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Sample records for liverpool lung project

  1. The Liverpool Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert J.; Bates, S. D.; Clay, Neil R.; Fraser, Stephen N.; Marchant, J. M.; Mottram, C. J.; Steele, I. A.; Tomlinson, M. D.

    2011-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope (LT) is a fully robotic 2m optical telescope at a world-class observatory site. It runs autonomously without direct human control either on site or remotely. It is not operated primarily for a single science project, but rather is a common-user facility, time allocated by an open, peer-review process and conducting a variety of optical and IR imaging, spectroscopic and polarimetric programs. This paper describes some of aspects of the site infrastructure and instrument suite designed specifically to support robust and reliable unsupervised operations. Aside from the telescope hardware, the other aspect of robotic operations is the mechanisms whereby users interact with the telescope and its automated scheduler. We describe how these have been implemented for the LT. Observing routinely since 2004, the LT has demonstrated it is possible to operate a large, common-user robotic observatory. Making the most of the flexibility afforded by fully robotic operations, development continues in collaboration with both observers and other observatories to develop observing modes to enable new science across the broad discipline of time-domain astrophysics.

  2. Community Adult Education; Evidence Submitted to the Russell Committee on Adult Education in England and Wales by the Workers' Educational Association (West Lancashire & Cheshire District) and the Liverpool Educational Priority Area Action/Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, T. O.

    This paper discusses six roles which an adult education agency can fill in an Educational Priority Area and illustrates each one with examples from the Liverpool E.P.A. Project. These roles are: (1) adult education cum community development; (2) adult education as a resource in community development work; (3) adult education as an aid to parents…

  3. The Liverpool Microwave Palaeointensity System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mimi; Biggin, Andrew; Hawkins, Louise; Hodgson, Emma; Hurst, Elliot

    2016-04-01

    The motivation for the group at Liverpool in the 1990s (led by John Shaw and Derek Walton) to start experimenting with using microwaves to demagnetise and remagnetise palaeomagnetic samples, rather than heating using conventional ovens, was to reduce laboratory induced alteration in absolute palaeointensity experiments. As with other methods, the non-ideal effects of grain size and naturally altered remanence must still be addressed. From humble beginnings using a domestic microwave oven the current 4th generation microwave system (MWS) has developed in to an integrated combined 14 GHz microwave resonant cavity and SQUID magnetometer system. The MWS is designed to investigate one 5 mm diameter sample at a time with microwave exposure (the equivalent of a heating step in conventional experiments) ranging from a few seconds up to around a minute. Each experiment (protocol, checks, direction and strength of applied field, number of steps etc) can be tailored to the behaviour of each individual sample. There have been many published studies demonstrating the equivalence of conventional thermal (Thellier) and microwave techniques using both artificial and natural remanence and also that the microwave method can indeed reduce laboratory induced alteration. Here an overview of the present MWS including a discussion of the physical processes occurring will be given. Examples of current projects (both archaeological and geological) utilising the method will also be described. Finally, future developments and applications of the method will be discussed.

  4. The Liverpool Bay Coastal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Michael John; O'Neill, Clare K.; Palmer, Matthew R.

    2010-05-01

    A pre-operational Coastal Observatory has been functioning since August 2002 in Liverpool Bay, Irish Sea. Its rationale is to develop the science underpinning the ecosystem based approach to marine management, including distinguishing between natural and man-made variability, with particular emphasis on eutrophication and predicting responses of a coastal sea to climate change. Liverpool Bay has strong tidal mixing, receives fresh water principally from the Dee, Mersey and Ribble estuaries, each with different catchment influences, and has enhanced levels of nutrients. Horizontal and vertical density gradients are variable both in space and time. The challenge is to understand and model accurately this variable region which is turbulent, turbid, receives enhanced nutrients and is productive. The Observatory has three components, for each of which the goal is some (near) real-time operation - measurements; coupled 3-D hydrodynamic, wave and ecological models; a data management and web-based data delivery system which provides free access to the data, http://cobs.pol.ac.uk. The integrated measurements are designed to test numerical models and have as a major objective obtaining multi-year records, covering tidal, event (storm / calm / bloom), seasonal and interannual time scales. The four main strands on different complementary space or time scales are:- a) fixed point time series (in situ and shore-based); very good temporal and very poor spatial resolution. These include tide gauges; a meteorological station on Hilbre Island at the mouth of the Dee; two in situ sites, one by the Mersey Bar, measuring waves and the vertical structure of current, temperature and salinity. A CEFAS SmartBuoy whose measurements include surface nutrients is deployed at the Mersey Bar site. b) regular (nine times per year) spatial water column surveys on a 9 km grid; good vertical resolution for some variables, limited spatial coverage and resolution, and limited temporal resolution. The

  5. Community Businesses--Lessons from Liverpool, UK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeming, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of community business development in two neighborhoods in Liverpool, England, resulted in the following implications for economic development strategy: (1) social entrepreneurs do not access the same infrastructure as business entrepreneurs; (2) community businesses differ from private enterprise; (3) displacement effects must be…

  6. Liverpool Telescope Spectrum of ASASSN-16jb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum of ASASSN-16jb (see ASAS-SN Transients; Shappee et al. 2014) with the FRODOSpec spectrograph (Barnsley et al. 2012) on the 2.0m Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004) on 2016 August 20.87 UT. The spectrum was taken using the higher resolution mode, which gives a wavelength coverage of 3900 to 5100 & Aring and 5900 to 8000 & Aring, with a resolution of R ~ 5400.

  7. Liverpool: the early years of biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pitt, G A

    2003-02-01

    The first Chair and department of biochemistry in the U.K. were founded at the University of Liverpool in 1902, thanks to a generous donation by William Johnston, a Liverpool shipowner. The first holder of the Johnston Chair, Benjamin Moore, was a dynamic man, who set up an active research centre. In 1906, he and Edward Whitley founded The Bio-Chemical Journal as a private venture, and in 1912, they sold it to the Biochemical Society. Moore also initiated the first Honours School of Biochemistry in the country before moving to London in 1914 and being succeeded by Walter Ramsden. The development of the department was stopped by World War I, and there was little expansion in the 1920s. After Ramsden's retirement in 1931, the third Johnston Professor, Harold Channon, increased staff numbers, ran a successful research school and re-established the Honours course. World War II brought that to an end, and Channon moved into industry. After the war, biochemistry expanded from a niche subject in a small number of British universities into one that was strongly represented in most universities, but the penetration of biochemistry into wide areas of functional biology has blurred conventional subject boundaries, so in many universities (including the University of Liverpool), departments of biochemistry have been incorporated into large more general schools. PMID:12546645

  8. News Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

  9. "In My Liverpool Home": An Investigation into the Institutionalised Invisibility of Liverpool's Black Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Bill; Charles, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Reviewing the 22 years that have elapsed since Gifford's 1989 report labelled Liverpool as racist, the authors focus on the fact that in a city which has had a British African Caribbean (BAC) community for over 400 years, there is minimum representation of that community in the city's workforce. The authors investigate two major forms of…

  10. Recent Science Highlights from the Robotic Liverpool Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert; Marchant, J.; Moss, C.; Steele, I.

    2008-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope is a fully-robotic 2-metre astronomical telescope owned and operated on La Palma by the Astrophysics Research Institute of Liverpool John Moores University (UK) with the financial support of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). A range of instruments are permanently mounted at the Cassegrain focus providing optical imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry and near-IR imaging with instrument changes in less than one minute. Though a very broad range of observational projects run on the telescope, the instrumentation and infrastructure have been designed specifically to exploit the robotic observatory's fully automated capabilities by focusing on the demands of time-domain astrophysics. Targets may be monitored on any time scale from hours to months and rapid response observations made in response to events such as GRBs, novae and supernovae or newly discovered solar system objects. In this poster we present a few recent highlights from the range of greater than 40 observational programs running now or over the past year, many of which are specifically enabled by the robotic nature of the telescope. In the case of results that have not been already published in refereed journals, the authors have kindly given permission for the inclusion of their data in this paper. * An exceptionally early measurement of GRB optical polarization, only 203 seconds after the burst itself (Mundell et al., 2007, Science, 315, 1822) * The first detection of the YORP effect in an asteroid's spin period (Lowry et al., 2007, Science, 316, 272) * Milli-magnitude photometry of several extra-solar planetary transits (Pollaco et al, in prep.). For more details of the telescope and the time allocation procedures please see http://telescope.livjm.ac.uk/

  11. Hugh Neill (1806-64) and the early years of the Liverpool Ophthalmic Infirmary.

    PubMed

    Silvester, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    This account of the early history of ophthalmology in Liverpool refers particularly to Hugh Neill, one of the many Edinburgh-educated surgeons working in Liverpool during the early 19th century. PMID:23143318

  12. Television and the Construction of Myth: Liverpool 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Adrian; Leaman, Oliver

    This document analyzes the construction of a mythical representation through television, focusing on the British Broadcasting Company's (BBC) television coverage of the violence which took place at the Heysel Stadium in Brussels prior to the 1985 European Cup Final between Juventus and Liverpool. As background for this analysis, a concept of…

  13. In pursuit of accurate timekeeping: Liverpool and Victorian electrical horology.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuto

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores how nineteenth-century Liverpool became such an advanced city with regard to public timekeeping, and the wider impact of this on the standardisation of time. From the mid-1840s, local scientists and municipal bodies in the port city were engaged in improving the ways in which accurate time was communicated to ships and the general public. As a result, Liverpool was the first British city to witness the formation of a synchronised clock system, based on an invention by Robert Jones. His method gained a considerable reputation in the scientific and engineering communities, which led to its subsequent replication at a number of astronomical observatories such as Greenwich and Edinburgh. As a further key example of developments in time-signalling techniques, this paper also focuses on the time ball established in Liverpool by the Electric Telegraph Company in collaboration with George Biddell Airy, the Astronomer Royal. This is a particularly significant development because, as the present paper illustrates, one of the most important technologies in measuring the accuracy of the Greenwich time signal took shape in the experimental operation of the time ball. The inventions and knowledge which emerged from the context of Liverpool were vital to the transformation of public timekeeping in Victorian Britain. PMID:25470885

  14. In pursuit of accurate timekeeping: Liverpool and Victorian electrical horology.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuto

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores how nineteenth-century Liverpool became such an advanced city with regard to public timekeeping, and the wider impact of this on the standardisation of time. From the mid-1840s, local scientists and municipal bodies in the port city were engaged in improving the ways in which accurate time was communicated to ships and the general public. As a result, Liverpool was the first British city to witness the formation of a synchronised clock system, based on an invention by Robert Jones. His method gained a considerable reputation in the scientific and engineering communities, which led to its subsequent replication at a number of astronomical observatories such as Greenwich and Edinburgh. As a further key example of developments in time-signalling techniques, this paper also focuses on the time ball established in Liverpool by the Electric Telegraph Company in collaboration with George Biddell Airy, the Astronomer Royal. This is a particularly significant development because, as the present paper illustrates, one of the most important technologies in measuring the accuracy of the Greenwich time signal took shape in the experimental operation of the time ball. The inventions and knowledge which emerged from the context of Liverpool were vital to the transformation of public timekeeping in Victorian Britain. PMID:25508512

  15. Liverpool Telescope Spectrum of Classical Nova ASASSN-16ig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum of classical nova ASASSN-16ig in Sagittarius (see ATels #9343, #9352, #9359, CBET 4295, 4299) with the FRODOSpec spectrograph (Barnsley et al. 2012) on the 2.0m Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004) on 2016 August 11.88 UT. The spectrum was taken using the higher resolution mode, which gives a wavelength coverage of 3900 to 5100 A and 5900 to 8000 A, with a resolution of R ~ 5400.

  16. Liverpool Telescope Spectrum of OGLE-2016-NOVA-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.

    2016-07-01

    We obtained a spectrum of OGLE-2016-NOVA-02 (ATel #9246) with the FRODOSpec spectrograph (Barnsley et al. 2012) on the 2.0m Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004) on 2016 July 15.97 UT. The spectrum was taken using the higher resolution mode, which gives a wavelength coverage of 5900 to 8000 & Aring and resolution of R = 5300 in the red arm (no significant features were detected in the blue arm, which covers 3900 to 5100 & Aring).

  17. Quality of life and epilepsy: the Liverpool experience.

    PubMed

    Baker, G A

    1998-01-01

    The use of quality of life (QOL) measures in epilepsy research is relatively recent compared with that in other chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. However, in recent years much research has been undertaken to develop and validate QOL measures for use in various groups of people with epilepsy, including children, the elderly, and newly diagnosed patients. QOL measures are now available for use in both clinical trials and primary care. The Liverpool Group is one of the leading research teams in this field and is probably best known for developing the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale. However, the group has also developed a number of other QOL measures, with an emphasis on keeping the measures appropriate, practical, and responsive, and always considering the burden to patients. This review describes some of the measures the Liverpool Group has developed, outlines their application in clinical trials of a number of aspects of antiepileptic drugs, and details the importance of some of the findings. The diversity of the group's approach and of its involvement in assessing the QOL of people with epilepsy are emphasized. PMID:9589809

  18. Calibration of the Liverpool Telescope RINGO3 polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowikowska, Aga; Krzeszowski, Krzysztof; Żejmo, Michał; Reig, Pablo; Steele, Iain

    2016-05-01

    We present an analysis of polarimetric observations of standard stars performed over the period of more than 3 yr with the RINGO3 polarimeter mounted on the Liverpool Telescope. The main objective was to determine the instrumental polarization of the RINGO3 polarimeter in three spectral energy ranges: blue (350-640 nm), green (650-760 nm) and red (770-1000 nm). The observations were conducted between 2012 and 2016. The total time span of 1126 d was split into five epochs due to the hardware changes to the observing system. Our results should be applied to calibrate all polarimetric observations performed with the RINGO3 polarimeter.

  19. Re-Shaping Teacher Identity? The Liverpool Teachers' Centre 1973-1976

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1975 Eric Midwinter, Principal of the Liverpool Teachers' Centre, established a unified organisational structure responsible for delivering continuing professional development (CPD) to Liverpool schools. His ambition was to embed community education practices across the city's entire teaching force. However, during a…

  20. Modelling a storm surge event in Liverpool Bay with FVCOM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, P.

    2012-04-01

    A model of the Irish Sea/Liverpool Bay area has been developed using the finite volume, unstructured mesh code FVCOM. The model has been run with meteorological forcing to simulate the storm surge event of January 2007. This event has previously been modelled with the POLCOMS code, the results of which were used for a comparison of accuracy and computational efficiency of the two approaches. The wind speed (and hence wind stress) together with atmospheric pressure have been applied to the model as surface boundary conditions for a period of a few days to allow the model to settle down, and then the results for the peak of the storm on January 18th 2007 have been analysed to give metrics for the accuracy of the sea surface elevation that is predicted against measurements taken at Hilbre Island, near the mouth of the River Dee in Liverpool Bay. It was found that by changing the wind stress formulation within the FVCOM code a significant improvement in the accuracy of the model results could be obtained for the period of this surge event.

  1. Entropy analysis of SPM patterns: case study of Liverpool Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivtsov, V.; Mikkelsen, O. A.; Jones, S. E.

    2012-06-01

    In Liverpool Bay (UK), suspended particulate matter (SPM) monitoring data and tidal data collected in the period September 2004 to February 2006 were analyzed by means of entropy analysis and factor analysis in order to identify the meteorological and oceanographic variables of importance for the characterisation of the shape of SPM size spectra. Entropy analysis of in situ particle size spectra revealed five basic types, each attributable to different sets of environmental conditions. The results of correlation analysis showed that changes in the position of the main modal are significantly related to several environmental variables. One important class of these relationships is represented by wave-related variables (e.g. wave energy, maximum orbital velocity). Another important class of correlations (e.g. with salinity, density, water depth) can be associated with the inshore-offshore gradient in depth and physicochemical conditions existing in the bay. The strongest correlations, however, were with the air and water temperatures. Factor analysis (with Varimax rotation) of the overall dataset extracted four factors, together explaining over 70% of variance. Factor 1 explains >21% of the total variance, and appears to be related to wave activity. Factor 2, explaining 18.5% of the total variance, appears to be related to tidal currents. Factor 3 explains 16.4% of the total variance observed, and appears to be related to temperature-modulated seasonal differences in oceanographic conditions. Factor 4 explains 15.2% of the total variance observed, and represents the inshore-offshore gradient in depth and physicochemical conditions. These findings are a step towards a better characterisation of floc size and, therefore, more precise calculations of sedimentation and transport rates needed for an improved understanding of ecosystem functioning in Liverpool Bay and, for that matter, other similar settings.

  2. Object oriented design of the Liverpool Telescope Robotic Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Stephen N.; Steele, Iain A.

    2002-12-01

    In the traditional, manned observatory, an astronomer must continually be weighing together many factors during the course of an observing run in order to make an appropriate decision on the course of action at that time. Weather conditions may force suspension of the observing program to protect the telescope, later to be resumed when conditions improve. Power outages may force controlled shutdown of computers and other hardware. Changes in sky condition may require on-the-fly changes to the scheduled program. For the Liverpool Telescope (LT), the Robotic Control System (RCS) is designed to act as a replacement for the duty astronomer. The system is required to be robust, reliable and adaptable e.g. to future instrument configurations and varying operational objectives. Consequently, object-oriented techniques which promote modularity and code re-use have been employed throughout the design of this system to facilitate maintainance and future upgrading. This paper describes the task management architecture (TMA) - a configurable, pattern based object model defining the cognitive functionality of the RCS, the environment monitoring architecture (EMA) - a configurable, rule-based decision making paradigm and the use of our proprietary Java message system (JMS) communications architecture to control the telescope and associated instrumentation.

  3. University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University: Globalization of Higher Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    This essay studies the University of Nottingham Ningbo China and Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University--the two Chinese campuses established respectively by the University of Nottingham and the University of Liverpool. They represent successful models of globalization of higher education in China; however their rationale, strategies, curricula,…

  4. How Can Only 18 Black Teachers Working in Liverpool Represent a Diverse Teaching Workforce? A Critical Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, William; Charles, Marie

    2016-01-01

    This paper follows on from the authors' previous research into minimal Black teacher representation in Liverpool schools [Boyle, B., and M. Charles. 2010. "Tightening the Shackles: The Continued Invisibility of Liverpool's British African Caribbean Teachers." "Journal of Black Studies" 42 (3): 427-435]. It is based on a…

  5. Lung cancer mortality trends in Chile and six-year projections using Bayesian dynamic linear models.

    PubMed

    Torres-Avilés, Francisco; Moraga, Tomás; Núñez, Loreto; Icaza, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    The objectives were to analyze lung cancer mortality trends in Chile from 1990 to 2009, and to project the rates six years forward. Lung cancer mortality data were obtained from the Chilean Ministry of Health. To obtain mortality rates, population projections were used, based on the 2002 National Census. Rates were adjusted using the world standard population as reference. Bayesian dynamic linear models were fitted to estimate trends from 1990 to 2009 and to obtain projections for 2010-2015. During the period under study, there was a 19.9% reduction in the lung cancer mortality rate in men. In women, there was increase of 28.4%. The second-order model showed a better fit for men, and the first-order model a better fit for women. Between 2010 and 2015 the downward trend continued in men, while a trend to stabilization was projected for lung cancer mortality in women in Chile. This analytical approach could be useful implement surveillance systems for chronic non-communicable disease and to evaluate preventive strategies. PMID:26578021

  6. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  7. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  8. Liverpool Telescope classification of ATLAS16bdg as a Type Ia supernova near maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, C. G.; Smith, R. J.; Childress, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    On 2016 June 15 at approximately 21:03 UT, we performed multicolour optical imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry with the 2-m robotic Liverpool Telescope IO:O camera of galaxy NGC4708 in which a bright optical transient was reported by Tonry et al. ATel #9151 (ATLAS16bdg).

  9. The Liverpool Care Pathway: what went right and what went wrong.

    PubMed

    Julia Neuberger, Rabbi Baroness

    2016-03-01

    The history of the Liverpool Care Pathway shows how the best of intentions, and good guidelines, can be perverted by poor practice, lack of thought, poor training and inadequate communication. Good clinical leadership can encourage high quality care of dying people, whatever guidelines are being used, or not. PMID:26961447

  10. Liverpool's Discovery: A University Library Applies a New Search Tool to Improve the User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This article features the University of Liverpool's arts and humanities library, which applies a new search tool to improve the user experience. In nearly every way imaginable, the Sydney Jones Library and the Harold Cohen Library--the university's two libraries that serve science, engineering, and medical students--support the lives of their…

  11. An Analysis of the Science and Technology Collections at the Carnegie Public Library, East Liverpool, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlatt, Thomas R.

    An analysis of the science and technology collections at Carnegie Public Library of East Liverpool, Ohio was undertaken to obtain more thorough knowledge of these areas of the collection before collection development prioritization was made. The entire shelflist from Dewey classification number 500 through 629 was reviewed using the automated…

  12. Liverpool Telescope classification of Gaia16ams and Gaia16aoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Hourihane, A.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Mattila, S.; Harrison, D.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Blagorodnova, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report spectroscopic classifications obtained using the robotic Liverpool Telescope + SPRAT (R~350; 400-800 nm) on the night of 2016 May 17. Gaia16ams has a red spectrum, with broad molecular absorption features consistent with a late spectra-type star.

  13. Dr James Currie (1756-1805): Liverpool physician, campaigner, hydrotherapist and man of letters.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    James Currie was born and educated in Scotland but spent most of his professional life in Liverpool, where, as physician to the Liverpool Infirmary, he campaigned against the unsanitary living conditions in the rapidly growing port. He was an early advocate of water cures for fever and other maladies, on which subject he carried out experiments and published a seminal work. He was a pioneer in the use of the clinical thermometer. He was also an early advocate of the abolition of slavery and a man with literary and scientific interests, which brought him into contact with many of his most distinguished contemporaries. These included Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802), William Wilberforce (1759-1833), Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) and Robert Burns (1759-96), of whose poetry Currie was the first editor. He died in August 1805 at Sidmouth in Devon, whose parish church carries his memorial. PMID:16435032

  14. Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic facility for time domain astronomy in 2020+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Bates, S. D.; Smith, R. J.; Bode, M. F.; Baker, I.; Peacocke, T.; Thomson, K.

    2014-07-01

    The robotic 2m Liverpool Telescope, based on the Canary island of La Palma, has a diverse instrument suite and a strong track record in time domain science, with highlights including early time photometry and spectra of supernovae, measurements of the polarization of gamma-ray burst afterglows, and high cadence light curves of transiting extrasolar planets. In the next decade the time domain will become an increasingly prominent part of the astronomical agenda with new facilities such as LSST, SKA, CTA and Gaia, and promised detections of astrophysical gravitational wave and neutrino sources opening new windows on the transient universe. To capitalise on this exciting new era we intend to build Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic facility on La Palma dedicated to time domain science. The next generation of survey facilities will discover large numbers of new transient sources, but there will be a pressing need for follow-up observations for scientific exploitation, in particular spectroscopic follow-up. Liverpool Telescope 2 will have a 4-metre aperture, enabling optical/infrared spectroscopy of faint objects. Robotic telescopes are capable of rapid reaction to unpredictable phenomena, and for fast-fading transients like gamma-ray burst afterglows. This rapid reaction enables observations which would be impossible on less agile telescopes of much larger aperture. We intend Liverpool Telescope 2 to have a world-leading response time, with the aim that we will be taking data with a few tens of seconds of receipt of a trigger from a ground- or space-based transient detection facility. We outline here our scientific goals and present the results of our preliminary optical design studies.

  15. An experiment in big data: storage, querying and visualisation of data taken from the Liverpool Telescope's wide field cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, R. M.; Steele, Iain A.; Smith, R. J.; Mawson, Neil R.

    2014-07-01

    The Small Telescopes Installed at the Liverpool Telescope (STILT) project has been in operation since March 2009, collecting data with three wide field unfiltered cameras: SkycamA, SkycamT and SkycamZ. To process the data, a pipeline was developed to automate source extraction, catalogue cross-matching, photometric calibration and database storage. In this paper, modifications and further developments to this pipeline will be discussed, including a complete refactor of the pipeline's codebase into Python, migration of the back-end database technology from MySQL to PostgreSQL, and changing the catalogue used for source cross-matching from USNO-B1 to APASS. In addition to this, details will be given relating to the development of a preliminary front-end to the source extracted database which will allow a user to perform common queries such as cone searches and light curve comparisons of catalogue and non-catalogue matched objects. Some next steps and future ideas for the project will also be presented.

  16. The UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial: a pilot randomised controlled trial of low-dose computed tomography screening for the early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Field, John K; Duffy, Stephen W; Baldwin, David R; Brain, Kate E; Devaraj, Anand; Eisen, Tim; Green, Beverley A; Holemans, John A; Kavanagh, Terry; Kerr, Keith M; Ledson, Martin; Lifford, Kate J; McRonald, Fiona E; Nair, Arjun; Page, Richard D; Parmar, Mahesh Kb; Rintoul, Robert C; Screaton, Nicholas; Wald, Nicholas J; Weller, David; Whynes, David K; Williamson, Paula R; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Hansell, David M

    2016-01-01

    the control arm. A total of 1994 participants underwent CT scanning: 42 participants (2.1%) were diagnosed with lung cancer; 36 out of 42 (85.7%) of the screen-detected cancers were identified as stage 1 or 2, and 35 (83.3%) underwent surgical resection as their primary treatment. Lung cancer was more common in the lowest socioeconomic group. Short-term adverse psychosocial consequences were observed in participants who were randomised to the intervention arm and in those who had a major lung abnormality detected, but these differences were modest and temporary. Rollout of screening as a service or design of a full trial would need to address issues of outreach. The health-economic analysis suggests that the intervention could be cost-effective but this needs to be confirmed using data on actual lung cancer mortality. CONCLUSIONS The UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot was successfully undertaken with 4055 randomised individuals. The data from the UKLS provide evidence that adds to existing data to suggest that lung cancer screening in the UK could potentially be implemented in the 60-75 years age group, selected via the Liverpool Lung Project risk model version 2 and using CT volumetry-based management protocols. FUTURE WORK The UKLS data will be pooled with the NELSON (Nederlands Leuvens Longkanker Screenings Onderzoek: Dutch-Belgian Randomised Lung Cancer Screening Trial) and other European Union trials in 2017 which will provide European mortality and cost-effectiveness data. For now, there is a clear need for mortality results from other trials and further research to identify optimal methods of implementation and delivery. Strategies for increasing uptake and providing support for underserved groups will be key to implementation. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78513845. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health

  17. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  18. Liverpool telescope 2: a new robotic facility for rapid transient follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperwheat, C. M.; Steele, I. A.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bates, S. D.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M. F.; Carter, D.; Clay, N. R.; Collins, C. A.; Darnley, M. J.; Davis, C. J.; Gutierrez, C. M.; Harman, D. J.; James, P. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Kobayashi, S.; Marchant, J. M.; Mazzali, P. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Newsam, A.; Oscoz, A.; Palle, E.; Piascik, A.; Rebolo, R.; Smith, R. J.

    2015-03-01

    The Liverpool Telescope is one of the world's premier facilities for time domain astronomy. The time domain landscape is set to radically change in the coming decade, with synoptic all-sky surveys such as LSST providing huge numbers of transient detections on a nightly basis; transient detections across the electromagnetic spectrum from other major facilities such as SVOM, SKA and CTA; and the era of `multi-messenger astronomy', wherein astrophysical events are detected via non-electromagnetic means, such as neutrino or gravitational wave emission. We describe here our plans for the Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic telescope designed to capitalise on this new era of time domain astronomy. LT2 will be a 4-metre class facility co-located with the Liverpool Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. The telescope will be designed for extremely rapid response: the aim is that the telescope will take data within 30 seconds of the receipt of a trigger from another facility. The motivation for this is twofold: firstly it will make it a world-leading facility for the study of fast fading transients and explosive phenomena discovered at early times. Secondly, it will enable large-scale programmes of low-to-intermediate resolution spectral classification of transients to be performed with great efficiency. In the target-rich environment of the LSST era, minimising acquisition overheads will be key to maximising the science gains from any follow-up programme. The telescope will have a diverse instrument suite which is simultaneously mounted for automatic changes, but it is envisaged that the primary instrument will be an intermediate resolution, optical/infrared spectrograph for scientific exploitation of transients discovered with the next generation of synoptic survey facilities. In this paper we outline the core science drivers for the telescope, and the requirements for the optical and mechanical design.

  19. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  20. A message of hope: creation of the Faces of Lung Cancer project for increasing awareness of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Quinn, G P; Bell-Ellison, B A; Bell, M Y; Caraway, V D; Conforte, D; Graci, L B; Lewandowski, A; Reynolds, B; Shaffer, A; Powell-Stafford, V L; Sapp, A L; Shimizu, C O; Vadaparampil, S; Vaughn, E J; Williams, C; Bepler, G

    2008-11-01

    In 2002, the Thoracic Oncology Advocacy Program at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute was created with a mission to contribute to the prevention and cure of lung cancer by embracing the patient perspective. In an effort to increase awareness of clinical trials (CTs) and to humanize the CT process, members of the advocacy programme were involved in the creation of the Faces of Lung Cancer project. Twelve lung cancer patients who participated in a CT, four caregivers of patients who had been on a trial and four thoracic health care professionals were interviewed and photographed by a professional photographer with prior experience in photo-documentary work. Preliminary results indicate just the process of participating in the Faces of Lung Cancer project and creating the photo essay has had a positive impact on the lives of cancer patients and their caregivers. Formal evaluation of the Faces of Lung Cancer project is underway; however, preliminary results indicate that the project is viewed as successful in terms of conveying a message of hope and increasing awareness. By including visual displays, in conjunction with patient interviews, the photo essay is able to generate and blend powerful information and images that provide a richer, more complete portrayal of the context of a patient's experience. PMID:18771536

  1. Evaluation of a projection-domain lung nodule insertion technique in thoracic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chi; Chen, Baiyu; Koo, Chi Wan; Takahashi, Edwin A.; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Levin, David L.; Kuzo, Ronald S.; Viers, Lyndsay D.; Vincent Sheldon, Stephanie A.; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng

    2016-04-01

    Task-based assessment of computed tomography (CT) image quality requires a large number of cases with ground truth. Inserting lesions into existing cases to simulate positive cases is a promising alternative approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate a recently-developed raw-data based lesion insertion technique in thoracic CT. Lung lesions were segmented from patient CT images, forward projected, and reinserted into the same patient CT projection data. In total, 32 nodules of various attenuations were segmented from 21 CT cases. Two experienced radiologists and 2 residents blinded to the process independently evaluated these inserted nodules in two sub-studies. First, the 32 inserted and the 32 original nodules were presented in a randomized order and each received a rating score from 1 to 10 (1=absolutely artificial to 10=absolutely realistic). Second, the inserted and the corresponding original lesions were presented side-by-side to each reader, who identified the inserted lesion and provided a confidence score (1=no confidence to 5=completely certain). For the randomized evaluation, discrimination of real versus artificial nodules was poor with areas under the receiver operative characteristic curves being 0.69 (95% CI: 0.58-0.78), 0.57 (95% CI: 0.46-0.68), and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.54-0.69) for the 2 radiologists, 2 residents, and all 4 readers, respectively. For the side-by-side evaluation, although all 4 readers correctly identified inserted lesions in 103/128 pairs, the confidence score was moderate (2.6). Our projection-domain based lung nodule insertion technique provides a robust method to artificially generate clinical cases that prove to be difficult to differentiate from real cases.

  2. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering.

    PubMed

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as "genomic islands (GIs)." To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, "GEMINI." GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  3. Identification of Novel Genomic Islands in Liverpool Epidemic Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Using Segmentation and Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Mehul; Mathee, Kalai; Azad, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in a myriad of infections and a leading pathogen responsible for mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Horizontal transfers of genes among the microorganisms living within CF patients have led to highly virulent and multi-drug resistant strains such as the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa, namely the LESB58 strain that has the propensity to acquire virulence and antibiotic resistance genes. Often these genes are acquired in large clusters, referred to as “genomic islands (GIs).” To decipher GIs and understand their contributions to the evolution of virulence and antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa LESB58, we utilized a recursive segmentation and clustering procedure, presented here as a genome-mining tool, “GEMINI.” GEMINI was validated on experimentally verified islands in the LESB58 strain before examining its potential to decipher novel islands. Of the 6062 genes in P. aeruginosa LESB58, 596 genes were identified to be resident on 20 GIs of which 12 have not been previously reported. Comparative genomics provided evidence in support of our novel predictions. Furthermore, GEMINI unraveled the mosaic structure of islands that are composed of segments of likely different evolutionary origins, and demonstrated its ability to identify potential strain biomarkers. These newly found islands likely have contributed to the hyper-virulence and multidrug resistance of the Liverpool epidemic strain of P. aeruginosa. PMID:27536294

  4. Sixteen new lung function signals identified through 1000 Genomes Project reference panel imputation

    PubMed Central

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V.; Miller, Suzanne; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Shrine, Nick; Obeidat, Ma'en; Trochet, Holly; McArdle, Wendy L.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Hui, Jennie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Joshi, Peter K.; Teumer, Alexander; Albrecht, Eva; Imboden, Medea; Rawal, Rajesh; Lopez, Lorna M.; Marten, Jonathan; Enroth, Stefan; Surakka, Ida; Polasek, Ozren; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Granell, Raquel; Hysi, Pirro G.; Flexeder, Claudia; Mahajan, Anubha; Beilby, John; Bossé, Yohan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Campbell, Harry; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; González, Juan R.; Grallert, Harald; Hammond, Chris J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heliövaara, Markku; Henderson, John; Hocking, Lynne; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; Johansson, Åsa; Kemp, John P.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumar, Ashish; Lind, Lars; Melén, Erik; Musk, Arthur W.; Navarro, Pau; Nickle, David C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ried, Janina S.; Ripatti, Samuli; Schulz, Holger; Scott, Robert A.; Sin, Don D.; Starr, John M.; Deloukas, Panos; Hansell, Anna L.; Hubbard, Richard; Jackson, Victoria E.; Marchini, Jonathan; Pavord, Ian; Thomson, Neil C.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Viñuela, Ana; Völzke, Henry; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Zemunik, Tatijana; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Spector, Tim D.; Evans, David M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vitart, Veronique; Kähönen, Mika; Gyllensten, Ulf; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Heinrich, Joachim; Stubbe, Beate; Wilson, James F.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; James, Alan L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hayward, Caroline; Sayers, Ian; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lung function measures are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 38,199 European ancestry individuals, we studied genome-wide association of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC with 1000 Genomes Project (phase 1)-imputed genotypes and followed up top associations in 54,550 Europeans. We identify 14 novel loci (P<5 × 10−8) in or near ENSA, RNU5F-1, KCNS3, AK097794, ASTN2, LHX3, CCDC91, TBX3, TRIP11, RIN3, TEKT5, LTBP4, MN1 and AP1S2, and two novel signals at known loci NPNT and GPR126, providing a basis for new understanding of the genetic determinants of these traits and pulmonary diseases in which they are altered. PMID:26635082

  5. Sixteen new lung function signals identified through 1000 Genomes Project reference panel imputation.

    PubMed

    Soler Artigas, María; Wain, Louise V; Miller, Suzanne; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Huffman, Jennifer E; Ntalla, Ioanna; Shrine, Nick; Obeidat, Ma'en; Trochet, Holly; McArdle, Wendy L; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Hui, Jennie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Joshi, Peter K; Teumer, Alexander; Albrecht, Eva; Imboden, Medea; Rawal, Rajesh; Lopez, Lorna M; Marten, Jonathan; Enroth, Stefan; Surakka, Ida; Polasek, Ozren; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Granell, Raquel; Hysi, Pirro G; Flexeder, Claudia; Mahajan, Anubha; Beilby, John; Bossé, Yohan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Campbell, Harry; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; González, Juan R; Grallert, Harald; Hammond, Chris J; Harris, Sarah E; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heliövaara, Markku; Henderson, John; Hocking, Lynne; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; Johansson, Åsa; Kemp, John P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumar, Ashish; Lind, Lars; Melén, Erik; Musk, Arthur W; Navarro, Pau; Nickle, David C; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Raitakari, Olli T; Ried, Janina S; Ripatti, Samuli; Schulz, Holger; Scott, Robert A; Sin, Don D; Starr, John M; Viñuela, Ana; Völzke, Henry; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Zemunik, Tatijana; Jarvis, Deborah L; Spector, Tim D; Evans, David M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vitart, Veronique; Kähönen, Mika; Gyllensten, Ulf; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J; Karrasch, Stefan; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Heinrich, Joachim; Stubbe, Beate; Wilson, James F; Wareham, Nicholas J; James, Alan L; Morris, Andrew P; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hayward, Caroline; Sayers, Ian; Strachan, David P; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2015-01-01

    Lung function measures are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 38,199 European ancestry individuals, we studied genome-wide association of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC with 1000 Genomes Project (phase 1)-imputed genotypes and followed up top associations in 54,550 Europeans. We identify 14 novel loci (P<5 × 10(-8)) in or near ENSA, RNU5F-1, KCNS3, AK097794, ASTN2, LHX3, CCDC91, TBX3, TRIP11, RIN3, TEKT5, LTBP4, MN1 and AP1S2, and two novel signals at known loci NPNT and GPR126, providing a basis for new understanding of the genetic determinants of these traits and pulmonary diseases in which they are altered. PMID:26635082

  6. Cycling and Health: An Exploratory Study of Views about Cycling in an Area of North Liverpool, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavill, Nick; Watkins, Francine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore views about cycling among members of identified community groups living near the Loop Line, a cycling and walking path in a deprived part of North Liverpool, UK. Design/methodology/approach: Following a literature review, qualitative focus group research was conducted among six groups of children,…

  7. How Did Illiterates Fare as Literacy Became Almost Universal? Evidence from Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Liverpool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitch, David

    2003-01-01

    A sample of marriage registers from the parish of Liverpool St. Nicholas Church in England between 1839-1927 is used to examine changing characteristics of grooms who signed with a mark over this period. The proportion of illiterate grooms in the parish fell from about a third to under 5%. Age at marriage and likelihood of being a widower rose…

  8. IO:I, a near-infrared camera for the Liverpool Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Robert M.; Jermak, Helen E.; Steele, Iain A.; Smith, Robert J.; Bates, Stuart D.; Mottram, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    IO:I is a new instrument that has recently been commissioned for the Liverpool Telescope, extending current imaging capabilities beyond the optical and into the near-infrared. Cost has been minimized by the use of a previously decommissioned instrument's cryostat as the base for a prototype and retrofitting it with Teledyne's 1.7-μm cutoff Hawaii-2RG HgCdTe detector, SIDECAR ASIC controller, and JADE2 interface card. The mechanical, electronic, and cryogenic aspects of the cryostat retrofitting process will be reviewed together with a description of the software/hardware setup. This is followed by a discussion of the results derived from characterization tests, including measurements of read noise, conversion gain, full well depth, and linearity. The paper closes with a brief overview of the autonomous data reduction process and the presentation of results from photometric testing conducted on on-sky, pipeline processed data.

  9. The responsiveness of the Liverpool Oral Rehabilitation Questionnaire (LORQ): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pace-Balzan, Adrian; Butterworth, Christopher; Lowe, Derek; Rogers, Simon N

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the responsiveness of denture patients to the Liverpool Oral Rehabilitation Questionnaire (LORQ). Changes in scores for 20 core items completed from 2000 to 2005 by 16 patients both before and after oral rehabilitation were assessed. The median age of respondents was 68 years and the median time between questionnaires was 2.6 years. Results indicated that masticatory efficiency impacted both food choice (P = .03) and social life (P = .06). After rehabilitation there was less worry about maxillary prostheses falling out (P = .07), less embarrassment while conversing (P = .02), and less worry about losing self-confidence from embarrassment caused by dentures (P = .06). Also, drooling problems deteriorated (P = .03). This exploratory study reports encouraging findings, but a larger prospective multicenter study is required to determine the responsiveness of the current version of the LORQ (version 3). PMID:20095193

  10. Career patterns of dental hygienists qualifying from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hillam, D G

    1989-04-22

    This study assesses the pattern of employment of dental hygienists who qualified from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene between 1977 and 1986. Of the 100 students who qualified during this period, 98 responded to a questionnaire. Seventy-seven per cent were employed as dental hygienists or dental health educators at the time of the survey, which took place between October 1987 and February 1988. The results show that after an initial slight under-employment, the majority quickly found as much work as they wanted and worked for an average of 2.24 practices each. The majority chose part-time employment and there was a steady decline in the number of sessions worked from the third year after qualifying. This decline was due to domestic commitments rather than dissatisfaction with the job. Only 4% stated they would definitely not return to work as a hygienist whilst a further 10% were uncertain. PMID:2719891

  11. Comet 67P observations with LOTUS: a new near-UV spectrograph for the Liverpool Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, Jon; Jermak, Helen; Steele, Iain; Snodgrass, Colin; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Jones, Geraint

    2015-11-01

    The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft has been orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereinafter “67P”) since August 2014, providing in-situ measurements of the dust, gas and plasma content of the coma within ~100km of the nucleus. Supporting the mission is a world-wide coordinated campaign of simultaneous ground-based observations of 67P (www.rosetta-campaign.net), providing wider context of the outer coma and tail invisible to Rosetta. We can now compare these observations, augmented by "ground truth" from Rosetta, with those of other comets past and future that are only observed from Earth.The robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT) is part of this campaign due to its unique ability to flexibly and autonomously schedule regular observations over entire semesters. Its optical imagery has recently been supplemented by near-UV spectroscopy to observe the UV molecular bands below 4000Å that are of considerable interest to cometary science. The LT's existing spectrographs FRODOSpec and SPRAT cut off at 4000Å, so the Liverpool Telescope Optical-to-UV Spectrograph - LOTUS - was fast-track designed, built and deployed on-sky in just five months. LOTUS contains no moving parts; acquisition is made with the LT's IO:O imaging camera, and different width slits for calibration and science are selected by fine-tuning the telescope's pointing on an innovative "step" design in its single slit.We present here details of the LOTUS spectrograph, and some preliminary results of our ongoing observations of comet 67P.

  12. Biological Marker Analysis as Part of the CIBERES-RTIC Cancer-SEPAR Strategic Project on Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Monsó, Eduard; Montuenga, Luis M; Sánchez de Cos, Julio; Villena, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the Clinical and Molecular Staging of Stage I-IIp Lung Cancer Project is to identify molecular variables that improve the prognostic and predictive accuracy of TMN classification in stage I/IIp non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical data and lung tissue, tumor and blood samples will be collected from 3 patient cohorts created for this purpose. The prognostic protein signature will be validated from these samples, and micro-RNA, ALK, Ros1, Pdl-1, and TKT, TKTL1 y G6PD expression will be analyzed. Tissue inflammatory markers and stromal cell markers will also be analyzed. Methylation of p16, DAPK, RASSF1a, APC and CDH13 genes in the tissue samples will be determined, and inflammatory markers in peripheral blood will also be analyzed. Variables that improve the prognostic and predictive accuracy of TNM in NSCLC by molecular staging may be identified from this extensive analytical panel. PMID:25614375

  13. Lung cancer risks in the vicinity of uranium tailings sites. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, V.C.; Sandquist, G.M. )

    1982-04-01

    Lung cancer mortality data have been assembled for many counties of interest to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP). The counties generally either contain UMTRAP tailings sites or are adjacent to them. The lung cancer rates of nearly all counties are less than the US average rate. In addition, some of the many factors associated with lung cancer are identified as are cancer risk estimators for radon daughters. 17 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Development of a new version of the Liverpool Malaria Model. II. Calibration and validation for West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study, an extensive literature survey led to the construction of a new version of the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM). A new set of parameter settings was provided and a new development of the mathematical formulation of important processes related to the vector population was performed within the LMM. In this part of the study, so far undetermined model parameters are calibrated through the use of data from field studies. The latter are also used to validate the new LMM version, which is furthermore compared against the original LMM version. Methods For the calibration and validation of the LMM, numerous entomological and parasitological field observations were gathered for West Africa. Continuous and quality-controlled temperature and precipitation time series were constructed using intermittent raw data from 34 weather stations across West Africa. The meteorological time series served as the LMM data input. The skill of LMM simulations was tested for 830 different sets of parameter settings of the undetermined LMM parameters. The model version with the highest skill score in terms of entomological malaria variables was taken as the final setting of the new LMM version. Results Validation of the new LMM version in West Africa revealed that the simulations compare well with entomological field observations. The new version reproduces realistic transmission rates and simulated malaria seasons are comparable to field observations. Overall the new model version performs much better than the original model. The new model version enables the detection of the epidemic malaria potential at fringes of endemic areas and, more importantly, it is now applicable to the vast area of malaria endemicity in the humid African tropics. Conclusions A review of entomological and parasitological data from West Africa enabled the construction of a new LMM version. This model version represents a significant step forward in the modelling of a weather

  15. Dosimetric comparison of treatment plans based on free breathing, maximum, and average intensity projection CTs for lung cancer SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Yuan; Wang Zhiheng; Ge Hong; Zhang Tian; Cai Jing; Kelsey, Christopher; Yoo, David; Yin Fangfang

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To determine whether there is a CT dataset may be more favorable for planning and dose calculation by comparing dosimetric characteristics between treatment plans calculated using free breathing (FB), maximum and average intensity projection (MIP and AIP, respectively) CTs for lung cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Twenty lung cancer SBRT patients, treated on a linac with 2.5 mm width multileaf-collimator (MLC), were analyzed retrospectively. Both FB helical and four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for each patient. Internal target volume (ITV) was delineated based on MIP CTs and modified based on both ten-phase datasets and FB CTs. Planning target volume (PTV) was then determined by adding additional setup margin to ITV. The PTVs and beams in the optimized treatment plan based on FB CTs were copied to MIP and AIP CTs, with the same isocenters, MLC patterns and monitor units. Mean effective depth (MED) of beams, and some dosimetric parameters for both PTVs and most important organ at risk (OAR), lung minus PTV, were compared between any two datasets using two-tail paired t test. Results: The MEDs in FB and AIP plans were similar but significantly smaller (Ps < 0.001) than that in MIP plans. Minimum dose, mean dose, dose covering at least 90% and 95% of PTVs in MIP plans were slightly higher than two other plans (Ps < 0.008). The absolute volume of lung minus PTV receiving greater than 5, 10, and 20 Gy in MIP plans were significantly smaller than those in both FB and AIP plans (Ps < 0.008). Conformity index for FB plans showed a small but statistically significantly higher. Conclusions: Dosimetric characteristics of AIP plans are similar to those of FB plans. Slightly better target volume coverage and significantly lower low-dose region ({<=}30 Gy) in lung was observed in MIP plans. The decrease in low-dose region in lung was mainly caused by the change of lung volume contoured on two datasets rather than the

  16. Initiating tumor banking for translational research: MD Anderson and Liverpool experience.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Pandey, A; Shaw, R

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate progress in the cancer diagnosis and therapy has only been possible with the ongoing translational research that is likely to play a very important role in future as well. Hence the importance of such translation from bedside to bench and vis versa cannot be over-emphasized. Accordingly it has become more important to collect tumor samples along with the clinical information in a systematic manner to perform a good basic science research in future. With a population of over a billion and a heavy burden of cancer, India has the 'biggest' potential to establish the 'largest' tumor bank across the globe. Establishing a tumor bank involves money and manpower that may not be feasible across most of the centers in India. Taking into the considering the model of tumor banking of the two leading institutions of the world (MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA and University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool UK), this article presents the salient tips for a center in India to get started with tumor banking with minimal investment. Furthermore a simplified form of ethical consent is presented for the centers to adapt unanimously. PMID:17401220

  17. Thomas Fresh (1803-1861), Inspector of Nuisances, Liverpool's first public health officer.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Norman

    2013-11-01

    Thomas Fresh was Liverpool's first public health officer, having been appointed Inspector of Nuisances by the Health of Towns Committee on 4 September 1844, more than two years before the celebrated appointment of Duncan as Britain's first Medical Officer of Health and Newlands as the first Borough Engineer. Even before that, Fresh was the officer responsible for environmental health interventions. He is often cited as the first environmental health practitioner. Although he gained a national reputation for his work, Fresh was undervalued at the time and his life and work have been underreported since. He had an eventful personal life. He was married three times and widowed twice. In his youth he spent four months on remand before being acquitted. He was a talented entrepreneur: he created a building society, a model farm and a residential settlement that today bears his name. However, he took on financial commitments that were beyond his means, resulting in his sudden and premature departure from public life. PMID:24585830

  18. Proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma: The Liverpool-Clatterbridge experience

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Bertil . E-mail: Bertil@damato.co.uk; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-08-01

    Purpose To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using a 62-MeV cyclotron in patients considered unsuitable for other forms of conservative therapy. Methods and Materials A total of 349 patients with choroidal melanoma referred to the Liverpool Ocular Oncology Centre underwent proton beam radiotherapy at Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology (CCO) between January 1993 and December 2003. Four daily fractions of proton beam radiotherapy were delivered, with a total dose of 53.1 proton Gy, and with lateral and distal safety margins of 2.5 mm. Outcomes measured were local tumor recurrence; ocular conservation; vision; and metastatic death according to age, gender, eye, visual acuity, location of anterior and posterior tumor margins, quadrant, longest basal tumor dimension, tumor height, extraocular extension, and retinal invasion. Results The 5-year actuarial rates were 3.5% for local tumor recurrence, 9.4% for enucleation, 79.1% for conservation of vision of counting fingers or better, 61.1% for conservation of vision of 20/200 or better, 44.8% for conservation of vision of 20/40 or better, and 10.0% for death from metastasis. Conclusion Proton beam radiotherapy with a 62 MeV cyclotron achieves high rates of local tumor control and ocular conservation, with visual outcome depending on tumor size and location.

  19. Clinically assisted hydration and the Liverpool Care Pathway: Catholic ethics and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Nowarska, Anna

    2015-08-01

    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), a framework introduced for providing comfortable care at the last stage of life, has recently become highly contentious. Among the most serious allegations levelled against it, has been that the LCP may be used as a covert form of euthanasia by withdrawal of clinically assisted hydration (CAH). This concern has been raised, in particular by a number of Catholic medical professionals, who have asserted that the LCP is incompatible with Catholic ethics. This paper examines the key Catholic ethical principles relevant to treatment and care towards the end of life (the sanctity/inviolability of life principle, the distinction between ordinary and extraordinary means). Relevant current clinical evidence regarding CAH in relation to terminal thirst, dehydration, prolongation of life and possible negative impacts on the dying is also scrutinised. It is argued that for some patients at the very end of life it may be permissible and even desirable to withhold or withdraw it. Thus, as administration of CAH may become extraordinary, forgoing it in some situations is fully compatible with Catholic ethics. The article therefore concludes that the stance of the LCP in respect of provision of CAH is fully in alignment with Catholic teaching. PMID:25034970

  20. Lung tumor tracking, trajectory reconstruction, and motion artifact removal using rotational cone-beam projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John Henry

    Management of lung tumor motion is a challenging and important problem for modern, highly conformal radiotherapy. Poorly managed tumor motion can lead to imaging artifacts, poor target coverage, and unnecessarily high dose to normal tissues. The goals of this dissertation are to develop a real-time localization algorithm that is applicable to rotational cone-beam projections acquired during regular (˜60 seconds) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, and to use these tracking results to reconstruct a tumor's trajectory, shape and size immediately prior to treatment. Direct tumor tracking is performed via a multiple template matching algorithm where templates are derived from digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) generated from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Three-dimensional (3D) tumor trajectories are reconstructed by binning twodimensional (2D) tracking results according to their corresponding respiratory phases. Within each phase bin a point is calculated approximating the 3D tumor position, resulting in a 3D phase-binned trajectory. These 3D trajectories are used to construct motion blurring functions which are in turn used to remove motion blurring artifacts from reconstructed CBCT volumes with a deconvolution algorithm. Finally, the initial direct tracking algorithm is combined with diaphragm-based tracking to develop a more robust "combined" tracking algorithm. Respiratory motion phantoms (digital and physical), and example patient cases were used to test each technique. Direct tumor tracking performed well for both phantom cases, with sub-millimeter root mean square error (e rms) in the axial and tangential imager dimensions. In patient studies the algorithm performed well for many angles, but exhibited large errors for some projections. Accurate 3D trajectories were successfully reconstructed for patients and phantoms. Errors in reconstructed trajectories were smaller than the errors in the direct tracking results in all cases. The

  1. Super-resolution reconstruction for 4D computed tomography of the lung via the projections onto convex sets approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Wu, Xiuxiu; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin E-mail: qianjinfeng08@gmail.com; Chen, Wufan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The use of 4D computed tomography (4D-CT) of the lung is important in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. Sometimes, dense sampling is not acquired along the superior–inferior direction. This disadvantage results in an interslice thickness that is much greater than in-plane voxel resolutions. Isotropic resolution is necessary for multiplanar display, but the commonly used interpolation operation blurs images. This paper presents a super-resolution (SR) reconstruction method to enhance 4D-CT resolution. Methods: The authors assume that the low-resolution images of different phases at the same position can be regarded as input “frames” to reconstruct high-resolution images. The SR technique is used to recover high-resolution images. Specifically, the Demons deformable registration algorithm is used to estimate the motion field between different “frames.” Then, the projection onto convex sets approach is implemented to reconstruct high-resolution lung images. Results: The performance of the SR algorithm is evaluated using both simulated and real datasets. Their method can generate clearer lung images and enhance image structure compared with cubic spline interpolation and back projection (BP) method. Quantitative analysis shows that the proposed algorithm decreases the root mean square error by 40.8% relative to cubic spline interpolation and 10.2% versus BP. Conclusions: A new algorithm has been developed to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. The algorithm outperforms the cubic spline interpolation and BP approaches by producing images with markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

  2. A review of the Liverpool elbow prosthesis from 1974 to 1982.

    PubMed

    Soni, R K; Cavendish, M E

    1984-03-01

    Eighty elbows in 65 patients with an average age of 57 years have had two-part non-constrained Liverpool elbow arthroplasties performed since 1974. Fifty-five had rheumatoid arthritis, eight osteoarthritis or ankylosis secondary to injury, one osteochondritis dissecans and one pyknodysostosis. The average preoperative range of movement was 42 degrees to 112 degrees with 47 degrees of pronation and 42 degrees of supination. There was significant gain in the arc of movements at follow-up: 32 degrees in the extension-flexion range (average range 32 degrees to 134 degrees of flexion) and 42 degrees in forearm rotation (average pronation 69 degrees and supination 62 degrees). Before operation severe pain was the predominating symptom in 43 elbows (53.8%) but after replacement there was only moderate pain in five elbows (6.2%). The results were excellent in 42 (52.5%), good in 15 (18.7%), fair in 9 (11.3%) and unsatisfactory or poor in 14 (17.5%). Eight elbows required revision of the arthroplasty: three were post-traumatic, disorganised or osteoarthritic joints, three rheumatoid and both elbows in the patient with pyknodysostosis. Loosening of the prosthesis (particularly the humeral component) was the common factor necessitating revision. Of six rheumatoid elbows needing removal of the implant, four had deep infection, one had a dislodged humeral component as a result of injury and in one a divided olecranon had developed non-union. Rheumatoid elbows benefited more than post-traumatic arthritic elbows from the operation. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6707062

  3. Soapbox: My Body Project--Getting Cut-Up about the Lungs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuel, Diana E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems of dissecting fresh animal lungs (one activity of the "My Body" health education program), considering availability/cost, safety, teacher knowledge, and possible objections from anti-dissection groups. Solutions are offered and suggestions made for making the exercise a teacher demonstration rather than a student activity. (DH)

  4. Highlights of the eleventh annual meeting of the National Cancer Research Institute, 1-4 November 2015, Liverpool, UK.

    PubMed

    Nailor, Audrey; Lewis, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The annual meeting of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI), held in Liverpool, UK, has a solid reputation of being a multidisciplinary conference. It brings the diverse cancer interests of the United Kingdom together, from funders to researchers to clinicians. Key themes for the coming year's innovation emerge. At this meeting, particularly notable topics were immunotherapy and prevention, with sessions on Big Data and e-cigarettes generating significant interest and discussion. Broad themes included discussions around cancer evolution, and the economic challenges of the United Kingdom's cancer burden. PMID:26823684

  5. Highlights of the eleventh annual meeting of the National Cancer Research Institute, 1–4 November 2015, Liverpool, UK

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Lewis, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The annual meeting of the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI), held in Liverpool, UK, has a solid reputation of being a multidisciplinary conference. It brings the diverse cancer interests of the United Kingdom together, from funders to researchers to clinicians. Key themes for the coming year’s innovation emerge. At this meeting, particularly notable topics were immunotherapy and prevention, with sessions on Big Data and e-cigarettes generating significant interest and discussion. Broad themes included discussions around cancer evolution, and the economic challenges of the United Kingdom’s cancer burden. PMID:26823684

  6. Incorporating epistasis interaction of genetic susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms in a lung cancer risk prediction model.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Michael W; Raji, Olaide Y; Duffy, Stephen W; Young, Robert P; Hopkins, Raewyn J; Field, John K

    2016-07-01

    Incorporation of genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into risk prediction models may account for a substantial fraction of attributable disease risk. Genetic data, from 2385 subjects recruited into the Liverpool Lung Project (LLP) between 2000 and 2008, consisting of 20 SNPs independently validated in a candidate-gene discovery study was used. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) were used to explore evidence of epistasis among 20 replicated SNPs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify similar risk predictors for lung cancer in the LLP risk model for the epidemiological model and extended model with SNPs. Both models were internally validated using the bootstrap method and model performance was assessed using area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Using MDR and RF, the overall best classifier of lung cancer status were SNPs rs1799732 (DRD2), rs5744256 (IL-18), rs2306022 (ITGA11) with training accuracy of 0.6592 and a testing accuracy of 0.6572 and a cross-validation consistency of 10/10 with permutation testing P<0.0001. The apparent AUC of the epidemiological model was 0.75 (95% CI 0.73-0.77). When epistatic data were incorporated in the extended model, the AUC increased to 0.81 (95% CI 0.79-0.83) which corresponds to 8% increase in AUC (DeLong's test P=2.2e-16); 17.5% by NRI. After correction for optimism, the AUC was 0.73 for the epidemiological model and 0.79 for the extended model. Our results showed modest improvement in lung cancer risk prediction when the SNP epistasis factor was added. PMID:27121382

  7. Incorporating epistasis interaction of genetic susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms in a lung cancer risk prediction model

    PubMed Central

    MARCUS, MICHAEL W.; RAJI, OLAIDE Y.; DUFFY, STEPHEN W.; YOUNG, ROBERT P.; HOPKINS, RAEWYN J.; FIELD, JOHN K.

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into risk prediction models may account for a substantial fraction of attributable disease risk. Genetic data, from 2385 subjects recruited into the Liverpool Lung Project (LLP) between 2000 and 2008, consisting of 20 SNPs independently validated in a candidate-gene discovery study was used. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) and random forest (RF) were used to explore evidence of epistasis among 20 replicated SNPs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify similar risk predictors for lung cancer in the LLP risk model for the epidemiological model and extended model with SNPs. Both models were internally validated using the bootstrap method and model performance was assessed using area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Using MDR and RF, the overall best classifier of lung cancer status were SNPs rs1799732 (DRD2), rs5744256 (IL-18), rs2306022 (ITGA11) with training accuracy of 0.6592 and a testing accuracy of 0.6572 and a cross-validation consistency of 10/10 with permutation testing P<0.0001. The apparent AUC of the epidemiological model was 0.75 (95% CI 0.73–0.77). When epistatic data were incorporated in the extended model, the AUC increased to 0.81 (95% CI 0.79–0.83) which corresponds to 8% increase in AUC (DeLong's test P=2.2e-16); 17.5% by NRI. After correction for optimism, the AUC was 0.73 for the epidemiological model and 0.79 for the extended model. Our results showed modest improvement in lung cancer risk prediction when the SNP epistasis factor was added. PMID:27121382

  8. Is the Liverpool Land Eclogite Terrane, Eastern Greenland Caledonides, Baltican, Laurentian, or Both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Johnston, S. M.; Belousova, E. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Hartz, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Liverpool land Eclogite Terrane (LLET) is a small (≈200 km2) high pressure metamorphic terrane at the southern tip of the Eastern Greenland Caledonides. Recent publications propose the LLET is a subducted Baltic terrane that underplated the Eastern Greenland Caledonides during the ca. 400 Ma Scandian Orogeny and was stranded in Greenland (Laurentia) during the opening of the Atlantic. However Johnston et al. (2011) proposed the LLET is actually a composite terrane comprised of a mid-crustal, high-pressure (granulite facies) terrane, the Jaettedal Complex, tectonically juxtaposed during the Scandian orogeny against a higher pressure (eclogite-facies), peridotite-bearing, metamorphic terrane, the Tvaerdal complex. The composite Tvaerdal/Jaettedal Terrane (now the LLET) was subsequently exhumed from beneath a Laurentian plutonic continental arc terrane, the Hurry Inlet Complex. U-Pb Precambrian ages from the Tvaerdal Complex obtained by LA-ICPMS from detrital zircons (this study) as well as published zircon dates do not distinctly match the published Proterozoic zircon age patterns of basins and crystalline complexes from either Laurentia or Baltica, therefore not resolving the provenance of the Tvaerdal Complex. However, Paleozoic zircon U-Pb dates (this study and the literature) demonstrate the Tvaerdal Complex underwent relatively short-lived high pressure/ultrahigh pressure metamorphism and subsequent anatectic melting between 415-385 Ma while recent work by Johnston et al. (2014) indicates the Jaettedal Complex underwent an earlier, much longer evolution between 460-412 Ma. The older ages from the Jaettedal coincide with ages obtained from the overlying Hurry Inlet Complex as well as other Greenland igneous terranes suggesting the Jaettedal Complex is a Laurentian terrane involved in the lengthy evolution of a continental arc complex along the eastern Greenland margin during the closure of Iapetus. The paucity of concordant 460-412 ages from the Tvaerdal

  9. How integrating primary care and public health could improve population health outcomes: a view from Liverpool, UK.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Rachael; Davies, Sandra M; Hussey, John A

    2016-01-01

    Although primary care is at the forefront of delivering healthcare to the population, its role in preventing poor health has varied throughout history. Faced with growing demand on healthcare services and a rise in noncommunicable diseases, some health systems are attempting to integrate healthcare delivery with broader population health and wellbeing interventions. Liverpool has a rich history of taking action to improve population health; this paper discusses a range of interventions that have taken place across the city. There is a renewed opportunity to systematise approaches to primary and secondary prevention, strengthened by the lead that general practitioners now have in commissioning health services and their accountability for improved population health outcomes through clinical commissioning groups. This is strongly articulated in the Healthy Liverpool program, a city-wide plan for health and care services. This paper suggests that four key enablers strengthen delivery of public health priorities through primary care: maximising opportunities to identify risk factors for preventable disease, fully exploiting the data collected in primary care to plan and design services, responding to community needs and assets through community engagement, and addressing wider determinants of health through strong partnerships. PMID:26863165

  10. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  12. "Stop It, It's Bad for You and Me": Experiences of and Views on Passive Smoking among Primary-School Children in Liverpool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Susan E.; Springett, Jane; Porcellato, Lorna; Dugdill, Lindsey

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at how children between the ages of 4 and 8 years report they feel when they are exposed to passive smoking and how they react in these situations. Data were collected annually from a cohort of 250 primary school children, which was tracked from their Reception Classes to Year 3 across six Liverpool schools. Quantitative and…

  13. Assessment of coastal density gradients near a macro-tidal estuary: Application to the Mersey and Liverpool Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. J.; Balfour, C. A.; Player, Rose J. J.; Polton, Jeff A.

    2014-09-01

    Density gradients in coastal regions with significant freshwater input are large and variable and are a major control of nearshore circulation. However their measurement is difficult, especially where the gradients are largest, close to the coast, with significant uncertainties because of a variety of factors - time and spatial (horizontal and vertical) scales are small, tidal currents are strong and water depths shallow. Whilst temperature measurements are relatively straightforward, measurement of salinity (the dominant control of spatial variability for density) can be less reliable in turbid coastal waters. The nearshore density gradients in Liverpool Bay are investigated using an integrated multi-year data set from an in situ buoy, instrumented ferry and HF radar. The ferry is particularly useful for estimating coastal density gradients since measurements are made right from the mouth of Mersey, where gradients are on average 3×10-4 kg m-4. Using measurements at the single in situ site by the Mersey Bar, 17 km from land, density gradients can be estimated from the tidal excursion or by using ferry data; both giving average values of 5×10-5 kg m-4. Nine years of surface salinity measurements there show no evidence of predominant periodicities, although there is a weak annual cycle, and no consistent relation with storms or floods, leading to the conclusion that the majority of the Mersey plume, for most of the time, lies closer to the English shore than the Mersey Bar. Liverpool Bay's circulation is the dominant factor, with wind forcing tending to reinforce it for wind speeds greater than 5-10 m s-1. Near bed currents are consistently shoreward and near surface currents northward.

  14. A multicentre randomised controlled trial of reciprocal lung cancer peer review and supported quality improvement: results from the improving lung cancer outcomes project

    PubMed Central

    Russell, G K; Jimenez, S; Martin, L; Stanley, R; Peake, M D; Woolhouse, I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Results from the National Lung Cancer Audit demonstrate unexplained variation in outcomes. Peer review with supported quality improvement has been shown to reduce variation in other areas of health care but has not been formally tested in cancer multidisciplinary teams. The aim of the current study is to assess the impact of reciprocal peer-to-peer review visits with supported quality improvement and collaborative working on lung cancer process and outcome measures. Methods: English lung cancer teams were randomised to usual care or facilitated reciprocal peer review visits followed by 12 months of supported quality improvement. The primary outcome was change in the following national audit indicators; mulitdisciplinary team discussion, histological confirmation, active treatment, surgical resection, small-cell chemotherapy and specialist nurse review. Patient experience was measured using a new lung cancer patient questionnaire in the intervention group. Results: Thirty teams (31 trusts) entered the intervention group and 29 of these submitted a total of 67 quality improvement plans. Active treatment increased in the intervention group (n=31) by 5.2% compared with 1.2% in the control group (n=48, mean difference 4.1%, 95% CI −0.1 to 8.2%, P=0.055). The remaining audit indicators improved similarly in all groups. Mean patient experience scores in the intervention group did not change significantly during the study but a significant improvement was seen in the scores for the five teams with the worst baseline scores (0.86 to 0.22, P<0.001). Conclusions: Reciprocal peer review with supported quality improvement was feasible and effective in stimulating quality improvement activity but resulted in only modest improvements in lung cancer treatment rates and patient experience. PMID:24651386

  15. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  16. Cross-sectional associations between high-deprivation home and neighbourhood environments, and health-related variables among Liverpool children

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Robert J; Boddy, Lynne M; Knowles, Zoe R; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To investigate differences in health-related, home and neighbourhood environmental variables between Liverpool children living in areas of high deprivation (HD) and medium-to-high deprivation (MD) and (2) to assess associations between these perceived home and neighbourhood environments and health-related variables stratified by deprivation group. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 10 Liverpool primary schools in 2014. Participants 194 children aged 9–10 years. Main outcome measures Health-related variables (self-reported physical activity (PA) (Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children, PAQ-C), cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass index (BMI) z-scores, waist circumference), home environment variables: (garden/backyard access, independent mobility, screen-based media restrictions, bedroom media) and neighbourhood walkability (Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale for Youth, NEWS-Y). Explanatory measures Area deprivation. Results There were significant differences between HD and MD children's BMI z-scores (p<0.01), waist circumference (p<0.001) and cardiorespiratory fitness (p<0.01). HD children had significantly higher bedroom media availability (p<0.05) and independent mobility scores than MD children (p<0.05). MD children had significantly higher residential density and neighbourhood aesthetics scores, and lower crime safety, pedestrian and road traffic safety scores than HD children, all of which indicated higher walkability (p<0.01). HD children's BMI z-scores (β=−0.29, p<0.01) and waist circumferences (β=−0.27, p<0.01) were inversely associated with neighbourhood aesthetics. HD children's PA was negatively associated with bedroom media (β=−0.24, p<0.01), and MD children's PA was positively associated with independent mobility (β=0.25, p<0.01). MD children's independent mobility was inversely associated with crime safety (β=−0.28, p<0.01) and neighbourhood aesthetics (β=−0.24, p<0.05). Conclusions Children

  17. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  18. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  19. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  20. Matching Skill Needs to Training Provision in the Electrotechnical Industry. Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Development Agency, London (England).

    A project examined skills shortages and gaps in the electrotechnical industry and to what extent stakeholders' training provision was addressing them in two areas in England--the eastern region, and Liverpool with the Wirral peninsula in the northwest. The national training organization called the National Electrotechnical Training (NET) and…

  1. Design, Development and Evaluation of VirtualAlps 1.0 and 2.0: Virtual Field Guides for teaching Levels 5 and 6 Geoscience at Liverpool John Moores University, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Tim; Litherland, Kate; Morris, Simon; Nuttall, Anne-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Virtual Field Guides (VFGs) developed at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) have been used in teaching geosciences for around ten years. This paper briefly reviews: VirtualAlps 1.0 developed for level 5 undergraduates; and then focuses on VirtualALps 2.0, a new semantic web based VFG for level 6 teaching, developed in a partnership between an academic and a technical team as part of the Ensemble project. In VirtualAlps 2.0 students use faceted browsing tools to make selections of resources, as a result of which relationships between them are highlighted, but not explicitly labelled. The range of sources of information - some from the tutor's own research archive, some sourced from elsewhere on the internet - are used by students to prepare a report on the feasibility and environmental impact of a proposed hydroelectric power dam in a Swiss Alpine valley. This requires students to analyse visual and numeric data alongside secondary literature, but also to be aware of the underlying concepts which form the associations between the different resources. This tool is designed for students to have their first taste of preparing an 'authentic' report, and the ways in which the semantic technologies can support professional practice in geoscience subjects will be discussed.

  2. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  3. Modeling of turbulent dissipation and its validation in periodically stratified region in the Liverpool Bay and in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Kaushik; Maity, Subhendu; Warrior, Hari V.

    2015-07-01

    The present work explores the applicability of an alternative eddy viscosity formulation in numerical models dealing with the dynamics of the coastal ocean. The formulation is based on the Reynolds stress anisotropy-anisotropy being an important tool for capturing turbulent mixing. Initially idealized entrainment scenarios are evaluated that are typical for shelf seas viz. entrainment in linearly stratified and two-layer fluids caused by surface wind stress or barotropic pressure gradient-driven bottom stress. An attempt is made to simulate the realistic semi-diurnal cycle of turbulent dissipation in Liverpool Bay Region of Freshwater Inflow (ROFI) in the Irish Sea characterized by strong horizontal gradients and interactions with tidal flow. Turbulent dissipation cycles with a 25-h period using free-falling light yo-yo (FLY) dissipation profiler exhibits a strong asymmetry between ebb and flood. The above dynamics involving tidal straining during the ebb and mixing during the flood has been simulated using k- and the alternative formulated turbulence scheme in a one-dimensional (1-D) dynamic model. The model is forced with observed tidal flow and horizontal gradients of temperature and salinity. Simulated dissipation cycles show good agreement with observation. The present work also involves a comparison of dissipation rate measurements in northern North Sea using the abovementioned turbulence schemes—the measurements being taken using free-falling shear probes and CTD (conductivity, temperature, and depth) sensors. The main forcing provided for the upper and bottom boundary layers are atmospheric forcing and tides, respectively. To compare the observations and model results, quantitative error measurements have also been studied which reveal the applicability of the alternative turbulence scheme.

  4. Use of a Modified Liverpool Care Pathway in a Tertiary Asian Hospital: Is There Still a Role for It?

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Shirlyn Neo Hui; Shivananda, Sushma; Ying, Tan Yung; Thang, Arrynoer; Kyawt, Aung Myat; Santoso, Ulina; Yin, Grace Pang Su; Pheng, Alethea Yee Chung; Hui, Patricia Neo Soek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: In 2007, the Care of the Dying clinical coordinated Pathway (CDP) was adapted from the United Kingdom Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) and implemented in a tertiary hospital in Singapore to improve care in oncology and subsequently renal patients. With concerns about its use after the Neuberger review, an audit of patients on the CDP was performed to determine if the use of such a pathway should be continued locally. Methods: A two-year retrospective audit of CDP use was conducted. Aspects of communication, initiation of CDP, patient monitoring, medications, nutrition, and hydration were assessed. Results: In the 111 patient records reviewed, there were documented extent of care discussions with 94% of caregivers and 29% of patients before CDP initiation. Of the 88% of CDPs initiated within office hours, 90% fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All patients were monitored at least every eight hours. Seventy-three patients (66%) were prescribed opioids or sedatives and subsequently monitored appropriately, albeit 56% had no documented prior discussion with caregivers regarding medication use. Indications for opioid use were documented for all patients and only one patient had documentation of excessive sedation. Oral feeding and parenteral hydration were continued in 85% and 74% of patients, respectively. Conclusion: There was no documented compromise in medication safety, clinical monitoring, and provision of nutrition and hydration for patients on the CDP. However, documentation of important end-of-life decisions and conversations remain poor. Development of an alternative care tool encouraging systematic discussion and documentation of individualized end-of-life care plans should be considered. PMID:25719737

  5. Environmental contamination with an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Liverpool cystic fibrosis centre, and study of its survival on dry surfaces.

    PubMed

    Panagea, S; Winstanley, C; Walshaw, M J; Ledson, M J; Hart, C A

    2005-02-01

    We conducted an environmental survey in the Liverpool adult cystic fibrosis (CF) centre in order to determine the extent of environmental contamination with an epidemic strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that colonizes most CF patients in Liverpool, and to identify possible reservoirs and routes of cross-infection. In addition, we studied the survival of this strain on dry surfaces, compared with that of other CF P. aeruginosa strains, to explore factors that might contribute to its high transmissibility. Samples were collected from staff, patients and the environment (drains, bath tubs, showers, dry surfaces, respiratory equipment and air) in the inpatient ward and outpatient clinic. P. aeruginosa strains were tested using a new polymerase chain reaction amplification assay specific for the Liverpool epidemic strain (LES). LES was isolated from patients' hands, clothes and bed linen. Environmental contamination with LES was only detected in close proximity to colonized patients (external surfaces of their respiratory equipment, and spirometry machine tubing and chair) and was short-lived. No persistent environmental reservoirs were found. LES was detected in the majority of air samples from inside patients' rooms, the ward corridor and the outpatient clinic. Survival of LES on dry surfaces was significantly longer than that for some other strains tested, but not compared with other strains shown not to be transmissible. Improved environmental survival on its own, therefore, cannot explain the high transmissibility of this epidemic strain. Our study suggests that airborne dissemination plays a significant role in patient-to-patient spread of LES, and confirms the need to segregate those patients colonized by epidemic P. aeruginosa strains from all other CF patients. PMID:15620443

  6. Pet ownership, dog types and attachment to pets in 9–10 year old children in Liverpool, UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic differences in childhood ownership and attitudes to pets. The objective of this study was to describe the factors associated with living with different pet types, as well as factors that may influence the intensity of relationship or ‘attachment’ that children have to their pet. Data were collected using a survey of 1021 9–10 year old primary school children in a deprived area of the city of Liverpool, UK. Results Dogs were the most common pet owned, most common ‘favourite’ pet, and species most attached to. Twenty-seven percent of dog-owning children (10% of all children surveyed) reported living with a ‘Bull Breed’ dog (which includes Pit Bulls and Staffordshire Bull Terriers), and the most popular dog breed owned was the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Multivariable regression modelling identified a number of variables associated with ownership of different pets and the strength of attachment to the child’s favourite pet. Girls were more likely to own most pet types, but were no more or less attached to their favourite pet than boys. Children of white ethnicity were more likely to own dogs, rodents and ‘other’ pets but were no more or less attached to their pets than children of non-white ethnicity. Single and youngest children were no more or less likely to own pets than those with younger brothers and sisters, but they showed greater attachment to their pets. Children that owned dogs lived in more deprived areas than those without dogs, and deprivation increased with number of dogs owned. ‘Pit Bull or cross’ and ‘Bull Breed’ dogs were more likely to be found in more deprived areas than other dog types. Non-whites were also more likely to report owning a ‘Pit Bull or cross’ than Whites. Conclusions Gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status were associated with pet ownership, and sibling status with level of attachment to the pet. These are important to consider when

  7. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... balloon-like tissues (blebs) that cause lung collapse ( pneumothorax ) Wedge resection, to remove part of a lobe ... Treat injuries that cause lung tissue to collapse ( pneumothorax or hemothorax ) Treat permanently collapsed lung tissue ( atelectasis ) ...

  8. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a total collapse, it is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, ...

  9. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  10. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  11. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  12. The Bureau of Health Education's Elementary School Health Curriculum Project, Berkeley Model, and the American Lung Association - Bureau of Health Education's Primary Grades Health Curriculum Project, Seattle Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This document describes two models for an early school health curriculum project. These two projects were initiated with the aim of increasing effective cooperation of public health personnel work with public schools in teaching health maintenance and prevention of disease. The Berkeley Project worked with students of grade three through grade…

  13. VMAT–SBRT planning based on an average intensity projection for lung tumors located in close proximity to the diaphragm: a phantom and clinical validity study

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Shingo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Misaki; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Kamikaseda, Hiroshi; Masaoka, Akira; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to validate the use of an average intensity projection (AIP) for volumetric-modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT–SBRT) planning for a moving lung tumor located near the diaphragm. VMAT–SBRT plans were created using AIPs reconstructed from 10 phases of 4DCT images that were acquired with a target phantom moving with amplitudes of 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm. To generate a 4D dose distribution, the static dose for each phase was recalculated and the doses were accumulated by using the phantom position known for each phase. For 10 patients with lung tumors, a deformable registration was used to generate 4D dose distributions. Doses to the target volume obtained from the AIP plan and the 4D plan were compared, as were the doses obtained from each plan to the organs at risk (OARs). In both phantom and clinical study, dose discrepancies for all parameters of the dose volume (Dmin, D99, Dmax, D1 and Dmean) to the target were <3%. The discrepancies of Dmax for spinal cord, esophagus and heart were <1 Gy, and the discrepancy of V20 for lung tissue was <1%. However, for OARs with large respiratory motion, the discrepancy of the Dmax was as much as 9.6 Gy for liver and 5.7 Gy for stomach. Thus, AIP is clinically acceptable as a planning CT image for predicting 4D dose, but doses to the OARs with large respiratory motion were underestimated with the AIP approach. PMID:26419645

  14. Evidence for a Mid-Crustal Continental Suture and Implications for Multistage (U)HP exhumation, Liverpool Land, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S.; Brueckner, H.; Gehrels, G.; Manthei, C.; Hacker, B.; Kylander-Clark, A.; Hartz, E. H.

    2008-12-01

    The East Greenland Caledonides consists of a series of west-directed sheets that formed from 460-360 Ma as Baltica subducted westward beneath Laurentia, and offer an opportunity to study high- and ultrahigh- pressure exhumation in orogenic hangingwalls. The Liverpool Land (LL) gneiss complex, 100 km east of the nearest Caledonian gneisses, provides a window into the deepest levels of the Greenland Caledonides. From the bottom up, the LL tectonostratigraphy is comprised of the eclogite-bearing Tvaerdal orthogneiss and the granulite-facies Jaettedal paragneiss structurally below the top-N Hurry Inlet Detachment. We present new thermobarometry and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology from the LL gneisses to define the tectonostratigraphy, continental affinity, and exhumation histories of the LL gneiss complex. The Tvaerdal orthogneiss consists of felsic orthogneisses that host rare ultramafic bodies (Fo92) and mafic boudins that yield peak pressures of >25 kbar at 800°C. Host gneiss zircons dated using LA-MC- ICPMS yield 1676 ± 17 Ma (2s) cores with 403 ± 6 Ma (2s) rims that suggest Mesoproterozoic emplacement of the original intrusive body followed by late-Caledonian deformation. The Tvaerdal orthogneiss also includes voluminous decompression melts; one yielded a TIMS U/Pb titanite age of 387.5 ± 2.2 Ma (2s). The structurally higher Jaettedal paragneiss consists of pelitic gneisses interlayered with granodioritic-dioritic orthogneisses. The Jaettedal-Tvaerdal contact is petrologically abrupt and concordant to regional foliation and lacks sub-amphibolite-facies displacement. Aluminum silicate-bearing pelitic assemblages within the Jaettedal paragneiss yield peak metamorphic conditions of 10-11 kbar at 750- 800°C. U/Pb age maps made using LA-MC-ICPMS from three paragneisses reveal Mesoproterozoic- Archean detrital cores with Caledonian rim overgrowths that cluster between 439-434 Ma. An amphibolite restite from the Jaettedal paragneiss yielded a TIMS U

  15. "Become a Reporter", the Four Skills News Project: Applying and Practising Language Skills Using Digital Tools for Level C1/C2 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magedera-Hofhansl, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    The Four Skills News Project is an example of communicative language learning, developed for final year German students at the University of Liverpool. It focuses on how students use and practise their reading, writing, listening and speaking skills via the creative use of news reports and digital technology. Each student creates an avatar using…

  16. Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Kislinger, Thomas; Jurisica, Igor; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data for both lung development and lung cancer continue to accumulate. Significant molecular intersection between these two processes has been hypothesized due to overlap in phenotypes and genomic variation. Examining the network biology of both cancer and development of the lung may shed functional light on the individual signaling modules involved. Stem cell biology may explain a portion of this network intersection and consequently studying lung organogenesis may have relevance for understanding lung cancer. This review summarizes our understanding of the potential overlapping mechanisms involved in lung development and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:19202349

  17. [10 years after implementation of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying patient; important improvements in end-of-life care].

    PubMed

    Geijteman, Eric C T; Dekkers, Anneke G W M; van Zuylen, Lia

    2013-01-01

    The Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying patient (LCP) is a quality instrument that contributes to the quality of care of dying patients. The pathway provides care goals for structuring the multidisciplinary care of patients who are in the last hours or days of life and their families. The LCP should be used as soon as the multidisciplinary team recognises that the patient's death within hours or days is imminent. Research has shown that using the pathway contributes to better symptom control in the patient and improved coping with grief by relatives, among other things. At this time, the Dutch version of the LCP ('Zorgpad Stervensfase') has been implemented in over 100 healthcare institutions in the Netherlands. A digital version of the LCP is under construction, which makes it possible to integrate it in electronic patient files. This digital version will also stimulate quality assurance and scientific research. PMID:24020622

  18. The Angstrom Project: a new microlensing candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  19. TU-F-17A-08: The Relative Accuracy of 4D Dose Accumulation for Lung Radiotherapy Using Rigid Dose Projection Versus Dose Recalculation On Every Breathing Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Lee, C; Tee, S; Lee, P; Iwamoto, K; Low, D; Valdes, G; Robinson, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D dose accumulation using projection of dose calculated on the end-exhalation, mid-ventilation, or average intensity breathing phase CT scan, versus dose accumulation performed using full Monte Carlo dose recalculation on every breathing phase. Methods: Radiotherapy plans were analyzed for 10 patients with stage I-II lung cancer planned using 4D-CT. SBRT plans were optimized using the dose calculated by a commercially-available Monte Carlo algorithm on the end-exhalation 4D-CT phase. 4D dose accumulations using deformable registration were performed with a commercially available tool that projected the planned dose onto every breathing phase without recalculation, as well as with a Monte Carlo recalculation of the dose on all breathing phases. The 3D planned dose (3D-EX), the 3D dose calculated on the average intensity image (3D-AVE), and the 4D accumulations of the dose calculated on the end-exhalation phase CT (4D-PR-EX), the mid-ventilation phase CT (4D-PR-MID), and the average intensity image (4D-PR-AVE), respectively, were compared against the accumulation of the Monte Carlo dose recalculated on every phase. Plan evaluation metrics relating to target volumes and critical structures relevant for lung SBRT were analyzed. Results: Plan evaluation metrics tabulated using 4D-PR-EX, 4D-PR-MID, and 4D-PR-AVE differed from those tabulated using Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase by an average of 0.14±0.70 Gy, - 0.11±0.51 Gy, and 0.00±0.62 Gy, respectively. Deviations of between 8 and 13 Gy were observed between the 4D-MC calculations and both 3D methods for the proximal bronchial trees of 3 patients. Conclusions: 4D dose accumulation using projection without re-calculation may be sufficiently accurate compared to 4D dose accumulated from Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase, depending on institutional protocols. Use of 4D dose accumulation should be considered when evaluating normal tissue complication

  20. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  1. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  2. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  3. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/20675678 . Kotloff RM, Keshavjee S. Lung transplantation. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et ... 58. Solomon M, Grasemann H, Keshavjee S. Pediatric lung transplantation. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2010; 57(2):375- ...

  4. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  5. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  6. Lung Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  7. The New Generation Astronomical Telescopes Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, M. F.

    This 2.6 million-pound project, based in Liverpool (Merseyside) has three aims: the regeneration of regional industry; fostering scientific education and public understanding of science and technology, and research in astrophysics. The project partners are Liverpool John Moores University, Royal Greenwich Observatory, and National Museums and Galleries on Merseyside. The project received a major grant from the European Union. We see it as of potentially great interest to developing countries who might adapt it to optimise benefits from future astronomy programmes. We are constructing the 2m Liverpool Telescope (LT), the World's largest robotic telescope, to be operational on La Palma (Canaries) in 1999, as the prototype of a range of high-specification 1m to 3m-class telescopes, with relatively low capital and operating costs, to be constructed jointly by RGO and JMU. LT's fully-automated operating mode will allow it to undertake, much less expensively, many programmes which are difficult, or impossible, on conventional telescopes. A second 2m is being built by us for a group in India. Surveying the U.K. community showed that LT would be around 8 times over-subscribed ensuring, with efficient peer review, front-rank science. Although most observing time is for research, around 5% will be reserved for science education and public understanding of science. The U.K. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council funded a pilot study of providing data from the telescope to schools and colleges. A progress report on this aspect will be available in Kyoto.

  8. Early lung cancer detection project: Evaluation of 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine (H{sub 2}TCPP). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tockman, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The author evaluated a synthetic porphyrin, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP) as a marker of carcinogenesis. H{sub 2}TCPP was compared with two other carcinogenesis markers evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to detect exfoliated sputum cells undergoing transformation to lung cancer. In the present project the authors first established optimal conditions for cultured neoplastic and non-neoplastic (sputum) cells to take up H{sub 2}TCPP. This was accomplished using spectrofluorimetry and video-enhanced fluorescent microscopy to maximize H{sub 2}TCPP auto-fluorescence across a matrix of substrate conditions, including; reagent concentration, incubation time, temperature, and pH. The second aim was to validate H{sub 2}TCPP on clinical material obtained from subjects monitored in advance of clinical cancer and link those marker results with subsequent histologic confirmation of disease. This was accomplished by applying H{sub 2}TCPP to sputum specimens archived by the Frost Center at Johns Hopkins which maintains a record of the clinical course and long-term follow-up for the patients from whom the specimens were obtained. The authors have used fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry to compare uptake of these cytoplasmic Mabs to that of a potential new marker of carcinogenesis, 5, 10, 15, 20 tetrakis (4 carboxyphenyl) porphene (H{sub 2}TCPP). The nuclear uptake of H{sub 2}TCPP was compared to a standard quantitative fluorescent DNA marker (7-AAD).

  9. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhurst, Tim; MacManus, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) plays a key role in the evaluation of undiagnosed lung nodules, when primary lung cancer is strongly suspected, or when it has already been diagnosed by other techniques. Although technical factors may compromise characterization of small or highly mobile lesions, lesions without apparent FDG uptake can generally be safely observed, whereas FDG-avid lung nodules almost always need further evaluation. FDG-PET/CT is now the primary staging imaging modality for patients with lung cancer who are being considered for curative therapy with either surgery or definitive radiation therapy. PMID:25829084

  10. Farmer's lung

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, E. J.; Seal, R. M. E.; Thomas, G. O.; Hayes, M.; Meek, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    In assessing patients suffering from farmer's lung, the acute stage must be distinguished from the chronic stage of the disease. The conspicuous radiographic signs in the acute farmer's lung episode and the often dramatic clearing make an important contribution to the diagnosis. The radiographic changes in chronic farmer's lung are not specific and cover a wide range of appearances. Even minor nodular changes are significant. Farmer's lung, acute and chronic, is not a disease predominantly characterized by a defect in gas exchange. During the acute illness the reduction in diffusing capacity is often accompanied by a decrease in lung volumes; the pulmonary function profile of the chronic stage is variable. In only a relatively small proportion of chronic farmer's lung patients does a defect in gas exchange predominate, and in some it may be manifest only during exercise. Airway obstruction is a feature of chronic farmer's lung. In chronic farmer's lung patients discrepancies between the severity of complaints and results of pulmonary function tests are not infrequent. In some patients with considerable disability conventional pulmonary function studies may demonstrate little or no impairment of the functions measured. In patients suffering from an acute farmer's lung episode, serological tests should be positive, possibly in high titre. In the chronic stage of the disease the chance of finding positive serology in a patient diminishes with the length of time elapsed since the last acute episode. The period of serological transition appears to be the third year. Images PMID:4971361

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of the Lung Microbiome in Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Borewicz, Klaudyna; Pragman, Alexa A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Hertz, Marshall; Wendt, Christine; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients experience poor long-term survival, largely due to chronic rejection. The pathogenesis of chronic rejection is incompletely understood, but bacterial colonization of the lung is associated with chronic rejection, while antibiotic use slows its progression. The lung harbors a bacterial community, termed the microbiome, which is present both in health and disease. We hypothesize that the lung microbiome will change following transplantation, and these changes may correspond to the development of rejection. Twelve bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were obtained from four patients at three time points after transplantation and two BALF samples were obtained from healthy, non-transplant controls. The microbiome of each sample was determined by pyrosequencing the 16S rDNA hypervariable 3 region. The data were analyzed using mothur, Ribosomal Database Project Classifier, Fast UniFrac, and Metastats. Transplanted lungs contained more bacterial sequences and demonstrated more microbial diversity than did control lungs. Bacteria in the phyla Proteobacteria (class Betaproteobacteria) predominated in the transplant samples. In contrast, the microbiome of the healthy lung consisted of the phyla Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria) and Firmicutes. The microbiome of the transplanted lung is vastly different from that of healthy lungs, mainly due to the presence of the family Burkholderiaceae in transplant samples. PMID:23173619

  12. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  13. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  14. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  15. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

  16. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  17. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  18. The Angstrom Project: two new microlensing/nova transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, Eamonn

    2008-11-01

    We report the discovery of two new optical transients in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). These transients were discovered using difference imaging techniques by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  19. Effect of socioeconomic deprivation on uptake of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination in Liverpool, UK over 16 years: a longitudinal ecological study.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, D; Macpherson, P; Farmer, S; Ghebrehewet, S; Seddon, D; Vivancos, R; Keenan, A

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal uptake of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine by certain socioeconomic groups may have contributed to recent large measles outbreaks in the UK. We investigated whether socioeconomic deprivation was associated with MMR vaccine uptake over 16 years. Using immunization data for 72,351 children born between 1995 and 2012 in Liverpool, UK, we examined trends in vaccination uptake. Generalized linear models were constructed to examine the relative effect of socioeconomic deprivation and year of birth on MMR uptake. Uptake of MMR1 by age 24 months ranged between 82·5% in 2003 [95% confidence interval (CI) 81·2-83·7] and 93·4% in 2012 (95% CI 92·7-94·2). Uptake of MMR2 by age 60 months ranged between 65·3% (95% CI 64·4-67·4) in 2006 and 90·3% (95% CI 89·4-91·2) in 2012. In analysis adjusted for year of birth and sex, children in the most deprived communities were at significantly greater risk of not receiving MMR1 [risk ratio (RR) 1·70, 95% CI 1·45-1·99] and MMR2 (RR 1·36, 95% CI 1·22-1·52). Higher unemployment and lower household income were significantly associated with low uptake. Contrary to concerns about lower MMR uptake in affluent families, over 16 years, children from the most socioeconomically deprived communities have consistently had the lowest MMR uptake. Targeted catch-up campaigns and strategies to improve routine immunization uptake in deprived areas are needed to minimize the risk of future measles outbreaks. PMID:26542197

  20. After the Liverpool Care Pathway—development of heuristics to guide end of life care for people with dementia: protocol of the ALCP study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N; Manthorpe, J; Sampson, E L; Iliffe, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction End of life care guidance for people with dementia is lacking and this has been made more problematic in England with the removal of one of the main end of life care guidelines which offered some structure, the Liverpool Care Pathway. This guidance gap may be eased with the development of heuristics (rules of thumb) which offer a fast and frugal form of decision-making. Objective To develop a toolkit of heuristics (rules of thumb) for practitioners to use when caring for people with dementia at the end of life. Method and analysis A mixed-method study using a co-design approach to develop heuristics in three phases. In phase 1, we will conduct at least six focus groups with family carers, health and social care practitioners from both hospital and community care services, using the ‘think-aloud’ method to understand decision-making processes and to develop a set of heuristics. The focus group topic guide will be developed from the findings of a previous study of 46 interviews of family carers about quality end-of-life care for people with dementia and a review of the literature. A multidisciplinary development team of health and social care practitioners will synthesise the findings from the focus groups to devise and refine a toolkit of heuristics. Phase 2 will test the use of heuristics in practice in five sites: one general practice, one community nursing team, one hospital ward and two palliative care teams working in the community. Phase 3 will evaluate and further refine the toolkit of heuristics through group interviews, online questionnaires and semistructured interviews. Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethical approval from a local NHS research ethics committee (Rec ref: 15/LO/0156). The findings of this study will be presented in peer-reviewed publications and national and international conferences. PMID:26338688

  1. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation may be the only intervention that can prolong survival and improve quality of life for those individuals with advanced lung disease who are acceptable candidates for the procedure. However, these candidates may be extremely ill and require ventilator and/or circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation, and lung transplantation recipients are at risk of numerous post-transplant complications that include surgical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, opportunistic infection, and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which may be caused by chronic rejection. Many advances in pre- and post-transplant management have led to improved outcomes over the past decade. These include the creation of sound guidelines for candidate selection, improved surgical techniques, advances in donor lung preservation, an improving ability to suppress and treat allograft rejection, the development of prophylaxis protocols to decrease the incidence of opportunistic infection, more effective therapies for treating infectious complications, and the development of novel therapies to treat and manage CLAD. A major obstacle to prolonged survival beyond the early post-operative time period is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is the most common form of CLAD. This manuscript discusses recent and evolving advances in the field of lung transplantation. PMID:23710330

  2. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Proposals for Coding T Categories for Subsolid Nodules and Assessment of Tumor Size in Part-Solid Tumors in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Asamura, Hisao; Bankier, Alexander A; Beasley, Mary Beth; Detterbeck, Frank; Flieder, Douglas B; Goo, Jin Mo; MacMahon, Heber; Naidich, David; Nicholson, Andrew G; Powell, Charles A; Prokop, Mathias; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Rusch, Valerie; van Schil, Paul; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes codes for the primary tumor categories of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and a uniform way to measure tumor size in part-solid tumors for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis classification of lung cancer. In 2011, new entities of AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma were defined, and they were later incorporated into the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. To fit these entities into the T component of the staging system, the Tis category is proposed for AIS, with Tis (AIS) specified if it is to be distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma in situ (SCIS), which is to be designated Tis (SCIS). We also propose that MIA be classified as T1mi. Furthermore, the use of the invasive size for T descriptor size follows a recommendation made in three editions of the Union for International Cancer Control tumor, node, and metastasis supplement since 2003. For tumor size, the greatest dimension should be reported both clinically and pathologically. In nonmucinous lung adenocarcinomas, the computed tomography (CT) findings of ground glass versus solid opacities tend to correspond respectively to lepidic versus invasive patterns seen pathologically. However, this correlation is not absolute; so when CT features suggest nonmucinous AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, the suspected diagnosis and clinical staging should be regarded as a preliminary assessment that is subject to revision after pathologic evaluation of resected specimens. The ability to predict invasive versus noninvasive size on the basis of solid versus ground glass components is not applicable to mucinous AIS, MIA, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas because they generally show solid nodules or consolidation on CT. PMID:27107787

  3. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  4. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  5. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  6. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  7. Tsunami lung.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Shozushima, Tatsuyori; Ogino, Nobuyoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Koeda, Yorihiko; Ueda, Hironobu; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Terui, Katsutoshi; Nakadate, Toshihide; Aoki, Hidehiko; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2012-04-01

    We encountered three cases of lung disorders caused by drowning in the recent large tsunami that struck following the Great East Japan Earthquake. All three were females, and two of them were old elderly. All segments of both lungs were involved in all the three patients, necessitating ICU admission and endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. All three died within 3 weeks. In at least two cases, misswallowing of oil was suspected from the features noted at the time of the detection. Sputum culture for bacteria yielded isolation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Legionella pneumophila, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The cause of tsunami lung may be a combination of chemical induced pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22057370

  8. Development of a new version of the Liverpool Malaria Model. I. Refining the parameter settings and mathematical formulation of basic processes based on a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A warm and humid climate triggers several water-associated diseases such as malaria. Climate- or weather-driven malaria models, therefore, allow for a better understanding of malaria transmission dynamics. The Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM) is a mathematical-biological model of malaria parasite dynamics using daily temperature and precipitation data. In this study, the parameter settings of the LMM are refined and a new mathematical formulation of key processes related to the growth and size of the vector population are developed. Methods One of the most comprehensive studies to date in terms of gathering entomological and parasitological information from the literature was undertaken for the development of a new version of an existing malaria model. The knowledge was needed to allow the justification of new settings of various model parameters and motivated changes of the mathematical formulation of the LMM. Results The first part of the present study developed an improved set of parameter settings and mathematical formulation of the LMM. Important modules of the original LMM version were enhanced in order to achieve a higher biological and physical accuracy. The oviposition as well as the survival of immature mosquitoes were adjusted to field conditions via the application of a fuzzy distribution model. Key model parameters, including the mature age of mosquitoes, the survival probability of adult mosquitoes, the human blood index, the mosquito-to-human (human-to-mosquito) transmission efficiency, the human infectious age, the recovery rate, as well as the gametocyte prevalence, were reassessed by means of entomological and parasitological observations. This paper also revealed that various malaria variables lack information from field studies to be set properly in a malaria modelling approach. Conclusions Due to the multitude of model parameters and the uncertainty involved in the setting of parameters, an extensive literature survey was carried out

  9. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... years. Their conditions are so severe that other treatments, such as medicines or breathing devices, no longer work. Lung transplants most often are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary ...

  10. The Angstrom Project: M31 microlensing alert ANG-08B-M31-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnley, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Newsam, A. M.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Street, C. Han B.-G. Park R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report an ongoing microlensing candidate in M31 by the Angstrom Project M31 bulge microlensing survey using the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The candidate was detected from difference imaging photometry generated by the Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) in a series of Sloan i'-band images of the bulge of M31.

  11. 75 FR 29356 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD 20892-7924,...

  12. 76 FR 10912 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group, Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room...

  13. 78 FR 67370 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project..., Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; NHLBI Institutional Training Mechanism Review Committee. Date... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of...

  14. 77 FR 30541 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed.../DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD...

  15. 76 FR 28996 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group, Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed..., National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD 20892-7924,...

  16. 75 FR 68368 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group, Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD 20892-7924,...

  17. 77 FR 12599 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group, Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed.../DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD...

  18. 77 FR 66854 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Scientific Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health,...

  19. 78 FR 13880 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group, Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6701...

  20. 75 FR 9912 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD 20892-7924,...

  1. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Emphysema Interstitial fibrosis Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary hypertension Sarcoidosis Lung hemorrhage Asthma Risks There are no significant ... Read More Asbestosis Interstitial lung disease Lung disease Sarcoidosis Update Date 11/19/2015 Updated by: Denis ...

  2. How Lungs Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Diseases > How Lungs Work How Lungs Work The Respiratory System Your lungs are part of ... Parts of the Respiratory System and How They Work Airways SINUSES are hollow spaces in the bones ...

  3. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  4. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease? Childhood interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) lung disease, ... with similar symptoms—it's not a precise diagnosis. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) also occurs in adults. However, the cause ...

  5. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... Gender Height Hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen) level

  6. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge

  7. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  8. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - ...

  9. Lung Circulation.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Karthik; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2016-01-01

    The circulation of the lung is unique both in volume and function. For example, it is the only organ with two circulations: the pulmonary circulation, the main function of which is gas exchange, and the bronchial circulation, a systemic vascular supply that provides oxygenated blood to the walls of the conducting airways, pulmonary arteries and veins. The pulmonary circulation accommodates the entire cardiac output, maintaining high blood flow at low intravascular arterial pressure. As compared with the systemic circulation, pulmonary arteries have thinner walls with much less vascular smooth muscle and a relative lack of basal tone. Factors controlling pulmonary blood flow include vascular structure, gravity, mechanical effects of breathing, and the influence of neural and humoral factors. Pulmonary vascular tone is also altered by hypoxia, which causes pulmonary vasoconstriction. If the hypoxic stimulus persists for a prolonged period, contraction is accompanied by remodeling of the vasculature, resulting in pulmonary hypertension. In addition, genetic and environmental factors can also confer susceptibility to development of pulmonary hypertension. Under normal conditions, the endothelium forms a tight barrier, actively regulating interstitial fluid homeostasis. Infection and inflammation compromise normal barrier homeostasis, resulting in increased permeability and edema formation. This article focuses on reviewing the basics of the lung circulation (pulmonary and bronchial), normal development and transition at birth and vasoregulation. Mechanisms contributing to pathological conditions in the pulmonary circulation, in particular when barrier function is disrupted and during development of pulmonary hypertension, will also be discussed. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:897-943, 2016. PMID:27065170

  10. Who Needs a Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Lung Transplant? Your doctor may recommend a lung transplant ... lungs to pick up oxygen. Applying to a Lung Transplant Program Lung transplants are done in medical ...

  11. Cilia Dysfunction in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Ann E.; Walters, Matthew S.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the human airway epithelium is the presence of ciliated cells bearing motile cilia, specialized cell surface projections containing axonemes comprised of microtubules and dynein arms, which provide ATP-driven motility. In the airways, cilia function in concert with airway mucus to mediate the critical function of mucociliary clearance, cleansing the airways of inhaled particles and pathogens. The prototypical disorder of respiratory cilia is primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder that leads to impaired mucociliary clearance, repeated chest infections, and progressive destruction of lung architecture. Numerous acquired lung diseases are also marked by abnormalities in both cilia structure and function. In this review we summarize current knowledge regarding airway ciliated cells and cilia, how they function to maintain a healthy epithelium, and how disorders of cilia structure and function contribute to inherited and acquired lung disease. PMID:25386990

  12. Cilia dysfunction in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Ann E; Walters, Matthew S; Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the human airway epithelium is the presence of ciliated cells bearing motile cilia, specialized cell surface projections containing axonemes composed of microtubules and dynein arms, which provide ATP-driven motility. In the airways, cilia function in concert with airway mucus to mediate the critical function of mucociliary clearance, cleansing the airways of inhaled particles and pathogens. The prototypical disorder of respiratory cilia is primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder that leads to impaired mucociliary clearance, to repeated chest infections, and to the progressive destruction of lung architecture. Numerous acquired lung diseases are also marked by abnormalities in both cilia structure and function. In this review we summarize current knowledge regarding airway ciliated cells and cilia, how they function to maintain a healthy epithelium, and how disorders of cilia structure and function contribute to inherited and acquired lung disease. PMID:25386990

  13. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frödin, J E

    1996-01-01

    This synthesis of the literature on radiotherapy for lung cancer is based on 80 scientific articles, including 2 meta-analyses, 29 randomized studies, 19 prospective studies, and 21 retrospective studies. These studies involve 28172 patients. Basic treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), is chemotherapy. Addition of radiotherapy to the primary tumor and mediastinum reduces local recurrence, prolongs long-term survival, and is often indicated. Current, and future, studies can be expected to show successive improvements in results for SCLC by optimizing the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Should these treatments be given simultaneously or sequentially, and in which order? Which fractionation is best? Probably, no change in resource requirements for radiotherapy will be necessary, with the possible exception of changes in fractionation. Surgery constitutes primary treatment for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stages I and II. Radiotherapy may provide an alternative for patients who are inoperable for medical reasons. The value of radiotherapy following radical surgery for NSCLC remains to be shown. It is not indicated based on current knowledge. For NSCLC stage III, radiotherapy shrinks tumors and prolongs survival at 2 and 3 years. Whether it influences long-term survival after 5 years has not been shown. Considering the side effects of treatment, one must question whether limited improvements in survival motivate routine radiotherapy in these patients. Earlier attempts to add chemotherapy to radiotherapy to improve treatment results of NSCLC have not yielded convincing results. Several studies are currently on-going. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) greatly reduces the risk for brain metastases from SCLC. However, it has little influence on survival. Many treatment centers give PCI to SCLC patients who have achieved complete remission. This practice may be questioned since PCI is associated with serious complications. PCI is

  14. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  15. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  16. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  17. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  18. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  19. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  20. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  1. Lung Cancer Staging and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jones, Kirk D; Jablons, David M

    2016-01-01

    The seventh edition of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) TNM staging system was developed by the International Association for the Staging of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project by a coordinated international effort to develop data-derived TNM classifications with significant survival differences. Based on these TNM groupings, current 5-year survival estimates in NSLCC range from 73 % in stage IA disease to 13 % in stage IV disease. TNM stage remains the most important prognostic factor in predicting recurrence rates and survival times, followed by tumor histologic grade, and patient sex, age, and performance status. Molecular prognostication in lung cancer is an exploding area of research where interest has moved beyond TNM stage and into individualized genetic tumor analysis with immunohistochemistry, microarray, and mutation profiles. However, despite intense research efforts and countless publications, no molecular prognostic marker has been adopted into clinical use since most fail in subsequent cross-validation with few exceptions. The recent interest in immunotherapy for NSCLC has identified new biomarkers with early evidence that suggests that PD-L1 is a predictive marker of a good response to new immunotherapy drugs but a poor prognostic indicator of overall survival. Future prognostication of outcomes in NSCLC will likely be based on a combination of TNM stage and molecular tumor profiling and yield more precise, individualized survival estimates and treatment algorithms. PMID:27535389

  2. Joseph Rotblat: Moral Dilemmas and the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veys, Lucy

    2013-12-01

    John Fitzgerald Kennedy famously said, "One man can make a difference and every man should try."1 Joseph Rotblat (1908-2005) was the quintessence of Kennedy's conviction. He was the only scientist who left Los Alamos after it transpired that the atomic bomb being developed there was intended for use against adversaries other than Nazi Germany. I explore Rotblat's early research in Warsaw and Liverpool, which established his reputation as a highly capable experimental physicist, and which led him to join the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos in 1944. I examine his motivation for resigning from the project in 1945, and the unwillingness of his fellow scientists to follow suit, which draws attention to the continuing discourse on the responsibility of scientists for the consequences of their research.

  3. Open lung biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of different conditions, such as: Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Wegener granulomatosis Risks There is a possibility of ... fibrous Mesothelioma - malignant Pulmonary tuberculosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Viral pneumonia X-ray Update ...

  4. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. ... your bronchial tubes ( bronchitis ) or deep in your lungs ( pneumonia ). These infections cause a buildup of mucus ...

  5. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  6. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  7. Occupational lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cone, J E

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed. PMID:3303381

  8. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed.

  9. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators, technologists, and…

  10. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer PMID:25398122

  11. Lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Bassett, Erik K; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Lung tissue engineering is an emerging field focused on the development of lung replacement devices and tissue to treat patients with end stage lung disease. Microfluidic based lung assist devices have been developed that have biomimetically designed vascular networks that achieve physiologic blood flow. Gas exchange in these devices occurs across a thin respiratory membrane. Designed for intrathoracic implantation as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy, these lung assist devices will allow ambulation and hospital discharge for patients with end stage lung disease. Decellularized lungs subsequently recellularized with epithelial and endothelial cells have been implanted in small animal models with demonstration of initial gas exchange. Further development of these tissues and scaling to large animal models will validate this approach and may be an organ source for lung transplantation. Initial clinical success has been achieved with decellularized tracheal implants using autologous stem cells. Development of microfluidic lung models using similar architecture to the lung assist device technology allows study of lung biology and diseases with manipulation of lung cells and respiratory membrane strain. PMID:24896347

  12. 42 CFR 52e.5 - What are the project requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.5 What are the project... of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases; (2) With respect to applications relating to... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with one or more other Federal Health agencies, State, local...

  13. 42 CFR 52e.5 - What are the project requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.5 What are the project... of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases; (2) With respect to applications relating to... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with one or more other Federal Health agencies, State, local...

  14. 42 CFR 52e.5 - What are the project requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.5 What are the project... of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases; (2) With respect to applications relating to... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with one or more other Federal Health agencies, State, local...

  15. 42 CFR 52e.5 - What are the project requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.5 What are the project... of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases; (2) With respect to applications relating to... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with one or more other Federal Health agencies, State, local...

  16. 42 CFR 52e.5 - What are the project requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GRANTS FOR PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROJECTS § 52e.5 What are the project... of heart, blood vessel, lung, or blood diseases; (2) With respect to applications relating to... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute with one or more other Federal Health agencies, State, local...

  17. CFTR and lung homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a cAMP-activated chloride and bicarbonate channel that is critical for lung homeostasis. Decreases in CFTR expression have dire consequences in cystic fibrosis (CF) and have been suggested to be a component of the lung pathology in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Decreases or loss of channel function often lead to mucus stasis, chronic bacterial infections, and the accompanying chronic inflammatory responses that promote progressive lung destruction, and, eventually in CF, lung failure. Here we discuss CFTR's functional role airway surface liquid hydration and pH, in regulation of other channels such as the epithelial sodium channel, and in regulating inflammatory responses in the lung. PMID:25381027

  18. The lung in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, which induces gradients in ventilation, blood flow, and gas exchange. Studies of lungs in microgravity provide a means of elucidating the effects of gravity. They suggest a mechanism by which gravity serves to match ventilation to perfusion, making for a more efficient lung than anticipated. Despite predictions, lungs do not become edematous, and there is no disruption to, gas exchange in microgravity. Sleep disturbances in microgravity are not a result of respiratory-related events; obstructive sleep apnea is caused principally by the gravitational effects on the upper airways. In microgravity, lungs may be at greater risk to the effects of inhaled aerosols.

  19. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  20. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  1. Perioperative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Patients are at risk for several types of lung injury in the perioperative period. These injuries include atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, bronchopleural fistula, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Anesthetic management can cause, exacerbate or ameliorate most of these injuries. Clinical research trends show that traditional protocols for perioperative mechanical ventilation, using large tidal volumes without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can cause a sub-clinical lung injury and this injury becomes clinically important when any additional lung injury is added. Lung-protective ventilation strategies using more physiologic tidal volumes and appropriate levels of PEEP can decrease the extent of this injury. PMID:18494396

  2. 76 FR 57066 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... and projects conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, including consideration of...; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood...

  3. 78 FR 60299 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NHLBI Program Project... of Scientific Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room...

  4. 77 FR 1703 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel Program Project Grant... Scientific Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7206,...

  5. 77 FR 58402 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... programs and projects conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, including consideration... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research;...

  6. 78 FR 27411 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHLBI Program Project... Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute,...

  7. 76 FR 3641 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Program Project in... Review/DERA, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7206, Bethesda,...

  8. 75 FR 61508 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... and projects conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, including consideration of....837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases...

  9. 78 FR 57168 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... and projects conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, including consideration of....837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases...

  10. 76 FR 70462 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... of Committee: Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group; Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed..., and Blood Institute, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Room 7208, Bethesda, MD 20892-7924, (301) 435-0303,...

  11. Lung transplantation at Duke

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alice L.; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents the gold-standard therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Utilization of this therapy continues to rise. The Lung Transplant Program at Duke University Medical Center was established in 1992, and since that time has grown to one of the highest volume centers in the world. The program to date has performed over 1,600 lung transplants. This report represents an up-to-date review of the practice and management strategies employed for safe and effective lung transplantation at our center. Specific attention is paid to the evaluation of candidacy for lung transplantation, donor selection, surgical approach, and postoperative management. These evidence-based strategies form the foundation of the clinical transplantation program at Duke. PMID:27076968

  12. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  13. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015: ...

  14. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  15. COPD: obstructed lungs.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2016-06-01

    CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE pulmonary diseases (COPD) affect 14 per cent of the population over 40 years of age. With an ageing population, the number of those requiring care for COPD is expected to increase, having a significant effect on health-care resources. COPD is projected to become the third leading cause of death globally by 2020. This disease has a major impact on economic and social well-being, and on quality of life. It is regarded as largely preventable but, once developed, is a progressive and complex condition characterised by frequent exacerbations and co-morbidities. Smoking is the primary cause of COPD but up to 30 per cent of those with COPD have never smoked. It is increasingly recognised COPD may have its origins prenatally and in early childhood. Treating exacerbations, improving exercise capacity, and delaying progression of disease are key management strategies. No curative or disease modifying therapies are available. Nurses are essential in providing comprehensive care to patients in both acute care and for long-term management. They also have a vital role to play in preserving healthy lung function in the early years of life to reduce the risk of COPD in older age. PMID:27514228

  16. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  18. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  1. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  2. Rare lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    There are several different kinds of lung cancer, often referred to as lung cancer subtypes. Some of these occur more often than others. In this factsheet we will specifically look at the subtypes of cancers that do not happen very often and are considered 'rare'. PMID:27066129

  3. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  4. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  5. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of N2 means cancer has spread to the middle part of the chest (called the mediastinum). A rating ... so that the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung and/or lymph node ... biopsied are your lungs, bones, and brain. These types of biopsies can be done with ...

  6. Lung needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... when there is an abnormal condition near the surface of the lung, in the lung itself, or on the chest wall. Most often, it is done to rule out cancer. The biopsy is usually done after abnormalities appear on a chest x-ray or CT ...

  7. Immunosuppression for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Choo Y.; Madsen, Joren C.; Rosengard, Bruce R.; Allan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT As a result of advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapy, and postoperative management, lung transplantation has become an established therapeutic option for individuals with a variety of end-stage lung diseases. The current 1-year actuarial survival rate following lung transplantation is approaching 80%. However, the 5- year actuarial survival rate has remained virtually unchanged at approximately 50% over the last 15 years due to the processes of acute and chronic lung allograft rejection (1). Clinicians still rely on a vast array of immunosuppressive agents to suppress the process of graft rejection, but find themselves limited by an inescapable therapeutic paradox. Insufficient immunosuppression results in graft loss due to rejection, while excess immunosuppression results in increased morbidity and mortality from opportunistic infections and malignancies. Indeed, graft rejection, infection, and malignancy are the three principal causes of mortality for the lung transplant recipient. One should also keep in mind that graft loss in a lung transplant recipient is usually a fatal event, since there is no practical means of long-term mechanical support, and since the prospects of re-transplantation are low, given the shortage of acceptable donor grafts. This chapter reviews the current state of immunosuppressive therapy for lung transplantation and suggests alternative paradigms for the management of future lung transplant recipients. PMID:19273152

  8. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  9. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  10. Automatic lung nodule classification with radiomics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingchen; Wang, Qian; Ren, Yacheng; Hu, Haibo; Zhao, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the first killer among the cancer deaths. Malignant lung nodules have extremely high mortality while some of the benign nodules don't need any treatment .Thus, the accuracy of diagnosis between benign or malignant nodules diagnosis is necessary. Notably, although currently additional invasive biopsy or second CT scan in 3 months later may help radiologists to make judgments, easier diagnosis approaches are imminently needed. In this paper, we propose a novel CAD method to distinguish the benign and malignant lung cancer from CT images directly, which can not only improve the efficiency of rumor diagnosis but also greatly decrease the pain and risk of patients in biopsy collecting process. Briefly, according to the state-of-the-art radiomics approach, 583 features were used at the first step for measurement of nodules' intensity, shape, heterogeneity and information in multi-frequencies. Further, with Random Forest method, we distinguish the benign nodules from malignant nodules by analyzing all these features. Notably, our proposed scheme was tested on all 79 CT scans with diagnosis data available in The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA) which contain 127 nodules and each nodule is annotated by at least one of four radiologists participating in the project. Satisfactorily, this method achieved 82.7% accuracy in classification of malignant primary lung nodules and benign nodules. We believe it would bring much value for routine lung cancer diagnosis in CT imaging and provide improvement in decision-support with much lower cost.

  11. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  12. Lung Cell Oxidant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, Norbert; Simon, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidant damage of lung tissue during in vivo hyperoxic exposure appears to be amplified by neutrophils that release toxic amounts of oxygen metabolites. In our studies cloned lung epithelial cells (L2 cells), lung fibroblasts, and pulmonary artery endothelial cells were cultured under either ambient (Po2 ∼ 140 torr) or hyperoxic (Po2 ∼ 630 torr) conditions for 48 h (24 h for endothelial cells). After cultivation, phorbol myristate acetate- or opsonized zymosan-stimulated neutrophils were added to the cultivated monolayers for 4 h, and lung cell damage was quantitated using 51Cr release as an index. The data show that stimulated neutrophils are able to injure the three lung cell lines tested, with endothelial cells being highly susceptible to this injury and L2 cells being slightly more susceptible than lung fibroblasts. The studies also demonstrate that all three lung cell lines exposed to sustained hyperoxia are more susceptible to neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity than their time-matched air controls. Hydrogen peroxide was the main toxic oxygen metabolite because catalase (2,500 U/ml) completely protected the target cells. Equivalent quantities of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase instead of by neutrophils gave a similar degree of target cell injury. Superoxide dismutase at high concentrations (250 μg/ml) provided some protection. Other systems that detoxify oxygen metabolites were without protective effect. These findings indicate that the increase in susceptibility of lung cells to neutrophil-mediated oxidant damage is a toxic effect of hyperoxia on lung cells. This specific manifestation of oxygen damage provides insight into the integration between primary mechanisms (oxygen exposure) and secondary mechanisms (release of oxygen metabolites by neutrophils) with respect to the cellular basis for pulmonary oxygen toxicity. PMID:6284800

  13. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  14. Bioengineering Lungs for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2016-05-01

    Whole lung extracellular matrix scaffolds can be created by perfusion of cadaveric organs with decellularizing detergents, providing a platform for organ regeneration. Lung epithelial engineering must address both the proximal airway cells that function to metabolize toxins and aid mucociliary clearance and the distal pneumocytes that facilitate gas exchange. Engineered pulmonary vasculature must support in vivo blood perfusion with low resistance and intact barrier function and be antithrombotic. Repopulating the native lung matrix with sufficient cell numbers in appropriate anatomic locations is required to enable organ function. PMID:27112255

  15. Microgravity and the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from studies of the effect of microgravity on the lungs of rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission, and from relevant laboratory experiments. The effects of microgravity fall into five categories: topographical structure and function, the lung volumes and mechanics, the intrathoracic blood pressures and volumes, the pulmonary deposition of aerosol, and denitrogenaton during EVA. The ultrastructure of the left lungs of rats flown for 14 days on the Cosmos 2044 spacecraft and that of some tail-suspended rats disclosed presence of red blood cells in the alveolar spaces, indicating that pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary edema occurred in these rats. Possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed.

  16. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases. PMID:26587450

  17. Cystic and nodular lung disease.

    PubMed

    Richards, J Caleb; Lynch, David A; Chung, Jonathan H

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse cystic and nodular lung diseases have characteristic imaging findings. The most common causes of cystic lung disease are lymphangioleiomyomatosis and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Other less common cystic lung diseases include Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, and light chain deposition disease. Computed tomography is used to differentiate cystic lung disease from emphysema, honeycombing, cavities, and bronchiectasis, which mimic cystic lung disease. Diffuse nodular lung disease are categorized as centrilobular, perilymphatic, and random types. In diffuse nodular lung disease, a specific diagnosis is achieved through a combination of history, physical examination, and imaging findings. PMID:26024606

  18. Overview of Clinical Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C.; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2014-01-01

    Since the first successful lung transplant 30 years ago, lung transplantation has rapidly become an established standard of care to treat end-stage lung disease in selected patients. Advances in lung preservation, surgical technique, and immunosuppression regimens have resulted in the routine performance of lung transplantation around the world for an increasing number of patients, with wider indications. Despite this, donor shortages and chronic lung allograft dysfunction continue to prevent lung transplantation from reaching its full potential. With research into the underlying mechanisms of acute and chronic lung graft dysfunction and advances in personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to both the donor lung and the lung transplant recipient, there is increasing confidence that we will improve short- and long-term outcomes in the near future. PMID:24384816

  19. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses are streptococci and staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is a serious infection. Obstruction ... night sweats. In contrast, lung abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA can be fatal within days, ...

  20. 7. Immunologic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2008-02-01

    The lung is an extremely complex organ and participates in initial responses to inhaled antigens, infectious agents, and irritants or as a response to exposure through the oral, parenteral, or transdermal routes. There can be constriction of the airways or involvement or even destruction of the lung parenchyma, depending on the condition. This review focuses on selected aspects of the pulmonary innate and adaptive immune responses; the new condition World Trade Center cough, which can cause an asthma-like presentation and resemble reactive airways dysfunction syndrome; and the diagnosis and treatment of various immunologic lung conditions. Innate immune responses occur in the acute respiratory distress syndrome and in transfusion-related acute lung injury. Adaptive immune responses involve specialized mucosal and systemic immune responses, lymphocytes, and antibodies and can result in CD4+ TH1 and TH2 phenotypes, such as TH1 for tuberculosis and TH2 for asthma. PMID:18241689

  1. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the chest Working with or around asbestos, coal dust, cotton dust, and silica dust (called occupational ... routinely screened for lung disease. These jobs include coal mining, sand blasting, and working on a ship.

  2. Reflux and Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reflux and Lung Disease Proper Hydration Sodium Dangers Plant-Based Diets Why Breakfast Matters Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals About Us Treatment & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make an Appointment Make a Donation ...

  3. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  4. Platelets in Lung Biology

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  5. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 65. Lake F, Proudman S. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach. Semin Respir Crit Care Med . 2014;35:222-238. PMID: 24668537 www.ncbi.nlm.nih. ...

  6. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  7. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27101251

  8. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  9. [Hypoxic lung failure].

    PubMed

    David, S; Wiesner, O

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic lung failure is among the major indications for patients' referral to intensive care units either for surveillance or if necessary therapy. There are a vast number of pathophysiological causes of lung failure and the optimal treatment highly depends on the underlying pathology; therefore, no standard algorithm exists. So-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a very severe manifestation of hypoxemic lung failure that is of particular relevance for intensivists and is therefore the focus of this review. In addition to fundamental pathophysiology of lung injury, the article also focuses on established and modern treatment strategies. Moreover, we will briefly highlight innovative concepts of ARDS treatment that might become relevant in the future. PMID:27084180

  10. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  11. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... called alveoli, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide actually takes place. Each lung houses about 300- ... growth. Without oxygen, the body's cells would die. Carbon dioxide is the waste gas produced when carbon is ...

  12. What Are the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen from the air. They also help remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas that can be toxic) from ... The lungs' intake of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide is called gas exchange. Gas exchange is part ...

  13. Comparative genomics of isolates of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa epidemic strain associated with chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Jeukens, Julie; Boyle, Brian; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Aaron, Shawn D; Charette, Steve J; Fothergill, Joanne L; Tucker, Nicholas P; Winstanley, Craig; Levesque, Roger C

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main cause of fatal chronic lung infections among individuals suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). During the past 15 years, particularly aggressive strains transmitted among CF patients have been identified, initially in Europe and more recently in Canada. The aim of this study was to generate high-quality genome sequences for 7 isolates of the Liverpool epidemic strain (LES) from the United Kingdom and Canada representing different virulence characteristics in order to: (1) associate comparative genomics results with virulence factor variability and (2) identify genomic and/or phenotypic divergence between the two geographical locations. We performed phenotypic characterization of pyoverdine, pyocyanin, motility, biofilm formation, and proteolytic activity. We also assessed the degree of virulence using the Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba model. Comparative genomics analysis revealed at least one large deletion (40-50 kb) in 6 out of the 7 isolates compared to the reference genome of LESB58. These deletions correspond to prophages, which are known to increase the competitiveness of LESB58 in chronic lung infection. We also identified 308 non-synonymous polymorphisms, of which 28 were associated with virulence determinants and 52 with regulatory proteins. At the phenotypic level, isolates showed extensive variability in production of pyocyanin, pyoverdine, proteases and biofilm as well as in swimming motility, while being predominantly avirulent in the amoeba model. Isolates from the two continents were phylogenetically and phenotypically undistinguishable. Most regulatory mutations were isolate-specific and 29% of them were predicted to have high functional impact. Therefore, polymorphism in regulatory genes is likely to be an important basis for phenotypic diversity among LES isolates, which in turn might contribute to this strain's adaptability to varying conditions in the CF lung. PMID:24505294

  14. [Blast lung injuries].

    PubMed

    Clapson, P; Pasquier, P; Perez, J-P; Debien, B

    2010-09-01

    In armed conflicts and during terrorist attacks, explosive devices are a major cause of mortality. The lung is one of the organs most sensitive to blasts. Thus, today it is important that every GP at least knows the basics and practices regarding treatment of blast victims. We suggest, following a review of the explosions and an assessment of the current threats, detailing the lung injuries brought about by the explosions and the main treatments currently recommended. PMID:20933166

  15. Lung epinephrine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.; Elayan, H.; Ziegler, M.G. )

    1990-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo epinephrine (E) synthesis by rat lung. Nine days after removal of the adrenal medullas, circulating E was reduced to 7% of levels found in sham-operated rats but 30% of lung E remained. Treatment of demedullated rats with 6 hydroxydopamine plus reserpine did not further reduce lung E. In the presence of S-(3H)adenosylmethionine lung homogenates readily N-methylated norepinephrine (NE) to form (3H)E. The rate of E synthesis by lung homogenates was progressively more rapid with increasing NE up to a concentration of 3 mM, above which it declined. The rate of E formation was optimal at an incubation pH of 8 and at temperatures of approximately 55 degrees C. We compared the E-forming enzyme(s) of lung homogenates with those of adrenal and cardiac ventricle. The adrenal contains mainly phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), which is readily inhibited by SKF 29661 and methylates dopamine (DA) very poorly. Cardiac ventricles contain mainly nonspecific N-methyltransferase (NMT), which is poorly inhibited by SKF 29661 and readily methylates both DA and NE. Lung homogenates were inhibited by SKF 29661 about half as well as adrenal but more than ventricle. We used the rate of E formation from NE as an index of PNMT-like activity and deoxyepinephrine synthesis from DA as an index of NMT-like activity. PNMT and NMT activity in rat lung homogenates were not correlated with each other, displayed different responses to change in temperature, and were affected differently by glucocorticoids.

  16. Immunotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moundhri, M.; O'Brien, M.; Souberbielle, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    More research and new treatment options are needed in all stages of lung cancer. To this end immunotherapy needs a revival in view of recent improved technologies and greater understanding of the underlying biology. In this review we discuss mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy, non-specific, specific and adoptive, with particular reference to a direct therapeutic action on all subtypes of lung cancer. PMID:9703271

  17. Chemoprevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-04-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung. Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to determine higher risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and pre-malignant biology continues to advance. Additional biomarkers of risk continue to be investigated and validated. The World Health Organization/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification for lung cancer now recognizes distinct histologic lesions that can be reproducibly graded as precursors of non-small cell lung cancer. For example, carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive squamous cell cancer. Similar precursor lesions exist for adenocarcinoma, and these pre-malignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. At this time, chemopreventive agents can only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials are currently in progress and additional trials are in the planning stages. This review will discuss the principles of chemoprevention, summarize the completed trials, and discuss ongoing and potential future trials with a focus on targeted pathways. PMID:19349487

  18. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  19. Lung Parenchymal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This article focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  20. Multiple cystic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Francisco, Flavia Angélica; Soares Souza, Arthur; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt-Hogg-Dubé); other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:26621970

  1. Lung parenchymal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2011-07-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This chapter focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  2. Lung cancer in Australia.

    PubMed

    McLennan, G; Roder, D M

    1989-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death of cancer in Australian men and the third leading cause in Australian women. Efforts are being made to reduce the incidence of this disease by smoking-cessation programmes and improved industrial hygiene, and these measures need to be encouraged strongly by all sectors of the community. On a population basis, insufficient evidence is available to justify screening procedures for the early detection of lung cancer in "at-risk" groups. Cure is possible by surgical resection in early cases. Improvements in therapeutic results with traditional cancer treatments largely have reached a plateau, but a number of newer therapies, and combinations of standard therapies, currently are being evaluated. Of particular interest is concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in localized non-small-cell lung cancer; laser "debulking" in conjunction with radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, and biological response-modifying agents in non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It is important that data be collected adequately to define epidemiological changes and to evaluate treatment results (including repeat bronchoscopy, to assess local control of tumour), and that the quality of life is recorded and reported in the evaluation process. Finally, phase-III studies in lung-cancer treatments require adequate numbers of subjects to enable meaningful conclusions to be achieve objectives within a reasonable study period. PMID:2469943

  3. The LungPath study: variation in the diagnostic and staging pathway for patients with lung cancer in England.

    PubMed

    Cane, Paul; Linklater, Karen; Santis, George; Møller, Henrik; Peake, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The LungPath project investigated differences in lung cancer diagnostic practice by following the diagnostic pathways of 1507 patients from 19 representative English lung cancer centres. We found large variation in the proportion of patients receiving positron emission tomography-CT scan (range 13%-64%) and endobronchial ultrasound (range 2%-31%). There was also wide variation in the proportion of patients with good performance status who had their tumours histologically confirmed (range 61%-100%). The variation is discussed with reference to current national guidelines and implications for patient care. PMID:26179248

  4. Live imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  5. Live Imaging of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  6. SU-E-J-185: Gated CBCT Imaging for Positioning Moving Lung Tumor in Lung SBRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Li, T; Zhang, Y; Burton, S; Karlovits, B; Clump, D; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Lung stereo-tactic body radiotherapy(SBRT) treatment requires high accuracy of lung tumor positioning during treatment, which is usually accomplished by free breathing Cone-Beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scan. However, respiratory motion induced image artifacts in free breathing CBCT may degrade such positioning accuracy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of gated CBCT imaging for lung SBRT treatment. Methods: Six Lung SBRT patients were selected for this study. The respiratory motion of the tumors ranged from 1.2cm to 3.5cm, and the gating windows for all patients were set between 35% and 65% of the respiratory phases. Each Lung SBRT patient underwent free-breathing CBCT scan using half-fan scan technique. The acquired projection images were transferred out for off-line analyses. An In-house semi-automatic algorithm was developed to trace the diaphragm movement from those projection images to acquire a patient's specific respiratory motion curve, which was used to correlate respiratory phases with each projection image. Afterwards, a filtered back-projection algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the gated CBCT images based on the projection images only within the gating window. Results: Target volumes determined by free breathing CBCT images were 71.9%±72% bigger than the volume shown in gated CBCT image. On the contrary, the target volume differences between gated CBCT and planning CT images at exhale stage were 5.8%±2.4%. The center to center distance of the targets shown in free breathing CBCT and gated CBCT images were 9.2±8.1mm. For one particular case, the superior boundary of the target was shifted 15mm between free breathing CBCT and gated CBCT. Conclusion: Gated CBCT imaging provides better representation of the moving lung tumor with less motion artifacts, and has the potential to improve the positioning accuracy in lung SBRT treatment.

  7. Barriers to uptake among high-risk individuals declining participation in lung cancer screening: a mixed methods analysis of the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) trial

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Noor; Lifford, Kate J; Carter, Ben; McRonald, Fiona; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Baldwin, David R; Weller, David; Hansell, David M; Duffy, Stephen W; Field, John K; Brain, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study aimed to identify the barriers to participation among high-risk individuals in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) pilot trial. Setting The UKLS pilot trial is a randomised controlled trial of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening that has recruited high-risk people using a population approach in the Cambridge and Liverpool areas. Participants High-risk individuals aged 50–75 years were invited to participate in UKLS. Individuals were excluded if a LDCT scan was performed within the last year, if they were unable to provide consent, or if LDCT screening was unable to be carried out due to coexisting comorbidities. Outcome measures Statistical associations between individual characteristics and UKLS uptake were examined using multivariable regression modelling. In those who completed a non-participation questionnaire (NPQ), thematic analysis of free-text data was undertaken to identify reasons for not taking part, with subsequent exploratory linkage of key themes to risk factors for non-uptake. Results Comparative data were available from 4061 high-risk individuals who consented to participate in the trial and 2756 who declined participation. Of those declining participation, 748 (27.1%) completed a NPQ. Factors associated with non-uptake included: female gender (OR=0.64, p<0.001), older age (OR=0.73, p<0.001), current smoking (OR=0.70, p<0.001), lower socioeconomic group (OR=0.56, p<0.001) and higher affective risk perception (OR=0.52, p<0.001). Among non-participants who provided a reason, two main themes emerged reflecting practical and emotional barriers. Smokers were more likely to report emotional barriers to participation. Conclusions A profile of risk factors for non-participation in lung screening has emerged, with underlying reasons largely relating to practical and emotional barriers. Strategies for engaging high-risk, hard-to-reach groups are critical for the equitable uptake of a potential future lung cancer screening programme

  8. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts. PMID:22402423

  9. Lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung (including recent reports on the prevention of breast cancer in high-risk individuals). Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to define the highest-risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and premalignant biology continue to make advances. Squamous cell carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer. Precursor lesions also have been identified for adenocarcinoma, and these premalignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. Chemopreventive agents can currently only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials have recently been completed or are enrolling subjects. PMID:22550242

  10. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant? A lung transplant can improve your quality of life and ... highest. In recent years, short-term survival after lung transplant has improved. Recent data on single-lung ...

  11. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  12. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease The broad term "childhood interstitial lung disease" ( ... affect are shown in the illustration below. Normal Lungs and Lung Structures Figure A shows the location ...

  13. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  14. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  15. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The survival from bronchogenic carcinoma is highly dependent upon stage at the time of treatment. This is particularly true for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma, but holds true for small cell carcinoma as well. The problem presented to the medical profession has been to find a practical means of detecting lung cancer while it is still at an early stage. Three studies in progress have indicated that a larger proportion of the patients may be found to have early stage lung cancer when screened with a combination of chest X-rays and sputum cytology. However, the detection of these early stage cases has not yet been translated into an improvement in the overall mortality rate from lung cancer. PMID:6278787

  16. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  17. Lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, U

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. First diagnosis only when disease has already reached the metastatic phase is the main reason for failure in treatment. To this regard, although low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) has proven to be effective in the early detection of lung cancer (providing both higher resectability and higher long-term survival rates), the capacity of annual CT screening to reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers has yet to be demonstrated. Numerous ongoing large-scale randomised trials are under way in high-risk individuals with different study designs. The initial results should be available within the next 2 years. PMID:20424610

  18. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  19. [Chemoprevention of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takaaki; Saito, Makoto; Honda, Hidetoshi; Hirata, Takeshi; Kato, Harubumi

    2003-02-01

    Since a high concentration of beta-carotene in blood reduces the risk of lung cancer, a large-scale intervention examination containing beta-carotene was conducted, mainly by the National Cancer Institute. The results showed that the risk of lung cancer increased with administration of beta-carotene. This result demonstrates that continuation of smoking is an important factor in the increased risk, and not smoking is confirmed to be the most important prevention method. The authors examined the treatment effect of raising the concentration of folic acid and vitamin B12 in blood on bronchial dysplasia as a pre-cancerous lesion. A significant medical treatment effect was see in the folic acid and vitamin B12 medication groups, which seems promising for the chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:12610863

  20. [Smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Postmus, P E

    1999-11-01

    Since fifty years it is clear now that smoking of tobacco products is responsible for the lung cancer epidemic that is currently in progress worldwide. Although in the Western world a small decrease of lung cancer in males is found, the number of female patients is steadily increasing. Changes in tobacco production have resulted in exposition of smokers to other carcinogens. This is probably the cause of the change in the histological pattern with an increase of adenocarcinoma and stabilisation of squamous cell lung cancer. Despite the bad prognosis there is some hope that with improvement of early detection methods more patients can be cured. However, for a real change it is necessary to discourage smoking by all means. PMID:11930407

  1. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  2. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  3. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  4. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  5. Lung-MAP Clinical Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Lung-MAP study, which will examine treatment outcomes for patients with squamous cell lung cancer assigned to different targeted drugs based on the results of genomic tumor profiling.

  6. National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

  7. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  8. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  9. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  10. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  11. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  12. Environmental radiation and the lung

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Philip E.; Walsh, Phillip J.

    1974-01-01

    Environmental sources of radioactive materials and their relation to lung doses and lung burdens are described. The approaches used and the problems encountered in estimating lung doses are illustrated. Exposure to radon daughter products is contrasted to exposure to plutonium as particular examples of the hazards associated with radioactive materials of different chemical and physical characteristics. PMID:4620334

  13. Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

  14. Microgravity and the lung.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G K

    2000-07-01

    Although environmental physiologists are readily able to alter many aspects of the environment, it is not possible to remove the effects of gravity on Earth. During the past decade, a series of space flights were conducted in which comprehensive studies of the lung in microgravity (weightlessness) were performed. Stroke volume increases on initial exposure to microgravity and then decreases as circulating blood volume is reduced. Diffusing capacity increases markedly, due to increases in both pulmonary capillary blood volume and membrane diffusing capacity, likely due to more uniform pulmonary perfusion. Both ventilation and perfusion become more uniform throughout the lung, although much residual inhomogeneity remains. Despite the improvement in the distribution of both ventilation and perfusion, the range of the ventilation-to-perfusion ratio seen during a normal breath remains unaltered, possibly because of a spatial mismatch between ventilation and perfusion on a small scale. There are unexpected changes in the mixing of gas in the periphery of the lung, and evidence suggests that the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the lung exists at a scale of an acinus or a few acini. In addition, aerosol deposition in the alveolar region is unexpectedly high compared with existing models. PMID:10904076

  15. American Lung Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule September 7, 2016 In response to today’s ... to finalize an update to the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule to reduce ozone pollution, Harold P. Wimmer... ...

  16. Subclinical Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tracy J.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of high-resolution computed tomography in clinical and research settings has increased the detection of interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals. We reported that in smokers, ILA were present in about 1 of every 12 high-resolution computed tomographic scans; however, the long-term significance of these subclinical changes remains unclear. Studies in families affected with pulmonary fibrosis, smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patients with inflammatory lung disease have shown that asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals with ILA have reductions in lung volume, functional limitations, increased pulmonary symptoms, histopathologic changes, and molecular profiles similar to those observed in patients with clinically significant interstitial lung disease (ILD). These findings suggest that, in select at-risk populations, ILA may represent early stages of pulmonary fibrosis or subclinical ILD. The growing interest surrounding this topic is motivated by our poor understanding of the inciting events and natural history of ILD, coupled with a lack of effective therapies. In this perspective, we outline past and current research focused on validating radiologic, physiological, and molecular methods to detect subclinical ILD. We discuss the limitations of the available cross-sectional studies and the need for future longitudinal studies to determine the prognostic and therapeutic implications of subclinical ILD in populations at risk of developing clinically significant ILD. PMID:22366047

  17. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 224,390 % of All New Cancer Cases 13.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 158,080 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 415,707 people living with lung and bronchus ...

  18. Lung Cancer – Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer, early attempts to modulate the immune system via vaccine based therapeutics have to date, been unsuccessful. An improved understanding of tumor immunology has facilitated the production of more sophisticated lung cancer vaccines. It is anticipated, that it will likely require multiple epitopes of a diverse set of genes restricted to multiple haplotypes to generate a truly effective vaccine that is able to overcome the various immunologic escape mechanisms that tumors employ. Other issues to overcome include optimal patient selection, which adjuvant agent to use and how to adequately monitor for an immunological response. This review discusses the most promising vaccination strategies for non small cell lung cancer including the allogeneic tumor cell vaccine belagenpumatucel-L, which is a mixture of 4 allogeneic non small cell lung cancer cell lines genetically modified to secrete an antisense oligonucleotide to TGF-β2 and three other target protein-specific vaccines designed to induce responses against melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), mucin 1 (MUC1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). PMID:21952280

  19. CAVEOLINS AND LUNG FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A.; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  20. Autoimmunity: lungs and citrullination.

    PubMed

    Klareskog, Lars; Catrina, Anca I

    2015-05-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are a distinctive feature of a subset of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A new report investigates how lung inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects protein citrullination, providing an additional piece of information on the potential link between airway inflammation and RA. PMID:25776950

  1. [Arc welder's lung].

    PubMed

    Molinari, Luciana; Alvarez, Clarisa; Semeniuk, Guillermo B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis of electric arc welder or siderotic pneumoconiosis was described by Doig and McLaughlin in 1936 as a lung disease caused by chronic inhalation of iron fumes in electric arc welders. We present a case report of electric arc welder siderosis associated with high levels of ferritin, without findings of iron deposit in any other organ. PMID:21163741

  2. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  3. Caveolins and lung function.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  4. Marijuana and the lung.

    PubMed

    Patrick, G B

    1980-05-01

    Short-term effects of marijuana smoking include bronchodilatation; long-term effects on the respiratory tree appear comparable with those of heavy cigarette use. Contamination of marijuana with paraquat, a potent herbicide, does not at this time appear to constitute a significant hazard to the lungs. PMID:7375399

  5. Nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this review is to report the Clinical Year in Review proceedings in the field of nonsmall cell lung cancer that were presented at the 2012 European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Various topics were reviewed, including epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and palliative and end of life care. PMID:23457162

  6. Lung cancer treatment outcomes in recipients of lung transplant

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lingling; Pennell, Nathan A.; Elson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung transplant recipients develop lung cancer more commonly than the general population. The best treatment approach for these patients is unclear. The goal of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes in this population. Methods We used the Cleveland Clinic lung transplant database to identify patients diagnosed with lung cancer at the time of or after lung transplant. Transplant and lung cancer-related data were retrospectively reviewed. Results Among 847 patients underwent lung transplant between 2005 and 2013, 17 (2%) were diagnosed with lung cancer and included. Median age was 61 (range, 48–70) years. Majority were stage I/II (n=11), one had stage IIIA, five had stage IV. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were more common than small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (n=15 vs. 2). Curative treatment was performed as lobectomy in native lung (n=1), and radiation in transplanted lung (n=2). Chemotherapy was given in 10 patients, primarily carboplatin-based doublets with docetaxel, pemetrexed, or etoposide. Six of these received palliative chemotherapy for either metastases at diagnosis (n=3) or recurrence after early stage disease (n=3). Except for one patient with complete response, all others had progressive disease following palliative chemotherapy. Overall, patients who received chemotherapy had a median survival of 7.5 months from the initiation of chemotherapy, but 30% developed grade 5 sepsis. Median survival for stage I–IIIA and stage IV were 23.2 and 2.5 months respectively. Conclusions Lung cancer in lung transplant recipients carries various clinical courses. Patients with metastatic disease have substantial toxicities from chemotherapy and poor survival. Early stage patients should be offered treatment with modified dosages to decrease the risk of severe toxicities. PMID:26798588

  7. Update in Lung Cancer 2014.

    PubMed

    Spira, Avrum; Halmos, Balazs; Powell, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    In the past 2 years, lung cancer research and clinical care have advanced significantly. Advancements in the field have improved outcomes and promise to lead to further reductions in deaths from lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. These advances include identification of new molecular targets for personalized targeted therapy, validation of molecular signatures of lung cancer risk in smokers, progress in lung tumor immunotherapy, and implementation of population-based lung cancer screening with chest computed tomography in the United States. In this review, we highlight recent research in these areas and challenges for the future. PMID:26230235

  8. School Astronomy Club: from Project to Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folhas, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    them the students have participated in various activities such as scientific research of NEOs (Near Earth Objects) of the IASC Project (International Astronomical Search Collaboration (pronounced "Isaac")), an educational outreach program which provides high quality astronomical data from several Professional Astronomy Observatories, to allow students to scrutinize the space with professional tools and be able to make original astronomical discoveries. They use also professional, robotically controlled telescope for astronomical research and education projects, such as the two telescopes of Faulkes Telescope Project (2.0m diameter telescope at Hawaii and Australia) and the Liverpool Telescope of Astrophysics Research Institute of Liverpool John Moores University (2.0m diameter telescope, Canary Islands), to obtain pictures and data from galaxies and nebulae, and try to solve problems using real science data that they have either obtained themselves through their own observations or data acquired from other sources. These students learn what is, and how to make Science, develop their own skills and knowledge, transferring this enthusiasm to others and promoting a culture of school we all desire.

  9. Lung isolation, one-lung ventilation and hypoxaemia during lung isolation

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Atul; Bhargava, Suresh; Mangal, Vandana; Parashar, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Lung isolation is being used more frequently in both adult and paediatric age groups due to increasing incidence of thoracoscopy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in these patients. Various indications for lung isolation and one-lung ventilation include surgical and non-surgical reasons. Isolation can be achieved by double-lumen endotracheal tubes or bronchial blocker. Different issues arise in prone and semi-prone position. The management of hypoxia with lung isolation is a stepwise drill of adding inhaled oxygen, adding positive end-expiratory pressure to ventilated lung and continuous positive airway pressure to non-ventilated side. PMID:26556920

  10. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients. PMID:27107715

  11. [Pumpless extracorporeal lung assist].

    PubMed

    Göbölös, László; Hejjel, László; Imre, Jenô; Lindenmayer-G, Réka; Wiebe, Karsten; Foltan, Maik; Thrum, Andrea; Ugocsai, Péter; Tóth, Zsolt; Farkasfalvi, Klára; Sipos, Elemér; Kiss, Rudolf; Gyorimolnár, Iván; Philipp, Alois

    2008-06-29

    The recently introduced pumpless extracorporeal lung assist (PECLA) is a remarkable alternative to the conventional extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in case of severe lung failure. By establishing a shunt between femoral artery and vein using the arterio-venous pressure gradient as a driving force through a low-resistance membrane oxygenator, PECLA provides highly effective gas-exchange by preserved cardiac function. Due to its closed system, reduced priming volume and low heparin demand, the unfavourable effects of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can be effectively diminished. Hence the small technical, financial and personal input, the PECLA can be ideally used in district hospitals and during transport as well. Our short summary demonstrates the advantages and safety of the system proven over 123 cases. PMID:18565818

  12. LUMOR: an app for standardized control and monitoring of a porcine lung and its nutrient cycle.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Gregor; Frohner, Matthias; Sauermann, Stefan; Forjan, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of the EU-funded project ElBik has been the lung simulator 'iLung', which imitates an actively breathing human lung with a porcine lung. In order to keep the explanted lung in a nearly physiological state during transportation from the slaughterhouse to the ventilation laboratory the tissue needs to be nourished and temperature controlled. The Project AlveoPic designs a mobile transport vehicle implementing an ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 compliant communication interface for the exchange of the physical parameters, alert messages and setpoint-values. An appropriate 11073 domain information model is designed and limitations of the defined services and attributes are identified. For monitoring purposes the Android App LUMOR is implemented providing a user with an easy-to-handle GUI. It was found, that alert capabilities and remote set features are not well supported in ISO/IEEE 11073-20601 at the moment and possible workarounds are discussed. PMID:24825688

  13. Angiosarcoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Grafino, Mónica; Alves, Paula; de Almeida, Margarida Mendes; Garrido, Patrícia; Hasmucrai, Direndra; Teixeira, Encarnação; Sotto-Mayor, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular tumor. Pulmonary involvement is usually attributable to metastasis from other primary sites, primary pulmonary angiosarcoma therefore being quite uncommon. We report a case of angiosarcoma with pulmonary involvement, probably primary to the lung, which had gone untreated for more than two years. We describe this rare neoplasm and its growth, as well as the extensive local invasion and hematogenous metastasis at presentation. We also discuss its poor prognosis. PMID:26982044

  14. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  15. Lung donor selection criteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant. PMID:25132970

  16. Lung donor selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant. PMID:25132970

  17. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2000-05-01

    Screening for lung cancer serves to prevent deaths from this disease insofar as earlier resections are associated with higher rates of cure. There is good reason to believe that this is the case: in stage I, the 5-year survival rate with resection is 70%, whereas without resection the corresponding rate is only 10%. Before this evidence emerged, various authoritative organizations and agencies in North America advised against screening for lung cancer on the grounds of the results of several RCTs. As for CXR, I argue that the study results are consistent with up to 40% reduction in the fatality rate. Moreover, modern helical CT screening provides for detecting much smaller tumors than were detected in those studies. It is time to revoke the conclusion that screening for lung cancer does not serve to prevent deaths from this disease, and to quantify the usefulness of CT screening in particular. As for the requisite research, the prevailing orthodoxy has it that RCTs are to be used, but I argue that more meaningful results are obtainable, more rapidly and much less expensively, by the use of noncomparative (and hence unrandomized) studies. PMID:10855255

  18. Farmer's lung in Devon.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, J T; Adkins, G E; Margaret, L; Moore, B; McWhite, E

    1975-01-01

    Farmer's lung is a cause of disability to agricultural workers in Devon and there is no evidence that the incidence is falling. A survey of known cases was made to assess the degree of disability in relation to the clinical history, the presence of farmer's lung precipitins, tests of lung function, and radiographic changes. Information was obtained about 200 patients diagnosed between 1939 and 1971. A survey of 148 of these patients showed that the disease was most commonly diagnosed in men aged 40 to 50 years and the most important symptom at diagnosis was dyspnoea related to occupational exposure to hay or grain. The onset was often insidious and only 67 patients (45%) were diagnosed during the first year of the disorder. Disability was severe in about one-third of the cases. The degree of disability did not seem to be related to the serological changes recorded either at diagnosis or at the time of our survey. Disability was commonly associated with restriction and reduced gas transfer factor and with airways obstruction in more severe cases. Many individuals reporting significant disability had only slightly abnormal ventilatory function tests at rest. Radiographic changes were found at survey in about one-third of the subjects reporting disability. Many farmers had not used an efficient mask. Treatment is unsatisfactory but steroid therapy is effective in acute episodes. PMID:1179317

  19. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  20. Synchronous Multiple Lung Adenocarcinomas: Estrogen Concentration in Peripheral Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shinchi, Yusuke; Sanada, Mune; Motooka, Yamato; Fujino, Kosuke; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate of synchronous multiple lung adenocarcinomas (SMLA), which display multiple ground glass opacity nodules in the peripheral lung, is increasing due to advances in high resolution computed tomography. The backgrounds of multicentric development of adenocarcinoma are unknown. In this study, we quantitated estrogen concentration in the peripheral lungs of postmenopausal female patients with SMLA. Methods The tissue concentration of estrogens (estrone [E1] and estdadiol [E2]) in the noncancerous peripheral lung were measured with liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in postmenopausal female patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The expression levels of CYP19A1 in the normal lung were also quantitated with real-time PCR. Thirty patients with SMLA and 79 cases of control patients with single lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed. Results The concentrations of E1 and E2 in the noncancerous tissue were significantly higher in SMLA cases than control cases (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02, respectively). The minor allele (A) of single nucleotide polymorphism rs3764221 were significantly associated with higher concentration of E1 and E2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.01, respectively) and higher CYP19A1 mRNA expression (P = 0.03). Conclusion The tissue estrogen concentration of peripheral lung was significantly higher in SMLA than control cases. The high concentration of estrogen may be one of the causes of multicentric development of peripheral lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27526096

  1. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients. PMID:26483336

  2. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  3. Controversies in Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ritu R; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Jacobson, Francine L

    2016-02-01

    There remains an extensive debate over lung cancer screening, with lobbying for and against screening for very compelling reasons. The National Lung Screening Trial, International Early Lung Cancer Program, and other major screening studies favor screening with low-dose CT scans and have shown a reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality. The increasing incidence of lung cancer and the dismal survival rate for advanced disease despite improved multimodality therapy have sparked an interest in the implementation of national lung cancer screening. Concerns over imaging workflow, radiation dose, management of small nodules, overdiagnosis bias, lead-time and length-time bias, emerging new technologies, and cost-effectiveness continue to be debated. The authors address each of these issues as they relate to radiologic practice. PMID:26846531

  4. Computer simulations of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-10-01

    Lung surfactant lines the gas-exchange interface in the lungs and reduces the surface tension, which is necessary for breathing. Lung surfactant consists mainly of lipids with a small amount of proteins and forms a monolayer at the air-water interface connected to bilayer reservoirs. Lung surfactant function involves transfer of material between the monolayer and bilayers during the breathing cycle. Lipids and proteins are organized laterally in the monolayer; selected species are possibly preferentially transferred to bilayers. The complex 3D structure of lung surfactant and the exact roles of lipid organization and proteins remain important goals for research. We review recent simulation studies on the properties of lipid monolayers, monolayers with phase coexistence, monolayer-bilayer transformations, lipid-protein interactions, and effects of nanoparticles on lung surfactant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26922885

  5. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel Alberto; Wakelee, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is predominantly associated with cigarette smoking; however, a substantial minority of patients with the disease have never smoked. In the US it is estimated there are 17,000-26,000 annual deaths from lung cancer in never smokers, which as a separate entity would be the seventh leading cause of cancer mortality. Controversy surrounds the question of whether or not the incidence of lung cancer in never-smokers is increasing, with more data to support this observation in Asia. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in never smokers including second hand smoke, indoor air pollution, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility among others. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histology of lung cancer in never smokers and in comparison to lung cancer in smokers appears less complex with a higher likelihood to have targetable driver mutations. PMID:26667338

  6. Uranium miner lung cancer study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    1986-06-01

    This study on uranium miners was started in 1957 and extended through June 30, 1986. It consisted of the routine screening of sputum from uranium miners of the Colorado Plateau, and collection of surgical and autopsy material from uranium miners who developed lung cancer. The projects resulted in: (1) Proof, for the first time, that cancer takes from 10 to 15 years to develop from the maximum accumulated carcinogenic insult and can be demonstrated through progressive cellular changes of the bronchial tree; (2) Development of a method for preserving, concentrating, and processing sputum samples. This is known as the Saccomanno Technique, and is used worldwide in diagnosing lung cancer; (3) Publication of the 1st and 2nd editions of a full-color textbook entitled ''Diagnostic Pulmonary Cytology;'' (4) Presentation of conclusive data on the effects of cigarette smoking and alpha progeny radiation on uranium miners, and information on safe radiation exposure levels; (5) Development of a brush-wash tube for collecting, concentrating, and preparing bronchial brushings and washings; (6) Development of cytological criteria which has improved sensitivity from 30% to about 60%; (7) Development of criteria for cytologic identification of carcinoma in situ, making it possible to diagnose lung cancer before it can be detected on chest x-ray.

  7. World conference on lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Felip, Enriqueta; Rosell, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer death. Improving this dismal outcome requires cooperation among several specialists. The 10th World Conference on Lung Cancer was held in Vancouver, Canada last month. The meeting was organised on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and the British Columbia Cancer Agency. This Conference was chaired by Nevin Murray and the scientific sessions took place 10 - 14 August, with > 3000 participating lung cancer experts. The Vancouver programme included > 140 invited speakers throughout the 'meet the professor', plenary and interactive sessions, as well as 300 oral and 500 poster presentations. PMID:14640956

  8. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  9. Ex vivo lung graft perfusion.

    PubMed

    Briot, Raphaël; Gennai, Stéphane; Maignan, Maxime; Souilamas, Redha; Pison, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    This review proposes an update of the state of the art and the ongoing clinical trials of ex vivo lung perfusion for lung transplantation in patients. Ex vivo lung perfusion techniques (EVLP) can be used to evaluate a lung graft outside of the body. The goal of EVLP is to study the functional status of lung grafts that were first rejected for transplantation because they did not match all criteria for a conventional transplantation. After an EVLP evaluation, some of these lungs may be requalified for a possible transplantation in patients. This article proposes an overview of the developments of EVLP techniques. During EVLP, the perfusion and ventilation of the isolated lung preparation are very progressive in order to avoid oedema due to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Lung evaluation is mainly based on gasometric (PaO2/FiO2) and rheological criteria (low pulmonary arterial resistance). Several series of patients transplanted with EVLP evaluated lungs have been recently published with promising results. EVLP preparations also allow a better understanding of the physiopathology and treatments of ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Organ procurements from "non-heart-beating" donors will probably require a wider application of these ex vivo techniques. The development of semi-automated systems might facilitate the clinical use of EVLP techniques. PMID:26746565

  10. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  11. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  12. Understanding Lung Problems: Make Each Breath Healthy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each Breath Healthy Heath and Aging Understanding Lung Problems—Make Each Breath Healthy Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ( ... time your likelihood of having a serious lung problem increases, especially if you smoke. Lung problems that ...

  13. Heart-lung transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A combined heart-lung transplant may be recommended for patients who have both cardiac and lung disease. The most common reasons for a combined heart-lung transplant are pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. What To Expect Before a Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect Before a Lung Transplant If you get into a medical center's ... friends also can offer support. When a Donor Lung Becomes Available OPTN matches donor lungs to recipients ...

  16. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. What to Expect During a Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During a Lung Transplant Just before lung transplant surgery, you will ... airway and its blood vessels to your heart. Lung Transplant The illustration shows the process of a ...

  18. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases? Asbestos-related lung diseases are diseases caused ... peritoneum (PER-ih-to-NE-um). Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases Figure A shows the location of the ...

  19. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  20. Agricultural lung disease.

    PubMed

    Spurzem, John R; Romberger, Debra J; Von Essen, Susanna G

    2002-12-01

    Agricultural work is associated with high rates of injury, disability, and illness. Agricultural workers are at increased risk for a variety of illnesses including respiratory disorders, dermatologic conditions, and cancer. The recognition of ODTS led to increased understanding of acute illness in farmers and grain workers. Previously, many cases of acute illness were probably erroneously called farmer's lung. The same agents that are responsible for ODTS are responsible for the high prevalence of bronchitis in certain agricultural workers. The recent description of the innate immune system is very exciting because it will lead to increased understanding of the pathogenesis of organic dust induced disorders. PMID:12512166

  1. Lung cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Kornelia; Kropfmüller, Roland; Schinko, Herwig; Bogner, Stephan; Fellner, Franz; Arzt, Wolfgang; Lamprecht, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In the 26th week of gestation, a 29-year-old pregnant office employee was referred to the pulmonary department of Linz General Hospital (AKH) under the suspicion of tuberculosis. She complained of a cough with intermittent hemoptysis and pain in the thoracic spine from which she had been suffering the past 9 weeks. A plain chest X-ray showed a dense infiltrate on the right side and multiple smaller shadows in both lungs. Laboratory testing revealed anemia, leukocytosis, and an increase of C-reactive protein. All tests for tuberculosis were negative.A bronchoscopy was performed and biopsies were taken from the right upper and middle lobe. The histopathological examination found cells of an adenocarcinoma. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large tumor and surrounding atelectasis were seen in the right upper and middle lobe, as well as multiple intrapulmonary metastases in both lungs. In addition, not only metastases in the thoracic spine (level Th2/3) but also at other osseous locations and multiple cerebral metastases were detected. The patient received one cycle of chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel and carboplatin (AUC5) in the 27th week of gestation. Additional radiotherapy was applied to the involved thoracic spine. Due to positive epidermal growth factor receptor mutation, therapy with gefitinib 250 mg/day was started 2 days after a Caesarean section (preceded by treatment for fetal lung maturation). A healthy girl was delivered in the 30th week of pregnancy. Staging with computed tomography (CT) after delivery revealed an unstable fracture of Th2 with compression of the spinal cord. Neurosurgery was performed, consisting of a ventral corporectomy of Th1-2 followed by an anterior and posterior osteosynthesis for stabilization. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits within 1 week. Subsequent treatment with gefitinib improved the performance status of the patient, and CT scans of the chest and an MRI of the brain showed the size of

  2. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  3. Immunologic lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references.

  4. Eosinophilic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic lung diseases especially comprise eosinophilic pneumonia or as the more transient Löffler syndrome, which is most often due to parasitic infections. The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia is based on characteristic clinical-imaging features and the demonstration of alveolar eosinophilia, defined as at least 25% eosinophils at BAL. Peripheral blood eosinophilia is common but may be absent at presentation in idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which may be misdiagnosed as severe infectious pneumonia. All possible causes of eosinophilia, including drug, toxin, fungus related etiologies, must be thoroughly investigated. Extrathoracic manifestations should raise the suspicion of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:27514599

  5. Screening for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Brendon M; Pua, Bradley; Altorki, Nasser K

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is a global health burden and is among the most common and deadliest of all malignancies worldwide. The goal of screening programs is to detect tumors in earlier, curable stages, consequently reducing disease-specific mortality. The issue of screening has great relevance to thoracic surgeons, who should play a leading role in the debate over screening and its consequences. The burden is on thoracic surgeons to work in a multidisciplinary setting to guide and treat these patients safely and responsibly, ensuring low morbidity and mortality of potential diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. PMID:27261909

  6. Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Archontogeorgis, Kostas; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Nena, Evangelia; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) represent a heterogeneous group of more than two hundred diseases of either known or unknown etiology with different pathogenesis and prognosis. Lung cancer, which is the major cause of cancer death in the developed countries, is mainly attributed to cigarette smoking and exposure to inhaled carcinogens. Different studies suggest a link between ILDs and lung cancer, through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as inflammation, coagulation, dysregulated apoptosis, focal hypoxia, activation, and accumulation of myofibroblasts as well as extracellular matrix accumulation. This paper reviews current evidence on the association between lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and pneumoconiosis. PMID:22900168

  7. Heart-lung transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100147.htm Heart-lung transplant - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Transplantation Lung Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  8. UK partnership targets lung cancer.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Cancer Research UK has joined with two major pharmaceutical companies to launch a large multiarm clinical trial, dubbed the National Lung Matrix trial, to test the effectiveness of promising experimental therapies in treating rare forms of advanced lung cancer. PMID:25002593

  9. Asbestos-related lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Westerfield, B.T. )

    1992-06-01

    Asbestos is a versatile fibrous mineral that can cause lung disease and death. Asbestosis, benign pleural disease, lung cancer, and mesothelioma can all result from inhaling asbestos. The history of disease and exposure risks are discussed. The difficult assessment of risk and the long latency period for development of disease demand evaluation and regular surveillance of asbestos-exposed workers.22 references.

  10. Lung Cancer Screening Recommendation Questioned.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    According to a retrospective analysis of data from the National Lung Screening Trial, participants with a history of heavy smoking who test negative for abnormalities suggestive of lung cancer on an initial low-dose CT screen may not need yearly CT scans. Instead, they could work with their doctors to devise an appropriate screening schedule based on individual risk factors. PMID:27076372

  11. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  12. Bronchoscopy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emslander, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cancer site in men and women with a high incidence and mortality rate. Most patients are diagnosed when the disease has already spread. An early, detection and immediate and accurate histological or cytological diagnosis are essential for a hopeful outcome. In most patients, bronchoscopy is the method of choice in establishing a suspected lung neoplasm. With the rigid and flexible method, two complementary techniques are available. The methods bear a very low mortality rate if sufficient monitoring and resuscitative instrumentation is available. Rigid bronchoscopy offers the possibility of obtaining large biopsy specimens from the tumorous tissue and provides an effective tool in the control of major haemorrhage. However, it cannot be used for the inspection of further peripherally located parts of the bronchial system and needs general anaesthesia. In contrast, the flexible method can be quickly and readily performed at practically any location using portable equipment. Bronchi can be inspected up to the 8th order and with bronchial washing, forceps biopsy, brush biopsy and fluorescence bronchoscopy techniques with a high diagnostic yield are available. This holds true, especially if these sampling techniques are used as complementary methods. PMID:18493335

  13. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  14. Stem Cells and Lung Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    El-Badrawy, Mohammad K.; Shalabi, Nesrein M.; Mohamed, Mie A.; Ragab, Amany; Abdelwahab, Heba Wagih

    2016-01-01

    Background:Tissues such as the lung, liver, and pancreas that have a low steady-state cell turnover yet can respond robustly after injury to replace damaged cells. The airway epithelium is exposed to inhaled particles and pathogens that may lead to the development of a many infectious and inflammatory respiratory diseases. Lung transplantation is an accepted modality of treatment for end-stage lung diseases. Since the early 1990 s, more than 26,000 lung transplants have been performed at centers worldwide. However, the availability of donor tissues and organs is limited, which presents a serious limitation for widespread transplantation surgery. The appearance of bioengineered lung and tracheal tissue transplants is considered a promising alternative to the classical transplantation of donor organ/tissue. Stem cells therapy arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. PMID:27426083

  15. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  16. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-16

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Modulation of lung liquid clearance by isoproterenol in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Saldías, F; Lecuona, E; Friedman, E; Barnard, M L; Ridge, K M; Sznajder, J I

    1998-05-01

    beta-Adrenergic agonists have been reported to increase lung liquid clearance by stimulating active Na+ transport across the alveolar epithelium. We studied mechanisms by which beta-adrenergic isoproterenol (Iso) increases lung liquid clearance in isolated perfused fluid-filled rat lungs. Iso perfused through the pulmonary circulation at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-8) M increased lung liquid clearance compared with that of control lungs (P < 0.01). The increase in lung liquid clearance was inhibited by the beta-antagonist propranolol (10(-5) M), the Na(+)-channel blocker amiloride (10(-4) M), and the antagonist of Na-K-ATPase, ouabain (5 x 10(-4) M). Colchicine, which inhibits cell microtubular transport of ion-transporting proteins to the plasma membrane, blocked the stimulatory effects of Iso on active Na+ transport, whereas the isomer lumicolchicine, which does not affect cell microtubular transport, did not inhibit Na+ transport. In parallel with these changes, the Na-K-ATPase alpha 1-subunit protein abundance and activity increased in alveolar type II cells stimulated by 10(-6) M Iso. Colchicine blocked the stimulatory effect of Iso and the recruitment of Na-K-ATPase alpha 1-protein to the basolateral membrane of alveolar type II cells. Accordingly, Iso increased active Na+ transport and lung liquid clearance by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors and probably by upregulation of apical Na+ channels and basolateral Na-K-ATPase mechanisms. Recruitment from intracellular pools and microtubular transport of Na+ pumps to the plasma membrane participate in beta-adrenergic stimulation of lung liquid clearance in rat lungs. PMID:9612284

  18. [Therapeutic training and sports in chronic diseases of the lung].

    PubMed

    Podolsky, A; Haber, P

    1993-01-01

    Training is defined as systematic physical activity in order to improve the physical working capacity, which causes measurable morphological and functional changes in organs. Effects and the rules of applying aerobic endurance training in patients with chronic diseases of the lungs are dealt with. Training does not replace the normal medication, but is an additional therapeutic mean in order to regain physical working capacity, lost by chronic immobilization in the natural course of disease. Contraindications are acute diseases and exacerbations, but not a certain degree of the disease. Training does not improve the lung function, but the function of the other organs, the physical working capacity ist based on (circulation, musculature). This helps to use optimally the remaining reserves of lung function. Methods of aerobic endurance training are described, the definition of aims, performance diagnostic and the finding of the exact doses of training according to intensity, duration, frequency and the weekly netto training time. The training in different diseases of the lungs is discussed: In asthma bronchiale the prophylaxis of the exercise induced asthma and permitted and forbidden drugs for asthmatics according to the rules of international olympic committee. In chronic bronchitis with arterial hypoxemia, in restrictive lung diseases and in pulmonary hypertension. At last the way to prescribing training for patients with chronic pulmonary diseases is described as well as the advising of patients wishing to do sport by their own motivation or planning projects, for instance touristic ones, which require physical stress. PMID:8465532

  19. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  20. Target Therapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cafarotti, Stefano; Lococo, Filippo; Froesh, Patrizia; Zappa, Francesco; Andrè, Dutly

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is an extremely heterogeneous disease, with well over 50 different histological variants recognized under the fourth revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) typing system. Because these variants have differing genetic and biological properties correct classification of lung cancer is necessary to assure that lung cancer patients receive optimum management. Due to the recent understanding that histologic typing and EGFR mutation status are important for target the therapy in lung adenocarcinoma patients there was a great need for a new classification that addresses diagnostic issues and strategic management to allow for molecular testing in small biopsy and cytology specimens. For this reason and in order to address advances in lung cancer treatment an international multidisciplinary classification was proposed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS), further increasing the histological heterogeneity and improving the existing WHO-classification. Is now the beginning of personalized therapy era that is ideally finalized to treat each individual case of lung cancer in different way. PMID:26667341

  1. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  2. Ventilator-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kuchnicka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation of disease-affected lungs, as well as being an inadequate mode of ventilation for initially healthy lungs, can cause significant changes in their structure and function. In order to differentiate these processes, two terms are used: ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In both cases, lung injury primarily results from differences in transpulmonary pressure - a consequence of an imbalance between lung stress and strain. This paper focuses on changes in lung structure and function due to this imbalance. Moreover, in this context, barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma are interpreted, and the importance of signal transduction as a process inducing local and systemic inflammatory responses (biotrauma), is determined. None of the assessed methods of reducing VALI and VILI has been found to be entirely satisfactory, yet studies evaluating oscillatory ventilation, liquid ventilation, early ECMO, super-protective ventilation or noisy ventilation and administration of certain drugs are under way. Low tidal volume ventilation and adequately adjusted PEEP appear to be the best preventive measures of mechanical ventilation in any setting, including the operating theatre. Furthermore, this paper highlights the advances in VILI/VALI prevention resulting from better understanding of pathophysiological phenomena. PMID:24092514

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and the Lung.

    PubMed

    Baffi, Cynthia W; Wood, Lisa; Winnica, Daniel; Strollo, Patrick J; Gladwin, Mark T; Que, Loretta G; Holguin, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    A link between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and lung diseases has been observed in several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This syndrome has been identified as an independent risk factor for worsening respiratory symptoms, greater lung function impairment, pulmonary hypertension, and asthma. This review will discuss several potential mechanisms to explain these associations, including dietary factors and the effect of adiposity and fat-induced inflammation on the lungs, and the role of other comorbidities that frequently coexist with MetS, such as OSA and obesity. In contrast to the well-known association between asthma and obesity, the recognition that MetS affects the lung is relatively new. Although some controversy remains as to whether MetS is a unique disease entity, its individual components have independently been associated with changes in pulmonary function or lung disease. There is, however, uncertainty as to the relative contribution that each metabolic factor has in adversely affecting the respiratory system; also, it is unclear how much of the MetS-related lung effects occur independently of obesity. In spite of these epidemiological limitations, the proposed mechanistic pathways strongly suggest that this association is likely to be causal. Given the wide prevalence of MetS in the general population, it is imperative that we continue to further understand how this metabolic disorder impacts the lung and how to prevent its complications. PMID:26836925

  4. Tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Head, K. W.; Nielsen, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lung tumours are not common in domestic animals; there has not been the increase in epidermoid carcinomas and anaplastic small-cell carcinomas that has occurred in man this century. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in animals. The biological behaviour of each type of tumour in animals seems to be much the same as in man. The tumours are described histologically, the main categories being: epidermoid carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumours, bronchial gland tumours, benign tumours, and sarcomas. ImagesFig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4371738

  5. Anaerobic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M T; Goldman, B S

    1994-06-01

    Aspiration is the leading cause of anaerobic lung infections. Risk factors for these infections include a depressed level of consciousness, a history of seizure, general anesthesia, central nervous system or neuromuscular disease, cerebrovascular accident, impaired swallowing and use of a tracheal or nasogastric tube. Clinical presentation includes fever, weight loss, malaise and cough productive of foul-smelling sputum. Diagnosis is based on radiographic findings, clinical features and a characteristic morphology of mixed flora on Gram stain of uncontaminated pulmonary specimens. The diagnosis is confirmed by isolation of organisms, usually polymicrobial, on culture. Treatment includes proper drainage, debridement of necrotic tissue and an antibiotic regimen (often initially empiric) with an agent active against anaerobic and aerobic organisms. PMID:8203319

  6. Measurement of absolute regional lung air volumes from near-field x-ray speckles.

    PubMed

    Leong, Andrew F T; Paganin, David M; Hooper, Stuart B; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J

    2013-11-18

    Propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBX) imaging yields high contrast images of the lung where airways that overlap in projection coherently scatter the x-rays, giving rise to a speckled intensity due to interference effects. Our previous works have shown that total and regional changes in lung air volumes can be accurately measured from two-dimensional (2D) absorption or phase contrast images when the subject is immersed in a water-filled container. In this paper we demonstrate how the phase contrast speckle patterns can be used to directly measure absolute regional lung air volumes from 2D PBX images without the need for a water-filled container. We justify this technique analytically and via simulation using the transport-of-intensity equation and calibrate the technique using our existing methods for measuring lung air volume. Finally, we show the full capabilities of this technique for measuring regional differences in lung aeration. PMID:24514306

  7. Effects of endotoxin induced lung injury and exercise in goats/sheep. Final report, 1 February 1992-2 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mundie, T.G.

    1993-06-02

    This study was designed the effects of exercise performed on animals already injured with E. coli endotoxin. This would tell us whether exercise makes the lung injury worse. It would also tell us how much exercise performance is impaired. These studies were designed to give further insights into the underlying causes of acute lung injury. Premature termination of the study prevented completion of the research project. It appeared from the limited experimentation conducted that maximal exercise was impaired by endotoxin-induced lung injury. Conclusions regarding exacerbation of endotoxin-induced lung injury cannot be made.... Acute lung injury, Maximal exercise, Endotoxin.

  8. Pulmonary mechanics and diffusion after 'shock lung'.

    PubMed Central

    Yernault, J C; Englert, M; Sergysels, R; De Coster, A

    1975-01-01

    Pulmonary function studies performed in seven patients who had recovered from 'shock lung' showed a highly significant decrease of diffusing properties of the lung, a slight loss of lung recoil pressure, and a borderline increase of residual volume with normal vital capacity and total lung capacity. Pulmonary compliance was normal. The interpretation of these findings is discussed. PMID:1145529

  9. 75 FR 36427 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... Emphasis Panel, Program Project in Cardiovascular Disease. Date: July 29, 2010. Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m... Project in Lung Disease BioRepository. Date: July 15, 2010. Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Agenda: To review...

  10. Lung deformation estimation and four-dimensional CT lung reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Taylor, Russell H; Fichtinger, Gabor; Cleary, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image acquisition is a useful technique in radiation treatment planning and interventional radiology in that it can account for respiratory motion of lungs. Current 4D lung reconstruction techniques have limitations in either spatial or temporal resolution. In addition, most of these techniques rely on auxiliary surrogates to relate the time of CT scan to the patient's respiratory phase. In this paper, we propose a novel 4D CT lung reconstruction and deformation estimation algorithm. Our algorithm is purely image based. The algorithm can reconstruct high quality 4D images even if the original images are acquired under irregular respiratory motion. The algorithm is validated using synthetic 4D lung data. Experimental results from a swine study data are also presented. PMID:16685974

  11. Occupational and environmental lung disease.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Danielle M; Meyer, Cristopher A; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Occupational and environmental lung disease remains a major cause of respiratory impairment worldwide. Despite regulations, increasing rates of coal worker's pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis are being reported in the United States. Dust exposures are occurring in new industries, for instance, silica in hydraulic fracking. Nonoccupational environmental lung disease contributes to major respiratory disease, asthma, and COPD. Knowledge of the imaging patterns of occupational and environmental lung disease is critical in diagnosing patients with occult exposures and managing patients with suspected or known exposures. PMID:26024603

  12. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  13. A case of familial hot tub lung

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yusuke; Nakano, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Hot tub lung is a lung disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex. We report the first case of familial hot tub lung appearing simultaneously in a husband and wife. Our case supports the consideration that hot tub lung is a hypersensitivity pneumonitis rather than an infectious lung disease. It also suggests that the state of hot tub lung changes seasonally depending on temperature variations, in a manner similar to summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This case demonstrates similarities between hot tub lung and summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis in regards to familial occurrence and seasonal changes in the disease state. PMID:27222790

  14. A case of familial hot tub lung.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yusuke; Nakano, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Hot tub lung is a lung disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex. We report the first case of familial hot tub lung appearing simultaneously in a husband and wife. Our case supports the consideration that hot tub lung is a hypersensitivity pneumonitis rather than an infectious lung disease. It also suggests that the state of hot tub lung changes seasonally depending on temperature variations, in a manner similar to summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This case demonstrates similarities between hot tub lung and summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis in regards to familial occurrence and seasonal changes in the disease state. PMID:27222790

  15. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project Wild may…

  16. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting. PMID:25940429

  17. How Can Visual Arts Help Doctors Develop Medical Insight?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Kathleen; Hammond, Margaret F.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examines how using the visual arts can develop medical insight, as part of a pilot programme for two groups of medical students. It was a UK study; a collaboration between Liverpool and Glyndw University's and Tate Liverpool's learning team. Tate Liverpool is the home of the National Collection of Modern Arts in the North of…

  18. Lung Transcriptomics during Protective Ventilatory Support in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Valladares, Francisco; Klassert, Tilman E.; Valladares, Basilio; Slevogt, Hortense; Ma, Shwu-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe inflammatory process of the lung. The only proven life-saving support is mechanical ventilation (MV) using low tidal volumes (LVT) plus moderate to high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). However, it is currently unknown how they exert the protective effects. To identify the molecular mechanisms modulated by protective MV, this study reports transcriptomic analyses based on microarray and microRNA sequencing in lung tissues from a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis-induced ALI. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. At 24 hours post-CLP, septic animals were randomized to three ventilatory strategies: spontaneous breathing, LVT (6 ml/kg) plus 10 cmH2O PEEP and high tidal volume (HVT, 20 ml/kg) plus 2 cmH2O PEEP. Healthy, non-septic, non-ventilated animals served as controls. After 4 hours of ventilation, lung samples were obtained for histological examination and gene expression analysis using microarray and microRNA sequencing. Validations were assessed using parallel analyses on existing publicly available genome-wide association study findings and transcriptomic human data. The catalogue of deregulated processes differed among experimental groups. The ‘response to microorganisms’ was the most prominent biological process in septic, non-ventilated and in HVT animals. Unexpectedly, the ‘neuron projection morphogenesis’ process was one of the most significantly deregulated in LVT. Further support for the key role of the latter process was obtained by microRNA studies, as four species targeting many of its genes (Mir-27a, Mir-103, Mir-17-5p and Mir-130a) were found deregulated. Additional analyses revealed 'VEGF signaling' as a central underlying response mechanism to all the septic groups (spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated). Based on this data, we conclude that a co-deregulation of 'VEGF signaling' along with 'neuron projection

  19. Screening for occult lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, T. H.; MacIntosh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot screening program for the early detection of lung cancer was carried out in Saskatchewan in 1968 using chest roentgenography and cytologic examination of sputum samples. The yield from 23 000 men aged 40 years and over was only 10 cases. Nine of the men had advanced disease. One had occult lung cancer. A period of 31 months elapsed between the discovery of malignant cells in this patient's sputum and roentgenographic localization of the tumour. Following pneumonectomy he has survived with no discernible residual or metastatic tumour for 12 years. The morphologic changes in the resected lung provided a basis for discussing the preclinical phase of squamous cancer of the lung, the treatment of occult cancer and multicentric primary pulmonary tumours. The survey would have been more successful with a narrower target group and more frequent examination. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6299495

  20. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  1. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  2. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  3. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... caused by conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis). Also, these tests might ...

  4. Early detection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  5. [Photodynamic Therapy for Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Keishi; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2016-07-01

    In Japan, Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is recommended as a treatment option for centrally located early-stage lung cancers (CLELCs). It is a minimally invasive treatment with excellent anti-tumor effects. The 2nd generation photosensitizer, talaporfin sodium has strong anti-tumor effects with much less photosensitivity than porfimer sodium. Moreover, the laser equipment is compact and portable, and talaporfin sodium is now the current mainstay of PDT for lung cancer. For successful PDT, accurate evaluation of tumor extent and bronchial invasion is crucial. Detailed examination of the tumor using autofluorescence bronchoscopy and endobronchial ultrasonography or optical coherence tomography is extremely useful before PDT. At present, PDT has become the 1st choice of treatment for CLELC in institutions with the necessary equipment. It can also be effective for advanced lung cancer causing tracheobronchial obstruction. With such advances in PDT for CLELC, we are expanding the indications of PDT for not only CLELC, but also peripheral type lung cancer. PMID:27440036

  6. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  7. Early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Midthun, David E

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  8. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulos, George A; Vasarmidi, Eirini; Jacob, Joseph; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M

    2015-09-01

    For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currently considered aetiologically linked to smoking and a few others which are more likely to develop in smokers. Here, we aim to focus on the most recent findings regarding the role of smoking in the pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of ILDs. PMID:26324804

  9. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  10. Physical therapy in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Downs, A M

    1996-06-01

    Lung transplantation requires the skillful attention of a health care team to provide optimal results. The physical therapist is an integral part of this team, providing expertise in exercise testing and prescription in all phases, from initial evaluation through postoperative rehabilitation and beyond. In addition, the physical therapist promotes effective ventilation, offers techniques for enhanced coughing and mucociliary clearance, and provides treatment of the musculoskeletal system. Lung transplantation is reserved for patients in whom all other treatments have been exhausted. It is important for the physical therapist to stay abreast of the evolving field of lung transplantation, including medications and complications. The physical therapist has a critical role in helping lung transplant recipients achieve optimal function, increased survival, and improved quality of life. PMID:8650277

  11. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    MedlinePlus

    ... a volcano erupts and releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make ... react with oxygen, moisture, and sunlight in the atmosphere, volcanic smog forms. This smog is a type ...

  12. Lung Involvement in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Scleroderma is a multisystem disease characterized by a severe inflammatory process and exuberant fibrosis. Lung involvement is a frequent complication and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this syndrome. Two major pulmonary syndromes are associated with scleroderma; a pulmonary vascular disorder evolving over time into relatively isolated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Each syndrome, when present, is a cause of morbidity and significantly reduces survival of scleroderma patients when compared to patients free of lung complication. When pulmonary hypertension and ILD are combined, survival is further reduced. Current therapy appears to have no meaningful effect on either condition and, thus, there is a need for better understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms. This review focuses on clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of PAH and ILD as well as other frequent but less debilitating lung complications of scleroderma. PMID:21195581

  13. Integrating social work into palliative care for lung cancer patients and families: a multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Sidhu, Rupinder K; Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer patients and their family caregivers face a wide range of potentially distressing symptoms across the four domains of quality of life. A multidimensional approach to addressing these complex concerns with early integration of palliative care has proven beneficial. This article highlights opportunities to integrate social work using a comprehensive quality of life model and a composite patient scenario from a large lung cancer educational intervention National Cancer Institute-funded program project grant. PMID:24797998

  14. LUNG CANCER IN NEVER SMOKERS: CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Samet, Jonathan M.; Avila-Tang, Erika; Boffetta, Paolo; Hannan, Lindsay M.; Olivo-Marston, Susan; Thun, Michael J.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    More than 161,000 lung cancer deaths are projected to occur in the U.S. in 2008. Of these, an estimated 10–15% will be caused by factors other than active smoking, corresponding to 16,000–24,000 deaths annually. Thus lung cancer in never smokers would rank among the most common causes of cancer mortality in the U.S. if considered to be a separate category. Slightly more than half of the lung cancers caused by factors other than active smoking occur in never smokers. As summarized in the accompanying article, lung cancers that occur in never smokers differ from those that occur in smokers in their molecular profile and response to targeted therapy. These recent laboratory and clinical observations highlight the importance of defining the genetic and environmental factors responsible for the development of lung cancer in never-smokers. This article summarizes available data on the clinical epidemiology of lung cancer in never smokers, and the several environmental risk factors that population-based research has implicated in the etiology of these cancers. Primary factors closely tied to lung cancer in never smokers include exposure to known and suspected carcinogens including radon, second-hand tobacco smoke, and other indoor air pollutants. Several other exposures have been implicated. However, a large fraction of lung cancers occurring in never-smokers cannot be definitively associated with established environmental risk factors, highlighting the need for additional epidemiologic research in this area. PMID:19755391

  15. Welding and Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Van Gelder, Rainer; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Consonni, Dario; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Marcus, Michael; Fabianova, Eleonora; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:24052544

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:22356987

  17. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  18. Angiogenesis in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Mitzner, W; Lee, W; Georgakopoulos, D; Wagner, E

    2000-07-01

    When pulmonary arterial blood flow is obstructed in all mammals studied, there is a compensatory growth of the bronchial vasculature. This angiogenesis normally occurs through a proliferation of the systemic circulation to the intraparenchymal airways. It is an important pathophysiological process, not only in pulmonary vascular disease, but also in lung cancer, because the blood flow that supplies primary lung tumors arises from the systemic circulation. In the mouse, however, the systemic blood vessels that supply the trachea and mainstem bronchi do not penetrate into the intraparenchymal airways, as they do in all other larger species. In this study, we attempted to generate a new functional bronchial circulation in the mouse by permanently obstructing 40% of the pulmonary circulation. We quantified the systemic blood flow to the lung with fluorescent microspheres for 3 months after left pulmonary artery ligation. Results demonstrated that a substantial systemic blood flow to the lung that can eventually supply up to 15% of the normal pulmonary flow can be generated beginning 5-6 days after ligation. These new angiogenic vessels do not arise from the extraparenchymal bronchial circulation. Rather they enter the lung directly via a totally new vasculature that develops between the visceral and parietal pleuras, supplied by several intercostal arteries. This unique model of angiogenesis occurs in the absence of any hypoxic stimulus and mimics the vascular source of many lung tumors. PMID:10880380

  19. [The epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in males and the fifth most frequent cancer in females. In developed countries only breast cancer is diagnosed more often in women. Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in males and females. In the Europe lung cancer accounts for 21% of all cancer cases in males and 29% of all cancer deaths. The rapid increase in lung cancer incidence was observed the since beginning of the XX century till 1990-1994. The incidence in males decreased recently, but still increases in females, especially in young women. The changes in frequency of various histological subtypes of lung cancer are observed too. Despite many clinical trials, modern diagnostic techniques and improved supportive care, the prognosis remains unfavourable and long-term survival almost did not change. In Poland the incidence of lung cancer in 2002 was 81.9/100 000 in males and 22.2/100 000 in females. In both genders 1-year and 5-year survivals time are one of the shortest in Europe. PMID:17541915

  20. Uncontrolled Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death Donors (uDCDDs) as a Source of Lungs for Transplant.

    PubMed

    Egan, T M; Requard, J J

    2015-08-01

    In April 2014, the American Journal of Transplantation published a report on the first lung transplant in the United States recovered from an uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death donor (uDCDD), assessed by ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). The article identified logistical and ethical issues related to introduction of lung transplant from uDCDDs. In an open clinical trial, we have Food and Drug Administration and Institutional Review Board approval to transplant lungs recovered from uDCDDs judged suitable after EVLP. Through this project and other experiences with lung recovery from uDCDDs, we have identified solutions to many logistical challenges and have addressed ethical issues surrounding lung transplant from uDCDDs that were mentioned in this case report. Here, we discuss those challenges, including issues related to recovery of other solid organs from uDCDDs. Despite logistical challenges, uDCDDs could solve the critical shortage of lungs for transplant. Furthermore, by avoiding the deleterious impact of brain death and days of positive pressure ventilation, and by using opportunities to treat lungs in the decedent or during EVLP, lungs recovered from uDCDDs may ultimately prove to be better than lungs currently being transplanted from conventional brain-dead organ donors. PMID:25873272

  1. Feasibility of a photosynthetic artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Basu-Dutt, S; Fandino, M R; Salley, S O; Thompson, I M; Whittlesey, G C; Klein, M D

    1997-01-01

    The success of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for the treatment of acute respiratory failure has led to consideration of the development of a more portable, and perhaps even implantable, artificial lung. The authors suggest a bioregenerative life support system that includes a photo-synthetic organism that can remove CO2 and produce O2 in the presence of an energy source. To build a model of such a photosynthetic artificial lung, the photosynthetic capability of a high temperature strain of the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was maximized at a cell density of 25 million cells/ml to serve as the O2 producer and CO2 remover. The "patient" in this model was comprised of 1 L of medium or 350 ml of blood, interfaced with the photosynthetic system across a gas transfer membrane. The experiments demonstrated the ability of the plant cells to supply O2 and remove CO2 from the "patient" with a maximum rate of 0.55 mmoles/L/hr under the most favorable measured operating conditions. The projected rate of 1.0 mmoles/L/hr required for physiologic applications is not totally ab absurd idea, with a slightly modified set-up. Modifications may be in the form of regulating the photosynthetic pathway or genetically engineering a hybrid strain with enhanced O2 producing and suppressed photoinhibition capacity. PMID:9242940

  2. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Malcolm M.; McKenna, Robert J.; Deschamps, Claude C.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately selected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory therapy, chest radiology, and nursing. The critical analysis of perioperative outcomes has influenced details of the conduct of the procedure and has established a bilateral, stapled approach as the standard of care for LVRS. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) remains the world's largest multi-center, randomized trial comparing LVRS to maximal medical therapy. NETT purposely enrolled a broad spectrum of anatomic patterns of emphysema. This, along with the prospective, audited collection of extensive demographic, physiologic, radiographic, surgical and quality-of-life data, has positioned NETT as the most robust repository of evidence to guide the refinement of patient selection criteria for LVRS, to assist surgeons in providing optimal intraoperative and postoperative care, and to establish benchmarks for survival, complication rates, return to independent living, and durability of response. This article reviews the evolution of current LVRS practice with a particular emphasis on technical aspects of the operation, including the predictors and consequences of its most common complications. PMID:18453353

  3. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  4. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  5. Perfusion and ventilation of isolated canine lungs

    PubMed Central

    Otto, T. J.; Trenkner, M.; Stopczyk, A.; Gawdziński, M.; Chełstowska, B.

    1968-01-01

    In order to evaluate methods of preserving lungs for use in transplantation, experiments on 28 mongrel dogs were carried out. Two methods were tried—first, mechanical respiration of isolated lungs under deep hypothermia, with the vascular bed filled with blood; and, secondly, the perfusion of isolated lungs with the aid of a modified DeWall's apparatus. Allogenic transplantations of lungs preserved in both ways were carried out. Gasometric and histological examinations of preserved lungs, before and after transplantation, were performed. The best results were obtained with perfusion under hypothermic conditions; ventilation without perfusion resulted in failure. Lung transplantation was successful when, after being preserved, the lung remained unchanged. Major discrepancies between the macroscopic and microscopic findings in preserved lungs were observed. An original classification of the changes occurring in preserved lungs is proposed. PMID:4886091

  6. Advances in target therapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul; Berghmans, Thierry; Meert, Anne-Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Herein, we have reviewed and analysed recent literature, published in 2013 and early 2014, in the context of pre-existing data. Considered target therapies were tyrosine kinase inhibitors of active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (e.g. erlotinib, gefinitib and afatinib), anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements (e.g. crizotinib) or angiogenesis (drugs under development), or monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (e.g. bevacizumab) or epidermal growth factor receptors (e.g. cetuximab). The therapeutic project has to consider tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the case of nonsmall cell lung cancer with active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement. However, these drugs should not be used in the absence of the targeted genetic abnormalities. PMID:25726551

  7. Lung procurement for transplantation: new criteria for lung donor selection.

    PubMed

    Moretti, M P; Betto, C; Gambacorta, M; Vesconi, S; Scalamogna, M; Benazzi, E; Ravini, M

    2010-05-01

    In Italy, like everywhere in the world, the organ shortage for transplantation is a real problem. It is well known that lung donors (LD) are particularly difficult to procure and that management of the organ do not care during the diagnosis of cerebral death represents a difficult challenge. In this context, the salvage of the so-called "marginal donors" may increase the pool of donors, favoring organ retrieval. To increase lung procurement, the intensivist must recognize "marginal donors," optimizing organ selection and function. The aim of our study was to review LD procured in 2008, as identified by the unrestricted criteria, of the Nord Italian Transplant program Center (NITp). Particularly, the age and habits of donors and the presence of a parenchyma contusion were not sufficient per se to exclude donation. We revisited lung ventilation and monitoring modalities during cerebral death before retrieval. In 2008, the application of enlarged criteria for LD enabled us to collect 21 LD, namely 33% of all cerebral deaths, versus 13% in 2007. Seeking to maintain good gas exchange and lung function, we implemented a safe ventilation program avoided high peak pressures, and fluid therapy properly guided by the cardiac index and extravascular lung water index monitoring. Specific actions to improve LD procurement may help cope with the organ-donor shortage. Although our series was small, our results were encouraging; they underline the necessity to continuously review donor criteria and care, allowing good donor/recipient matching. PMID:20534222

  8. Lung epithelial ion transport in neonatal lung disease.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, O

    2001-05-01

    Lung epithelial ion transport promotes salt and water movement across the fetal and neonatal lung epithelium. The mechanism is dependent on basolateral membrane Na-K-ATPase and the apical membrane Cl(-) and Na(+) channels. During fetal life active secretion of Cl(-) and parallel movement of Na(+) across the epithelium into the developing lung lumen induce accumulation of liquid into the future airspaces. Postnatally, however, absorption of fluid from the airspaces must start. Present evidence suggests that activation of Na(+) transport from the lumen into the basolateral direction drives fluid absorption and results in an essentially dry air-filled alveolus. In laboratory animals amiloride, a Na(+) channel blocker, induces respiratory distress and impedes lung fluid clearance. One of the epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels, ENaC, is composed of three homologous subunits that differentially respond to glucocorticoid hormone. In newborn infants an increase in pulmonary fluid and a defective Na(+) transport associate with respiratory distress. The ontogeny, subunit composition and function of ENaC along the respiratory tract are currently under investigation. It will be interesting to find out whether the subunit composition and function of lung ENaC respond to the therapy of the critically ill newborn infant. PMID:11359039

  9. Common lung conditions: environmental pollutants and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants can have short- and long-term effects on lung health. Sources of air pollution include gases (eg, carbon monoxide, ozone) and particulate matter (eg, soot, dust). In the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency regulates air pollution. Elevated ozone concentrations are associated with increases in lung-related hospitalizations and mortality. Elevated particulate matter pollution increases the risk of cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality. Occupations with high exposures to pollutants (eg, heavy construction work, truck driving, auto mechanics) pose higher risk of chronic obstructive lung disease. Some industrial settings (eg, agriculture, sawmills, meat packing plants) also are associated with higher risks from pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency issues an air quality index for cities and regions in the United States. The upper levels on the index are associated with increases in asthma-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Damp and moldy housing might make asthma symptoms worse; individuals from lower socioeconomic groups who live in lower quality housing are particularly at risk. Other household exposures that can have negative effects on lung health include radon, nanoparticles, and biomass fuels. PMID:23767420

  10. Cultured lung epithelium: A cellular model for lung preservation.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Matsumoto-Pon, J; Widdicombe, J H

    1997-11-01

    Cellular models have helped with the development of conditions needed for hypothermic preservation of kidney, liver, and heart. Recently, highly differentiated cultured lung epithelial cell lines grown with basolateral side feeding technique have become available that can mimic airspace, epithelium, and interstitium of lung parenchyma. Cultured lung epithelium coupled with Ussing's short-circuit current technique was used as a cellular model system for lung preservation. A parametric study was conducted to correlate the effects of luminal fluid composition (University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and phosphate-buffered saline) and storage gas (air vs nitrogen) at 4 degrees C for 24 h on postischemic electrogenic properties (transepithelial ion transport and resistance). The results showed that cells were better preserved with the UW solution on both sides as measured by their transepithelial resistance, an indicator of tight junction integrity (Rte approximately 65% of control values approximately 135 Omega cm2). In addition, they responded better to mediators that stimulate chloride secretion than cells preserved with other conditions. Cells preserved with no additional fluid on the apical side had substantially lowered Rte (<20%) than those preserved with an additional thin layer of fluid ( approximately 35-65%). This cellular model system is a realistic representation of lung epithelium and can provide an accurate assessment of preservation quality through the measurements of tight junction integrity and active ion transport. PMID:9367609

  11. Lung Injury After One-Lung Ventilation: A Review of the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms Affecting the Ventilated and the Collapsed Lung.

    PubMed

    Lohser, Jens; Slinger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Lung injury is the leading cause of death after thoracic surgery. Initially recognized after pneumonectomy, it has since been described after any period of 1-lung ventilation (OLV), even in the absence of lung resection. Overhydration and high tidal volumes were thought to be responsible at various points; however, it is now recognized that the pathophysiology is more complex and multifactorial. All causative mechanisms known to trigger ventilator-induced lung injury have been described in the OLV setting. The ventilated lung is exposed to high strain secondary to large, nonphysiologic tidal volumes and loss of the normal functional residual capacity. In addition, the ventilated lung experiences oxidative stress, as well as capillary shear stress because of hyperperfusion. Surgical manipulation and/or resection of the collapsed lung may induce lung injury. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung at the conclusion of OLV invariably induces duration-dependent, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inflammatory cytokines are released in response to localized injury and may promote local and contralateral lung injury. Protective ventilation and volatile anesthesia lessen the degree of injury; however, increases in biochemical and histologic markers of lung injury appear unavoidable. The endothelial glycocalyx may represent a common pathway for lung injury creation during OLV, because it is damaged by most of the recognized lung injurious mechanisms. Experimental therapies to stabilize the endothelial glycocalyx may afford the ability to reduce lung injury in the future. In the interim, protective ventilation with tidal volumes of 4 to 5 mL/kg predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 to 10 cm H2O, and routine lung recruitment should be used during OLV in an attempt to minimize harmful lung stress and strain. Additional strategies to reduce lung injury include routine volatile anesthesia and efforts to minimize OLV duration and hyperoxia. PMID:26197368

  12. Neonatal opaque right lung: delayed fluid resorption

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, K.; Richardson, J.

    1981-12-01

    Eight newborn infants with opaque right lungs were examined. Clinically, the main problem associated with the opaque right lung is mild respiratory distress, and radiographyically, the findings consist of (a) a totally opaque right lung, (b) a semiopaque right lung, or (c) an opaque right upper lobe only. These findings are usually interpreted as representing pneumonia, empyema, or hydrochlothorax, but the fact that they clear within 24 to 48 hours indicates that none of these diseases is the cause. It is thought that neonatal opaque right lung results from the transient retention of normal fetal fluid in the right lung.

  13. Facts and promises on lung biomarkers in interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Campo, Ilaria; Zorzetto, Michele; Bonella, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a heterogeneous group of >100 pulmonary disorders. ILDs are characterized by an irreversible architectural distortion and impaired gas exchange; however, there is great variability in the clinical course. ILD diagnosis requires a combination of clinical data, radiological imaging and histological findings (when a lung biopsy is required). At the same time, successful management of ILD patients strictly depends on an accurate and confident diagnosis. In this context, the detection of reliable biomarkers able to identify ILD subtypes, avoiding lung biopsy, as well as the capacity to stratify patients and predict over time the disease course, has become a primary aim for all research studies in this field. PMID:26146183

  14. Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chirieac, Lucian R.; Dacic, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    An ongoing research and multiple clinical trials involve new targeted therapies and less aggressive treatment regimens that improve survival in patients with lung cancer. Targeted therapeutic agents are based on the concept of discovering genetic alterations and the signaling pathways altered in cancer and have added significantly to our armamentarium in order to prolong patient survival and minimizing drug toxicity. Among 34 molecularly targeted drugs approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of various cancers since 1998 three targeted therapies have been approved for treatment of lung cancer (gefitinib in 2002, erlotinib in 2003, and bevacizumab in 2006). This review focuses on the targeted therapies in lung cancer, the molecular biomarkers that help identify patients that will benefit for these targeted therapies, describes the basic molecular biology principles and selected molecular diagnostic techniques and the pathological features correlated with molecular abnormalities in lung cancer. Lastly, new molecular abnormalities described in lung cancer that are predictive to novel promising targeted agents in various phases of clinical trials are discussed. PMID:20680095

  15. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  16. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  17. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  18. Radiographic comparison of human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Michels, D B; Friedman, P J; West, J B

    1979-10-01

    Human lung shape was measured during zero gravity (0 G) to decide whether the normal vertical regional differences in ventilation are due directly to distortion of the elastic lung by its own weight, or instead, due indirectly to the effect of gravity on the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. This was important because we previously established that weightlessness virtually abolishes the normal topographical inequality of ventilation (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 45: 987-998, 1978). Chest radiographs were made after 10 s of a weightless flight trajectory aboard a NASA-Ames Research Center Learjet in both posterior-anterior and left lateral projections on five seated volunteers at residual volume, functional residual capacity, and total lung capacity. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle, and lower lung regions. We found no significant differences between any of the normal gravity (1 G) and o G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at o G (mean changes generally less than 3% or about 0.5 cm). By contrast, Grassino et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 39: 997-1003, 1975) found no change in the vertical distribution of ventilation after voluntarily changing lung dimensions by more than 1 cm by moving the abdomen in or out. We conclude that gravity produces the topographical distribution of ventilation in the upright human lung by distorting the elastic lung tissue within the chest rather than by altering the shape of the rib cage and diaphragm. PMID:511694

  19. Spectrum of fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Padilla, Maria L

    2009-02-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by inflammation and/or fibrosis of the pulmonary interstitium. In 2002, the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society revised the classification of interstitial lung diseases and introduced the term diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are a subtype of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are subdivided into usual interstitial pneumonia (with its clinical counterpart idiopathic interstitial pneumonia), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease, and lymphocytic pneumonia. Sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis are the 2 most common granulomatous diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis/polymyositis (causing antisynthetase syndrome) are diffuse parenchymal lung diseases of known association because these conditions are associated with connective tissue disease. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare genetic diffuse parenchymal lung disease characterized by the clinical triad of pulmonary disease, oculocutaneous albinism, and bleeding diathesis. This review provides an overview of the chronic fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Its primary objective is to illuminate the clinical challenges encountered by clinicians who manage the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases regularly and to offer potential solutions to those challenges. Treatment for the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases is limited, and for many patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation remains the best option. Although much has been learned about the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases during the past decade, research in these diseases is urgently needed. PMID:19170214

  20. Fast tomosynthesis for lung cancer detection using the SBDX geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Pineda, Angel R.; Solomon, Edward G.; Leung, Ann N.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2003-06-01

    Radiology-based lung-cancer detection is a high-contrast imaging task, consisting of the detection of a small mass of tissue within much lower density lung parenchyma. This imaging task requires removal of confounding image details, fast image acquisition (< 0.1 s for pericardial region), low dose (comparable to a chest x-ray), high resolution (< 0.25 mm in-plane) and patient positioning flexibility. We present an investigation of tomosynthesis, implemented using the Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray System (SBDX), to achieve these goals. We designed an image-based computer model of tomosynthesis using a high-resolution (0.15-mm isotropic voxels), low-noise CT volume image of a lung phantom, numerically added spherical lesions and convolution-based tomographic blurring. Lesion visibility was examined as a function of half-tomographic angle for 2.5 and 4.0 mm diameter lesions. Gaussian distributed noise was added to the projected images. For lesions 2.5 mm and 4.0 mm in diameter, half-tomographic angles of at least 6° and 9° respectively were necessary before visualization of the lesions improved. The addition of noise for a dose equivalent to 1/10 that used for a standard chest radiograph did not significantly impair lesion detection. The results are promising, indicating that lung-cancer detection using a modified SBDX system is possible.

  1. Successful lung transplantation after donor lung reconditioning with urokinase in ex vivo lung perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Inci, Ilhan; Yamada, Yoshito; Hillinger, Sven; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Trinkwitz, Michael; Weder, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is considered a contraindication to lung donation for transplantation as it might result in graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to assess and recondition a questionable donor graft before transplantation. In this report we present a case of successful bilateral lung transplant after donor lung assessment and treatment with a fibrinolytic agent, urokinase, during EVLP. PMID:25441801

  2. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. I Vivo Characterization of Ultrasonic Backscattering from Normal and Abnormal Lungs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Farhad

    The primary goal of this project has been to characterize the lung tissue in its in vivo ultrasonic backscattering properties in normal human subjects, and study the changes in the lung echo characteristics under various pathological conditions. Such a characterization procedure is used to estimate the potential of ultrasound for providing useful diagnostic information about the superficial region of the lung. The results of this study may be divided into three categories: (1) This work has resulted in the ultrasonic characterization of lung tissue, in vivo, and has investigated the various statistical features of the lung echo properties in normal human subjects. The echo properties of the lungs are characterized with respect to the mean echo amplitude relative to a perfect reflector and the mean autocorrelation of normalized echo signals. (2) A theoretical model is developed to simulate the ultrasonic backscattering properties of the lung under normal and various simulated abnormal conditions. This model has been tested on various phantoms simulating the strong acoustic interactions of the lung. When applied to the lung this model has shown excellent agreement to experimental data gathered on a population of normal human subjects. By varying a few of the model parameters, the effect of changes in the lung structural parameters on the detected ultrasonic echoes is investigated. It is found that alveoli size changes of about 50 percent and concentration changes of 40 percent may produce spectral changes exceeding the variability exhibited by normal lungs. (3) Ultrasonic echoes from the lungs of 4 groups of patients were studied. The groups included patients with edema, emphysema, pneumothorax, and patients undergoing radiation therapy for treatment of lung cancer. Significant deviations from normal lung echo characteristics is observed in more than 80 percent of the patients studied. These deviations are intercompared and some qualitative associations between the

  4. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance. PMID:23606351

  5. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  6. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  7. Atypical histiocytosis in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijun; Zhang, Rongxuan; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Jinfu; Garfield, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report a rare case of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lung with a review of literature. Methods The clinical materials were noted. Literature related to this condition from the past 50 years was reviewed from the group of histiocytic tumors. Results and conclusions Clinical manifestations were non-specific. The imaging characteristics of our case were infiltrative lesions with multiple cysts in both lungs. Pathology showed nodular proliferation of atypical cells. Immunohistochemistry suggested a histiocytic origin of the infiltrating atypical cells. Because the pathological findings did not fall into any particular category of typical histiocytic tumors, the final diagnosis was atypical histiocytic tumor. The presentation of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lungs, only, with infiltrative lesions and multiple air cysts seems very rare, with pathological examination being “gold standard” for the diagnosis. PMID:23991320

  8. Diet and obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Romieu, I; Trenga, C

    2001-01-01

    The results presented in this review suggest that the impact of nutrition on obstructive lung disease is most evident for antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C and, to a lesser extent, vitamin E. By decreasing oxidant insults to the lung, antioxidants could modulate the development of chronic lung diseases and lung function decrement. Antioxidant vitamins could also play an important role in gene-environment interactions in complex lung diseases such as childhood asthma. Data also suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may have a potentially protective effect against airway hyperreactivity and lung function decrements; however, relevant data are still sparse. Although epidemiologic data suggest that consumption of fresh fruit may reduce risk of noncarcinogenic airway limitation, there are no clear data on which nutrients might be most relevant. While some studies evaluate daily intake of vitamin C, other studies use fruit consumption as a surrogate for antioxidant intake. Given the dietary intercorrelations among antioxidant vitamins, particularly vitamin C, beta-carotene, and flavonoids, as well as other micronutrients, it may be difficult to isolate a specific effect. Some population subgroups with higher levels of oxidative stress, such as cigarette smokers, may be more likely to benefit from dietary supplementation, since some studies have suggested that antioxidant intake may have a greater impact in this group. Studies of lung function decrement and COPD in adults suggest that daily intake of vitamin C at levels slightly exceeding the current Recommended Dietary Allowance (60 mg/day among nonsmokers and 100 mg/day among smokers) may have a protective effect (20). In the Schwartz and Weiss (85) and Britton et al. (87) studies, an increase of 40 mg/day in vitamin C intake led to an approximate 20-ml increase in FEV1. Daily mean vitamin C intakes in these studies were 66 mg and 99.2 mg, respectively, and the highest intake level (178 mg/day) was approximately

  9. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Israel L.; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M.; Mariani, Alessandro W.; Fernandes, Flávio G.; Unterpertinger, Fernando V.; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex® was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98). The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p = 0.035). The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H2O in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H2O in Group 2 (p = 0.816). The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p = 0.87). The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0), and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm2 and 137.50/mm2, respectively (p = 0.71). CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation. PMID:23018310

  10. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A J; Pope, C A

    1995-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies over the last 40 years suggest rather consistently that general ambient air pollution, chiefly due to the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, may be responsible for increased rates of lung cancer. This evidence derives from studies of lung cancer trends, studies of occupational groups, comparisons of urban and rural populations, and case-control and cohort studies using diverse exposure metrics. Recent prospective cohort studies observed 30 to 50% increases in lung cancer rates associated with exposure to respirable particles. While these data reflect the effects of exposures in past decades, and despite some progress in reducing air pollution, large numbers of people in the United States continue to be exposed to pollutant mixtures containing known or suspected carcinogens. It is not known how many people in the United States are exposed to levels of fine respirable particles that have been associated with lung cancer in recent epidemiologic studies. These observations suggest that the most widely cited estimates of the proportional contribution of air pollution to lung cancer occurrence in the United States based largely on the results of animal studies, may be too low. It is important that better epidemiologic research be conducted to allow improved estimates of lung cancer risk from air pollution among the general population. The development and application of new epidemiologic methods, particularly the improved characterization of population-wide exposure to mixtures of air pollutants and the improved design of ecologic studies, could improve our ability to measure accurately the magnitude of excess cancer associated with air pollution. PMID:8741787

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  12. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the abdomen (diaphragm), the membranes surrounding the space between the lungs (mediastinal pleura), or membranes of ... tumor of any size has grown into the space between the lungs (mediastinum), the heart, the large ...

  13. Heavy Drinking Might Harm the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160283.html Heavy Drinking Might Harm the Lungs Alcohol appears to reduce ... 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy drinking may increase the risk of lung problems, a ...

  14. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » How are lung carcinoid tumors diagnosed? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  16. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  17. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... other segments of the American population. However, lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic men and the second-leading cause among Hispanic women. November is Lung Cancer Awareness ...

  18. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in human ex vivo and porcine in vivo lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonography has become the imaging technique of choice for guiding intraoperative interventions in abdominal surgery. Due to artefacts from residual air content, however, videothoracoscopic and open intraoperative ultrasound-guided thermoablation of lung malignancies are impossible. Lung flooding is a new method that allows complete ultrasound imaging of lungs and their tumours. Methods Fourteen resected tumourous human lung lobes were examined transpleurally with B-mode ultrasound before (in atelectasis) and after lung flooding with isotonic saline solution. In two swine, the left lung was filled with 15 ml/kg isotonic saline solution through the left side of a double-lumen tube. Lung tumours were simulated by transthoracic ultrasound-guided injection of 5 ml of purified bovine serum albumin in glutaraldehyde, centrally into the left lower lung lobe. The rate of tumour detection, the severity of disability caused by residual gas, and sonomorphology of the lungs and tumours were assessed. Results The ex vivo tumour detection rate was 100% in flooded human lung lobes and 43% (6/14) in atelectatic lungs. In all cases of atelectasis, sonographic tumour imaging was impaired by residual gas. Tumours and atelectatic tissue were isoechoic. In 28% of flooded lungs, a little residual gas was observed that did not impair sonographic tumour imaging. In contrast to tumours, flooded lung tissue was hyperechoic, homogeneous, and of fine-grained structure. Because of the bronchial wall three-laminar structure, sonographic differentiation of vessels and bronchi was possible. In all cases, malignant tumours in the flooded lung appeared well-demarcated from the lung parenchyma. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, and large cell carcinomas were hypoechoic. Bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma was slightly hyperechoic. Transpleural sonography identifies endobronchial tumour growth and bronchial wall destruction. With transthoracic sonography, the flooded animal lung can be completely

  19. Aspiration-related lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Prather, Andrew D; Smith, Tristan R; Poletto, Dana M; Tavora, Fabio; Chung, Jonathan H; Nallamshetty, Leelakrishna; Hazelton, Todd R; Rojas, Carlos A

    2014-09-01

    Aspiration is a common but underrecognized clinicopathologic entity, with varied radiographic manifestations. Aspiration represents a spectrum of diseases, including diffuse aspiration bronchiolitis, aspiration pneumonitis, airway obstruction by foreign body, exogenous lipoid pneumonia, interstitial fibrosis, and aspiration pneumonia with or without lung abscess formation. Many patients who aspirate do not present with disease, suggesting that pathophysiology is related to a variety of factors, including decreased levels of consciousness, dysphagia, impaired mucociliary clearance, composition of aspirate, and impaired host defenses. In this pictorial essay, we will review the different types of aspiration lung diseases, focusing on their imaging features and differential diagnosis. PMID:24911122

  20. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  1. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018

  2. Lung Edema Clearance: Relevance to Patients with Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Zaher S.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary edema clearance is necessary for patients with lung injury to recover and survive. The mechanisms regulating edema clearance from the lungs are distinct from the factors contributing edema formation during injury. Edema clearance is effected via vectorial transport of Na+ out of the airspaces which generates an osmotic gradient causing water to follow the gradient out of the cells. This Na+ transport across the alveolar epithelium is mostly effected via apical Na+ and chloride channels and basolateral Na,K-ATPase. The Na,K-ATPase pumps Na+ out of the cell and K+ into the cell against their respective gradients in an ATP-consuming reaction. Two mechanisms contribute to the regulation of the Na,K-ATPase activity:recruitment of its subunits from intracellular compartments into the basolateral membrane, and transcriptional/translational regulation. Na,K-ATPase activity and edema clearance are increased by catecholamines, aldosterone, vasopressin, overexpression of the pump genes, and others. During lung injury, mechanisms regulating edema clearance are inhibited by yet unclear pathways. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate pulmonary edema clearance may lead to therapeutic interventions that counterbalance the inhibition of edema clearance during lung injury and improve the lungs’ ability to clear fluid, which is crucial for patient survival. PMID:26241220

  3. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  4. Probable Phaeoacremonium parasiticum as a cause of cavitary native lung nodules after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shah, S K; Parto, P; Lombard, G A; James, M A; Beckles, D L; Lick, S; Valentine, V G

    2013-02-01

    Lung nodules after lung transplantation most often represent infection or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the allograft. Conversely, native lung nodules in single lung transplant recipients are more likely to be bronchogenic carcinoma. We present a patient who developed native lung cavitary nodules. Although malignancy was anticipated, evaluation revealed probable Phaeoacremonium parasiticum infection. Phaeoacremonium parasiticum is a dematiaceous fungus first described as a cause of soft tissue infection in a renal transplant patient. Lung nodules have not been previously described and this is the first case, to our knowledge, of P. parasiticum identified after lung transplantation. PMID:23279754

  5. The Lung Physiome: merging imaging-based measures with predictive computational models of structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-01-01

    Global measurements of the lung provided by standard pulmonary function tests do not give insight into the regional basis of lung function and lung disease. Advances in imaging methodologies, computer technologies, and subject-specific simulations are creating new opportunities for studying structure-function relationships in the lung through multi-disciplinary research. The digital Human Lung Atlas is an imaging-based resource compiled from male and female subjects spanning several decades of age. The Atlas comprises both structural and functional measures, and includes computational models derived to match individual subjects for personalized prediction of function. The computational models in the Atlas form part of the Lung Physiome project, which is an international effort to develop integrative models of lung function at all levels of biological organization. The computational models provide mechanistic interpretation of imaging measures; the Atlas provides structural data upon which to base model geometry, and functional data against which to test hypotheses. The example of simulating air flow on a subject-specific basis is considered. Methods for deriving multi-scale models of the airway geometry for individual subjects in the Atlas are outlined, and methods for modeling turbulent flows in the airway are reviewed. PMID:20835982

  6. The Lung Microbiome in Moderate and Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pragman, Alexa A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Reilly, Cavan S.; Wendt, Christine; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory disorder characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract contributes to approximately 50% of COPD exacerbations. Even during periods of stable lung function, the lung harbors a community of bacteria, termed the microbiome. The role of the lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of COPD remains unknown. The COPD lung microbiome, like the healthy lung microbiome, appears to reflect microaspiration of oral microflora. Here we describe the COPD lung microbiome of 22 patients with Moderate or Severe COPD compared to 10 healthy control patients. The composition of the lung microbiomes was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Sequences were analyzed using mothur, Ribosomal Database Project, Fast UniFrac, and Metastats. Our results showed a significant increase in microbial diversity with the development of COPD. The main phyla in all samples were Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Principal coordinate analyses demonstrated separation of control and COPD samples, but samples did not cluster based on disease severity. However, samples did cluster based on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled bronchodilators. Metastats analyses demonstrated an increased abundance of several oral bacteria in COPD samples. PMID:23071781

  7. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion – State of the Art in Lung Donor Pool Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N.; Zych, Bartlomiej; Saez, Diana Garcia; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Karck, Matthias; Simon, Andre R.; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation remains the gold standard for patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the number of suitable donor lungs for the increasing number of patients on the waiting list necessitates alternative tools to expand the lung donor pool. Modern preservation and lung assessment techniques could contribute to improved function in previously rejected lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) already demonstrated its value in identification of transplantable grafts from the higher risk donor pool. Moreover, lungs from EVLP did not show significantly different postoperative results compared to standard criteria lungs. This could be explained by the reduction of the ischemia-reperfusion injury through EVLP application. The aim of this article is to review technical characteristics and the growing clinical EVLP experience with special attention to EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25644463

  8. Ex vivo lung perfusion - state of the art in lung donor pool expansion.

    PubMed

    Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N; Zych, Bartlomiej; Saez, Diana Garcia; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M; Karck, Matthias; Simon, Andre R; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation remains the gold standard for patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the number of suitable donor lungs for the increasing number of patients on the waiting list necessitates alternative tools to expand the lung donor pool. Modern preservation and lung assessment techniques could contribute to improved function in previously rejected lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) already demonstrated its value in identification of transplantable grafts from the higher risk donor pool. Moreover, lungs from EVLP did not show significantly different postoperative results compared to standard criteria lungs. This could be explained by the reduction of the ischemia-reperfusion injury through EVLP application. The aim of this article is to review technical characteristics and the growing clinical EVLP experience with special attention to EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25644463

  9. A new design for high stability pressure-controlled ventilation for small animal lung imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.; Lewis, R. A.; Wallace, M. J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a custom-designed ventilator to deliver a stable pressure to the lungs of small animals for use in imaging experiments. Our ventilator was designed with independent pressure vessels to separately control the Peak Inspiratory Pressure (PIP) and Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) to minimise pressure fluctuations during the ventilation process. The ventilator was computer controlled through a LabVIEW interface, enabling experimental manipulations to be performed remotely whilst simultaneously imaging the lungs in situ. Mechanical ventilation was successfully performed on newborn rabbit pups to assess the most effective ventilation strategies for aerating the lungs at birth. Highly stable pressures enabled reliable respiratory gated acquisition of projection radiographs and a stable prolonged (15 minute) breath-hold for high-resolution computed tomography of deceased rabbit pups at different lung volumes.

  10. Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

  11. [Lung transplantation in patients with interstitial lung disease/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Murer, Christian; Benden, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an established therapy for advanced lung disease. Among the common disease indications for lung transplantation, patients with interstitial lung disease, in particular, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), have the worst prognosis. Thus referral to a transplant center should ideally be realised at the time of diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP), regardless of lung function, in order to carry out a through initial assessment and evaluation. PMID:26884220

  12. Environmental change and Rift Valley fever in eastern Africa: projecting beyond HEALTHY FUTURES.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David; Hagenlocher, Michael; Jones, Anne E; Kienberger, Stefan; Leedale, Joseph; Morse, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a relatively recently emerged zoonosis endemic to large parts of sub-Saharan Africa that has the potential to spread beyond the continent, have profound health and socio-economic impacts, particularly in communities where resilience is already low. Here output from a new, dynamic disease model [the Liverpool RVF (LRVF) model], driven by downscaled, bias-corrected climate change data from an ensemble of global circulation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project run according to two radiative forcing scenarios [representative concentration pathway (RCP)4.5 and RCP8.5], is combined with results of a spatial assessment of social vulnerability to the disease in eastern Africa. The combined approach allowed for analyses of spatial and temporal variations in the risk of RVF to the end of the current century. Results for both scenarios highlight the high-risk of future RVF outbreaks, including in parts of eastern Africa to date unaffected by the disease. The results also highlight the risk of spread from/to countries adjacent to the study area, and possibly farther afield, and the value of considering the geography of future projections of disease risk. Based on the results, there is a clear need to remain vigilant and to invest not only in surveillance and early warning systems, but also in addressing the socio-economic factors that underpin social vulnerability in order to mitigate, effectively, future impacts. PMID:27063733

  13. Flavorings-Related Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Flavorings-Related Lung Disease Exposures to ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  14. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R

    1978-01-01

    Lung cancer is consistently more common in urban areas than in rural. The excess cannot be accounted for by specific occupational hazards but some of it might be due to the presence of carcinogens in urban air. The excess cannot be wholly due to such agents, because the excess in nonsmokers is small and variable. Cigarette consumption has also been greater in urban areas, but it is difficult to estimate how much of the excess it can account for. Occupational studies confirm that pollutants present in town air are capable of causing lung cancer in man and suggest that the pollutants and cigarette smoke act synergistically. The trends in the mortality from lung cancer in young and middle-aged men in England and Wales provide uncertain evidence but support the belief that atmospheric pollution has contributed to the production of the disease. In the absence of cigarette smoking, the combined effect of all atmospheric carcinogens is not responsible for more than about 5 cases of lung cancer per 100,000 persons per year in European populations. PMID:648488

  15. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  16. Lung function and radiation response.

    PubMed

    Hong, A; Dische, S; Saunders, M I; Lockwood, P; Crocombe, K

    1991-12-01

    This study investigated whether impaired respiratory function affected the response to radiotherapy. A prospective study was performed in which lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The findings were considered to reflect the physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and these were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of the patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between the tests performed and the severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In the patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. In patients selected for curative radiotherapy, lung function would not appear to be an important factor influencing the response of normal tissues or tumour to irradiation. PMID:1663411

  17. CIGARETTE SMOKE AND LUNG CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cigarette smoke has been implicated in a causal relationship with carcinoma of the lung. An intriguing feature of the disease is the site-selectivity with which bronchogenic cancer manifests itself; most cancers are detected in the main, lobar and segmental bronchi, perhaps speci...

  18. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  19. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  20. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  1. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 <1 L) due to the theoretically increased risk of pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 <1 L nor transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (TLCO) <40% predicted shown to be independent predictors of HVCD insertion or pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort. PMID:26980011

  2. Radon and lung cancer risk: taking stock at the millenium.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Eradze, G R

    2000-01-01

    Radon is a well-established human carcinogen for which extensive data are available, extending into the range of exposures experienced by the general population. Mounting epidemiologic evidence on radon and lung cancer risk, now available from more than 20 different studies of underground miners and complementary laboratory findings, indicates that risks are linear in exposure without threshold. Radon is also a ubiquitous indoor air pollutant in homes, and risk projections imply that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Recommended control strategies in the United States and other countries, which include testing of most homes and mitigation of those exceeding guideline levels, have been controversial. Further research is needed, drawing on molecular and cellular approaches and continuing the follow-up of the underground miner cohorts, and scientists should work toward constructing mechanistically based models that combine epidemiologic and experimental data to yield risk estimates with enhanced certainty. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931781

  3. Functional respiratory assessment in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Reyes, José Luis; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect, to a greater or lesser degree, the alveolus, peripheral airway, and septal interstitium. Functional assessment in patients suspected of having an interstitial lung disease has implications for diagnosis and makes it possible to objectively analyze both response to treatment and prognosis. Recently the clinical value of lung-diffusing capacity and the six-minute walking test has been confirmed, and these are now important additions to the traditional assessment of lung function that is based on spirometry. Here we review the state-of-the-art methods for the assessment of patients with interstitial lung disease. PMID:25857578

  4. Haemodynamic Effects of Lung Recruitment Manoeuvres

    PubMed Central

    Szakmány, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Atelectasis caused by lung injury leads to increased intrapulmonary shunt, venous admixture, and hypoxaemia. Lung recruitment manoeuvres aim to quickly reverse this scenario by applying increased airway pressures for a short period of time which meant to open the collapsed alveoli. Although the procedure can improve oxygenation, but due to the heart-lung and right and left ventricle interactions elevated intrathoracic pressures can inflict serious effects on the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview on the pathophysiological background of the heart-lung interactions and the best way to monitor these changes during lung recruitment. PMID:26682219

  5. News CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

  6. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease. PMID:8457492

  7. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  8. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  9. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Lung and heart-lung transplantation. Evolution and new applications.

    PubMed Central

    Bolman, R M; Shumway, S J; Estrin, J A; Hertz, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and lung transplantation (LT) are effective treatment modalities for patients with advanced pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease. Lung transplantation offers potential advantages over HLT, including reduced pretransplant waiting time and improved efficiency of organ utilization, and is currently being offered to patients formerly treated by HLT. To explore the relative merits of these procedures, the authors examined the results in 44 procedures (23 HLT and 21 LT) in 42 patients transplanted at their institution. Heart-lung transplant recipients included 20 adults and three children (ages 5,5 and 3). Most HLT patients had primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) (n = 9) or Eisenmenger's syndrome (ES) (n = 8). Twenty-two of twenty-three patients have been long-term survivors (mean follow-up = 17.8 months, Kapaln-Meier survival at 12 months = 85%). Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) has occurred in five patients (22%), and all have died. Of 21 LTs in 19 patients, nine had obstructive and eight had restrictive lung diseases. Three single-LT (SLT) patients had PPH, and one had ES secondary to a ventricular septal defect. Mean pulmonary artery pressures fell from 55 +/- 6 mm Hg before SLT to 21 +/- 3 mm Hg after SLT; p less than 0.001. Three pediatric patients (ages 4, 10, 17, and 17[re-transplant]) have undergone four SLTs. With mean follow-up of 6.4 months, LT patients have survival at 12 months of 80% (Kaplan-Meier). Lung transplant patients wait a far shorter time for their transplant than do HLT patients (166 vs. 384 days, p less than 0.03). Three patients (19%) have evidence of OB after SLT, with one death. By virtue of equal intermediate-term outcomes, shorter waiting times, and better use of donor organs in comparison with HLT, LT should be offered whenever possible to patients with end-stage pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease. The authors' pediatric LT and HLT experience (7 treatments in 6 patients) is the largest reported

  11. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein. PMID:24252206

  12. Speckle tracking technology for quantifying lung sliding.

    PubMed

    Dori, Guy; Jakobson, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) is gaining recognition as a useful tool for assessing lung physiology and pathology. Yet, currently the skill of performing lung US is taught by experienced operators to novice ones, mainly by recognizing expected patterns. Recognizing the latter may be difficult and subjective. In this hypothesis we propose to apply a well-known and used image processing technology in echocardiography, speckle tracking (ST), to lung sliding - the marker of normal lung function. If implementing ST to lung sliding is technically feasible, several outcomes are expected: (1) Lung sliding will become an objective, operator-independent marker of normal lung function. (2) Subsequently, ST will provide normal values for lung sliding. (3) Lastly, the effects of pulmonary pathologies on lung sliding may be assessed. It is stressed, however, that the preliminary idea suggested here is limited to a single physiological phenomenon (lung sliding). Only when technical feasibility is demonstrated then ST technology may potentially be applied and investigated in other clinical settings of lung diseases. PMID:27142150

  13. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein. PMID:24252206

  14. The "baby lung" became an adult.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Marini, John J; Pesenti, Antonio; Quintel, Michael; Mancebo, Jordi; Brochard, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The baby lung was originally defined as the fraction of lung parenchyma that, in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), still maintains normal inflation. Its size obviously depends on ARDS severity and relates to the compliance of the respiratory system. CO2 clearance and blood oxygenation primarily occur within the baby lung. While the specific compliance suggests the intrinsic mechanical characteristics to be nearly normal, evidence from positron emission tomography suggests that at least a part of the well-aerated baby lung is inflamed. The baby lung is more a functional concept than an anatomical one; in fact, in the prone position, the baby lung "shifts" from the ventral lung regions toward the dorsal lung regions while usually increasing its size. This change is associated with better gas exchange, more homogeneously distributed trans-pulmonary forces, and a survival advantage. Positive end expiratory pressure also increases the baby lung size, both allowing better inflation of already open units and adding new pulmonary units. Viewed as surrogates of stress and strain, tidal volume and plateau pressures are better tailored to baby lung size than to ideal body weight. Although less information is available for the baby lung during spontaneous breathing efforts, the general principles regulating the safety of ventilation are also applicable under these conditions. PMID:26781952

  15. Epidemiology of lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in China. Along with socioeconomic development, environmental problems have intensified and the burden of lung cancer continues to increase. Methods In this study, national cancer registry data was used for evaluating incidence, mortality, time trend, and prediction. Results In China in 2010, 605 900 patients were diagnosed and 486 600 patients died of lung cancer. Throughout the last three decades, the mortality of lung cancer has dramatically increased, as shown in national death surveys. From 2000 to 2010, age specific incidence of lung cancer increased in most age groups. It is estimated that in 2015, the total number of new cases of lung cancer will reach 733 300. Conclusions Lung cancer is a serious disease affecting public health and an effective control strategy is needed in China. PMID:26273360

  16. Infectious Triggers of Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Aric L

    2016-07-01

    Survival after lung transplantation is limited in large part due to the high incidence of chronic rejection, known as chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Pulmonary infections are a frequent complication in lung transplant recipients, due both to immunosuppressive medications and constant exposure of the lung allograft to the external environment via the airways. Infection is a recognized risk factor for the development of CLAD, and both acute infection and chronic lung allograft colonization with microorganisms increase the risk for CLAD. Acute infection by community acquired respiratory viruses, and the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for CLAD. Colonization by the fungus Aspergillus may also augment the risk of CLAD. Fostering this transition from healthy lung to CLAD in each of these infectious episodes is the persistence of an inflammatory lung allograft environment. PMID:27221821

  17. The Spatiotemporal Cellular Dynamics of Lung Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lelkes, E.; Headley, M.B.; Thornton, E.E.; Looney, M.R.; Krummel, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    The lung is a complex structure that is interdigitated with immune cells. Understanding the 4-dimensional process of normal and defective lung function and immunity has been a centuries-old problem. Challenges intrinsic to the lung have limited adequate microscopic evaluation of its cellular dynamics in real time, until recently. Because of emerging technologies, we now recognize alveolar-to-airway transport of inhaled antigen. We understand the nature of neutrophil entry during lung injury and are learning more about cellular interactions during inflammatory states. Insights are also accumulating in lung development and the metatastatic niche of the lung. Here we assess the developing technology of lung imaging, its merits for studies of pathophysiology and areas where further advances are needed. PMID:24974157

  18. Sunflower Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Leon; Osness, Donna

    1978-01-01

    An elementary school physical education program is described involving (1) grade-specific health education emphasizing nutrition, heart and lung anatomy and physiology, and disease prevention; (2) an innovative physical education program for children, teachers, and parents; (3) development of a low-cholesterol, low-sugar lunch program; and (4)…

  19. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  20. Transthyretin as a potential biomarker for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection

    PubMed Central

    DING, HONGMEI; LIU, JIANHUA; XUE, RONG; ZHAO, PENG; QIN, YI; ZHENG, FANG; SUN, XUGUO

    2014-01-01

    Satisfactory biomarkers for screening and early diagnosis of lung cancer remain scarce and require further investigation. The aim of the present study was to examine the changes of the biochemical and protein composition in the serum and pleural effusion from lung cancer and lung infection (bacterial pneumonia) patients. A total of 92 patients with lung cancer, 38 with bacterial pneumonia and 42 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The serum levels of cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and transthyretin (TTR) in the lung cancer patients were higher than that of the lung infection patients (P<0.05). The levels of TTR were higher, whereas the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was lower in the pleural effusion from the lung cancer patients compared to the lung infection patients (P<0.05). Furthermore, the pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios in the lung cancer patients were higher, whereas the ratios of ADA were lower (P<0.05). By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, four major peaks corresponding to native TTR, Sul-TTR, Cys-TTR and Cysgly-TTR were observed in the serum of the lung cancer and lung infection patients. A significant increase was found in the proportion of Cysgly-TTR in the pleural effusion from the patients with lung cancer. The data indicated that a combination of pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios and modified TTR may be beneficial for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection. PMID:25054025

  1. The Relation Between Lung Dust and Lung Pathology in Pneumoconiosis*

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmidt, G.

    1960-01-01

    Methods of isolation and analysis of dust from pneumoconiotic lungs are reviewed, and the results of lung dust analyses for different forms of pneumoconiosis are presented. A tentative classification separates beryllium, aluminium, abrasive fume, and asbestos, which cause interstitial or disseminated fibrosis from quartz, coal, haematite, talc, kaolin, and other dusts, which cause a nodular or focal fibrosis which may change to forms with massive lesions. The data suggest that in the first, but not in the second, group the dusts are relatively soluble; only in the second group do amounts of dust and severity of fibrosis go in parallel for a given form of pneumoconiosis. In classical silicosis the quartz percentage is higher and the amount of total dust much lower than in coal-miners' pneumoconiosis. Mixed forms of both groups occur, for instance, in diatomite workers. The need for more research, especially in the first group, is pointed out. Images PMID:13727444

  2. Shop Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob

    Vocational agriculture teachers in Oklahoma prepared the shop project drawings which comprise the document. Seventy-one projects, with lists of required materials, diagrams, and measurements, are included. Construction projects fall into six categories (number of projects in parentheses): Trailers (5), racks (3), livestock production projects…

  3. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  4. Stem cells--potential for repairing damaged lungs and growing human lungs for transplant.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne E; Rippon, Helen J

    2006-08-01

    Repair or regeneration of defective lung epithelium would be of great therapeutic potential. It is estimated by the British Lung Foundation that 1 in 7 people in the UK is affected by a lung disease and that 1 in 4 admissions to children's wards are as a result of respiratory problems. Potential cellular sources for the regeneration of lung tissue in vivo or lung tissue engineering in vitro include endogenous pulmonary epithelial stem cells, extrapulmonary circulating stem cells and embryonic stem cells. This article discusses the potential role of each of these stem cell types in future approaches to the treatment of lung injury and disease. PMID:16856797

  5. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  6. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation. PMID:26297204

  7. Deep pulmonary lymphatics in immature lungs.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Renée; Cormack, Meredith; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Tsuda, Akira

    2009-09-01

    Recently, we found that the translocation of inhaled nanoparticles from the air space to secondary organs is age dependent and substantially greater in neonates than in adults (J Respir Crit Care Med 177: A48, 2008). One reason for this difference might be age-dependent differences in alveolar barrier integrity. Because the neonate lung is undergoing morphogenetic and fluid balance changes, we hypothesize that the alveolar barrier of developing lungs is more easily compromised and susceptible to foreign material influx than that of adult lungs. On the basis of these hypotheses, we predict that the postnatally developing lung is also more likely to allow the translocation of some materials from the air space to the lymphatic lumens. To test this idea, we intratracheally instilled methyl methacrylate into immature and adult lungs and compared lymphatic filling between these two age groups. Scanning electron microscopy of the resultant corrosion casts revealed peribronchial saccular and conduit lymphatic architecture. Deep pulmonary lymphatic casts were present on the majority (58.5%) of airways in immature lungs, but lymphatic casting in adult lungs, as anticipated, was much more infrequent (21.6%). Thus the neonate lung appears to be more susceptible than the adult lung to the passage of instilled methyl methacrylate from the air space into the lymphatics. We speculate that this could imply greater probability of translocation of other materials, such as nanoparticles, from the immature lung as well. PMID:19556455

  8. Sex Steroid Signaling: Implications for Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sathish, Venkatachalem; Martin, Yvette N.; Prakash, Y.S.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the sex hormones (estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone) have biological and pathophysiological actions in peripheral, non-reproductive organs, including the lung. Clinically, sex differences in the incidence, morbidity and mortality of lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer and pulmonary hypertension have been noted, although intrinsic sex differences vs. the roles of sex steroids are still not well-understood. Accordingly, it becomes important to ask the following questions: 1) Which sex steroids are involved? 2) How do they affect different components of the lung under normal circumstances? 3) How does sex steroid signaling change in or contribute to lung disease, and in this regard, are sex steroids detrimental or beneficial? As our understanding of sex steroid signaling in the lung improves, it is important to consider whether such information can be used to develop new therapeutic strategies to target lung diseases, perhaps in both sexes or in a sex-specific manner. In this review, we focus on the basics of sex steroid signaling, and the current state of knowledge regarding how they influence structure and function of specific lung components across the life span and in the context of some important lung diseases. We then summarize the potential for sex steroids as useful biomarkers and therapeutic targets in these lung diseases as a basis for future translational research in the area of gender and individualized medicine. PMID:25595323

  9. Curbing the burden of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Urman, Alexandra; Hosgood, H Dean

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer contributes substantially to the global burden of disease and healthcare costs. New screening modalities using low-dose computerized tomography are promising tools for early detection leading to curative surgery. However, the screening and follow-up diagnostic procedures of these techniques may be costly. Focusing on prevention is an important factor to reduce the burden of screening, treatment, and lung cancer deaths. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has identified several lung carcinogens, which we believe can be considered actionable when developing prevention strategies. To curb the societal burden of lung cancer, healthcare resources need to be focused on early detection and screening and on mitigating exposure(s) of a person to known lung carcinogens, such as active tobacco smoking, household air pollution (HAP), and outdoor air pollution. Evidence has also suggested that these known lung carcinogens may be associated with genetic predispositions, supporting the hypothesis that lung cancers attributed to differing exposures may have developed from unique underlying genetic mechanisms attributed to the exposure of interest. For instance, smokingattributed lung cancer involves novel genetic markers of risk compared with HAP-attributed lung cancer. Therefore, genetic risk markers may be used in risk stratification to identify subpopulations that are at a higher risk for developing lung cancer attributed to a given exposure. Such targeted prevention strategies suggest that precision prevention strategies may be possible in the future; however, much work is needed to determine whether these strategies will be viable. PMID:27178304

  10. [Lung cavities, mycetomas and hemoptysis].

    PubMed

    Domej, Wolfgang; Hermann, Josef; Krause, Robert; Wehrschütz, Martin; Maier, Alfred; Flögel, Erich

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary mycetomas, or fungus balls, consist of spherical masses of mycelia and hyphae, fibrin and granulocytes that grow and partly fill cavitary lesions without invading tissue. They are usually caused by molds of the Aspergillus species, rarely by Mucor or yeast fungi such as Candida species, that colonize damaged lung tissue. Hemoptysis is the most frequent symptom. Since systemic and local administration of antifungal agents is of uncertain efficacy, resectional surgery should be the treatment of choice in cases of severe hemoptysis, if lung function is not severely compromised. As pulmonary resection in the form of lobectomy or pneumonectomy is associated with raised mortality, cavernostomy and cavernoplasty may be options for high-risk patients. PMID:18030549

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. PMID:27178690

  12. Telocytes in trachea and lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Y; Li, H; Manole, C G; Sun, A; Ge, J; Wang, X

    2011-01-01

    We show the existence of a novel type of interstitial cell—telocytes (TC) in mouse trachea and lungs. We used cell cultures, vital stainings, as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Phase contrast microscopy on cultured cells showed cells with unequivocally characteristic morphology of typical TC (cells with telopodes—Tp). SEM revealed typical TC with two to three Tp—very long and branched cell prolongations. Tp consist of an alternation of thin segments (podomers) and thick segments (podoms). The latter accommodate mitochondria (as shown by Janus Green and MitoTracker), rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. TEM showed characteristic podomers and podoms as well as close relationships with nerve endings and blood capillaries. IHC revealed positive expression of TC for c-kit, vimentin and CD34. In conclusion, this study shows the presence in trachea and lungs of a peculiar type of cells, which fulfils the criteria for TC. PMID:21810171

  13. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  14. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers (LCINS) has lately been recognized as a unique disease based on rapidly gained knowledge from genomic changes to treatment responses. The focus of this article is on current knowledge and challenges with regard to LCINS expanded from recent reviews highlighting five areas: (1) distribution of LCINS by temporal trends, geographic regions, and populations; (2) three well-recognized environmental risk factors; (3) other plausible environmental risk factors; (4) prior chronic lung diseases and infectious diseases as risk factors; and (5) lifestyles as risk or protective factors. This article will also bring attention to recently published literature in two pioneering areas: (1) histological characteristics, clinical features with emerging new effective therapies, and social and psychological stigma; and (2) searching for susceptibility genes using integrated genomic approaches. PMID:21500120

  15. Mechanisms of Lung Fibrosis Resolution.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Hagood, James S; Wong, Simon; Taype, Carmen A; Madala, Satish K; Hardie, William D

    2016-05-01

    Fibrogenesis involves a dynamic interplay between factors that promote the biosynthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix along with pathways that degrade the extracellular matrix and eliminate the primary effector cells. Opposing the often held perception that fibrotic tissue is permanent, animal studies and clinical data now demonstrate the highly plastic nature of organ fibrosis that can, under certain circumstances, regress. This review describes the current understanding of the mechanisms whereby the lung is known to resolve fibrosis focusing on degradation of the extracellular matrix, removal of myofibroblasts, and the role of inflammatory cells. Although there are significant gaps in understanding lung fibrosis resolution, accelerated improvements in biotechnology and bioinformatics are expected to improve the understanding of these mechanisms and have high potential to lead to novel and effective restorative therapies in the treatment not only of pulmonary fibrosis, but also of a wide-ranging spectrum of chronic disorders. PMID:27021937

  16. Glued lungs: Sticky and tricky

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Deepak; Nair, Vidya; Khanna, Arjun; Dogra, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    We report a male patient who underwent bronchoscopic instillation of glue to control moderate hemoptysis which later led to the development of postobstructive pneumonia and extensive foreign body reaction in the bronchial wall and the lung distal to the glue application. He continued to have intermittent hemoptysis and underwent bronchial artery embolization. However, recurrent moderate hemoptysis eventually led to pneumonectomy, which showed severe foreign body reaction in bronchi- and post-obstructive changes in the lung parenchyma and the draining lymph nodes. This case highlights a serious complication of intrabronchial cyanoacrylate gluing to control bleeding in hemoptysis, which might warrant its very cautious use in moderate hemoptysis although surgical modality is considered the definitive treatment in life-threatening hemoptysis. PMID:27625448

  17. [Cannabis smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; de Chazeron, I; Meurice, J-C

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but it is mainly smoked mixed with tobacco. The combined smoking of cannabis and tobacco is a common-place phenomenon in our society. However, its use is responsible for severe pulmonary consequences. The specific impact of smoking cannabis is difficult to assess precisely and to distinguish from the effect of tobacco. Marijuana smoke contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carcinogens at higher concentration than tobacco smoke. Cellular, tissue, animal and human studies, and also epidemiological studies, show that marijuana smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Cannabis exposure doubles the risk of developing lung cancer. This should encourage clinicians to identify cannabis use and to offer patients support in quitting. PMID:25012035

  18. Bronchoplastic procedures for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Naruke, T; Yoneyama, T; Ogata, T; Suemasu, K

    1977-06-01

    Twenty patients with lung cancer have undergone bronchoplastic procedures September, 1965, to June, 1976 in our hospital. Bronchoplastic procedures are considered to be indicated for early cases of hilar lung cancer rather than for somewhat advanced cases. Endoscopic examination and roentgenograms of the bronchial arteries are needed to delineate resectional lines of bronchus, the former for deciding the mucosal extent and the latter the intrabronchial extent of the tumor. The bronchoplastic procedures we adopted were free from the risks and dangers generally accompanying the operation, and there were no postoperative deaths. For the prevention of postoperative complications, careful attention to suture technique is needed, and postoperative bronchoscopic suction of intrabronchial secretions is absolutely necessary. These procedures assure good quality of life postoperatively and improvement in the survival rate by preserving pulmonary function, enhancing curability, and increasing the operative indications. These advantages warrant high evaluation of the operation. PMID:870767

  19. Guidance molecules in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nasarre, Patrick; Potiron, Vincent; Drabkin, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Guidance molecules were first described in the nervous system to control axon outgrowth direction. They are also widely expressed outside the nervous system where they control cell migration, tissue development and establishment of the vascular network. In addition, they are involved in cancer development, tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. This review is primarily focused on their functions in lung cancer and their involvement in lung development is also presented. Five guidance molecule families and their corresponding receptors are described, including the semaphorins/neuropilins/plexins, ephrins and Eph receptors, netrin/DCC/UNC5, Slit/Robo and Notch/Delta. In addition, the possibility to target these molecules as a therapeutic approach in cancer is discussed. PMID:20139699

  20. Work-related lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Weston, Ainsley

    2011-01-01

    Work-related respiratory diseases affect people in every industrial sector, constituting approximately 60% of all disease and injury mortality and 70% of all occupational disease mortality. There are two basic types: interstitial lung diseases, that is the pneumoconioses (asbestosis, byssinosis, chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), silicosis, flock workers' lung, and farmers' lung disease), and airways diseases, such as work-related or exacerbated asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiolitis obliterans (a disease that was recognized in the production of certain foods only 10 years ago). Common factors in the development of these diseases are exposures to dusts, metals, allergens and other toxins, which frequently cause oxidative damage. In response, the body reacts by activating primary immune response genes (i.e. cytokines that often lead to further oxidative damage), growth factors and tissue remodelling proteins. Frequently, complex imbalances in these processes contribute to the development of disease. For example, tissue matrix metalloproteases can cause the degradation of tissue, as in the development of CWP small profusions, but usually overexpression of matrix metalloproteases is controlled by serum protein inhibitors. Thus, disruption of such a balance can lead to adverse tissue damage. Susceptibility to these types of lung disease has been investigated largely through candidate gene studies, which have been characteristically small, often providing findings that have been difficult to corroborate. An important exception to this has been the finding that the HLA-DPB11(E69) allele is closely associated with chronic beryllium disease and beryllium sensitivity. Although chronic beryllium disease is only caused by exposure to beryllium, inheritance of HLA-DPB1(E69) carries an increased risk of between two- and 30-fold in beryllium exposed workers. Most, if not all, of these occupationally related diseases are

  1. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  2. [Lung ultrasound in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Yousef, N

    2016-03-01

    Lung ultrasound (LU) is becoming a bedside point-of-care technique in critical care and emergency medicine as it is performed and immediately interpreted by the clinician. LU is quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and provides accurate diagnostic information when compared with conventional lung imaging methods, such as CT scans and chest radiographs, with the additional advantage of being non-irradiating, adapted to bedside use, and easily repeatable with no side effects for the patient. LU is easy to learn, does not require sophisticated ultrasound machines or settings, and shows low intra- and interobserver variability when a standardized approach is used. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasound semiology has been described and validated in both adults and children. In summary, LU allows for quick easy recognition of a normally aerated lung in contrast to an interstitial or alveolar pattern. Recognition of these patterns may be even easier in neonates due to their small size and the absence of obesity and heavy musculature. Specific LU findings have been described for some types of neonatal lung injury, such as neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the neonate, meconium aspiration syndrome, and neonatal pneumonia. In the newborn, LU has proved its usefulness in predicting the need for hospital admission and/or intubation based on simple LU patterns. A recently proposed LU score, adapted for the neonate, correlates well with oxygenation status, independently of gestational age and underlying respiratory condition. The score reliably predicts the need for surfactant treatment in preterm babies less than 34 weeks gestation treated with nasal CPAP from birth. LU is a promising tool with numerous potential applications that warrant future studies. However, like every technique, LU has its limitations and should not completely replace standard radiography. LU can nevertheless largely reduce exposure to ionizing radiation by limiting the

  3. Smoking-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Jeffrey R; Franks, Teri J

    2009-11-01

    Dyspneic smokers who come to clinical attention demonstrate varying combinations of emphysema, airway inflammation, and fibrosis in addition to the changes of pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. There is also growing acceptance of a link between cigarette smoke and alveolar wall fibrosis. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a dramatic response to recent-onset smoking seen in a small number of individuals. The interconnected pathways that lead to lung inflammation and fibrosis in cigarette smokers are slowly coming into focus. PMID:19935224

  4. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Role of lung fluid volume in growth and maturation of the fetal sheep lung.

    PubMed Central

    Moessinger, A C; Harding, R; Adamson, T M; Singh, M; Kiu, G T

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of alterations in lung fluid volume on growth and maturation of the fetal lung. In a chronic fetal sheep preparation, right fetal lung volume was decreased by drainage of lung fluid while the volume of the left lung was expanded by mainstem bronchus ligation leading to lung fluid retention. After an experimental period of 25 d (from 105 to 129 d of gestation, term = 145 d), the right (deflated) lung was significantly hypoplastic and contained less DNA than the controls; 175.15 +/- 55.18 vs. 346.77 +/- 61.97 mg, respectively; P less than 0.001. In contrast, the left (expanded) lung was significantly hyperplastic and contained more DNA than the controls; 390.74 +/- 103.53 vs. 238.85 +/- 33.32 mg, respectively; P = 0.001. Biochemical indices of lung maturation, including total phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content expressed per unit of tissue DNA, were no different when comparing the hypoplastic, hyperplastic, and control lungs. These findings demonstrate that fetal lung cell multiplication is influenced by local distension with lung fluid, while the biochemical maturation of fetal lung surfactant is under systemic control. Images PMID:2212011

  6. Pretreatment with perfluorohexane vapor attenuates fMLP-induced lung injury in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R; Fehrenbach, Antonia; Heintz, Manuel; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Klenz, Gesa; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Hübler, Matthias; Spieth, Peter M; Koch, Thea

    2010-08-01

    The authors investigated the protective effects and dose dependency of perfluorohexane (PFH) vapor on leukocyte-mediated lung injury in isolated, perfused, and ventilated rabbit lungs. Lungs received either 18 vol.% (n = 7), 9 vol.% (n = 7), or 4.5 vol.% (n = 7) PFH. Fifteen minutes after beginning of PFH application, lung injury was induced with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Control lungs (n = 7) received fMLP only. In addition 5 lungs (PFH-sham) remained uninjured receiving 18 vol.% PFH only. Pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), peak inspiratory pressure (P(max)), and lung weight were monitored for 90 minutes. Perfusate samples were taken at regular intervals for analysis and representative lungs were fixed for histological analysis. In the control, fMLP application led to a significant increase of mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediators. Pretreatment with PFH attenuated the rise in these parameters. This was accompanied by preservation of the structural integrity of the alveolar architecture and air-blood barrier. In uninjured lungs, mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediator formation remained uneffected in the presence of PFH. The authors concluded that pretreatment with PFH vapor leads to an attenuation of leukocyte-mediated lung injury. Vaporization of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) offers new therapeutic options, making use of their protective and anti-inflammatory properties in prophylaxis or in early treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:20653469

  7. Unmasking the lung cancer epigenome.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The reprogramming of the epigenome through silencing of genes and microRNAs by cytosine DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling is critical for the initiation and progression of lung cancer through affecting all major cell regulatory pathways. Importantly, the fact that epigenetic reprogramming is reversible by pharmacological agents has opened new avenues for clinical intervention. This review focuses on the tremendous progress made in elucidating genes and microRNAs that are epigenetically silenced in lung cancer and highlights how loss of function impacts cell phenotype and major signaling pathways. The article describes the utility of (a) an in vitro model using hTERT/Cdk4 immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell lines to identify genes and microRNAs silenced during premalignancy and (b) an in vivo orthotopic nude rat lung cancer model to evaluate response to epigenetic therapy. New insights regarding the advantage of aerosol delivery of demethylating agents and the concept of priming tumors for subsequent therapy are presented and discussed. PMID:25668024

  8. Lung cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Baldwin, D R

    2015-12-01

    Deaths from lung cancer are greater than for any other type of malignancy. Many people present with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis and survival is limited. Low radiation dose CT (LDCT) screening appears to offer part of the solution to this. The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed a 20% reduction in cancer related mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all cause mortality in patients who had LDCT compared to chest X-ray. Lung Cancer screening is now being implemented in the US using the NLST screening criteria but many questions remain about the details of the methodology of screening and its cost effectiveness. Many of these questions are being answered by ongoing European trials that are reporting their findings. In this review we objectively analyse current research evidence and explore the issues that need to be resolved before implementation, including technical considerations, selection criteria and effective nodule management protocols. We discuss the potential barriers that will be faced when beginning a national screening programme and possible solutions to them. PMID:26605556

  9. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    López, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  10. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  11. Biological considerations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Almand, B; Carbone, D P

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of lung cancer biology has rapidly expanded in recent years. Lung cancer, unlike most human cancers, can be traced to an environmental risk factor in the majority of cases, and this fact is reflected in the vast number of genetic alterations discovered in lung tumors whose pathogenesis is believed to be mediated by carcinogen exposure. The discovery of these alterations has led to a greater understanding of tumor development. The dramatic progress in the understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of oncogenesis and the induction of immunity has led to a rejuvenation of efforts to apply this new knowledge to this common and refractory disease. Further, the resurgent interest in cancer immunology and tumor-host interactions holds promise for the development of new approaches to treatment based on harvesting the immune systems ability to recognize these alterations. Hopefully, this understanding will lead to novel approaches with real and convincing clinical efficacy once some of these strategies are tested in carefully performed randomized clinical trials with appropriate power to detect meaningful differences. PMID:11224984

  12. Paraquat Poisoning—Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matthew, Henry; Logan, Andrew; Woodruff, M. F. A.; Heard, Brian

    1968-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy ingested a mouthful of paraquat and developed severe respiratory distress. Treatment included the transplantation of one lung, but subsequently changes developed in the graft which are thought to have been due to paraquat, and the patient died two weeks after the operation The dangers of keeping poisonous substances in incorrectly labelled bottles has once again been demonstrated, while the pattern of paraquat poisoning, especially the development of proliferative alveolitis and terminal bronchiolitis, is confirmed. Immediate forced diuresis followed by haemodialysis is necessary to remove paraquat, thereby perhaps avoiding initiation of the changes in the lungs. The technical feasibility of human lung transplantation has again been demonstrated. It has also been shown that infection does not necessarily pose an insuperable problem, at any rate if, as in the case described, there was no preoperative pulmonary infection in either recipient or donor. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5-8Fig. 9-12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15-16Fig. 16 PMID:4877735

  13. The UPR and lung disease.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fabiola; Lambrecht, Bart; Janssens, Sophie

    2013-05-01

    The respiratory tract has a surface area of approximately 70 m(2) that is in direct contact with the external environment. Approximately 12,000 l of air are inhaled daily, exposing the airway epithelium to up to 25 million particles an hour. Several inhaled environmental triggers, like cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, or allergens, are known inducers of endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress and cause a dysregulation in ER homeostasis. Furthermore, some epithelial cell types along the respiratory tract have a secretory function, producing large amounts of mucus or pulmonary surfactant, as well as innate host defense molecules like defensins. To keep up with their secretory demands, these cells must rely on the appropriate functioning and folding capacity of the ER, and they are particularly more vulnerable to conditions of unresolved ER stress. In the lung interstitium, triggering of ER stress pathways has a major impact on the functioning of vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, causing aberrant dedifferentiation and proliferation. Given the large amounts of foreign material inhaled, the lung is densely populated by various types of immune cells specialized in engulfing and killing pathogens and in secreting cytokines/chemokines for efficient microbial clearance. Unfolded protein response signaling cascades have been shown to intersect with the functioning of immune cells at all levels. The current review aims to highlight the role of ER stress in health and disease in the lung, focusing on its impact on different structural and inflammatory cell types. PMID:23536202

  14. The evolving potential for pediatric ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Nagendran, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    Despite the rise in the number of adult lung transplantations performed, rates of pediatric lung transplantation remain low. Lung transplantation is an accepted therapy for pediatric end-stage lung disease; however, it is limited by a shortage of donor organs. EVLP has emerged as a platform for assessment and preservation of donor lung function. EVLP has been adopted in adult lung transplantation and has successfully led to increased adult lung transplantations and donor lung utilization. We discuss the future implications of EVLP utilization, specifically, its potential evolving role in overcoming donor shortages in smaller children and adolescents to improve the quality and outcomes of lung transplantation in pediatric patients. PMID:26694514

  15. Repression of Igf1 expression by Ezh2 prevents basal cell differentiation in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Laura A; Holik, Aliaksei Z; Short, Kieran M; Pasquet, Julie; Lun, Aaron T L; Blewitt, Marnie E; Smyth, Ian M; Ritchie, Matthew E; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2015-04-15

    Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the establishment of lung epithelial cell lineage identities during development are largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 during lung lineage determination. Loss of Ezh2 in the lung epithelium leads to defective lung formation and perinatal mortality. We show that Ezh2 is crucial for airway lineage specification and alveolarization. Using optical projection tomography imaging, we found that branching morphogenesis is affected in Ezh2 conditional knockout mice and the remaining bronchioles are abnormal, lacking terminally differentiated secretory club cells. Remarkably, RNA-seq analysis revealed the upregulation of basal genes in Ezh2-deficient epithelium. Three-dimensional imaging for keratin 5 further showed the unexpected presence of a layer of basal cells from the proximal airways to the distal bronchioles in E16.5 embryos. ChIP-seq analysis indicated the presence of Ezh2-mediated repressive marks on the genomic loci of some but not all basal genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action of Ezh2. We found that loss of Ezh2 de-represses insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression and that modulation of IGF1 signaling ex vivo in wild-type lungs could induce basal cell differentiation. Altogether, our work reveals an unexpected role for Ezh2 in controlling basal cell fate determination in the embryonic lung endoderm, mediated in part by repression of Igf1 expression. PMID:25790853

  16. NIOSH 1992 projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The report presents information on the areas of scientific research, surveillance, and related studies in which NIOSH is working. The report highlights work being done in the areas of occupationally caused lung diseases, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive disorders, nervous system disorders, hearing loss, skin problems, psychological distress, musculoskeletal injuries, and severe traumatic injuries. Specific projects are also discussed and classified according to the division of NIOSH under which they fall (biomedical and behavioral science; physical sciences and engineering; respiratory disease; standards development and technology transfer; surveillance, hazard evaluations and field studies; safety research, and training and manpower development). A change or adjustment in the vision of NIOSH is briefly discussed as the Institute moves into the 1990s.

  17. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Lung Cancer This booklet is about lung cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the lungs and basics about lung cancer Treatment for lung ...

  18. [Pathophysiology after resections of the lung (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Malm, A; Arborelius, M; Kristersson, S

    1977-01-01

    Measures of preventing postoperative lung atelectasis are discussed. The importance of total pre-operative smoking prohibition is stressed. Formula for pre-operative prediction of postoperative ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure are presented. Lung distention is not to be compared to lung emphysema. Lung distention may even improve ventilation as well as circulation of the remaining lung tissue. PMID:899323

  19. Registration based super-resolution reconstruction for lung 4D-CT.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Xiao, Shan; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Lung 4D-CT plays an important role in lung cancer radiotherapy for tumor localization and treatment planning. In lung 4D-CT data, the resolution in the slice direction is often much lower than the in-plane resolution. For multi-plane display, isotropic resolution is necessary, but the commonly used interpolation operation will blur the images. In this paper, we present a registration based method for super resolution enhancement of the 4D-CT multi-plane images. Our working premise is that the low-resolution images of different phases at the corresponding position can be regarded as input "frames" to reconstruct high resolution images. First, we employ the Demons registration algorithm to estimate the motion field between different "frames". Then, the projections onto convex sets (POCS) approach is employed to reconstruction high-resolution lung images. We show that our method can get clearer lung images and enhance image structure, compared with the cubic spline interpolation and back projection method. PMID:25570484

  20. Restrictive lung disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    King, T E

    1992-12-01

    Restrictive ventilatory defects characterized by a reduction in lung volumes and an increase in the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity occur when lung expansion is limited because of alterations in the lung parenchyma or because of abnormalities in the pleura, chest wall, or neuromuscular apparatus. Few studies have examined pregnant women with carefully defined restrictive lung disorders. The majority of pulmonary diseases have their onset after the childbearing years. When present, most do not alter fertility. Further, these disorders are only a relative contraindication to pregnancy because both the fetus and mother are able to survive without a high risk of increased morbidity or mortality. The clinical course of sarcoidosis is generally not altered by pregnancy. Factors indicative of a poor prognosis in sarcoidosis and pregnancy include parenchymal lesions on chest radiography, advanced roentgenologic staging, advanced maternal age, low inflammatory activity, requirement for drugs other than corticosteroids, and the presence of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. Pregnancy seldom has a significant effect on the course of the connective tissue diseases. In PSS with significant renal involvement, pregnancy has the potential for poor fetal prognosis and the risk of maternal death due to a lethal progression of renal failure. Worsening of SLE is uncommon in pregnancy, and prophylactic therapy is generally not necessary. Most women with LAM are advised to avoid pregnancy or the use of estrogens because of the concern that it will lead to worsening of their disease. The incidence of kyphoscoliosis in pregnancy is relatively high. Premature birth rates are higher than that in the normal population. The risk of progression of the abnormal curve in a scoliotic patient appears low. However, women with unstable scolioses at the time of pregnancy can demonstrate progression of the curve with the pregnancy. Respiratory complications during