitro development of rediae from miracidia for a digenetic trematode. PMID:10028533

  4. RNA-Seq Reveals Infection-Induced Gene Expression Changes in the Snail Intermediate Host of the Carcinogenic Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Sotillo, Javier; Tesana, Smarn; Laha, Thewarach; Kulsantiwong, Jutharat; Nolan, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos is the snail intermediate host of the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, the leading cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in the Greater Mekong sub-region of Thailand. Despite the severe public health impact of Opisthorchis-induced CCA, knowledge of the molecular interactions occurring between the parasite and its snail intermediate host is scant. The examination of differences in gene expression profiling between uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos could provide clues on fundamental pathways involved in the regulation of snail-parasite interplay. Methodology/Principal Findings Using high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing and extensive bioinformatic analyses, we characterized the transcriptomes of uninfected and O. viverrini-infected B. siamensis goniomphalos. Comparative analyses of gene expression profiling allowed the identification of 7,655 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), associated to 43 distinct biological pathways, including pathways associated with immune defense mechanisms against parasites. Amongst the DEGs with immune functions, transcripts encoding distinct proteases displayed the highest down-regulation in Bithynia specimens infected by O. viverrini; conversely, transcription of genes encoding heat-shock proteins and actins was significantly up-regulated in parasite-infected snails when compared to the uninfected counterparts. Conclusions/Significance The present study lays the foundation for functional studies of genes and gene products potentially involved in immune-molecular mechanisms implicated in the ability of the parasite to successfully colonize its snail intermediate host. The annotated dataset provided herein represents a ready-to-use molecular resource for the discovery of molecular pathways underlying susceptibility and resistance mechanisms of B. siamensis goniomphalos to O. viverrini and for comparative analyses with pulmonate snail intermediate hosts of other platyhelminths including schistosomes. PMID:24676090

  5. Fasciola hepatica - monitoring the milky way? The use of tank milk for liver fluke monitoring in dairy herds as base for treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Duscher, Ruth; Duscher, Georg; Hofer, Johannes; Tichy, Alexander; Prosl, Heinrich; Joachim, Anja

    2011-06-10

    In this study 595 lactating cows originating from 31 carinthian farms were investigated in accordance of liver fluke infection using individual and tank milk as well as individual blood and faecal samples. Two commercial ELISAs were used to test the milk and blood serum, and the results were compared with coproscopy and a commercial copro-antigen ELISA. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and two-graph operating characteristics (TG ROC) of tank milk results were conducted based on the individual milk to determine the minimum reliable in-herd antibody prevalence for the predominant condition in the investigation area. In 17.8% of the examined individuals located in 64.5% of the farms eggs were detected by coproscopy. The copro-antigen ELISA delivered 13.4% positive individuals from 54.8% of the farms. The milk ELISAs showed 42.7% (Euroclone) and 44.2% (Pourquier) positive cows on 90.3% of the farms. The blood samples were positive in 43% (Euroclone) and 45.2% (Pourquier) of the individuals from 90.3% to 96.8% of the herds, respectively. Based on the milk and the blood an average in-herd prevalence of 30-45% can be assumed. The serum and milk samples delivered correlating results with kappa values between 0.94 and 0.97, whereas the coproscopy and copro-antigen ELISA did not correlate well with the ELISA results. The two different ELISA tests highly correlated on individual and on herd level. Both showed a reliable minimum in-herd prevalence of ?20%, meaning that one fifth of the individuals in a herd have to be positive to obtain a positive bulk tank milk result. In the investigated area a higher in-herd prevalence is expected, therefore the tank milk is useful as a monitoring tool and can be used as a basis for intervention strategies. PMID:21334811

  6. The Dynamics of Treg/Th17 and the Imbalance of Treg/Th17 in Clonorchis sinensis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Li, Bo; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Ying; Pan, Wei; Liu, Xiang-Ye; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis, is a chronic parasitic infection regulated by T cell subsets. An imbalance of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) and interleukin (IL)-17-secreting T cells (Th17) may control inflammation and play an important role in the pathogenesis of immune evasion. In the present study, we assessed the dynamics of Treg/Th17 and determined whether the Treg/Th17 ratio is altered in C. sinensis-infected mice. The results showed that the percentages of splenic Treg cells in CD4+ T cells were suppressed on day 14 post-infection (PI) but increased on day 56 PI, while Th17 cells were increased on day 56 PI compared with normal control (NC) mice. The Treg/Th17 ratio steadily increased from day 28 to day 56 PI. The hepatic levels of their specific transcription factors (Foxp3 for Treg and ROR?t for Th17) were increased in C. sinensis-infected mice from day 14 to 56 PI, and significantly higher than those in NC mice. Meanwhile, serum levels of IL-2 and IL-17 were profoundly increased in C. sinensis-infected mice throughout the experiment; while the concentrations of IL-6 and transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) peaked on day 14 PI, but then decreased on day 28 and 56 PI. Our results provide the first evidence of an increased Treg/Th17 ratio in C. sinensis-infected mice, suggesting that a Treg/Th17 imbalance may play a role in disease outcomes of clonorchiasis. PMID:26599407

  7. Use of sequence motifs as barcodes and secondary structures of Internal Transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, rDNA) for identification of the Indian liver fluke, Fasciola (Trematoda: Fasciolidae)

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, PK; Tandon, V; Biswal, DK; Goswami, LM; Chatterjee, A

    2009-01-01

    Most phylogenetic studies using current methods have focused on primary DNA sequence information. However, RNA secondary structures are particularly useful in systematics because they include characteristics that give “morphological” information which is not found in the primary sequence. Also DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat are useful for identification of trematodes. The species of liver flukes of the genus Fasciola (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Fasciolidae) are obligate parasitic trematodes residing in the large biliary ducts of herbivorous mammals. While Fasciola hepatica has a cosmopolitan distribution, the other major species, i.e., F. gigantica is reportedly prevalent in the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Asia. To determine the Fasciola sp. of Assam (India) origin based on rDNA molecular data, ribosomal ITS2 region was sequenced (EF027103) and analysed. NCBI databases were used for sequence homology analysis and the phylogenetic trees were constructed based upon the ITS2 using MEGA and a Bayesian analysis of the combined data. The latter approach allowed us to include both primary sequence and RNA molecular morphometrics and revealed a close relationship with isolates of F. gigantica from China, Indonesia and Japan, the isolate from China with significant bootstrap values being the closest. ITS2 sequence motifs allowed an accurate in silico distinction of liver flukes. The data indicate that ITS2 motifs (? 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tool for trematode species identification. Using the novel approach of molecular morphometrics that is based on ITS2 secondary structure homologies, phylogenetic relationships of the various isolates of fasciolid species have been discussed. PMID:19294000

  8. Immunization and challenge shown by hamsters infected with Opisthorchis viverrini following exposure to gamma-irradiated metacercariae of this carcinogenic liver fluke.

    PubMed

    Papatpremsiri, A; Junpue, P; Loukas, A; Brindley, P J; Bethony, J M; Sripa, B; Laha, T

    2016-01-01

    Here we report findings to optimize and standardize conditions to attenuate metacercariae of Opisthorchis viverrini by ionizing radiation to elicit protective immune responses to challenge infection. Metacercariae were gamma-irradiated and the ability of irradiated metacercariae to prevent patent infection of challenge metacercariae in hamsters was determined, as well as their ability to induce a host antibody response. Metacercariae irradiated in a dose-dependent manner, with 3, 5, 10, 12, 20, 25 and 50 Gray, were used to infect Syrian golden hamsters by stomach gavage to ascertain the effect of irradiation on ability of the worms to establish infection. In addition, other hamsters were infected with metacercariae irradiated with 20-50 Gray, followed by challenge with intact/wild-type (non-irradiated) metacercariae to determine the protective effect as established by the numbers of adult flukes, eggs of O. viverrini in hamster faeces and anti-O. viverrini antibody titres. Significantly fewer worms were recovered from hamsters immunized with metacercariae irradiated at 20, 25 and 50 Gray than from control hamsters infected with intact metacercariae or 0 Gray, and the worms showed damaged reproductive organs. Faecal egg numbers were decreased significantly in hamsters immunized with 25 and 50 Gray metacercariae of O. viverrini. Moreover, hamsters administered metacercariae that were protected elicited a robust, specific anti-fluke immunoglobulin G response compared to control hamsters, suggesting a role for antibody in protection elicited by radiation-attenuated metacercariae. PMID:25315797

  9. Epidemiological Survey on the Infection of Intestinal Flukes in Residents of Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do, the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Cho, Pyo-Yun; Lee, Dong-Min; Kim, Tong-Soo; Kim, In-Sang; Hwang, Eun-Jung; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2010-01-01

    Infection status of intestinal flukes was investigated in residents of Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do, the Republic of Korea. Total 1,257 fecal samples of residents were examined by formalin-ether sedimentation technique and Kato-Katz thick smear method. Helminth eggs were detected from 95 (7.6%) residents, and eggs of heterophyid flukes and Clonorchis sinensis were found from 62 (4.9%) and 40 (3.2%) cases, respectively. The larger heterophyid eggs, somewhat dark-brown in color and 37.7 × 21.5 µm in average size, and found in 32 (2.6%) out of 62 egg positive cases of heterophyid flukes. To confirm the adult flukes, we performed worm recovery from 12 cases after praziquantel treatment and purgation with MgSO4. A total of 1,281 adult flukes, assigned to 7 species, were recovered from 9 cooperative cases. Heterophyes nocens (total 981 specimens) was collected from 9 cases, Stictodora fuscata (80) from 7, Gymnophalloides seoi (75) from 5, Pygidiopsis summa (140) from 3, Stellantchasmus falcatus (3) from 2, and Stictodora lari and Acanthotrema felis (each 1 worm) from 1 case each. The intrauterine eggs of S. fuscata collected from the recovered worm were identical with the larger heterophyid eggs detected in the stool examination. By the present study, it was confirmed that A. felis is a new intestinal fluke infecting humans, and residents in Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do are infected with variable species of intestinal trematodes. PMID:20585529

  10. Unchanged triclabendazole kinetics after co-administration with ivermectin and methimazole: failure of its therapeutic activity against triclabendazole-resistant liver flukes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The reduced drug accumulation based on enhanced drug efflux and metabolic capacity, identified in triclabendazole (TCBZ)-resistant Fasciola hepatica may contribute to the development of resistance to TCBZ. The aim of this work was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of TCBZ administered alone or co-administered with ivermectin (IVM, efflux modulator) and methimazole (MTZ, metabolic inhibitor) in TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica-parasitized sheep. Sheep infected with TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica (Sligo isolate) were divided into three groups (n = 4): untreated control, TCBZ-treated (i.r. at 10 mg/kg) and TCBZ+IVM+MTZ treated sheep (10 i.r., 0.2 s.c. and 1.5 i.m. mg/kg, respectively). Plasma samples were collected and analysed by HPLC. In the clinical efficacy study, the animals were sacrificed at 15 days post-treatment to evaluate the comparative efficacy against TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica. Results The presence of IVM and MTZ did not affect the plasma disposition kinetics of TCBZ metabolites after the i.r. administration of TCBZ. The AUC value of TCBZ.SO obtained after TCBZ administration (653.9 ± 140.6 ?g.h/ml) was similar to that obtained after TCBZ co-administered with IVM and MTZ (650.7 ± 122.8 ?g.h/ml). Efficacy values of 56 and 38% were observed for TCBZ alone and for the combined treatment, respectively. No statistical differences (P > 0.05) were observed in fluke counts between treated groups and untreated control, which confirm the resistant status of the Sligo isolate. Conclusions The presence of IVM and MTZ did not affect the disposition kinetics of TCBZ and its metabolites. Thus, the combined drug treatment did not reverse the poor efficacy of TCBZ against TCBZ-resistant F. hepatica. PMID:20128898

  11. Structural analysis of secretory phospholipase A2 from Clonorchis sinensis: therapeutic implications for hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, Gururao; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Singh, Tej Pal; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-07-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a common complication of the infection by the parasite, Clonorchis sinensis. There is a high incidence of this disease in the Asian countries with an increased risk of conversion to cancer. A secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) enzyme from the parasite is implicated in the pathology. This is an attractive drug target in the light of extensive structural characterization of this class of enzyme. In this study, the structure of the enzyme was modeled based on its sequence homology to the group III bee venom PLA(2). On analysis, the overall structure essentially is comprised of three helices, two sets of ?-wings and an elongated C-terminal extension. The structure is stabilized by four disulfide bonds. The structure is comprised of a calcium binding loop, active site and a substrate binding hydrophobic channel. The active site of the enzyme shows the classical features of PLA(2) with the participation of the three residues: histidine-aspartic acid-tyrosine in hydrogen bond formation. This is an interesting variation from the house keeping group III PLA(2) enzyme of human which has a histidine-aspartic acid and phenylalanine arrangement at the active site. This difference is therefore an important structural parameter that can be exploited to design specific inhibitor molecules against the pathogen PLA(2). Likewise, there are certain unique structural features in the hydrophobic channel and the putative membrane binding surface of the PLA(2) from Clonorchis sinensis that not only help understand the mechanism of action but also provide knowledge for a targeted therapy of liver fibrosis caused by the parasite. PMID:22215060

  12. Passive cambering and flexible propulsors: cetacean flukes.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Nusbaum, Moira K; Beneski, John T; Ketten, Darlene R

    2006-12-01

    The flukes are the primary locomotor structure in cetaceans, which produce hydrodynamic thrust as the caudal vertebrae are oscillated dorso-ventrally. Effective thrust generation is a function of the kinematics of the flukes, the angle of attack between the flukes and the incident water flow, and the shape of the flukes. We investigated the effect of bending within the caudal region of odontocete cetaceans to determine how changes in angular displacement between caudal vertebrae could effect passive shape change of the flukes. The internal and external changes of bent flukes were examined with computer tomography. Flukes and tailstock were removed from deceased Delphinus delphis, Lagenorhynchus acutus, Peponocephala electra, Phocoena phocoena and Tursiops truncatus, and bent on an adjustable support at 0, 45 and 90 degrees . At 0 degrees , cross-sections of the flukes displayed a symmetrical profile. Cross-sections of bent flukes (45 degrees , 90 degrees ) were asymmetrical and showed a cambered profile. Maximum cambering occurred close to the tailstock and decreased toward the fluke tip. Maximum angular displacement occurred at the 'ball vertebra', which was located posterior of the anterior insertion of the flukes on the tailstock. Bending at the 'ball vertebra' passively cambers the flexible flukes. Cambering could increase hydrodynamic force production during swimming, particularly during direction reversal in the oscillatory cycle. PMID:17671317

  13. A major cathepsin B protease from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has atypical active site features and a potential role in the digestive tract of newly excysted juvenile parasites

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Simone A.; Piedrafita, David; Phillips, Carolyn I.; Samarawickrema, Nirma; Law, Ruby H.P.; Smooker, Peter M.; Quinsey, Noelene S.; Irving, James A.; Greenwood, Deanne; Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Bogyo, Matthew; Turk, Boris; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Spithill, Terry W.; Pike, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage of the Fasciola hepatica lifecycle occurs just prior to invasion into the wall of the gut of the host, rendering it an important target for drug development. The cathepsin B enzymes from NEJ flukes have recently been demonstrated to be crucial to invasion and migration by the parasite. Here we characterize one of the cathepsin B enzymes (recombinant FhcatB1) from NEJ flukes. FhcatB1 has biochemical properties distinct from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes, with an atypical preference for Ile over Leu or Arg residues at the P2 substrate position and an inability to act as an exopeptidase. FhcatB1 was active across a broad pH range (optimal activity at pH 5.5–7.0) and resistant to inhibition by cystatin family inhibitors from sheep and humans, suggesting that this enzyme would be able to function in extracellular environments in its mammalian hosts. It appears, however, that the FhcatB1 protease functions largely as a digestive enzyme in the gut of the parasite, due to the localization of a specific, fluorescently labeled inhibitor with an Ile at the P2 position. Molecular modelling and dynamics were used to predict the basis for the unusual substrate specificity: a P2 Ile residue positions the substrate optimally for interaction with catalytic residues of the enzyme, and the enzyme lacks an occluding loop His residue crucial for exopeptidase activity. The unique features of the enzyme, particularly with regard to its specificity and likely importance to a vital stage of the parasite’s life cycle, make it an excellent target for therapeutic inhibitors or vaccination. PMID:19401154

  14. Molecular identification, immunolocalization, and characterization of Clonorchis sinensis triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juanjuan; Liao, Hua; Li, Shan; Zhou, Chenhui; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Liang, Chi; Yu, Xinbing

    2015-08-01

    Clonorchis sinensis triosephosphate isomerase (CsTIM) is a key regulatory enzyme of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, which catalyzes the interconversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. In this study, the biochemical characterizations of CsTIM have been examined. A full-length complementary DNA (cDNA; Cs105350) sequence encoding CsTIM was obtained from our C. sinensis cDNA library. The open reading frame of CsTIM contains 759 bp which encodes 252 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CsTIM shares 60-65% identity with other species. Western blot analysis displayed that recombinant CsTIM (rCsTIM) can be probed by anti-rCsTIM rat serum and anti-C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (anti-CsESPs) rat serum. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blotting analysis revealed that CsTIM messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were differentially expressed in development cycle stages of the parasite, including adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria, and egg. In addition, immunolocalization assay showed that CsTIM was located in the seminal vesicle, eggs, and testicle. Moreover, rCsTIM exhibited active enzyme activity in catalytic reactions. The Michaelis constant (K m) of rCsTIM was 0.33 mM, when using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as the substrate. The optimal temperature and pH of CsTIM were 37 °C and 7.5-9.5, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that CsTIM is an important protein involved in glycometabolism, and CsTIM possibly take part in many biological functions in the growth and development of C. sinensis. PMID:25990061

  15. Foodborne Intestinal Flukes in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Hee; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Rim, Han-Jong

    2009-01-01

    In Southeast Asia, a total of 59 species of foodborne intestinal flukes have been known to occur in humans. The largest group is the family Heterophyidae, which constitutes 22 species belonging to 9 genera (Centrocestus, Haplorchis, Heterophyes, Heterophyopsis, Metagonimus, Procerovum, Pygidiopsis, Stellantchasmus, and Stictodora). The next is the family Echinostomatidae, which includes 20 species in 8 genera (Artyfechinostomum, Acanthoparyphium, Echinochasmus, Echinoparyphium, Echinostoma, Episthmium, Euparyphium, and Hypoderaeum). The family Plagiorchiidae follows the next containing 5 species in 1 genus (Plagiorchis). The family Lecithodendriidae includes 3 species in 2 genera (Phaneropsolus and Prosthodendrium). In 9 other families, 1 species in 1 genus each is involved; Cathaemaciidae (Cathaemacia), Fasciolidae (Fasciolopsis), Gastrodiscidae (Gastrodiscoides), Gymnophallidae (Gymnophalloides), Microphallidae (Spelotrema), Neodiplostomidae (Neodiplostomum), Paramphistomatidae (Fischoederius), Psilostomidae (Psilorchis), and Strigeidae (Cotylurus). Various types of foods are sources of human infections. They include freshwater fish, brackish water fish, fresh water snails, brackish water snails (including the oyster), amphibians, terrestrial snakes, aquatic insects, and aquatic plants. The reservoir hosts include various species of mammals or birds.The host-parasite relationships have been studied in Metagonimus yokogawai, Echinostoma hortense, Fasciolopsis buski, Neodiplostomum seoulense, and Gymnophalloides seoi; however, the pathogenicity of each parasite species and host mucosal defense mechanisms are yet poorly understood. Clinical aspects of each parasite infection need more clarification. Differential diagnosis by fecal examination is difficult because of morphological similarity of eggs. Praziquantel is effective for most intestinal fluke infections. Continued efforts to understand epidemiological significance of intestinal fluke infections, with detection of further human cases, are required. PMID:19885337

  16. Extension of occurrence area of the American fluke Fascioloides magna in south-western Poland.

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Kuligowska, Izabela; Pyziel, Anna M; Lachowicz, Jacek; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Liver fluke Fascioloides magna is a typical parasite of American cervids. The reason for F. magna to appear in Poland territory was bringing the American wapiti deer to those forests around 1850. Along with these deer the aforementioned fluke was also introduced. The aim of this study was to present the case of finding of this species in cervids in Bory Zielonogórskie. Samples of deer feces were collected in February 2015 in Forest District Krzystkowice. A total of 16 samples of feces were examined, 7 of which came from the red deer, 4 from roe deer and 2 samples from fallow deer. Three grams of feces from each sample were examined for the presence of trematode eggs using the decantation method. Eggs of F. magna were detected in 2 of 7 examined samples from red deer, in the first sample it were found 3 eggs, and in the second one 46 eggs. Moreover, flukes eggs were found in 3 out of 4 roe deer faecal samples, in numbers of 1, 3 and 58 eggs respectively in each sample. Also, in faecal samples from two fallow deer were found in one of them 17 eggs F. magna. The results of this study extend the range of occurrence of the trematodes F. magna on the neighboring Lower Silesia Forest complex of Bory Zielonogórskie which are distant about 50 km. Fallow deer and roe deer were considered to be new in Poland definitive hosts of F. magna. . PMID:26342504

  17. Exome sequencing of liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ong, Choon Kiat; Subimerb, Chutima; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Wongkham, Sopit; Cutcutache, Ioana; Yu, Willie; McPherson, John R; Allen, George E; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Wong, Bernice Huimin; Myint, Swe Swe; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Heng, Hong Lee; Gan, Anna; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Wu, Yingting; Wu, Jeanie; Lee, Ming Hui; Huang, DaChuan; Ong, Pauline; Chan-on, Waraporn; Cao, Yun; Qian, Chao-Nan; Lim, Kiat Hon; Ooi, Aikseng; Dykema, Karl; Furge, Kyle; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Sripa, Banchob; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Futreal, P Andrew; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajarabhongsa; Rozen, Steve; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2012-06-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini-related cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a fatal bile duct cancer, is a major public health concern in areas endemic for this parasite. We report here whole-exome sequencing of eight O. viverrini-related tumors and matched normal tissue. We identified and validated 206 somatic mutations in 187 genes using Sanger sequencing and selected 15 genes for mutation prevalence screening in an additional 46 individuals with CCA (cases). In addition to the known cancer-related genes TP53 (mutated in 44.4% of cases), KRAS (16.7%) and SMAD4 (16.7%), we identified somatic mutations in 10 newly implicated genes in 14.8-3.7% of cases. These included inactivating mutations in MLL3 (in 14.8% of cases), ROBO2 (9.3%), RNF43 (9.3%) and PEG3 (5.6%), and activating mutations in the GNAS oncogene (9.3%). These genes have functions that can be broadly grouped into three biological classes: (i) deactivation of histone modifiers, (ii) activation of G protein signaling and (iii) loss of genome stability. This study provides insight into the mutational landscape contributing to O. viverrini-related CCA. PMID:22561520

  18. Clonorchis sinensis Infestation Promotes Three-Dimensional Aggregation and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jihee; Ju, Jung-Won; Kim, Sun Min; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Pak, Jhang Ho

    2014-01-01

    Numerous experimental and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infestation and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). However, the role of C. sinensis in the increased invasiveness and proliferation involved in the malignancy of CCA has not been addressed yet. Here, we investigated the possibility that C. sinensis infestation promotes expression of focal and cell-cell adhesion proteins in CCA cells and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Adhesion proteins help maintain cell aggregates, and MMPs promote the three-dimensional invasion of cells into the neighboring extracellular matrix (ECM). Using a novel microfluidic assay, we quantitatively addressed the role of excretory-secretory products (ESPs) gradients from C. sinensis in promoting the invasion of cells into the neighboring ECM. PMID:25340585

  19. Liver abscess or neoplasm? A diagnostic and surgical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzai, Hasib

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma can is often associated with hepatitis B infection. With localised tumours, liver resection can result in a cure. This case presents an unusual finding of concurrent hepatitis B and liver fluke infection with hepatocellular carcinoma in a 50 year old man from Thailand. The discussion illustrates difficulties of arriving at a diagnosis and ensuring appropriate surgical management. PMID:24946348

  20. Liver abscess or neoplasm? A diagnostic and surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Hasib

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma can is often associated with hepatitis B infection. With localised tumours, liver resection can result in a cure. This case presents an unusual finding of concurrent hepatitis B and liver fluke infection with hepatocellular carcinoma in a 50 year old man from Thailand. The discussion illustrates difficulties of arriving at a diagnosis and ensuring appropriate surgical management. PMID:24946348

  1. RNAi-mediated silencing of enolase confirms its biological importance in Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Tian, Yanli; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-04-01

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infection is still a common public health problem in freshwater fish consumption areas in Asian countries. More molecular evidence are required to speed up the prevention strategies to control this kind of infectious disease. In the present study, to confirm the biological importance of Csenolase followed by our previous observations of the key metabolic enzyme, we explored the RNA silence effect of the Csenolase-derived RNA interference (RNAi) in C. sinensis. The extramembranous region aa105-226 was selected as the target sequence of RNA silence. Csenolase-derived double strand RNA (dsRNA-Csenolase, 366 bp) was synthetized and delivered into C. sinensis by soaking approach. The penetration of dsRNA into adult worms and metacercariae was tracked using fluorescently labeled RNA. Western blotting and qRT-PCR experiments were performed to determine dsRNA-Csenolase-silencing effect. Our results showed that, after incubating for 120 h, dsRNA-Csenolase could effectively target and downregulate the expression of Csenolase in both adult worms (P < 0.001) and metacercariae (P < 0.01), resulting in a remarkable killing effect on C. sinensis adult worms (P < 0.01). Fluorescent Cy3-labeled dsRNA was mostly deposited in the uterus and vitellarium of adult worm and in the cyst wall of metacercaria. The present study is the first report of RNAi trials in C. sinensis, allowing further applications in identifying functional genes in C. sinensis. PMID:24458653

  2. Identification, immunolocalization, and characterization analyses of an exopeptidase of papain superfamily, (cathepsin C) from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; He, Lei; Xu, Yanquan; Chen, Xueqing; Huang, Yan; Ren, Mengyu; Liang, Chi; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Lu, Gang; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-10-01

    Cathepsin C is an important exopeptidase of papain superfamily and plays a number of great important roles during the parasitic life cycle. The amino acid sequence of cathepsin C from Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) showed 54, 53, and 49% identities to that of Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, and Homo sapiens, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis utilizing the sequences of papain superfamily of C. sinensis demonstrated that cathepsin C and cathepsin Bs came from a common ancestry. Cathepsin C of C. sinensis (Cscathepsin C) was identified as an excretory/secretory product by Western blot analysis. The results of transcriptional level and translational level of Cscathepsin C at metacercaria stage were higher than that at adult worms. Immunolocalization analysis indicated that Cscathepsin C was specifically distributed in the suckers (oral sucker and ventral sucker), eggs, vitellarium, intestines, and testis of adult worms. In the metacercaria, it was mainly detected on the cyst wall and excretory bladder. Combining with the results mentioned above, it implies that Cscathepsin C may be an essential proteolytic enzyme for proteins digestion of hosts, nutrition assimilation, and immune invasion of C. sinensis. Furthermore, it may be a potential diagnostic antigen and drug target against C. sinensis infection. PMID:25138068

  3. Advanced Enzymology, Expression Profile and Immune Response of Clonorchis sinensis Hexokinase Show Its Application Potential for Prevention and Control of Clonorchiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zeli; Xie, Zhizhi; Lin, Zhipeng; Sun, Hengchang; Wan, Shuo; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 35 million people are infected with Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) globally, of whom 15 million are in China. Glycolytic enzymes are recognized as crucial molecules for trematode survival and have been targeted for vaccine and drug development. Hexokinase of C. sinensis (CsHK), as the first key regulatory enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, was investigated in the current study. Principal Findings There were differences in spatial structure and affinities for hexoses and phosphate donors between CsHK and HKs from humans or rats, the definitive hosts of C. sinensis. Effectors (AMP, PEP, and citrate) and a small molecular inhibitor regulated the enzymatic activity of rCsHK, and various allosteric systems were detected. CsHK was distributed in the worm extensively as well as in liver tissue and serum from C. sinensis infected rats. Furthermore, high-level specific IgG1 and IgG2a were induced in rats by immunization with rCsHK. The enzymatic activity of CsHK was suppressed by the antibody in vitro. Additionally, the survival of C. sinensis was inhibited by the antibody in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Due to differences in putative spatial structure and enzymology between CsHK and HK from the host, its extensive distribution in adult worms, and its expression profile as a component of excretory/secretory products, together with its good immunogenicity and immunoreactivity, as a key glycolytic enzyme, CsHK shows potential as a vaccine and as a promising drug target for Clonorchiasis. PMID:25799453

  4. Fluke abundance versus host age for an invasive trematode (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) of sympatric elk and beef cattle in southeastern Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Melissa A.; Goater, Cameron P.; Colwell, Douglas D.; van Paridon, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological parameters such as transmission rate, rate of parasite-induced host mortality, and rate of development of host defenses can be assessed indirectly by characterizing the manner in which parasite burdens change with host age. For parasites that are host generalists, estimates of these important parameters may be host-species dependent. In a cross-sectional study, we determined age–abundance profiles of infection in samples of sympatric free-ranging elk and domestic cattle infected with the lancet liver fluke, Dicrocoelium dendriticum. This parasite was introduced into Cypress Hills Provincial Park in southeastern Alberta, Canada in the mid 1990s, and now occurs in 60–90% of co-grazing elk and beef cattle examined at necropsy. The livers of 173 elk were made available by hunters during the 1997–2011 hunting seasons and livers from 35 cattle were purchased from ranchers. In elk, median worm abundance peaked in 6–24 month-olds (median?=?72, range?=?0–1006) then significantly declined to <10 worms/host in 10–16?year olds. The decline in fluke burden with age is not consistent with an age-related decline in exposure to metacercariae in intermediate hosts and high rates of fluke-induced host mortality are unlikely. Rather, the pattern of peak fluke burdens in elk calves and juveniles, followed by a decline in older animals is consistent with the development of a protective immune response in older hosts. There was no pattern of worm accumulation or decline in sympatric cattle, although statistical power to detect a significant effect was low. These results highlight the complexity and context-dependent nature of epidemiological processes in multi-host systems. PMID:25426422

  5. Biomechanical Perspective on the Origin of Cetacean Flukes

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    of the water. This chapter will focus on how thrust is generated by the action of the flukes in ac- cordance). Swimmingis the only mode of locomotionfor cetaceans, which moved into the water and abandoned the terrestrial produce hydrodynamic thrust that opposes the drag experiencedby the body as a result of the viscosity

  6. Characterization of a gut-associated asparaginyl endopeptidase of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Lee, Jinyoung; Ju, Hye-Lim; Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Yeonchul; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2015-06-01

    Asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEP: EC 3.4.22.34) are a family of cysteine proteases classified into the MEROPS clan CD, family C13. In this study, we characterized the biochemical and antigenic properties of an AEP of Clonorchis sinensis (CsAEP). The recombinant CsAEP showed hydrolytic activity at pH values ranging from acidic to neutral with optimum activity at pH 6.0. While the recombinant CsAEP was stable at neutral pHs, it was unstable at acidic pHs and resulted in loss of enzymatic activity. The recombinant enzyme was effectively inhibited by iodoacetic acid and N-ethylmaleimide, but not by E-64. The partially purified native CsAEP showed biochemical properties similar to the recombinant enzyme. Native CsAEP is likely to be cleaved into an N-terminal mature enzyme and a C-terminal fragment via autocatalytic activation at acidic pHs. Polyclonal antibody raised against the recombinant CsAEP recognized three forms of CsAEP, proenzyme, the N-terminal mature enzyme and the C-terminal fragment, in the worm extract (WE) of C. sinensis. However, only the C-terminal fragment was mainly found in the excretory and secretory (ES) products of the parasite. Strong CsAEP activity was found in the WE, but only a trace level of CsAEP activity was detected in the ES products of the parasite. CsAEP was expressed in various developmental stages of C. sinensis, from metacercariae to adults, and was found to be localized in the intestine of the parasite as well as in intestinal contents. Sera from rats experimentally infected with C. sinensis reacted with CsAEP beginning 4 weeks after infection. These results suggest that CsAEP is a gut-associated enzyme synthesized in the intestine of C. sinensis and subsequently secreted into the intestinal lumen of the parasite. PMID:25819296

  7. Comparison of two serpins of Clonorchis sinensis by bioinformatics, expression, and localization in metacercaria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yabo; Hu, Dong; Wang, Lexun; Liang, Chi; Hu, Xuchu; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, which has been an important public health problem in China, is caused by ingestion of raw or undercooked fish contaminated by live metacercaria. Therefore, preventing fish from infecting is of great significance for controlling the disease. SERPINs (serine protease inhibitors) are well known as negative regulators of hemostasis, thrombolysis, and innate immune responses. In the present study, two full-length sequences encoding SERPIN were identified from metacercaria cDNA library of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) and were denominated as CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the two sequences shares 35.9% identity to each other. Both of the sequences have SERPIN domain and the greatest difference between the two domains is the reactive centre loop. Transmembrane region was found in CsSERPIN3 while not in CsSERPIN. The expression of the two CsSERPINs was significantly higher at the life stage of metacercaria than that of adult. The transcription levels of CsSERPIN and CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage were 3.249- and 11.314-fold of that at adult stage, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of CsSERPIN was 4.32-fold of that of CsSERPIN3 at metacercaria stage. Immunobiochemistry revealed that CsERPIN was dispersed at subtegument and oral sucker of metacercaria, while CsSERPIN3 localized intensely in the tegument of metacercaria of C. sinensis inside of the cyst wall. All these indicated that the CsSERPINs play important roles at metacercaria stage of the parasite. CsSERPIN may take part in regulation of endogenous serine proteinase and CsSERPIN3 may be involved in immune evasion and be a potential candidate for vaccine and drug target for clonorchiasis. PMID:24831344

  8. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a glucose transporter (CsGLUT) in Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seong Kyu; Cho, Pyo Yun; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Hong, Sung-Jong; Nam, Ho-Woo; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Ardelli, Bernadette F; Park, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Tong-Soo; Cha, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding a glucose transporter of Clonorchis sinensis (CsGLUT) was isolated from the adult C. sinensis cDNA library. The open reading frame of CsGLUT cDNA consists of 1653 base pairs that encode a 550-amino acid residue protein. Hydropathy analysis suggested that CsGLUT possess 12 putative membrane-spanning domains. The Northern blot analysis result using poly(A)(+)RNA showed a strong band at ~2.1 kb for CsGLUT. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, CsGLUT mediated the transport of radiolabeled deoxy-D-glucose in a time-dependent but sodium-independent manner. Concentration-dependency results showed saturable kinetics and followed the Michaelis-Menten equation. Nonlinear regression analyses yielded a Km value of 588.5?±?53.0 ?M and a Vmax value of 1500.0?±?67.5 pmol/oocyte/30 min for [1,2-(3)H]2-deoxy-D-glucose. No trans-uptakes of bile acid (taurocholic acid), amino acids (tryptophan and arginine), or p-aminohippuric acid were observed. CsGLUT-mediated transport of deoxyglucose was significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited by radio-unlabeled deoxyglucose and D-glucose. 3-O-Methylglucose at 10 and 100 ?M inhibited deoxyglucose uptake by ~50 % without concentration dependence. No inhibitory effects by galactose, mannose, and fructose were observed. This work may contribute to the molecular biological study of carbohydrate metabolism and new drug development of C. sinensis. PMID:26450594

  9. Strain variation in the susceptibility and immune response to Clonorchis sinensis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Hafiz; Li, Shunyu; Bae, Young Mee; Choi, Min-Ho; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2012-03-01

    Mice have shown various susceptibility to infection by Clonorchis sinensis. To compare the intra-specific variation in the host-parasite relationship of C. sinensis, 6 strains of mice (ICR, BALB/c, C57BL/6, DDY, CBA/N, and C3H/HeN) with 3 different haplotypes were evaluated on their susceptibility. The worm recovery rate and immunological responses were observed after 4 and 8 weeks of infection with 30 metacercariae. The highest worm recovery rate was observed as 20.7% in the C3H/HeN strain after 4 weeks of infection along with histopathological changes. The rate was 10.0% in C57BL/6 mice after 8 weeks. ICR, BALB/c, and CBA/N showed elevated levels of IgE at both time points when compared to the rest of the strains. The serum IgG1 and IgG2a levels were elevated in most of the strains; however, the C57BL/6 strain showed a lower level of IgG2a that indicated the IgG1 predominance over IgG2a. The production of IL-4 after concanavalin-A stimulation of splenocytes slightly increased among the mouse strains except C3H/HeN after 4 or 8 weeks of infection, but each strain produced high levels of IFN-? after 8 weeks, which implied mixed Th1/Th2 responses. ICR, DDY, CBA/N, and C3H/HeN strains showed a significantly increased level of IL-10 after 8 weeks as compared to C57BL/6. All of the strains showed an increased level of IL-13 and suggested fibrotic changes in the mice. In conclusion, mice are insusceptible to infection with C. sinensis; however, the C57BL/6, BALB/c and ICR strains are relatively susceptible after 8 weeks of infection among the six strains. Worm expulsion may be one of the causes of low susceptibility of C3H/HeN mice strain at the 8th week. Elevated IgE, IFN-?, and IL-13 of infected mice suggest both Th1 and Th2 responses that may be related to the low host susceptibility. PMID:21763454

  10. A natural focus of the blood fluke Orientobilharzia turkestanica (Skrjabin, 1913) (Trematoda: Schistosomatidae) in red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Majoros, Gábor; Dán, Adám; Erdélyi, Károly

    2010-06-24

    The large American liver fluke, Fascioloides magna - introduced to Europe before 1875 - was the first non-indigenous trematode to be detected in Hungarian cervids in 1995. As the most precious deer population became infected in the Gemenc game reserve a study has been launched to assess the extent and the effect of F. magna infections and to examine the options for the treatment of infected deer populations. Livers of red deer shot during regular hunting were submitted for the survey and were investigated by necropsy for the presence of F. magna and other liver dwelling trematodes. Recovered parasites were counted, sorted and stored in 70% ethanol. Unexpectedly, blood flukes were found in liver blood vessels at necropsy. They were identified as Orientobilharzia turkestanica (Skrjabin, 1913) by their morphological features as well as by molecular methods. This parasite is widespread in the middle belt of Asia from Korea to the eastern part of Turkey and infects mainly bovids. It was never found in red deer until now and this is the first report of its occurrence in Hungary and Europe. A subsequent search for the local intermediate host of O. turkestanica in the Gemenc area identified only the pulmonate snail Radix auricularia (Linnaeus, 1758) [syn: Lymnaea auricularia] as a vector capable of producing cercariae of this trematode. Cercariae of O. turkestanica were examined morphologically and were confirmed to be the larvae of this trematode by PCR. O. turkestanica appears to be fairly common in red deer of the Gemenc area. No clinical or pathological effect of the infection could be identified in this study. A form of cercarial dermatitis locally called "water mange" was formerly attributed to the larvae of avian shistosomes. It regularly occurred among fishermen fishing in shallow ponds remaining after floods along the Danube in the Gemenc area. This isolated habitat of O. turkestanica presents an exceptional opportunity to study epidemical situations of typical mammalian schistosomosis under temperate climatic conditions. PMID:20347227

  11. Involvement of PSMD10, CDK4, and Tumor Suppressors in Development of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma of Syrian Golden Hamsters Induced by Clonorchis sinensis and N-Nitrosodimethylamine

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Hafiz; Choi, Min-Ho; Kim, Woo Ho; Jang, Ja-June; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis is a group-I bio-carcinogen for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Although the epidemiological evidence links clonorchiasis and CCA, the underlying molecular mechanism involved in this process is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressors, including PSMD10, CDK4, p53 and RB in C. sinensis induced hamster CCA model. Methods Different histochemical/immunohistochemical techniques were performed to detect CCA in 4 groups of hamsters: uninfected control (Ctrl.), infected with C. sinensis (Cs), ingested N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and both Cs infected and NDMA introduced (Cs+NDMA). The liver tissues from all groups were analyzed for gene/protein expressions by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blotting. Principal Findings CCA was observed in all hamsters of Cs+NDMA group with well, moderate, and poorly differentiated types measured in 21.8% ± 1.5%, 13.3% ± 1.3%, and 10.8% ± 1.3% of total tissue section areas respectively. All CCA differentiations progressed in a time dependent manner, starting from the 8th week of infection. CCA stroma was characterized with increased collagen type I, mucin, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The qPCR analysis showed PSMD10, CDK4 and p16INK4 were over-expressed, whereas p53 was under-expressed in the Cs+NDMA group. We observed no change in RB1 at mRNA level but found significant down-regulation of RB protein. The apoptosis related genes, BAX and caspase 9 were found downregulated in the CCA tissue. Gene/protein expressions were matched well with the pathological changes of different groups except the NDMA group. Though the hamsters in the NDMA group showed no marked pathological lesions, we observed over-expression of Akt/PKB and p53 genes proposing molecular interplay in this group which might be related to the CCA initiation in this animal model. Conclusions/Significance The present findings suggest that oncogenes, PSMD10 and CDK4, and tumor suppressors, p53 and RB, are involved in the carcinogenesis process of C. sinensis induced CCA in hamsters. PMID:26313366

  12. An integrated pipeline for next generation sequencing and annotation of the complete mitochondrial genome of the giant intestinal fluke, Fasciolopsis buski (Lankester, 1857) Looss, 1899

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Ghatani, Sudeep; Shylla, Jollin A.; Sahu, Ranjana; Mullapudi, Nandita

    2013-01-01

    Helminths include both parasitic nematodes (roundworms) and platyhelminths (trematode and cestode flatworms) that are abundant, and are of clinical importance. The genetic characterization of parasitic flatworms using advanced molecular tools is central to the diagnosis and control of infections. Although the nuclear genome houses suitable genetic markers (e.g., in ribosomal (r) DNA) for species identification and molecular characterization, the mitochondrial (mt) genome consistently provides a rich source of novel markers for informative systematics and epidemiological studies. In the last decade, there have been some important advances in mtDNA genomics of helminths, especially lung flukes, liver flukes and intestinal flukes. Fasciolopsis buski, often called the giant intestinal fluke, is one of the largest digenean trematodes infecting humans and found primarily in Asia, in particular the Indian subcontinent. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies now provide opportunities for high throughput sequencing, assembly and annotation within a short span of time. Herein, we describe a high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline for mt genomics for F. buski that emphasizes the utility of short read NGS platforms such as Ion Torrent and Illumina in successfully sequencing and assembling the mt genome using innovative approaches for PCR primer design as well as assembly. We took advantage of our NGS whole genome sequence data (unpublished so far) for F. buski and its comparison with available data for the Fasciola hepatica mtDNA as the reference genome for design of precise and specific primers for amplification of mt genome sequences from F. buski. A long-range PCR was carried out to create an NGS library enriched in mt DNA sequences. Two different NGS platforms were employed for complete sequencing, assembly and annotation of the F. buski mt genome. The complete mt genome sequences of the intestinal fluke comprise 14,118 bp and is thus the shortest trematode mitochondrial genome sequenced to date. The noncoding control regions are separated into two parts by the tRNA-Gly gene and don’t contain either tandem repeats or secondary structures, which are typical for trematode control regions. The gene content and arrangement are identical to that of F. hepatica. The F. buski mtDNA genome has a close resemblance with F. hepatica and has a similar gene order tallying with that of other trematodes. The mtDNA for the intestinal fluke is reported herein for the first time by our group that would help investigate Fasciolidae taxonomy and systematics with the aid of mtDNA NGS data. More so, it would serve as a resource for comparative mitochondrial genomics and systematic studies of trematode parasites. PMID:24255820

  13. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal...Carcasses found infested with gid bladder-worms (Coenurus cerebralis, Multiceps...

  14. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal...Carcasses found infested with gid bladder-worms (Coenurus cerebralis, Multiceps...

  15. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal...Carcasses found infested with gid bladder-worms (Coenurus cerebralis, Multiceps...

  16. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals...hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal...Carcasses found infested with gid bladder-worms (Coenurus cerebralis, Multiceps...

  17. Infrared calibration development at Fluke Corporation Hart Scientific Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebmann, Frank

    2008-03-01

    A flat plate calibrator is one instrument used in calibrating infrared (IR) thermometers, primarily in the 8 - 14 ?m band. One such family of flat plate calibrators is the 418X Precision IR Calibrator from Fluke Corporation Hart Scientific Division. This product is calibrated with a radiometric calibration. To support this radiometric calibration and its traceability, a number of developments have been made at Hart Scientific. These developments include the construction of a new IR calibration laboratory with radiometric traceability. This presentation discusses the research done to establish IR calibration capabilities. Among the topics discussed are the need for radiometric traceability for flat plate calibrators, the traceability chain to national laboratories included in radiometric calibrations at Hart Scientific, the development of blackbody cavity baths in Hart's IR calibration laboratory, and Hart Scientific's IR uncertainty budgets.

  18. The genome of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Berriman, Matthew; Haas, Brian J.; LoVerde, Philip T.; Wilson, R. Alan; Dillon, Gary P.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Andrade, Luiza F.; Ashton, Peter D.; Aslett, Martin A.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.; Blandin, Gaelle; Caffrey, Conor R.; Coghlan, Avril; Coulson, Richard; Day, Tim A.; Delcher, Art; DeMarco, Ricardo; Djikeng, Appoliniare; Eyre, Tina; Gamble, John A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Gu, Yong; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hirai, Hirohisha; Hirai, Yuriko; Houston, Robin; Ivens, Alasdair; Johnston, David A.; Lacerda, Daniela; Macedo, Camila D.; McVeigh, Paul; Ning, Zemin; Oliveira, Guilherme; Overington, John P.; Parkhill, Julian; Pertea, Mihaela; Pierce, Raymond J.; Protasio, Anna V.; Quail, Michael A.; Rajandream, Marie-Adčle; Rogers, Jane; Sajid, Mohammed; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stanke, Mario; Tivey, Adrian R.; White, Owen; Williams, David L.; Wortman, Jennifer; Wu, Wenjie; Zamanian, Mostafa; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Barrell, Barclay G.; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2009-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis that affects 210 million people in 76 countries. We report here analysis of the 363 megabase nuclear genome of the blood fluke. It encodes at least 11,809 genes, with an unusual intron size distribution, and novel families of micro-exon genes that undergo frequent alternate splicing. As the first sequenced flatworm, and a representative of the lophotrochozoa, it offers insights into early events in the evolution of the animals, including the development of a body pattern with bilateral symmetry, and the development of tissues into organs. Our analysis has been informed by the need to find new drug targets. The deficits in lipid metabolism that make schistosomes dependent on the host are revealed, while the identification of membrane receptors, ion channels and more than 300 proteases, provide new insights into the biology of the life cycle and novel targets. Bioinformatics approaches have identified metabolic chokepoints while a chemogenomic screen has pinpointed schistosome proteins for which existing drugs may be active. The information generated provides an invaluable resource for the research community to develop much needed new control tools for the treatment and eradication of this important and neglected disease. PMID:19606141

  19. Detection of Clonorchis sinensis Circulating Antigen in Sera from Chinese Patients by Immunomagnetic Bead ELISA Based on IgY

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Ge; Wang, Ting; Lu, Shengjun; Liu, Wenqi; Li, Yonglong; Lei, Jiahui

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis, caused by Clonorchis sinensis, is widely distributed in Southeast Asia including China. Clonorchiasis is included in control programs of neglected tropical diseases by World Health Organization (WHO) because it is one of the major health problems in most endemic areas. Diagnosis of clonorchiasis plays a key role in the control programs. However, so far, there is no satisfactory method for clonorchiasis because of low sensitivity, poor practicality and high false positivity of available diagnostic tools. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed an immunomagnetic bead enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on IgY (egg yolk immunoglobulin) against cysteine proteinase of C. sinensis for detection of circulating antigen in serum samples of patients infected with C. sinensis. The polyclonal IgY, coated with magnetic beads, was used as a capture antibody and a monoclonal IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase as a detection antibody in the IgY-based immunomagnetic bead ELISA system (IgY-IMB-ELISA). The results showed that the sensitivity of IgY-IMB-ELISA was 93.3% (14 of 15) in cases of heavy infection (5000 to 9999 eggs per gram feces, i.e, EPG 5000–9999), 86.7% (13 of 15) in cases of moderate infection (EPG 1000–4999) and 75.0% (9 of 12) in cases of light infection (EPG <1000) of clonorchiasis. Together 36 of total 42 (85.7%) serum samples of human clonorchiasis gave a positive reaction. There was a significant correlation between ELISA optical density and egg counts (EPG) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in total 42 patients. There were no positive results in patients with trichinosis (n?=?10) or cysticercosis (n?=?10). Cross-reactivity was 6.7% (2 of 30) with schistosomiasis japonica and 10.0% (3 of 30) with paragonimiasis, respectively. No positive reaction was found in 20 healthy persons. Conclusions Our findings suggest that IgY-IMB-ELISA appears to be a sensitive and specific assay for detection of circulating antigen in human clonorchiasis. PMID:25474577

  20. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal of carcasses, edible... 315 of this subchapter, it shall be condemned. (b) In the case of sheep carcasses affected...

  1. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal of carcasses, edible... 315 of this subchapter, it shall be condemned. (b) In the case of sheep carcasses affected...

  2. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal of carcasses, edible... 315 of this subchapter, it shall be condemned. (b) In the case of sheep carcasses affected...

  3. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal of carcasses, edible... 315 of this subchapter, it shall be condemned. (b) In the case of sheep carcasses affected...

  4. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. (a) In the disposal of carcasses, edible... 315 of this subchapter, it shall be condemned. (b) In the case of sheep carcasses affected...

  5. Experimental Final Hosts of Metagonimus Hakubaensis (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) and Their Suitability to the Fluke

    PubMed Central

    KUDO, Noboru; OTA, Chieko; SAKA, Fumiko; IKEDA, Yae; TOMIHISA, Yusuke; ITOI, Yasunaga; OYAMADA, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Seven laboratory mammal and bird species were orally inoculated with 200–1,000 encysted Metagonimus hakubaensis metacercariae that had been isolated from naturally infected lampreys (Lethenteron reissneri) captured in Aomori Prefecture. At 8 and 15 days post-infection, adult flukes were recovered from all of the laboratory animals tested, and therefore, hamster, rat, mouse, dog, cat, chicken and quail were considered as final hosts of M. hakubaensis. Recovery rates of the fluke were higher in dogs and hamsters than in cats, rats, mice, chickens and quails. The flukes recovered from dogs and hamsters showed increased body length and higher fecundity than those recovered from the other hosts. These results indicate that the suitability of dogs and hamsters for M. hakubaensis infection is higher than that of the other laboratory animals. PMID:25649951

  6. Evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against ticks and fluke.

    PubMed

    Elango, Gandhi; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2011-03-01

    The present study was based on assessments of the antiparasitic activities to determine the efficacies of leaf hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos (Linn.) Correa ex Roxb, Andrographis lineata Wallich ex Nees., Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wallich ex Nees., Cocculus hirsutus (L.) Diels, Eclipta prostrata L., and Tagetes erecta L. against the adult cattle tick Haemaphysalis bispinosa Neumann 1897 (Acarina: Ixodidae), the larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Canestrini 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae) and sheep fluke Paramphistomum cervi Zeder 1790 (Digenea: Paramphistomatidae). All plant extracts showed moderate toxic effect on parasites after 24 h of exposure; however, the highest parasitic activity was found in leaf ethyl acetate extract of A. lineata, methanol extract of A. marmelos, A. paniculata, and C. hirsutus against H. bispinosa (LC(50)?= 395.27, 358.45, 327.21 and 420.50 ppm); ethyl acetate extract of A. paniculata, C. hirsutus, methanol extracts of A. marmelos, A. lineata, and E. prostrata against the larvae of R. microplus (LC(50)?= 207.70, 258.61, 134.09, 206.00, and 274.33 ppm); hexane extract of A. lineata, ethyl acetate extract of A. paniculata, E. prostrata, acetone extracts of T. erecta, methanol extracts of A. marmelos and C. hirsutus against P. cervi (LC(50)?= 254.23, 451.17, 425.73, 253.60, 542.71, and 360.17 ppm), respectively. The present study is the first report on the veterinary parasitic activity of plant extracts from Southern India. PMID:20922419

  7. Proteomic profile of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    E-print Network

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Gallego, Javier Sotillo

    2014-10-02

    Immunol, 25 (2001), pp. 474 561-564. 475 [16] Adema CM, Hertel LA, Miller RD, Loker ES. A family of fibrinogen-related proteins that 476 precipitates parasite-derived molecules is produced by an invertebrate after infection. Proc Natl 477 Acad Sci U... cancer establishes OLFM4 as a new 520 nonmetastatic tumor marker. Mol Cell Proteomics, 10 (2011), M111 009712. 521 [33] Grant JE, Bradshaw AD, Schwacke JH, Baicu CF, Zile MR, Schey KL. Quantification of protein 522 expression changes in the aging left...

  8. Activity of luxabendazole against liver flukes, gastrointestinal roundworms, and lungworms in naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Kassai, T; Takáts, C; Fok, E; Redl, P

    1988-01-01

    The anthelmintic potential of luxabendazole was investigated in sheep harboring mixed naturally acquired helminth infections. Results were assessed by comparing worm counts of the treated groups (seven animals each) on days 7-8 posttreatment with those of the nontreated control group, except for protostrongylid lungworms, for which the changes in pre- and posttreatment group mean larval counts/g feces were assessed for intensity effect. A single oral treatment at doses of 10.0 or 12.5 mg/kg body wt removed 97.6% of the adult Fasciola hepatica and 63.2%-83.8% of the Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Luxabendazole at 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 mg/kg proved 100% effective in removing adult worms of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia and Nematodirus as well as tissue-associated larval stages of gastrointestinal nematodes of the abomasal mucosa. The drug showed an intensity effect of 79.7%-87.6% against Strongyloides papillosus. Luxabendazole removed all Dictyocaulus filaria and reduced the fecal excretion of larvae of protostrongylid species (Protostrongylus rufescens, Neostrongylus linearis, Cystocaulus ocreatus, Muellerius capillaris) by 97.8%-99.6%. The efficacy of luxabendazole compared favorably with that of Diplin Kombi (oxyclozanide and levamisole), which was used as a reference drug. PMID:2974592

  9. Carcinogenic liver fluke secretes extracellular vesicles that promote cholangiocytes to adopt a tumorigenic phenotype

    E-print Network

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Sotillo, Javier; Smout, Michael; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Jones, Malcolm K.; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Potriquet, Jeremy; Laohaviroj, Marut; Mulvenna, Jason; Brindley, Paul J.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex

    2015-05-17

    and Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD, Australia 3Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK 4QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia 5School of Veterinary Sciences, The University... Medicine, and Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty, George Washington University, Washington DC, USA 9Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand #Corresponding Author: Alex Loukas. Email...

  10. Restriction enzyme mapping of ribosomal DNA can distinguish between fasciolid (liver fluke) species.

    PubMed

    Blair, D; McManus, D P

    1989-10-01

    Recognition sites for nine different restriction endonucleases were mapped on rDNA genes of fasciolid species. Southern blots of digested DNA from individual worms were probed sequentially with three different probes derived from rDNA of Schistosoma mansoni and known to span between them the entire rDNA repeat unit in that species. Eighteen recognition sites were mapped for Fasciola hepatica, and seventeen for Fasciola gigantica and Fascioloides magna. Each fasciolid species had no more than two unique recognition sites, the remainder being common to one or both of the other two species. No intraspecific variation in restriction sites was noted in F. hepatica (individuals from 11 samples studied; hosts were sheep, cattle and laboratory animals; geographical origins. Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, U.K., Hungary and Spain), or in F. gigantica (two samples; Indonesia and Malaysia). Only one sample of F. magna was available. One specimen of Fasciola sp. from Japan (specific identity regarded in the literature as uncertain) yielded a restriction map identical to that of F. gigantica. Almost all recognition sites occurred in or near the putative rRNA coding regions. The non-transcribed spacer region had few or no cut sites despite the fact that this region is up to about one half of the entire repeat unit in length. Length heterogeneity was noted in the non-transcribed spacer, even within individual worms. PMID:2552311

  11. Aberrant Expression of NF-?B in Liver Fluke Associated Cholangiocarcinoma: Implications for Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Puapairoj, Anucha; Khuntikeo, Narong; Pugkhem, Ake; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya; Chaiyagool, Jariya; Umezawa, Kazuo; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-01-01

    Background Up-regulation and association of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) with carcinogenesis and tumor progression has been reported in several malignancies. In the current study, expression of NF-?B in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) patient tissues and its clinical significance were determined. The possibility of using NF-?B as the therapeutic target of CCA was demonstrated. Methodology Expression of NF-?B in CCA patient tissues was determined using immunohistochemistry. Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), a specific NF-?B inhibitor, was used to inhibit NF-?B action. Cell growth was determined using an MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was shown by DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and immunocytofluorescent staining. Effects of DHMEQ on growth and apoptosis were demonstrated in CCA cell lines and CCA-inoculated mice. DHMEQ-induced apoptosis in patient tissues using a histoculture drug response assay was quantified by TUNEL assay. Principal Findings Normal bile duct epithelia rarely expressed NF-?B (subunits p50, p52 and p65), whereas all CCA patient tissues (n ?=? 48) over-expressed all NF-?B subunits. Inhibiting NF-?B action by DHMEQ significantly inhibited growth of human CCA cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DHMEQ increased cell apoptosis by decreasing the anti-apoptotic protein expressions–Bcl-2, XIAP–and activating caspase pathway. DHMEQ effectively reduced tumor size in CCA-inoculated mice and induced cell apoptosis in primary histocultures of CCA patient tissues. Conclusions NF-?B was over-expressed in CCA tissues. Inhibition of NF-?B action significantly reduced cell growth and enhanced cell apoptosis. This study highlights NF-?B as a molecular target for CCA therapy. PMID:25170898

  12. Identification of the Boudicca and Sinbad retrotransposons in the genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Claudia S; Lewis, Fred A; Brindley, Paul J

    2006-08-01

    Schistosomes have a comparatively large genome, estimated for Schistosoma mansoni to be about 270 megabase pairs (haploid genome). Recent findings have shown that mobile genetic elements constitute significant proportions of the genomes of S. mansoni and S. japonicum. Much less information is available on the genome of the third major human schistosome, S. haematobium. In order to investigate the possible evolutionary origins of the S. mansoni long terminal repeat retrotransposons Boudicca and Sinbad, several genomes were searched by Southern blot for the presence of these retrotransposons. These included three species of schistosomes, S. mansoni, S. japonicum, and S. haematobium, and three related platyhelminth genomes, the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna and the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala. In addition, Homo sapiens and three snail host genomes, Biomphalaria glabrata, Oncomelania hupensis, and Bulinus truncatus, were examined for possible indications of a horizontal origin for these retrotransposons. Southern hybridization analysis indicated that both Boudicca and Sinbad were present in the genome of S. haematobium. Furthermore, low stringency Southern hybridization analyses suggested that a Boudicca-like retrotransposon was present in the genome of B. truncatus, the snail host of S. haematobium. PMID:17072464

  13. Liver metastases

    MedlinePLUS

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic ... Almost any cancer can spread to the liver. Cancers that can spread to the liver include: Breast cancer Colorectal cancer Esophageal ...

  14. Liver Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Primary liver cancer starts in the liver. Metastatic liver ... and spreads to your liver. Risk factors for primary liver cancer include Having hepatitis B or C ...

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Skin Invasion by Blood Fluke Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hansell, Elizabeth; Braschi, Simon; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Sajid, Mohammed; Debnath, Moumita; Ingram, Jessica; Lim, K. C.; McKerrow, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Background During invasion of human skin by schistosome blood fluke larvae (cercariae), a multicellular organism breaches the epidermis, basement membrane, and dermal barriers of skin. To better understand the pathobiology of this initial event in schistosome infection, a proteome analysis of human skin was carried out following invasion by cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. Methodology and Results Human skin samples were exposed to cercariae for one-half hour to two hours. Controls were exposed to water used to collect cercariae in an identical manner, and punctured to simulate cercarial tunnels. Fluid from both control and experimental samples was analyzed by LC/MS/MS using a linear ion trap in “triple play” mode. The coexistence of proteins released by cercariae and host skin proteins from epidermis and basement membrane confirmed that cercarial tunnels in skin were sampled. Among the abundant proteins secreted by cercariae was the cercarial protease that has been implicated in degradation of host proteins, secreted proteins proposed to mediate immune invasion by larvae, and proteins implicated in protection of parasites against oxidative stress. Components of the schistosome surface tegument, previously identified with immune serum, were also released. Both lysis and apoptosis of epidermal cells took place during cercarial invasion of the epidermis. Components of lysed epidermal cells, including desmosome proteins which link cells in the stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum, were identified. While macrophage-derived proteins were present, no mast cell or lymphocyte cytokines were identified. There were, however, abundant immunoglobulins, complement factors, and serine protease inhibitors in skin. Control skin samples incubated with water for the same period as experimental samples ensured that invasion-related proteins and host protein fragments were not due to nonspecific degeneration of the skin samples. Conclusions This analysis identified secreted proteins from invasive larvae that are released during invasion of human skin. Analysis of specific host proteins in skin invaded by cercariae served to highlight both the histolytic events facilitating cercarial invasion, and the host defenses that attempt to arrest or retard invasion. Proteins abundant in psoriatic skin or UV and heat-stressed skin were not abundant in skin invaded by cercariae, suggesting that results did not reflect general stress in the surgically removed skin specimen. Abundant immunoglobulins, complement factors, and serine protease inhibitors in skin form a biochemical barrier that complements the structural barrier of the epidermis, basement membrane, and dermis. The fragmentation of some of these host proteins suggests that breaching of host defenses by cercariae includes specific degradation of immunoglobulins and complement, and either degradation of, or overwhelming the host protease inhibitor repertoire. PMID:18629379

  16. The Problem: Schistosomiasis Schistosomes, commonly known as the blood fluke, infect an estimated 200

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    ® The Problem: Schistosomiasis Schistosomes, commonly known as the blood fluke, infect an estimated snail host found mainly in Asia, Africa, and South America. Schistosomiasis, the chronic illness account for >99% of schistosomiasis cases worldwide with S. japonicum causing the remainder. Only one drug

  17. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    A liver biopsy is a medical procedure performed in order to obtain a small sample of the liver. This is ... small scar. The most common reasons for a liver biopsy include the evaluation of: ? Jaundice ? Liver inflammation (hepatitis) ? ...

  18. Phyllodistomum kanae sp. nov. (Trematoda: Gorgoderidae), a bladder fluke from the Ezo salamander Hynobius retardatus.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    The Ezo salamander, Hynobius retardatus, is endemic only to Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. Gravid flukes of the family Gorgoderidae were discovered from the urinary bladder of H. retardatus. The parasites were identified as a new species named Phyllodistomum kanae sp. nov. In the neighboring Honshu island another bladder fluke, Phyllodistomum patellare, has already been found from the Japanese newt. The new species clearly differs from P. patellare in having a spherical ovary and very weakly lobed testes. The discovery of species of Phyllodistomum from urodelan amphibians is very uncommon in Eurasia. A molecular phylogeny based on 28S ribosomal DNA suggests that sphaeriid bivalves may serve as the first intermediate host for the new species. PMID:25892565

  19. The Observational Problem of Whether Life on Earth is a Fluke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, N. J.

    1998-12-01

    The presence of life on Earth could be the result of such a rare accident, so that life far from Earth would be exceedingly rare. The issue arises because the simplest known life forms are exceedingly complex, the apparent result of a long line of chemical and biological evolution. We know that life was relatively abundant on Earth not long after the last ocean-destroying collision occurred here. But this alone does not tell us whether or not in the development of life there was some extremely improbable step or steps. Whether life here was the result of such a fluke or flukes is susceptible to two lines of study, one observational, the other experimental. In the experimental method, one attempts to create very simple life forms. But it is by no means certain that human experimental ability is as good as nature's. The observational approach has three current facets, looking for microbial life elsewhere in the solar system, looking for chemical tracers of life in other planetary systems and looking for the communications of extra-terrestrial intelligences. All three are discussed at this meeting by Chyba, Beichman and Tarter. The discovery of life elsewhere in the solar system does not exclude a fluke -- if panspermia works within the solar system, we could all be Martians, Europans etc. in origin, and the fluke might have occurred there. If panspermia works between different planetary systems, then at best we are looking to see whether life exists with both forms of handedness, which would demonstrate that life developed at least twice, and such a test would require an interstellar vehicle. The study of chemical tracers and communications are searches designed against false positives. This paper explores the implications that would be associated with positive results from observations.

  20. Fasciola hepatica: Histology of the Reproductive Organs and Differential Effects of Triclabendazole on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Fluke Isolates and on Flukes from Selected Field Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises the findings of a series of studies in which the histological changes, induced in the reproductive system of Fasciola hepatica following treatment of the ovine host with the anthelmintic triclabendazole (TCBZ), were examined. A detailed description of the normal macroscopic arrangement and histological features of the testes, ovary, vitelline tissue, Mehlis’ gland and uterus is provided to aid recognition of the drug-induced lesions, and to provide a basic model to inform similar toxicological studies on F. hepatica in the future. The production of spermatozoa and egg components represents the main energy consuming activity of the adult fluke. Thus the reproductive organs, with their high turnover of cells and secretory products, are uniquely sensitive to metabolic inhibition and sub-cellular disorganisation induced by extraneous toxic compounds. The flukes chosen for study were derived from TCBZ-sensitive (TCBZ-S) and TCBZ-resistant (TCBZ-R) isolates, the status of which had previously been proven in controlled clinical trials. For comparison, flukes collected from flocks where TCBZ resistance had been diagnosed by coprological methods, and from a dairy farm with no history of TCBZ use, were also examined. The macroscopic arrangement of the reproductive system in flukes was studied using catechol/carmine stained whole mounts, and the histology of the main organs was examined using conventional haematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Validation of apoptosis in the fluke sections was carried out using an in situ hybridisation method designed to label endonuclease-induced DNA strand breaks. In TCBZ-S flukes exposed to TCBZ metabolites for 24–96 h in vivo, but not in TCBZ-R flukes, those tissues where active meiosis and/or mitosis occurred (testis, ovary, and vitelline follicles), were found to display progressive loss of cell content. This was due to apparent failure of cell division to keep pace with expulsion of the mature or effete products. Further, actively dividing cell types tended to become individualised, rounded and condensed, characteristic of apoptotic cell death. In the treated TCBZ-S flukes, strong positive labelling indicating apoptosis was associated with the morphologically abnormal cells undergoing mitosis or meiosis in the testis, ovary and vitelline follicles. In treated flukes from field outbreaks of suspected TCBZ-R fasciolosis, no significant histological changes were observed, nor was there any positive labelling for apotosis. On the other hand, sections of TCBZ treated flukes derived from a field case of fasciolosis where TCBZ resistance was not suspected displayed severe histological lesions, and heavy positive labelling for apoptosis. The triggering of apoptosis is considered to be related to failure of spindle formation at cell division, supporting the contention that TCBZ inhibits microtubule formation. In treated TCBZ-S flukes, protein synthesis and transport was apparently inhibited in the Mehlis’ secretory cells, perhaps due to energy uncoupling or to microtubule defects. In the uterus, successful formation of shelled eggs represents the culmination of a complex sequence of cytokinetic, cytological and synthetic activity involving the vitelline follicles, the ovary and the Mehlis’ gland. Histological evidence indicating failure of ovigenesis in TCBZ-S flukes was evident from as early as 24 h post-treatment onwards. Light labelling for apoptosis was associated with the testis of untreated Cullompton (TCBZ-S) and Sligo type 2 (TCBZ-R) flukes, which exhibit abnormal spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis, respectively. This was attributed to apoptosis and to heterophagy of effete germ line cells by the sustentacular tissue. The studies summarised in this review illustrate the potential utility of histological techniques for conveniently screening representative samples of flukes in field trials designed to validate instances of drug resistance. Histology can also be used to test the efficacy of new products against known drug-resistant and drug-suscep

  1. Liver Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Facts How the Liver Works The liver is one of the largest and most complex ... a spongy mass of wedge-shaped lobes. The liver has numerous functions that are necessary for life. ...

  2. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  3. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  4. Molecular Characterization of Severin from Clonorchis sinensis Excretory/Secretory Products and Its Potential Anti-apoptotic Role in Hepatocarcinoma PLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Liang, Pei; Chen, Wenjun; Bian, Meng; Ren, Mengyu; Lin, Jinsi; Liang, Chi; Xu, Jin; Wu, Zhongdao; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2013-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis, caused by the infection of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), is a kind of neglected tropical disease, but it is highly related to cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been well known that the excretory/secretory products of C. sinensis (CsESPs) play key roles in clonorchiasis associated carcinoma. From genome and transcriptome of C. sinensis, we identified one component of CsESPs, severin (Csseverin), which had three putative gelsolin domains. Its homologues are supposed to play a vital role in apoptosis resistance of tumour cell. Methodology/Principal Findings There was significant similarity in tertiary structures between human gelsolin and Csseverin by bioinformatics analysis. We identified that Csseverin expressed at life stage of adult worm, metacercaria and egg by the method of quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. Csseverin distributed in vitellarium and intrauterine eggs of adult worm and tegument of metacercaria by immunofluorence assay. We obtained recombinant Csseverin (rCsseverin) and confirmed that rCsseverin could bind with calciumion in circular dichroism spectrum analysis. It was demonstrated that rCsseverin was of the capability of actin binding by gel overlay assay and immunocytochemistry. Both Annexin V/PI assay and mitochondrial membrane potential assay of human hepatocarcinoma cell line PLC showed apoptosis resistance after incubation with different concentrations of rCsseverin. Morphological analysis, apoptosis-associated changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and Annexin V/PI apoptosis assay showed that co-incubation of PLC cells with rCsseverin in vitro led to an inhibition of apoptosis induced by serum-starved for 24 h. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the molecular properties of Csseverin, a molecule of CsESPs, were characterized in our study. rCsseverin could cause obvious apoptotic inhibition in human HCC cell line. Csseverin might exacerbate the process of HCC patients combined with C. sinensis infection. PMID:24367717

  5. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... list depends on his or her blood type, body size, stage of liver disease, overall health, and the availability of a matching liver. In the United States, there are more people who need a liver transplant than ... are the body rejecting the liver and infections. Rejection occurs when ...

  6. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.25 Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm... tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus ovis, so-called sheep measles, not transmissible to man), such carcasses may...

  7. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.25 Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm... tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus ovis, so-called sheep measles, not transmissible to man), such carcasses may...

  8. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.25 Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm... tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus ovis, so-called sheep measles, not transmissible to man), such carcasses may...

  9. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.25 Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm... tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus ovis, so-called sheep measles, not transmissible to man), such carcasses may...

  10. 9 CFR 311.25 - Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; tapeworm cysts in sheep; hydatid cysts; flukes; gid bladder-worms. 311.25 Section 311.25 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.25 Parasites not transmissible to man; tapeworm... tapeworm cysts (Cysticercus ovis, so-called sheep measles, not transmissible to man), such carcasses may...

  11. Eye fluke infection status in Baltic cod, Gadus morhua, after three decades and their use as ecological indicators.

    PubMed

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Marana, Moonika H; Skov, Jakob; Bahlool, Qusay Z M; Sindberg, Diana; Mundeling, Mai; Overgaard, Bettina C; Kania, Per W; Buchmann, Kurt

    2015-09-01

    Eye flukes of the genus Diplostomum were recorded with a prevalence of 7.4% and a mean intensity of 11.9 (range 1-75) parasites per fish in eye lenses of a total of 188 Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, sampled in the Southeastern Baltic Sea from March 2013 to February 2014. A slight decrease of infection level, among the fish with body length ranging from 30 to 89.5 cm, was found when data were compared to a corresponding survey in the 1980s. Due to imprecise species identification of eye flukes based on morphometric analyses we present, as a baseline for further studies, rDNA sequences from a subsample of 19 eye flukes based on sequencing of a part of 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2 and part of 28S. We discuss the use of eye fluke recordings in Baltic cod as an environmental indicator due to the dependence of the parasite's life cycle on biotic (occurrence of snail and bird hosts) and abiotic (temperature and salinity) parameters. PMID:26204178

  12. Liver Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  13. Liver Panel

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Liver Panel Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Liver Function Tests; LFTs Formal name: Hepatic Function Panel Related tests: ALT , ALP , AST , Bilirubin , Albumin , Total ...

  14. Liver scan

    MedlinePLUS

    ... technetium sulfur colloid scan; Liver-spleen radionuclide scan; Nuclear scan - technetium; Nuclear scan - liver or spleen ... Radiation from any scan is always a slight concern. The level of radiation in this procedure is ...

  15. Liver transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... end up with fully working livers after a successful transplant. The donor liver is transported in a ... and the likelihood that a transplant will be successful. The amount of time you spend on a ...

  16. Liver disease.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Essential facts Liver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UK and, according to the British Liver Trust, the only major cause of death still increasing year on year. NHS Choices says there are more than 100 different types of liver disease affecting at least two million people in the UK at any one time. PMID:26530565

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the adult rumen fluke Paramphistomum cervi following next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vijayata; Garg, Sweta; Chourasia, Reetika; Hasnani, J J; Patel, P V; Shah, Tejas M; Bhatt, Vaibhav D; Mohapatra, Amitbikram; Blake, Damer P; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-10-01

    Rumen flukes are parasitic trematodes (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) of major socioeconomic importance in many countries. Key representatives, such as Paramphistomum cervi, can cause "Rumen fluke disease" or paramphistomosis and undermine economic animal productivity and welfare. P. cervi is primarily a problem in sheep, goat and buffalo production as a consequence of reduced weight gain and milk production, clinical disease or death. Recent technological advances in genomics and bioinformatics now provide unique opportunities for the identification and pre-validation of drug targets and vaccines through improved understanding of the biology of pathogens such as P. cervi and their relationship with their hosts at the molecular level. Here, we report next generation transcriptome sequencing analysis for P. cervi. RNAseq libraries were generated from RNA extracted from 15 adult P. cervi parasites sampled from each of three different host species (sheep, goat and buffalo) and a reference transcriptome was generated by assembly of all Ion Torrent PGM sequencing data. Raw reads (7,433,721 in total) were initially filtered for host nucleotide contamination and ribosomal RNAs and the remaining reads were assembled into 43,753 high confidence transcript contigs. In excess of 50% of the assembled transcripts were annotated with domain- or protein sequence similarity derived functional information. The reference adult P. cervi transcriptome will serve as a basis for future work on the biology of this important parasite. Using the widely investigated trematode virulence factor and vaccine candidate Cathepsin L as an example, the epitope GPISIAINA was found to be conserved in P. cervi isolated from three different host species supporting its candidacy for vaccine development and illustrating the utility of the adult P. cervi transcriptome. PMID:26049095

  18. Liver transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M.; Mennini, G.; Lai, Q.; Ginanni Corradini, S.; Drudi, F.M.; Pugliese, F.; Berloco, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) involves the substitution of a diseased native liver with a normal liver (or part of one) taken from a deceased or living donor. Considered an experimental procedure through the 1980s, OLT is now regarded as the treatment of choice for a number of otherwise irreversible forms of acute and chronic liver disease. The first human liver transplantation was performed in the United States in 1963 by Prof. T.E. Starzl of the University of Colorado. The first OLT to be performed in Italy was done in 1982 by Prof. R. Cortesini. The procedure was successfully performed at the Policlinico Umberto I of the University of Rome (La Sapienza). The paper reports the indications for liver transplantation, donor selection and organ allocation in our experience, surgical technique, immunosuppression, complications and results of liver transplantation in our center. PMID:23396075

  19. What Is Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How many people get liver cancer? What is liver cancer? Liver cancer starts in the liver. To understand ... have. Cancers that start in the liver (primary liver cancers) The place where a cancer starts is called ...

  20. Pleural epitheliod hemangioendothelioma: What started as a liver fluke and ended up being almost mistaken for malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Jamy, Omer H.; Huber, Bryan; Giri, Smith

    2015-01-01

    Epitheliod hemangioendothelioma (EHE) is a rare tumor of vascular origin. The pleural variant has only been reported around 20 times in English literature. It commonly occurs in older men and carries a poor prognosis with average survival lasting from a few weeks to months. Pleural EHE (PEHE) can be a diagnostic challenge due to its rarity as well as similarities to other pleural and vascular tumors. There is currently no standard treatment for EHE. Due to the rarity of this disease, reaching a final diagnosis is challenging. It's clinical, radiological, and pathological resemblance to malignant mesothelioma can cause a delay in diagnosis. Special stains such as CD31, CD34, and factor VIII related antigen can help differentiate between the two. Ordering appropriate stains in a timely manner can help avoid misdiagnosing PEHE.

  1. Plasma IgG autoantibody against actin-related protein 3 in liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini infection.

    PubMed

    Rucksaken, R; Haonon, O; Pinlaor, P; Pairojkul, C; Roytrakul, S; Yongvanit, P; Selmi, C; Pinlaor, S

    2015-07-01

    Opisthorchiasis secondary to Opisthorchis viverrini infection leads to cholangiocellular carcinoma through chronic inflammation of the bile ducts and possibly inducing autoimmunity. It was hypothesized that plasma autoantibodies directed against self-proteins are biomarkers for opisthorchiasis. Plasma from patients with opisthorchiasis was tested using proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell lines, and spots reacting with plasma were excised and subjected to LC-MS/MS. Seven protein spots were recognized by IgG autoantibodies, and the highest matching scored protein was actin-related protein 3 (ARP3). The antibody against ARP3 was tested in plasma from 55 O. viverrini-infected patients, 24 patients with others endemic parasitic infections and 17 healthy controls using Western blot and ELISA. Immunoreactivity against recombinant ARP3 was significantly more prevalent in opisthorchiasis compared to healthy controls at Western blotting and ELISA (P < 0.05). Plasma ARP3 autoantibody titres were also higher in opisthorchiasis compared to healthy individuals (P < 0.01) and other parasitic infections including Strongyloides stercoralis (P < 0.001), echinostome (P < 0.05), hookworms (P < 0.001) and Taenia spp. (P < 0.05). It was further characterized in that the ARP3 autoantibody titre had a sensitivity of 78.18% and specificity of 100% for opisthorchiasis. In conclusion, it may be suggested that plasma anti-ARP3 might represent a new diagnostic antibody for opisthorchiasis. PMID:25809205

  2. Factors affecting abundance and prevalence of blood fluke, Cardicola forsteri, infection in commercially ranched southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, in Australia.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Hamish M; Hayward, Craig J; Nowak, Barbara F

    2015-05-30

    A survey of blood fluke, Cardicola forsteri, infection in ranched southern bluefin tuna, Thunnus maccoyii, was undertaken over three farming seasons, from March 2004 to September 2006. Analyses of covariance and logistic regression were used to explore the effects of company, year, season, time in culture, and condition index on intensity, abundance and prevalence of blood fluke infection. Average prevalence of blood fluke infection was 62.64% over the period of the survey. Average intensity was 6.20 (± 0.57) fluke per infected host and the average abundance was 3.70 (± 0.57) fluke per host. Year did not influence mean intensity or abundance although a significant decrease in prevalence in 2005 was evident. Tuna harvested in winter had a significantly greater abundance and prevalence of blood fluke than the tuna harvested in autumn. No effect of intensity or abundance of infection was observed on the condition of the infected tuna. A universal factor in explaining variation in C. forsteri intensity, abundance and prevalence was company. Differences in infection levels between tuna from different companies may be related to differences in husbandry measures employed on each farm, or due to different average sizes of tuna farmed by each of the companies, or due to the location of the operations. PMID:25862423

  3. Intervention to Improve the Quality of Life of a Bottlenose Dolphin That Developed Necrosis on the Tail Flukes

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Keiichi; Murakami, Masahito; Kato, Junichi; Miyahara, Hirokazu; Izumisawa, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes. Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance. To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins. PMID:24259946

  4. Engineering liver

    E-print Network

    Griffith, Linda G.

    Interest in “engineering liver” arises from multiple communities: therapeutic replacement; mechanistic models of human processes; and drug safety and efficacy studies. An explosion of micro- and nanofabrication, biomaterials, ...

  5. Liver spots

    MedlinePLUS

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  6. Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adults is cirrhosis. This is scarring of the liver, caused by injury or long-term disease. The most common reason in children is biliary atresia, a disease of the bile ducts. If you have a ... the new liver. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ...

  7. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ...

  8. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T; Segel, Nicholas H; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-12-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  9. Co-dispersal of the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum and Homo sapiens in the Neolithic Age

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingbo; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Su, Jing; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P.; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Jin, Li; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of human infectious diseases is of considerable public health and biomedical interest. Little is known about the relationship between the distribution of ancient parasites and that of their human hosts. Schistosoma japonicum is one of the three major species of schistosome blood flukes causing the disease of schistosomiasis in humans. The parasite is prevalent in East and Southeast Asia, including the People’s Republic of China, the Philippines and Indonesia. We studied the co-expansion of S. japonicum and its human definitive host. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences showed that S. japonicum radiated from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River to the mountainous areas of China, Japan and Southeast Asia. In addition, the parasite experienced two population expansions during the Neolithic agriculture era, coinciding with human migration and population growth. The data indicate that the advent of rice planting likely played a key role in the spread of schistosomiasis in Asia. Moreover, the presence of different subspecies of Oncomelania hupensis intermediate host snails in different localities in Asia allowed S. japonicum to survive in new rice-planting areas, and concurrently drove the intraspecies divergence of the parasite. PMID:26686813

  10. Sequencing and characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome from the pancreatic fluke Eurytrema pancreaticum (Trematoda: Dicrocoeliidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Liu, Guo-Hua; Gao, Jun-Feng; Zheng, Xu; Zhang, Yan; Duan, Hong; Yue, Dong-Mei; Fu, Xue; Su, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Chun-Ren

    2016-01-15

    The trematode Eurytrema pancreaticum is a parasite of ruminant pancreatic and bile ducts, and also occasionally infects humans, causing eurytremiasis. In spite of it being a common fluke of cattle and sheep in endemic regions, little is known about the genomic resources of the parasite. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of E. pancreaticum. It is 15,031bp in size, and encodes 36 genes: 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The E. pancreaticum mt gene order is the same as that of Dicrocoelium chinensis and Dicrocoelium dendriticum, and all genes are transcribed in the same direction. Phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes by Bayesian inference shows that E. pancreaticum is closely related to D. chinensis and other members of the family Dicrocoeliidae with strong posterior probability support. The E. pancreaticum mt genome should prove to be a useful resource for comparative mt genomic studies of digenetic trematodes, and will provide a rich source of DNA markers for studies into the systematics, epidemiology, and population genetics of this parasite and other digenean trematodes. PMID:26434796

  11. Flukes without snails: advances in the in vitro cultivation of intramolluscan stages of trematodes.

    PubMed

    Coustau, C; Yoshino, T P

    2000-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of parasitic helminths, including the digenetic trematodes, has long been a valuable tool in medical and veterinary parasitology, permitting and/or facilitating the development of diagnostic reagents, chemotherapeutic agents, and vaccines and providing insights into naturally complex host-parasite interactions. In vitro cultivation of the intramolluscan stages of trematodes has been particularly challenging, given the ontogenic complexities involved in the production of multiple larval generations from germinal tissues through an asexual "budding" process. Recently, however, advanced larval development has been achieved by incorporating the Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line into cocultivation systems. Most notably, the entire intramolluscan cycle (from miracidium to cercaria) has been completed for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, while significant primary sporocyst development has been attained for several other digeneans including S. japonicum and Fascioloides magna. Here we review recent advances in the cultivation of several larval trematode species and discuss the potential use of this culture system for addressing fundamental questions of host-parasite compatibility. PMID:10631085

  12. Co-dispersal of the blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum and Homo sapiens in the Neolithic Age.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Su, Jing; Feng, Zheng; McManus, Donald P; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Jin, Li; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The global spread of human infectious diseases is of considerable public health and biomedical interest. Little is known about the relationship between the distribution of ancient parasites and that of their human hosts. Schistosoma japonicum is one of the three major species of schistosome blood flukes causing the disease of schistosomiasis in humans. The parasite is prevalent in East and Southeast Asia, including the People's Republic of China, the Philippines and Indonesia. We studied the co-expansion of S. japonicum and its human definitive host. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences showed that S. japonicum radiated from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River to the mountainous areas of China, Japan and Southeast Asia. In addition, the parasite experienced two population expansions during the Neolithic agriculture era, coinciding with human migration and population growth. The data indicate that the advent of rice planting likely played a key role in the spread of schistosomiasis in Asia. Moreover, the presence of different subspecies of Oncomelania hupensis intermediate host snails in different localities in Asia allowed S. japonicum to survive in new rice-planting areas, and concurrently drove the intraspecies divergence of the parasite. PMID:26686813

  13. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T.; Segel, Nicholas H.; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  14. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Handouts Education Resources Support Services Helpful Links For Liver Health Information Call 1-800-GO-LIVER (1- ... The Progression of Liver Disease The Progression of Liver Disease There are many different types of liver ...

  15. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) What is prevention? Cancer ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  16. Liver bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Caralt, Mireia; Velasco, Enrique; Lanas, Angel; Baptista, Pedro M

    2014-01-01

    Liver bioengineering has been a field of intense research and popular excitement in the past decades. It experiences great interest since the introduction of whole liver acellular scaffolds generated by perfusion decellularization1–3. Nevertheless, the different strategies developed so far have failed to generate hepatic tissue in vitro bioequivalent to native liver tissue. Even notable novel strategies that rely on iPSC-derived liver progenitor cells potential to self-organize in association with endothelial cells in hepatic organoids are lacking critical components of the native tissue (e.g., bile ducts, functional vascular network, hepatic microarchitecture, etc)4. Hence, it is vital to understand the strengths and short comes of our current strategies in this quest to re-create liver organogenesis in vitro. To shed some light into these issues, this review describes the different actors that play crucial roles in liver organogenesis and highlights the steps still missing to successfully generate whole livers and hepatic organoids in vitro for multiple applications. PMID:25102189

  17. Liver enzymes and blood metabolites in a population of free-ranging red deer (Cervus elaphus) naturally infected with Fascioloides magna.

    PubMed

    Severin, K; Mašek, T; Janicki, Z; Konjevi?, D; Slavica, A; Marinculi?, A; Martinkovi?, F; Vengušt, G; Džaja, P

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the effects of Fascioloides magna infection on the serum biochemistry values of the naturally infected red deer population in eastern Croatia. The investigation was performed on 47 red deer with F. magna infection confirmed patho-anatomically in 27 animals (57.4%). Fibrous capsules and migratory lesions were found in 14 deer while only fibrous capsules without migratory lesions were found in 13 deer. In 13 deer both immature and mature flukes were found, in 5 deer only immature flukes were found and in 9 deer only mature flukes were found. Fascioloides magna infected deer with fibrous capsules and migratory lesions had significantly higher values for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and globulin, and lower values for albumin/globulin ratio and glucose compared to uninfected deer. Fascioloides magna infected deer with fibrous capsules without the presence of migratory lesions had higher values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and globulin, and lower values for albumin/globulin ratio and glucose, than the uninfected deer. The number of immature flukes was positively correlated with values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), ?-glutamyltransferase (GGT), LDH, GLDH, urea and triglycerides. The number of migratory lesions was positively correlated with GGT, GLDH, globulin and urea values. The creatinine value was positively correlated with the number of mature flukes. The trial showed that F. magna infection causes significant changes in serum biochemistry. Moreover, these changes do not completely resemble changes following F. hepatica infection. Further investigation of changes in liver enzymes and other serum metabolites in controlled, experimentally induced fascioloidosis in red deer is needed to better understand the pathogenesis of F. magna. PMID:21729388

  18. Prolyl Oligopeptidase from the Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni: From Functional Analysis to Anti-schistosomal Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fajtová, Pavla; Štefani?, Saša; Hradilek, Martin; Dvo?ák, Jan; Vondrášek, Ji?í; Jílková, Adéla; Ulrychová, Lenka; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Mareš, Michael; Horn, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that infects over 240 million people worldwide, and for which there is a need to identify new targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Our research is focused on Schistosoma mansoni prolyl oligopeptidase (SmPOP) from the serine peptidase family S9, which has not been investigated in detail in trematodes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that SmPOP is expressed in adult worms and schistosomula in an enzymatically active form. By immunofluorescence microscopy, SmPOP is localized in the tegument and parenchyma of both developmental stages. Recombinant SmPOP was produced in Escherichia coli and its active site specificity investigated using synthetic substrate and inhibitor libraries, and by homology modeling. SmPOP is a true oligopeptidase that hydrolyzes peptide (but not protein) substrates with a strict specificity for Pro at P1. The inhibition profile is analogous to those for mammalian POPs. Both the recombinant enzyme and live worms cleave host vasoregulatory, proline-containing hormones such as angiotensin I and bradykinin. Finally, we designed nanomolar inhibitors of SmPOP that induce deleterious phenotypes in cultured schistosomes. Conclusions/Significance We provide the first localization and functional analysis of SmPOP together with chemical tools for measuring its activity. We briefly discuss the notion that SmPOP, operating at the host-parasite interface to cleave host bioactive peptides, may contribute to the survival of the parasite. If substantiated, SmPOP could be a new target for the development of anti-schistosomal drugs. PMID:26039195

  19. Adulticidal and larvicidal efficacy of some medicinal plant extracts against tick, fluke and mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Bagavan, A; Kamaraj, C; Elango, G; Abduz Zahir, A; Abdul Rahuman, A

    2009-12-23

    The adulticidal and larvicidal effect of indigenous plant extracts were investigated against the adult cattle tick Haemaphysalis bispinosa Neumann, 1897 (Acarina: Ixodidae), sheep fluke Paramphistomum cervi Zeder, 1790 (Digenea: Paramphistomatidae), fourth instar larvae of malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus Grassi and Japanese encephalitis vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae). The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effect of leaf hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Annona squamosa L., Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, Gloriosa superba L., Mukia maderaspatensis (L.) M.Roem, Pergularia daemia (Forsk.) Chiov. and Phyllanthus emblica L. were exposed to different concentrations. All plant extracts showed moderate toxic effect on parasites after 24h of exposure; however, the highest mortality was found in leaf hexane extract of A. squamosa, methanol extracts of G. superba and P. emblica against H. bispinosa (LC(50)=145.39, 225.57 and 256.08ppm); methanol extracts of C. asiatica, G. superba, P. daemia and P. emblica against P. cervi (LC(50)=77.61, 60.16, 59.61, and 60.60ppm); acetone, ethyl acetate extracts of A. squamosa, methanol extract of C. asiatica, acetone extracts of G. superba, ethyl acetate, hexane and methanol extracts of P. daemia against A. subpictus (LC(50)=17.48, 18.60, 26.62, 18.43, 34.06, 13.63, and 50.39ppm); and chloroform, ethyl acetate extracts of A. squamosa, ethyl acetate extract of P. daemia, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of P. emblica against C. tritaeniorhynchus (LC(50)=63.81, 60.01, 31.94, 69.09, and 54.82ppm), respectively. These results demonstrate that methanol extracts of C. asiatica, G. superba, P. daemia and P. emblica extracts may serve as parasites control even in their crude form. PMID:19819626

  20. American Liver Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources Liver Disease Information Select Info Center Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis ...

  1. Liver cancer - Hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually seen in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  2. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation - www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services - www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  3. Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Liver Hepatocellular Carcinoma Last Updated: May 14, 2013 What is liver cancer?Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer in the United States, making up more than

  4. Infection Status of Estuarine Fish and Oysters with Intestinal Fluke Metacercariae in Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Kim, In-Sang; Hwang, Eun-Jung; Kim, Tong-Soo; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2012-01-01

    The source of human infection with intestinal flukes was surveyed in estuarine fishes, including the dotted gizzard shad, common sea bass, common blackish goby, redlip mullet, black sea bream, and oyster collected from Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do, Korea during August and September 2007. Collected fishes and oysters were artificially digested in pepsin-HCl solution and examined under a stereomicroscope. In 36 shads (Konosirus punctatus) and 20 basses (Lateolabrax japonicus) examined, Heterophyopsis continua metacercariae were found in 58.3% and 100%, and their average numbers were 12.0 and 6.3 per infected fish, respectively. In 34 gobies (Acanthogobius flavimanus) examined, metacercariae of H. continua were detected in 79.4%, Stictodora lari in 97.1%, and Acanthotrema felis in 92.1%, and their average numbers were 45.8, 189.3, and 235.3 per infected fish, respectively. In 37 redlip mullets (Chelon haematocheilus), Heterophyes nocens metacercariae were found in 56.8%, Pygidiopsis summa in 94.6%, and Stictodora fuscata in 45.9%, and the average metacercarial densities were 17.4, 31.3, and 35.1 per infected fish, respectively. In 30 black sea breams (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) and 45 oysters (Crassostrea gigas) examined, no metacercariae were detected. From the above results, it has been confirmed that the dotted gizzard shad, common sea bass, common blackish goby, and redlip mullet from Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do, Korea are infected with the metacercariae of heterophyid flukes. PMID:22949748

  5. The effectiveness of repeated tank treatments of copper sulfate and formalin on gill flukes and Ich in naturally infested white bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ectoparasites infesting the gills of juvenile fish reared in tanks can cause serious fish losses. Multiple treatments of formalin and copper sulfate (CuSO4) were evaluated for effectiveness against a natural infestation of gill flukes Onchocleidus mimus (Monogenoidea: Ancyrocephalidae) and Ichthyop...

  6. Whole transcriptome profiling of adult and infective stages of the trematode Opisthorchis felineus.

    PubMed

    Pomaznoy, Mikhail Yu; Logacheva, Maria D; Young, Neil D; Penin, Aleksey A; Ershov, Nikita I; Katokhin, Alexey V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2016-02-01

    Opisthorchis felineus, the trematode belonging to the family Opisthorchiidae, is a causative agent of the infection called opisthorchiasis or liver fluke infection. Being a close relative of Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis (oriental liver flukes) it is encountered in northern Eurasia, especially in Russia, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Ukraine, and Baltic countries. Whole genome data for oriental liver flukes revealed their adaptations for life in the bile duct but our knowledge of O. felineus is scarce. To address this knowledge gap and uncover evolutionary aspect of the adaptations on the transcriptomic level, we used RNA-sequencing approach to investigate two stages of the parasite residing in different hosts. Bioinformatic analysis revealed specific features affecting various biochemical pathways and gene networks. Namely, we observed the loss of genes involved in polyamine synthesis, methionine salvage and peroxisome biogenesis. Some of the gene families, like MD-2 lipid binding proteins, calmodulins and cathepsins on the contrary have expanded compared to free living eukaryotes. We identified significant differences between the stages in homeodomain-containing genes, G-protein coupled receptors, and neuroactive signaling systems. Granulin-like growth factors specific for O. felineus were also identified. In this work, we provide the first whole transcriptome investigation of this parasite. We also hope that these results will create a background for further molecular research of helminth infections and opisthorchiasis in particular. PMID:26363139

  7. Engineering Liver

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda G.; Wells, Alan; Stolz, Donna Beer

    2014-01-01

    Interest in “engineering liver” arises from multiple communities: therapeutic replacement; mechanistic models of human processes; and drug safety and efficacy studies. An explosion of micro- and nano-fabrication, biomaterials, microfluidic, and other technologies potentially afford unprecedented opportunity to create microphysiological models of human liver, but engineering design principles for how to deploy these tools effectively towards specific applications, including how to define the essential constraints of any given application (including available sources of cells, acceptable cost, and user-friendliness) are still emerging. Arguably less appreciated is the parallel growth in computational systems biology approaches towards these same problems – particularly, in parsing complex disease processes from clinical material, building models of response networks, and in how to interpret the growing compendium of data on drug efficacy and toxicology in patient populations. Here, we provide insight into how the complementary paths of “engineering liver” – experimental and computational – are beginning to interplay towards greater illumination of human disease states and technologies for drug development. PMID:24668880

  8. Fasciola hepatica: characterization of somatic and excretory-secretory antigens of adult flukes recognized by infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Navarrete, M A; Arriaga, C; Bautista, C R; Morilla, A

    1993-01-01

    The immune response of sheep to somatic components and excretory/secretory products of adult Fasciola hepatica, was studied during an experimental infection. Antibodies against adult fluke somatic and excretory/secretory antigens were detected by thin layer immunoassay from the second week post infection. Similarly, the results of Western blot analysis showed specific recognition of several components as early as two weeks after infection. However, an increase in the number and intensity of bands with time of infection was observed in the patterns of antigenic recognition. Most notorious was the strong reactivity of all infected sheep sera towards components of 20-23 kDa in the somatic preparation and components of 23-27 kDa in the excretory/secretory products of adult F. hepatica, specially noticeable after the sixth week post-infection. Since these polypeptides were recognized by all infected animals, they could play an important role in the diagnosis of sheep fascioliasis. PMID:8047733

  9. Molecular Characterization of the North American Lung Fluke Paragonimus kellicotti in Missouri and its Development in Mongolian Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Peter U.; Curtis, Kurt C.; Marcos, Luis A.; Weil, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human paragonimiasis is an emerging disease in Missouri. To characterize local parasites, we examined crayfish from three rivers. Metacercaeriae consistent with Paragonimus kellicotti were detected in 69%, 67%, and 37% of crayfish from the Big Piney, Huzzah, and Black Rivers, respectively. Sequencing of the second internal transcribed spacer and other DNA markers confirmed the species identification and the presence of identical parasite sequences in clinical specimens from two human cases. Mongolian gerbils were infected by intraperitoneal injection with 3–8 metacercariae. Most gerbils died 15–49 days post-infection. Necropsies showed pulmonary hemorrhage with necrosis, and flukes as long as 8 mm were recovered from intrathoracic tissues. Western blot analysis using P. kellicotti antigen showed a strong antibody response in gerbils 39 days post-infection. These results demonstrate that P. kellicotti is common in Missouri crayfish. The gerbil model may be useful for research on the pathogenesis, immunology, and treatment of paragonimiasis. PMID:21633042

  10. Austropeplea ollula (Pulmonata: Lymnaeidae): A new molluscan intermediate host of a human intestinal fluke, Echinostoma cinetorchis (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Park, Yun-Kyu; Hwang, Myung-Ki

    2001-01-01

    Three freshwater snail species of the family Lymnaeidae have been reported from Korea, Radix auricularia coreana, Austropeplea ollula and Fossaria truncatula. Out of 3 lymnaeid snail species, A. ollula was naturally infected with the Echinostoma cinetorchis cercariae (infection rate = 0.7%). In the experiments with the laboratory-bred snails, F. truncatula as well as A. ollula was also susceptible to the E. cinetorchis miracidia with infection rates of 25% and 40%, respectively. All of three lymnaeid snail species exposed to the E. cinetorchis cercariae were infected with the E. cinetorchis metacercariae. It is evident that A. ollula acts as the first molluscan intermediate host of E. cinetorchis in Korea, and F. truncatula may be a possible candidate for the first intermediate host of this intestinal fluke. Also, three lymnaeid snail species targeted were experimentally infected with E. cinetorchis metacercariae. PMID:11590915

  11. Larval stages of the bluefin tuna blood fluke Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) found from Terebella sp. (Polychaeta: Terebellidae).

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Yukitaka; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Tamaki, Akio; Yamanishi, Ryohei; Kanai, Kinya

    2014-04-01

    We found aporocotylid larval stages (sporocysts and cercariae) from five individuals of terebellid polychaete Terebella sp., which were collected from seabed substrate and ropes and floats attached to tuna cages in a tuna farm on the coast of Tsushima Island, Nagasaki, Japan. Nucleotide sequences of the regions of internal transcribed spacer 2 ribosomal DNA and 28S ribosomal DNA from these larval stages were 100% identical to those of Cardicola opisthorchis registered in GenBank. C. opisthorchis is a pathogen causing blood fluke infection of Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis, which is considered to have a significant impact on the Japanese Pacific bluefin tuna aquaculture industry. This is the first description of the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis. This indicates that the life cycle of C. opisthorchis is completed within tuna farms in this area. PMID:24291605

  12. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  13. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This is the same parasite that causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection ...

  14. A new blood fluke of the genus Cardicola (Trematoda: Sanguinicolidae) from Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel, 1844) cultured in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K; Tanaka, S; Sugihara, Y; Takami, I

    2010-03-01

    A new sanguinicolid blood fluke, Cardicola orientalis n. sp., is described from the afferent branchial artery and heart of Pacific bluefin tuna Thunnus orientalis (Temminck & Schlegel) cultured in Mie and Nagasaki Prefectures, Japan. The new species is most similar to C. ambrosioi Braicovich, Etchegoin, Timi et Sardella, 2006 from the Brazilian flathead, Percophis brasiliensis Quoy & Gaimard, but can be differentiated by the position of the female genital pore (in midline or slightly sinistral in C. orientalis vs. sinistral in C. ambrosioi) and much longer distance between male and female genital pore (101microm vs. 27microm). In wet mount preparations of infected fish, eggs were accumulated in great numbers in the gill lamellae and afferent filament arteries. Importance of this blood fluke infection of cultured Pacific bluefin tuna in Japan is discussed. PMID:19835980

  15. Liver Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bacak, Stephen J; Thornburg, Loralei L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but life-threatening medical emergency in pregnancy whose true incidence remains unknown. Many cases of acute liver failure are caused by pregnancy-related conditions such as acute fatty liver of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. However, acute deterioration in liver function can also be caused by drug overdose, viral infections, and an exacerbation of underlying chronic liver disease. This article provides an overview of the normal liver changes that occur during pregnancy, and summarizes the most common conditions and general management strategies of liver failure during pregnancy. PMID:26600444

  16. Population dynamics and host reactions in young foxes following experimental infection with the minute intestinal fluke, Haplorchis pumilio

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections with fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT) including the minute intestinal fluke, Haplorchis pumilio, are highly prevalent in Southeast Asia. However, little is known about the infection dynamics and clinical symptoms in the final hosts which include a range of animal species and man. We aimed to generate such information using an experimental model with H. pumilio in foxes. Method Eight commercially bred foxes were each orally infected with 2000 H. pumilio metacercariae. Another three foxes served as uninfected controls. Faecal examination for eggs was performed twice weekly. The body weight was measured, standard haematological and biochemical analysis were performed regularly. All foxes were euthanized at day 56 post infection (p.i.). Adult worms were quantified and location in the small intestine noted. Results Anorexia was observed in all infected foxes starting day 12 p.i. and lasting for approximately a week. A weight loss was noticed in the infected group in weeks 3–6 p.i. Five of eight infected foxes excreted H. pumilio eggs day 9 p.i. onwards, the remaining three started on day 13 p.i. Mean (± SD) faecal egg counts showed an initial peak at day 16–20 with a maximum of 1443?±?1176 eggs per gram of faeces (epg), where after a stable egg output around 4–500 epg was seen. Worm burdens ranged between 116–2070 adult flukes with a mean (± SD) worm recovery of 948?±?666. The majority of worms were found in the lower part of the jejunum. Total white blood cell and lymphocyte counts were significant lower in the infected group from first week p.i. onwards and throughout the study period. A significantly lower level of eosinophils was found in week 2 p.i. and transient anaemia was seen in week 2 and 4 p.i. Conclusion This study showed a short prepatency period, an initial peak in egg excretion, establishment of infection in all animals with predilection site in the lower jejunum and a marked but transient clinical effect of the infection. The findings on egg output and prepatency should be taken into consideration when control programs targeting dogs and other reservoir hosts are to be established. PMID:23289937

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Human Skin Treated with Larval Schistosome Peptidases Reveals Distinct Invasion Strategies among Species of Blood Flukes

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica; Knudsen, Giselle; Lim, K. C.; Hansell, Elizabeth; Sakanari, Judy; McKerrow, James

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts. Methods Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays. Conclusions This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts. PMID:21980548

  18. Correlation of Humoral Immune Response in Southern Bluefin Tuna, T. maccoyii, with Infection Stage of the Blood Fluke, Cardicola forsteri

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Nicole T.; Leef, Melanie J.; Valdenegro, Victoria; Hayward, Craig J.; Nowak, Barbara F.

    2012-01-01

    The blood fluke, Cardicola forsteri, is a prevalent infection in ranched southern bluefin tuna. This project aimed to define the timing and intensity of the various developmental stages of C. forsteri within southern bluefin tuna as well as to relate infection to host pathology and immune response. Archival samples from several cohorts of T. maccoyii sampled from 2008 to 2010 were used in this study. The prevalence and intensity of C. forsteri infection was described using heart flushes and histological examination. Humoral immune response, i.e. C. forsteri specific antibody, lysozyme activity, and alternative complement activity, was also described. Based on the validated and detailed C. forsteri infection timeline, relationships between infection events, physiological response, and diagnosis were proposed. Immune response developed concurrently with C. forsteri infection, with the majority of physiological response coinciding with commencing egg production. Further research is needed to confirm the origin of C. forsteri antigen which is responsible for immune response development and how T. maccoyii immune response works against infection. To aide this research, further diagnostic methods for confirmation of infection need to be developed. PMID:23029217

  19. Biomarkers for liver fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin M.; Smith, Richard D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Orton, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Methods and systems for diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in a subject are provided. In some examples, such methods and systems can include detecting liver fibrosis-related molecules in a sample obtained from the subject, comparing expression of the molecules in the sample to controls representing expression values expected in a subject who does not have liver fibrosis or who has non-progressing fibrosis, and diagnosing or prognosing liver fibrosis in the subject when differential expression of the molecules between the sample and the controls is detected. Kits for the diagnosis or prognosis of liver fibrosis in a subject are also provided which include reagents for detecting liver fibrosis related molecules.

  20. Food-Borne Trematodiases

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Jennifer; Utzinger, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    Summary: An estimated 750 million people are at risk of infections with food-borne trematodes, which comprise liver flukes (Clonorchis sinensis, Fasciola gigantica, Fasciola hepatica, Opisthorchis felineus, and Opisthorchis viverrini), lung flukes (Paragonimus spp.), and intestinal flukes (e.g., Echinostoma spp., Fasciolopsis buski, and the heterophyids). Food-borne trematodiases pose a significant public health and economic problem, yet these diseases are often neglected. In this review, we summarize the taxonomy, morphology, and life cycle of food-borne trematodes. Estimates of the at-risk population and number of infections, geographic distribution, history, and ecological features of the major food-borne trematodes are reviewed. We summarize clinical manifestations, patterns of infection, and current means of diagnosis, treatment, and other control options. The changing epidemiological pattern and the rapid growth of aquaculture and food distribution networks are highlighted, as these developments might be associated with an elevated risk of transmission of food-borne trematodiases. Current research needs are emphasized. PMID:19597009

  1. Characterization of Constituents and Anthelmintic Properties of Hagenia abyssinica

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Henrieke; Reider, Katrin; Franke, Katrin; Wessjohann, Ludger A.; Keiser, Jennifer; Dagne, Ermias; Arnold, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The dried female flowers of Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J. F. Gmel. (Rosaceae) are traditionally used as an anthelmintic remedy in Ethiopia and formerly were incorporated into the European Pharmacopoeia. One-, two- and tricyclic phloroglucinol derivatives (kosins) were suggested to be the active principles. However, polar constituents may also contribute to the activity. Therefore, we investigated for the first time the polar constituents. We isolated typical Rosaceae constituents such as quercetin 3-O-?-glucuronide, quercetin 3-O-?-glucoside and rutin. Polar kosin glycosides or derivatives could not be detected. The anthelmintic activity of fractions of different polarity were tested against the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, the liver flukes Clonorchis sinensis and Fasciola hepatica and the intestinal fluke Echinostoma caproni. The anthelmintic activity decreased with increasing polarity of the tested fractions. ESI-MS investigations indicated the predominant occurrence of kosins in the active fractions. Using the anthelmintic active extracts of Hagenia abyssinica we developed a simple, inexpensive bioassay against the non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which can be used as an initial screening procedure for anthelmintic properties of crude extracts of plants or fungi. The anthelmintic activity of test extracts against the model organism was determined in a microtiter plate assay by enumeration of living and dead nematodes under a microscope. PMID:22896828

  2. Differences in the compatibility of infection between the liver flukes Fascioloides magna and Fasciola hepatica in a Colombian population of the snail Galba sp.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, G; Correa, A C; Djuikwo-Teukeng, F F; Novobilský, A; Höglund, J; Pankrác, J; Kašný, M; Vignoles, P; Hurtrez-Boussčs, S; Pointier, J P; Rondelaud, D

    2015-11-01

    Experimental infections of Galba sp. (origin, Colombia) with allopatric isolates of Fasciola hepatica from France or Fascioloides magna from the Czech Republic were carried out during five successive snail generations to determine if this lymnaeid might sustain complete larval development of either parasite. In snails exposed to F. hepatica, 7 of 400 snails harboured several rediae and only two snails contained a small number of free cercariae on day 50 post-exposure. In contrast, the intensity of F. magna infection in Galba sp. progressively increased from the F1 to F5 generations. Spontaneous cercarial shedding of F. magna occurred in 7 of 100 Galba sp. belonging to the F5 generation and the number of shed cercariae did not differ significantly from that noted in control Galba truncatula of French origin. Galba sp. from Colombia can be added to the list of potential intermediate hosts for F. magna. PMID:25000491

  3. Natural prevalence in Cuban populations of the lymnaeid snail Galba cubensis infected with the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica: small values do matter.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Antonio A; Sánchez, Jorge; Alba, Annia; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Hurtrez-Boussčs, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Natural infections of lymnaeid snails by Fasciola hepatica are of primary importance to study transmission. Also, infected snails in the field can be used to explore the existing compatibility in host-parasite interactions. This paper aimed to describe the infection rate of Galba cubensis populations in fasciolosis transmission areas. Eight sites were sampled in western Cuba and 24 infected snails at six sites were found. The mean prevalence was 2.94% and the maximum value was 11.4%. The intensity of parasite infection was assessed as the number of rediae inside a single snail. High variation within the sites examined was observed, but a maximum of 76 rediae was recovered from one individual. Although the presence of two other trematode families (Schistosomatidae and Paramphistomatidae) was discovered in dissected individuals, no co-infection with F. hepatica was observed. This is the first time a study of natural prevalence of F. hepatica infection is carried out in Cuba, considered a hyper endemic country for bovine fasciolosis. Our results suggest that fasciolosis transmission may occur even when the number of infected snails remains relatively low. PMID:26250985

  4. Antioxidants in liver health

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Grajales, Sael; Muriel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Liver diseases are a worldwide medical problem because the liver is the principal detoxifying organ and maintains metabolic homeostasis. The liver metabolizes various compounds that produce free radicals (FR). However, antioxidants scavenge FR and maintain the oxidative/antioxidative balance in the liver. When the liver oxidative/antioxidative balance is disrupted, the state is termed oxidative stress. Oxidative stress leads to deleterious processes in the liver and produces liver diseases. Therefore, restoring antioxidants is essential to maintain homeostasis. One method of restoring antioxidants is to consume natural compounds with antioxidant capacity. The objective of this review is to provide information pertaining to various antioxidants found in food that have demonstrated utility in improving liver diseases. PMID:26261734

  5. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  6. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. The heavy drinking could be every day, or just a ...

  7. Liver biopsy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A liver biopsy is not a routine procedure, but is performed when it is necessary to determine the presence of liver disease and to look for malignancy, cysts, parasites, or other pathology. The actual procedure is only slightly uncomfortable. ...

  8. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    ... transplant and liver disease patients. Pre-Transplant Protein Malnutrition -- Many patients with end stage liver disease do ... to lose weight sensibly and slowly, without causing malnutrition (especially protein malnutrition). Losing excess weight decreases the ...

  9. Liver transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver failure causes many problems, including malnutrition, problems with blood clotting, bleeding form the gastrointestinal tract, and jaundice. Frequently, patients who undergo liver transplantation are quite ill, and require ...

  10. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  11. Characterization of MicroRNAs from Orientobilharzia turkestanicum, a Neglected Blood Fluke of Human and Animal Health Significance

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing-Hua; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Huang, Si-Yang; Zou, Feng-Cai; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    The neglected blood flukes Orientobilharzia spp. belonging to the Platyhelminthes, infect animals in a number of countries of the world, and cause cercarial dermatitis in humans, as well as significant diseases and even death in economically-important animals. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are now considered to be a key mechanism of gene regulation. Herein, we investigated the global miRNA expression profile of adult O. turkestanicum using next-generation sequencing technology and real-time quantitative PCR, to gain further information on the role of these molecules in host invasion and the parasitic lifestyle of this species. A total of 13.48 million high quality reads were obtained out of 13.78 million raw sequencing reads, with 828 expressed miRNAs identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the miRNAs of O. turkestanicum were still rapidly evolving and there was a “directed mutation” pattern compared with that of other species. Target mRNAs were successfully predicted to 518 miRNAs. These targets included energy metabolism, transcription initiation factors, signal transduction, growth factor receptors. miRNAs targeting egg proteins, including major egg antigen p40, and heat shock proteins were also found. Enrichment analysis indicated enrichment for mRNAs involved in catalytic, binding, transcription regulators and translation regulators. The present study represented the first large-scale characterization of O. turkestanicum miRNAs, which provides novel resources for better understanding the complex biology of this zoonotic parasite, which, in turn, has implications for the effective control of the disease it causes. PMID:23071694

  12. Transcriptional immune response of cage-cultured Pacific bluefin tuna during infection by two Cardicola blood fluke species.

    PubMed

    Polinski, Mark; Shirakashi, Sho; Bridle, Andrew; Nowak, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Infections by two blood fluke species, Cardicola orientalis and Cardicola opisthorchis, currently present the greatest disease concern for the sea-cage culture of Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) - a species of high global economic importance and ecological concern. In this study, we aimed to rapidly, quantitatively, and differentially identify infections by these two parasite species in cultured PBT as well as identify potential host immune responses. Using real-time qPCR, we were successful in quantitatively detecting parasite-specific DNA from within host blood, gill, and heart tissues; positively identifying parasitic infections 44 days earlier than microscopy methods previously employed. Both gill and heart became heavily infected by both parasite species in PBT within two months of sea-cage culture, which was only mitigated by the administration of anthelmintic praziquantel. Nevertheless, fish were observed to mount an organ specific transcriptive immune response during infection that mirrored the relative quantity of pathogenic load. In heart, significant (3-6 fold) increases in IgM, MHC2, TCR?, and IL-8 transcription was observed in infected fish relative to uninfected controls; whereas in the gills only IgM transcription was observed to be induced (11 fold) by infection. Interestingly, the relative quantity of IgM transcription was highly correlated to the relative abundance of C. orientalis but not C. opisthorchis DNA in the gill samples, even though this organ showed high prevalence of DNA from both parasite species. Taken together, these findings indicate that although ineffective at combating infection during primary exposure, a cellular immune response is mounted in PBT as a potential rejoinder to future Cardicola exposure, particularly against C. orientalis. Although future investigation into antibody effectiveness will be needed, this work provides valuable preliminary insight into host responsiveness to Cardicola infection as well as additional support for the need of anthelmintic treatment following primary parasite exposure during PBT culture. PMID:24161760

  13. Ultrasound elastography in liver.

    PubMed

    Frulio, N; Trillaud, H

    2013-05-01

    Conventional imaging techniques cannot provide information about tissue mechanical properties. Many injuries can cause changes in tissue stiffness, especially tumors and fibrosis. In recent years, various non-invasive ultrasound methods have been developed to study tissue elasticity for a large number of applications (breast, thyroid, prostate, kidneys, blood vessels, liver…). For non-invasive assessment of liver diseases, several ultrasound elastography techniques have been investigated: Transient elastography (the most extensively used), Real Time Elastography (RTE), Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) and more recently Shear Wave Elastography (SWE). Even if evaluation of liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease remains the principal application, there are many others applications for liver: predicting cirrhosis-related complications; monitoring antiviral treatments in chronic viral liver disease; characterizing liver tumors; monitoring local treatments, etc. The aim of this article is to report on the different hepatic ultrasound elastography techniques, their advantages and disadvantages, their diagnostic accuracy, their applications in clinical practice. PMID:23623211

  14. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  15. [Liver and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, O M

    2011-01-01

    Liver metabolism aims to change the biological activity of drugs to make them water-soluble to be excreted with bile and urine. The degree of metabolism depends on fermentative capacity for each drag (P450 fermentative system is localized in microsomal fraction of hepatocyte). Metabolism ability also changes under the influence of other substances. Liver diseases lead up to decrease of drug clirens and to increase the semi-excretion time because of reduction of liver metabolism. Therefore the drags usually undergoing intensive liver metabolism necessitate a high risk of overdose when liver diseases present. On the other hand no risk of overdose exist when drags with low liver metabolism are used. PMID:21560652

  16. [Acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Alberto, Sara Folgado; Pires, S Sousa; Figueiredo, A; Deus, J Ramos de

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure refers to the rapid development of severe acute liver injury with impaired synthetic function in a patient who previously had a normal liver or a well compensated liver disease. Its aetiology is diversified and it provides one of the best indicators of prognosis thus being crucial its quick identification. Because it can progress to multiple organ failure syndrome these patients should be managed in an Intensive Care Unit. The first therapeutic approach consists of intensive care support until treatment for specific aetiologies can be started. Besides encephalopathy, many other complications can develop causing the high rates of morbidity and mortality of acute liver failure and so they need tight surveillance and treatment. Liver support systems are therapeutic options still in study and without proven success in a long term period which makes hepatic transplantation the final therapeutic. Given the wide limitations of hepatic transplantation the final decision is based on a correct diagnosis and prognostic scoring systems. PMID:20350465

  17. Robotic liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  18. Alcohol and liver, 2010.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A

    2010-03-21

    Liver is known as an organ that is primarily affected by alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the cause of an increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Progression of ALD is driven by "second hits". These second hits include the complex of nutritional, pharmacological, genetic and viral factors, which aggravate liver pathology. However, in addition to liver failure, ethanol causes damage to other organs and systems. These extrahepatic manifestations are regulated via the similar hepatitis mechanisms. In the Topic Highlight series, we provide an update of current knowledge in the field of ALD. PMID:20238395

  19. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  20. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  1. Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACR Multimedia gallery Multimedia Archive Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease There are a number of problems in the liver that can be treated with nonsurgical, interventional radiology ...

  2. General Information about Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) What is prevention? Cancer ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Key Points Liver cancer is a ...

  3. 25 Ways to Love Your Liver

    MedlinePLUS

    ... run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer For Liver Health Information Call 1-800-GO-LIVER (1- ... Love Your Liver 25 Ways to Love Your Liver The American Liver Foundation has put together this ...

  4. What Happens After Treatment for Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after liver cancer What happens after treatment for liver cancer? For some people with liver cancer, treatment ... 1-800-227-2345. Follow-up after a liver transplant A liver transplant can be very effective ...

  5. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  6. Liver Transplantation for Cholestatic Liver Diseases in Adults.

    PubMed

    Khungar, Vandana; Goldberg, David Seth

    2016-02-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is an established lifesaving therapy for patients with cholestatic liver diseases, including primary cholestatic diseases, namely primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as secondary forms of cholestatic liver disease, including those with cholestatic complications of LT needing a retransplant. Patients with cholestatic liver diseases can be transplanted for complications of end-stage liver disease or for disease-specific symptoms before the onset of end-stage liver disease. These patients should be regularly assessed. Patient survival after LT for cholestatic liver diseases is generally better than for other indications. PMID:26593299

  7. Managing alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease continues to be a significant cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality throughout the world. A number of diagnostic and prognostic models have been developed in the management of this condition, although specific roles for liver biopsy still remain particularly in the setting of alcoholic hepatitis. Despite a large number of recent treatment trials, the ideal pharmacotherapy approach remains undefined. Most essential is the supportive care and focus on abstinence and nutrition. Owing in part to a great deal of attention from governmental funding sources, a number of new treatment approaches are undergoing rigorous evaluation, hopefully providing future treatment options in this very severe condition. PMID:26523266

  8. Diet - liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of toxic waste products. Increasing your intake of carbohydrates to be in proportion with the amount of ... severe liver disease include: Eat large amounts of carbohydrate foods. Carbohydrates should be the major source of ...

  9. Diet and Your Liver

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Also, • Do not eat uncooked shellfish such as oysters and clams • Limit eating foods that have a ... of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus. Diet Recommendations: • Limit foods that have a lot ...

  10. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may be available to you or your child, talk to your child's doctor or a hospital social worker. Many resources are available to help you get through this ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) ...

  11. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... United States than in other parts of the world. Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American ...

  12. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sřrensen, Karen Kristine; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; McCuskey, Robert S; Smedsrřd, Bĺrd

    2015-01-01

    The liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) forms the fenestrated wall of the hepatic sinusoid and functions as a control post regulating and surveying the trafficking of molecules and cells between the liver parenchyma and the blood. The cell acts as a scavenger cell responsible for removal of potential dangerous macromolecules from blood, and is increasingly acknowledged as an important player in liver immunity. This review provides an update of the major functions of the LSEC, including its role in plasma ultrafiltration and regulation of the hepatic microcirculation, scavenger functions, immune functions, and role in liver aging, as well as issues that are either undercommunicated or confusingly dealt with in the literature. These include metabolic functions, including energy metabolic interplay between the LSEC and the hepatocyte, and adequate ways of identifying and distinguishing the cells. © 2015 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 5:1751-1774, 2015. PMID:26426467

  13. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  14. Optical diagnostics of liver pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2003-10-01

    The applicability of reflectance spectroscopy to detect pathological changes in human liver tissue was investigated. Post mortem reflectance spectra were collected from liver tissue originating from 13 individuals. A point counting method was applied to determine relative areas of connective tissue, liver cells with or without fat vacuoles, and vascular spaces in the liver. Preliminary results show that the amount of fat and connective tissue in liver can be estimated from reflectance spectra.

  15. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as healthcare standards, the ethical, legal, equity, and the other humanism issues of Theme V have been resolved less conclusively than the medical-scientific problems of Themes I–IV. PMID:20235333

  16. Neuropilins and liver

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are highly conserved transmembrane glycoproteins that possess pleiotropic functions. Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and its homologue neuropilin-2 interact as coreceptors with both class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factor and are involved in neuronal guidance and angiogenesis, respectively. The contribution of NRPs to tumor angiogenesis has been highlighted in previous studies, leading to the development of NRP antagonists as novel anti-angiogenesis therapies. However, more recent studies have demonstrated that NRPs have a much broader spectrum of activity in the integration of different pathways in physiological and pathological conditions. A few studies investigated the role of NRPs in both malignant and non-neoplastic liver diseases. In normal liver, NRP1 is expressed in hepatic stellate cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. NRP1 expression in hepatocytes has been associated with malignant transformation and may play an important role in tumor behavior. A contribution of NRPs in sinusoidal remodeling during liver regeneration has been also noted. Studies in chronic liver diseases have indicated that, besides its influence on angiogenesis, NRP1 might contribute to the progression of liver fibrosis owing to its effects on other growth factors, including transforming growth factor ?1. As a result, NRP1 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target for future antifibrotic therapies based on the simultaneous blockade of multiple growth factor signaling pathways. In this review, the structure of NRPs and their interactions with various ligands and associated cell surface receptors are described briefly. The current understanding of the roles of the NRPs in liver diseases including tumors, regeneration and fibrogenesis, are also summarized. PMID:26109793

  17. Gut microbiota and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases. PMID:25684933

  18. Fasciola hepatica: Specificity of a coproantigen ELISA test for diagnosis of fasciolosis in faecal samples from cattle and sheep concurrently infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, coccidians and/or rumen flukes (paramphistomes), under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kajugu, P-E; Hanna, R E B; Edgar, H W; McMahon, C; Cooper, M; Gordon, A; Barley, J P; Malone, F E; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2015-09-15

    Chronic fasciolosis is often diagnosed by faecal egg counting (FEC), following concentration of the eggs in the sample by a zinc sulphate floatation method. However, concentration by a sedimentation technique gives improved sensitivity. Interpretation of FEC results for fasciolosis is complicated by factors such as the long pre-patent period and irregular egg shedding. Thus, FEC reduction tests (FECRT), when used alone, are not completely reliable for diagnosis of anthelmintic susceptibility or resistance in local fluke populations, especially when parasite burdens are small. A Fasciola hepatica coproantigen ELISA test has been introduced which more accurately reflects the presence of flukes in the host bile ducts in late pre-patent infections, and absence of flukes following successful chemotherapeutic intervention. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the specificity of the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA technique, particularly regarding potential cross-reactivity with rumen fluke (paramphistome), gastrointestinal nematode and coccidian infections. The method involved parallel testing of a large battery of faecal samples from field-infected cattle and sheep using floatation and sedimentation FECs and coproantigen analysis. No evidence was found for significant false positivity in the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA due to paramphistome, coccidian and/or gastrointestinal nematode co-infections. With sedimentation FECs less than 10 F. hepatica eggs per gram (epg), the likelihood of a positive coproantigen result for the sample progressively decreased. Diagnosis of fasciolosis should be based on consideration of both FEC and coproantigen ELISA findings, to ensure optimum sensitivity for pre-patent and low-level infections. PMID:26234898

  19. Extracorporeal Bioartificial Liver for Treating Acute Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Tripathi, Anuj; Jain, Shivali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Liver is a vital organ of the human body performing myriad of essential functions. Liver-related ailments are often life-threatening and dramatically deteriorate the quality of life of patients. Management of acute liver diseases requires adequate support of various hepatic functions. Thus far, liver transplantation has been proven as the only effective solution for acute liver diseases. However, broader application of liver transplantation is limited by demand for lifelong immunosuppression, shortage of organ donors, relative high morbidity, and high cost. Therefore, research has been focused on attempting to develop alternative support systems to treat liver diseases. Earlier attempts have been made to use nonbiological therapies based on the use of conventional detoxification procedures such as filtration and dialysis. However, the absence of liver cells in such techniques reduced the overall survival rate of the patients and led to inadequate essential liver-specific functions. As a result, there has been growing interest in the development of biological therapy-based extracorporeal liver support systems as a bridge to liver transplantation or to support the ailing liver. A bioartificial liver support is an extracorporeal device through which plasma is circulated over living and functionally active hepatocytes packed in a bioreactor with the aim to aid the diseased liver until it regenerates or until a suitable graft for transplantation is available. This review article gives a brief overview of efficacy of various liver support systems that are currently available. Also, the development of advanced liver support systems, which has been analyzed for improving the important system component such as cell source and other culture and circulation conditions for the maintenance of the liver-specific functions, have been described. PMID:22416599

  20. Angiogenesis and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Gülsüm Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that hepatic angiogenesis, regardless of the etiology, takes place in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) that are characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis. Because anti-angiogenic therapy has been found to be efficient in the prevention of fibrosis in experimental models of CLDs, it is suggested that blocking angiogenesis could be a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced fibrosis. Consequently, efforts are being directed to revealing the mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during the progression of liver fibrosis. Literature evidences indicate that hepatic angiogenesis and fibrosis are closely related in both clinical and experimental conditions. Hypoxia is a major inducer of angiogenesis together with inflammation and hepatic stellate cells. These profibrogenic cells stand at the intersection between inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis and play also a pivotal role in angiogenesis. This review mainly focuses to give a clear view on the relevant features that communicate angiogenesis with progression of fibrosis in CLDs towards the-end point of cirrhosis that may be translated into future therapies. The pathogenesis of hepatic angiogenesis associated with portal hypertension, viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease are also discussed to emphasize the various mechanisms involved in angiogenesis during liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25848465

  1. Anesthesia for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) have complex problems such as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (POPH), hepatic encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, (ICP), left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO), high Model of end liver disease (MELD) scores, hyponatremia, and coagulopathies. The anesthesia management for liver transplantation can be very complex, dynamic and challenging. Anesthesia agents affect hepatic blood flow and anesthetic drug distribution, metabolism and elimination maybe altered in end stage liver disease. Other non-anesthetic agents such as nitric oxide, epoprosterenol, THAM, hypertonic saline, fibrinogen concentrates, fresh frozen plasma, platelets, packed red blood cells, recombinant plasminogen activator, calcium chloride, epinephrine etc. may play a vital role in the perioperative management of these patients. Intraoperative hemostasis and coagulation management can be very arduous as these patients may bleed or be at risk for thrombosis. Monitoring modalities such as Thromboelastography (TEG), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE), Bispectral Index (BIS) and Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter (ONSD) ultrasound play a significant role in various circumstances. Surgical techniques include complete or partial occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) with or without use of venovenous bypass (VVBP) or portocaval shunts. Post reperfusion syndrome (PRS) is a crucial event in this procedure, where patients may experience arrhythmia and/or cardiac arrest. Anesthetic handling of this phase has been recapitulated in detail. Provision of anesthesia services to the living liver transplant donor and pain management has been outlined. PMID:26118926

  2. Liver involvement in systemic infection

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    The liver is often involved in systemic infections, resulting in various types of abnormal liver function test results. In particular, hyperbilirubinemia in the range of 2-10 mg/dL is often seen in patients with sepsis, and several mechanisms for this phenomenon have been proposed. In this review, we summarize how the liver is involved in various systemic infections that are not considered to be primarily hepatotropic. In most patients with systemic infections, treatment for the invading microbes is enough to normalize the liver function tests. However, some patients may show severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure, requiring intensive treatment of the liver. PMID:25276279

  3. Farm-Level Risk Factors for Fish-Borne Zoonotic Trematode Infection in Integrated Small-Scale Fish Farms in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Van Thi; Ersbřll, Annette Kjćr; Nguyen, Khue Viet; Madsen, Henry; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Background Northern Vietnam is an endemic region for fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZT), including liver and intestinal flukes. Humans acquire the FZT infection by eating raw or inadequately cooked fish. The production of FZT-free fish in aquaculture is a key component in establishing a sustainable program to prevent and control the FZT transmission to humans. Interventions in aquaculture should be based on knowledge of the main risk factors associated with FZT transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings A longitudinal study was carried out from June 2006 to May 2007 in Nam Dinh province, Red River Delta to investigate the development and risk factors of FZT infections in freshwater cultured fish. A total of 3820 fish were sampled six times at two-month intervals from 96 fish farms. Logistic analysis with repeated measurements was used to evaluate potential risk factors based on information collected through questionnaire interviews with 61 fish farm owners. The results showed that the FZT infections significantly increased from first sampling in June to July 2006 (65%) to sixth sampling in April to May, 2007 (76%). The liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis and different zoonotic intestinal flukes including Haplochis pumilio, H. taichui, H. yokogawai, Centrocestus formosanus and Procerovum varium were found in sampled fish. Duration of fish cultured (sampling times), mebendazole drug self-medication of household members, presence of snails in the pond, and feeding fish with green vegetation collected outside fish farms all had a significant effect on the development of FZT prevalence in the fish. Conclusions/Significance The FZT prevalence in fish increased by 11 percentage points during a one-year culture period and the risk factors for the development of infection were identified. Results also highlight that the young fish are already highly infected when stocked into the grow-out systems. This knowledge should be incorporated into control programs of FZT transmission in integrated small-scale aquaculture nursery and grow-out systems in Vietnam. PMID:20644617

  4. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  5. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  6. Aging Liver. A review.

    PubMed

    Anantharaju, Abhinandana; Feller, Axel; Chedid, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline of cellular functions. The aging liver appears to preserve its function relatively well. Aging is associated in human liver with morphological changes such as decrease in size attributable to decreased hepatic blood flow. Ultrastructural analysis of the human liver has revealed that the integrity of mitochondria and enzymatic activity remain mostly unchanged with aging. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the aging process and result mainly from nonenzymatic processes in the liver. Endogenous free radicals are generated within mitochondria and suspected to cause severe injury to mitochondrial DNA. This damaged DNA accumulates with aging. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids, highly sensitive to ROS, decrease in liver mitochondria from human centenarians, a feature acquired during evolution as a protective mechanism to favor longevity. Diet is considered the main environmental factor having effect on lifespan. It has a major impact on aging liver, the central metabolic organ of the body. The ubiquitin proteolytic pathway in the liver serves to destroy many proteins, among them p21 which is encoded by abundant mRNA in senescent cells, can inhibit cell proliferation and favors DNA repair. Drug therapy in the elderly may be complicated by several factors such as decline in body weight, renal function, liver mass and hepatic blood flow, making adverse drug reactions more frequent. Hepatic drug metabolism is mainly mediated by the cytochrome P(450 )system and drug interactions in the elderly are likely related to the progressive decline of this system after the fifth decade of life and another decrease in individuals aged >70. Antihypertensive therapy in the elderly depends upon either hepatic or renal function and should be adjusted accordingly. Finally, telomerases are the biological clocks of replicative lifespan. Shortening of telomeric ends of chromosomes correlates with aging and decline in the replicative potential of the cell: replicative senescence. Telomere DNA of human somatic cells shortens during each cell division thus leading to a finite proliferation. Transfection of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene results in elongation of telomeres and extension of lifespan. This also applies to humans. Replicative senescence in human cells evolved as a mechanism to protect them from continuous divisions leading to multiple mutations. Longer-lived species such as humans had to develop replicative senescence to ensure that they would have the increased protection that their longevity necessitates. PMID:12393949

  7. Neoplasms of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, K.; Ishak, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    Primary Liver Cancer is perhaps the most prevalent malignancy in the world, particularly in South East Asia and Africa. After the discovery of hepatitis B virus as a cause of chronic liver disease often terminating cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and, more recently, the integration of viral DNA into host chromosomal DNA, the progress made in this field has been remarkable. This book contains 35 chapters and covers all topical aspects, such as oncogenes, epidemiology, carcinogenic role of hepatitis viruses, histopathology, new imaging techniques and new treatment modalities that include ultrasound-guided intratumor injections of ethanol and targeting chemotherapy.

  8. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  9. The Virtual Liver: Modeling Chemical-Induced Liver Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver) project is aimed at modeling chemical-induced processes in hepatotoxicity and simulating their dose-dependent perturbations. The v-Liver embodies an emerging field of research in computational tissue modeling that integrates molecular and cellul...

  10. Plants Consumption and Liver Health

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-Song; He, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a very important organ with a lot of functions for the host to survive. Dietary components are essential for and can be beneficial or detrimental to the healthy or diseased liver. Plants food is an essential part of the human diet and comprises various compounds which are closely related to liver health. Selected food plants can provide nutritional and medicinal support for liver disease. At the present, the knowledge of the effects of plants on the liver is still incomplete. The most urgent task at the present time is to find the best dietary and medicinal plants for liver health in an endless list of candidates. This review article updates the knowledge about the effects of plants consumption on the health of the liver, putting particular emphasis on the potential beneficial and harmful impact of dietary and medicinal plants on liver function. PMID:26221179

  11. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community Join the Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on our online support community by clicking here . ...

  12. What's New in Liver Cancer Research?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can I learn more about liver cancer? What`s new in liver cancer research? There is always research ... liver cancer worldwide. Finding liver cancer early Some new blood tests are being studied to see if ...

  13. Liver Surgery Codes

    Cancer.gov

    Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Ducts C220–C221 (Except for M9727, 9733, 9741-9742, 9764-9809, 9832, 9840-9931, 9945-9946, 9950-9967, 9975-9992) Codes 00 None; no surgery of primary site; autopsy ONLY 10 Local tumor destruction, NOS 11 Photodynamic

  14. Glycosylation and Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Herrera, Harmin; Block, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is the 5th most common cancer, but the 2nd leading cause of cancer death, in the world, with more than 700,000 fatalities annually. The major etiology of liver cancer is infection with an hepatotropic virus such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). While chronic viral infection remains the main cause of liver disease and risk of HCC, rates of non –viral associated HCC are occurring at an alarmingly increasing rate. Like many cancers, survival rates are closely associated with time of detection. If HCC is caught early, survival rates can be as high as 50%. Regrettably, most cases of HCC are caught late where survival rates can be as low as 2–7%. Thus, there has been great interest in discovering serum biomarkers that could be used to identify those with HCC. To this end, many groups have examined the N-linked glycans to identify changes that occur with HCC. As the liver secretes the vast majority of proteins into the serum, this has often been a starting point for study. In serum, alterations in core fucosylation, outer-arm fucosylation, increased sialylation and glycan branching have been observed in patients with HCC. Similar findings have been found directly in HCC tissue suggesting that these glycan changes may play a role in tumor formation and development. PMID:25727150

  15. The EPA Liver Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The v-Liver is part of a broader EPA effort on Virtual Tissues (VT) aimed at reducing the magnitude and spectrum of animal testing by integrative in silico and in vitro models, which recapitulate the properties of intact organs. The other VT projects include the Virtual Embryo (...

  16. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Alfire, Marcos E; Treem, William R

    2006-04-01

    NAFLD likely is the most common liver disease in children and is responsible for significant progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and the need for liver transplantation in adults and even in some adolescents. Early diagnosis and lifestyle interventions appear to be our best hope for controlling progression of disease. The pediatrician is responsible for screening all obese children with measurement of aminotransferases. Those with elevated enzymes (particularly ALT) for longer than 3 months, in the absence of markers of hepatitis B or C, autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis, or alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, should follow up with an abdominal ultrasound. In patients with a BMI in the morbidly obese range, an ultrasound to search for a diffusely echogenic liver should be performed even if the liver enzymes are normal. Findings suggestive of NAFLD should prompt the institution of appropriate dietary and exercise regimens. If these are unsuccessful after a 3-month trial, the patient should be referred to a pediatric gastroenterologist and hepatologist for further work-up and treatment, preferably in the context of a controlled therapeutic trial. Only by aggressively engaging this current epidemic will we be able to decrease the mounting human cost of NAFLD. PMID:16637558

  17. Molecular and functional characterization of a tandem-repeat galectin from the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Timothy P.; Dinguirard, Nathalie; Kunert, John; Hokke, Cornelius H.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a tandem-repeat type galectin was characterized from an embryonic cell line (Bge) and circulating hemocytes of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. The predicted B. glabrata galectin (BgGal) protein of 32 kDa possessed 2 carbohydrate recognition domains, each displaying 6 of 8 conserved amino acids involved in galactoside-binding activity. A recombinant BgGal (rBgGal) demonstrated hemagglutinating activity against rabbit erythrocytes, which was specifically inhibited by galactose-containing sugars (lacNAc/lac > galNAc/gal). Although native galectin was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of Bge cells and the plasma membrane of a subset of snail hemocytes (60%), it was not detected in cell-free plasma by Western blot analysis. The findings that rBgGal selectively recognizes the schistosome-related sugar, lacNAc, and strongly binds to hemocytes and the tegument of S. mansoni sporocysts in a sugar-inhibitable fashion suggest that hemocyte-bound galectin may be serving as pattern recognition receptor for this, or other pathogens possessing appropriate sugar ligands. Based on molecular and functional features, BgGal represents an authentic galectin, the first to be fully characterized in the medically-important molluscan Class Gastropoda. PMID:18280060

  18. Where are the South American freshwater turtle blood flukes (Trematoda: Spirorchiidae)? The first morphological and molecular analysis of spirorchiid cercariae from freshwater snails in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; de Melo, Alan Lane; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    Trematodes belonging to the family Spirorchiidae are blood parasites mainly of turtles with a worldwide distribution. These flukes were recently reported in some marine turtles from South America, where the occurrence of spirorchiids in freshwater definitive and intermediate hosts is so far unknown. In the present study, three morphotypes of brevifurcate apharyngeate distome cercariae found in freshwater molluscs from an urban reservoir in Brazil were used for morphological and molecular (nuclear 28S rDNA) evaluation. Two morphotypes of cercariae, probably congeneric species, were found in 12/17,465 specimens of Biomphalaria spp. and differ from each other by body size and sequences (0.1%). They present morphology similar to North American freshwater spirorchiids (Spirorchis spp.), however surprisingly molecular data reveals that these lineages are more closely related to marine spirorchiids. A third species found in 2/777 Pomacea sp. differs morphologically from all previously described spirorchiid cercariae and genetically from spirorchiids with available sequences (16-19%), grouping in the phylogenetic tree with freshwater North American species. This is the first report of freshwater spirorchiids in South America and the first molecular confirmation of the involvement of a caenogastropod in the life cycle of spirorchiids. PMID:26253761

  19. Discovery of intermediate hosts for two species of blood flukes Cardicola orientalis and Cardicola forsteri (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae) infecting Pacific bluefin tuna in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Shin, Sang Phil; Honryo, Tomoki; Uchida, Hiro'omi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Fish blood flukes (Aporocotylidae) are important pathogens of farmed finfish around the world. Among them, Cardicola spp. infecting farmed tuna are considered to be serious threats to tuna farming and have received tremendous attention. We conducted periodical samplings at a tuna farming site in Japan between January and May, 2015 to determine the life cycle of Cardicola spp. We collected over 4700 terebellid polychaetes from ropes, floats and frames of tuna culture cages and found nearly 400 infected worms. Sporocysts and cercariae found in Nicolea gracilibranchis were genetically identified as Cardicola orientalis by 28S and ITS2 ribosomal DNA sequences. This was the first discovery of the intermediate host for this parasite species. Infection prevalence and the abundance of N. gracilibranchis significantly varied between sampling points and the highest number of infected terebellids were collected from ropes. We also demonstrated morphologically and molecularly that asexual stages found in a single Amphitrite sp. (Terebellidae) and adult worms isolated from farmed juvenile tuna were Cardicola forsteri. This is the first report of C. forsteri in Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT) Thunnus orientalis in Japan. Our results demonstrated that all three species of Cardicola orientalis, C. forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis exist in Japanese farmed PBTs and that they all use terebellid polychaetes as the intermediate hosts. PMID:26571413

  20. The liver in haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ulvik, Rune J

    2015-07-01

    The review deals with genetic, regulatory and clinical aspects of iron homeostasis and hereditary haemochromatosis. Haemochromatosis was first described in the second half of the 19th century as a clinical entity characterized by excessive iron overload in the liver. Later, increased absorption of iron from the diet was identified as the pathophysiological hallmark. In the 1970s genetic evidence emerged supporting the apparent inheritable feature of the disease. And finally in 1996 a new "haemochromatosis gene" called HFE was described which was mutated in about 85% of the patients. From the year 2000 onward remarkable progress was made in revealing the complex molecular regulation of iron trafficking in the human body and its disturbance in haemochromatosis. The discovery of hepcidin and ferroportin and their interaction in regulating the release of iron from enterocytes and macrophages to plasma were important milestones. The discovery of new, rare variants of non-HFE-haemochromatosis was explained by mutations in the multicomponent signal transduction pathway controlling hepcidin transcription. Inhibited transcription induced by the altered function of mutated gene products, results in low plasma levels of hepcidin which facilitate entry of iron from enterocytes into plasma. In time this leads to progressive accumulation of iron and subsequently development of disease in the liver and other parenchymatous organs. Being the major site of excess iron storage and hepcidin synthesis the liver is a cornerstone in maintaining normal systemic iron homeostasis. Its central pathophysiological role in HFE-haemochromatosis with downgraded hepcidin synthesis, was recently shown by the finding that liver transplantation normalized the hepcidin levels in plasma and there was no sign of iron accumulation in the new liver. PMID:25204225

  1. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Jie; Li, Meng-Dong; Wang, Yu-Ming; Nie, Qing-He; Chen, Guo-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs. RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rdh and 5thh. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5h experiment. CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF. PMID:11819412

  2. Liver regeneration following repeat SBRT

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Andrew; Quesada, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for oligometastases and may confer a survival benefit in select patients. Herein, we document the first case of liver regeneration (LR) following repeat right hepatic lobe SBRT in a woman with breast cancer metastases. Retraction of the treated lobe was significant with a near 50% volume reduction. Compensatory contralateral lobe hypertrophy was noted with a 320% volume increase. The overall liver volume remained stable, within ±5% of baseline. This case indicates that repeat liver SBRT can be delivered safely to individual patients and that compensatory contralateral lobe hypertrophy is observed to maintain a functional liver volume. PMID:25830045

  3. The heart in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Cristina; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Bańares, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    The heart and liver are organs that are closely related in both health and disease. Patients who undergo liver transplantation may suffer from heart disease that is: (a) related to the original cause of the liver disease such as hemochromatosis, (b) related to the liver disease itself, or (c) related to other associated conditions. Furthermore, liver transplantation is one of the most cardiovascular stressful events that a patient with cirrhosis may undergo. After liver transplantation, the progression of pre-existing or the development of new-onset cardiac disease may occur. This article reviews the relationship between the heart and liver transplantation in the pre-transplant, intra-operative, and post-transplant periods. PMID:21145840

  4. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Sudeep; Khan, Shahid A; Grover, Vijay Paul Bob; Gwilt, Catherine; Smith, Belinda; Brown, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the commonest primary malignancy of the liver. It usually occurs in the setting of chronic liver disease and has a poor prognosis if untreated. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is a suitable therapeutic option for early, unresectable HCC particularly in the setting of chronic liver disease. Following on from disappointing initial results, the seminal study by Mazzaferro et al in 1996 established OLT as a viable treatment for HCC. In this study, the “Milan criteria” were applied achieving a 4-year survival rate similar to OLT for benign disease. Since then various groups have attempted to expand these criteria whilst maintaining long term survival rates. The technique of living donor liver transplantation has evolved over the past decade, particularly in Asia, and published outcome data is comparable to that of OLT. This article will review the evidence, indications, and the future direction of liver transplantation for liver cancer. PMID:19938188

  5. Lipids changes in liver cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing-ting; Xu, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Wu, Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism. Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver. It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs, these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed. Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide, and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries. In addition, liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases, which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer. PMID:17565510

  6. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases. PMID:26447962

  7. Liver tumors: Multidisciplinary management

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, W.J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on an aggressive, multidisciplinary approach toward patients with liver tumors. It was written in response to the recognition that a greater range of therapeutic management is being offered. Management of such tumors involve more than one individual - included is the primary physician first contacted by the patient, the diagnostician and finally the group of individuals that actually treats the disease. Either intermittent systemic chemotherapy is given, or a few highly selected cases have massive hepatic resections in a very few major medical centers. Further, the perception has been clouded by a combination of high surgical mortality and poor results obtainable with conventional systemic chemotherapy. For this reason, the authors have undertaken a study of liver tumors. Their major objective is to show that it is possible to obtain superior results by presenting a range of options.

  8. [Antioxidants in liver protection].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Blázovics, Anna

    2004-07-01

    Great importance has been attributed to antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of conditions associated with oxidative stress for many years. At the same time the antioxidants are free radicals themselves, and they can exert prooxidant activity depending on the concentration. They influence the cell redox homeostasis by their prooxidant and antioxidant activity as well. Drugs of chronic liver diseases should be considered, because free radicals are generated during the activity of the monooxygenase system, which affect the tissue oxidised status. Combined antioxidant treatment is more favourable compared with monotherapy, because antioxidants have scavenger-, compartment- and tissue-specificity and they regenerate each other directly, too. Beside their antioxidant property they may also directly regulate many important processes, e.g. cell cycle. We have some favourable results with regard combined antioxidant therapy of liver disease of different etiology. PMID:15320484

  9. De novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of the pancreatic fluke Eurytrema pancreaticum (trematoda: Dicrocoeliidae) using Illumina paired-end sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Xu, Min-Jun; Song, Hui-Qun; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-15

    Eurytrema pancreaticum is one of the most common trematodes living in the pancreatic and bile ducts of ruminants and also occasionally infects humans, causing eurytremiasis. In spite of its economic and medical importance, very little is known about the genomic resources of this parasite. Herein, we performed de novo sequencing, assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of adult E. pancreaticum. Approximately 36.4 million high-quality clean reads were obtained, and the length of the transcript contigs ranged from 66 to 19,968nt with mean length of 479nt and N50 length of 1094nt, and then 23,573 unigenes were assembled. Of these unigenes, 15,353 (65.1%) were annotated by blast searches against the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Among these, 15,267 (64.8%), 2732 (11.6%) and 10,354 (43.9%) of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the NR, NT and Swiss-Prot databases, respectively. 5510 (23.4%) and 4567 (19.4%) unigenes were assigned to GO and COG, respectively. 8886 (37.7%) unigenes were identified and mapped onto 254 pathways in the KEGG Pathway database. Furthermore, we found that 105 (1.18%) unigenes were related to pancreatic secretion and 61 (0.7%) to pancreatic cancer. The present study represents the first transcriptome of any members of the family Dicrocoeliidae, which has little genomic information available in the public databases. The novel transcriptome of E. pancreaticum should provide a useful resource for designing new strategies against pancreatic flukes and other trematodes of human and animal health significance. PMID:26494161

  10. Liver Planning Software Accurately Predicts Postoperative Liver Volume and Measures Early

    E-print Network

    Miga, Michael I.

    Liver Planning Software Accurately Predicts Postoperative Liver Volume and Measures Early or remnant liver volume (RLV) after hepatic resection is a critical predictor of perioperative outcomes. This study investigates whether the accuracy of liver surgical plan- ning software for predicting

  11. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as...

  12. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as...

  13. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as...

  14. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as...

  15. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â...ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as...

  16. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Charlie C.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Li, X. Allen; Das, Shiva K.; Miften, Moyed; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2010-03-01

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  17. Iron homeostasis in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erik R; Shah, Yatrik M

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is tightly regulated. A principal function of the liver is the regulation of iron homeostasis. The liver senses changes in systemic iron requirements and can regulate iron concentrations in a robust and rapid manner. The last 10 years have led to the discovery of several regulatory mechanisms in the liver which control the production of iron regulatory genes, storage capacity, and iron mobilization. Dysregulation of these functions leads to an imbalance of iron, which is the primary causes of iron-related disorders. Anemia and iron overload are two of the most prevalent disorders worldwide and affect over a billion people. Several mutations in liver-derived genes have been identified, demonstrating the central role of the liver in iron homeostasis. During conditions of excess iron, the liver increases iron storage and protects other tissues, namely the heart and pancreas from iron-induced cellular damage. However, a chronic increase in liver iron stores results in excess reactive oxygen species production and liver injury. Excess liver iron is one of the major mechanisms leading to increased steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23720289

  18. Liver disease in the Talmud.

    PubMed

    Westreich, M

    1990-02-01

    Diseases of the liver have been of interest to physicians throughout the ages. There are references to hepatic diseases in ancient writings on medicine as far back as the Egyptian papyrii (1). In this article, I deal with the multiple references to the liver and liver disease that are found in the books of the Talmud. The areas discussed include anatomy, physiology, trauma, liver disease, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and hematemesis. The modes of therapy and their theory give an interesting perspective to Middle Eastern medicine 1,500 years ago. PMID:2406332

  19. Liver transplantation in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, SR; Minford, E; Gunson, B; Buckels, JAC

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper provides a review of the practice of liver transplantation with the main emphasis on UK practice and indications for transplantation. Referral and Assessment: This section reviews the process of referral and assessment of patients with liver disease with reference to UK practice. Donor Organs: The practice of brainstem death and cadaveric organ donation is peculiar to individual countries and rates of donation and potential areas of improvement are addressed. Operative Technique: The technical innovations that have led to liver transplantation becoming a semi-elective procedure are reviewed. Specific emphasis is made to the role of liver reduction and splitting and living related liver transplantation and how this impacts on UK practice are reviewed. The complications of liver transplantation are also reviewed with reference to our own unit. Immunosuppression: The evolution of immunosuppression and its impact on liver transplantation are reviewed with some reference to future protocols. Retransplantation: The role of retransplantation is reviewed. Outcome and Survival: The results of liver transplantation are reviewed with specific emphasis on our own experience. Future: The future of liver transplantation is addressed. PMID:11819840

  20. Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    McDowell Torres, Dawn; Stevens, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Although comprising a minority of the transplant population, acute liver failure (ALF) patients represent some of the most challenging cases in terms of the level and complexity of care required. An ALF patient requires much more than a single skilled intensivist, gastroenterologist, or surgeon. Successful care of the ALF patient begins with early diagnosis and triage to the appropriate level of care where a multitude of specialties are required to work together to maximize the chance of recovery and/or extend the window of opportunity for transplant. PMID:20827368

  1. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Liver Disease and Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The normal functioning of brain is intimately as well as intricately interrelated with normal functioning of the liver. Liver plays a critical role of not only providing vital nutrients to the brain but also of detoxifying the splanchnic blood. Compromised liver function leads to insufficient detoxification thus allowing neurotoxins (such as ammonia, manganese, and other chemicals) to enter the cerebral circulation. In addition, portosystemic shunts, which are common accompaniments of advanced liver disease, facilitate free passage of neurotoxins into the cerebral circulation. The problem is compounded further by additional variables such as gastrointestinal tract bleeding, malnutrition, and concurrent renal failure, which are often associated with liver cirrhosis. Neurologic damage in chronic liver disease and liver cirrhosis seems to be multifactorial primarily attributable to the following: brain accumulation of ammonia, manganese, and lactate; altered permeability of the blood-brain barrier; recruitment of monocytes after microglial activation; and neuroinflammation, that is, direct effects of circulating systemic proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, IL-1?, and IL-6. Radiologist should be aware of the conundrum of neurologic complications that can be encountered in liver disease, which include hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocerebral degeneration, hepatic myelopathy, cirrhosis-related parkinsonism, cerebral infections, hemorrhage, and osmotic demyelination. In addition, neurologic complications can be exclusive to certain disorders, for example, Wilson disease, alcoholism (Wernicke encephalopathy, alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, Marchiafava-Bignami disease, etc). Radiologist should be aware of their varied clinical presentation and radiological appearances as the diagnosis is not always straightforward. PMID:25908229

  2. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Nabiha; Renner, Eberhard L

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment modality for end stage liver disease caused by many etiologies including autoimmune processes. That said, the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreased over the years due to the availability of effective medical treatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superior transplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. While AIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limited clinical significance in most, but not all cases. Recurrent PSC, however, often progresses over years to a stage requiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence and the predisposing factors of disease recurrence remain debated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseases is required to develop preventive measures. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatment of recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC) following LT. PMID:26689244

  3. Liver lobe torsion and liver abscess in a dog.

    PubMed

    Downs, M O; Miller, M A; Cross, A R; Selcer, B A; Abdy, M J; Watson, E

    1998-03-01

    A 4-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback had acute onset of vomiting, lethargy, and discolored urine. Physical examination revealed lethargy, pyrexia, weak femoral pulses, cardiac arrhythmia, distended abdomen, and signs of pain on abdominal palpation. Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography revealed a gas-containing lesion in the cranial portion of the abdomen. Preoperative care included administration of fluids, antibiotics, and antiarrhythmic medication. Exploratory laparotomy revealed hemobilia and a 360 degrees clockwise torsion of the papillary process of the caudate lobe of the liver. Clinical signs resolved completely after liver lobectomy, and the dog was alive 2 years after surgery. Torsion of a liver lobe is rare in dogs. Necrosis of the involved liver lobe can result in acute weakness, shock, and death. Hemodynamic stabilization, antibiotic treatment, and surgical intervention have been successful in treating this condition. Liver lobe torsion should be considered on the differential diagnoses list of acute abdominal pain. PMID:9524639

  4. Therapy of Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Christoph; Wiegand, Johannes; Karlas, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Liver abscess (LA) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Methods This review comprehensively describes epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of LA, with a strong focus on antimicrobial treatment choices and the impact of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Results In industrialized areas, pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) accounts for over 80% of the cases, whereas Entamoeba histolyticais responsible for up to 10% of the cases, with a higher incidence in tropical areas. Highly virulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniaehave emerged as a predominant cause of PLA in Asian countries and tend to spread to the USA, Australia, and European countries, therefore requiring special alertness. Most common symptoms of LA are fever, chills, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain, although a broad spectrum of non-specific symptoms may also occur. Conclusion Imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography scan) and microbiological findings play a crucial role in the diagnosis of LA. The treatment of choice for PLA is a multimodal approach combining broad-spectrum antibiotics and aspiration or drainage of larger abscess cavities. Amebic LA can be cured by metronidazole therapy without drainage. PMID:26287275

  5. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans Among the Hispanic/Latino population, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  6. In vitro models for liver toxicity testing

    E-print Network

    Soldatow, Valerie Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, various liver-derived in vitro model systems have been developed to enable investigation of the potential adverse effects of chemicals and drugs. Liver tissue slices, isolated microsomes, perfused liver, ...

  7. The Liver, Regulator of Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this theme issue is to review the basic physiological, nutritional, and pathological facts pertaining to the liver. It is an educational tool through which university teachers and people in charge of training may enhance their teaching programs. The main liver diseases seen in young children and pregnant women in tropical regions is…

  8. LIVER AND THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed the following specific aims: Specific Aim 1 will be to develop a model and the liver phenotype (defined as above) is maintained. In Specific Aim 2, we will demonstrate that manipulation of the host environment will induce changes in liver tissues. We will exa...

  9. Orthotopic liver transplantation for giant liver haemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Undine G; Bucher, Julian N; Schoenberg, Markus B; Benzing, Christian; Schmelzle, Moritz; Gradistanac, Tanja; Strocka, Steffen; Hau, Hans-Michael; Bartels, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In liver haemangiomas, the risk of complication rises with increasing size, and treatment can be obligatory. Here we present a case of a 46-year-old female who suffered from a giant haemangioma causing severe portal hypertension and vena cava compression, leading to therapy refractory ascites, hyponatremia and venostasis-associated thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. The patients did not experience tumour rupture or consumptive coagulopathy. Surgical resection was impossible because of steatosis of the non-affected liver. Orthotopic liver transplantation was identified as the only treatment option. The patient’s renal function remained stable even though progressive morbidity and organ allocation were improbable according to the patient’s lab model for end-stage liver disease (labMELD) score. Therefore, non-standard exception status was approved by the European organ allocation network “Eurotransplant”. The patient underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation 16 mo after admission to our centre. Our case report indicates the underrepresentation of morbidity associated with refractory ascites in the labMELD-based transplant allocation system, and it indicates the necessity of promptly applying for non-standard exception status to enable transplantation in patients with a severe clinical condition but low labMELD score. Our case highlights the fact that liver transplantation should be considered early in patients with non-resectable, symptomatic benign liver tumours. PMID:26722664

  10. SYBR, TaqMan, or both: highly sensitive, non-invasive detection of Cardicola blood fluke species in Southern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii).

    PubMed

    Polinski, Mark; Hamilton, Dylan Belworthy; Nowak, Barbara; Bridle, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Three species of blood fluke from the genus Cardicola are known to parasitize and cause disease in Bluefin Tunas--C. forsteri, C. orientalis, and C. opisthorchis. Although initially believed to be separated by geography and host specificity, recent identification of at least two Cardicola spp. concurrently present within all three Bluefin species has raised questions concerning pathogenicity, relative abundance, and distribution of these parasites within Bluefin populations. Here, we present sensitive and differential real-time qPCR nucleic acid detection of these Cardicola spp. by targeting the ITS2 region of the parasite rDNA for PCR amplification. A limit of sensitivity of 1-5 genome copy equivelents was achieved for each of the three Cardicola species tested without cross-species or host genomic amplification. Similar sensitivity was further achieved in the presence of up to 20 ng/?L non-target host gDNA using SYBR Green chemistry alone, or in the presence of up to 160 ng/?L host gDNA through the utilization of a TaqMan probe common-reporter detection system. These methods were subsequently used to positively identify both C. forsteri and C. orientalis DNA in preserved samples of serum, gill, and heart from ranched Southern Bluefin Tuna Thunnus maccoyii. Both methods were more sensitive for positively and differentially identifying the presence of Cardicola spp. than either histological or heart-flush microscopy techniques previously employed, and also possess the ability to be applied in non-lethal blood sampling of these highly valued fish. This is the first report for rapid and differential molecular quantitative detection of Cardicola, and opens the potential for effective monitoring of infection in cultured bluefin populations. Further, it is anticipated that the use of SYBR Green for melt-curve analyses in conjunction with a common-reporter TaqMan assay will present a flexible, accurate, and cost-effective approach for differential detection of a variety of other pathogens in future. PMID:23896120

  11. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  12. Arrhythmia risk in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the functioning of the heart and the liver have been described, with heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions that simultaneously affect both. The heart is one of the most adversely affected organs in patients with liver cirrhosis. For example, arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk for arrhythmia is influenced by factors such as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, cardiac ion channel remodeling, electrolyte imbalances, impaired autonomic function, hepatorenal syndrome, metabolic abnormalities, advanced age, inflammatory syndrome, stressful events, impaired drug metabolism and comorbidities. Close monitoring of cirrhotic patients is needed for arrhythmias, particularly when QT interval-prolonging drugs are given, or if electrolyte imbalances or hepatorenal syndrome appear. Arrhythmia risk may persist after liver transplantation due to possible QT interval prolongation, persistence of the parasympathetic impairment, post-transplant reperfusion and chronic immunosuppression, as well as consideration of the fact that the transplant itself is a stressful event for the cardiovascular system. The aims of the present article were to provide a review of the most important data regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and biomarkers of arrhythmia risk in patients with liver cirrhosis, to elucidate the association with long-term outcome, and to propose future research directions. PMID:25866603

  13. Post-hepatectomy liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Rondi; Fong, Yuman

    2014-10-01

    Hepatectomies are among some of the most complex operative interventions performed. Mortality rates after major hepatectomy are as high as 30%, with post-hepatic liver failure (PHLF) representing the major source of morbidity and mortality. We present a review of PHLF, including the current definition, predictive factors, pre-operative risk assessment, techniques to prevent PHLF, identification and management. Despite great improvements in morbidity and mortality, liver surgery continues to demand excellent clinical judgement in selecting patients for surgery. Appropriate choice of pre-operative techniques to improve the functional liver remnant (FLR), fastidious surgical technique, and excellent post-operative management are essential to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:25392835

  14. Treatment of Neuroendocrine Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Farley, Heather A; Pommier, Rodney F

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are rare and slow-growing malignancies that commonly metastasize to the liver, resulting hormonal syndromes and death from liver failure. Surgical consultation and liver debulking are key components in management. Traditional surgical resection guidelines do not apply to these tumors as with other cancers. Surgical resection has shown survival benefit even in the event of an incomplete resection. Ablation may be used as an adjunct to resection or in patients who are not candidates for resection. Asymptomatic patients with high-volume disease do as well with intra-arterial therapy as with surgery. PMID:26610783

  15. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  16. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective. PMID:26359647

  17. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  18. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  19. Cholestatic Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jorge L.; Choquette, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Inherited syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia are the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the prime indication for liver transplantation in children. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases has increased substantially by the discovery of genetic mutations in children with intrahepatic cholestasis and the findings that inflammatory circuits are operative at the time of diagnosis of biliary atresia. Building on this solid foundation, recent studies provide new insight into genotype-phenotype relationships and how mutations produce altered bile composition and cholestasis. New evidence exists that although liver transplantation is curative for patients with end-stage liver disease owing to cholestasis, some patients may develop recurrence of cholestasis because of the emergence of autoantibodies that disrupt canalicular function in the new graft. Progress is also evident in biliary atresia, with recent studies identifying candidate modifier genes and directly implicating lymphocytes and inflammatory signals in the pathogenesis of bile duct injury and obstruction. PMID:20425482

  20. How Is Liver Cancer Found?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to make it easier to see tumors. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) MRI scans can be very helpful in looking at liver ... has spread to other parts of the body. MRI scans use radio waves and strong magnets instead of ...

  1. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... providers engage in frequent follow-ups with ongoing discussions about the management of their condi- tion. Current ... glucose in the blood. Most importantly for this discussion, however, the liver filters the blood and removes ...

  2. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. Microbiology of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Moore-Gillon, J C; Eykyn, S J; Phillips, I

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen patients with pyogenic liver abscesses were studied over 10 years to discover the causative organisms of the condition. Pus was subjected to Gram-negative smear or gas-liquid chromatography to detect volatile acids characteristic of anaerobes and then cultured. All isolates were identified by conventional methods and tested for sensitivity to appropriate antimicrobial agents. Bacteria were grown from the liver abscesses in all 16 patients. Streptococcus milleri Lancefield group F was the commonest organism isolated from the pyogenic liver abscesses, being found in 13 patients. If Strep milleri is isolated care should be taken not to mistake it for an anaerobe, and finding the organism in the blood should alert the clinician to the possible presence of a liver abscesses. PMID:6794712

  4. Energy Metabolism in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an essential metabolic organ, and its metabolic activity is tightly controlled by insulin and other metabolic hormones. Glucose is metabolized into pyruvate through glycolysis in the cytoplasm, and pyruvate is completely oxidized to generate ATP through the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. In the fed state, glycolytic products are used to synthesize fatty acids through de novo lipogenesis. Long-chain fatty acids are incorporated into triacylglycerol, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters in hepatocytes, and these complex lipids are stored in lipid droplets and membrane structures, or secreted into the circulation as VLDL particles. In the fasted state, the liver secretes glucose through both breakdown of glycogen (glycogenolysis) and de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). During pronged fasting, hepatic gluconeogenesis is the primary source of endogenous glucose production. Fasting also promotes lipolysis in adipose tissue to release nonesterified fatty acids which are converted into ketone bodies in the liver though mitochondrial ? oxidation and ketogenesis. Ketone bodies provide a metabolic fuel for extrahepatic tissues. Liver metabolic processes are tightly regulated by neuronal and hormonal systems. The sympathetic system stimulates, whereas the parasympathetic system suppresses, hepatic gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates glycolysis and lipogenesis, but suppresses gluconeogenesis; glucagon counteracts insulin action. Numerous transcription factors and coactivators, including CREB, FOXO1, ChREBP, SREBP, PGC-1?, and CRTC2, control the expression of the enzymes which catalyze the rate-limiting steps of liver metabolic processes, thus controlling liver energy metabolism. Aberrant energy metabolism in the liver promotes insulin resistance, diabetes, and nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). PMID:24692138

  5. Cell and Tissue Engineering for Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Fox, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous hurdles presented by the complexity of the liver’s structure and function, advances in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and devices are accelerating the development of cell-based therapies for treating liver disease and liver failure. This State of the Art Review discusses both the near and long-term prospects for such cell-based therapies and the unique challenges for clinical translation. PMID:25031271

  6. STEM CELLS, CELL TRANSPLANTATION AND LIVER REPOPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Michael; Shafritz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation is currently the only therapeutic option for patients with end-stage chronic liver disease and for severe acute liver failure. Because of limited donor availability, attention has been focused on the possibility to restore liver mass and function through cell transplantation. Stem cells are a promising source for liver repopulation after cell transplantation, but whether or not the adult mammalian liver contains hepatic stem cells is highly controversial. Part of the problem is that proliferation of mature adult hepatocytes is sufficient to regenerate the liver after two-thirds partial hepatectomy or acute toxic liver injury and participation of stem cells is not required. However, under conditions in which hepatocyte proliferation is blocked, undifferentiated epithelial cells in the periportal areas, called “oval cells”, proliferate, differentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver mass. These cells are referred to as facultative liver stem cells, but they do not repopulate the normal liver after their transplantation. In contrast, epithelial cells isolated from the early fetal liver can effectively repopulate the normal liver, but they are already traversing the hepatic lineage and may not be true stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells and embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate along the hepatic lineage in culture, but at present these cells are inefficient in repopulating the liver. This review will characterize these various cell types and compare the properties of these cells and the conditions under which they do or do not repopulate the liver following their transplantation. PMID:18187050

  7. Toward surface quantification of liver fibrosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuting; Kang, Chiang Huen; Xu, Shuoyu; Tuo, Xiaoye; Trasti, Scott; Tai, Dean C. S.; Raja, Anju Mythreyi; Peng, Qiwen; So, Peter T. C.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Welsch, Roy; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring liver fibrosis progression by liver biopsy is important for certain treatment decisions, but repeated biopsy is invasive. We envision redefinition or elimination of liver biopsy with surface scanning of the liver with minimally invasive optical methods. This would be possible only if the information contained on or near liver surfaces accurately reflects the liver fibrosis progression in the liver interior. In our study, we acquired the second-harmonic generation and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy images of liver tissues from bile duct-ligated rat model of liver fibrosis. We extracted morphology-based features, such as total collagen, collagen in bile duct areas, bile duct proliferation, and areas occupied by remnant hepatocytes, and defined the capsule and subcapsular regions on the liver surface based on image analysis of features. We discovered a strong correlation between the liver fibrosis progression on the anterior surface and interior in both liver lobes, where biopsy is typically obtained. The posterior surface exhibits less correlation with the rest of the liver. Therefore, scanning the anterior liver surface would obtain similar information to that obtained from biopsy for monitoring liver fibrosis progression.

  8. Cell Sources, Liver Support Systems and Liver Tissue Engineering: Alternatives to Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Han Joon; Choi, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body; it has a complex architecture, wide range of functions and unique regenerative capacity. The growing incidence of liver diseases worldwide requires increased numbers of liver transplant and leads to an ongoing shortage of donor livers. To meet the huge demand, various alternative approaches are being investigated including, hepatic cell transplantation, artificial devices and bioprinting of the organ itself. Adult hepatocytes are the preferred cell sources, but they have limited availability, are difficult to isolate, propagate poor and undergo rapid functional deterioration in vitro. There have been efforts to overcome these drawbacks; by improving culture condition for hepatocytes, providing adequate extracellular matrix, co-culturing with extra-parenchymal cells and identifying other cell sources. Differentiation of human stem cells to hepatocytes has become a major interest in the field of stem cell research and has progressed greatly. At the same time, use of decellularized organ matrices and 3 D printing are emerging cutting-edge technologies for tissue engineering, opening up new paths for liver regenerative medicine. This review provides a compact summary of the issues, and the locations of liver support systems and tissue engineering, with an emphasis on reproducible and useful sources of hepatocytes including various candidates formed by differentiation from stem cells. PMID:26019753

  9. [Immunosuppression after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Calmus, Yvon

    2009-09-01

    The standard immunosuppression protocol after liver transplantation (LT) is based on an anticalcineurin (ACN) (tacrolimus or cyclosporine microemulsion) combined with mycophenolate and corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are usually stopped between 6 and 12 months after LT, except for patients whose transplantations were necessitated by autoimmune disease. ACN and mycophenolate must be monitored to verify the dose, with a residual blood assay (for tacrolimus), at 2hours (for cyclosporine microemulsion), or by a simplified area under the curve (for mycophenolate). The first-line treatment for rejection calls for increasing the dosage of tacrolimus (or switching to tacrolimus for patients treated with cyclosporine). Second-line treatment for refractory rejection is corticosteroid bolus (500-1000 mg of methylprednisolone, one to three times). Antibodies blocking the interleukin 2 receptors (basiliximab) or lymphocytes (thymoglobulin) make it possible to reduce the incidence of rejection, decrease corticosteroid doses rapidly and introduce ACN later on (useful in cases of kidney failure). The mTOR inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus) have different side effects (hyperlipidemia, thrombocytopenia, and pulmonary, cutaneous, and articular events) than ACNs. The absence of any renal or vascular effect is interesting for patients with kidney failure, and the antiproliferative effect can be useful for patients transplanted because of cancer. The current objective of immunosuppression is to reduce the adverse effects (kidney failure, metabolic complications, cancer and infections, in particular, which reduce the survival of patients and grafts), and in the future, to promote the establishment of tolerance that ideally will allow the patient to stop prophylactic immunosuppressant treatment. New chemical agents, capable of acting on new and more specific pathways, are in phase II/III testing. PMID:19651486

  10. Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver inflammation drives hepatic fibrosis, and current immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral therapies can weaken this driver. Hepatic fibrosis is reversed, stabilized, or prevented in 57%-79% of patients by conventional treatment regimens, mainly by their anti-inflammatory actions. Responses, however, are commonly incomplete and inconsistently achieved. The fibrotic mechanisms associated with liver inflammation have been clarified, and anti-fibrotic agents promise to improve outcomes as adjunctive therapies. Hepatitis C virus and immune-mediated responses can activate hepatic stellate cells by increasing oxidative stress within hepatocytes. Angiotensin can be synthesized by activated hepatic stellate cells and promote the production of reactive oxygen species. Anti-oxidants (N-acetylcysteine, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and vitamin E) and angiotensin inhibitors (losartin) have had anti-fibrotic actions in preliminary human studies, and they may emerge as supplemental therapies. Anti-fibrotic agents presage a new era of supplemental treatment for chronic liver disease. PMID:24627588

  11. Autophagy regulates sphingolipid levels in the liver[S

    PubMed Central

    Alexaki, Aikaterini; Gupta, Sita D.; Majumder, Saurav; Kono, Mari; Tuymetova, Galina; Harmon, Jeffrey M.; Dunn, Teresa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipid levels are tightly regulated to maintain cellular homeostasis. During pathologic conditions such as in aging, inflammation, and metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, levels of some sphingolipids, including the bioactive metabolite ceramide, are elevated. Sphingolipid metabolism has been linked to autophagy, a critical catabolic process in both normal cell function and disease; however, the in vivo relevance of the interaction is not well-understood. Here, we show that blocking autophagy in the liver by deletion of the Atg7 gene, which is essential for autophagosome formation, causes an increase in sphingolipid metabolites including ceramide. We also show that overexpression of serine palmitoyltransferase to elevate de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis induces autophagy in the liver. The results reveal autophagy as a process that limits excessive ceramide levels and that is induced by excessive elevation of de novo sphingolipid synthesis in the liver. Dysfunctional autophagy may be an underlying mechanism causing elevations in ceramide that may contribute to pathogenesis in diseases. PMID:25332431

  12. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kaswala, Dh; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349

  13. Effect of Pressure on Liver Stiffness During the Development of Liver Fibrosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen Bo; Xu, Qing Hua; Jiao, Zi Yu; Wu, Rong; Song, Qing; Luo, Yu Kun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether hepatic arterial pressure and portal pressure have an effect on liver stiffness during the development of liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis was induced in 50 healthy New Zealand white rabbits. Laparotomy was performed to measure liver stiffness, and the portal vein and hepatic artery were successively ligated to repeat the measurements. A significant difference was observed among liver stiffness values measured at different time points (F = 22.82, p < 0.001). Differences between original liver stiffness and liver stiffness measured after portal ligation were positively correlated with portal pressure (r = 0.801, p < 0.001). In animals with grade 4 liver fibrosis, the increase in liver stiffness caused by pressure was greater than that caused by extracellular matrix accumulation (p = 0.002). In conclusion, hepatic arterial pressure and portal pressure have a significant effect on liver stiffness during the development of liver fibrosis. PMID:26497767

  14. Liver Transplantation for Caroli Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zahmatkeshan, M.; Bahador, A.; Geramizade, B.; Emadmarvasti, V.; Malekhosseini, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Caroli disease is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multifocal, segmental dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. Patients with Caroli disease who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those who also have complications related to portal hypertension may require liver transplantation. In liver transplant ward of Shiraz University of Medical Science we had 4 patients with Caroli disease who were transplanted. Herein, we describe the demographic characteristics and post-transplant course of the patients. These patients presented with liver failure, recurrent cholangitis and portal hypertension sequelae unresponsive to medical treatment. The mean age of patients was 24.5 (range: 18–36) years, the mean MELD score was 17.5 (range: 11–23), three patients were female; one was male. All of the patients had good post-transplantation course except for one patient who developed post-operative biliary stricture for whom biliary reconstruction was done. PMID:25013645

  15. LIVER REGENERATION: ALTERNATIVE EPITHELIAL PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, George K.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of hepatic tissue triggers a regenerative response in the whole organ. Under typical normal conditions, all hepatic cells (epithelial: hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells; non-epithelial: stellate cells, macrophages and endothelial cells) undergo one to three rounds of replication to establish the original number of cells and restore organ size. The review summarizes the literature of regenerative patterns in situations in which proliferation of either hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells is inhibited. The evidence strongly suggests that under these circumstances, hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells can function as facultative stem cells for each other and replenish the inhibited cellular compartment by a process of trans-differentiation, involving complex signaling pathways. These pathways are activated under experimental conditions in rodents and in fulminant hepatitis associated with liver failure in humans. Mechanistic analysis of these pathways has implications for liver biology and for potential therapeutic modalities in human liver disease. PMID:19788929

  16. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  17. Clinical implications of advances in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Jin; Lee, Kyeong Geun

    2015-01-01

    Remarkable advances have been made recently in the area of liver regeneration. Even though liver regeneration after liver resection has been widely researched, new clinical applications have provided a better understanding of the process. Hepatic damage induces a process of regeneration that rarely occurs in normal undamaged liver. Many studies have concentrated on the mechanism of hepatocyte regeneration following liver damage. High mortality is usual in patients with terminal liver failure. Patients die when the regenerative process is unable to balance loss due to liver damage. During disease progression, cellular adaptations take place and the organ microenvironment changes. Portal vein embolization and the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy are relatively recent techniques exploiting the remarkable progress in understanding liver regeneration. Living donor liver transplantation is one of the most significant clinical outcomes of research on liver regeneration. Another major clinical field involving liver regeneration is cell therapy using adult stem cells. The aim of this article is to provide an outline of the clinical approaches being undertaken to examine regeneration in liver diseases. PMID:25834796

  18. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R. PMID:25861623

  19. Hepatitis C and liver transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert S.

    2005-08-01

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapy to correct liver failure, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma arising from hepatitis C infection. But despite the successful use of living donors and improvements in immunosuppression and antiviral therapy, organ demand continues to outstrip supply and recurrent hepatitis C with accelerated progression to cirrhosis of the graft is a frequent cause of graft loss and the need for retransplantation. Appropriate selection of candidates and timing of transplantation, coupled with better pre- and post-transplant antiviral therapy, are needed to improve outcomes.

  20. Getting a New Liver: Facts about Liver Transplants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PELD score, which means Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease.) A computer calculates this score. The score is calculated using results from two ... regularly to update 5 your MELD or PELD score. Be sure to notify ... of any change in your medical condition. When a donor is found for you, the ...

  1. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects.

    PubMed

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inęs

    2015-10-21

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  2. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inęs

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  3. How Many People Get Liver Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer? How many people get liver cancer? The American Cancer Society's estimates for primary liver and bile duct cancers ... Health On The Net National Health Council © 2015 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  4. Liver regeneration by hepatic progenitor cells 

    E-print Network

    Bird, Thomas Graham

    2011-07-05

    The liver is the largest solid organ in the body and is frequently the site of injury. During disease, liver injury is usually compensated for by exceptionally efficient regeneration which occurs both from differentiated ...

  5. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David K.

    “Humanized” mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury ...

  6. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for an unrelated reason. Further testing with a liver biopsy is performed when clinically warranted in patients with steatohepatitis. The liver biopsy helps rule out other diseases and assesses the ...

  7. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  8. Vitamin E reduces liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Aiko; Kawabe, Naoto; Hashimoto, Senju; Murao, Michihito; Nakano, Takuji; Shimazaki, Hiroaki; Kan, Toshiki; Nakaoka, Kazunori; Ohki, Masashi; Takagawa, Yuka; Takamura, Tomoki; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E treatment on liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Thirty-eight NAFLD patients were administered vitamin E for > 1 year. The doses of vitamin E were 150, 300, or 600 mg; three times per day after each meal. Responses were assessed by liver enzyme levels [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotranferease (ALT), and ?-glutamyl transpeptidase (?-GTP)], noninvasive scoring systems of hepatic fibrosis-4 [FIB-4 index and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet index (APRI)], and liver stiffness [velocity of shear wave (Vs)] measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. Vs measurements were performed at baseline and 12 mo after baseline. The patients were genotyped for the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) polymorphisms and then divided into either the CC/CG or GG group to examine each group’s responses to vitamin E treatment. RESULTS: We found marked differences in the platelet count, serum albumin levels, alkaline phosphatase levels, FIB-4 index, APRI, and Vs at baseline depending on the PNPLA3 polymorphism. AST, ALT, and ?-GTP levels (all P < 0.001); FIB-4 index (P = 0.035); APRI (P < 0.001); and Vs (P < 0.001) significantly decreased from baseline to 12 mo in the analysis of all patients. In the subset analyses of PNPLA3 genotypes, AST levels (P = 0.011), ALT levels (P < 0.001), ?-GTP levels (P = 0.005), APRI (P = 0.036), and Vs (P = 0.029) in genotype GG patients significantly improved, and AST and ALT levels (both P < 0.001), ?-GTP levels (P = 0.003), FIB-4 index (P = 0.017), and APRI (P < 0.001) in genotype CC/CG patients. CONCLUSION: One year of vitamin E treatment improved noninvasive fibrosis scores and liver stiffness in NAFLD patients. The responses were similar between different PNPLA3 genotypes. PMID:26644818

  9. LIVER BIOLOGY AND PATHOBIOLOGY Liver Tissue Engineering at Extrahepatic Sites in Mice

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    LIVER BIOLOGY AND PATHOBIOLOGY BIOLOGY Liver Tissue Engineering at Extrahepatic Sites in Mice as a Potential New Therapy for Genetic Liver Diseases Kazuo Ohashi,1,3 Jacob M. Waugh,2 Michael D. Dake,2 Takashi and Mark A. Kay1 Liver tissue engineering using hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed as an alterna

  10. Multiple Adaptive Mechanisms to Chronic Liver Disease Revealed at Early Stages of Liver Carcinogenesis

    E-print Network

    Domany, Eytan

    Multiple Adaptive Mechanisms to Chronic Liver Disease Revealed at Early Stages of Liver-knockout (Mdr2-KO) mice. These mice lack the liver-specific P-glycoprotein responsible by hepatocellular carcinoma development after the age of 1 year. Liver tissue samples of Mdr2-KO mice in the early

  11. New Concepts in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Riehle, Kimberly J.; Dan, Yock Young; Campbell, Jean S.; Fausto, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    The unique ability of the liver to regenerate itself has fascinated biologists for years and has made it the prototype for mammalian organ regeneration(1–3). Harnessing this process has great potential benefit in the treatment of liver failure and has been the focus of intense research over the past 50 years. Not only will detailed understanding of cell proliferation in response to injury be applicable to other dysfunction of organs, it may also shed light on how cancer develops in a cirrhotic liver, in which there is intense pressure on cells to regenerate. Advances in molecular techniques over the past few decades have led to the identification of many regulatory intermediates, and pushed us onto the verge of an explosive era in regenerative medicine. To date, more than 10 clinical trials have been reported in which augmented regeneration using progenitor cell therapy has been attempted in human patients(4). This review traces the path that has been taken over the last few decades in the study of liver regeneration, highlights new concepts in the field, and the challenges that still stand between us and clinical therapy. PMID:21199532

  12. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  13. Predictive Models of Liver Cancer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive models of chemical-induced liver cancer face the challenge of bridging causative molecular mechanisms to adverse clinical outcomes. The latent sequence of intervening events from chemical insult to toxicity are poorly understood because they span multiple levels of bio...

  14. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Inherited liver diseases in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A; Riely, C A

    1995-01-01

    Important inherited disorders causing acute and chronic liver disease include hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, alpha 1-antiprotease (antitrypsin) deficiency, and cystic fibrosis. The detection of an index case has implications for screening family members. A normal life span can be expected with treatment in asymptomatic patients with Wilson's disease and hemochromatosis. We present a clinical approach to disease recognition, investigation, and screening. PMID:7483606

  16. Fibrogenesis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hideki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In developed countries, ALD is a major cause of end-stage liver disease that requires transplantation. The spectrum of ALD includes simple steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, ?brosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Alcohol abstinence is the most effective therapy for ALD. However, targeted therapies are urgently needed for patients with severe ALD (i.e., alcoholic hepatitis) or those who do not abstain from alcohol. The lack of studies and the availability of animal models that do not reflect all the features of this disease in humans inhibit the development of new drugs for ALD. In ALD-associated fibrosis, hepatic stellate cells are the principal cell type responsible for extracellular matrix production. Although the mechanisms underlying fibrosis in ALD are largely similar to those observed in other chronic liver diseases, oxidative stress, methionine metabolism abnormalities, hepatocyte apoptosis, and endotoxin lipopolysaccharides that activate Kupffer cells may play unique roles in disease-related fibrogenesis. Lipogenesis during the early stages of ALD has recently been implicated as a risk factor for the progression of cirrhosis. Other topics include osteopontin, interleukin-1 signaling, and genetic polymorphism. In this review, we discuss the basic pathogenesis of ALD and focus on liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25009376

  17. Transcriptional Ontogeny of the Developing Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    During embryogenesis the liver is derived from endodermal cells lining the digestive tract. These endodermal progenitor cells contribute to forming the parenchyma of a number of organs including the liver and pancreas. Early in organogenesis the fetal liver is populated by hemato...

  18. Percutaneous needle treatment of liver tumors

    E-print Network

    · Percutaneous needle treatment of liver tumors · Target multiple tumors through a single incisionmm x 90mm x 260mm · Autoclavable I. Free Space III. Bovine Liver · Precurved concentric nitinol tubes.80 Bovine Liver (mm) 3.32 ± 2.66 II. Ethanol Solution Future Work · Human trials with manual unit · Fully

  19. Therapy for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaurigue, Maryconi M; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism results in about 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide, representing 4% of all mortality. Although alcoholism is associated with more than 60 diseases, most mortality from alcoholism results from alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD includes alcoholic steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, in order of increasing severity. Important scoring systems of ALD severity include: Child-Pugh, a semi-quantitative scoring system useful to roughly characterize clinical severity; model for end-stage liver disease, a quantitative, objective scoring system used for prognostication and prioritization for liver transplantation; and discriminant function, used to determine whether to administer corticosteroids for alcoholic hepatitis. Abstinence is the cornerstone of ALD therapy. Psychotherapies, including twelve-step facilitation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and motivational enhancement therapy, help support abstinence. Disulfiram decreases alcohol consumption by causing unpleasant sensations after drinking alcohol from accumulation of acetaldehyde in serum, but disulfiram can be hepatotoxic. Adjunctive pharmacotherapies to reduce alcohol consumption include naltrexone, acamprosate, and baclofen. Nutritional therapy helps reverse muscle wasting, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies, and trace element deficiencies associated with ALD. Although reduced protein intake was previously recommended for advanced ALD to prevent hepatic encephalopathy, a diet containing 1.2-1.5 g of protein/kg per day is currently recommended to prevent muscle wasting. Corticosteroids are first-line therapy for severe alcoholic hepatitis (discriminant function ? 32), but proof of their efficacy in decreasing mortality remains elusive. Pentoxifylline is an alternative therapy. Complications of advanced ALD include ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, esophageal variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and portopulmonary hypertension. Alcoholic cirrhotics have increased risk of developing hepatomas. Liver transplantation is the ultimate therapy for severe ALD, but generally requires 6 mo of proven abstinence for eligibility. Alcoholic cirrhotics who maintain abstinence generally have a relatively favorable prognosis after liver transplantation. PMID:24605013

  20. [Reutilization of 3H-thymidine by liver cells induced by syngeneic liver extracts].

    PubMed

    Shadrin, B P; Bulava, G V

    1980-02-01

    The effect of liver extract on 3H-thymidine incorporation by liver cells of syngenic recipients has been studied by autoradiography. Intravenous administration of liver extract, 1 hour after 3H-thymidine injection, increased the number of labelled liver cells 37 and 61 hours after extract administration. The parenteral administration of the liver extract is supposed to stimulate a reaction affecting the redistribution of tritium-thymidine-labeled DNA in the organism. PMID:7385364

  1. Liver Life Walk Chicago is an annual event organized by the American Liver Foundation to raise awareness on liver disease prevention and management.

    E-print Network

    Alford, Simon

    Liver Life Walk Chicago is an annual event organized by the American Liver Foundation® to raise awareness on liver disease prevention and management. The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology invites you to join us when we walk to help move forward the fight against liver disease! Liver Life Walk

  2. Decellularized human liver as a natural 3D-scaffold for liver bioengineering and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Rombouts, Krista; Rennie Hall, Andrew; Urbani, Luca; Vinh Luong, Tu; Al-Akkad, Walid; Longato, Lisa; Brown, David; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Dhillon, Amar P.; Fuller, Barry; Davidson, Brian; Moore, Kevin; Dhar, Dipok; De Coppi, Paolo; Malago, Massimo; Pinzani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Liver synthetic and metabolic function can only be optimised by the growth of cells within a supportive liver matrix. This can be achieved by the utilisation of decellularised human liver tissue. Here we demonstrate complete decellularization of whole human liver and lobes to form an extracellular matrix scaffold with a preserved architecture. Decellularized human liver cubic scaffolds were repopulated for up to 21 days using human cell lines hepatic stellate cells (LX2), hepatocellular carcinoma (Sk-Hep-1) and hepatoblastoma (HepG2), with excellent viability, motility and proliferation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Biocompatibility was demonstrated by either omental or subcutaneous xenotransplantation of liver scaffold cubes (5?×?5?×?5?mm) into immune competent mice resulting in absent foreign body responses. We demonstrate decellularization of human liver and repopulation with derived human liver cells. This is a key advance in bioartificial liver development. PMID:26248878

  3. Internal bioartificial liver with xenogeneic hepatocytes prevents death from acute liver failure: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Roger, V; Balladur, P; Honiger, J; Baudrimont, M; Delelo, R; Robert, A; Calmus, Y; Capeau, J; Nordlinger, B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that a bioartificial liver, using allogeneic or xenogeneic hepatocytes protected from rejection by a semipermeable membrane, could prevent death from acute liver failure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An implantable bioartificial liver using isolated hepatocytes could be an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation to treat patients with acute liver failure. It could serve either as a bridge until liver transplantation or as the main treatment until recovery of the native liver. However, allogeneic or xenogeneic hepatocytes that could be used in clinical applications are spontaneously rejected. METHODS: Acute liver failure was induced in rats by 95% liver resection. Twenty-five million hepatocytes harvested in rats (allogeneic) or guinea pigs (xenogeneic) were encapsulated in a semipermeable membrane to protect them from rejection. The hollow fibers containing hepatocytes were transplanted into the peritoneum of recipient rats. Survival rates were compared between rats transplanted or not with hepatocytes. RESULTS: In groups not transplanted with viable hepatocytes, 73% to 93% of rats died after 95% liver resection. The mortality rate was reduced to 39% in rats transplanted with allogeneic hepatocytes and 36% in rats transplanted with xenogeneic hepatocytes. The bioartificial liver could be removed 1 month after transplantation, when regeneration of the native liver was complete. Allogeneic and xenogeneic hepatocytes remained viable. CONCLUSIONS: The implantable bioartificial liver was able to prevent death in this model of acute liver failure. This could be an important step toward clinical application of the method. Images Figure 4. PMID:9671059

  4. Saturated hydrocarbons in bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bartholomew; Modzeleski, Vincent E.; Scott, Ward M.

    1969-01-01

    A homologous series of n-alkanes (C14–C33) and two isoprenoid hydrocarbons, 2,6,10,14-tetramethylhexadecane (phytane) and 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) have been identified in bovine liver. Another branched but non-isoprenoid alkane and three isomers of molecular formula C20H40 were partially identified. Phytane and the C18–C22 and C29–C33 n-alkanes were found to be the major components in liver, suggesting that at least the main hydrocarbon components were derived from various plants in the diet. The hydrocarbons were separated and identified by a series of steps involving solvent extraction, saponification, elution chromatography on alumina and silica gel columns, molecular sieving and by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, followed by combined capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. PMID:5820649

  5. Liver schwannoma: findings on MRI.

    PubMed

    Momtahen, Amir Javad; Akduman, Ece Isin; Balci, Numan Cem; Fattahi, Rana; Havlioglu, Necat

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging features of benign liver schwannoma in a 52-year-old woman are described. An oval shaped, 4.4x3.6x2.9-cm lesion was located in Segment 7 of the right hepatic lobe. The lesion was hypointense on T(1)-weighted images and mixed hypo- and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted images. On serial contrast-enhanced images, the lesion revealed gradually increasing centrilobular enhancement. The tumor was surgically removed thereafter. PMID:18499377

  6. Transoesophageal echocardiography during liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    De Pietri, Lesley; Mocchegiani, Federico; Leuzzi, Chiara; Montalti, Roberto; Vivarelli, Marco; Agnoletti, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has become the standard of care for patients with end stage liver disease. The allocation of organs, which prioritizes the sickest patients, has made the management of liver transplant candidates more complex both as regards their comorbidities and their higher risk of perioperative complications. Patients undergoing LT frequently display considerable physiological changes during the procedures as a result of both the disease process and the surgery. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE), which visualizes dynamic cardiac function and overall contractility, has become essential for perioperative LT management and can optimize the anaesthetic management of these highly complex patients. Moreover, TEE can provide useful information on volume status and the adequacy of therapeutic interventions and can diagnose early intraoperative complications, such as the embolization of large vessels or development of pulmonary hypertension. In this review, directed at clinicians who manage TEE during LT, we show why the procedure merits a place in challenging anaesthetic environment and how it can provide essential information in the perioperative management of compromised patients undergoing this very complex surgical procedure. PMID:26483865

  7. Postreperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sung-Moon

    2015-12-01

    As surgical and graft preservation techniques have improved and immunosuppressive drugs have advanced, liver transplantation (LT) is now considered the gold standard for treating patients with end-stage liver disease worldwide. However, despite the improved survival following LT, severe hemodynamic disturbances during LT remain a serious issue for the anesthesiologist. The greatest hemodynamic disturbance is postreperfusion syndrome (PRS), which occurs at reperfusion of the donated liver after unclamping of the portal vein. PRS is characterized by marked decreases in mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance, and moderate increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and central venous pressure. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PRS are complex. Moreover, risk factors associated with PRS are not fully understood. Rapid and appropriate treatment with vasopressors, volume replacement, or venesection must be provided depending on the cause of the hemodynamic disturbance when hemodynamic instability becomes profound after reperfusion. The negative effects of PRS on postoperative early morbidity and mortality are clear, but the effect of PRS on postoperative long-term mortality remains a matter of debate. PMID:26634075

  8. Early liver retransplantation in adults.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abbas; Petrowsky, Henrik; Kaplan, Bruce; Jie, Tun; Porubsky, Marian; Habib, Shahid; Rilo, Horacio; Gruessner, Angelika C; Gruessner, Rainer W G

    2014-02-01

    Up to 23% of liver allografts fail post-transplant. Retransplantation is only the recourse but remains controversial due to inferior outcomes. The objective of our study was to identify high-risk periods for retransplantation and then compare survival outcomes and risk factors. We performed an analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data for all adult liver recipients from 2002 through 2011. We analyzed the records of 49,288 recipients; of those, 2714 (5.5%) recipients were retransplanted. Our analysis included multivariate regression with the outcome of retransplantation. The highest retransplantation rates were within the first week (19% of all retransplantation, day 0-7), month (20%, day 8-30), and year (33%, day 31-365). Only retransplantation within the first year (day 0-365) had below standard outcomes. The most significant risk factors were as follows: within the first week, cold ischemia time >16 h [odds ratio (OR) 3.6]; within the first month, use of split allografts (OR 2.9); and within the first year, use of a liver donated after cardiac death (OR 4.9). Each of the three high-risk periods within the first year had distinct causes of graft failure, risk factors for retransplantation, and survival rates after retransplantation. PMID:24112236

  9. Radiofrequence ablation of liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Piao, Da-Xun

    2002-06-01

    Primary and secondary malignant liver cancer are some of most common malignant tumors in the world. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not very effective against them. Surgical resection has been considered the only potentially curtive option, but the majority of patients are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location near major intrahepatic blood vessels and bile ducts, precluding a margin-negative resection, cirrhotic, hepatitis virus infection or multifocial. Radiofrequence ablation (RFA), which is a new evolving effective and minimally invasive technique, can produce coagulative necrosis of malignant tumors. RFA should be used percutaneously, laparascopically, or during the open laparotomy under the guidance of ultrasound, CT scan and MRI. RFA has lots of advantages superior to other local therapies including lower complications, reduced costs and hospital stays, and the possibility of repeated treatment. In general, RFA is a safe, effective treatment for unresectable malignant liver tumors less than 7.0 cm in diameter. We review the principle, mechanism, procedures and experience with RFA for treating malignant liver tumors. PMID:12046057

  10. Postreperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As surgical and graft preservation techniques have improved and immunosuppressive drugs have advanced, liver transplantation (LT) is now considered the gold standard for treating patients with end-stage liver disease worldwide. However, despite the improved survival following LT, severe hemodynamic disturbances during LT remain a serious issue for the anesthesiologist. The greatest hemodynamic disturbance is postreperfusion syndrome (PRS), which occurs at reperfusion of the donated liver after unclamping of the portal vein. PRS is characterized by marked decreases in mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance, and moderate increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and central venous pressure. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PRS are complex. Moreover, risk factors associated with PRS are not fully understood. Rapid and appropriate treatment with vasopressors, volume replacement, or venesection must be provided depending on the cause of the hemodynamic disturbance when hemodynamic instability becomes profound after reperfusion. The negative effects of PRS on postoperative early morbidity and mortality are clear, but the effect of PRS on postoperative long-term mortality remains a matter of debate. PMID:26634075

  11. Radiofrequence ablation of liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Piao, Da-Xun

    2002-01-01

    Primary and secondary malignant liver cancers are some of most common malignant tumors in the world. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not very effective against them. Surgical resection has been considered the only potentially curtive option, but the majority of patients are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location near major intrahepatic blood vessels and bile ducts, precluding a margin-negative resection, cirrhotic, hepatitis virus infection or multifocial. Radiofrequence ablation (RFA), which is a new evolving effective and minimally invasive technique, can produce coagulative necrosis of malignant tumors. RFA should be used percutaneously, laparscopically, or during the open laparotomy under the guidance of ultrasound, CT scan and MRI. RFA has lots of advantages superior to other local therapies including lower complications, reduced costs and hospital stays, and the possibility of repeated treatment. In general, RFA is a safe, effective treatment for unresectable malignant liver tumors less than 7.0 cm in diameter. We review the principle, mechanism, procedures and experience with RFA for treating malignant liver tumors. PMID:12046057

  12. Preoperative assessment of postoperative liver function: the importance of residual liver volume.

    PubMed

    Pulitano, Carlo; Crawford, Michael; Joseph, David; Aldrighetti, Luca; Sandroussi, Charbel

    2014-09-01

    An inadequate volume of future liver remnant (FLR) remains an absolute contraindication to liver resection. FLR measurement correlates with surgical outcome and is fundamental to identify those patients that may benefit from portal vein embolization (PVE) and to assess the liver volume change following embolization. In order to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure, preoperative analysis of FLR must be included in the surgical planning of every major liver resection. The aims of this review are to describe the use of preoperative volumetric analysis in modern liver surgery and indications for PVE. PMID:24962104

  13. Liver gender dimorphism - insights from quantitative morphology.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ricardo; Correia-Gomes, Carla; Miranda, Helena; Carneiro, Fatima

    2015-12-01

    It was shown recently that many genes are differentially expressed in the liver of males and females, thus strengthening the concept of liver gender dimorphism. This dimorphism exists in many pathological scenarios, from regeneration to fibrosis, which has led to the development of gender hepatology. Nevertheless, it is still unknown if gender dimorphism occurs in the structure of the normal liver. In recent years, it has been shown that, compared with male, the female rat liver bears less fibrotic tissue, more Kupffer cells (per volume unit) and has higher hepatocellularity, including binucleated hepatocytes (per volume unit). Our hypothesis is that the human liver also hides a gender dimorphic pattern. Baseline differences in fibrotic tissue would contribute to explain severe liver fibrosis in men. As to the disparity of Kupffer cells, this would clarify the stronger response to post-surgery infections in women, and it could be equated when appraising the higher susceptibility to alcohol. Regarding differences in hepatocytes, they not only justify existing differences in some liver parameters (e.g., transaminases and bilirubin), but they could also account for the higher regenerative potential of the female liver. The structural dimorphism in the human liver would sustain the concept of gender hepatology and, eventually, should be considered in the context of liver transplantation. PMID:26196413

  14. Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Asrani, Sumeet K; O'Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    For years, the natural history of patients with cirrhosis has been described as a period of stable compensated liver disease followed by a tumultuous progression in decompensated liver disease towards eventual liver transplantation or death. During this progression, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been the single best predictor of outcome. However over the last two decades, the concept of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) has been proposed as an alternate path in the natural history of cirrhosis. Unlike acute liver failure (ALF) that occurs in patients without underlying liver disease, ACLF occurs in patients with chronic liver disease and is characterized by a precipitating event (identified or surreptitious) often resulting in acute deterioration in liver function, multi-organ system failure, and high short-term mortality. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the differing ways ACLF is characterized and define the natural course of patients with ACLF especially as it relates to management of cirrhotic patients on the transplant waiting list and its impact on liver transplantation outcomes. PMID:25017076

  15. Liver cancer mortality rate model in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwattanapongse, Wattanavadee; Prasitwattanaseree, Sukon

    2013-09-01

    Liver Cancer has been a leading cause of death in Thailand. The purpose of this study was to model and forecast liver cancer mortality rate in Thailand using death certificate reports. A retrospective analysis of the liver cancer mortality rate was conducted. Numbering of 123,280 liver cancer causes of death cases were obtained from the national vital registration database for the 10-year period from 2000 to 2009, provided by the Ministry of Interior and coded as cause-of-death using ICD-10 by the Ministry of Public Health. Multivariate regression model was used for modeling and forecasting age-specific liver cancer mortality rates in Thailand. Liver cancer mortality increased with increasing age for each sex and was also higher in the North East provinces. The trends of liver cancer mortality remained stable in most age groups with increases during ten-year period (2000 to 2009) in the Northern and Southern. Liver cancer mortality was higher in males and increase with increasing age. There is need of liver cancer control measures to remain on a sustained and long-term basis for the high liver cancer burden rate of Thailand.

  16. Liver transplantation: history, outcomes and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meirelles Júnior, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno de; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Almeida, Marcio Dias de; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; Meira Filho, Sérgio Paiva

    2015-01-01

    In 1958 Francis Moore described the orthotopic liver transplantation technique in dogs. In 1963, Starzl et al. performed the first liver transplantation. In the first five liver transplantations no patient survived more than 23 days. In 1967, stimulated by Calne who used antilymphocytic serum, Starzl began a successful series of liver transplantation. Until 1977, 200 liver transplantations were performed in the world. In that period, technical problems were overcome. Roy Calne, in 1979, used the first time cyclosporine in two patients who had undergone liver transplantation. In 1989, Starzl et al. reported a series of 1,179 consecutives patients who underwent liver transplantation and reported a survival rate between one and five years of 73% and 64%, respectively. Finally, in 1990, Starzl et al. reported successful use of tacrolimus in patents undergoing liver transplantation and who had rejection despite receiving conventional immunosuppressive treatment. Liver Transplantation Program was initiated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 1990 and so far over 1,400 transplants have been done. In 2013, 102 deceased donors liver transplantations were performed. The main indications for transplantation were hepatocellular carcinoma (38%), hepatitis C virus (33.3%) and alcohol liver cirrhosis (19.6%). Of these, 36% of patients who underwent transplantation showed biological MELD score > 30. Patient and graft survival in the first year was, 82.4% and 74.8%, respectively. A major challenge in liver transplantation field is the insufficient number of donors compared with the growing demand of transplant candidates. Thus, we emphasize that appropriated donor/receptor selection, allocation and organ preservation topics should contribute to improve the number and outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:25993082

  17. Impact of Liver Directed Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Gabriela M.; Parmar, Abhishek D.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Tamirisa, Nina P.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data on the current management and outcomes of liver directed therapy (LDT) in older patients presenting with stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC). Objective To evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes in use of LDT in the setting of improved chemotherapy. Methods We used Cancer Registry and linked Medicare claims to identify patients ?66 undergoing surgical resection of the primary tumor and chemotherapy after presenting with stage IV CRC (2001–2007). LDT was defined as liver resection and/or ablative procedures. Results We identified 5,500 patients. LDT was used in 34.9% of patients; liver resection was performed in 1,686 patients (30.7%) and locoregional therapy in 554 patients (10.1%), with 322 patients having both resection and ablation/embolization. Use of LDT was negatively associated with increasing year of diagnosis (OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.93–0.99), age >85 (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.45–0.82), and poor tumor differentiation (OR=0.73, 95% CI 0.64–0.83). LDT was associated with improved survival (median 28.4 vs. 21.1 months, P<0.0001); however, survival improved for all patients over time. We found a significant interaction between LDT and time period of diagnosis and noted a greater survival improvement with LDT for those diagnosed in the late (2005–2007) time period. Conclusions Older patients with stage IV CRC are experiencing improved survival over time independent of age, comorbidity and use of LDT. Greater gains in survival are seen with LDT for patients diagnosed in the later time period. These data suggest that improved patient selection may be positively impacting outcomes. PMID:24990539

  18. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- ?B and Heat Shock Proteins. PMID:21443508

  19. Clinical review: The liver in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    During sepsis, the liver plays a key role. It is implicated in the host response, participating in the clearance of the infectious agents/products. Sepsis also induces liver damage through hemodynamic alterations or through direct or indirect assault on the hepatocytes or through both. Accordingly, liver dysfunction induced by sepsis is recognized as one of the components that contribute to the severity of the disease. Nevertheless, the incidence of liver dysfunction remains imprecise, probably because current diagnostic tools are lacking, notably those that can detect the early liver insult. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, diagnostic tools, and impact on outcome as well as the pathophysiological aspects, including the cellular events and clinical picture leading to liver dysfunction. Finally, therapeutic considerations with regard to the weakness of the pertinent specific approach are examined. PMID:23134597

  20. Three-dimensional print of a liver for preoperative planning in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zein, Nizar N; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A; Bishop, Paul D; Samaan, Maggie; Eghtesad, Bijan; Quintini, Cristiano; Miller, Charles; Yerian, Lisa; Klatte, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    The growing demand for liver transplantation and the concomitant scarcity of cadaveric livers have increased the need for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Ensuring the safety of donors and recipients is critical. The preoperative identification of the vascular and biliary tract anatomy with 3-dimensional (3D) printing may allow better preoperative surgical planning, avert unnecessary surgery in patients with potentially unsuitable anatomy, and thereby decrease the complications of liver transplant surgery. We developed a protocol and successfully 3D-printed synthetic livers (along with their complex networks of vascular and biliary structures) replicating the native livers of 6 patients: 3 living donors and 3 respective recipients who underwent LDLT. To our knowledge, these are the first complete 3D-printed livers. Using standardized preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessments, we demonstrated identical anatomical and geometrical landmarks in the 3D-printed models and native livers. PMID:23959637

  1. Primary Solitary Tuberculosis of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Edip; Acarli, Koray; Alper, Aydin; Çevikba?, U?ur; Ario?ul, Orhan

    1992-01-01

    Primary solitary tuberculous involvement of the liver is a rare condition. We present the case of a patient who was operated on with a preoperative diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver resection was performed and antituberculous therapy was started. It is difficult to make the correct diagnosis preoperatively except when a successful needle biopsy can be performed. Despite the rarity of the condition primary solitary tuberculosis should be considered among the space occupying lesions of the liver. PMID:1327085

  2. Ochrobactrum intermedium Infection after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Lieke V. M.; Arends, Jan P.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Talens, Adriaan; Terpstra, Peter; Slooff, Maarten J. H.

    1999-01-01

    A case of bacteremia due to Ochrobactrum intermedium, with concomitant liver abscesses, in an orthotopic liver transplant recipient is presented. Identical microorganisms were isolated from fecal specimens and from an aspirate of a liver abscess that was indicative of invasion of the graft by gastrointestinal spread. 16S DNA sequence analysis of the blood isolate revealed the recovery of the recently proposed new species O. intermedium, closely related to Ochrobactrum anthropi and Brucella spp. PMID:9854103

  3. 9 CFR 319.881 - Liver meat food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Liver meat food products. 319.881 Section...COMPOSITION Miscellaneous § 319.881 Liver meat food products. Meat food products characterized and labeled as liver products such as liver loaf, liver...

  4. 9 CFR 319.881 - Liver meat food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liver meat food products. 319.881 Section...COMPOSITION Miscellaneous § 319.881 Liver meat food products. Meat food products characterized and labeled as liver products such as liver loaf, liver...

  5. 9 CFR 319.881 - Liver meat food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Liver meat food products. 319.881 Section...COMPOSITION Miscellaneous § 319.881 Liver meat food products. Meat food products characterized and labeled as liver products such as liver loaf, liver...

  6. 9 CFR 319.881 - Liver meat food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Liver meat food products. 319.881 Section...COMPOSITION Miscellaneous § 319.881 Liver meat food products. Meat food products characterized and labeled as liver products such as liver loaf, liver...

  7. 9 CFR 319.881 - Liver meat food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Liver meat food products. 319.881 Section...COMPOSITION Miscellaneous § 319.881 Liver meat food products. Meat food products characterized and labeled as liver products such as liver loaf, liver...

  8. A Bioartificial Liver-State of the Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Alastair J.; Neuberger, James M.

    2002-02-01

    End-stage liver disease is treated by liver transplantation, but donor organ shortages remain a serious problem. This has prompted the design of bioartificial liver devices to ``bridge'' patients until they either recover or receive a liver transplant. In these devices, patient plasma is circulated extracorporeally through a bioreactor that houses liver cells (hepatocytes) sandwiched between artificial plates or capillaries.

  9. Changes in nutritional status after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giusto, Michela; Lattanzi, Barbara; Di Gregorio, Vincenza; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Merli, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver disease has an important effect on nutritional status, and malnourishment is almost universally present in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. During recent decades, a trend has been reported that shows an increase in number of patients with end-stage liver disease and obesity in developed countries. The importance of carefully assessing the nutritional status during the work-up of patients who are candidates for liver replacement is widely recognised. Cirrhotic patients with depleted lean body mass (sarcopenia) and fat deposits have an increased surgical risk; malnutrition may further impact morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. After transplantation and liver function is restored, many metabolic alterations are corrected, dietary intake is progressively normalised, and lifestyle changes may improve physical activity. Few studies have examined the modifications in body composition that occur in liver recipients. During the first 12 mo, the fat mass progressively increases in those patients who had previously depleted body mass, and the muscle mass recovery is subtle and non-significant by the end of the first year. In some patients, unregulated weight gain may lead to obesity and may promote metabolic disorders in the long term. Careful monitoring of nutritional changes will help identify the patients who are at risk for malnutrition or over-weight after liver transplantation. Physical and nutritional interventions must be investigated to evaluate their potential beneficial effect on body composition and muscle function after liver transplantation. PMID:25152572

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Parth J.; Majithia, Raj; Diehl, David L.; Baron, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy remains the cornerstone in the diagnosis and management of liver disorders. Results of liver biopsy can often drive therapeutic decision-making. Unfortunately, studies have shown conventional biopsy techniques to carry significant sampling variability that can potentially impact patient care. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is gaining traction as an alternative method of biopsy. For parenchymal disease, it can decrease sampling variability. It offers a more targeted approach for focal lesions. Its diagnostic yield and limited adverse event profile make it a promising approach for liver biopsy. PMID:26020041

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Majithia, Raj; Diehl, David L; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy remains the cornerstone in the diagnosis and management of liver disorders. Results of liver biopsy can often drive therapeutic decision-making. Unfortunately, studies have shown conventional biopsy techniques to carry significant sampling variability that can potentially impact patient care. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is gaining traction as an alternative method of biopsy. For parenchymal disease, it can decrease sampling variability. It offers a more targeted approach for focal lesions. Its diagnostic yield and limited adverse event profile make it a promising approach for liver biopsy. PMID:26020041

  12. Partial orthotopic liver transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinbauer, F; Födra, C; Müller, V; Reck, T; Ernst, H; Kranz, D; Köckerling, F

    1995-01-01

    A partial orthotopic liver transplantation technique (70% POLT) for use in rats and comparable with the corresponding recipient operation in the 'splitting transplantation' in man was developed. Body weight, liver function, histological and electron-microscopic findings were studied in comparison with whole rat liver transplantation with rearterialization, 30% POLT and corresponding liver resections. After 70 and 30% POLT typical signs of hepatic regeneration were found, but no pathological alterations in the electron-microscopic picture. This POLT model might be helpful for the investigation of unresolved questions in 'splitting transplantation'. PMID:7649207

  13. Right Liver Lobe Hypoplasia and Related Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Alicioglu, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hypoplasia and agenesis of the liver lobe is a rare abnormality. It is associated with biliary system abnormalities, high location of the right kidney, and right colon interposition. These patients are prone to gallstones, portal hypertension and possible surgical complications because of anatomical disturbance. Case Report Magnetic resonance imaging features of a rare case of hypoplasia of the right lobe of the liver in a sigmoid cancer patient are presented. Conclusions Hypoplasia of the right liver should not be confused with liver atrophy; indeed, associations with other coexistent abnormalities are also possible. Awareness and familiarity with these anomalies are necessary to avoid fatal surgical and interventional complications. PMID:26634012

  14. Liver fibrosis markers of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirayuki; Bando, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Hideji; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the major causes of chronic liver injury. NAFLD includes a wide range of clinical conditions from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, and liver cirrhosis. The histological findings of NASH indicate hepatic steatosis and inflammation with characteristic hepatocyte injury (e.g., ballooning degeneration), as is observed in the patients with alcoholic liver disease. NASH is considered to be a potentially health-threatening disease that can progress to cirrhosis. A liver biopsy remains the most reliable diagnostic method to appropriately diagnose NASH, evaluate the severity of liver fibrosis, and determine the prognosis and optimal treatment. However, this invasive technique is associated with several limitations in routine use, and a number of biomarkers have been developed in order to predict the degree of liver fibrosis. In the present article, we review the current status of noninvasive biomarkers available to estimate liver fibrosis in the patients with NASH. We also discuss our recent findings on the use of the glycated albumin-to-glycated hemoglobin ratio, which is a new index that correlates to various chronic liver diseases, including NASH. PMID:26139988

  15. Chronic liver lobe torsion in a cat.

    PubMed

    Nazarali, Alim; Singh, Ameet; Chalmers, Heather; Stevens, Brian; Plattner, Brandon L

    2014-01-01

    A 13 yr old castrated male blue British shorthair with a 3 mo history of vomiting was diagnosed with a left lateral liver lobe mass following abdominal ultrasonography. At the time of celiotomy, liver lobe torsion (LLT) of the left lateral lobe was also present. Histopathologic evaluation of the liver mass and associated lobe revealed extensive necrosis secondary to chronic torsion. This is the second reported case of LLT in a cat. Both cases were associated with liver masses. The cat presented in this case remained clinically normal 8 mo postoperatively following lobectomy of the affected lobe. PMID:24446406

  16. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-09-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours. The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group are on an average 2.15-2.57%, 2.96-3.23%, and 91.01-97.21% for the CT images with normal appearing livers, 2.28-3.62%, 3.15-4.33%, and 86.14-93.53% for the CT images with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases, and 2.37-3.96%, 3.25-4.57%, and 82.23-89.44% for the 4D-CT images also with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases, respectively. The proposed three-step method can achieve efficient automatic liver contouring for planning CT and 4D-CT images with follow-up treatment planning and should find widespread applications in future treatment planning systems.

  17. Resveratrol and liver: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Faghihzadeh, Forouzan; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Adibi, Payman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies demonstrated that resveratrol has many therapeutic effects on liver disorders. Resveratrol significantly increased survival after liver transplantation, decreased fat deposition, necrosis, and apoptosis which induced by ischemia in Wistar rats. It provided liver protection against chemical, cholestatic, and alcohol injury. Resveratrol can improve glucose metabolism and lipid profile and decrease liver fibrosis and steatosis. Furthermore, it was able to alter hepatic cell fatty acid composition. According to extension of liver disease around the world and necessity of finding new threat, this review critically examines the current preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies on the preventive and therapeutic effects of resveratrol in liver disorders. Materials and Methods: A search in PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus was undertaken to identify relevant literature using search terms, including “liver,” “hepatic,” and “Resveratrol.” Both in vivo and in vitro studies were included. No time limiting considered for this search. Results: A total of 76 articles were eligible for this review. In these articles, resveratrol shows antioxidative properties in different models of hepatitis resulting in reducing of hepatic fibrosis. Conclusion: Resveratrol could reduce hepatic steatosis through modulating the insulin resistance and lipid profile in animals. These high quality preclinical studies propose the potential therapeutic implication of resveratrol in liver disorders especially those with hepatic steatosis. Resveratrol can play a pivotal role in prevention and treatment of liver disorders by reducing hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26664429

  18. Endoderm specification, liver development, and regeneration.

    PubMed

    North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    The endoderm is the innermost germ layer that gives rise to the lining of the gut, the gills, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, and derivatives of the pharyngeal pouch. These organs form the gastrointestinal tract and are involved with the absorption, delivery, and metabolism of nutrients. The liver has a central role in regulating these processes because it controls lipid metabolism, protein synthesis, and breakdown of endogenous and xenobiotic products. Liver dysfunction frequently leads to significant morbidity and mortality; however, in most settings of organ injury, the liver exhibits remarkable regenerative capacity. PMID:21550446

  19. [Treatment of alcoholic liver diseases. Abstinence, nutritional support, drug therapy, liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pár, A

    2000-04-16

    The review summarizes clinically established treatment forms of alcoholic liver disease in four main chapters: abstinence, nutritional supportation, drug therapy and liver transplantation are discussed. Drug therapy is described according to the three types of alcoholic hepatopathies (fatty liver, hepatitis and cirrhosis). Early diagnosis and treatment depending on the severity and stage of alcoholic liver disease are of importance for the attempts to retard progression and improve prognosis. PMID:10817009

  20. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptome suggests divergent liver function among human, mouse and rat

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    MPSS Microarray SAGE EST The human liver plays a vital role in meeting the body's metabolic needsA comparative analysis of liver transcriptome suggests divergent liver function among human, mouse Hao a,d, , Jian Huang c,f, a Bioinformatics Center, Key Lab of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes

  1. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â or âspotted.â 311.31 Section 311.31 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis;...

  2. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â or âspotted.â 311.31 Section 311.31 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis;...

  3. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â or âspotted.â 311.31 Section 311.31 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis;...

  4. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â or âspotted.â 311.31 Section 311.31 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis;...

  5. 9 CFR 311.31 - Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as “telangiectatic,” “sawdust,” or “spotted.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Livers affected with carotenosis; livers designated as âtelangiectatic,â âsawdust,â or âspotted.â 311.31 Section 311.31 Animals and Animal... DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.31 Livers affected with carotenosis;...

  6. Metabolomic Analysis of Liver Tissue from the VX2 Rabbit Model of Secondary Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, R.; Dazard, J-E.; Sandlers, Y.; Rehman, F.; Abbas, R.; Kombu, R.; Zhang, G-F.; Brunengraber, H.; Sanabria, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The incidence of liver neoplasms is rising in USA. The purpose of this study was to determine metabolic profiles of liver tissue during early cancer development. Methods. We used the rabbit VX2 model of liver tumors (LT) and a control group consisting of sham animals implanted with Gelfoam into their livers (LG). After two weeks from implantation, liver tissue from lobes with and without tumor was obtained from experimental animals (LT+/LT?) as well as liver tissue from controls (LG+/LG?). Peaks obtained by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry were subjected to identification. 56 metabolites were identified and their profiles compared between groups using principal component analysis (PCA) and a mixed-effect two-way ANOVA model. Results. Animals recovered from surgery uneventfully. Analyses identified a metabolite profile that significantly differs in experimental conditions after controlling the False Discovery Rate (FDR). 16 metabolites concentrations differed significantly when comparing samples from (LT+/LT?) to samples from (LG+/LG?) livers. A significant difference was also shown in 20 metabolites when comparing samples from (LT+) liver lobes to samples from (LT?) liver lobes. Conclusion. Normal liver tissue harboring malignancy had a distinct metabolic signature. The role of metabolic profiles on liver biopsies for the detection of early liver cancer remains to be determined. PMID:24723740

  7. Metabolomic Analysis of Liver Tissue from the VX2 Rabbit Model of Secondary Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, R; Dazard, J-E; Sandlers, Y; Rehman, F; Abbas, R; Kombu, R; Zhang, G-F; Brunengraber, H; Sanabria, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The incidence of liver neoplasms is rising in USA. The purpose of this study was to determine metabolic profiles of liver tissue during early cancer development. Methods. We used the rabbit VX2 model of liver tumors (LT) and a control group consisting of sham animals implanted with Gelfoam into their livers (LG). After two weeks from implantation, liver tissue from lobes with and without tumor was obtained from experimental animals (LT+/LT-) as well as liver tissue from controls (LG+/LG-). Peaks obtained by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry were subjected to identification. 56 metabolites were identified and their profiles compared between groups using principal component analysis (PCA) and a mixed-effect two-way ANOVA model. Results. Animals recovered from surgery uneventfully. Analyses identified a metabolite profile that significantly differs in experimental conditions after controlling the False Discovery Rate (FDR). 16 metabolites concentrations differed significantly when comparing samples from (LT+/LT-) to samples from (LG+/LG-) livers. A significant difference was also shown in 20 metabolites when comparing samples from (LT+) liver lobes to samples from (LT-) liver lobes. Conclusion. Normal liver tissue harboring malignancy had a distinct metabolic signature. The role of metabolic profiles on liver biopsies for the detection of early liver cancer remains to be determined. PMID:24723740

  8. Immune-protected xenogeneic bioartificial livers with liver-specific microarchitecture and hydrogel-encapsulated cells.

    PubMed

    No, Da Yoon; Jeong, Gi Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Development of a xenogeneic biological liver support is important in providing a bridge to transplantation or liver regeneration, thus helping to overcome the chronic shortage of liver donors. Among the critical factors in developing biological liver support are the creation of in vivo mimetic micro liver tissue (mLT), especially mLTs containing liver-specific ultrastructure, and an encapsulation method that can package massive numbers of cells while providing immune-protection from the host immune system. We describe here the development of mLTs that include liver microarchitecture and their in situ encapsulation in hydrogel composites. Concave microwells and the tri-culture of three types of primary liver cells were applied for the construction of mLTs showing excellent liver functions and long-term (>1 month) viability in vitro. Large quantities of rat mLTs were encapsulated in collagen-alginate composites, implanted into hepatic failure mice and sustained their survival during regeneration of the remaining liver. The proposed liver support system offers xenogeneic hepatic assistance by mimicking native liver microarchitecture and providing immune-protection without the need for complicated devices or processes, and as such represents a promising system for recovery of organ function. PMID:25088727

  9. 3D liver models on a microplatform: well-defined culture, engineering of liver tissue and liver-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Yoon No, Da; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Jaeseo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    The liver, the largest organ in the human body, is a multi-functional organ with diverse metabolic activities that plays a critical role in maintaining the body and sustaining life. Although the liver has excellent regenerative and recuperative properties, damages caused by chronic liver diseases or viral infection may lead to permanent loss of liver functions. Studies of liver disease mechanism have focused on drug screening and liver tissue engineering techniques, including strategies based on in vitro models. However, conventional liver models are plagued by a number of limitations, which have motivated the development of 'liver-on-a-chip' and microplatform-based bioreactors that can provide well-defined microenvironments. Microtechnology is a promising tool for liver tissue engineering and liver system development, as it can mimic the complex in vivo microenvironment and microlevel ultrastructure, by using a small number of human cells under two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions. These systems provided by microtechnology allow improved liver-specific functions and can be expanded to encompass diverse 3D culture methods, which are critical for the maintenance of liver functions and recapitulation of the features of the native liver. In this review, we provide an overview of microtechnologies that have been used for liver studies, describe biomimetic technologies for constructing microscale 2D and 3D liver models as well as liver-on-a-chip systems and microscale bioreactors, and introduce applications of liver microtechnology and future trends in the field. PMID:26279012

  10. Connective tissue diseases and the liver.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Wael I; Tavill, Anthony S

    2002-10-01

    Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and scleroderma are systemic disorders that may have an autoimmune basis. The system manifestations vary, and there is frequent overlap among the syndromes. Liver involvement in patients with connective tissue diseases has been well documented but is generally considered rare. Although advanced liver disease with cirrhosis and liver failure is rare in patients with connective tissue diseases, clinical and biochemical evidence of associated liver abnormalities is common. Previous treatment with potentially hepatotoxic drugs or coincident viral hepatitis has usually been implicated as the main causes of liver disease in patients with connective tissue diseases. However, even after careful exclusion of these etiologies, the question remains whether to classify the patient as having a primary liver disease with associated autoimmune, clinical, and laboratory features or as having liver disease as a manifestation of generalized connective tissue disease. The main example of this pathogenetic dilemma is autoimmune hepatitis and SLE-associated hepatitis, which have been regarded as two different entities, although they have features in common of autoimmune syndromes. Several clinical and histopathologic features have been used to discriminate autoimmune hepatitis from SLE, a relevant diagnostic exercise because complications and therapy are quite different. Although hepatic steatosis and abnormal results on biochemical liver function tests are the most common hepatic abnormalities associated with connective tissue diseases, other less frequent abnormalities have been noted, such as nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal vein obliteration and portal hypertension, features of primary biliary cirrhosis, and rarely portal fibrosis with abnormal lobular architecture. Vascular disorders of the liver also have been described, such as Budd-Chiari syndrome. Histologic assessment may reveal a variety of subclinical liver diseases. The aim of this contribution is to review the current published data regarding liver involvement in connective tissue diseases. PMID:12352299

  11. Outcomes following liver trauma in equestrian accidents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Equestrian sports are common outdoor activities that may carry a risk of liver injury. Due to the relative infrequency of equestrian accidents the injury patterns and outcomes associated with liver trauma in these patients have not been well characterized. Methods We examined our experience of the management of equestrian liver trauma in our regional hepatopancreaticobiliary unit at a tertiary referral center. The medical records of patients who sustained liver trauma secondary to equestrian activities were analysed for parameters such as demographic data, liver function tests, patterns of injury, radiological findings, the need for intervention and outcomes. Results 20 patients sustained liver trauma after falling from or being kicked by a horse. The majority of patients were haemodynamically stable on admission. Alanine transaminase (ALT) levels were elevated in all patients and right-sided rib fractures were a frequently associated finding. CT demonstrated laceration of the liver in 12 patients, contusion in 3 and subcapsular haematoma in 2. The right lobe of the liver was most commonly affected. Only two patients required laparotomy and liver resection; the remaining 18 were successfully managed conservatively. Conclusions The risk of liver injury following a horse kick or falling off a horse should not be overlooked. Early CT imaging is advised in these patients, particularly in the presence of high ALT levels and concomitant chest injuries such as rib fractures. Despite significant liver trauma, conservative management in the form of close observation, ideally in a high-dependency setting, is often sufficient. Laparotomy is only rarely warranted and associated with a significantly higher risk of post-operative bile leaks. PMID:25177363

  12. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  13. What I Need to Know about Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Language URL What I need to know about Liver Transplantation Page Content On this page: What is ... Pronunciation Guide For More Information Acknowledgments What is liver transplantation? Liver transplantation is surgery to remove a ...

  14. Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders Among Asian Americans, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  15. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePLUS

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  16. Image Guidance Improves Localization of Sonographically Occult Colorectal Liver Metastases

    E-print Network

    Miga, Michael I.

    Image Guidance Improves Localization of Sonographically Occult Colorectal Liver Metastases Universe colorectal liver metastases using the Explorer system (Pathfinder Technologies, Nashville, TN). Colorectal liver metastases are small lesions that can be difficult to identify with conventional intraoperative

  17. Immune Components of Liver Damage Associated with Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serov, Youri A.; Alazmi, Mansour; Baba, Kamaldeen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are associated with liver abnormalities and often have overlapping pathological and clinical manifestations. As a result, they can present great clinical challenges and evoke questions about diagnostic criteria for liver diseases. Moreover, discriminating between liver involvement as a manifestation of connective tissue disease and primary liver disease can be challenging since they share a similar immunological mechanism. Most patients with connective tissue diseases exhibit liver test abnormalities that likely result from coexisting, primary liver diseases, such as fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and drug-related liver toxicity. Liver damage can be progressive, leading to cirrhosis, complications of portal hypertension, and liver-related death, and, therefore, must be accurately identified. In this review, we highlight the challenges facing the diagnosis of liver damage associated with connective tissue disease and identify immune mechanisms involved in liver damage associated with connective tissue diseases. PMID:26357616

  18. Role of the Maternal Liver in Lactating Mice

    E-print Network

    Camba-Colon, Joanna Irene Rosa

    2009-01-01

    syndrome       The liver acts as a detoxification center liver is important in lactation.   It plays an important role in the  detoxification detoxification center for both.  Nonetheless,  despite the critical role of the liver 

  19. Acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Bernal, William; Jalan, Rajiv; Quaglia, Alberto; Simpson, Kenneth; Wendon, Julia; Burroughs, Andrew

    2015-10-17

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure combines an acute deterioration in liver function in an individual with pre-existing chronic liver disease and hepatic and extrahepatic organ failures, and is associated with substantial short-term mortality. Common precipitants include bacterial and viral infections, alcoholic hepatitis, and surgery, but in more than 40% of patients, no precipitating event is identified. Systemic inflammation and susceptibility to infection are characteristic pathophysiological features. A new diagnostic score, the Chronic Liver Failure Consortium (CLIF-C) organ failure score, has been developed for classification and prognostic assessment of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. Disease can be reversed in many patients, and thus clinical management focuses upon the identification and treatment of the precipitant while providing multiorgan-supportive care that addresses the complex pattern of physiological disturbance in critically ill patients with liver disease. Liver transplantation is a highly effective intervention in some specific cases, but recipient identification, organ availability, timing of transplantation, and high resource use are barriers to more widespread application. Recognition of acute-on-chronic liver failure as a clinically and pathophysiologically distinct syndrome with defined diagnostic and prognostic criteria will help to encourage the development of new management pathways and interventions to address the unacceptably high mortality. PMID:26423181

  20. Silymarin Accelerates Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ping; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Lin, Chien-Chung; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Padma, V. Vijaya; Pan, Lung-Fa; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Partial hepatectomy (PHx) is a liver regeneration physiological response induced to maintain homeostasis. Liver regeneration evolved presumably to protect wild animals from catastrophic liver loss caused by toxins or tissue injury. Silymarin (Sm) ability to stimulate liver regeneration has been an object of curiosity for many years. Silymarin has been investigated for use as an antioxidant and anticarcinogen. However, its use as a supportive treatment for liver damage is elusive. In this study, we fed silymarin (Sm, 25?mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 weeks. Surgical 2/3 PHx was then conducted on the rats at 6?hrs, 24?hrs, and 72?hrs. Western blot and RT-PCR were conducted to detect the cell cycle activities and silymarin effects on hepatic regeneration. The results showed that silymarin enhanced liver regeneration by accelerating the cell cycle in PHx liver. Silymarin led to increased G1 phase (cyclin D1/pRb), S phase (cyclin E/E2F), G2 phase (cyclin B), and M phase (cyclin A) protein and mRNA at 6?hrs, 24?hrs, and 72?hrs PHx. HGF, TGF?, and TGF?1 growth factor expressions were also enhanced. We suggest that silymarin plays a crucial role in accelerated liver regeneration after PHx. PMID:26339266

  1. Cryosurgery for malignant tumours of the liver

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, J. Gregory; Temple, Walley J.; Wiseman, David A.; Saliken, John C.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided cryosurgery to treat malignant tumours of the liver. Design A prospective nonrandomized trial. The follow-up was complete and ranged from 8 to 35 months. Setting A university-affiliated hospital. Patients Ten patients with secondary malignant tumours of the liver; 1 with primary hepatoma. Interventions Computed portography for preoperative staging; laparotomy and ultrasonographic examination of the liver; cryosurgical ablation of liver tumours with or without a concomitant resection. Thirteen procedures were performed on 11 patients. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative morbidity, disease-free and overall survival. Results Of 24 lesions frozen, the procedure on 4 lesions was considered a technical failure because of persistent disease. There were no perioperative deaths. One patient had a liver abscess that resolved with percutaneous drainage. One patient had a biliary fistula that resolved spontaneously, and one had a transient rise in the serum creatinine level. Of 11 patients treated, 7 had a recurrence in the liver (persistent disease in 2 and new liver metastases in 5); 2 of these patients died. One patient died of distant disease with no local recurrence. At the time of writing, one patient was alive with extrahepatic disease and no local recurrence and two were free of disease. Conclusions Cryosurgery of the liver is a relatively safe procedure that allows treatment of otherwise un-resectable malignant disease. Proof of long-term benefit requires further experience and follow-up. PMID:8857990

  2. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism. PMID:26447960

  3. Portal flow steal after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bohyun; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Portal flow steal occasionally persists even after the liver transplantation, which may reduce the portal flow and thus threaten the patients' outcome. Therefore, pre- and peri-operative detection of portal steal phenomenon requiring radiological or surgical interruption is essential for the liver transplantation candidates as well as for the recipients. PMID:26523275

  4. Liver lobe torsion in a dog.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Michael G

    2007-04-01

    Abdominal radiographs of a dog presented for anorexia and vomiting revealed an ill-defined increase in opacity caudal to the stomach and caudal displacement of the small intestines. Ultrasonographs revealed an enlarged liver lobe with vascular thrombosis. Left medial liver lobe torsion was confirmed at postmortem. PMID:17494372

  5. Liver scan in traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Liver imaging was performed in two patients with traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia. It has elucidated the cause of obliteration of the right hemidiaphragmatic shadow on the chest x-ray. These cases are illustrative of the usefulness of liver imaging in the diagnosis of traumatic right hemidiaphragmatic hernia as well as hepatic injury.

  6. The fetal liver as cell source for the regenerative medicine of liver and pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, Rossella; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Carpino, Guido; Gentile, Raffaele; Napoli, Cristina; Venere, Rosanna; Gatto, Manuela; Brunelli, Roberto; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Patients affected by liver diseases and diabetes mellitus are in need for sources of new cells to enable a better transition into clinic programs of cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In this setting, fetal liver is becoming the most promising and available source of cells. Fetal liver displays unique characteristics given the possibility to isolate cell populations with a wide spectrum of endodermal differentiation and, the co-existence of endodermal and mesenchymal-derived cells. Thus, the fetal liver is a unique and highly available cell source contemporarily candidate for the regenerative medicine of both liver and pancreas. The purpose of this review is to revise the recent literature on the different stem cells populations isolable from fetal liver and candidate to cell therapy of liver diseases and diabetes and to discuss advantages and limitation with respect to other cell sources. PMID:25332958

  7. Prediction of Post-Operative Liver Dysfunction by Serum Markers of Liver Fibrosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yinghao; Shi, Guoming; Huang, Cheng; Zhu, Xiaodong; Chen, Si; Sun, Huichuan; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of biomarkers in predicting postoperative liver dysfunction in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods A total of 200 patients operated from July 2009 to June 2010 at Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University for pathologically confirmed HCC were retrospectively analyzed for clinical data, HBD DNA level and serum biochemical markers for liver fibrosis. The patients were followed up to observersation end point. Correlation of the monitored parameters with postoperative liver dysfunction and patient survival was statistically analyzed. Results Preoperative hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level, serum prealbumin (PA) hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) levels correlated with postoperative liver dysfunction. A predictive model was generated using these 4 parameters and validated in 89 HCC patients with sensitivity and specificity of 0.625 and 0.912, respectively. However, no correlation was identified between postoperative liver function and overall survival. Conclusion Liver fibrosis markers could be preoperatively used in predicting postoperative liver dysfunction in HCC patients. PMID:26501145

  8. Uridine Prevents Fenofibrate-Induced Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuc T.; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Pizzorno, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, can modulate liver lipid metabolism although its specific acting targets have not been identified. Using mice with fenofibrate-induced fatty liver as a model system, the effects of uridine on liver lipid metabolism are examined. At a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg, fenofibrate treatment causes reduction of liver NAD+/NADH ratio, induces hyper-acetylation of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme (ECHD) and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1), and induces excessive accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). Uridine co-administration at a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg raises NAD+/NADH ratio, inhibits fenofibrate-induced hyper-acetylation of ECHD, ACOX1, and reduces accumulation of LCFA and VLCFA. Our data indicates a therapeutic potential for uridine co-administration to prevent fenofibrate-induced fatty liver. PMID:24475249

  9. Role of Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    This review evaluates the available evidence to establish the role of liver transplantation in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma in India. Most liver transplants in India are living donor transplants due to the paucity of brain dead organ donors. There is sufficient evidence to permit allocation of organs to patients with tumors within the Milan criteria. If the waiting list time is more than 6 months, a down-staging locoregional treatment modality such a trans-arterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, resection or percutaneous ethanol injection may be used to prevent disease progression. Allocating scarce livers to patients with more advanced tumors may not be justifiable. However, living donor liver transplantation may be offered to medically fit patients with hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, offering a guarded prognosis to patients beyond the Milan or UCSF criteria. Vascular invasion and extra-hepatic disease should be absolute contraindications to liver transplantation. PMID:25755618

  10. Elucidating the Metabolic Regulation of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiansheng; Rudnick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capability of liver is well known, and the mechanisms that regulate liver regeneration are extensively studied. Such analyses have defined general principles that govern the hepatic regenerative response and implicated specific extracellular and intracellular signals as regulated during and essential for normal liver regeneration. Nevertheless, the most proximal events that stimulate liver regeneration and the distal signals that terminate this process remain incompletely understood. Recent data suggest that the metabolic response to hepatic insufficiency might be the proximal signal that initiates regenerative hepatocellular proliferation. This review provides an overview of the data in support of a metabolic model of liver regeneration and reflects on the clinical implications and areas for further study suggested by these findings. PMID:24139945

  11. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Intermittent ischaemia maintains function after ischaemia reperfusion in steatotic livers

    PubMed Central

    Steenks, Mathilde; van Baal, Mark CPM; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; de Bruijn, Menno T; Schiesser, Marc; Teo, Mike H; Callahan, Tom; Padbury, Rob TA; Barritt, Greg J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) and intermittent ischaemia (INT) reduce liver injury after ischaemia reperfusion (IR). Steatotic livers are at a higher risk of IR injury, but the protection offered by IPC and INT is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of IPC and INT in maintaining liver function in steatotic livers. Material and methods: A model of segmental hepatic ischaemia (45 min) and reperfusion (60 min) was employed using lean and obese Zucker rats. Bile flow recovery was measured to assess dynamic liver function, hepatocyte fat content quantified and blood electrolytes, metabolites and bile calcium measured to assess liver and whole body physiology. Liver marker enzymes and light and electron microscopy were employed to assess hepatocyte injury. Results: IPC was not effective in promoting bile flow recovery after IR in either lean or steatotic livers, whereas INT promoted good bile flow recovery in steatotic as well as lean livers. However, the bile flow recovery in steatotic livers was less than that in lean livers. In steatotic livers, ischaemia led to a rapid and substantial decrease in fat content. Steatotic livers were more susceptible to IR injury than lean livers, as indicated by increased blood ALT concentrations and major histological injury. Conclusion: INT is more effective than IPC in restoring liver function in the acute phase of IR in steatotic livers. In obese patients, INT may be useful in promoting better liver function after IR after liver resection. PMID:20590895

  13. Evolving surgical approaches in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Henrik; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2009-02-01

    The growing discrepancy between the need and the availability of donor livers has resulted in evolving surgical approaches in liver transplantation during the last two decades to expand the donor pool. One approach is to transplant partial grafts, obtained either from a living donor or splitting a cadaveric donor liver. For both surgical methods, it is important to obtain a minimal viable graft volume to prevent small-for-size syndrome and graft failure. This minimal volume, expressed as graft-to-whole body ratio, must be between 0.8 and 1%. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) became the primary transplant option in many Asian countries and is increasingly performed as an adjunct transplant option in countries with low donation rates. Split liver transplantation (SLT) is a surgical method that creates two allografts from one deceased donor. The most widely used splitting technique is the division of the liver into a left lateral sectoral graft (segments 2 and 3) for a pediatric patient and a right trisegmental graft (segments 1 and 4 to 8) for an adult patient. Both LDLT and SLT are also important and established methods for the treatment of pediatric patients. Another evolving surgical approach is auxiliary liver transplantation, which describes the transplanting a whole or partial graft with preservation of the partial native liver. This bridging technique is applied in patients with fulminate liver failure and should allow the regeneration of the injured liver with the potential to discontinue immunosuppression. Other methods such as xenotransplantation, as well as hepatocyte and stem cell transplantation, are promising approaches that are still in experimental phases. PMID:19235664

  14. Anesthesia for Patients With Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Safari, Saeid; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: Liver plays an important role in metabolism and physiological homeostasis in the body. This organ is unique in its structure and physiology. So it is necessary for an anesthesiologist to be familiar with various hepatic pathophysiologic conditions and consequences of liver dysfunction. Evidence Acquisition: We searched MEDLINE (Pub Med, OVID, MD Consult), SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for the following keywords: liver disease, anesthesia and liver disease, regional anesthesia in liver disease, epidural anesthesia in liver disease and spinal anesthesia in liver disease, for the period of 1966 to 2013. Results: Although different anesthetic regimens are available in modern anesthesia world, but anesthetizing the patients with liver disease is still really tough. Spinal or epidural anesthetic effects on hepatic blood flow and function is not clearly investigated, considering both the anesthetic drug-induced changes and outcomes. Regional anesthesia might be used in patients with advanced liver disease. In these cases lower drug dosages are used, considering the fact that locally administered drugs have less systemic effects. In case of general anesthesia it seems that using inhalation agents (Isoflurane, Desflurane or Sevoflurane), alone or in combination with small doses of fentanyl can be considered as a reasonable regimen. When administering drugs, anesthetist must realize and consider the substantially changed pharmacokinetics of some other anesthetic drugs. Conclusions: Despite the fact that anesthesia in chronic liver disease is a scary and pretty challenging condition for every anesthesiologist, this hazard could be diminished by meticulous attention on optimizing the patient’s condition preoperatively and choosing appropriate anesthetic regimen and drugs in this setting. Although there are paucity of statistics and investigations in this specific group of patients but these little data show that with careful monitoring and considering the above mentioned rules a safe anesthesia could be achievable in these patients. PMID:25031586

  15. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant. PMID:26308413

  16. Blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) infecting body cavity of South American catfishes (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae): two new species from rivers in Bolivia, Guyana and Peru with a re-assessment of Plehniella Szidat, 1951.

    PubMed

    Orelis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Plehniella Szidat, 1951 is emended based on new collections from South American long-whiskered catfishes. It is clearly differentiated from Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 by lacking lateral tegumental body spines and by having 6 asymmetrical caeca. Plehniella sabajperezi sp. n. infects body cavity of Pimelodus albofasciatus (Mees) from the Demerara and Rupununi Rivers (Guyana) and Pimelodus blochii (Valenciennes) from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia) and Napo River (Peru). It differs from Plehniella coelomicola Szidat, 1951 (type species) by having a thin-walled vas deferens that greatly exceeds the length of cirrus-sac and that joins the cirrus-sac at level of ovovitelline duct and ootype, an internal seminal vesicle that is absent or diminutive, and a cirrus-sac that is spheroid, nearly marginal, and envelops the laterally-directed distal portion of the male genitalia. Plehniella armbrusteri sp. n. infects body cavity of P. blochii from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia). It differs from P. coelomicola and P. sabajperezi by having a relatively ovoid body, a massive intestine comprising caeca that are deeply-lobed to diverticulate and terminate in the posterior half of the body, a testis that flanks the distal tips of the posteriorly-directed caeca, and a proximal portion of the vas deferens that loops ventral to the testis. Small adults (Plehniella sp.) collected from body cavity of Pimelodus grosskopfii (Steindachner) from Cienega de Jobo and Canal del Dique (Colombia) differ from congeners by having a posteriorly-constricted body region, an anterior sucker with concentric rows of minute spines, an elongate anterior oesophageal swelling, short and wide caeca, and a male genital pore that opens proportionally more anteriad. This study nearly doubles the number of aporocotylids documented from South America Rivers and comprises the first record of a fish blood fluke from P. blochii, P. albofasciatus and P. grosskopfii as well as from Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana or Peru. PMID:26373332

  17. Acute liver failure in children.

    PubMed

    Squires, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in children differs from that observed in adults in both the etiologic spectrum and the clinical picture. Children, particularly very young ones, do not demonstrate classical features of encephalopathy and the definition of ALF has been revised to include patients with advanced coagulopathy, regardless of mental status. A significant number of these children will go on to require transplant or die. Etiologies vary by age with metabolic and infectious diseases prominent in the first year of life and acetaminophen overdose and Wilson's disease occurring in adolescents. In almost 50% of cases, however, the child has an indeterminate cause for ALF. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach and is directed at establishing the etiology where possible and monitoring, anticipating, and managing the multisystem complications that occur in children with ALF. Overall, short-term outcomes are better in children than adults but are dependent upon the degree of encephalopathy and diagnosis. PMID:18452115

  18. Identification of microRNA Genes in Three Opisthorchiids

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Vladimir Y.; Afonnikov, Dmitry A.; Vasiliev, Gennady V.; Kashina, Elena V.; Sripa, Banchob; Mordvinov, Viacheslav A.; Katokhin, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opisthorchis felineus, O. viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis (family Opisthorchiidae) are parasitic flatworms that pose a serious threat to humans in some countries and cause opisthorchiasis/clonorchiasis. Chronic disease may lead to a risk of carcinogenesis in the biliary ducts. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression at post-transcriptional level and are implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes during the parasite- host interplay. However, to date, the miRNAs of opisthorchiid flukes, in particular those essential for maintaining their complex biology and parasitic mode of existence, have not been satisfactorily described. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a SOLiD deep sequencing-bioinformatic approach, we identified 43 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for O. felineus (miracidia, metacercariae and adult worms), 20 novel and 16 conserved miRNAs for O. viverrini (adult worms), and 33 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for C. sinensis (adult worms). The analysis of the data revealed differences in the expression level of conserved miRNAs among the three species and among three the developmental stages of O. felineus. Analysis of miRNA genes revealed two gene clusters, one cluster-like region and one intronic miRNA in the genome. The presence and structure of the two gene clusters were validated using a PCR-based approach in the three flukes. Conclusions This study represents a comprehensive description of miRNAs in three members of the family Opistorchiidae, significantly expands our knowledge of miRNAs in multicellular parasites and provides a basis for understanding the structural and functional evolution of miRNAs in these metazoan parasites. Results of this study also provides novel resources for deeper understanding the complex parasite biology, for further research on the pathogenesis and molecular events of disease induced by the liver flukes. The present data may also facilitate the development of novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of opisthorchiasis/clonorchiasis. PMID:25898350

  19. MARS therapy, the bridging to liver retransplantation - Three cases from the Hungarian liver transplant program.

    PubMed

    P?cze, Balázs; Fazakas, János; Zádori, Gergely; Görög, Dénes; Kóbori, László; Dabasi, Eszter; Mándli, Tamás; Piros, László; Smudla, Anikó; Szabó, Tamás; Toronyi, Eva; Tóth, Szabolcs; T?zsér, Gellért; Végs?, Gyula; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs

    2013-06-01

    Besides orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) there is no long-term and effective replacement therapy for severe liver failure. Artificial extracorporeal liver supply devices are able to reduce blood toxin levels, but do not replace any synthetic function of the liver. Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is one of the methods that can be used to treat fulminant acute liver failure (ALF) or acute on chronic liver failure (AoCLF). The primary non-function (PNF) of the newly transplanted liver manifests in the clinical settings exactly like acute liver failure. MARS treatment can reduce the severity of complications by eliminating blood toxins, so that it can help hepatic encephalopathy (HE), hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), and the high rate mortality of cerebral herniation. This might serve as a bridging therapy before orthotopic liver retransplantation (reOLT). Three patients after a first liver transplantation became candidate for urgent MARS treatment as a bridging solution prior to reOLT in our center. Authors report these three cases, fo-cusing on indications, MARS sessions, clinical courses, and final outcomes. PMID:24265893

  20. Arrest of Liver Haemorrhage Secondary to Percutaneous Liver Biopsy of a Haemangioma with Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Elijah

    2002-01-01

    Background Haemorrhage resulting from blunt and penetrating injury to the liver remains a difficult therapeutic problem, often resulting in massive intraperitoneal blood loss. Perihepatic liver packing and inflow occlusive techniques in combination with finger fracture exploration of injuries to allow vessel ligation are the mainstays if treatment with normal liver parenchyma. More recently fibrin glue haemostatic agents have been used to arrest traumatic haemorrhage from the liver. We report a case of the use of fibrin glue to arrest the bleeding caused by the percutaneous biopsy of a liver haemangioma. Case Outline A 42 year-old woman underwent percutaneous diagnostic biopsy of a liver lesion and subsequently experienced shock secondary to massive bleeding from the biopsy site. At laparotomy there was massive bleeding from the puncture site of the liver lesion. Control of haemorrhage was obtained by injecting fibrin glue down the biopsy site tract. This manoeuvre resulted in complete arrest of haemorrhage with no adverse effect. Discussion The use of fibrin glue as a haemostatic agent in trauma is an important adjunct to perihepatic liver packing and finger fracture exploration of injuries. It may have exceptional utility in patients with penetrating trauma to the liver by direct intraparenchymal injection. This case illustrates that fibrin glue can be used to arrest bleeding from vascular tumours such as haemangiomas. It may help to minimise bleeding for all percutaneous liver biopsies. PMID:18332950

  1. Impaired lipid accumulation in the liver of Tsc2-heterozygous mice during liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Obayashi, Yoko; Campbell, Jean S.; Fausto, Nelson; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation in early liver regeneration. •Liver regeneration in the Tsc2+/? mice was not enhanced. •The Tsc2+/? livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies during liver regeneration. •Mortality rate increased in Tsc2+/? mice after partial hepatectomy. •Tuberin plays a critical role in hepatic lipid accumulation to support regeneration. -- Abstract: Tuberin is a negative regulator of mTOR pathway. To investigate the function of tuberin during liver regeneration, we performed 70% hepatectomy on wild-type and Tsc2+/? mice. We found the tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation during early liver regeneration in wild-type mice. However, liver regeneration in the Tsc2+/? mice was not enhanced. Instead, the Tsc2+/? livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies, and this was accompanied by increased mortality. These findings suggest that tuberin plays a critical role in liver energy balance by regulating hepatocellular lipid accumulation during early liver regeneration. These effects may influence the role of mTORC1 on cell growth and proliferation.

  2. A rat model of liver transplantation with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiucheng; Fan, Hongkai; Xiong, Rihui; Jiang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death, reflecting clinical conditions. Rats were fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to establish the fatty liver model. This model simulates liver steatosis caused by various factors before clinical donation after cardiac death. A pneumothorax was created in the donor rat to induce hypoxia and cardiac arrest before incising the liver. This simulated the processes of hypoxia and cardiac arrest caused by withdrawal of treatment in actual clinical situations. The harvested cardiac death donor liver was then transplanted using the Kamada technique. Donor operative time was 45.7 ± 4.2 min; cardiac arrest time, 9 ± 0.8 min; recipient surgery time, 40.3 ± 4.9 min; and no-liver time, 15 ± 2.5 min. Of 40 liver-transplanted rats, 2 died within 24 h, with a surgical success rate of 95%. The transaminase levels on post-transplantation days 1, 3, 5, and 7 were 835.4 ± 71.33 U/L, 1334.5 ± 102.13 U/L, 536.4 ± 65.52 U/L, and 218.2 ± 36.77 U/L, respectively. This rat liver transplantation model with a steatotic donor liver after cardiac death could improve the simulation of the pathophysiological processes of clinical donation after cardiac death, and could be used as a reliable and stable animal model. PMID:26629068

  3. Monitoring of Total and Regional Liver Function after SIRT.

    PubMed

    Bennink, Roelof J; Cieslak, Kasia P; van Delden, Otto M; van Lienden, Krijn P; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Jansen, Peter L; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a promising treatment modality for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic liver cancer. SIRT is usually well tolerated. However, in most patients, SIRT will result in a (temporary) decreased liver function. Occasionally patients develop radioembolization-induced liver disease (REILD). In case of a high tumor burden of the liver, it could be beneficial to perform SIRT in two sessions enabling the primary untreated liver segments to guarantee liver function until function in the treated segments has recovered or functional hypertrophy has occurred. Clinically used liver function tests provide evidence of only one of the many liver functions, though all of them lack the possibility of assessment of segmental (regional) liver function. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) has been validated as a tool to assess total and regional liver function in liver surgery. It is also used to assess segmental liver function before and after portal vein embolization. HBS is considered as a valuable quantitative liver function test enabling assessment of segmental liver function recovery after regional intervention and determination of future remnant liver function. We present two cases in which HBS was used to monitor total and regional liver function in a patient after repeated whole liver SIRT complicated with REILD and a patient treated unilaterally without complications. PMID:24982851

  4. Cutaneous Manifestations of Common Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Jindal, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Skin functions as a window to our overall health and a number of systemic diseases result in various cutaneous changes. Knowledge of these manifestations helps in suspecting an underlying systemic illness. Cutaneous abnormalities are quite common in patients with liver diseases and this article aims to focus on these dermatoses. Cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with liver disease though common are nonspecific. They can also be seen in patients without liver diseases and generally do not indicate about a specific underlying hepatic disorder. The presence of a constellation of signs and symptoms is more useful in pointing toward an underlying hepatobiliary condition. The commonest symptom in patients with liver disease is pruritus which is often protracted and disabling. Other common features include spider angiomas, palmar erythema, paper money skin, xanthelasmas, pigmentary changes, and nutritional deficiencies. In this article, first the common cutaneous manifestations that may be associated with liver disorders are discussed and then common liver diseases with their specific cutaneous findings are discussed. Cutaneous abnormalities may be the first clue to the underlying liver disease. Identifying them is crucial for early diagnosis and better management. PMID:25755383

  5. Surgery in the Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence S.

    2010-01-01

    Surgery is performed in patients with liver disease more frequently now than in the past, in part because of the long-term survival of patients with cirrhosis. Recent work has focused on estimating perioperative risk in patients with liver disease. Hemodynamic instability in the perioperative period can worsen liver function in patients with liver disease. Operative risk correlates with the severity of the underlying liver disease and the nature of the surgical procedure. Thorough preoperative evaluation is necessary prior to elective surgery. Surgery is contraindicated in patients with certain conditions, such as acute hepatitis, acute liver failure, and alcoholic hepatitis. Estimation of perioperative mortality is inexact because of the retrospective nature of and biased patient selection in available clinical studies. The Child-Pugh classification (Child-Turcotte-Pugh score) and particulary the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score provide reasonable estimations of perioperative mortality but do not replace the need for careful preoperative preparation and postoperative monitoring, as early detection of complications is essential for improving outcomes. Medical therapy for specific manifestations of hepatic disease, including ascites, encephalopathy, and renal dysfunction, should be optimized preoperatively or, if necessary, administered in the postoperative period. PMID:20697561

  6. BIOCONJUGATION OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDES FOR TREATING LIVER FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhaoyang; Hajj Houssein, Houssam S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis results from chronic liver injury due to hepatitis B and C, excessive alcohol ingestion, and metal ion overload. Fibrosis culminates in cirrhosis and results in liver failure. Therefore, a potent antifibrotic therapy is in urgent need to reverse scarring and eliminate progression to cirrhosis. Although activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains the principle cell type responsible for liver fibrosis, perivascular fibroblasts of portal and central veins as well as periductular fibroblasts are other sources of fibrogenic cells. This review will critically discuss various treatment strategies for liver fibrosis, including prevention of liver injury, reduction of inflammation, inhibition of HSC activation, degradation of scar matrix, and inhibition of aberrant collagen synthesis. Oligonucleotides (ODNs) are short, single-stranded nucleic acids, which disrupt expression of target protein by binding to complementary mRNA or forming triplex with genomic DNA. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) provide an attractive strategy for treating liver fibrosis. A series of TFOs have been developed for inhibiting the transcription of ?1(I) collagen gene, which opens a new area for antifibrotic drugs. There will be in depth discussion on the use of TFOs and how different bioconjugation strategies can be utilized for their site-specific delivery to HSCs or hepatocytes for enhanced antifibrotic activities. Various insights developed in individual strategy and the need for multipronged approaches will also be discussed. PMID:18154454

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26356792

  8. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  9. The use of a liver with a gunshot injury as a donor for auxiliary liver transplantation: Case report?

    PubMed Central

    Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Ftériche, Fadhel Samir; Durand, François; Belghiti, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION liver transplantation can be the only treatment for acute liver failure. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 59 year-old female patient with acute liver failure due to mushroom poisoning underwent auxiliary liver transplantation. The liver graft was harvested from a brain-dead donor with a deep gunshot wound in the posterior sector of the graft. The postoperative course was uneventful with rapid recovery of the recipient and no complications associated with the gunshot wound. DISCUSSION Patients scheduled for urgent liver transplantation should have rapidly a liver graft otherwise the mortality rate is high. In our case, an injured liver graft by gunshot was successfully used allowing liver transplantation and increasing the pool of liver grafts. CONCLUSION A gunshot liver graft can be used if the major vascular or biliary structures are not injured. PMID:23995479

  10. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT. PMID:24876742

  11. Implications of Hyponatremia in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cimen, Sertac; Guler, Sanem; Ayloo, Subhashini; Molinari, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Although there are a limited number of quality studies, appropriate peri-operative management of serum electrolytes seems to reduce adverse outcomes in liver transplantation. Hyponatremia is defined as the presence of serum concentration of sodium equal ?130 mmol/L and it is detected in approximately 20% of patients with end stage liver disease waiting for a liver transplant (LT). This paper will focus on the pathogenesis of dilutional hyponatremia and its significance in terms of both candidacy for LT and post-operative outcomes. PMID:26237018

  12. A therapy for liver failure found in the JNK yard.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Holger; Grompe, Markus

    2013-04-11

    In the liver, the hepatocyte mass is kept stable through a tight balance between hepatocyte death and proliferation that is frequently lost upon acute or chronic liver injury. Wuestefeld et al. (2013) now identify a potentially druggable target that enhances hepatocyte proliferation and promotes liver regeneration, thereby preventing liver failure. PMID:23582318

  13. A Therapy for Liver Failure Found in the JNK Yard

    PubMed Central

    Willenbring, Holger; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the liver, the hepatocyte mass is kept stable through a tight balance between hepatocyte death and proliferation that is frequently lost upon acute or chronic liver injury. Wuestefeld et al. (2013) now identify a potentially druggable target that enhances hepatocyte proliferation and promotes liver regeneration, preventing liver failure. PMID:23582318

  14. www.yalecancercenter.org Living with Liver Cancer

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Living with Liver Cancer Guest Expert: Wasif Saif, MD Associate Professor and research of liver cancer. Here is Ed Chu. Chu Why don't we start off by defining what liver cancer is? Saif The liver is one of the biggest and largest organs present in our body and there are different functions

  15. www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment Options for Liver

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Treatment Options for Liver Cancer Guest Expert: Wasif Saif, MD Associate for this evenings show is liver cancer. Could you start off by telling us what liver cancer is? Saif This is a great time to talk about liver cancer because after the last two decades we are now able to develop new drugs

  16. Treatment of liver ischemia reperfusion injury by limiting

    E-print Network

    Frazier, William A.

    Treatment of liver ischemia­ reperfusion injury by limiting thrombospondin-1/CD47 signaling Jeff S remains a primary complication of transplant surgery, accounting for about 80% of liver transplant underwent liver I/R injury. Wild-type animals were pretreated with CD47 or control antibodies before liver I

  17. FXR inhibits gankyrin in mouse livers and prevents development of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanjun; Iakova, Polina; Jin, Jingling; Sullivan, Emily; Sharin, Vladislav; Hong, Il-Hwa; Anakk, Sayee; Mayor, Angela; Darlington, Gretchen; Finegold, Milton; Moore, David; Timchenko, Nikolai A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the early events in development of liver cancer is a neutralization of tumor suppressor proteins Rb, p53, HNF4? and C/EBP?. The elimination of these proteins is mediated by a small subunit of proteasome, gankyrin, which is activated by cancer. The aim of this study was to determine mechanisms which repress gankyrin in quiescent livers and mechanisms of activation of gankyrin in liver cancer. We found that farnesoid X receptor, FXR, inhibits expression of gankyrin in quiescent livers by silencing the gankyrin promoter through HDAC1-C/EBP? complexes. C/EBP? is a key transcription factor which delivers HDAC1 to gankyrin promoter and causes epigenetic silencing of the promoter. We show that down-regulation of C/EBP? in mouse hepatoma cells and in mouse livers reduces C/EBP?-HDAC1 complexes and activates the gankyrin promoter. Deletion of FXR signaling in mice leads to de-repression of the gankyrin promoter and to spontaneous development of liver cancer at 12 months of age. DEN-mediated liver cancer in WT mice also involves the reduction of FXR and activation of gankyrin. Examination of liver cancer in old mice and liver cancer in human patients revealed that FXR is reduced; while gankyrin is elevated during spontaneous development of liver cancer. Searching for animal models with altered levels of FXR, we found that long-lived Little mice have high levels of FXR and do not develop liver cancer with age and after DEN injections due to failure to activate gankyrin and eliminate Rb, p53, HNF4? and C/EBP? proteins. CONCLUSION FXR prevents liver cancer by inhibiting the gankyrin promoter via C/EBP?-HDAC1 complexes leading to subsequent protection of tumor suppressor proteins from degradation. PMID:23172628

  18. Radiotherapeutic Parameters Predictive of Liver Complications Induced by Liver Tumor Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Seong, Jinsil Shim, Su Jung; Han, Kwang Hyub

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify radiotherapeutic parameters for predicting the occurrence of liver complications induced by radiotherapy of a liver tumor. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2003, a total of 131 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was determined by the fraction of nontumor liver receiving 50% of the isocenter dose (V{sub 50%}). We evaluated three sets of published radiation dose guidelines using nontumor liver volume or a combination of nontumor liver volume and hepatic functional reserve. The V{sub 50%} was divided into three intervals (<33%, 33-66%, and >66%) and four categories (<25%, 25-49%, 50-75%, and >75%) according to guidelines by University of Michigan and the Yonsei University, respectively. According to the guideline of Cheng et al., the radiation dose was determined by the indocyanin green retention rate at 15 min (ICG-R15) and the nontumor liver volume. Results: Of the 131 patients, 13 patients (9.9%) presented with liver complications. The incidence was 11.1%, 10.3%, and 18.2%, respectively, for a V{sub 50%} of less than 33%, 33% to 66%, and more than 66%. The observed hepatic toxicity incidence was 10%, 12.1%, and 10.4% respectively for a V{sub 50%} of less than 25%, 25% to 49%, and 50% to 75%, respectively. Nontumor liver volume and ICG-R15 were not predictors of liver complications. The incidence of liver complications was significantly increased in patients with Child-Pugh Class B (p = 0.044). Conclusions: The parameter, V{sub 50%}, can be divided into 4 categories and used to predict acceptable toxicity. Furthermore, indicators of liver functional status like the Child-Pugh class may be more important and useful parameters than ICG-R15 for predicting radiation-related liver disease.

  19. Keeping high model for end-stage liver disease score liver transplantation candidates alive.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Orloff, Susan L; Levitsky, Josh; Martin, Paul; Foley, David P

    2015-11-01

    As the mean Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score at time of liver transplantation continues to increase, it is crucial to implement preemptive strategies to reduce wait-list mortality. We review the most common complications that arise in patients with a high MELD score in an effort to highlight strategies that can maximize survival and successful transplantation. Liver Transpl 21:1428-1437, 2015. © 2015 AASLD. PMID:26335696

  20. Changes in gut bacterial populations and their translocation into liver and ascites in alcoholic liver cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The liver is the first line of defence against continuously occurring influx of microbial-derived products and bacteria from the gut. Intestinal bacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Escape of intestinal bacteria into the ascites is involved in the pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, which is a common complication of liver cirrhosis. The association between faecal bacterial populations and alcoholic liver cirrhosis has not been resolved. Methods Relative ratios of major commensal bacterial communities (Bacteroides spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium leptum group, Enterobactericaea and Lactobacillus spp.) were determined in faecal samples from post mortem examinations performed on 42 males, including cirrhotic alcoholics (n?=?13), non-cirrhotic alcoholics (n?=?15), non-alcoholic controls (n?=?14) and in 7 healthy male volunteers using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Translocation of bacteria into liver in the autopsy cases and into the ascites of 12 volunteers with liver cirrhosis was also studied with RT-qPCR. CD14 immunostaining was performed for the autopsy liver samples. Results Relative ratios of faecal bacteria in autopsy controls were comparable to those of healthy volunteers. Cirrhotics had in median 27 times more bacterial DNA of Enterobactericaea in faeces compared to the healthy volunteers (p?=?0.011). Enterobactericaea were also the most common bacteria translocated into cirrhotic liver, although there were no statistically significant differences between the study groups. Of the ascites samples from the volunteers with liver cirrhosis, 50% contained bacterial DNA from Enterobactericaea, Clostridium leptum group or Lactobacillus spp.. The total bacterial DNA in autopsy liver was associated with the percentage of CD14 expression (p?=?0.045). CD14 expression percentage in cirrhotics was significantly higher than in the autopsy controls (p?=?0.004). Conclusions Our results suggest that translocation of intestinal bacteria into liver may be involved as a one factor in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis. PMID:24564202

  1. Needle Track Seeding of Primary and Secondary Liver Carcinoma After Percutaneous Liver Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Garden, O. James

    1993-01-01

    Seeding of tumour in the needle track following percutaneous needle biopsy of liver neoplasms is rarely reported. We describe two such cases following the needle biopsy of an hepatocellular carcinoma and secondary colorectal carcinoma respectively. The risk of needle track recurrence of liver tumours should not be regarded as insignificant. The diagnosis of liver neoplasms may be achieved by non-invasive modalities, and their needle biopsy should be reserved for cases not amenable to surgical resection. PMID:8387809

  2. Nutrition assessment in patients undergoing liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Neha; Singh, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a major surgery performed on patients with end stage liver disease. Nutrition is an integral part of patient care, and protein-energy malnutrition is almost universally present in patients suffering from liver disease undergoing LT. Nutrition assessment of preliver transplant phase helps to make a good nutrition care plan for the patients. Nutrition status has been associated with various factors which are related to the success of liver transplant such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. To assess the nutritional status of preliver transplant patients, combinations of nutrition assessment methods should be used like subjective global assessment, Anthropometry mid arm-muscle circumference, Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and handgrip strength. PMID:25316978

  3. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... no known reason. Pale, chalky bowel movements and dark urine. Fever . Tests that examine the liver and ... streams of protons (small, positively-charged particles of matter) to kill tumor cells. This type of radiation ...

  4. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections. PMID:26055800

  5. Modelling of FDG metabolism in liver voxels.

    PubMed

    Baker, C; Dowson, N; Thomas, P; Rose, S

    2015-01-21

    Kinetic analysis is a tool used to glean additional information from positron emission tomography (PET) data by exploiting the dynamics of tissue metabolism. The standard irreversible and reversible two compartment models used in kinetic analysis were initially developed to analyse brain PET data. The application of kinetic analysis to PET of the liver presents the opportunity to move beyond the generic standard models and develop physiologically informed pharmacokinetic models that incorporate structural and functional features in particular to the liver. In this paper, we develop a new compartment model, called the tubes model, which is informed by the liver?s sinusoidal architecture, high fractional blood volume, high perfusion rate, and large hepatocyte surface area facing the space of Disse. The tubes model distributes tracer between the blood and intracellular compartments in more physiologically faithful proportions than the standard model, producing parametric images with improved contrast between healthy and neoplastic tissue. PMID:25451530

  6. Hepatitis C: New challenges in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Filipec Kanizaj, Tajana; Kunac, Nino

    2015-01-01

    In an era of great achievements in liver transplantation, hepatitis C viral infection (HCV) remains an unsolved problem. As a leading indication for liver transplantation in Western countries, HCV poses a significant burden both before and after transplantation. Post-transplant disease recurrence occurs in nearly all patients with detectable pretransplant viremia, compromising the lifesaving significance of transplantation. Many factors involving the donor, recipient and virus have been evaluated throughout the literature, although few have been fully elucidated and implemented in actual clinical practice. Antiviral therapy has been recognized as a cornerstone of HCV infection control; however, experience and success are diminished following transplantation in a challenging cohort of patients with liver cirrhosis. Current therapeutic protocols surpass those used previously, both in sustained viral response and side-effect profile. In this article we review the most relevant and contemporary scientific evidence regarding hepatitis C infection and liver transplantation, with special attention dedicated to novel, more efficient and safer antiviral regimens. PMID:26019441

  7. Nuclear Receptor Variants in Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Müllenbach, Roman; Weber, Susanne N.; Lammert, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This review aims to provide a snapshot of the actual state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NR) involved in regulating important aspects of liver metabolism. It recapitulates recent evidence for the application of NR in genetic diagnosis of monogenic (“Mendelian”) liver disease and their use in clinical diagnosis. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases such as viral hepatitis or fatty liver disease identifies key players in disease predisposition and progression. Evidence from these analyses points towards a role of NR polymorphisms in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. The new insights into NR variants also offer perspectives and cautionary advice for their use as handles towards diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22523693

  8. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of liver tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Nilsson, Jan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Sturesson, Christian; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic contact probe is a cost-effective, rapid, and non-invasive optical method used to extract diagnosis information of tissue. By combining commercially available VIS- and NIR-spectrometers with various fiber-optic contact-probes, we have access to the full wavelength range from around 400 to 1600 nm. Using this flexible and portable spectroscopy system, we have acquired ex-vivo DRS-spectra from murine, porcine, and human liver tissue. For extracting the tissue optical properties from the measured spectra, we have employed and compared predictions from two models for light propagation in tissue, diffusion theory model (DT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC). The focus in this work is on the capacity of this DRS-technique in discriminating metastatic tumor tissue from normal liver tissue as well as in assessing and characterizing damage to non-malignant liver tissue induced by preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastases.

  9. Effects of hypergravity on rat liver regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of centrifugation on liver regrowth were examined by measuring mitotic activity. The results indicate that the increased gravity caused a delay in the onset of mitotic activity and a significant decrease in overall mitotic activity.

  10. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  11. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  12. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)].

    PubMed

    Rau, Monika; Weiss, Johannes; Geier, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in Europe and in the USA with rising prevalence. Patients with a metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia) are patients at risk with the highest prevalence for NAFLD. Progression from a non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) occurs in 5-20% of patients with the potential to develop a liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. NASH patients and NAFLD patients with higher fibrosis should be identified because they are at risk of a higher mortality. A specific treatment for NASH is not available at the moment. Therefore, the treatment of risk factors and metabolic syndrome has high priority. PMID:26182253

  13. Risks of Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... United States than in other parts of the world. Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American ...

  14. Split liver transplantation: What’s unique?

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-01-01

    The intraoperative management of split liver transplantation (SLT) has some unique features as compared to routine whole liver transplantations. Only the liver has this special ability to regenerate that confers benefits in survival and quality of life for two instead of one by splitting livers. Primary graft dysfunction may result from small for size syndrome. Graft weight to recipient body weight ratio is significant for both trisegmental and hemiliver grafts. Intraoperative surgical techniques aim to reduce portal hyperperfusion and decrease venous portal pressure. Ischemic preconditioning can be instituted to protect against ischemic reperfusion injury which impacts graft regeneration. Advancement of the technique of SLT is essential as use of split cadaveric grafts expands the donor pool and potentially has an excellent future. PMID:26421261

  15. Liver Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Liver Cancer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Burmese (myanmasa) Chinese - Traditional (????) Hmong (Hmoob) Korean (???) Laotian (Lao) Spanish (espańol) Tagalog (Tagalog) Vietnamese ( ...

  16. Purification of sulfide oxidase from rat liver 

    E-print Network

    Pu, Lixia

    1994-01-01

    The present study represents an initial investigative effort to purify sulfide oxidase from rat liver. Two methods to determine sulfide oxidase activity have been established and both are based on measuring substrate ...

  17. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Iruzubieta, Paula; Terán, Álvaro; Crespo, Javier; Fábrega, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis, but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) virus infection. The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known, but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases. Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease. Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required. PMID:25544877

  19. Dengue and its effects on liver

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as an important arboviral disease with significant impact on the disease burden in population residing in tropical countries. Dengue is spread by the bite of Aedes mosquito. The virus seems to have some hepatotoxic effects. Affliction of liver in form of derangements in the liver function tests is common and may include mild elevations in serum bilirubin, elevated transaminases and derangements in serum albumin. Although asymptomatic in most cases, clinical manifestations like jaundice, and acute liver failure (ALF) may occasionally complicate the clinical picture. Indeed, dengue has been implicated as an important cause of ALF in endemic countries. The present review focuses on the hepatic manifestations and the pathogenesis of the liver injury in dengue. PMID:25685758

  20. Cadmium, zinc, and copper in horse liver and in horse liver metallothionein: comparisons with kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Elinder, C.G.; Nordberg, M.; Palm, B.; Piscator, M.

    1981-10-01

    Cadmium, zinc, and copper were determined in liver and in kidney cortex samples obtained from 33 normal Swedish horses. Cadmium concentrations in liver ranged from 0.002 to 0.165 mmole/kg and in kidney from 0.01 to 2.15 mmole/kg. There was a significant correlation between liver and kidney concentrations of cadmium. The average kidney concentration of cadmium was about 15 times that of liver. Zinc concentrations increased with increasing cadmium concentrations in both liver and kidney. The relative increase of zinc with cadmium was more pronounced in liver than in kidney. However, the absolute increase of zinc was larger in kidney due to the much higher concentration of cadmium in kidney compared to liver. Any significant correlation between copper and cadmium, or copper and zinc, could not be revealed. Sephadex gel filtration was performed on supernatants from homogenates of kidney and liver from 19 of the horses. In both organs the major part of cadmium was recovered in protein fractions corresponding to metallothionein (MT), in which the increase of zinc also took place. The molar ratio between zinc and cadmium was higher in MT fractions obtained from liver than in MT fractions obtained from kidney.

  1. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  2. Management of biliary complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Riccardo; Piardi, Tullio; Sangiuolo, Federico; Sommacale, Daniele; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) currently represent a major source of morbidity after liver transplantation. Although refinements in surgical technique and medical therapy have had a positive influence on the reduction of postoperative morbidity, BC affect 5% to 25% of transplanted patients. Bile leak and anastomotic strictures represent the most common complications. Nowadays, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage such complications in order to prevent liver failure and retransplantation. PMID:26689137

  3. Bone Marrow and Fetal Liver Radiation Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Flomerfelt, Francis A; Gress, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    Radiation chimeras are prepared by subjecting recipient mice to sublethal or lethal dose of irradiation and injecting them with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from untreated donor mice. HSC can be obtained from bone marrow or fetal liver. This technique is a powerful tool when coupled with gene targeting strategies to investigate function of HSCs, thymocyte development, and T cell function. This protocol describes how to produce bone marrow or fetal liver chimeras. PMID:26294402

  4. Propionibacterium acnes Pyogenic Liver Abscess and Pylephlebitis

    PubMed Central

    Poursina, Arash; Weissman, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Reported is an unusual case of pyogenic liver abscess and septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein in a 44-year-old male caused by Propionibacterium acnes successfully managed with a combination of percutaneous drainage and antimicrobial therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this bacterium isolated in pure culture as the sole etiologic organism of pyogenic liver abscess and pylephlebitis in an adult patient. PMID:25954544

  5. Abstract --Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Abstract -- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver (NASH) and end-stage liver disease, and is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The diagnosis, grading, and staging of NAFLD currently is based on liver biopsy examination with histologic

  6. Liver cell models in in vitro toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Guillouzo, A

    1998-01-01

    In vitro liver preparations are increasingly used for the study of hepatotoxicity of chemicals. In recent years their actual advantages and limitations have been better defined. The cell models, slices, and mainly primary hepatocyte cultures, appear to be the most powerful in vitro systems, as liver-specific functions and responsiveness to inducers are retained either for a few days or several weeks depending on culture conditions. Maintenance of phase I and phase II xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities allows various chemical investigations to be performed, including determination of kinetic parameters, metabolic profile, interspecies comparison, inhibition and induction effects, and drug-drug interactions. In vitro liver cell models also have various applications in toxicology: screening of cytotoxic and genotoxic compounds, evaluation of chemoprotective agents, and determination of characteristic liver lesions and associated biochemical mechanisms induced by toxic compounds. Extrapolation of the results to the in vivo situation remains a matter of debate. Presently, the most convincing applications of liver cell models are the studies on different aspects of metabolism and mechanisms of toxicity. For the future, there is a need for better culture conditions and differentiated hepatocyte cell lines to overcome the limited availability of human liver tissues. In addition, strategies for in vitro analysis of potentially toxic chemicals must be better defined. PMID:9599700

  7. Bone marrow stem cells and liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Porada, Graça; Zanjani, Esmail D.; Porada, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new approaches to treat patients with hepatic diseases that can eliminate the need for liver transplantation is imperative. The use of cell therapy as a means of repopulating the liver has several advantages over whole organ transplantation, since it would be less invasive, less immunogenic, and would allow the use, in some instances, of autologous-derived cells. Stem/progenitor cells that would be ideal for liver repopulation would need to have characteristics such as availability and ease of isolation, the ability to be expanded in vitro, ensuring adequate numbers of cells, susceptibility to modification by viral vector transduction/genetic recombination, to correct any underlying genetic defects, and the ability of restoring liver function following transplantation. Bone marrow-derived stem cells such as Hematopoietic, Mesenchymal and Endothelial Progenitor cells possess some or most of these characteristics, making them ideal candidates for liver regenerative therapies. Here, we will summarize the ability of each of these stem cell populations to give rise to functional hepatic elements which could mediate repair in patients with liver damage/disease. PMID:20417684

  8. [Skin manifestations of alcoholic liver damage].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, G

    2000-04-01

    Alcohol-induced diseases of the liver, such as fatty liver, hepatitis and cirrhosis with the potential development of hepato-cellular carcinoma can cause many effects on the skin. Even though they are not caused by excessive alcohol alone, but also by other diseases of the liver or other diseases of internal organs, an experienced person will be able to carry out specific diagnostic procedures. Skin symptoms due to liver diseases include 1. Vascular changes, such as spider nevi, teleangiectasias and palmar erythema. 2. Nail changes, particularly white nails. 3. Changes of the mucous membranes, i.e. glossy tongue. 4. Changes due to altered hormones, particularly gyneco-mastia, female distribution of hair and testicular atrophy and 5. Changes in the color of the skin like icterus and melanosis cutis. Rarely pruritus and other diseases of the skin are seen, such as porphyria cutanea tarda, which is often caused by an altered liver function. In the final stages of alcoholism, the neglect of personal hygiene particularly of the skin is evident (cutis vagantium). Since the exact mechanism of the skin symptoms remains obscure, it is difficult to evaluate the significance. Most often they do not correlate with the severity of the liver disease. PMID:10804882

  9. Current management of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Jampana, Sarat C

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease accounts for significant economic burden with second most common cause for liver transplantation in the US. Although alcohol abstinence is most crucial, morbidity and mortality occur amongst those with continuing alcohol intake and with established end stage liver disease due to lack of specific treatment modalities to manage this disease. Patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis, a distinct subset of alcoholic liver disease have a potential for mortality in about 25% within about 1 month despite treatment with available specific agents such as corticosteroids and/or pentoxifylline. Hence, there is clear need for newer and better treatment options to manage these patients. In this article, potential emerging newer targets to manage this disease are discussed including intestinal decontamination, caspase inhibitors, antioxidants, and interlukins. In the background of encouraging emerging data (retrospective data from the UNOS database and data from a case matched prospective French study) on the beneficial effects of liver transplantation amongst patients with alcoholic hepatitis who are non-responders to current medical treatments, this article would also deal controversies surrounding the role and use of liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. Issues such as rule of 6 months of abstinence, ethical issues, and shortage of donor organs will be debated. PMID:25323125

  10. Effect of autophagy on liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qiwen, Wang; Cuifang, Chang; Ningning, Gu; Cuiyun, Pan; Cunshuan, Xu

    2015-11-20

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated degradation pathway, which plays an important role in hepatic physiological and pathological processes, in eukaryotic cells. The liver has a remarkable regenerative capacity. After acute or chronic injury, the residual hepatic cells can be activated to enter the cell-cycle for proliferation, in order to compensate for lost liver tissue and recover liver function. In this review, we summarize the relationship between liver regeneration (LR) after various types of injury and autophagy. For example, autophagy is activated to accelerate LR after physically, alcohol and food borne induced liver injury, while the role of autophagy in animal models of LR after chemical injury remains controversial. Autophagy can also be used to promote the replication of virus particles by some hepatotropic viruses (e.g., HBV, HCV) and inhibit LR after viral infection. Studies on mechanisms of autophagy and LR will contribute to clarify the regenerative process and provide new methods for the treatment of liver disease. PMID:26582525

  11. Liver Cirrhosis: Evaluation, Nutritional Status, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Osaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the major organ for the metabolism of three major nutrients: protein, fat, and carbohydrate. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is the major cause of chronic liver disease. Liver cirrhosis (LC) results from different mechanisms of liver injury that lead to necroinflammation and fibrosis. LC has been seen to be not a single disease entity but one that can be graded into distinct clinical stages related to clinical outcome. Several noninvasive methods have been developed for assessing liver fibrosis and these methods have been used for predicting prognosis in patients with LC. On the other hand, subjects with LC often have protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and poor physical activity. These conditions often result in sarcopenia, which is the loss of skeletal muscle volume and increased muscle weakness. Recent studies have demonstrated that PEM and sarcopenia are predictive factors for poorer survival in patients with LC. Based on these backgrounds, several methods for evaluating nutritional status in patients with chronic liver disease have been developed and they have been preferably used in the clinical field practice. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge in the field of LC from the viewpoints of diagnostic method, nutritional status, and clinical outcomes. PMID:26494949

  12. Molecular mechanisms underlying chemical liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xinsheng; Manautou, Jose E.

    2013-01-01

    The liver is necessary for survival. Its strategic localisation, blood flow and prominent role in the metabolism of xenobiotics render this organ particularly susceptible to injury by chemicals to which we are ubiquitously exposed. The pathogenesis of most chemical-induced liver injuries is initiated by the metabolic conversion of chemicals into reactive intermediate species, such as electrophilic compounds or free radicals, which can potentially alter the structure and function of cellular macromolecules. Many reactive intermediate species can produce oxidative stress, which can be equally detrimental to the cell. When protective defences are overwhelmed by excess toxicant insult, the effects of reactive intermediate species lead to deregulation of cell signalling pathways and dysfunction of biomolecules, leading to failure of target organelles and eventual cell death. A myriad of genetic factors determine the susceptibility of specific individuals to chemical-induced liver injury. Environmental factors, lifestyle choices and pre-existing pathological conditions also have roles in the pathogenesis of chemical liver injury. Research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis of chemical-induced liver diseases is fundamental for preventing or devising new modalities of treatment for liver injury by chemicals. PMID:22306029

  13. Ozone inhalation modifies the rat liver proteome?

    PubMed Central

    Theis, Whitney S.; Andringa, Kelly K.; Millender-Swain, Telisha; Dickinson, Dale A.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a serious public health concern. Recent findings indicate that the damaging health effects of O3 extend to multiple systemic organ systems. Herein, we hypothesize that O3 inhalation will cause downstream alterations to the liver. To test this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0.5 ppm O3 for 8 h/day for 5 days. Plasma liver enzyme measurements showed that 5 day O3 exposure did not cause liver cell death. Proteomic and mass spectrometry analysis identified 10 proteins in the liver that were significantly altered in abundance following short-term O3 exposure and these included several stress responsive proteins. Glucose-regulated protein 78 and protein disulfide isomerase increased, whereas glutathione S-transferase M1 was significantly decreased by O3 inhalation. In contrast, no significant changes were detected for the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 or cytochrome P450 2E1 and 2B in liver of O3 exposed rats compared to controls. In summary, these results show that an environmentally-relevant exposure to inhaled O3 can alter the expression of select proteins in the liver. We propose that O3 inhalation may represent an important unrecognized factor that can modulate hepatic metabolic functions. PMID:25544660

  14. Major hepatectomy for complex liver trauma

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Yoram; Cohen, Amir; Lahat, Eylon

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the most frequently injured intraperitoneal organ, despite its relatively protected location. The liver consisting of a relatively fragile parenchyma contained within the Glisson capsule, which is thin and does not provide it with great protection. The management of hepatic trauma has undergone a paradigm shift over the past several decades with significant improvement in outcomes. Shifting from mandatory operation to selective nonoperative treatment, and, presently, to nonoperative treatment with selective operation. Operative management emphasizes packing, damage control, and utilization of interventional radiology, such as angiography and embolization. Because of the high morbidity and mortality, liver resection seems to have a minimal role in the management of hepatic injury in many reports, but in a specialized referral center, like our institute, surgical treatment becomes, in many cases, the only life-saving treatment. Innovations in liver transplant surgery, living liver donation, and the growth of specialized liver surgery teams have changed the way that surgeons and hepatic resection are done. PMID:26311308

  15. Emerging concepts in liver graft preservation

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; Folch-Puy, Emma; Baptista, Pedro M; García-Gil, Agustín; Adam, René; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The urgent need to expand the donor pool in order to attend to the growing demand for liver transplantation has obliged physicians to consider the use of suboptimal liver grafts and also to redefine the preservation strategies. This review examines the different methods of liver graft preservation, focusing on the latest advances in both static cold storage and machine perfusion (MP). The new strategies for static cold storage are mainly designed to increase the fatty liver graft preservation via the supplementation of commercial organ preservation solutions with additives. In this paper we stress the importance of carrying out effective graft washout after static cold preservation, and present a detailed discussion of the future perspectives for dynamic graft preservation using MP at different temperatures (hypothermia at 4?°C, normothermia at 37?°C and subnormothermia at 20?°C-25?°C). Finally, we highlight some emerging applications of regenerative medicine in liver graft preservation. In conclusion, this review discusses the “state of the art” and future perspectives in static and dynamic liver graft preservation in order to improve graft viability. PMID:25593455

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver: New imaging strategies for evaluating focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The early detection of focal liver lesions, particularly those which are malignant, is of utmost importance. The resection of liver metastases of some malignancies (including colorectal cancer) has been shown to improve the survival of patients. Exact knowledge of the number, size, and regional distribution of liver metastases is essential to determine their resectability. Almost all focal liver lesions larger than 10 mm are demonstrated with current imaging techniques but the detection of smaller focal liver lesions is still relatively poor. One of the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is better soft tissue contrast (compared to other radiologic modalities), which allows better detection and characterization of the focal liver lesions in question. Developments in MRI hardware and software and the availability of novel MRI contrast agents have further improved the diagnostic yield of MRI in lesion detection and characterization. Although the primary modalities for liver imaging are ultrasound and computed tomography, recent studies have suggested that MRI is the most sensitive method for detecting small liver metastatic lesions, and MRI is now considered the pre-operative standard method for diagnosis. Two recent developments in MRI sequences for the upper abdomen comprise unenhanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and keyhole-based dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI (4D THRIVE). DWI allows improved detection (b = 10 s/mm2) of small (< 10 mm) focal liver lesions in particular, and is useful as a road map sequence. Also, using higher b-values, the calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient value, true diffusion coefficient, D, and the perfusion fraction, f, has been used for the characterization of focal liver lesions. DCE 4D THRIVE enables MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution and full liver coverage. 4D THRIVE improves evaluation of focal liver lesions, providing multiple arterial and venous phases, and allows the calculation of perfusion parameters using pharmacokinetic models. 4D THRIVE has potential benefits in terms of detection, characterization and staging of focal liver lesions and in monitoring therapy. PMID:21160723

  17. NUCLEAR MEMBRANES FROM MAMMALIAN LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Werner W.; Deumling, Barbara; Ermen, Baerbel; Jarasch, Ernst-Dieter; Kleinig, Hans

    1970-01-01

    Nuclear membranes were isolated from rat and pig liver by sonication of highly purified nuclear fractions and subsequent removal of adhering nucleoproteins in a high salt medium. The fractions were examined in the electron microscope by both negative staining and thin sectioning techniques and were found to consist of nuclear envelope fragments of widely varying sizes. Nuclear pore complex constituents still could frequently be recognized. The chemical composition of the nuclear membrane fractions was determined and compared with those of microsomal fractions prepared in parallel. For total nuclei as well as for nuclear membranes and microsomes, various enzyme activities were studied. The results indicate that a similarity exists between both fractions of cytomembranes, nuclear envelope, and endoplasmic reticulum, with respect to their RNA:protein ratio and their content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Both membranous fractions had many proteins in common including some membrane-bound enzymes. Activities in Mg-ATPase and the two examined cytochrome reductases were of the same order of magnitude. The content of cytochrome b5 as well as of P-450 was markedly lower in the nuclear membranes. The nuclear membranes were found to have a higher buoyant density and to be richer in protein. The glucose-6-phosphatase and Na-K-ATPase activities in the nuclear membrane fraction were very low. In the gel electrophoresis, in addition to many common protein bands, some characteristic ones for either microsomal or nuclear membranous material were detected. Significant small amounts of DNA and RNA were found to remain closely associated with the nuclear envelope fragments. Our findings indicate that nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum membranes which are known to be in morphological continuity have, besides a far-reaching similarity, some characteristic differences. PMID:4317731

  18. Detection of liver cancer and abnormal liver tissue by Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Ding, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiujun; Lin, Junxiu; Wang, Deli

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, laser induced human serum Raman spectra of liver cancer are measured. The spectra differences in serum from normal people and liver disease patients are analyzed. For the typical spectrum of normal serum, there are three sharp Raman peaks and relative intensity of Raman peaks excited by 514.5nm is higher than that excited by 488.0nm. For the Raman spectrum of liver cancer serum there are no peaks or very weak Raman peaks at the same positions. Results from more than two hundred case measurements show that clinical diagnostic accuracy is 92.86%. And then, the liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis are studied applying the technology of LIF. To liver cirrhosis, the shape of Raman peak is similar to normal and fluorescence spectrum is similar to that of liver cancer from statistic data. The experiment indicates that there is notable fluorescence difference between the abnormal and normal liver tissue and have blue shift in fluorescence peak. Except for human serum, we use rats serum for researching either. Compared with results of path al examination, we analyze the spectra of normal cases, hepatic fibrosis and hepatocirrhosis respectively in an attempt to find some difference between them. Red shift of fluorescence peak is observed with disease evolution using 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser. However, no distinct changes happen with 488.0nm excitation. These results have important reference values to explore the method of laser spectrum diagnosis.

  19. Medical therapy for polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Dennison, A; Garcea, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin analogues and rapamycin inhibitors are two classes of drugs available for the management of polycystic liver disease but their overall impact is not clearly established. This article systematically reviews the literature on the medical management of polycystic liver disease. The outcomes assessed include reduction in liver volume and the impact on quality of life. Methods The English language literature published between 1966 and August 2014 was reviewed from a MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase™ and Cochrane Library search. Search terms included 'polycystic', 'liver', 'sirolimus', 'everolimus', 'PCLD', 'somatostatin', 'octreotide', 'lanreotide' and 'rapamycin'. Both randomised trials and controlled studies were included. References of the articles retrieved were also searched to identify any further eligible publications. The studies included were appraised using the Jadad score. Results Seven studies were included in the final review. Five studies, of which three were randomised trials, investigated the role of somatostatin analogues and the results showed a mean reduction in liver volume ranging from 2.9% at six months to 4.95 ±6.77% at one year. Only one randomised study examined the influence of rapamycin inhibitors. This trial compared dual therapy with everolimus and octreotide versus octreotide monotherapy. Liver volume reduced by 3.5% and 3.8% in the control and intervention groups respectively but no statistical difference was found between the two groups (p=0.73). Two randomised trials investigating somatostatin analogues assessed quality of life using SF-36(®). Only one subdomain score improved in one of the trials while two subdomain scores improved in the other with somatostatin analogue therapy. Conclusions Somatostatin analogues significantly reduce liver volumes after six months of therapy but have only a modest improvement on quality of life. Rapamycin inhibitors do not confer any additional advantage. PMID:26688394

  20. Increased Porphyrins in Primary Liver Cancer Mainly Reflect a Parallel Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaczynski, Jerzy; Hansson, Göran; Wallerstedt, Sven

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic porphyries have been associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer (PLC), which on the other hand may cause an increased porphyrin production. To evaluate the role of an underlying liver disorder we analyzed porphyrins in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (n = 65), cholangiocellular carcinoma (n = 3), or suspected PLC, which turned out to be metastases (n = 18) or a benign disorder (n = 11). None of the patients had a family history of porphyry or clinical signs of porphyry. Increased aminolevulinic acid or porphyrin values were common not only in patients with PLC (43%) but also in metastatic (50%) and benign (64%) liver disorders. The corresponding proportion for HCC patients with liver cirrhosis (55%) was higher (P < .05) than in those without cirrhosis (17%). We conclude that symptomatic porphyries are unusual in PLC, whereas elevated urinary and/or faecal porphyrins are common, primarily reflecting a parallel liver disease and not the PLC. PMID:19841684

  1. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  2. Quantitative evaluation of fatty liver by computed tomography in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, R.; Sakata, K.; Kunieda, T.; Saji, S.; Doi, H.; Nozawa, Y.

    1984-04-01

    Biochemical, histologic, and computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the liver were performed in 32 rabbits in which fatty liver was induced by prolonged intravenous fat infusion. In two groups of rabbits, in which 2 and 4 g/kg/day of fat emulsion was administered, respectively, posttreatment reduction in CT value of mild degree was observed. In the group that received 8 g/kg/day of fat emulsion, posttreatment change in CT value was sufficient for a diagnosis of fatty liver of moderate degree. Reduction in CT value in fatty liver might be due largely to accumulation of triglyceride and cholesterol in the liver cells. Significant correlation was found between changes in CT value of the liver and degrees of histological fat accumulation in the liver cells. Consecutive measurement of CT values of the liver during prolonged intravenous hyperalimentation is a nonagressive method of diagnosing fatty liver.

  3. Use of Stem Cells for Liver Diseases—Current Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Pati, Nirupama Trehan; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2011-01-01

    End-stage liver disease and liver failure are major health problems worldwide leading to high mortality and morbidity and high healthcare costs. Currently, orthotropic liver transplantation is the only effective treatment available to the patients of end-stage liver disease. However, a serious shortage of liver donors, high cost, and risk of organ rejection are the major obstacles to liver transplantation. Because of the ability of stem cells for differentiation into any tissue type, they have huge potential in therapy of various end-stage or degenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Stem cell therapy has the potential to provide a valuable adjunct and alternative to liver transplantation and has immense potential in the management of end stage liver disease and liver failure. Stem cell therapy can be mediated by either a direct contribution to the functional hepatocyte population with embryonic, induced pluripotent, or adult stem cells or by promotion of endogenous regenerative processes with bone marrow-derived stem cells. Initial translational studies have been encouraging and have suggested improved liver function in advanced chronic liver disease and enhanced liver regeneration after portal vein embolization and partial hepatic resection. Stem cells infusion in cirrhotic patients has improved liver parameters and could form a viable bridge to transplantation. The present review summarizes basic of stem cell biology relevant to clinicians and an update on recent advances on the management of liver diseases using stem cells. PMID:25755306

  4. [Contrast ultrasound imaging in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Bleuzen, A; Correas, J M; Kissel, A; Tchuenbou, J; Vandooren, E

    2003-12-01

    The recent introduction of high-end ultrasound equipments combined with the introduction of contrast agents provides marked improvements in liver imaging for the detection and the characterization of focal lesions. Previous imaging methods were based on high acoustic power and demonstrated improved detection of focal liver lesions. However, good and reliable results were difficult to achieve due to limited number of sweeps, as most of the microbubbles were destroyed within one pass. Non linear imaging methods at low acoustic power allowed great advances in the characterization by limiting signal from background tissue as well as agent collapse allowing continuous imaging starting from the time of contrast injection until complete disappearance of the agent. Contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver follows conventional sonography performed with high standards for detection and localization of lesions using multiple sweeps. Then targeted acquisition is performed for specific lesion characterization after a second contrast injection. Interpretation is based on the presence or not of microbubbles within the lesion (hyper-, hypo- or isosignal) and the delay from injection (arterial, portal or parenchymal or late phase). A well-recognized semiology is reported in this paper. Based on these criteria, sensitivity and specificity are close to those reported with other modalities with accuracy 85-95% for focal liver lesions and 75% for hepatocellular carcinomas. Those results markedly improve ultrasound accuracy compared to conventional sonography, and so put contrast-enhanced sonography among recommended non-invasive imaging methods for focal liver lesions with changes in diagnostic strategy. PMID:14710035

  5. Potent effects of dioscin against liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the promising effects of dioscin against liver injury, but its effect on liver fibrosis remains unknown. The present work investigated the activities of dioscin against liver fibrosis and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dioscin effectively inhibited the cell viabilities of HSC-T6, LX-2 and primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but not hepatocytes. Furthermore, dioscin markedly increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-? (PPAR-?) expression and significantly reduced a-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA), transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), collagen ?1 (I) (COL1A1) and collagen ?1 (III) (COL3A1) levels in vitro. Notably, dioscin inhibited HSCs activation and induced apoptosis in activated HSCs. In vivo, dioscin significantly improved body weight and hydroxylproline, laminin, ?-SMA, TGF-?1, COL1A1 and COL3A1 levels, which were confirmed by histopathological assays. Dioscin facilitated matrix degradation, and exhibited hepatoprotective effects through the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, in addition to exerting anti-fibrotic effects through the modulation of the TGF-?1/Smad, Wnt/?-catenin, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and mitochondrial signaling pathways, which triggered the senescence of activated HSCs. In conclusion, dioscin exhibited potent effects against liver fibrosis through the modulation of multiple targets and signaling pathways and should be developed as a novel candidate for the treatment of liver fibrosis in the future. PMID:25853178

  6. Imaging and IGRT in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Kristy K.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging for radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery is a critical component of the radiation planning process for liver cancer. Due to the lack of inherent contrast between liver tumors and the surrounding liver, intravenous contrast is required for accurate target delineation on the planning CT. The appropriate phase of contrast is tumor specific, with arterial phase imaging usually used to define hepatocellular carcinoma, and venous phase imaging for vascular thrombosis related to hepatocellular carcinoma and most types of liver metastases. Breathing motion and changes in the liver position day-to-day may be substantial and need to be considered at the time of radiation planning and treatment. Many types of integrated imaging-radiation treatment systems and image guidance strategies are available to produce volumetric and/or planar imaging at the time of treatment delivery to reduce the negative impact of geometric changes that may occur. Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) can improve the precision of radiation therapy, so that the prescribed doses are more likely to represent those actually delivered. PMID:21939853

  7. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  8. The hepatic transcriptome in human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Nicholas A; Seth, Devanshi; Haber, Paul S; Gorrell, Mark D; McCaughan, Geoffrey W

    2006-01-01

    The transcriptome is the mRNA transcript pool in a cell, organ or tissue with the liver transcriptome being amongst the most complex of any organ. Functional genomics methodologies are now being widely utilized to study transcriptomes including the hepatic transcriptome. This review outlines commonly used methods of transcriptome analysis, especially gene array analysis, focusing on publications utilizing these methods to understand human liver disease. Additionally, we have outlined the relationship between transcript and protein expressions as well as summarizing what is known about the variability of the transcriptome in non-diseased liver tissue. The approaches covered include gene array analysis, serial analysis of gene expression, subtractive hybridization and differential display. The discussion focuses on primate whole organ studies and in-vitro cell culture systems utilized. It is now clear that there are a vast number research opportunities for transcriptome analysis of human liver disease as we attempt to better understand both non-diseased and disease hepatic mRNA expression. We conclude that hepatic transcriptome analysis has already made significant contributions to the understanding of human liver pathobiology. PMID:17090326

  9. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  10. Anatomical variant of the liver blood supply

    PubMed Central

    MASLARSKI, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Vascular variations are significant for liver transplantations, radiological procedures, laparoscopic method of operation and for the healing of penetrating injuries, including the space close to the hepatic area. These variants are very common in the abdominal region, and their description will be useful. During a routine dissection of a 73 year old female cadaver, we found in the subhepatic region that the blood supply of the liver differed from a normal one. The difference was found in the absence of the right liver branch and the cystic artery, which normally arises from the common hepatic artery. After a detailed dissection of the superior mesenteric artery we distinguished a branchthat was routed to the right lobe of the liver. The diameter of this vessel was 3.7 mm and the length 8.2 cm. In the artery pathway, three consecutive branches were observed. The first branch was found about 2.02 cm before the portal region of the liver. The second one became visible after another millimeter and finally the artery made one little curve and became a cystic artery. PMID:26609280

  11. Retained Foreign Body in Transplanted Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, C.; K?rm?z?, S.; Kutlu, R.; Yagci, M. A.; Isik, B.; Yilmaz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is a technically complex and long surgical procedure. A large quantity of various materials such as catheters, sutures, needles and clips are frequently used during the procedure. These materials may enter in the liver from the vascular or biliary orifices inadvertently. A 50-year-old patient who had hepatic failure due to HBV underwent a deceased-donor liver transplantation. The deceased donor was a 75-year-old HbsAg+ man. The recipient had subfebrile fever and leukocytosis post-operatively. A control computed tomography revealed a cuneiform ischemic area, and a foreign body inside the right anterior portal vein branch proximal to this ischemic region. A 10-F Nelaton catheter, 5-cm long, was removed from the portal vein by surgery. Retrospectively, we understood that the portal vein was cut during the back-table procedure and the portal vein catheter was replaced with a larger one for better irrigation. Most probably, the original catheter was cut together with the portal vein, and the tip of the catheter was retained in the portal system and migrated into the liver. As far as we know, such a complication of liver transplantation has never been described previously. PMID:26576265

  12. Nuclear receptor variants in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Vincent; Liebe, Roman; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This snapshot reviews the current state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in regulating various aspects of liver metabolism. Interindividual differences in responses to diet and other 'in-' and environmental stressors can be caused by variants in components of the NR regulatory gene network. We recapitulate recent evidence for the application of NRs in genetic diagnosis of monogenic liver disease. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes mellitus, pinpoints key players in disease predisposition and progression. In particular, NR1H4 variants have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and gallstone disease. Other examples include studies of NR1I2 and NR1I3 polymorphisms in patients with drug-induced liver injury and NR5A2 variation in cholangiocarcinoma. Associations of NR gene variants have been identified in patients with dyslipidemia and other metabolic syndrome-associated traits by genome-wide studies. Evidence from these analyses confirms a role for NR variation in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. These new insights into the impact of NR variants offer perspectives for their future use in diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. PMID:26045277

  13. Liver biopsy: complications and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Thampanitchawong, Pornpen; Piratvisuth, Teerha

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the complications and the risk factors of percutaneous liver biopsy, and to compare the complication rate between the periods o f 1987-1993 and 1994-1996. METHODS: Medical records of all patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy between January 1, 1987 to September 31, 1996 in Songklanagarind Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 484 percutaneous liver biopsies performed. The total complication rate was 6.4%, of which 4.5% were due to major bleeding; the death rate was 1.6%. The important risk factors correlated with bleeding complications and deaths were a platelet count of 70 × 109/L or less, a prolonged prothrombin time of > 3 s over control, or a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of > 10 s over control. Although physician inexperience was not statistically significantly associated with bleeding complications and deaths, there was a reduction of death rate from 2.2% in 1987-1993 to 0% in 1993-1996. This reduction is thought to result from both increased experience o f senior staff and increased supervision of residents. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of platelet count, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time should be done and need to be corrected in case of abnormality before liver biopsy. Percutaneous liver biopsy should be performed or supervised by an expert in gastrointestinal diseases, especially in high risk cases. PMID:11819452

  14. Acute liver failure: Summary of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Lee, William M; Squires, Robert H; Nyberg, Scott L; Doo, Edward; Hoofnagle, Jay H

    2008-04-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare but challenging clinical syndrome with multiple causes; a specific etiology cannot be identified in 15% of adult and 50% of pediatric cases. The course of ALF is variable and the mortality rate is high. Liver transplantation is the only therapy of proven benefit, but the rapidity of progression and the variable course of ALF limit its use. Currently in the United States, spontaneous survival occurs in approximately 45%, liver transplantation in 25%, and death without transplantation in 30% of adults with ALF. Higher rates of spontaneous recovery (56%) and transplantation (31%) with lower rates of death (13%) occur in children. The outcome of ALF varies by etiology, favorable prognoses being found with acetaminophen overdose, hepatitis A, and ischemia (approximately 60% spontaneous survival), and poor prognoses with drug-induced ALF, hepatitis B, and indeterminate cases (approximately 25% spontaneous survival). Excellent intensive care is critical in management of patients with ALF. Nonspecific therapies are of unproven benefit. Future possible therapeutic approaches include N-acetylcysteine, hypothermia, liver assist devices, and hepatocyte transplantation. Advances in stem cell research may allow provision of cells for bioartificial liver support. ALF presents many challenging opportunities in both clinical and basic research. PMID:18318440

  15. Investigations on Collectin Liver 1*

    PubMed Central

    Axelgaard, Esben; Jensen, Lisbeth; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Nielsen, Hans J.; Enghild, Jan J.; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens C.

    2013-01-01

    Collectins are pattern recognition molecules of the innate immune system showing binding to carbohydrate structures on microorganisms in a calcium-dependent manner. Recently, three novel collectins, collectin liver 1 (CL-L1), collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1 and CL-11), and collectin placenta 1 (CL-P1), were discovered. The roles of these three collectins remain largely unknown. Here, we present a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay for quantification of CL-L1. The concentration of CL-L1 in donor plasma (n = 210) was distributed log-normally with a median value of 3.0 ?g/ml (range 1.5–5.5 ?g/ml). We observed on average 30% higher concentrations of CL-L1 in plasma as compared with serum. Size analysis by gel-permeation chromatography showed CL-L1 in serum to elute as large 700–800-kDa complexes and smaller 200–300-kDa complexes. CL-L1 showed specific binding to mannose-TSK beads in a Ca2+-dependent manner. This binding could be inhibited by mannose and glucose, but not galactose, indicating that CL-L1 binds via its carbohydrate-recognition domain and has ligand specificity similar to that of mannan-binding lectin. Western blot analysis of CL-L1 showed the presence of several oligomeric forms in serum. Ontogeny studies showed CL-L1 to be present at birth at near adult levels. CL-L1 levels exhibit low variation in healthy adults over a 1-year period. During acute-phase responses, the CL-L1 levels display only minor variations. In serum, CL-L1 was found in complexes with mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases, suggesting a role in the lectin pathway of complement activation. The presented data establish a basis for future studies on the biological role of CL-L1. PMID:23814060

  16. Role of stem cells in repair of liver injury: Experimental and clinical benefit of transferred stem cells on liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Esrefoglu, Mukaddes

    2013-01-01

    Although the liver has a high regenerative capacity, as a result of massive hepatocyte death, liver failure occurs. In addition to liver failure, for acute, chronic and hereditary diseases of the liver, cell transplantation therapies can stimulate regeneration or at least ensure sufficient function until liver transplantation can be performed. The lack of donor organs and the risks of rejection have prompted extensive experimental and clinical research in the field of cellular transplantation. Transplantation of cell lineages involved in liver regeneration, including mature hepatocytes, fetal hepatocytes, fetal liver progenitor cells, fetal stem cells, hepatic progenitor cells, hepatic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood stem cells, have been found to be beneficial in the treatment of liver failure. In this article, the results of experimental and clinical cell transplantation trials for liver failure are reviewed, with an emphasis on regeneration. PMID:24187451

  17. Acute Liver Failure After a Late TIPSS Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Radeleff, Boris Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Schawo, Simone; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Sauer, Peter; Schemmer, Peter; Kauffmann, Guenter W.; Richter, Goetz M.

    2008-01-15

    We report a rare case of late transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) occlusion due to progressive stent protrusion into the periportal liver parenchyma, which was a result of delayed liver shrinkage 2 years after TIPSS. The initial TIPSS procedure had been carried out in a 52-year-old man as a bridge for liver transplantation because of post-alcoholic liver cirrhosis. We describe the applied TIPSS recanalization and revision technique. Immediately after TIPSS revision acute liver failure developed, which required emergency liver transplantation.

  18. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  19. Quantification of Liver Fat with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Sirlin, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular fat accumulation is common feature of liver disease. Intracellular fat (steatosis) is the histological hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) but also may occur with alcohol abuse, viral hepatitis, HIV and genetic lipodystrophies, and chemotherapy. This article reviews emerging magnetic resonance imaging techniques that attempt to quantify liver fat. The content provides an overview of fatty liver disease and diseases where fat is an important disease feature. Also discussed is the current use and limitation of non-targeted biopsy in diffuse liver disease, and why quantitative non-invasive biomarkers of liver fat would be beneficial. PMID:21094444

  20. Amiodarone as an autophagy promoter reduces liver injury and enhances liver regeneration and survival in mice after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Wen; Chen, Yaw-Sen; Lin, Chih-Che; Chen, Yun-Ju; Lo, Gin-Ho; Lee, Po-Huang; Kuo, Po-Lin; Dai, Chia-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chung, Wang-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of autophagy is involved in liver regeneration. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in the regulation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PHx) and the development of pharmacological interventions for improved liver regeneration after PHx. We show that autophagy was activated in the early stages of liver regeneration following 70% PHx in vivo. Moreover, amiodarone was associated with a significant enhancement of autophagy, liver growth, and hepatocyte proliferation, along with reduced liver injury and the termination of liver regeneration due to decreased transforming growth factor-?1 expression after 70% PHx. The promotion of autophagy appeared to selectively increase the removal of damaged mitochondria. We also found that Atg7 knockdown or pretreatment with chloroquine aggravated the liver injury associated with 70% PHx and reduced liver growth and hepatocyte proliferation. Finally, amiodarone improved liver regeneration, survival, and liver injury after 90% PHx. In conclusion, our results indicate that autophagy plays an important role in mouse liver regeneration and that modulating autophagy with amiodarone may be an effective method of improving liver regeneration, increasing survival, and ameliorating liver injury following PHx. PMID:26515640

  1. Amiodarone as an autophagy promoter reduces liver injury and enhances liver regeneration and survival in mice after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Wen; Chen, Yaw-Sen; Lin, Chih-Che; Chen, Yun-Ju; Lo, Gin-Ho; Lee, Po-Huang; Kuo, Po-Lin; Dai, Chia-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chung, Wang-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of autophagy is involved in liver regeneration. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in the regulation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PHx) and the development of pharmacological interventions for improved liver regeneration after PHx. We show that autophagy was activated in the early stages of liver regeneration following 70% PHx in vivo. Moreover, amiodarone was associated with a significant enhancement of autophagy, liver growth, and hepatocyte proliferation, along with reduced liver injury and the termination of liver regeneration due to decreased transforming growth factor-?1 expression after 70% PHx. The promotion of autophagy appeared to selectively increase the removal of damaged mitochondria. We also found that Atg7 knockdown or pretreatment with chloroquine aggravated the liver injury associated with 70% PHx and reduced liver growth and hepatocyte proliferation. Finally, amiodarone improved liver regeneration, survival, and liver injury after 90% PHx. In conclusion, our results indicate that autophagy plays an important role in mouse liver regeneration and that modulating autophagy with amiodarone may be an effective method of improving liver regeneration, increasing survival, and ameliorating liver injury following PHx. PMID:26515640

  2. Interfraction Liver Shape Variability and Impact on GTV Position During Liver Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Abdominal Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: For patients receiving liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), abdominal compression can reduce organ motion, and daily image guidance can reduce setup error. The reproducibility of liver shape under compression may impact treatment delivery accuracy. The purpose of this study was to measure the interfractional variability in liver shape under compression, after best-fit rigid liver-to-liver registration from kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to planning computed tomography (CT) scans and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) position. Methods and Materials: Evaluable patients were treated in a Research Ethics Board-approved SBRT six-fraction study with abdominal compression. Kilovoltage CBCT scans were acquired before treatment and reconstructed as respiratory sorted CBCT scans offline. Manual rigid liver-to-liver registrations were performed from exhale-phase CBCT scans to exhale planning CT scans. Each CBCT liver was contoured, exported, and compared with the planning CT scan for spatial differences, by use of in house-developed finite-element model-based deformable registration (MORFEUS). Results: We evaluated 83 CBCT scans from 16 patients with 30 GTVs. The mean volume of liver that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 21.7%. Excluding 1 outlier, the maximum volume that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 36.3% in a single patient. Over all patients, the absolute maximum deformations in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions were 10.5 mm (SD, 2.2), 12.9 mm (SD, 3.6), and 5.6 mm (SD, 2.7), respectively. The absolute mean predicted impact of liver volume displacements on GTV by use of center of mass displacements was 0.09 mm (SD, 0.13), 0.13 mm (SD, 0.18), and 0.08 mm (SD, 0.07) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusions: Interfraction liver deformations in patients undergoing SBRT under abdominal compression after rigid liver-to-liver registrations on respiratory sorted CBCT scans were small in most patients (<5 mm).

  3. Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Targeting Liver Disease: TTR Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Niemietz, Christoph; Chandhok, Gursimran; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    The liver has become an increasingly interesting target for oligonucleotide therapy. Mutations of the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR), expressed in vast amounts by the liver, result in a complex degenerative disease, termed familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). Misfolded variants of TTR are linked to the establishment of extracellular protein deposition in various tissues, including the heart and the peripheral nervous system. Recent progress in the chemistry and formulation of antisense (ASO) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) designed for a knockdown of TTR mRNA in the liver has allowed to address the issue of gene-specific molecular therapy in a clinical setting of FAP. The two therapeutic oligonucleotides bind to RNA in a sequence specific manner but exploit different mechanisms. Here we describe major developments that have led to the advent of therapeutic oligonucleotides for treatment of TTR-related disease. PMID:26437390

  4. Alcoholic Liver Disease: Role of Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M.; Melzer, Ehud; Mell, Haim; Opris, Mihai; Cohen, Lawrence; Malnick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical and translational research. It focuses on the role of the immune system and the signaling pathways of cytokines in the pathogenesis of ALD. An additional factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which plays a central role in the induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. LPS derived from the intestinal microbiota enters the portal circulation, and is recognized by macrophages (Kupffer cells) and hepatocytes. In individuals with ALD, excessive levels of LPS in the liver affect immune, parenchymal, and non-immune cells, which in turn release various inflammatory cytokines and recruit neutrophils and other inflammatory cells. In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to the activation of Kupffer cells and the inflammatory cascade. The role of the stellate cells in fibrogenesis is also discussed. PMID:26343741

  5. Post-treatment imaging of liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Kurtaran, Amir; Schindl, Martin; Gruenberger, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In the past few years, great improvements have been made to achieve local tumour control of primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. For hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and tumour ablation techniques, including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RF), and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) have been developed. For colorectal liver metastases, surgery is still the standard technique in localised disease, although percutaneous RF ablation has gained considerable acceptance. In patients with widespread disease, chemotherapy with new drugs offers improved survival. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities of choice to evaluate treatment response. The present review demonstrates imaging findings of complete and incomplete tumour control after intervention as well as the imaging spectrum of complications. Imaging guidelines according to the World Health Organization and Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) for assessment of chemotherapy response are presented. PMID:17921098

  6. Acute Liver Failure including Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Acute liver failure (ALF) is a dramatic and highly unpredictable clinical syndrome defined by the sudden onset of coagulopathy and encephalopathy. Although many disease processes can cause ALF, acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause in the United States, and has a 66% chance of recovery with early N-acetylcysteine treatment and supportive care. Cerebral edema and infectious complications are notoriously difficult to detect and treat in ALF patients and may lead to irreversible brain damage and multi-organ failure. Emergency liver transplantation is associated with a 70% 1-year patient survival but 20% of listed patients die, highlighting the importance of early referral of ALF patients with a poor prognosis to a liver transplant center. PMID:18570942

  7. [Modern magnetic resonance imaging of the liver].

    PubMed

    Hedderich, D M; Weiss, K; Maintz, D; Persigehl, T

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver has become an essential tool in the radiological diagnostics of both focal and diffuse diseases of the liver and is subject to constant change due to technological progress. Recently, important improvements could be achieved by innovations regarding MR hardware, sequences and postprocessing methods. The diagnostic spectrum of MRI could be broadened particularly due to new examination sequences, while at the same time scanning time could be shortened and image quality has been improved. The aim of this article is to explain both the technological background and the clinical application of recent MR sequence developments and to present the scope of a modern MRI protocol for the liver. PMID:26628259

  8. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gangireddy, VGR; Kanneganti, PC; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count <150×109/L) is a well-known complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and has been observed in 76% to 85% of patients. Significant thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50×109/L to 75×109/L) occurs in approximately 13% of patients with cirrhosis. Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease. PMID:25222481

  9. Functional capacity before and after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Iscar, M; Montoliu, M A; Ortega, T; Rodriguez, B; Rodríguez, M; Glez-Pinto, I; Alonso, P

    2009-04-01

    The maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) is a standard tool for preoperative counseling of candidates for lung and heart transplantations, as well as an optional measurement to assess liver or renal transplant patients. Also, it provides an objective tool of the functional capacity of posttransplant patients. Exercise limitation and loss of aerobic capacity are common among patients with end-stage liver disease. The functional capacity of these subjects is decreased, as estimated by measuring the VO(2) max in a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET). After transplantation improvement is expected in physical capacity. We sought to describe the influence of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) on the physical fitness of the recipient at 3 and 12 months after transplantation. Since CPET is an objective test, it is an important tool for clinicians to evaluate patients' functional capacity before and after OLT. PMID:19376414

  10. Prealbumin is predictive for postoperative liver insufficiency in patients undergoing liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang; Li, Jing; Yan, Jian-Jun; Liu, Cai-Feng; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, Yi-Qun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors for postoperative liver insufficiency in patients with Child-Pugh class A liver function undergoing liver resection. METHODS: A total of 427 consecutive patients undergoing partial hepatectomy from October 2007 to April 2011 at a single center (Department of Hepatic SurgeryI, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Shanghai, China) were included in the study. All the patients had preoperative liver function of Child-Pugh class A and were diagnosed as having primary liver cancer by postoperative histopathology. Surgery was performed by the same team and hepatic resection was carried out by a clamp crushing method. A clamp/unclamp time of 15 min/5 min was adopted for hepatic inflow occlusion. Patients’ records of demographic variables, intraoperative parameters, pathological findings and laboratory test results were reviewed. Postoperative liver insufficiency and failure were defined as prolonged hyperbilirubinemia unrelated to biliary obstruction or leak, clinically apparent ascites, prolonged coagulopathy requiring frozen fresh plasma, and/or hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence of postoperative liver insufficiency or liver failure was observed and the attributing risk factors were analyzed. A multivariate analysis was conducted to determine the independent predictive factors. RESULTS: Among the 427 patients, there were 362 males and 65 females, with a mean age of 51.1 ± 10.4 years. Most patients (86.4%) had a background of viral hepatitis and 234 (54.8%) patients had liver cirrhosis. Indications for partial hepatectomy included hepatocellular carcinoma (391 patients), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (31 patients) and a combination of both (5 patients). Hepatic resections of ? 3 and ? 4 liver segments were performed in 358 (83.8%) and 69 (16.2%) patients, respectively. Seventeen (4.0%) patients developed liver insufficiency after hepatectomy, of whom 10 patients manifested as prolonged hyperbilirubinemia unrelated to biliary obstruction or leak, 6 patients had clinically apparent ascites and prolonged coagulopathy, 1 patient had hepatic encephalopathy and died on day 21 after surgery. On univariate analysis, age ? 60 years and prealbumin < 170 mg/dL were found to be significantly correlated with postoperative liver insufficiency (P = 0.045 and P = 0.009, respectively). There was no statistical difference in postoperative liver insufficiency between patients with or without hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and esophagogastric varices. Intraoperative parameters (type of resection, inflow blood occlusion time, blood loss and blood transfusion) and laboratory test results were not associated with postoperative liver insufficiency either. Age ? 60 years and prealbumin < 170 mg/dL were selected on multivariate analysis, and only prealbumin < 170 mg/dL remained predictive (hazard ratio, 3.192; 95%CI: 1.185-8.601, P = 0.022). CONCLUSION: Prealbumin serum level is a predictive factor for postoperative liver insufficiency in patients with liver function of Child-Pugh class A undergoing hepatectomy. Since prealbumin is a good marker of nutritional status, the improved nutritional status may decrease the incidence of liver insufficiency. PMID:23323003

  11. Proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia

    2011-05-28

    Oxidative stress, generated by chronic ethanol consumption, is a major cause of hepatotoxicity and liver injury. Increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals due to ethanol metabolism by CYP2E1 is principally located in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondria, which does not only injure liver cells, but also other vital organs, such as the heart and the brain. Therefore, there is a need for better treatment to enhance the antioxidant response elements. To date, there is no established treatment to attenuate high levels of oxidative stress in the liver of alcoholic patients. To block this oxidative stress, proteasome inhibitor treatment has been found to significantly enhance the antioxidant response elements of hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Recent studies have shown in an experimental model of alcoholic liver disease that proteasome inhibitor treatment at low dose has cytoprotective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and liver steatosis. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment against oxidative stress occurred because antioxidant response elements (glutathione peroxidase 2, superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, and GCLC) were up-regulated when rats fed alcohol were treated with a low dose of PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade(®)). This is an important finding because proteasome inhibitor treatment up-regulated reactive oxygen species removal and glutathione recycling enzymes, while ethanol feeding alone down-regulated these antioxidant elements. For the first time, it was shown that proteasome inhibition by a highly specific and reversible inhibitor is different from the chronic ethanol feeding-induced proteasome inhibition. As previously shown by our group, chronic ethanol feeding causes a complex dysfunction in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which affects the proteasome system, as well as the ubiquitination system. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease are related to proteasome inhibitor reversibility and the rebound of proteasome activity 72 h post PS-341 administration. PMID:21633661

  12. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  13. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  14. S-nitrosothiol signaling regulates liver development and improves outcome following toxic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Saunders, Diane C; Kelsey, Peter B; Conway, Allie A; Tesmenitsky, Yevgenia; Marchini, Julio F; Brown, Kristin K; Stamler, Jonathan S; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B; Rosenthal, Gary J; Croce, Kevin J; North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-16

    Toxic liver injury is a leading cause of liver failure and death because of the organ's inability to regenerate amidst massive cell death, and few therapeutic options exist. The mechanisms coordinating damage protection and repair are poorly understood. Here, we show that S-nitrosothiols regulate liver growth during development and after injury in vivo; in zebrafish, nitric-oxide (NO) enhanced liver formation independently of cGMP-mediated vasoactive effects. After acetaminophen (APAP) exposure, inhibition of the enzymatic regulator S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) minimized toxic liver damage, increased cell proliferation, and improved survival through sustained activation of the cytoprotective Nrf2 pathway. Preclinical studies of APAP injury in GSNOR-deficient mice confirmed conservation of hepatoprotective properties of S-nitrosothiol signaling across vertebrates; a GSNOR-specific inhibitor improved liver histology and acted with the approved therapy N-acetylcysteine to expand the therapeutic time window and improve outcome. These studies demonstrate that GSNOR inhibitors will be beneficial therapeutic candidates for treating liver injury. PMID:24388745

  15. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Stĺl, Per

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD. PMID:26494963

  16. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stĺl, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD. PMID:26494963

  17. Bioengineered transplantable porcine livers with re-endothelialized vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ko, In Kap; Peng, Li; Peloso, Andrea; Smith, Charesa J; Dhal, Abritee; Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cindy; Clouse, Cara; Zhao, Weixin; Shupe, Thomas D; Soker, Shay; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    Donor shortage remains a continued challenge in liver transplantation. Recent advances in tissue engineering have provided the possibility of creating functional liver tissues as an alternative to donor organ transplantation. Small bioengineered liver constructs have been developed, however a major challenge in achieving functional bioengineered liver in vivo is the establishment of a functional vasculature within the scaffolds. Our overall goal is to bioengineer intact livers, suitable for transplantation, using acellular porcine liver scaffolds. We developed an effective method for reestablishing the vascular network within decellularized liver scaffolds by conjugating anti-endothelial cell antibodies to maximize coverage of the vessel walls with endothelial cells. This procedure resulted in uniform endothelial attachment throughout the liver vasculature extending to the capillary bed of the liver scaffold and greatly reduced platelet adhesion upon blood perfusion in vitro. The re-endothelialized livers, when transplanted to recipient pigs, were able to withstand physiological blood flow and maintained for up to 24 h. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that vascularized bioengineered livers, of clinically relevant size, can be transplanted and maintained in vivo, and represents the first step towards generating engineered livers for transplantation to patients with end-stage liver failure. PMID:25433603

  18. Liver injury from Herbals and Dietary Supplements in the US Drug Induced Liver Injury Network

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Victor J.; Barnhart, Huiman; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Davern, Timothy; Fontana, Robert J.; Grant, Lafaine; Reddy, K. Rajender; Seeff, Leonard B.; Serrano, Jose; Sherker, Averell H.; Stolz, Andrew; Talwalkar, Jayant; Vega, Maricruz; Vuppalanchi, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) studies hepatotoxicity due to conventional medications as well as herbals and dietary supplements (HDS). Rationale To characterize hepatotoxicity and its outcomes from HDS versus medications, patients with hepatotoxicity attributed to medications or HDS were enrolled prospectively between 2004 and 2013. The study took place among eight US referral centers that are part of the DILIN. Consecutive patients with liver injury referred to a DILIN center were eligible. The final sample comprised 130 (15.5%) of all subjects enrolled (839) who were judged to have experienced liver injury due to HDS. Hepatotoxicity due to HDS was evaluated by expert opinion. Demographic and clinical characteristics and outcome assessments including death and liver transplantation were ascertained. Cases were stratified and compared according to the type of agent implicated in liver injury; 45 had injury due to bodybuilding HDS, 85 due to non-bodybuilding HDS, and 709 due to medications. Main Results Liver injury due to HDS increased from 7% to 20% (p < 0.001) during the study period. Bodybuilding HDS caused prolonged jaundice (median 91 days) in young men but did not result in any fatalities or liver transplantation. The remaining HDS cases presented as hepatocellular injury, predominantly in middle-aged women and more frequently led to death or transplantation compared to injury from medications (13% vs. 3%, p < 0.05). Conclusions The proportion of liver injury cases attributed to HDS in DILIN has increased significantly. Liver injury from non-bodybuilding HDS is more severe than from bodybuilding HDS or medications, as evidenced by differences in unfavorable outcomes; death and transplantation. PMID:25043597

  19. Outcomes for liver transplant candidates listed with low model for end-stage liver disease score.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Allison J; Lai, Jennifer C; Dodge, Jennifer L; Roberts, John P

    2015-11-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, which estimates mortality within 90 days, determines priority for liver transplantation (LT). However, longer-term outcomes on the wait list for patients who are initially listed with low MELD scores are not well characterized. All adults listed for primary LT at a single, high-volume center from 2005 to 2012 with an initial laboratory MELD score of 22 or lower were evaluated. Excluded were those patients listed with MELD exception points who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) or transplantation at another center, or who were removed from the wait list for nonmedical reasons. Outcomes and causes of death were identified by United Network for Organ Sharing, the National Death Index, and an electronic medical record review. Multivariate competing risk analysis evaluated predictors of death compared to deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT); 893 patients were listed from 2005 to 2012. By the end of follow-up, 27% had undergone DDLT, and 31% were removed from the wait list for death or clinical deterioration. In a competing risks assessment, only MELD score of 6-9, older age, lower serum albumin, lower body mass index, and diabetes conferred an increased risk of wait-list dropout compared to DDLT. Listing for simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation was protective against wait-list dropout. Of the patients included, 275 patients died or were delisted for being too sick; 87% of the identifiable causes of death were directly related to end-stage liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma. In conclusion, patients with low listing MELD scores remain at a significant risk for death due to liver-related causes and may benefit from early access to transplantation, such as LDLT or acceptance of high-risk donor livers. Predictors of death compared to transplantation may allow for early identification of patients who are at risk for wait-list mortality. Liver Transpl 21:1403-1409, 2015. © 2015 AASLD. PMID:26289624

  20. Liver transplantation for acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Eric T.

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous causes of acute hepatic failure (AHF). Cerebral edema, coagulopathy, renal failure, metabolic disturbances and infection are the main clinical sequelae. Patients with AHF should be stabilized when first encountered and transferred to the nearest liver transplant center, as AHF progresses quickly and is often fatal. There are few adequate medical interventions and care of patients with AHF is supportive until spontaneous recovery ensues. If recovery does not appear to occur, most causes of AHF are well accepted indications for liver transplantation. PMID:18333235