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1

Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to an internet program that is all about life. Just what is life? This seems like a strange question. We all know what is meant by the word \\"life\\". But how do we define it? Are all living things alike? In this internet program, you will watch several short movies and some slides. After you see each movie and slide, you will write something about the movie and slide. Our learning goal is to make a list of the traits that all living things have in common. Get out a pencil and a piece of paper. We are off on a great adventure to learn about living things! This first movie is called, \\"Is It Alive?\\" It will help you begin thinking about living things and what they all have in common. Write on your paper: \\"Living Things\\". As you watch this movie, write the names of the things that you think are alive. Copy the ...

Richard S. Melenson

2005-11-21

2

Discovering the Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lab developed by Orange County Public School middle school science teachers. It is designed as an inquiry-based lab in which students explore how living and non living things are different. They are given many situations, including demo, lab, outdoor exploration, and follow-up, to learn the characteristics of living things.

Orange County Public Schools - science

2011-10-14

3

Living and Non-living things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is intended to help students understand the difference between living and non-living things by teaching them the characteristics of living things. Introduction: We know what living things are, right? People are living things, aren't they? Can you think of any other living things? How do you know they are living? Task: If you were asked to explain what the difference between living and non-living things, how would you? This ...

Mrs. Davies

2010-02-11

4

Living things and non-living things interact  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things and non-living things interact on a daily basis. The man is a human, a living thing. The corn crop and grass are also living things. The soil that the grass and corn crops are rooted in is a non-living thing.

Ken Hammond (USDA-ARS; )

2006-05-23

5

Living Things and their Habitats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will learn how to tell the difference between living and non-living organisms and their habitats. Our class has just learned about living things and their habitats. Use this webquest to create your own living things and their habitats. Remember a living thing: Grows Moves Reproduces A Habitat is a place (home) for living things. A habitat provides four important things: 1. Food 2. Shelter 3. Space 4. Water Now you get to decide ...

Mrs. D.

2006-10-11

6

Living Things and Where They Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on living things and their habitats includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

7

Looking for Living and Nonliving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a field investigation where students begin to generate ideas about what is living and nonliving by observing and recording what they see in a defined area outdoors and later sharing things that they think are living and why.

8

Fuel for Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners observe what happens when yeast cells are provided with a source of food (sugar). Red cabbage "juice" will serve as an indicator for the presence of carbon dioxide. Learners will observe how carbon dioxide gas is given off by yeast cells, as indicated by turning the mixture bright pink. This activity is broken up in three parts or sessions: making the indicator (can be done in advance), demonstration of cabbage juice indicator, and conducting the investigation.

Nancy P. Moreno

2011-01-01

9

Functions of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about the functions carried out by plants and animals for maintaining life. The task specifically seeks to find out if students recognize that plants and animals share several common life functions, even though they are seemingly very different organisms.

Francis Eberle

2005-01-01

10

Classification of Living Things: Introduction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Dennis O'Neal of Palomar College designed this site to introduce students to a tutorial on the Classification of Living Things. Topics addressed at this site include the Linnaen system of classification, amount of species in our world, the importance of biological diversity, the history of classification, and the relevancy of classification in the present day. There are links to the Main Menu, a Practice Quiz, and the other topics in the tutorial including Principals of Class, Kingdom to Subphylum, Class, and Subclass to Infraclass. Additionally, to link to a comprehensive glossary of relevant terms click on the Ecological Niches or Natural Selection links at the bottom of the site. For users with QuickTime there are several sound files that provide correct pronunciation of key terms.

O'Neal, Dennis

11

Interactions Between Living and Nonliving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When you finish this webquest you will know more about how living things interact with each other and with nonliving things in their environment. 1. What are the basic parts of a food chain? Read this page and write down the three main parts of a food chain onto your worksheet along with a one sentence description of each one. Parts of a food chain 2. So, what do decomposers do for each environment? Write a sentence telling what ...

Carrie Benson

2012-10-09

12

Consumers Get Energy from Other Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson where learners explore how animals obtain and store energy, and draw conclusions about the interconnectedness of living things in the flow of energy. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson four in the Astro-Venture Biology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

2012-08-03

13

Demonstrating the Influence of UV Rays on Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment that introduces students to the different types of UV rays and their effects on living things by using appropriate teaching materials and equipment. Demonstrates the effects of exposure to UV-B (fluorescent) and UV-C (germicidal) lamps by using bananas, duckweed, and the fruit fly. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

Morimoto, Kouichi

2002-01-01

14

The Internet of Things for Ambient Assisted Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet. Technological advancements lead to smart objects being capable of identifying, locating, sensing and connecting and thus leading to new forms of communication between people and things and things themselves. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) encompasses technical systems to support elderly people in their daily routine to allow an

A. Dohr; R. Modre-Opsrian; Mario Drobics; Dieter Hayn; Günter Schreier

2010-01-01

15

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they…

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-01-01

16

Investigating Biological Classification: Organization of All Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will investigate the organization of all living things through and learn how to classify through process of classifying their own shoes. Students will complete the classification of a Jaguar and write their own pneumonic device to remember the order of biological classification. (kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species)

Lindsey Oliver, Fridley Middle School, Fridley, MN

17

How to Care for Living Things in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) publication, the advantages of having living things in the classroom are discussed. Also given is a brief description of the facilities and environments required for various common mammals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and plants. (CP)

Pratt, Grace K.

18

How Living Things Obtain Energy: A Simpler Explanation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines five basic reactions which describe the biochemical pathways for living things obtaining energy. Shows the reactions that occur in respiration after glycolysis, the dehydrogenation reaction, decarboxylation, and two kinds of make-ready reactions which prepare molecules for further dehydrogenation and decarboxylation. Diagrams are…

Igelsrud, Donald E.

1989-01-01

19

Mathematics and Living Things. Student Text. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed for grade eight to enrich and supplement the usual courses of instruction. Mathematics and Living Things (MALT) utilizes exercises in biological science to derive data through which mathematical concepts and principles may be introduced and expanded. Chapters included are: (1) Leaves and Natural Variation: Measurement of…

Faber, Norman J.; And Others

20

Is it living or non living?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Once completed, students will have a deeper understanding of what is living and non living. Students will be able to identify the characteristics of non living and living things and will be able to classify them in an environment. Take this pretest to test your knowlege of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz Read this to learn more about living and non living things.Living vs Non Living Things Living things need 7 characteristics of life. Click on this link to learn more about what they are.7 Characteristics of Living Things Living and non living things have different characteristics. Look ...

Miss Aitken

2009-04-17

21

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on students’ understanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its curriculum. For the first three years of school, Brunei children are taught in Malay and then for the remainder of their education, instruction is in English. This research is concerned with the influence that this bilingual education system has on children’s learning of science. The purpose was to document the patterns of Brunei students’ developing understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things and examine the impact in the change in language as the medium of instruction. A cross-sectional case study design was used in one primary school. Data collection included an interview ( n = 75), which consisted of forced-response and semi-structured interview questions, a categorisation task and classroom observation. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that the transition from Malay to English as the language of instruction from Primary 4 onwards restricted the students’ ability to express their understandings about living things, to discuss related scientific concepts and to interpret and analyse scientific questions. From a social constructivist perspective these language factors will potentially impact on the students’ cognitive development by limiting the expected growth of the students’ understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things.

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-07-01

22

The lived experience of doing the right thing: a parse method study.  

PubMed

The purposes of this research were to discover the structure of the experience of doing the right thing and to contribute to nursing knowledge. The Parse research method was used in this study to answer the research question: What is the structure of the lived experience of doing the right thing? Participants were 10 individuals living in the community. The central finding of this study was the following structure: The lived experience of doing the right thing is steadfast uprightness amid adversity, as honorableness with significant affiliations emerges with contentment. New knowledge extended the theory of humanbecoming and enhanced understanding of the experience of doing the right thing. PMID:22228528

Smith, Sandra Maxwell

2012-01-01

23

Living Vs. Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First mouse over the objects to see some of the characteristics of living and non living things.Living Nonliving Characteristics 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Carrie Benson

2012-10-08

24

Why are living things sensitive to weak magnetic fields?  

PubMed

There is evidence for robust interactions of weak ELF magnetic fields with biological systems. Quite apart from the difficulties attending a proper physical basis for such interactions, an equally daunting question asks why these should even occur, given the apparent lack of comparable signals in the long-term electromagnetic environment. We suggest that the biological basis is likely to be found in the weak (?50?nT) daily swing in the geomagnetic field that results from the solar tidal force on free electrons in the upper atmosphere, a remarkably constant effect exactly in phase with the solar diurnal change. Because this magnetic change is locked into the solar-derived everyday diurnal response in living things, one can argue that it acts as a surrogate for the solar variation, and therefore plays a role in chronobiological processes. This implies that weak magnetic field interactions may have a chronodisruptive basis, homologous to the more familiar effects on the biological clock arising from sleep deprivation, phase-shift employment and light at night. It is conceivable that the widespread sensitivity of biological systems to weak ELF magnetic fields is vestigially derived from this diurnal geomagnetic effect. PMID:23915203

Liboff, Abraham R

2014-09-01

25

Living Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First take this pretest to test your knowledge of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Mrs. Benson

2010-02-23

26

Dying Objects\\/Living Things: The Thingness of Poetry in Yusef Komunyakaa's Talking Dirty to the Gods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on interdisciplinary work on the significance of cultural artefacts by scholars such as Bill Brown and W.J.T. Mitchell, this essay explores images of things in Komunyakaa’s recent mythopoetic verse while connecting this motif to the thingness of poetry itself, the latent and insistent force of its rhythmic form.

Daniel Cross Turner

2012-01-01

27

Genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains carried by adolescents living in Milan, Italy  

PubMed Central

Before a protein vaccine is introduced into a country, it is essential to evaluate its potential impact and estimate its benefits and costs. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis B (NmB) in the pharyngeal secretions of 1375 healthy adolescents aged 13–19 y living in Milan, Italy, in September 2012, and the possible protection offered by the two currently available NmB protein vaccines. Ninety-one subjects were Nm carriers (6.6%), 29 (31.9%) of whom carried the NmB capsular gene. The 29 identified strains belonged to eight clonal complexes (CCs), the majority of which were in the ST-41/44/Lin.3 CC (n = 11; 37.9%). All of the identified strains harboured ƒHbp alleles representing a total of 15 sub-variants: the gene for NHBA protein was found in all but three of the studied strains (10.3%) with 13 identified sub-variants. There were 15 porA sub-types, seven of which were identified in just one CC. The findings of this study seem to suggest that both of the protein vaccines proposed for the prevention of invasive disease due to NmB (the 4-protein and the 2-protein products) have a composition that can evoke a theoretically effective antibody response against the meningococcal strains currently carried by adolescents living in Northern Italy. The genetic characteristics of NmB strains can be easily evaluated by means of molecular methods, the results of which can provide an albeit approximate estimate of the degree of protection theoretically provided by the available vaccines, and the possible future need to change their composition. PMID:23880917

Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Terranova, Leonardo; Montinaro, Valentina; Scala, Alessia; Ansuini, Valentina; Principi, Nicola

2013-01-01

28

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous Exploration and Evaluation  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous,version1-7Mar2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Young children learning about living things: A case study of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although research from a developmental/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative data-collection methods to investigate the process of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives when Year 1 (5- and 6-year-old) students were learning about living things. Most students were found to think about living things with either stable, nonscientific or stable, scientific framework theories. Transitional phases of understanding also were identified. Patterns of conceptual change observed over the 5-week period of instruction included theory change and belief revision as well as reversals in beliefs. The predominant pattern of learning, however, was the assimilation of facts and information into the students' preferred framework theory. The social milieu of the classroom context exposed students' scientific and nonscientific beliefs that influenced other individuals in a piecemeal fashion. Children with nonscientific theories of living things were identified as being least able to benefit from socially constructed, scientific knowledge; hence, recommendations are made for teaching that focuses on conceptual change strategies rather than knowledge enrichment.

Venville, Grady

2004-05-01

30

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API  

E-print Network

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API Geoffrey C. Fox Indiana University, Bloomington IN 47408 USA rdhartma@indiana.edu ABSTRACT The Internet of Things (Io systems [2,3]. This is the vision of the Internet of Things. We present a cloud-compatible open source

31

The disparity mutagenesis model predicts rescue of living things from catastrophic errors  

PubMed Central

In animals including humans, mutation rates per generation exceed a perceived threshold, and excess mutations increase genetic load. Despite this, animals have survived without extinction. This is a perplexing problem for animal and human genetics, arising at the end of the last century, and to date still does not have a fully satisfactory explanation. Shortly after we proposed the disparity theory of evolution in 1992, the disparity mutagenesis model was proposed, which forms the basis for an explanation for an acceleration of evolution and species survival. This model predicts a significant increase of the mutation threshold values if the fidelity difference in replication between the lagging and leading strands is high enough. When applied to biological evolution, the model predicts that living things, including humans, might overcome the lethal effect of accumulated deleterious mutations and be able to survive. Artificially derived mutator strains of microorganisms, in which an enhanced lagging-strand-biased mutagenesis was introduced, showed unexpectedly high adaptability to severe environments. The implications of the striking behaviors shown by these disparity mutators will be discussed in relation to how living things with high mutation rates can avoid the self-defeating risk of excess mutations. PMID:25538731

Furusawa, Mitsuru

2014-01-01

32

A cloud-based Internet of Things platform for ambient assisted living.  

PubMed

A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

2014-01-01

33

A Cloud-Based Internet of Things Platform for Ambient Assisted Living  

PubMed Central

A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

2014-01-01

34

CELLS: The smallest living things... Purpose: To gain familiarity with cell structures and to learn  

E-print Network

1 CELLS: The smallest living things... Purpose: To gain familiarity with cell structures and to learn the differences between plant cells and animal cells. You have already learned about the parts of these cells in class; in this lab we will observe celery cells (plant cells) and human cheek cells (animal

Rose, Michael R.

35

Classification Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease with Special Reference to Living and Nonliving Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was conducted to assess the hypothesis that visual similarity between exemplars within a semantic category may affect differentially the recognition process of living and nonliving things, according to task demands, in patients with semantic memory disorders. Thirty-nine Alzheimer's patients and 39 normal elderly subjects were presented with a task in which they had to classify pictures and

M. C. Goldblum; F. Boller

1996-01-01

36

Revisiting Preschoolers' Living Things Concept: A Microgenetic Analysis of Conceptual Change in Basic Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological…

Opfer, John E.; Siegler, Robert S.

2004-01-01

37

LED and Semiconductor Photo-effects on Living Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied LED irradiation effects on plants and animals in the visible to UV region of light from GaN LEDs. The results are as follows. Blue light considers to be effective for pearl cultivation or for attraction of small fishes living in near the surface of sea such as Pompano or Sardine, white light radiation is effective for cultivation of botanical plankton for shells. Other experiments of UV light irradiation attracting effect on baby sea turtle and the germination UV effect of mushroom, green light weight enhance effect on baby pigs, light vernalization effect of vegitable and Ge far infrared therapic effect on human body are also given.

Fujiyasu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takemitsu; Fujiyasu, Kentarou; Ujihara, Shirou; Watanabe, Naoharu; Sunayama, Shunji; Ikoma, Shuuji

38

Science K-12, Living Things Are Products of Their Heredity and Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, health, general science, physical science) and grade level. Concepts regarding characteristics of living things are stressed in objectives for the primary grades (K-5), and reproductive biology is covered…

Utica City School District, NY.

39

Invitations to Interdependence: Caught in the Web. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about ecosystems which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

40

Invitations to Heredity: Generation to Generation. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about heredity and genetics which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

41

Invitations to Evolving. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about evolution which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

42

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 -Project Presentation #4 (M32) Date 30/04/2013  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 - Project Final hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things................................................................................................4 hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

43

Early Understanding of the Concept of Living Things: An Examination of Young Children's Drawings of Plant Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper looks at the drawings of a sample of 118 children aged between 4 and 7 years old on the topic of plant life and relates the content to their knowledge of the concept of living things. The research project uses two types of tests: a task to analyse the level of understanding of the concept of living things and a free drawing activity.…

Villarroel, José Domingo; Infante, Guillermo

2014-01-01

44

Implementing the process of science concept development in early childhood education through young children's learning of living and nonliving things: an action research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploring of the science concept development and change in young children has been a neglected area in most of the developing countries. Research in the developed world indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of such concepts like; energy, force, motion and living nonliving things, even by the age of 10 years. The purpose of this study

Shakeela Anjum

2005-01-01

45

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 Serious Gaming approach Date 2011-02-29  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious Gaming2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers  

E-print Network

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers.Huysmans@gmail.com {Peter.Rigole,Yolande.Berbers}@cs.kuleuven.be Abstract. In the Internet of Things, physical objects of the presented solution is illustrated by a concrete scenario. Keywords: RFID, Internet of Things, ontologies 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

The secret lives of liberals and conservatives: Personality profiles, interaction styles, and things they leave behind  

E-print Network

Although skeptics continue to doubt that most people are “ideological, ” evidence suggests that meaningful left-right differences do exist and that they may be rooted in basic personality dispositions, that is, relatively stable individual differences in psychological needs, motives, and orientations toward the world. Seventy-five years of theory and research on personality and political orientation has produced a long list of dispositions, traits, and behaviors. Applying a theory of ideology as motivated social cognition and a “Big Five ” framework, we find that two traits, Openness to New Experiences and Conscientiousness, parsimoniously capture many of the ways in which individual differences underlying political orientation have been conceptualized. In three studies we investigate the relationship between personality and political orientation using multiple domains and measurement techniques, including: self-reported personality assessment; nonverbal behavior in the context of social interaction; and personal possessions and the characteristics of living and working spaces. We obtained consistent and converging evidence that personality differences between liberals and conservatives are robust, replicable, and behaviorally significant, especially with respect to social (vs. economic) dimensions of ideology. In general, liberals are more open-minded, creative, curious, and

Dana R. Carney; John T. Jost; Samuel D. Gosling; Jeff Potter

2008-01-01

48

Feature Types and Object Categories: Is Sensorimotoric Knowledge Different for Living and Nonliving Things?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some models of semantic memory claim that items from living and nonliving domains have different feature-type profiles. Data from feature generation and perceptual modality rating tasks were compared to evaluate this claim. Results from two living (animals, fruits/vegetables) and two nonliving (tools, vehicles) categories showed that…

Ankerstein, Carrie A.; Varley, Rosemary A.; Cowell, Patricia E.

2012-01-01

49

LITTLE THINGS  

SciTech Connect

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey), which is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 dwarf irregular and 4 blue compact dwarf galaxies that is centered around H I-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The H I-line data are characterized by high sensitivity ({<=}1.1 mJy beam{sup -1} per channel), high spectral resolution ({<=}2.6 km s{sup -1}), and high angular resolution ({approx}6''). The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby ({<=}10.3 Mpc; 6'' is {<=}300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as H I map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, velocity-flux profiles, and surface gas density profiles. In addition to the H I data we have GALEX UV and ground-based UBV and H{alpha} images for most of the galaxies, and JHK images for some. Spitzer mid-IR images are available for many of the galaxies as well. These data sets are available online.

Hunter, Deidre A.; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Megan; Zhang Hongxin [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Ficut-Vicas, Dana; Brinks, Elias; Heesen, Volker [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, CP 204, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Cigan, Phil; Westpfahl, David J.; Young, Lisa M. [Physics Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Oh, Se-Heon [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Rupen, Michael P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-11-01

50

PM Roberta Gilchrist, 1-2 oktober 2014 Heirlooms and Ancient Objects: Connecting the Lives of Medieval People and Things  

E-print Network

of Medieval People and Things This lecture considers the intersecting biographies of medieval people and things. What did old things mean to medieval people - why did they keep them, and how did they use them spheres is used to explore the value of heirlooms as inter-generational objects, the household

51

Can We Make Definite Categorization of Student Attitudes? A Rough Set Approach to Investigate Students' Implicit Attitudinal Typologies toward Living Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the possibility of analyzing educational data using the theory of rough sets which is mostly employed in the fields of data analysis and data mining. Data were collected using an open-ended conceptual understanding test of the living things administered to first-year high school students. The responses of randomly selected…

Narli, Serkan; Yorek, Nurettin; Sahin, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

2010-01-01

52

Descriptive Characteristics and Health Outcomes of the Food by Prescription Nutrition Supplementation Program for Adults Living with HIV in Nyanza Province, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background The clinical effects and potential benefits of nutrition supplementation interventions for persons living with HIV remain largely unreported, despite awareness of the multifaceted relationship between HIV infection and nutrition. We therefore examined descriptive characteristics and nutritional outcomes of the Food by Prescription (FBP) nutrition supplementation program in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Methods Demographic, health, and anthropometric data were gathered from a retrospective cohort of 1,017 non-pregnant adult patients who enrolled into the FBP program at a Family AIDS Care and Education Services (FACES) site in Nyanza Province between July 2009 and July 2011. Our primary outcome was FBP treatment success defined as attainment of BMI>20, and we used Cox proportional hazards to assess socio-demographic and clinical correlates of FBP treatment success. Results Mean body mass index was 16.4 upon enrollment into the FBP program. On average, FBP clients gained 2.01 kg in weight and 0.73 kg/m2 in BMI over follow-up (mean 100 days), with the greatest gains among the most severely undernourished (BMI <16) clients (p<0.001). Only 13.1% of clients attained a BMI>20, though 44.5% achieved a BMI increase ?0.5. Greater BMI at baseline, younger age, male gender, and not requiring highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were associated with a higher rate of attainment of BMI>20. Conclusion This study reports significant gains in weight and BMI among patients enrolled in the FBP program, though only a minority of patients achieved stated programmatic goals of BMI>20. Future research should include well-designed prospective studies that examine retention, exit reasons, mortality outcomes, and long-term sustainability of nutrition supplementation programs for persons living with HIV. PMID:24646586

Nagata, Jason M.; Cohen, Craig R.; Young, Sera L.; Wamuyu, Catherine; Armes, Mary N.; Otieno, Benard O.; Leslie, Hannah H.; Dandu, Madhavi; Stewart, Christopher C.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Weiser, Sheri D.

2014-01-01

53

Confidence, tolerance, and allowance in biological engineering: the nuts and bolts of living things.  

PubMed

The emphasis of systems and synthetic biology on quantitative understanding of biological objects and their eventual re-design has raised the question of whether description and construction standards that are commonplace in electric and mechanical engineering are applicable to live systems. The tuning of genetic devices to deliver a given activity is generally context-dependent, thereby undermining the re-usability of parts, and predictability of function, necessary for manufacturing new biological objects. Tolerance (acceptable limits within the unavoidable divergence of a nominal value) and allowance (deviation introduced on purpose for the sake of flexibility and hence modularity, i.e. fitting together with a variety of other components) are key aspects of standardization that need to be brought to biological design. These should endow functional building blocks with a pre-specified level of confidence for bespoke biosystems engineering. However, in the absence of more fundamental knowledge, fine-tuning necessarily relies on evolutionary/combinatorial gravitation toward a fixed objective. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:25345679

Porcar, Manuel; Danchin, Antoine; de Lorenzo, Víctor

2015-01-01

54

Why the Wild Things Are: Animals in the Lives of Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines children's many connections to animals and their developmental significance, exploring the growth of the human animal connection, and showing how children's innate interest in animals is shaped by their families and their social worlds, and may in turn shape the kind of people they will become. Chapter 1 documents how theory and…

Melson, Gail F.

55

Living Things: Habitats & Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Text and photographs regarding habitats, populations and communities, biomes, niches and ecosystems in general with numerous links to lessons, activities, and organizations on specific subtopics in ecology.

2009-01-01

56

Living Things & Their Needs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These resources are geared for the very young, and each inquiry-based unit focuses on a different aspect of science and health. These educational materials are aligned with the National Science Education Standards and National Health Education Standards.

Baylor College of Medicine (Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center)

2010-01-01

57

Organization of LIving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

58

Interactions Among Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

59

How Living Things Function  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on biological organisms and their systems includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

60

Metaphors We Live By  

E-print Network

1. Make a list of some of the metaphors discussed by Lakoff and Johnson. Try inserting new words that convey a different meaning. For example, consider the expression, “I’d like to share some time with you ” rather than “spend some time with you.” 2. Make a list of “language asymmetries ” (see Part II, p. XX, and Reading 12 for definitions) and consider what underlying cultural values these asymmetries indicate. 3. Consider the use of the masculine he or man to refer to all people. Some people say that this “generic use ” is perfectly acceptable because the terms “imply ” women as well as men. Others argue that the term not only leaves out half the population but also perpetuates an image of women as “auxiliary”and men as “central.”Discuss this. 4. Discuss the cultural practice of women taking men’s names when they marry. What cultural values does this practice convey? 5. Keep track of all the “medicalized ” terms you hear for a few days (for example, erectile dysfunction, hyperkinesis). Try substituting more common terms and see if you think about the “problem ” differently. For example, clinically depressed versus tired and really burnt out. Do these problems seem more real or authentic with the use of some terms rather than others?

George Lakoff; Mark Johnson

1980-01-01

61

Taming the Wild Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews "Where the Wild Things Are," by Maurice Sendak. Includes excerpts from the speech Sendak gave when he accepted the Caldecott Medal for "Wild Things" and commentaries by child development professionals. Briefly reviews other books written by Sendak. (RJC)

Lystad, Mary

1989-01-01

62

"The second thing to hell is living under that bridge": narratives of women living with victimization, serious mental illness, and in homelessness.  

PubMed

The increasing rates of violence committed against homeless women living with serious mental illness (SMI) have been well documented. These increasing rates of violence need attention as they are a serious public health concern. The purpose of this qualitative study is to increase our understanding of victimization among this population as perceived by those who have lived the experience. The study sample consists of 15 homeless adult women who self-reported having been diagnosed with a SMI. The findings highlight the reality that, provided with the right type of resources, positive growth can occur among these women despite lifelong events of trauma, victimization, and loss. PMID:24131415

Bonugli, Rebecca; Lesser, Janna; Escandon, Socorro

2013-11-01

63

Wild Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The children's book Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak was animated using Alice version 2.0 for an introductory undergraduate 14-week programming course at Immaculata University. Using the software development lifecycle, the designers\\/developers collaborated on the requirements and design phases while the implementation phase was completed individually. The animation was designed and developed with the intent of applying objectoriented

Rich Cosgriff Jr.; Lori L. Monk; Mary Elizabeth Jones

2007-01-01

64

Living and Non Living Organisms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Core Curriculum Standard II: Students will understand that organisms depend on living and non living things within their environment. Introduction At the end of this assignment you should know the difference between a living and a non living organism and understand the effect a new environment (both living and non living things) can have on a living organism and the effect that living organism can have on the environment. ...

Ms. Henrie

2009-11-18

65

Live nephron imaging by MRI.  

PubMed

The local sensitivity of MRI can be improved with small MR detectors placed close to regions of interest. However, to maintain such sensitivity advantage, local detectors normally need to communicate with the external amplifier through cable connections, which prevent the use of local detectors as implantable devices. Recently, an integrated wireless amplifier was developed that can efficiently amplify and broadcast locally detected signals, so that the local sensitivity was enhanced without the need for cable connections. This integrated detector enabled the live imaging of individual glomeruli using negative contrast introduced by cationized ferritin, and the live imaging of renal tubules using positive contrast introduced by gadopentetate dimeglumine. Here, we utilized the high blood flow to image individual glomeruli as hyperintense regions without any contrast agent. These hyperintense regions were identified for pixels with signal intensities higher than the local average. Addition of Mn(2+) allowed the simultaneous detection of both glomeruli and renal tubules: Mn(2+) was primarily reabsorbed by renal tubules, which would be distinguished from glomeruli due to higher enhancement in T1-weighted MRI. Dynamic studies of Mn(2+) absorption confirmed the differential absorption affinity of glomeruli and renal tubules, potentially enabling the in vivo observation of nephron function. PMID:25186296

Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Pothayee, Nikorn; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Star, Robert; Bennett, Kevin; Koretsky, Alan

2014-11-15

66

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management By Evridiki Bersi -Kathimerini  

E-print Network

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management rules By Evridiki Bersi, replacing them with one of the most advanced waste-management systems in the world. In the 1970s, Germany Harmening, president of the Federation of the German Waste Management Industry, in his opening speech

Columbia University

67

Becoming a nurse faculty leader: taking risks by doing the right thing.  

PubMed

Risk taking is a key aspect of academic leadership essential to meeting the challenges and opportunities in higher education. What are the practices of risk taking in nurse faculty leaders? This interpretive phenomenological study examines the experience and meaning of risk taking among nurse leaders. The theme of doing the right thing is brought forth through in-depth hermeneutic analysis of 14 individual interviews and two focus group narratives. The practice of doing the right thing is propelled and captured by leaders through a sense professional responsibility, visioning the future, and being true to self and follow one's core values. This study develops an evidence base for incorporating ways of doing the right thing in leadership development activities at a time when there is tremendous need for highly effective leaders in academic settings. Examining the practices of doing the right thing as a part of leadership development lays a foundation for building the next generation of nursing leaders prepared to navigate the ever-changing and complex academic and health care environments. PMID:24630679

Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Pardue, Karen; Young, Patricia K; Morales, Mary Lou; Halstead, Judith; Pearsall, Catherine

2014-01-01

68

Lively Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintaining living things in a classroom requires knowledge and preparation. It also requires the proper equipment and space. There are two primary goals in the study of living things: first, we want our students to respect life, and second, we want them to appreciate its complexity in nature. Observing healthy living things in school accomplishes both goals. This chapter describes the appropriate precautions that should be taken into consideration when bringing living organisms into classrooms.

Juliana Texley

2002-01-01

69

Science K-12, Living Things in Continuous Change. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, general science, physical science, earth science) and grade level. In grades K-6, objectives for topics of science study include conditions for plants and animals to live, adaptation, conservation,…

Utica City School District, NY.

70

Modifiable Patient Characteristics and Racial Disparities in Evaluation Completion and Living Donor Transplant  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives To reduce racial disparities in transplant, modifiable patient characteristics associated with completion of transplant evaluation and receipt of living donor kidney transplant must be identified. Design, setting, participants, & measurements From 2004 to 2007, 695 black and white patients were surveyed about 15 less-modifiable and 10 more-modifiable characteristics at evaluation onset; whether they had completed evaluation within 1 year and received living donor kidney transplants by 2010 was determined. Logistic regression and competing risks time-to-event analysis were conducted to determine the variables that predicted evaluation completion and living donor kidney transplant receipt. Results Not adjusting for covariates, blacks were less likely than whites to complete evaluation (26.2% versus 51.8%, P<0.001) and receive living donor kidney transplants (8.7% versus 21.9%, P<0.001). More-modifiable variables associated with completing evaluation included more willing to be on the waiting list (odds ratio=3.4, 95% confidence interval=2.1, 5.7), more willing to pursue living donor kidney transplant (odds ratio=2.7, 95% confidence interval=1.8, 4.0), having access to more transplant education resources (odds ratio=2.2, 95% confidence interval=1.5, 3.2), and having greater transplant knowledge (odds ratio=1.8, 95% confidence interval=1.2, 2.7). Patients who started evaluation more willing to pursue living donor kidney transplant (hazard ratio=4.3, 95% confidence interval=2.7, 6.8) and having greater transplant knowledge (hazard ratio=1.2, 95% confidence interval=1.1, 1.3) were more likely to receive living donor kidney transplants. Conclusions Because patients who began transplant evaluation with greater transplant knowledge and motivation were ultimately more successful at receiving transplants years later, behavioral and educational interventions may be very successful strategies to reduce or overcome racial disparities in transplant. PMID:23520044

Peipert, John D.; Hyland, Shelley S.; McCabe, Melanie S.; Schenk, Emily A.; Liu, Jingxia

2013-01-01

71

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic investigation of mental phenomena, behaviour and the problems of adjustment to an environment. The  

E-print Network

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic goal of Psychology is to understand the causes of human behaviour. Psychologists investigate how.They examine biological, cognitive and social determinants of behaviour. Psychology is a broad science

Seldin, Jonathan P.

72

Losing Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews five children's books that deal with the theme of losing things and the feelings that can accompany it. Also discusses the loss of intangible things, such as talent, concentration, temper, or patience, and presents five creative activities that deal more with the loss of objects. (LRW)

Zingher, Gary

2003-01-01

73

Using the Real Thing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program to bring farm animals into the classroom. Topics discussed include using the senses, health and safety for both children and animals, and rewards of using animals in special situations. Talks given include "Similarities and Differences of Living Things"; "From a Sheep to a Ball of Wool"; and "Food from the Farm." (PVD)

Watson, Gwendy

1998-01-01

74

Nature, Education and Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay it is argued that the educational philosophy of John Dewey gains in depth and importance by being related to his philosophy of nature, his metaphysics. The result is that any experiental process is situated inside an event, an existence, a thing, and I try to interpret this "thing" as schools or major cultural events such…

Rømer, Thomas Aastrup

2013-01-01

75

Demographic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Mobile Phone Ownership and Usage among Youth Living in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The use of mobile phones and other technology for improving health through research and practice is growing quickly, in particular in areas with difficult-to-reach population or where the research infrastructure is less developed. In Sub-Saharan Africa, there appears to be a dramatic increase in mobile phone ownership and new initiatives that capitalize on this technology to support health promotion campaigns to change behavior and to increase health literacy. However, the extent to which difficult-to-reach youth in the slums of Kampala may own and use mobile phones has not been reported despite the burden of injuries, substance use, and HIV that they face. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of mobile phone ownership and use in this high-risk population and to identify psychosocial characteristics that may differentiate those owning and using a phone from those who do not. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of the Kampala Youth Survey (N=457). Data collection took place in 2011, and the survey was designed to quantify high-risk behaviors in a convenience sample of urban youth living on the streets or in the slums, 14–24 years of age, who were participating in a Uganda Youth Development Link drop-in center for disadvantaged street youth. We computed chi-square analyses to determine any significant differences in psychosocial characteristics based on phone ownership and use. Results: Overall, 46.9% of youth reported owning a mobile phone and ownership did not vary by sex but was more common among youth older than 18 years of age. Mobile phone ownership was also more common among those who reported taking care of themselves at night, who reported current drug use and who reported trading sex for money, food or other things. Conclusion: Given that nearly half of the youth own and use phones daily, new research is needed to determine next steps for mobile health (mhealth), including the feasibility of using mobile phones for data collection and interventions with this hard-to-reach population. Moreover, this technology may also be suitable for injury-specific research given that there were few differences with respect to injury-related variables in mobile phone ownership and usage. PMID:25157308

Swahn, Monica H.; Braunstein, Sarah; Kasirye, Rogers

2014-01-01

76

Live Well  

MedlinePLUS

... Against AIDS Act Against AIDS Campaigns Share Compartir Live Well Being aware of your overall health beyond ... things you can do to stay healthy and live well. Mental Health - Good mental health will help ...

77

Texts of Our Institutional Lives: Translucency, Coursepacks, and the Post-Historical University--An Investigation into Pedagogical Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contemporary university's reliance on coursepacks, whether they take print or digital form, is illuminated by Bruno Latour's theories and by consideration of a nineteenth-century copyright case involving noted textbook author William McGuffey. In particular, these contexts remind individuals that coursepacks are situated within shifting…

Pflugfelder, Ehren Helmut

2012-01-01

78

Energy Cycle in Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This diagram shows how energy from the sun cycles through plants and animals. Plants create sugars through photosynthesis which animals can then use for energy. ATP, glucose, and the mitochondria are also explained. Many key terms are hyperlinked to provide more detailed definitions.

2012-06-19

79

Living Things in Their Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

80

String Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

String Thing is an interactive online game in which learners change a virtual string's tension, length, and gauge to create different musical pitches. Educators can use this game as an introduction to sound and before completing any activities on music or building instruments. Alternatively, educators can use this game to review or assess these concepts.

WGBH

2010-01-01

81

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes: recruitment and baseline characteristics.  

PubMed

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) is a randomized controlled trial designed to translate the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention into a community setting using community health workers engaged through an existing Diabetes Care Center (DCC). Overweight and obese (BMI 25-40 kg/m²) individuals with pre-diabetes (fasting blood glucose 95-125 mg/dl) with no medical contraindications to participate in a lifestyle intervention were recruited for participation in this study. Standard recruitment strategies were employed, including mass mailing, direct provider referral, and community events. Participant recruitment and randomization for this trial began in 2007 and was concluded in 2009. 1818 screenings were conducted; of these, 326 (17.9%) qualified and 301 (16.6%) participants were randomized over a 21 month period. 23.8% of potential participants were excluded during the initial telephone screening, primarily for BMI and recent history of CVD. The majority of participants (220, 73.1%) reported mass mailing as their primary source of information about the study. Mass mailing was more effective with participants who identified themselves as white when compared to African-Americans. The cost of recruitment per randomized participant was $816, which includes direct costs and staff effort. 41% of the randomized participants were male and approximately 27% reported a race or ethnicity other than white. In comparison to the DPP study cohort, the HELP PD population is older, more educated and predominately white. These differences, reflecting in part the community in which HELP PD was conducted, may have implications for retention and adherence in the lifestyle intervention group. PMID:20974289

Blackwell, Caroline S; Foster, Kara A; Isom, Scott; Katula, Jeffrey A; Vitolins, Mara Z; Rosenberger, Erica L; Goff, David C

2011-01-01

82

20 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT BROWSERS AND THE WEB Illustrated by Christoph Niemann. Written by the Google Chrome Team.  

E-print Network

in the world. But how do our browsers and the web actually work? How has the World Wide Web evolved into what by the Google Chrome Team. www.20thingsilearned.com Foreword to 20 Things Many of us these days depend that allows the web to exist. We'll also take a look at how the web is used today, through cloud computing

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

83

Thing One  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artist's Statement \\u000aI have a preconceived notion about what paint is and what it’s made up of, what it looks like, and what it can do. Painting is made up of three components, the stretcher bar, the canvas, and the paint itself. But when you break it down, which part is really the painting? Which part is the actual “THING

Jenny Worcester

2011-01-01

84

Things that Make us Stupid Peter Gutmann  

E-print Network

of appropriately-designed technology to help humans accomplish tasks and achieve goals Things That Make Us SmartThings that Make us Stupid Peter Gutmann University of Auckland Things That Make Us Smart Influential industrial design book by Donald Norman #12;Things That Make Us Smart (ctd) Discusses the use

Gutmann, Peter

85

Hermeneutics by the Living Anton Markos  

E-print Network

EDITORIAL Hermeneutics by the Living Anton Markos Received: 20 January 2010 /Accepted: 22 March by introducing hermeneutics? After all, semiotics has already colonized the field, and biosemioticians of different "denominations" flourish at their annual meetings.1 Is not, after all, hermeneutics but an older

Markos, Anton

86

Internet of "printed" Things: low-cost fabrication of autonomous sensing nodes by inkjet printing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"What if electronics devices are printed using an inkjet printer even at home?" "What if those devices no longer need a battery?" I will introduce two enabling technologies for the Internet of Things concept. 1. Instant Inkjet Circuits: A low cost, fast and accessible technology to support the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. We demonstrated that "sintering-free" silver nano particle ink with a commodity inkjet printer can be used to fabricate printed circuit board and high-frequency applications such as antennas and sensors. The technology is now commercialized by AgIC, Inc. 2. Wireless Power: Although large amounts of data can be exchanged over a wireless communication link, mobile devices are still tethered by power cables. We are trying to solve this problem by two different approaches: energy harvesting. A simple circuitry comprised of diodes and capacitor can convert ambient radio signals into DC current. Our research revealed the signals from TV tower located 6.5km apart could be used to feed 100 microwatts to power microcontrollers.

Kawahara, Yoshihiro

2014-11-01

87

Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

2008-01-01

88

Demographic Characteristics of Pre-Mariel Cubans Living in the United States: 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes and analyzes the demographic characteristics of the Pre-Mariel Cuban American population living in the United States as presented in the 1980 U.S. Census of the Population. Information is not provided for the Mariel entrants, who began arriving from Cuba on April 21, 1980, because the data were derived from a one-in-a-thousand…

Boswell, Thomas D.; Rivero, Manuel

89

Characteristics of a Teflon Rod Antenna for Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Irradiation on Living Bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of a millimeter- and submillimeter-wave catheter for irradiation on living bodies using a Teflon rod dielectric antenna is described. The power sources of electromagnetic wave are an Impatt oscillator (90 GHz, 0.3 W) and a gyrotron (302 GHz, 30 W). Irradiation tests using various Teflon rod dielectric antennas were performed on cow livers, living rats and a cancerous tumor implanted in living mice. Irradiation results were considered by microwave theory and ray optics.

Tatsukawa, Toshiaki; Doi, Akitaka; Teranaka, Masato; Takashima, Hitoshi; Goda, Fuminori; Idehara, Toshitaka; Kanemaki, Tomohiro; Nishizawa, Seiji; Namba, Tunetoyo

2003-11-01

90

How Things Fly  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the National Air and Space Museum, this site allows users to visit the special exhibit How Things Fly. In How Do Things Fly? the following topics are discussed in a question and answer format: Can you fly?, Air is "stuff"!, Balloons, Animal flight, Airplanes, and Spacecraft. The physics behind flight for each topic is at a general level, making this site an excellent source for K-12 education. Specific science activities, along with recommended reading, are found in the Resource Center. Additional links contain interesting comments and activities for particular topics.

1999-01-01

91

Most academic units primarily either "describe things" or "invent things." They are either Einstein  

E-print Network

Schools is that they are places "where people and technology meet." They are places where social scientists study things and technologists invent things. Of course, by "technology" we mean infor- mation technology in its most inclusiveMost academic units primarily either "describe things" or "invent things." They are either Einstein

Wobbrock, Jacob O.

92

How to do things with things  

Microsoft Academic Search

J.L. Austin has demonstrated that people can “do things”—bring about social facts — with words. Here we describe how some people do things with things. This is a study of the symbolic use and situated history of material objects during a business negotiation between two German entrepreneurs: of the practical transformation of things-at-hand from objects of use into exemplars, or

Jürgen Streeck

1996-01-01

93

WHAT MAKES THINGS GO.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE INITIAL QUESTION IN THE TITLE IS ANSWERED THROUGH SIMPLE EXPERIMENTS FOR CULTURALLY DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. MUSCLES, RUNNING, WATER, WIND, STEAM, FAST BURNING AND ELECTRICITY ARE FOUND TO "MAKE THINGS GO." USING THESE BASIC DISCOVERIES, VOCABULARY IS BUILT UP BY WORKING WITH DIFFERENT WORDS RELATING TO THE EXPERIMENTS. A…

Mobilization for Youth, Inc., New York, NY.

94

Putting Things to REST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrating resources into the Web is an important aspect of making them accessible as part of this global information system. The integration of physical things into the Web so far has not been done on a large scale, which makes it harder to realize network eects that could emerge by the combination of today's Web content, and the integration of

Erik Wilde

95

Long-lived polarization protected by symmetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we elucidate, theoretically and experimentally, molecular motifs which permit Long-Lived Polarization Protected by Symmetry (LOLIPOPS). The basic assembly principle starts from a pair of chemically equivalent nuclei supporting a long-lived singlet state and is completed by coupling to additional pairs of spins. LOLIPOPS can be created in various sizes; here we review four-spin systems, introduce a group theory analysis of six-spin systems, and explore eight-spin systems by simulation. The focus is on AA'XnX'n spin systems, where typically the A spins are 15N or 13C and X spins are protons. We describe the symmetry of the accessed states, we detail the pulse sequences used to access these states, we quantify the fraction of polarization that can be stored as LOLIPOPS, we elucidate how to access the protected states from A or from X polarization and we examine the behavior of these spin systems upon introduction of a small chemical shift difference.

Feng, Yesu; Theis, Thomas; Wu, Tung-Lin; Claytor, Kevin; Warren, Warren S.

2014-10-01

96

Long-lived polarization protected by symmetry.  

PubMed

In this paper we elucidate, theoretically and experimentally, molecular motifs which permit Long-Lived Polarization Protected by Symmetry (LOLIPOPS). The basic assembly principle starts from a pair of chemically equivalent nuclei supporting a long-lived singlet state and is completed by coupling to additional pairs of spins. LOLIPOPS can be created in various sizes; here we review four-spin systems, introduce a group theory analysis of six-spin systems, and explore eight-spin systems by simulation. The focus is on AA'XnX'n spin systems, where typically the A spins are (15)N or (13)C and X spins are protons. We describe the symmetry of the accessed states, we detail the pulse sequences used to access these states, we quantify the fraction of polarization that can be stored as LOLIPOPS, we elucidate how to access the protected states from A or from X polarization and we examine the behavior of these spin systems upon introduction of a small chemical shift difference. PMID:25296806

Feng, Yesu; Theis, Thomas; Wu, Tung-Lin; Claytor, Kevin; Warren, Warren S

2014-10-01

97

Wondering About Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here you will find facts about and the opinions of an American astrophysicist who practiced in the second half of the twentieth century. The title explains why I did it. I invented some new ideas, I applied them to some astro objects, I computed things with pen and paper; I ended up thinking that I had succeeded in pushing the field ahead a bit. Attracted by Newtonian theory, I did some experiments too. I love hydrodynamics and magnetic fields in space. The math is beautiful, and the objects are stupendous in their brilliant displays. For some reason I meditated on gases between the stars, their pressures and motions. I left the stars to others, believing that their physics was under control. As I grew older, I had to decide whether to direct others rather than just myself and ended up at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics doing both. It was thrilling because I had never had management experience and was flying by the seat of my pants, as I guess other astrodirectors do. In the process, I advised the US government on future directions in astronomy, chairing a number of committees. It is astonishing that the government is interested in astronomy, and it is exciting to interact with the people in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Congress, and the Executive branch who have dedicated their lives to enable the expansion of our knowledge of astronomy. Along the way I studied more abstract concepts in physics, including magnetic helicity and its relation to the winding numbers of nonabelian particle physics. These are topological concepts that I should have learned in grad school but did not. This review has two parts. The first part is for scientists, and covers my life in chronological order. The second part is for laymen who are interested in science. It gives a flavor of my scientific work with no math and a minimum of jargon.

Field, George B.

2014-08-01

98

The internet of things for personalized health.  

PubMed

Advances in information and communications technologies (ICT) enable new personalized health care concepts which are often characterized by four "P" terms, i.e. personalized, predictive, preventive and participatory. However, real world implementations of the complete 4P spectrum hardly exist today. The Internet of Things (IoT) has been defined as an extension to the current Internet that enables pervasive communication between the physical and the virtual world. Smart devices and enabling elements like Near Field Communication (NFC) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology already exist and increasingly will be a mainstream element of our lives. This future vision paper attempts to assess if and how the Internet of Things for personalized health (IoT4pH) can help to facilitate the 4P healthcare paradigm and discusses related challenges and opportunities. PMID:24851958

Schreier, Günter

2014-01-01

99

Doing the right thing by incorporating evidence and professional goals in the ethics consult.  

PubMed

Classic ethical decision-making models are discussed, and two recommendations are provided. The author proposes applying evidence-based position statements to ethical deliberation and suggests acknowledging the differing philosophical underpinnings and goals of various stakeholders, including nurses, physicians, families, institutions, and the nation. Examples are provided throughout. When combined with evidence-based information and consideration of group goals, traditional ethical analysis may help nurses "do the right thing." PMID:23772802

Catlin, Anita

2013-07-01

100

Revealing Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Revealing Things is the Smithsonian Institution's first specifically web based exhibit; both the content and design of the site are fascinating. This work in progress is a prototype of a future, more fully-developed exhibit. It concentrates on "common, everyday objects to tell stories about people, their cultures, and the meanings they associate with their possessions." Items discussed include a 1937 chemistry set, a Vietnam memorial offering, a duckpin bowling ball, an early TV, and a celery vase, among many others. Organized according to theme, era, and object, the exhibit is presented in a new pop-up browser window. Within that window, navigation takes place via "maplets," a connected series of moving colored labels representing the three ways that the exhibit is organized. Users can move slider bars to effect the placement of the labels, and search on terms to create their own thematic or object-based exhibit. When the cursor is placed over an object label, scrolling text introduces it. Alternatively, the site can be navigated via a series of icons that run down the middle of the exhibition page. When an icon is clicked, the series of icons may rearrange. Each exhibit contains a photo of the object, along with written commentary on it. In addition, sound is sometimes available to play period music, or render out loud the exhibition text. The most fully-developed object at this time is "Patched Bellbottoms." Users are advised to read the help files on both the main page and the exhibit page for navigation tips. The exhibit is a fascinating precursor of what could be a new way to interactively view museum exhibits, allowing the user to cast off the restraints of a linear orientation. Note that the exhibit is extremely browser and bandwidth intensive.

101

Making Things Public Atmospheres of Democracy  

E-print Network

across national borders was often connected to a specific form of making things public we now callMaking Things Public Atmospheres of Democracy edited by Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel ZKM ICenter's Circus of Traveling Science Mario Biagioli Making things public is the result of specific cho- reographed

102

‘You learn to live with all the things that are wrong with you’: gender and the experience of multiple chronic conditions in later life  

PubMed Central

This article examines how older adults experience the physical and social realities of having multiple chronic conditions in later life. Drawing on data from in-depth interviews with 16 men and 19 women aged 73+ who had between three and 14 chronic conditions, we address the following research questions: (a) What is it like to have multiple chronic conditions in later life? (b) How do older men and women ‘learn to live’ with the physical and social realities of multiple morbidities? (c) How are older adults’ experiences of illness influenced by age and gender norms? Our participants experienced their physical symptoms and the concomitant limitations to their activities to be a source of personal disruption. However, they normalised their illnesses and made social comparisons in order to achieve a sense of biographical flow in distinctly gendered ways. Forthright in their frustration over their loss of autonomy and physicality but resigned and stoic, the men’s stories reflected masculine norms of control, invulnerability, physical prowess, self-reliance and toughness. The women were dismayed by their bodies’ altered appearances and concerned about how their illnesses might affect their significant others, thereby responding to feminine norms of selflessness, sensitivity to others and nurturance. We discuss the findings in relation to the competing concepts of biographical disruption and biographical flow, as well as successful ageing discourses. PMID:24976658

CLARKE, LAURA HURD; BENNETT, ERICA

2014-01-01

103

Living in the You have made up your mind to  

E-print Network

n learn the rules and live by them . I. Safety first, always. The very first thing you must learn. In short, stay inside the railings. If the ugly scream of "'man overboard" is ever heard on board your

104

Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure of Amerindian women living alongside the Beni River (Amazonian Bolivia)  

E-print Network

Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure of Amerindian women living alongside.1016/j.ijheh.2010.08.010 #12;2 Title: Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure Amazonia are exposed to mercury contamination through fish ingestion. A group of 170 Amerindian women

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Doing Right Things Right  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attracting quality students in sufficient volume requires schools to do the right things right. Doing right things right is a combination of what they do and how well they do it. Successful enrollment marketing, like all good marketing, depends on consistency of effort and doing enough of the right things in the right way, repeatedly. Here, the…

Perna, Mark C.

2006-01-01

106

Control load envelope shaping by live twist  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rotor control systems experience a rapid load growth resulting from retreating blade stall during flight conditions of high blade loading or airspeeds. An investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of changing blade torsional properties over the rotor flight envelope. The results of this study show that reducing the blade stiffness to introduce more blade live twist significantly reduces the large retreating blade control loads, while expanding the flight envelope and reducing retreating blade stall loads.

Tarzanin, F. J., Jr.; Mirick, P. H.

1974-01-01

107

Elaphoidella grandidieri (Harpacticoida: Copepoda): demographic characteristics and possible use as live prey in aquaculture.  

PubMed

In freshwater ecosystems, rotifers and cladocerans are ideal prey for fish larvae whereas copepods, due to their purported low growth rate and predatory tendency, are not. We recently isolated the parthenogenetic Elaphoidella grandidieri (Gueme et Richard, 1893) a benthic freshwater harpacticoid, from a fish farm in the State of Morelos, central Mexico and tested its potential as a live prey organism for larval vertebrates. Population growth and life table demography experiments were conducted, in 100 ml recipients with 50 ml of test medium on a diet of Scenedesmus acutus at a density of 1.0 X 10(6) cell ml(-1); the former on live algae alone while the latter on live algae as well as detritus. We also conducted experiments to document the prey preference for this copepod by the larval Ameca splendens (Pisces: Goodeidae) and Ambystoma mexicanum (Amphibia: Ambystomatidae), fed the rotifer Plationus patulus, the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens, and the cladocerans Moina macrocopa and Daphnia pulex. Elaphoidella grandidieri is relatively easy to maintain under laboratory conditions, reaching densities (copepodites and adults) of more than 10,000 l(-1). The generation time ranged between 30-45 days, depending on the diet. The net reproductive rate was as high as 60 nauplii female(-1) day (1). Population growth rates ranged between 0.03 and 0.11 d(-1), live algae being the superior diet compared to detritus. Both predators showed no preference for E. grandidieri, but in the absence of alternate prey they consumed 80% of the harpacticoids offered. The data have been discussed in relation to the potential of E. grandidierias live food for aquaculture. PMID:22315830

Nandini, S; Nunez Ortiz, Alma Rosa; Sarma, S S S

2011-07-01

108

Evaluation of litter type and dietary coarse ground corn inclusion on broiler live performance, gastrointestinal tract development, and litter characteristics.  

PubMed

Two 49 d floor pen studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of litter type and dietary coarse ground corn (CC) inclusion on broiler live performance, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, and litter characteristics. Experiment 1 was a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of 2 genders (male or female) and 2 CC levels (0 or 50%). From 15 to 35 d, the addition of CC decreased feed intake (P < 0.01) and BW gain (P < 0.05) of males but not females. The inclusion of CC decreased feed intake (P < 0.01) and BW gain (P < 0.01) from 0 to 49 d but improved adjusted feed conversion ratio (AdjFCR) from 35 to 49 d (P < 0.05). Male broilers exhibited better live performance than females during the study as evidenced by greater feed intake (P < 0.01) and BW gain (P < 0.01), and improved FCR (P < 0.01), but with increased mortality (P < 0.05). The inclusion of CC increased relative gizzard weight (P < 0.01) and decreased relative proventriculus weight (P < 0.01) at 49 d. Experiment 2 was a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of 2 CC levels (0 or 50%) and 2 litter types (ground old litter or new wood shavings litter). The inclusion of CC decreased feed intake throughout the experiment without affecting final BW when only males were used and improved FCR after 25 d (P < 0.01). New litter improved FCR from 1 to 14 d (P < 0.01). At 49 d, the birds fed the CC diet had reduced excreta nitrogen (P < 0.05) and litter moisture (P < 0.05). In conclusion, 50% CC inclusion initially produced negative effects on live performance that became positive as BW increased. The effects of CC became evident at an earlier age for males. New litter had only a marginal benefit on broiler live performance. PMID:25681480

Xu, Y; Stark, C R; Ferket, P R; Williams, C M; Nusairat, B; Brake, J

2015-03-01

109

LibraryThing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With the advent of the Internet, users could share thoughts, ideas, and rants almost instantaneously across oceans, mountain ranges, or even just across a mere ZIP code boundary. With this latest device created by Tim Spalding, those who are so inclined can share information about their own personal libraries across great distances. Currently users can catalog up to 200 books at no charge and also create tags for each record as they do so. Overall, this is a rather fun little tool, and it may become quite addictive over time. Library Thing is compatible with all operating systems.

Spalding, Tim

110

“All of Those Things We Don't Eat”: A Culture-Centered Approach to Dietary Health Meanings for Asian Indians Living in the United States  

PubMed Central

This article applies a culture-centered approach to analyze the dietary health meanings for Asian Indians living in the United States. The data were collected as part of a health promotion program evaluation designed to help Asian Indians reduce their risk of chronic disease. Community members who used two aspects of the program participated in two focus groups to learn about their health care experiences and to engage them in dialogue about how culture impacts their overall health. Using constructionist grounded theory, we demonstrate that one aspect of culture, the discourses around routine dietary choice, is an important, but under-recognized, aspect of culture that influences community members’ experiences with health care. We theorize community members’ dietary health meanings operate discursively through a dialectic tension between homogeneity and heterogeneity, situated amid culture, structure, and agency. Participants enacted discursive homogeneity when they affirmed dietary health meanings around diet as an important means through which members of the community maintain a sense of continuity of their identity while differentiating them from others. Participants enacted discursive heterogeneity when they voiced dietary health meanings that differentiated community members from one another due to unique life-course trajectories and other membership affiliations. Through this dialectic, community members manage unique Asian Indian identities and create meanings of health and illness in and through their discourses around routine dietary choice. Through making these discursive health meanings audible, we foreground how community members’ agency is discursively enacted and to make understandable how discourses of dietary practice influence the therapeutic alliance between primary care providers and members of a minority community. PMID:22364189

Koenig, Christopher J.; Dutta, Mohan J.; Kandula, Namratha; Palaniappan, Latha

2015-01-01

111

1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead of  

E-print Network

to capitalize on the Internet of Things today The Internet of Things (IoT) is not a futuristic technology trend1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead of being bewildered by the huge universe of things made up of billions

Chaudhuri, Surajit

112

1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead  

E-print Network

to capitalize on the Internet of Things today The Internet of Things (IoT) is not a futuristic technology trend1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead of being bewildered by the huge universe of things made up of billions

Chaudhuri, Surajit

113

Measuring protein mobility by photobleaching GFP-chimeras in living cells  

E-print Network

1 Measuring protein mobility by photobleaching GFP-chimeras in living cells Erik Snapp, Nihal Altan the fluorophore's fluorescence. The diffusive characteristics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)- chimeras, in which the same region of a cell expressing a GFP-chimera is repetitively photobleached and the loss

Snapp, Erik Lee

114

Alcohol and Associated Characteristics among Older Persons Living with HIV on Antiretroviral Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Alcohol use, and particularly unhealthy alcohol use, is associated with poor HIV-related outcomes among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Despite a rapidly growing proportion of PLWH ?50 years, alcohol use and its associated characteristics are under-described in this population. We describe alcohol use, severity, and associated characteristics using data from a sample of PLWH ?50 years who participated in a trial of a telephone-based intervention to improve adherence to ART. Methods Participants were recruited from AIDS Service Organizations in 9 states and included PLWH ?50 years who were prescribed ART, reported suboptimal adherence at screening (missing >1.5 days of medication or taking medications 2 hours early or late on >3 days in the 30 days prior to screening), and consented to participate. The AUDIT-C alcohol screen, socio-demographic characteristics, substance use and mental health comorbidity were assessed at baseline. AUDIT-C scores were categorized into non-drinking, low-level drinking, and mild-moderate unhealthy, and severe unhealthy drinking (0, 1-3, 4-6, 7-12, respectively). Analyses described and compared characteristics across drinking status (any/none) and across AUDIT-C categories among drinkers. Results Among 447 participants, 57% reporting drinking alcohol in the past year, including 35%, 15% and 7% reporting low-level drinking, mild-moderate unhealthy drinking, and severe unhealthy drinking, respectively. Any drinking was most common among men and those who were LGBT, married/partnered, had received past-year alcohol treatment, and never used injection drugs (p-values all <0.05). Differences in race, employment status, past year alcohol treatment, and positive depression screening (p-values all <0.05) were observed across AUDIT-C categories. Conclusions In this sample of older PLWH with suboptimal ART adherence, a majority reported past-year alcohol use and 22% screened positive for unhealthy alcohol use. Any and unhealthy alcohol use were associated with demographics, depression, and substance use history. Further research is needed regarding alcohol use among older PLWH. PMID:24625188

Williams, Emily C.; Bradley, Katharine A.; Balderson, Benjamin H.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Grothaus, Lou; McCoy, Katryna; Rittmueller, Stacey E.; Catz, Sheryl L.

2014-01-01

115

User Empowerment in the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

This paper focuses on the characteristics of two big triggers that facilitated wide user adoption of the Internet: Web 2.0 and online social networks. We detect brakes for reproduction of these events in Internet of things. To support our hypothesis we first compare the difference between the ways of use of the Internet with the future scenarios of Internet of things. We detect barriers that could slow down apparition of this kind of social events during user adoption of Internet of Things and we propose a conceptual framework to solve these problems.

Munjin, Dejan

2011-01-01

116

[Violence against adolescents: differentials by gender and living conditions strata].  

PubMed

An ecological study was conducted in order to analyze differences in mortality rates among adolescents by gender and living conditions strata in Recife from1998 to 2004. The average mortality coefficient for violence during this period was calculated by gender for the city and by living conditions strata. This analysis demonstrated a higher risk of death by violence for male adolescents in Stratum III (poorest living conditions). The mortality rates by violence for men and women were 10.89 (Recife); 10.90 (Stratum I); 11.70 (Stratum II) and 10.30 (Stratum III). The findings show that although males are at the highest risk, it is also quite clear that living conditions influence the distribution of the mortality rate due to violence. PMID:18813453

Ribeiro da Costa, Inês Eugênia; Ludemir, Ana Bernarda; Avelar, Isabel

2007-01-01

117

Selective Impairment of Living Things and Musical Instruments on a Verbal "Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire" in a Case of Apperceptive Visual Agnosia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes…

Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

2012-01-01

118

THINGS: THE H I NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)', a high spectral ({<=}5.2 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution survey of H I emission in 34 nearby galaxies obtained using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The overarching scientific goal of THINGS is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the interstellar medium (ISM) related to galaxy morphology, star formation, and mass distribution across the Hubble sequence. Unique characteristics of the THINGS database are the homogeneous sensitivity as well as spatial and velocity resolution of the H I data, which is at the limit of what can be achieved with the VLA for a significant number of galaxies. A sample of 34 objects at distances 2 {approx}< D {approx}< 15 Mpc (resulting in linear resolutions of {approx}100 to 500 pc) are targeted in THINGS, covering a wide range of star formation rates ({approx}10{sup -3} to 6 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), total H I masses M{sub HI} (0.01 to 14 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), absolute luminosities M{sub B} (-11.5 to -21.7 mag), and metallicities (7.5 to 9.2 in units of 12+log[O/H]). We describe the setup of the VLA observations, the data reduction procedures, and the creation of the final THINGS data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the velocity fields, the second moment (velocity dispersion) maps and individual channel maps of each THINGS galaxy. The THINGS data products are made publicly available through a dedicated webpage. Accompanying THINGS papers (in this issue of the Astronomical Journal) address issues such as the small-scale structure of the ISM, the (dark) matter distribution in THINGS galaxies, and the processes leading to star formation.

Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Thornley, Michele D., E-mail: walter@mpia.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States)

2008-12-15

119

What Makes Things Move?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will use an inquiry based approach to discover how things move. They will discover that a push and a pull are forces that put things into motion. They will also investigate how friction is a force that slows a moving object.

Theresa Porter, Clearbrook-Gonvick School, Clearbrook, MN

2012-03-22

120

The Educational Thing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, I argue that education should be conceived of as a thing in itself. To lift this view, I present aspects of Graham Harman's philosophy, a speculative realism that can be seen as a radical break with social constructivism and similar approaches. Next, I attempt to outline a rough sketch of an educational "thing", drawing on concepts…

Romer, Thomas Aastrup

2011-01-01

121

A Few New Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Citing the website "43 Things" (http://www.43things.com/) and derivatives Learning 2.0 (http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.com/) and California's School Library Learning 2.0 (http://www.schoollibrarylearning2.blogspot.com/), the author suggests other activities to help librarians and teacher-librarians train themselves for leadership in new information…

Valenza, Joyce Kasman

2008-01-01

122

WHAT MAKES THINGS GO, TEACHER'S GUIDE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SIX FIFTH-GRADE SCIENCE UNITS ARE PRESENTED--SOUND AND LIGHT IN COMMUNICATION, LIVING THINGS, WEATHER, EARTH AND ITS RESOURCES, MOTION AND FOREIGN TRANSPORTATION, AND ELECTROMAGNETS. THE INTEREST LEVEL IS APPROPRIATE FOR FIFTH-GRADERS, BUT THREE READING ABILITY LEVELS, GRADES 1, 3, AND 5, ARE PROVIDED. THE TEACHER IS THUS ENABLED TO MOTIVATE…

BRODY, LARRY; AND OTHERS

123

Structure and Function in Living Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. In this particular publication, provided a wide variety of resources to enrich your content knowledge of the characteristics of living things, including their diversity, extinction, and evolution. Other topics include bacteria, plants, fungi, and protists.

Mary LeFever

124

All Things Green  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation by Bob Feldmaier of the Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT) was presented at the 2013 All Things Green conference and discusses the topics of green fleets, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), and PEV charging infrastructure. Provided in the presentation is a basic overview of PEVs and the types of PEVs, factors that affect PEV efficiency and range, the benefits of driving PEVs, the types and costs of installation of PEV charging infrastructure, and information on the federal Green Fleets program. This conference is annual and is hosted by the Macomb County Chamber. Other presenters at this conference came from Clean Light Green Light, Consumers Energy, General Motors, New Haven Schools, NextEnergy, Waste Management, and more.

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT)

125

How We like to Live when We Have the Chance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article has been written by a group of persons with intellectual disability, which is called the Consultative Committee of Persons with Intellectual Disability. This group works in Malta. The article is about how we would like to live. It looks at two things: "where we would like to live" and "going out in the community". This article shows…

Deguara, Marthese; Jelassi, Omar; Micallef, Brian; Callus, Anne-Marie

2012-01-01

126

The World of Tiny Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the culturing of microorganisms as a laboratory activity emphaszing the growth of microorganisms in food. Provides background and safety information, procedures, and additional ideas. The complete unit (teacher's guide, student worksheets, evaluation and assessment, and resources for students and teachers) is available from the author.…

Karstaedt, Debbrah A.

1984-01-01

127

How to build a living thing  

E-print Network

A number of research groups worldwide are working on various aspects of the problem of building life from scratch. Jack W. Szostak's lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts is one of the centers of the action. Open a recent news ...

Campbell, MacGregor (MacGregor Ballard)

2009-01-01

128

Cross-sectional study of echocardiographic characteristics in healthy children living at high altitude.  

PubMed

Non-echocardiographic studies in healthy high altitude children have shown right ventricle predominance during infancy and childhood, associated to asymptomatic pulmonary hypertension and an increased pulmonary artery pressure. Systematic studies on echocardiography in such children have not been performed. In a cross-sectional study, we measured right and left heart morphologic and functional parameters, through M-mode, two-dimensional Doppler, and color Doppler echocardiographies, in a population of 321 healthy children ranging in age from 2 months to 19 years and living at high altitude (Tintaya, Peru, 4,100 m). Structured ad-hoc interviews were done to obtain information on medical history, patterns of exposure to high altitude of children and their parents and grandparents, place and altitude of pregnancy and birth, and housing conditions. A complete physical examination was performed before echocardiography. Hemoglobin concentration, pulse oximetry, and anthropometry were measured in all participating children. The right and left heart morphologic and functional echocardiographic measurements expressed by age and by body surface area were generally similar to sea-level reference populations. They were not consistently influenced by sex, nutritional status, chest dimensions, pulse oximetry, hemoglobin concentration, ethnicity, length of residence at high altitude, or parental history of exposure to high altitude. Most children had at least some degree of high-altitude ancestry as assessed by ethnicity and history of parental exposure to altitude. The cardiovascular development at high altitude in children with some degree of high-altitude ancestry seems to follow a pattern similar to sea-level children. The results can be used as reference values to interpret individual echocardiographic studies in comparable children living in similar settings. PMID:16254900

Huicho, Luis; Muro, Manuel; Pacheco, Alberto; Silva, Jaime; Gloria, Edgar; Marticorena, Emilio; Niermeyer, Susan

2005-01-01

129

Secondary metabolite localization by autofluorescence in living plant cells.  

PubMed

Autofluorescent molecules are abundant in plant cells and spectral images offer means for analyzing their spectra, yielding information on their accumulation and function. Based on their fluorescence characteristics, an imaging approach using multiphoton microscopy was designed to assess localization of the endogenous fluorophores in living plant cells. This method, which requires no previous treatment, provides an effective experimental tool for discriminating between multiple naturally-occurring fluorophores in living-tissues. Combined with advanced Linear Unmixing, the spectral analysis extends the possibilities and enables the simultaneous detection of fluorescent molecules reliably separating overlapping emission spectra. However, as with any technology, the possibility for artifactual results does exist. This methodological article presents an overview of the applications of tissular and intra-cellular localization of these intrinsic fluorophores in leaves and fruits (here for coffee and vanilla). This method will provide new opportunities for studying cellular environments and the behavior of endogenous fluorophores in the intracellular environment. PMID:25808147

Talamond, Pascale; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Conéjéro, Geneviève

2015-01-01

130

Compulsive Exercise: Too Much of a Good Thing? Contributed by Suzanne Girard Eberle, MS, RD  

E-print Network

- exercises or both is at risk for the Female Athlete Triad. Also called the "Energy Drain," the Female and osteoporosis. 1. The Female Athlete Triad is precipitated by under-fueling (consuming too few calories, usually and osteoporosis). To undo the Female Athlete Triad you must correct the energy (caloric) imbalance by consuming

Walker, Matthew P.

131

3.1.1Solving linear systems by graphing One of the first things that  

E-print Network

(1000 kg/m 3 ). Problem 3 - Black holes are defined by the simple formula R of the body. Bodies with no atmospheres preserve all impacts, regardless of size, while bodies to use because the quantities you would most like to graph differ by powers of 10 in size, temperature

132

America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2003. Population Characteristics. Current Population Reports. P20-553  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data in this report is from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the 2003 Current Population Survey (CPS). The population represented (the population universe) in the ASEC is the civilian non institutionalized population living in the United States. Members of the Armed Forces living off post or with their families on post are…

Fields, Jason

2004-01-01

133

Germination Characteristics of Engelmann Oak, and Coast Live Oak from the Santa Rosa Plateau,  

E-print Network

, Riverside County, California1 Gerald E. Snow2 Abstract: Over 2,000 acorns of Quercus agrifolia (coast live tion of coast live oak around rock outcrops (especially in cracks and the north side) due to ground squirrel transport and the apparently higher moisture requirements for germination (Snow 1973). 1 Presented

Standiford, Richard B.

134

Recruitment of Live Donors by Candidates for Kidney Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Background: Little is known about efforts that renal transplant candidates make to recruit live donors. It was hypothesized that preference for live donor kidney transplantation and greater knowledge about live donor transplantation are associated with candidates’ initiating conversations about donation with potential donors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A cross-sectional study of renal transplant candidates was performed at initial transplant evaluation. Candidates completed a questionnaire that specified whether they had initiated conversations about donation with any potential donors. The questionnaire also measured preference for live donor transplantation, knowledge about transplantation, concern about donor harm, willingness to ask for help in coping with kidney disease, and social support. Results: Ninety-six candidates participated. Forty-nine (51%) reported initiating a conversation with at least one potential donor. In multivariable logistic regression, domains associated with initiating a conversation included: preference for live donor transplantation, willingness to ask for help, and female gender. Older age was associated with a lower odds of initiating a conversation. Knowledge, concern about donor harm, social support, and ethnicity were not associated with initiating a conversation with a donor. Conclusions: Attempts at donor recruitment by kidney transplant candidates are common. These findings suggest that interventions that influence preferences about transplantation and willingness to ask others for help are logical targets to enhance access to live donor transplantation. PMID:18385392

Reese, Peter P.; Shea, Judy A.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Maureen K.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Bloom, Roy D.; Feldman, Harold I.

2008-01-01

135

Aberdeen can teach you a thing or two. This bustling city by the sea  

E-print Network

CITYAberdeen Produced by Lonely Planet for Get the Study Aberdeen iPhone app For all this information and more, download the free Study Aberdeen iPhone app. Simply download a QR code reader to your phone and then scan Studying in Aberdeen 6 Vital Statistics 9 Destination Aberdeen 10 Snapshots 20 Background 29 Find Out More

Levi, Ran

136

Aberdeen can teach you a thing or two. This bustling city by the sea  

E-print Network

CITYAberdeen Produced by Lonely Planet for Get the Study Aberdeen iPhone app For all this information and more, download the free Study Aberdeen iPhone app. Simply download a QR code reader to your phone and then scan on the beach. STUDENT VOICE #12;1 This is Aberdeen 3 Get to Know the City 4 Studying in Aberdeen 6 Vital

Levi, Ran

137

Different Things Make Different People Happy: Examining Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being by Gender and Parental Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper addresses a number of key challenges in current subjective well-being (SWB) research: A new wave of studies should take into account that different things may make different people happy, thus going beyond a unitary "happiness formula". Furthermore, empirical results need to be connected to broader theoretical narratives. Using a…

Kroll, Christian

2011-01-01

138

Production performance, repeatability and heritability estimates for live weight, fleece weight and fiber characteristics of alpacas in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production performance, repeatability and heritability estimates for live weight, fleece weight and fiber characteristics of alpacas farmed in the South Island of New Zealand are reported. Male alpacas produced heavier fleeces (p<0.001) than females, but with relatively similar fiber diameter. Mean (S.E.) shearing weight, greasy fleece weight (GFW), clean fleece weight (CFW), yield, staple length (SL), resistance to compression

T Wuliji; G. H Davis; K. G Dodds; P. R Turner; R. N Andrews; G. D Bruce

2000-01-01

139

Embryo production by ovum pick up from live donors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Embryo production by in vitro techniques has increased steadily over the years. For cattle where this technology is more advanced and is applied more, the number of in vitro produced embryos transferred to final recipients was over 30,000 in 1998. An increasing proportion of in vitro produced embryos are coming from oocytes collected from live donors by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration

C. Galli; G. Crotti; C. Notari; P. Turini; R. Duchi; G. Lazzari

2001-01-01

140

Living environment matters: relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health of the residents in a Dutch municipality.  

PubMed

Characteristics of an individual alone cannot exhaustively explain all the causes of poor health, and neighborhood of residence have been suggested to be one of the factors that contribute to health. However, knowledge about aspects of the neighborhood that are most important to health is limited. The main objective of this study was to explore associations between certain features of neighborhood environment and self-rated health and depressive symptoms in Maastricht (The Netherlands). A large amount of routinely collected neighborhood data were aggregated by means of factor analysis to 18 characteristics of neighborhood social and physical environment. Associations between these characteristics and self-rated health and presence of depressive symptoms were further explored in multilevel logistic regression models adjusted for individual demographic and socio-economic factors. The study sample consisted of 9,879 residents (mean age 55 years, 48 % male). Residents of unsafe communities were less likely to report good health (OR 0.88 95 % CI 0.80-0.97) and depressive symptoms (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.69-0.97), and less cohesive environment was related to worse self-rated health (OR 0.81 95 % CI 0.72-0.92). Residents of neighborhoods with more car traffic nuisance and more disturbance from railway noise reported worse mental health (OR 0.79 95 % CI 0.68-0.92 and 0.85 95 % CI 0.73-0.99, respectively). We did not observe any association between health and quality of parking and shopping facilities, facilities for public or private transport, neighborhood aesthetics, green space, industrial nuisance, sewerage, neighbor nuisance or satisfaction with police performance. Our findings can be used to support development of integrated health policies targeting broader determinants of health. Improving safety, social cohesion and decreasing traffic nuisance in disadvantaged neighborhoods might be a promising way to improve the health of residents and reduce health inequalities. PMID:24917124

Putrik, Polina; de Vries, Nanne K; Mujakovic, Suhreta; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic; Kant, Ijmert; Kunst, Anton E; van Oers, Hans; Jansen, Maria

2015-02-01

141

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS AND ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER. ORIGINAL 1-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOW AT PHOTO RIGHT. CEILING VENT TO CHIMNEY AT RIGHT UPPER PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

142

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by  

E-print Network

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination Peter Kner1 in the total internal reflection mode. The fluorescence microscope is an essential tool in many fields. There is still a need for a technique that can combine spatial super-resolution with multihertz frame rates over

Griffis, Eric

143

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal  

E-print Network

with DNA structures. After loading E robots with an antibody recognizing the insect's haemocytesUniversal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal Yaniv Amir1 , Eldad Ben-Ishay1 interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate

Shamir, Ron

144

Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been used successfully as an intracellular contrast agent for nuclear MRI cell tracking in vivo .W e present a method of detecting intracellular SPIO colloid uptake in live cells using cell magnetophoresis, with potential applications in measuring intracellular MRI con- trast uptake. The method was evaluated by measuring shifts in mean and distribution of

Ying Jing; Niladri Mal; P. Stephen Williams; Maritza Mayorga; Marc S. Penn; Jeffrey J. Chalmers; Maciej Zborowski

2008-01-01

145

Floodflow characteristics of Honcut Creek at State Highway 70 bridges near Live Oak, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

State Highway 70 crosses Honcut Creek about 3.2 miles upstream from its confluence with the Feather River, by three bridges separated by short approach embankments. The California Department of Transportation is planning to replace or widen these bridges; this report evaluates flow characteristics of the existing and proposed crossings. Agricultural improvements on the flood plain and low levees affect the magnitufe and distribution of flow to the bridges. Water-surface elevations of Honcut Creek are affected by levees on the flood plain, a natural channel constriction about 3,000 feet downstream from the bridges, and by high water levels on the Feather River. The average recurrence interval for overbank flow is less than 2 years. A flood with an average recurrence interval of 50 years would be about 19,000 cubic feet per second. For flows of 20,000 cubic feet per second on Honcut Creek, and with present bridge conditions, backwater caused by the bridge is about 0.4 foot. If the left-bank bridge is eliminated, backwater would increase to 0.5 foot. The bridges and approach embankments occupy about 66 percent of the channel. The average velocity of flow at the bridge ranges from 1 to 3.2 feet per second. For present channel and bridge conditions, overbank flows are distributed among the three bridges in a proportion of about 10, 40, and 50 percent for flows between 2,850 and 8,480 cubic feet per second. (USGS)

Blodgett, J.C.

1982-01-01

146

1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead of  

E-print Network

today The Internet of Things (IoT) is not a futuristic technology trend: it's here today, and it starts1. Start with your things. The Internet of Things doesn't have to be overwhelming. Microsoft's point of view is that instead of being bewildered by the huge universe of things made up of billions

Chaudhuri, Surajit

147

LibraryThing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Books are meant to be shared, so why not share your personal favorites with others around the world? LibraryThing makes it easy to do just this, and visitors can catalog their books online here after creating a profile. After entering their books, visitors can offer their own sage wisdom on each title, and cross-reference their thoughts with others on the network who have read similar titles. Visitors can take a virtual tour before signing up, and there's also a series of discussion boards. Users can catalog their first 100 books at no charge, and LibraryThing is compatible across all platforms, including Linux.

148

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS  

E-print Network

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS George Malaty, University of Joensuu, Finland "Life is good for only two things, discovering mathematics and teaching mathematics". Siméon Poisson (1781-1840) Mathematics for living and living for mathematics are related to the goals of mathematics

Spagnolo, Filippo

149

Detection and classification of live and dead Escherichia coli by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.  

PubMed

A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity. PMID:25683088

Sivakumar, P; Fernández-Bravo, A; Taleh, L; Biddle, J F; Melikechi, N

2015-02-01

150

Healthy living partnerships to prevent diabetes: recruitment and baseline characteristics. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

The Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) trial presents a successful enrollment model for a community-based translation of a lifestyle intervention. Mass mailing proved to be the most effective strategy to enroll participants. A database of persons interested in participating in clinical studies was used to successfully generate mailings, costing only $40 per randomized patient and quickly generating 22 randomizations. Referral from primary care settings was the other source of trial participants.

151

Lighthouse independent living program: Characteristics of youth served and their outcomes at discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the outcomes of 455 young people who entered the Lighthouse Independent Living Program during the period 2001–2006. On average, clients were admitted shortly before their 18th birthdays, and remained in the program for just under 10 months. At discharge, 60% had completed high school\\/GED program, 31% were employed, and 33% were independently housed. However, there were significant differences

Mark J. Kroner; Alvin S. Mares

2009-01-01

152

Developing network software and communications protocols towards the internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most profound changes today is the increase in mobility of portable yet powerful wireless devices capable of communicating via several different kinds of wireless radio networks of varying link-level characteristics. This paper addresses how the design and implementation of future applications and protocols can be facilitated by network programming frameworks. For the Internet of Things, upholding a

Bilhanan Silverajan; Jarmo Harju

2009-01-01

153

74 Published by the IEEE Computer Society 1089-7801/09/$26.00 2009 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING InternetofThingsTrack  

E-print Network

to the real world is the Internet of Things,2 which connects such resources with everyday objects's based on the Internet of Things and its technologies. Their framework for integrating Web services-Essen Heinrich HuÃ?mann University of Munich Perci: Pervasive Service Interaction with the Internet of Things #12

154

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complete Computer Solutions makes available the How Things Work Website. This is an excellent learning resource for anyone who has ever wondered about the workings of items such as oxygen tents or speedometers or materials such as porcelain. The site briefly summarizes a plethora of topics ranging from accordions to X-rays. This site is well worth a visit.

155

Psychology of everyday things  

Microsoft Academic Search

This topic considers the design of everyday things. It begins with examples of bad design. The goal here is to have students realize that human problems and errors when dealing with technology are usually a result of design failure, and that good design accounts for human capabilities. It then introduces concepts and design principles that help us analyze bad design

Donald A. Norman

1988-01-01

156

More about Charging Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the first chapter, you charged things up with excess electrons and saw what could happen as a result. Now we're going to get an idea of how to measure how much charge something has, figure out whether an object is positively or negatively charged, and make up a new concept called the electric field.

William C. Robertson, Ph.D.

2005-01-01

157

How Things Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a collection of 66 "How Things Work" columns from the journal "The Physics Teacher," 1983-1991. All the devices and phenomena are ones that are met in everyday life, involve physics principles, and require explanations that are not immediately obvious. Topics include: touch panels in elevators, liquid crystal displays, metal locators,…

Crane, H. Richard

158

All Things Considered: Drug Wars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This sites is the companion to National Public radio's (NPR) 2000 special on All Things Considered.. The NPR site is a bit modest, but it does offer the excellent radio reports from this week's All Things Considered special series.

2000-01-01

159

Five Things Right, Five Wrong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a brief description of a young librarians' first six months in the profession. The article lists five things the librarian knows he has done wrong, and five things he knows he has done right.

Morley, Gabriel

2005-01-01

160

Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change  

PubMed Central

Introduction Changing the built environment to promote active lifestyles requires collaboration among diverse sectors. Multisectoral collaborative groups in the United States promote active lifestyles through environmental and policy changes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of these collaborative groups and the extent to which they have achieved change. Methods We identified, recruited, and interviewed the coordinators of active living collaborative groups in the United States. We used descriptive statistics to characterize groups by composition, stakeholder engagement, and the extent of environmental and policy change in 8 strategic areas. Results Fifty-nine groups from 22 states participated in the study. Most groups had a diverse set of partners and used a range of activities to advance their agendas. Most groups achieved some form of environmental or policy change. On average, groups reported working on 5 strategy areas; parks and recreation (86%) and Safe Routes to School (85%) were named most frequently. More than half of groups reported their environmental initiatives as either in progress or completed. Groups reported the most success in changing policy for public plazas, street improvements, streetscaping, and parks, open space, and recreation. Complete Streets policy and zoning ordinances were the most frequently cited policy types. Engaging in media activities and the policy-making process in addition to engaging stakeholders appear to influence success in achieving change. Conclusion Although many groups successfully worked on parks and recreation improvements, opportunities remain in other areas, including transit and infill and redevelopment. Additional time and resources may be critical to realizing these types of changes. PMID:23391295

Reed, Hannah L.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Zieff, Susan G.; Eyler, Amy A.; Lyn, Rodney; Goins, Karin Valentine; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara

2013-01-01

161

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal.  

PubMed

Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems, logic circuits and robotics. The molecule also interfaces naturally with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have already been demonstrated. Here, we show that DNA origami can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof of principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully used the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets their cells. PMID:24705510

Amir, Yaniv; Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

2014-05-01

162

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal  

PubMed Central

Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems1-3, logic circuits4-6 and robotics7-9. The molecule also naturally interfaces with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have previously been demonstrated10-13. Here we show that DNA origami14-16 can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other17-18 in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof-of-principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT, and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully employed the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets the cells of the animal. PMID:24705510

Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

2014-01-01

163

The Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT): methodological issues and participant characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health problems and risk behaviours among young people are of great public health concern. Consequently, within the VII Framework Programme, the European Commission funded the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) project. This Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted in eleven European countries, with Sweden as the coordinating centre, and was designed to identify an effective way to promote mental health and reduce suicidality and risk taking behaviours among adolescents. Objective To describe the methodological and field procedures in the SEYLE RCT among adolescents, as well as to present the main characteristics of the recruited sample. Methods Analyses were conducted to determine: 1) representativeness of study sites compared to respective national data; 2) response rate of schools and pupils, drop-out rates from baseline to 3 and 12 month follow-up, 3) comparability of samples among the four Intervention Arms; 4) properties of the standard scales employed: Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (Z-SAS), Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), World Health Organization Well-Being Scale (WHO-5). Results Participants at baseline comprised 12,395 adolescents (M/F: 5,529/6,799; mean age=14.9±0.9) from Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain. At the 3 and 12 months follow up, participation rates were 87.3% and 79.4%, respectively. Demographic characteristics of participating sites were found to be reasonably representative of their respective national population. Overall response rate of schools was 67.8%. All scales utilised in the study had good to very good internal reliability, as measured by Cronbach’s alpha (BDI-II: 0.864; Z-SAS: 0.805; SDQ: 0.740; WHO-5: 0.799). Conclusions SEYLE achieved its objective of recruiting a large representative sample of adolescents within participating European countries. Analysis of SEYLE data will shed light on the effectiveness of important interventions aimed at improving adolescent mental health and well-being, reducing risk-taking and self-destructive behaviour and preventing suicidality. Trial registration US National Institute of Health (NIH) clinical trial registry (NCT00906620) and the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000214). PMID:23679917

2013-01-01

164

The human capital characteristics and household living standards of returning international migrants in Eastern and Southern Africa  

PubMed Central

Africa’s experience with return migration is not new. However, few empirical studies have examined the social and economic characteristics of returning migrants within the continent. In this study, the human capital endowments and household living standards of returning migrants in Uganda and South Africa are examined using recently available data. The study compares returnees in both countries with immigrants as well as the native-born population with no international migration experience. It also investigates how factors such as previous country of residence, year of arrival, and other demographic factors predict levels of education and living standards among returning migrants. In Uganda, the results show that recently arrived returning migrants had better educational endowments than both immigrants and non-migrants. Migrants who returned to Uganda following the fall of Idi Amin’s regime had the lowest educational levels and lowest living standards compared to other returnees. Furthermore, the results indicate that previous residence in countries in the West was associated with four additional years of schooling while returning migrants arriving from other African countries had the lowest levels of schooling among returning migrants. In South Africa, the study finds that returnees arriving almost immediately following the end of Apartheid had the highest levels of education compared to either immigrants or non-migrants. Returnees on average also had the highest household living standards in South Africa. Among South African immigrants, the results indicate that those arriving towards the end of the century had lower educational endowments compared to immigrants who arrived in the country two to four years after the end of Apartheid. PMID:24970950

Thomas, Kevin J A

2014-01-01

165

Internet of Systems (IoS) - Economic Re-equilibration Catalyzed by Internet of Things (IoT)  

E-print Network

How will the tapestry of humanity and the ethos of civilization evolve when billions of devices and trillions of sensors with quadrillion end points can connect events in our daily lives to the world around us and monitor ...

Datta, Shoumen

2014-01-01

166

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

167

Doing things with music  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an “esthetic technology”\\u000a to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination\\u000a that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived\\u000a as an affordance-laden structure.

Joel W. Krueger

2011-01-01

168

The Nature of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features interactive tools related to The Nature of Things television show. The tools include different videos and descriptions of a wide variety of subjects. Some examples include biomimicry, human illness, indoor pollution, and other issues affecting humans. The subject area covered is a very wide range, but users studying or interested in the human brain, biology of human beings, or relationships between animals will no doubt find this site intriguing.

169

First Things First  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Tomorrows Professor Listserve submission quotes a story about time management for faculty. The short story points to the importance of setting aside blocks of time for long-term important things (proposal writing, developing a new course, and writing up your research results) and the tendency to spend too much time on short-term urgent matters, and leave little or no time for reflection and long-term thinking essential to personal and professional success.

Steven R. Covey

170

Capturing community change: Active Living by Design's progress reporting system.  

PubMed

The Active Living by Design (ALbD) National Program Office (NPO) developed an evaluation system to track progress of 25 community partnerships, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Between June 2004 and October 2008, partnerships documented their actions and accomplishments through ALbD's online Progress Reporting System (PRS) database. All entries were verified and analyzed by the NPO. Results from the PRS suggest that the ALbD partnerships were successful fundraisers, leveraging $256 million from grants, policy decisions, in-kind and direct sources. The partnerships also documented newspaper coverage, TV, and radio air time and they developed physical activity programs such as exercise clubs and "walking school buses." Partnerships were adept at influencing decision makers to create or rewrite policies and improve built environments. Selected policy examples included, but were not limited to, approvals for capital improvements, street design standards, and development ordinances. Partnerships also contributed to the completion and approval of influential planning products, such as comprehensive land use, neighborhood, and roadway corridor plans. The most common built-environment changes were street improvements for safer pedestrian and bicycle travel, including new crosswalks, bicycle facilities, and sidewalks. The ALbD community partnerships' accomplishments and challenges contribute to knowledge and best practices in the active living field. Five years after their grant began, RWJF's initial investment showed substantial and measurable results. PMID:23079260

Bors, Philip A

2012-11-01

171

Descriptive models for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a semantic analysis for Internet of things, a conclusion is drawn that the word thing here indicates actually the thing's information and the Internet here is actually the Internet application. Internet of Things is a new type of Internet application which makes the thing's information be shared on a global scale. Internet of Things has two attributes: being an

Yinghui Huang; Guanyu Li

2010-01-01

172

Radiolytic characteristics of nitrite by gamma irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of nitrite radiolysis by gamma rays were investigated. Sodium nitrite in deionized distilled water was irradiated at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40 kGy, and the degradation rate constant was calculated. The sodium nitrite was significantly reduced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). The degradation rate of sodium nitrite fitted a first-order model; a

Hyun-Joo Ahn; Jae-Hyun Kim; Cheorun Jo; Hong-Sun Yook; Myung-Woo Byun

2003-01-01

173

Near-term climate mitigation by short-lived forcers  

PubMed Central

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate-forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes, such as methane (CH4) and black carbon, have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and black carbon would likely have only a modest impact on near-term global climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 would be reduced by 0.16 °C, with a range of 0.04–0.35 °C because of uncertainties in carbonaceous aerosol emissions and aerosol forcing per unit of emissions. The high end of this range is only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is relatively small. More realistic emission reductions would likely provide an even smaller climate benefit. We find that the climate benefit from reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated. These near-term climate benefits of targeted reductions in short-lived forcers are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits from a comprehensive climate policy. PMID:23940357

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew

2013-01-01

174

Natural infection by endoparasites among free-living wild animals.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of occurrence and variety of intestinal parasites among free-living wild animals. Fecal samples from wild mammals and birds at rehabilitation centers in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo were analyzed by sedimentation and flotation-centrifugation methods. Parasite eggs, oocysts, cysts and/or trophozoites were found in 71% of the samples. Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were detected in fecal samples from oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus) and scaly-headed parrots (Pionus maximiliani). Giardia cysts were identified in the feces of a gray brocket (Mazama gouazoubira). Among the most common parasites found, there were eggs from Toxocara cati, Toxascaris leonina and Ancylostoma tubaeforme, and from Cestoda. Several Enterobius sp. eggs were found in the feces of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus). It can be concluded from this study that despite the small number of samples, the diversity of parasites found was noteworthy. Additional information about parasite endofauna in wild animals is needed, since their presence might suggest that there could be proximity to and interactions with domestic animals and/or humans. In addition, further studies on parasites from free-living wild animals are of prime importance for understanding the intensity of anthropic changes in wild environments. PMID:23778826

Holsback, Luciane; Cardoso, Mauro José Lahm; Fagnani, Rafael; Patelli, Thaís Helena Constantino

2013-01-01

175

"The Things That Are inside of You Are Horrible": Children and Young Men with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Talk about the Impact of Living with a Long-Term Condition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited, progressive and life-limiting neuromuscular disease that affects boys. During their lives, they experience a series of medical and surgical interventions. Research reported in this paper took place in England with 37 young men living with DMD and their families and explored their experiences of…

Abbott, David; Carpenter, John

2015-01-01

176

Metabolic Characteristics and Response to High Altitude in Phrynocephalus erythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), a Lizard Dwell at Altitudes Higher Than Any Other Living Lizards in the World  

PubMed Central

Metabolic response to high altitude remains poorly explored in reptiles. In the present study, the metabolic characteristics of Phrynocephaluserythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits high altitudes (4500 m) and Phrynocephalusprzewalskii (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits low altitudes, were analysed to explore the metabolic regulatory strategies for lizards living at high-altitude environments. The results indicated that the mitochondrial respiratory rates of P. erythrurus were significantly lower than those of P. przewalskii, and that proton leak accounts for 74~79% of state 4 and 7~8% of state3 in P. erythrurus vs. 43~48% of state 4 and 24~26% of state3 in P. przewalskii. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in P. erythrurus was lower than in P. przewalskii, indicating that at high altitude the former does not, relatively, have a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. A higher activity related to ?-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) and the HOAD/citrate synthase (CS) ratio suggested there was a possible higher utilization of fat in P. erythrurus. The lower expression of PGC-1? and PPAR-? in P. erythrurus suggested their expression was not influenced by cold and low PO2 at high altitude. These distinct characteristics of P. erythrurus are considered to be necessary strategies in metabolic regulation for living at high altitude and may effectively compensate for the negative influence of cold and low PO2. PMID:23951275

Tang, Xiaolong; Xin, Ying; Wang, Huihui; Li, Weixin; Zhang, Yang; Liang, Shiwei; He, Jianzheng; Wang, Ningbo; Ma, Ming; Chen, Qiang

2013-01-01

177

The AMEL study, a cross sectional population-based survey on aging and malnutrition in 1200 elderly Lebanese living in rural settings: protocol and sample characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Lebanon is faced with a particular challenge because of large socioeconomic inequality and accelerated demographic transition. Rural residents seem more vulnerable because of limited access to transport, health and social services. No information is available regarding health, nutrition and living conditions of this specific population. The purpose of the AMEL (Aging and Malnutrition in Elderly Lebanese) study is to assess the nutritional status of community dwelling elderly people, aged 65 years and above, living in a rural settings in Lebanon, in line of socioeconomic factors, health and living conditions. The present paper will describe the gender specific characteristics of the study population. Methods AMEL is a cross-sectional population based study conducted between April 2011 and April 2012 including 1200 elderly individuals living in the 24 rural Caza (districts) of Lebanon. People aged greater than or equal to 65 y were randomly selected through multistage cluster sampling. Subjects were interviewed at their homes by trained interviewers. The questionnaire included the following measures: socio-demographic factors, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA), health related characteristics, functional ability, cognitive status, mood and social network. Results The sample included 591 men (49.3%) and 609 women (50.8%). Mean age was 75.32 years and similar between genders. Malnutrition (MNA?living conditions of community dwelling rural residents of Lebanon. These findings may alert policy makers to plan appropriate intervention in order to improve the quality of life and increase successful aging. PMID:23758758

2013-01-01

178

Living in the question.  

PubMed

We live in a fast moving-world. Business has accelerated to breathtaking speeds in the 1990s--and in the last few years the afterburner has really kicked in. The speed of change is overwhelming. Especially in health care, who has time to "live in the question?" We need to decide things quickly, get the decision out of the way, and move on, right? Maybe. Biology shows us that you can't plan ahead very far. New things come along that you don't even have a category for, and therefore you don't even see them. Things are going to happen that you literally have no notion are even possible. The key to succeeding in this environment? Don't plan ahead. Stay curious. Make small bets. Build organizational hothouses. Feed the seedlings that grow. The challenge is to remain curious, to live in the question, both personally and organizationally. PMID:10557490

Flower, J

1999-01-01

179

Living Carbocationic Polymerization. VII. Living Polymerization of Isobutylene by Tertiary Alkyl (or Aryl) Methyl Ether\\/Boron Trichloride Complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been discovered that the living polymerization of isobutylene (IB) can be induced by MeORt\\/BCl3 initiating systems in CH2C12or CH3C1 at ?10 and ?30°C. Diagnostic proof for the living polymerizations are 1) proportionality of Mn to polyisobutylene (PIB) formed and 2) independence of number of PIB chains of amount of PIB formed. By the use of agedC(CH3)3CH2OMe\\/BCl3 and C6H5C(CH3)2OMe\\/BCl3

Munmaya K. Mishra; Joseph P. Kennedy

1987-01-01

180

Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-08-12

181

A smart web service based on the context of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combining the Semantic Web and the Ubiquitous Web, Web 3.0 is for things. The Semantic Web enables human knowledge to be machine-readable and the Ubiquitous Web allows Web services to serve any thing, forming a bridge between the virtual world and the real world. By using context, Web services can become smarter—that is, aware of the target things' or applications'

Jing He; Yanchun Zhang; Guangyan Huang; Jinli Cao

2012-01-01

182

Microenvironments and different nanoparticle dynamics in living cells revealed by a standard nanoparticle.  

PubMed

For quantitative analysis of nanoparticle diffusions and submicro-environments in living cells, use of newly synthesized silica-based fluorescent nanoparticle (Si-FNP) as a standard nanoprobe is successfully demonstrated. The appropriate characteristics of a standard probe were fully analyzed in vitro by single molecule detection, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Using fluorescence correlation analysis in single living cells, we quantitatively compared the diffusional properties of the standard Si-FNP with a diameter of 50 nm, peptide coated Si-FNP, streptavidin coated Qdot, and GFP molecule which have different sizes and surface properties. The result demonstrates that the standard Si-FNP without coat is minimally trapped in the vesicles in the process of cellular endocytosis. Interestingly, a large proportion of Si-FNP introduced into the cells by electroporation diffuses freely in the cells during a cell cycle suggesting free diffusing NPs are hardly trapped in the vesicles. The simple but highly sensitive method will provide insight into strategies to understanding the hydrodynamic process of nanoparticle delivery into living cells as well as the cellular microenvironment in the view of submicro-size. PMID:22922061

Pack, Chan Gi; Song, Mi Ryoung; Tae, Eunju Lee; Hiroshima, Michio; Byun, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jun Sung; Sako, Yasushi

2012-11-10

183

The Myths We Live By: Reframing History for the 21st Century  

E-print Network

The Myths We Live By: Reframing History for the 21st Century Professor Giselle Byrnes Pro Vice, Parliament House #12;Professorial Lecture Series The myths we live by: reframing history for the 21st Century #12;Charles Darwin University Professorial Lecture Series The myths we live by: reframing history

184

Personal Control and the Ecology of Community Living Settings: Beyond Living-Unit Size and Type.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personal control exercised by 74 adults from community living settings in Minnesota were evaluated. Individuals living semi-independently exercised more personal control than did residents of HCBS Waiver-funded supported living services, who had more personal control than did those living in community ICFs/MR. Personal characteristics and…

Stancliffe, Roger J.; Abery, Brian H.; Smith, John

2000-01-01

185

Summarize the technology of the things of Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article detailed introduction things of Internet technology in domestic and foreign research condition, trend of development as well as research goal and significance. Elaborated the things of Internet concept, the principle and the characteristic, then from home automation(HA), intelligent medical service(IM), intelligent transportation(ITS), intelligent electrical network (SPG), modern agriculture (MA) and intelligent Logistics (IL)from the intelligence aspects and so

Qiuxia Yang; Zhiguo Wang; Yinggao Yue

2012-01-01

186

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? ...IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a) Privately-owned live Alaskan reindeer may pass to the...

2010-04-01

187

Some characteristics of the quality of life in old age illustrated by means of Allardt's concept.  

PubMed

This study illustrates some characteristics of the quality of life in old age when ageing is seen as a continued human development. In the Kungsholmen Project 87 healthy elderly persons were asked about the quality of their lives. Allardt's definition of quality of life was used as the conceptual framework for the content analysis. The findings indicate that the dimensions of loving and being, as Allardt describes them, take on a different meaning and the material things in the having dimension become less important. The differences point to another meaning of the quality of life in old age. The emphasis is on health and independence, contentment and a peaceful life, personal integrity in terms of a moral and a caring attitude. The findings tend to be in accordance with the successful ageing as described in Erikson's theory of psychosocial development and in Tornstam's theory of gerotranscendence. To gain a deeper understanding of this complex phenomenon, qualitative methods which go beyond definitions are required. PMID:8717809

Nilsson, M; Ekman, S L; Ericsson, K; Winblad, B

1996-01-01

188

Contemplation of Things Past  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On August 12, 1925, it was very hot in Philadelphia, the Perseid meteors raced across the sky, and my mother stopped shelling lima beans and went upstairs to her bedroom to give birth to me. At this point I skip over further details of this kind and get right to the central theme of my life. I didn't even know there was a theme until I was faced with the deadline for writing this essay. I assumed that I had just blundered along doing what seemed best at the moment. But now I see that what always seemed the best thing to do was also an opportunity to try to see further back in time than people had seen before and to contemplate about how it would be to have been there.

Wetherill, George W.

189

Privacy Preservation Technologies in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Since the beginning of the Internet thirty years ago, we have witnessed a number of changes in the application of communication technologies. Today, the Internet can be described to a large extent as a ubiquitous infrastructure that is always accessible. After the era of connecting places and connecting people, the Internet of the future will also connect things. The idea behind the resulting Internet of Things is to seamlessly gather and use information about objects of the real world during their entire lifecycle. In this paper, we consider different approaches to technological protection of user data privacy in the world of Internet of Things. In particular,we consider what kind of security problems are being faced and what level of protection can be provided by applying approaches based on secure multi-party computations.

Sen, Jaydip

2010-01-01

190

CHEMICAL IMAGING OF LIVING CELLS BY SYNCHROTRON INFRARED MICROSPECTROMETRY  

SciTech Connect

Chemical mapping of proteins and lipids inside a single living cell and at a resolution of a few microns, has been performed using synchroton infrared microspectrometry. Modifications of the chemical distributions upon mitosis and necrosis has been investigated.

JAMIN,N.; DUMAS,P.; MONCUIT,J.; FRIDMAN,W.H.; TEILLAUD,J.L.; CARR,G.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1997-07-29

191

Precise microinjection into living cells by summation of fluorescence intensity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is difficult to introduce a specific amount of a substance into cells by existing injection methods because there is no appropriate method of directly measuring the quantity of the injected substance. Although radioisotopes can be used, there is currently no apparatus that can practically handle such radioisotopes. The measurement of the diameter of a liquid droplet in air or oil is affected by surface tension if the liquid droplet is very small; but this issue does not occur with microinjection, in which a water solution is discharged under pressure through a capillary and into a cell. It is also difficult to measure the density or mass of the injected substance because of the low discharge rate, unlike the case of inkjet printers. To solve these problems, we propose a method of precise microinjection by summation of fluorescence intensity. In addition, we developed a new pressure pulse injection device that generates pressure with a rectangular waveform and a precise amplitude and pulse width to improve controllability of the discharge amount. Lastly, when the above device and method are combined, the coefficient of correlation between the specified number of pressure pulses per unit of time and the actual discharge amount exceeded 0.999. This research paper describes in detail the measurement system, standalone performance, and quantities of substances introduced into living cells.

Taninaka, Kiyoshi; Yabuki, A.; Ito, A.; Harada, T.

2007-02-01

192

Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2013-09-15

193

IV: When Things Get Hard  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is definitely easier to write about work when things are going well, but it is even more important to write about what happens when things get challenging. The act of writing about the challenging times can be challenging in itself but can also provide invaluable insights into the process of teaching: important for the writer and just as…

Rosenfeld, Malke; Mahoney, Meg Robson; Jordan, Kim; Jackson, Spoon; Gabel, Bonnie; Adams, Holly; Plemons, Anna

2014-01-01

194

A non-contact health monitoring model based on the Internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of things uses in various fields, which is of great convenience to people's lives. Health monitoring can provide users with convenient and reliable health services, which are of low cost. The current health monitoring systems depend on the instruments. Based on the Internet of things, a system called NCHMS is proposed, which is monitoring the health status with

Ning Yang; Xingli Zhao; Hong Zhang

2012-01-01

195

Characteristics of the Colombian armed conflict and the mental health of civilians living in active conflict zones  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the fact that the Colombian armed conflict has continued for almost five decades there is still very little information on how it affects the mental health of civilians. Although it is well established in post-conflict populations that experience of organised violence has a negative impact on mental health, little research has been done on those living in active conflict zones. Médecins Sans Frontières provides mental health services in areas of active conflict in Colombia and using data from these services we aimed to establish which characteristics of the conflict are most associated with specific symptoms of mental ill health. Methods An analysis of clinical data from patients (N = 6,353), 16 years and over, from 2010–2011, who consulted in the Colombian departments (equivalent to states) of Nariño, Cauca, Putumayo and Caquetá. Risk factors were grouped using a hierarchical cluster analysis and the clusters were included with demographic information as predictors in logistic regressions to discern which risk factor clusters best predicted specific symptoms. Results Three clear risk factor clusters emerged which were interpreted as ‘direct conflict related violence’, ‘personal violence not directly conflict-related’ and ‘general hardship’. The regression analyses indicated that conflict related violence was more highly related to anxiety-related psychopathology than other risk factor groupings while non-conflict violence was more related to aggression and substance abuse, which was more common in males. Depression and suicide risk were represented equally across risk factor clusters. Conclusions As the largest study of its kind in Colombia it demonstrates a clear impact of the conflict on mental health. Among those who consulted with mental health professionals, specific conflict characteristics could predict symptom profiles. However, some of the highest risk outcomes, like depression, suicide risk and aggression, were more related to factors indirectly related to the conflict. This suggests a need to focus on the systemic affects of armed conflict and not solely on direct exposure to fighting. PMID:23171497

2012-01-01

196

Where the Wild Things Are: Informal Experience and Ecological Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Category-based induction requires selective use of different relations to guide inferences; this article examines the development of inferences based on ecological relations among living things. Three hundred and forty-six 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children from rural, suburban, and urban communities projected novel "diseases" or "insides" from one…

Coley, John D.

2012-01-01

197

Five Foul Things That Are Also Good for You  

MedlinePLUS

... That Are Also Good for You Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Five Foul Things That Are Also ... more: NIH Human Microbiome Project This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

198

Of atoms, oaks, and cannibals; or, more things that talk.  

PubMed

While literary works are often treated as museum pieces, an alternative Romantic/ Pragmatic aesthetic emphasizes instead the rootedness of all texts in lived experience. This suggests that both literary and scientific texts may be approached as performances that weave together discursive and material elements, giving language to matter, both making, and becoming, "things that talk." Three authors are contrasted: Emerson uses natural objects as metaphors to complete his thought; Thoreau uses natural objects as mediators who enroll him to speak for them in the name of a wider ecology; Humboldt attempts to enroll nonhumans, namely cannibals, into the global civil community by asking them to speak for themselves. The resulting quandary unsettles the Cartesian boundary between human and nonhuman, subject and object; as scholars divided by this boundary, we must multiply our own relations, the better to understand the ties that bind us into the common project of building the Cosmos. PMID:21077556

Walls, Laura Dassow

2010-09-01

199

Survival characteristics of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes and Helicobacter pylori during passage through the free-living ciliate, Tetrahymena sp.  

PubMed

Free-living protozoa have been implicated in the survival and transport of pathogens in the environment, but the relationship between non-Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli or Helicobacter pylori and ciliates has not been characterized. Six diarrheagenic pathotypes of E. coli and an isolate of H. pylori were evaluated for their susceptibility to digestion by Tetrahymena, an aquatic ciliate. Tetrahymena strain MB125 was fed E. coli or H. pylori, and the ciliate's egested products examined for viable bacterial pathogens by the BacLight(™) LIVE/DEAD (™) assay, a cell elongation method, and by colony counts. All six diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes survived digestion, whereas H. pylori was digested. Growth of E. coli on agar plates indicated that the bacteria were able to replicate after passage through the ciliate. Transmission electron micrographs of E. coli cells as intact rods vs. degraded H. pylori cells corroborated these results. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a net-like matrix around intact E. coli cells in fecal pellets. These results suggest a possible role for Tetrahymena and its egested fecal pellets in the dissemination of diarrheagenic E. coli in the environment. This bacterial-protozoan interaction may increase opportunities for transmission of diarrheagenic E. coli to mammalian hosts including humans. PMID:22680607

Smith, Charlotte D; Berk, Sharon G; Brandl, Maria T; Riley, Lee W

2012-12-01

200

Approximate multiphase flow modeling by characteristic methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The flow of petroleum hydrocarbons, organic solvents and other liquids that are immiscible with water presents the nation with some of the most difficult subsurface remediation problems. One aspect of contaminant transport associated releases of such liquids is the transport as a water-immiscible liquid phase. Approximate models of immiscible flow are presented for two- and three-phase flow. The approximations are constructed by representing the flow by hyperbolic equations which have method of characteristics solutions. This approximation has the additional benefit of being based on the fundamental wave behavior of the flow, which is revealed by the solutions of the models. An important result is that for three-phase flow, two flow regimes exist. The first is characterized by the displacement of one of the liquids into a bank which moves ahead of the other liquid. The second is characterized by almost complete bypassing of a liquid by the other. The occurrence of the flow regimes is dependent on the organic liquid properties, soil type and the initial amounts of the fluids present.

Weaver, J. W.

1991-05-01

201

Quality of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS under the New Epidemic Characteristics in China and the Associated Factors  

PubMed Central

Background Improvement of quality of life has been one of goals in health care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). In China, the epidemic characteristics have changed and transmission is now most commonly sexual contact. However, the assessment of quality of life of PLWHA under new characteristics has limited reporting. This study was designed to assess the quality of life among PLWHA who contracted disease mainly via sexual contact and to clarify the associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Liaoning Province. Sample size (800) was calculated based on the fatality rate and enlarged with consideration on the loss of response. Participants were sampled by tables of random numbers among all registered PLWHA. Questionnaires pertaining to quality of life (SF-36) and related factors (demographic characteristics, social support and network, HIV/AIDS awareness, and behavior factors) were distributed during December 2010-April 2011. 783 effective responses were obtained. Results The average scores of physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and total score (TS) were 66.8±21.9 (Mean±SD), 62.2±20.9, and 64.5±20.2. General linear model analysis revealed that, in standardized estimate (?) sequence, PCS was significantly associated with monthly income, perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, transmission, and ethnicity; MCS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, condom use, monthly income, transmission, ethnicity, and alcohol consumption; whereas TS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, monthly income, transmission, condom use, and ethnicity. Conclusions Quality of life for PLWHA who contracted HIV mainly via sexual contact was worse and both physical conditions and social integration were impacted. Under current epidemic characteristics, efforts to increase social support and enhance the implementation of supporting policy are necessary to improve the quality of life of PLWHA. PMID:23741340

Sun, Wei; Wu, Ming; Qu, Peng; Lu, Chunming; Wang, Lie

2013-01-01

202

Analysis of long-lived isotopes by liquid scintillation spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Neutron production cross sections are reported for reactions leading to long-lived isotopes in fusion reactor materials. Pure elements and separated isotopes were irradiated with 14.6 to 14.8 MeV neutron fluences up to 10 Y n/cmS. Undesired activities were chemically separated and the long-lived activities were measured using both liquid scintillation and x-ray spectrometry. Results are presented for the reactions VWFe(n,2n)VVFe (2.73 y), WUNi(n,2n)WTNi (100 y), WTCu(n,P)WTNi, and WNi(n,2n)VZNi (76,000 y).

Bowers, D.L.; Greenwood, L.R.

1987-01-01

203

Internet of things and privacy preserving technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we consider different approaches to technological protection of users' privacy in the world of internet of things. Particularly, we consider what kind of problems and which level of protection can be achieved by applying approaches using secure multi-party computations.

Vladimir Oleshchuk

2009-01-01

204

"First Things First" Shows Promising Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses a school improvement model, First Things First, developed by James P. Connell, a former tenured professor of psychology at the University of Rochester in New York. The model has three pillars for the high school level: (1) small, themed learning communities that each keep a group of students together…

Hendrie, Caroline

2005-01-01

205

Doing the right thing in healthcare.  

PubMed

Healthcare in America is at stake based on the pretense of doing the right thing. The current situation leaves many Americans without quality healthcare. By identifying and recognizing some of these issues perhaps healthcare professionals may begin to offer solutions and stand up for patients. PMID:22753570

Karnick, Paula M

2012-07-01

206

The Pleasure of Finding Things out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The pleasure of finding things out" is a collection of short works by the Nobel Prize winning scientist Richard Feynman. The book provides insights into his infectious enthusiasm for science and his love of sharing ideas about the subject with anyone who wanted to listen. Feynman has been widely acknowledged as one of the greatest physicists of…

Loxley, Peter

2005-01-01

207

Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

HISPANICS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute One of the leading causes of cancer?related deaths among ... a rare but often fatal disease known as pancreatic cancer. This cancer, which is often detected only after ...

208

Where We Live: Fun With Compiling Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will find what is common and what is unique about where we live. Learners will count how many people, pets, windows, televisions and other things exist where they live. Everyone fills in information on a chart and then the group explores the data. Young learners focus on most, least, and simple comparisons; older ones look for typical responses and relationships among categories. For instance, does anyone have twice as many pets as people? Do those with more people mostly have more doors? This works well as a group activity or a display to which passers-by contribute. Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

2012-06-26

209

9 CFR 203.4 - Statement with respect to the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market...the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market...provides, in part, that every packer, live poultry dealer, stockyard...

2010-01-01

210

9 CFR 201.94 - Information as to business; furnishing of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...furnishing of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market...furnishing of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market...dealers. Each packer, swine contractor, live poultry dealer, stockyard...

2010-01-01

211

[The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].  

PubMed

Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals. PMID:22379772

Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

2011-11-01

212

Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

2007-01-01

213

Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis, (3) Orem's Systems of Nursing Care, and (4) regular in-service education. We

Charles E. Blair; Judy Glaister; Alston Brown; Carolyn Phillips

2007-01-01

214

Sustaining living rivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rivers cannot continue to meet society's needs, or the needs of living things, if humans continue to regard river management as a purely political or engineering challenge. The flow of rivers is part of a greater flow, the planet's water cycle, which sustains not only the flow of water but the entire web of life. Ultimately, the condition, or health,

James R. Karr; Ellen W. Chu

2000-01-01

215

Effects of dietary coarsely ground corn and litter type on broiler live performance, litter characteristics, gastrointestinal tract development, apparent ileal digestibility of energy and nitrogen, and intestinal morphology.  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of the dietary inclusion of 2 coarsely ground corn (CC) levels (0 or 50%) in diets of broilers reared on 2 litter types (new wood shavings or used litter) on live performance, litter characteristics, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of energy and nitrogen (N), and intestinal morphology. No interaction effects between CC level and litter type were observed on live performance. No litter effect was observed on live performance. Dietary inclusion of 50% CC increased BW at 35 d (P < 0.01) and improved cumulative feed conversion ratio (FCR) at 35 and 49 d of age (P < 0.01). The 50% CC treatment increased absolute and relative gizzard weight (P < 0.01) and decreased jejunum unit weight (g/cm) (P < 0.01). The new litter treatment (litter N) increased absolute and relative proventriculus weight (P < 0.05) but did not affect gizzard weight. An interaction effect between CC level and litter type was observed for litter N, where the 50% CC treatment reduced litter N regardless of litter type (P < 0.01), but litter N was reduced by new litter only among birds fed 0% CC (P < 0.05). The 50% CC inclusion increased litter pH (P < 0.05) and improved the AID of energy and N by 6.8% (P < 0.01) and 3.5% (P < 0.05), respectively. The 50% CC treatment increased jejunum villi tip width (P < 0.05) and villi surface area (P < 0.01), and decreased the muscularis layer thickness (P < 0.01), whereas new litter increased jejunum villi and ileum villi height (P < 0.05), jejunum villi surface area (P < 0.01), and the ratio of jejunum villi height to crypt depth (P < 0.01). This study showed that birds fed pelleted and screened diets containing 50% CC exhibited improved BW, FCR, and AID of energy and N, in conjunction with altered morphology of the GIT and intestinal mucosa. Litter type affected some GIT traits and functions but did not affect live performance. PMID:25681472

Xu, Y; Stark, C R; Ferket, P R; Williams, C M; Auttawong, S; Brake, J

2015-03-01

216

Digital video disc (DVD) technology is by no means new, but that doesn't mean we know every-thing about the way these devices store our movies and data. New insights into the function-  

E-print Network

#12;Digital video disc (DVD) technology is by no means new, but that doesn't mean we know every- thing about the way these devices store our movies and data. New insights into the function- ing of this mature technology have come from North Carolina State University and Colorado School of Mines researchers

Kemner, Ken

217

Inspecting for Quality. California's Lowest-Achieving Schools are Routinely Visited by Inspectors on the Lookout for, among Other things, Inadequate Textbook Supplies, Dirty Drinking Water, and Evidence of Vermin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes how the California's lowest-achieving schools are routinely visited by inspectors on the lookout for, among other things, inadequate textbook supplies, dirty drinking water, and evidence of vermin. Following the settlement from the case "Williams v. California," the laws known as the "Williams legislation"…

Jacobson, Linda

2006-01-01

218

Atomic-scale dynamics inside living cells explored by neutron scattering  

PubMed Central

Single-particle neutron spectroscopy has contributed important experimental data on molecular dynamics in biological systems. The technique provides information on atomic and molecular motions in macromolecules on the picosecond to the nanosecond time scale, which are essential to biological function. Here, we report on recent neutron measurements performed directly in living cells by using isotope labelling to explore the dynamics of specific cellular components. The paper proposes an integrated view of results on atomic-scale cell water dynamics, internal and global macromolecular motions and solvent isotope effect on macromolecular dynamics. The work established the specific usefulness of the neutron scattering technique to get insight into biologically relevant dynamical features, in particular through comparative measurements. The method developed can now be applied to look for dynamical signatures related to cell characteristics in many different cell types and organelles. PMID:19586955

Jasnin, Marion

2009-01-01

219

High-speed living polymerization of polar vinyl monomers by self-healing silylium catalysts.  

PubMed

This contribution describes the development and demonstration of the ambient-temperature, high-speed living polymerization of polar vinyl monomers (M) with a low silylium catalyst loading (? 0.05?mol?% relative to M). The catalyst is generated in situ by protonation of a trialkylsilyl ketene acetal ((R)SKA) initiator (I) with a strong Brønsted acid. The living character of the polymerization system has been demonstrated by several key lines of evidence, including the observed linear growth of the chain length as a function of monomer conversion at a given [M]/[I] ratio, near-precise polymer number-average molecular weight (M(n), controlled by the [M]/[I] ratio) with narrow molecular weight distributions (MWD), absence of an induction period and chain-termination reactions (as revealed by kinetics), readily achievable chain extension, and the successful synthesis of well-defined block copolymers. Fundamental steps of activation, initiation, propagation, and catalyst "self-repair" involved in this living polymerization system have been elucidated, chiefly featuring a propagation "catalysis" cycle consisting of a rate-limiting C--C bond formation step and fast release of the silylium catalyst to the incoming monomer. Effects of acid activator, catalyst and monomer structure, and reaction temperature on polymerization characteristics have also been examined. Among the three strong acids incorporating a weakly coordinating borate or a chiral disulfonimide anion, the oxonium acid [H(Et(2)O)(2)](+)[B(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) is the most effective activator, which spontaneously delivers the most active R(3)Si(+), reaching a high catalyst turn-over frequency (TOF) of 6.0×10(3)?h(-1) for methyl methacrylate polymerization by Me(3)Si(+) or an exceptionally high TOF of 2.4×10(5)?h(-1) for n-butyl acrylate polymerization by iBu(3)Si(+), in addition to its high (>90?%) to quantitative efficiencies and a high degree of control over M(n) and MWD (1.07-1.12). An intriguing catalyst "self-repair" feature has also been demonstrated for the current living polymerization system. PMID:20665581

Zhang, Yuetao; Lay, Frank; García-García, Pilar; List, Benjamin; Chen, Eugene Y-X

2010-09-10

220

In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-07-01

221

Live adult worms detected by ultrasonography in human Bancroftian filariasis.  

PubMed

Ultrasonographic examination of the scrotal area was performed in 14 asymptomatic individuals with bancroftian filariasis and microfilaremia. While in seven subjects (50%) the ultrasonographic findings were normal, lymphatic dilation and tortuosity were observed in the other seven. In these vessels, structures with peculiar aleatory movements (filaria dance sign) were detected. A segment of the lymphatic tract containing these mobile intraluminal structures that was resected surgically from the left spermatic cord of one individual confirmed that these structures were living Wuchereria bancrofti adult worms (two females and one male). Our study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using a low-cost, widely available, noninvasive technique (ultrasonography) to detect and monitor living adult worms and lymphatic dilation in patients with bancroftian filariasis. PMID:8024070

Amaral, F; Dreyer, G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Noroes, J; Cavalcanti, A; Samico, S C; Santos, A; Coutinho, A

1994-06-01

222

Application of the Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet of Things is not yet very widespread, many people have little information about Internet of things. But, for magical properties of the Internet of things , its appearance immediately aroused people's great interest. This paper, aiming application of the Internet of Things , use AHP to analyze and look forward to prospects of IOT in many fields.

Qin, Xiaming; Zhang, Guoqing

2011-12-01

223

Nitrogen fixation by symbiotic and free-living spirochetes.  

PubMed

Spirochetes from termite hindguts and freshwater sediments possessed homologs of a nitrogenase gene (nifH) and exhibited nitrogenase activity, a previously unrecognized metabolic capability in spirochetes. Fixation of 15-dinitrogen was demonstrated with termite gut Treponema ZAS-9 and free-living Spirochaeta aurantia. Homologs of nifH were also present in human oral and bovine ruminal treponemes. Results implicate spirochetes in the nitrogen nutrition of termites, whose food is typically low in nitrogen, and in global nitrogen cycling. These results also proffer spirochetes as a likely origin of certain nifHs observed in termite guts and other environments that were not previously attributable to known microbes. PMID:11431569

Lilburn, T G; Kim, K S; Ostrom, N E; Byzek, K R; Leadbetter, J R; Breznak, J A

2001-06-29

224

What is this thing called \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY. Background - Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is supposed to be caused by lack of daylight in winter. Yet the population of Northern Norway, living without sun for two winter months, does not spontaneously complain about depression during the dark period. Aims - To summarize research bearing upon the validity of the concept of SAD. Method - Review of rel-

VIDJE HANSEN; INGUNN SKRE; EILIV LUND

2008-01-01

225

Security Challenges for User-Oriented RFID Applications within the `Internet of Things'  

E-print Network

Security Challenges for User-Oriented RFID Applications within the `Internet of Things' G.P. HANCKE to be an important building block of the `Internet of Things' and examine how RFID, assisted by the deployment of NFC will need to address. Keywords: RFID, NFC, security, `Internet of Things', user-oriented architecture 1

Hancke, Gerhard

226

Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution  

E-print Network

1 Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution Sara Hachem.issarny}@inria.fr Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is characterized by a wide penetration in the regular user's life and fulfill users' queries for Thing-based measurements/actions. I. INTRODUCTION The Internet of today

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.  

PubMed

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

2006-10-01

228

Live Cell Imaging of Src/FAK Signaling by FRET  

PubMed Central

The Src/FAK complex is involved in many signaling pathways and plays crucial roles in cell adhesion/migration. It becomes clear that the subcellular localization of Src and FAK is crucial for their activities and functions. In this article, we first overview the molecular mechanisms and functions of Src and FAK involved in cell adhesion/migration. We then introduce the development of genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to visualize the activities of Src and FAK in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolutions. Different kinds of signal peptides targeting subcellular compartments are also discussed. FRET-based biosensors fused with these targeting signals peptides are further introduced to provide an overview on how these targeting signals can facilitate the localization of biosensors to continuously monitor the local activity of Src and FAK at subcellular compartments. In summary, genetically-encoded FRET biosensors integrated with subcellular compartment-targeting signals can provide powerful tools for the visualization of subcellular Src and FAK activities in live cells and advance our in-depth understanding of Src/FAK functions at different subcellular compartments. PMID:21857884

Seong, Jihye; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

2011-01-01

229

The Geoscience Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internet of Things is a term that refers to "uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure" (Wikipedia). We here use the term to describe new and innovative ways to integrate physical samples in the Earth Sciences into the emerging digital infrastructures that are developed to support research and education in the Geosciences. Many Earth Science data are acquired on solid earth samples through observations and experiments conducted in the field or in the lab. The application and long-term utility of sample-based data for science is critically dependent on (a) the availability of information (metadata) about the samples such as geographical location where the sample was collected, time of sampling, sampling method, etc. (b) links between the different data types available for individual samples that are dispersed in the literature and in digital data repositories, and (c) access to the samples themselves. Neither of these requirements could be achieved in the past due to incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names, and the lack of a central catalog that allows researchers to find a sample's archiving location. New internet-based capabilities have been developed over the past few years for the registration and unique identification of samples that make it possible to overcome these problems. Services for the registration and unique identification of samples are provided by the System for Earth Sample Registration SESAR (www.geosamples.org). SESAR developed the International Geo Sample Number, or IGSN, as a unique identifier for samples and specimens collected from our natural environment. Since December 2011, the IGSN is governed by an international organization, the IGSN eV (www.igsn.org), which endorses and promotes an internationally unified approach for registration and discovery of physical specimens in the Geoscience community and is establishing a new modular and scalable architecture for the IGSN to advance global implementation. Use of the IGSN will, for the first time, allow to establish links between samples (or the digital representation of them), data acquired on these samples, and the publications that report these data. Samples can be linked to a dataset by including IGSNs in the metadata record of a dataset's DOI® when the dataset is registered with the DOI® system for unique identification. Links between datasets and publications already have been implemented based on dataset DOIs® between some Geoscience journals and data centers that are Publication Agents in the DataCite consortium (www.datacite.org). Links between IGSNs, dataset DOIs, and publication DOIs will in the future allow researchers to find and access with a single query and without ambiguity all data acquired on a specific sample across the entire literature.

Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

2012-04-01

230

Implementation of the Internet of Things on Public Security  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of the Internet of Things will occur within a new ecosystem that will be driven by a number of key players. The public security as one of the key players is going to make real-time communications will be possible not only by humans but also by things at anytime and from anywhere. This research will present the advent of the Internet of Things to create a plethora of innovative applications and services, which will enhance quality of life and reduce inequalities.

Lu, Kesheng; Li, Xichun

231

Internet of Things Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT)  

E-print Network

Internet of Things Peng Du #12;Content Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT) Challenges IPv6 / 6LoWPAN ROLL #12;What is Internet of Things (IoT) Internet TCP/IP Things Criteria #12;Elements A brief idea what Internet ofThings is and why it is interesting to us Appreciated IPv6 is one

Roussos, George

232

Sound quality characteristics of refrigerator noise in real living environments with relation to psychoacoustical and autocorrelation function parameters.  

PubMed

Psychoacoustical and autocorrelation function (ACF) parameters were employed to describe the temporal fluctuations of refrigerator noise during starting, transition into/from the stationary phase and termination of operation. The temporal fluctuations of refrigerator noise include a click at start-up, followed by a rapid increase in volume, a change of pitch, and termination of the operation. Subjective evaluations of the noise of 24 different refrigerators were conducted in a real living environment. The relationship between objective measures and perceived noisiness was examined by multiple regression analysis. Sound quality indices were developed based on psychoacoustical and ACF parameters. The psychoacoustical parameters found to be important for evaluating noisiness in the stationary phase were loudness and roughness. The relationship between noisiness and ACF parameters shows that sound energy and its fluctuations are important for evaluating noisiness. Also, refrigerator sounds that had a fluctuation of pitch were rated as more annoying. The tolerance level for the starting phase of refrigerator noise was found to be 33 dBA, which is the level where 65% of the participants in the subjective tests were satisfied. PMID:17614491

Sato, Shin-ichi; You, Jin; Jeon, Jin Yong

2007-07-01

233

Excerpt: Living at the Pole by Paul Siple  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online article vividly and sensitively describes what it was like to live at the South Pole during Antarctica's long winter night. When a nationwide search was conducted to select a Boy Scout to accompany Richard E. Byrd on on his first Antarctic expedition in 1918, Paul Siple (1908-1968) was chosen, and it profoundly influenced the rest of his life. Returning to the continent several times, he became an Antarctic expert. He was chief biologist of Byrd's 1933-35 expedition and the scientific leader of the United State's first permanent station at the South Pole. Siple was among the small group of men who first wintered over at the Pole, and here describes that historic experience.

234

Discussion on the Application of Internet of Things in Logistics Production Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the bar code's disadvantage, information flow cann't match the physical flow in the logistics production industry this causes the efficiency very slowly. Internet of Things overcomes the shortcomings of the bar code, it will revolutionize logistics production management. This paper describes basic principles and characteristics of Internet of Things, and discusses the application of it in logistics production

Mao Cuiyun; Han Yuanhang

2010-01-01

235

Mr. Neil Armstrong interviewed by Dr. P.J. Vorzimmar -MSC-April 6, 1967 ARMSTRONG: You remember which things change in the course of the  

E-print Network

of things had yet to come in, so to speak, and then he told me about the little old lady who'd been brought, but I do recall reading some old articles that..gee, why had quite different thoughts a few years ago

236

Go West, Young Men: Conspicuous consumption in Dinaw Mengestus The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, as prefigured by V. S. Naipauls A Bend in the River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The broken promises of capitalism have been explored recently in Dinaw Mengestu’s The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears, a work with antecedents in V. S. Naipaul’s A Bend in the River. Dayo Olopade looks closely at these incisive yet literary critiques of conspicuous consumption.

Dayo Olopade

2009-01-01

237

Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

1997-06-01

238

BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES (IN VITRO) EXHIBITED BY FREE-LIVING AND SYMBIOTIC VIBRIO ISOLATES  

E-print Network

BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES (IN VITRO) EXHIBITED BY FREE- LIVING AND SYMBIOTIC VIBRIO ISOLATES V. NAIR, NM 88003-8001, USA Abstract Adhesion and biofilm forming ability of symbiotic bacteria play a crucial strains (free-living and symbiotic). Since these symbiotic factors contribute in some fashion

McFall-Ngai, Margaret

239

Playing by Someone Else's Rules: A Phenomenological Study of Vocational Teachers' Lived Experiences under School Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experiences of six vocational education teachers from several high schools in Chesapeake County, Maryland, who "lived under" the educational reforms of the past 2 decades were examined in a phenomenological study. The study, which used the approach designed by Van Manen in "Researching Lived Experience," included consideration of the…

Reinsel, Michael D.

240

Object Recognition for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a system which allows to request information on physical objects by taking a picture of them. This way, using a\\u000a mobile phone with integrated camera, users can interact with objects or ”things” in a very simple manner. A further advantage\\u000a is that the objects themselves don’t have to be tagged with any kind of markers. At the core

Till Quack; Herbert Bay; Luc J. Van Gool

2008-01-01

241

Embedded security for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of Things (IoT) consists of several tiny devices connected together to form a collaborative computing environment. IoT imposes peculiar constraints in terms of connectivity, computational power and energy budget, which make it significantly different from those contemplated by the canonical doctrine of security in distributed systems. In order to circumvent the problem of security in IoT domain, networks and

Arijit Ukil; Jaydip Sen; Sripad Koilakonda

2011-01-01

242

Talking of hallowed things: the silent poetry of Emily Dickinson  

E-print Network

TALKING OF HALLOWED THINGS: THE SILENT POETRY OF EMILY DICKINSON A Thesis by PAMELA RAE MATTHEWS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December... 1981 Major Subject: English TALKING OF HALLOWED THINGS: THE SILENT POETRY OF EMILY DICKINSON A Thesis by PAMELA RAE MATTHEWS Approved as to style and content by: ( r an of Co ' tee) (Memb r) (Member) Head of Department) December 1981...

Matthews, Pamela R

1981-01-01

243

African Americans and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

AFRICAN AMERICANS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute BETHESDA, MD ? When NFL Hall ... on a disease that, although rare, disproportionately affects African Americans. Pancreatic cancer is diagnosed in African Americans more ...

244

Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing must exhibit roundness, edibility, redness, fruitiness, and so on. Such theories  

E-print Network

#12;? Johnson-Laird, ). So, for example, to satisfy the concept (`to be an apple. . .'\\), a thing of concepts. For instance, apples resemble re engines by sharing the characteristic of redness, they resemble lost much of its popularity, largely because apples, although most o en red, are not necessarily so

Bucci, David J.

245

Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in flow cytometry, open up new possibilities for analyzing cellular processes occurring in single microbial and eukaryotic cells.

Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

2007-01-09

246

14 Conversations about Three Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, the author tries to look forward into the 21st century to divine three things: (i) What skills will researchers in the future need to solve the most pressing problems? (ii) What are some of the most likely candidates to be those problems? and (iii) What are some current areas of research that seem mined out and should not distract…

Wainer, Howard

2010-01-01

247

1. ATTRACTIVE THINGS WORK BETTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Noam Tractinsky, an Israeli scientist, was puzzled. Attractive things certainly should be preferred over ugly ones, but why would they work better? Yet two Japanese researchers, Masaaki Kurosu and Kaori Kashimura,, claimed just that. They developed two forms of automated teller machines, the ATM machines that allow us to get money and do simple banking tasks any time of the

Donald A. Norman

2002-01-01

248

10 Things Never to Say  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some individualized education plan (IEP) meetings are grueling for parents and educators alike, and too often things are said that have unintended consequences. Slips of the tongue can lead to bigger problems, such as due process hearings and complaints to the state education agency, not to mention accusations of discrimination and the legal…

Croyle, Kimberly

2007-01-01

249

NASA CONNECT: The Measurement of All Things  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

'The Measurement of All Things: Tools of the Aeronautics Trade' is the first of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'The Measurement of All Things: Tools of the Aeronautics Trade' students will explore the concept of measurement and the tools used in measuring things, while learning 'what' and 'how' engineers and scientists use measurement during the process of developing, designing, and testing airplanes.

1999-01-01

250

The Characteristics of a Model Technology Education Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The things that make the quality of a teacher stand out can cover a wide range of characteristics, actions, words, and experiences. The mark left on a student by a teacher, for good or bad, is written in an ink that will last a lifetime. This article describes a study that identifies the characteristics of exceptional technology education…

Kaufman, Andrew R.; Warner, Scott A.; Buechele, Jessica R.

2011-01-01

251

Basic structural and functional characteristics of the epidermal barrier in wild mammals living in different habitats and climates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the combination of standard light and transmission electron microscopy, cryo-SEM, immunohistochemistry and a new\\u000a sensitive glycolipid histochemical technique (5-hexadecanoylaminofluorescein staining, laser scanning microscopy), including\\u000a densitometrical evaluation, our approach gives for the first time an overview of the specific biology of the epidermal permeability\\u000a barrier in wild mammals (20 species from five orders), living under varying (aquatic or moist

Wilfried Meyer; Judith Schmidt; Johannes Kacza; Roger Busche; Hassan Y. Naim; Ralf Jacob

252

Differential induction of cellular responses by live and dead Leishmania promastigotes in healthy donors  

PubMed Central

The most effective protection against human leishmaniasis has been achieved following vaccination with live promastigotes. Killed promastigotes +BCG can protect, albeit to a lower degree. To explore what mechanisms may be involved in these differences, the ability of live and dead promastigotes to induce immune responses were evaluated in vitro. The data showed that live and dead promastigotes differ in their ability to induce proliferation and cytokine production. Cytokine gene expression of Th1 related cytokines (IL-12, IFN? and TNF?) in adult PBMC was more evident to live than to heat killed promastigotes. This was coupled with significantly higher number of IFN? secreting cells induced by live than killed promastigotes. However, ?-IL-12 antibodies did not block the IFN? response induced by live promastigotes. Proliferative responses were variable. In contrast to adult PBMC no IFN? secreting MNC could be detected in cord blood. However, in these cells the live promastigotes consistently induced higher proliferative response compared to dead. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:11359441

Nylén, S; Mörtberg, U; Kovalenko, D; Satti, I; Engström, K; Bakhiet, M; Akuffo, H

2001-01-01

253

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose by the rumen anaerobic  

E-print Network

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose fermentation patterns and to increase numbers of rumen bacteria, especially cellulolytic species (Wallace and fermentation of cellulose by an anaerobic fungus, Neocallimastix frontalis MCH3, which is particularly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics  

E-print Network

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics Svebor Karaman as long as possible. The aging diseases re- sult in a loss of autonomy. Dementia diseases of the elderly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Direct Analysis of Large Living Organism by Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new ambient ionization method allowing the direct chemical analysis of living human body by mass spectrometry (MS) was developed. This MS method, namely Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry, is based on electrostatic charging of a living individual to megavolt (MV) potential, illicit drugs, and explosives on skin/glove, flammable solvent on cloth/tissue paper, and volatile food substances in breath were readily ionized and detected by a mass spectrometer.

Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tang, Ho-Wai; Man, Sin-Heng; Mak, Pui-Yuk; Choi, Yi-Ching; Wong, Melody Yee-Man

2014-09-01

256

A Highly Specific Probe for Sensing Hydrogen Sulfide in Live Cells Based on Copper-Initiated Fluorogen with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Here we reported the first fluorescent probe with aggregation-induced emission characteristics, namely AIE-S, for the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. The detection system is selective for complicated biological application and the response is fast enough to complete within seconds. Moreover, the probe exhibits the unique advantage of being immune to aggregation-caused quenching which is a detrimental phenomenon limiting the application of most current available H2S fluorescent probes. The detection mechanism was investigated and postulated to be S2- initiated de-coordination and thereafter aggregation of the AIE-S complex. PMID:25285171

Li, Xin; Yang, Chengyu; Wu, Kai; Hu, Yongzhou; Han, Yifeng; Liang, Steven H.

2014-01-01

257

Internet of Things in college application prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things to China's development will bring about profound changes in university management and far-reaching impact. This paper analyzes the Internet of things and working principle of key technologies, combined with our college management problems; make things networking technology in the future development of Chinese universities and applications.

Jianhua Wang; Yongsheng Song; Yan Yu; Jun Zhang

2010-01-01

258

Data mashup in the internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of Things technology has aroused tremendous attention from academia and industry. Distributed, diversity and heterogeneous data in the Internet of Things make it difficult for users to efficiently access to valuable needed information. Data mahup, a significant technologic trend that contributes to the advance of Internet of Things, can improve the value of data and help users explore new

Du Zhiquan; Yu Nan; Cheng Bo; Chen Junliang

2011-01-01

259

101 Things to Learn in Art School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is the first thing to learn in art school? "Art can be anything." The second thing? "Learn to draw." With "101 Things to Learn in Art School", artist and teacher Kit White delivers and develops such lessons, striking an instructive balance between technical advice and sage concepts. These 101 maxims, meditations, and demonstrations offer both…

White, Kit

2011-01-01

260

5 From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and  

E-print Network

). Since embedded Web servers in an Inter- net of Things generally have fewer resources than Web clients5 From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and Best Creating networks of "smart things" found in the physical world (e.g., with RFID, wireless sensor

261

The Shape of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The making of pictures and the use of mathematics are often considered as activities carried out by two different classes of people.It may be true that the artist can get on without mathematics, but the converse is far less true.The operation which an artist terms ‘drawing’, might be described by a mathematician as ‘the mapping of a three?dimensional network into

P. G. Uloth

1974-01-01

262

Things are Heating Up  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this demonstration, students learn that heat makes air expand and rise, and learn how pressure systems are formed by observing the creation of a convection current. A large rectangular pan, a salad dressing bottle, a small latex balloon and water are required materials. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Phenomenal Weather. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

2012-08-03

263

Super-Resolution Video Microscopy of Live Cells by Structured Illumination  

PubMed Central

Structured-illumination microscopy can double the resolution of the wide-field fluorescence microscope, but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed SIM that is capable of 100 nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time frames. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in living Drosophila S2 cells in the total internal reflection (TIRF) mode. PMID:19404253

Kner, Peter; Chhun, Bryant B.; Griffis, Eric R.; Winoto, Lukman; Gustafsson, Mats G. L.

2010-01-01

264

Possibility of high performance quantum computation by superluminal evanescent photons in living systems.  

PubMed

Penrose and Hameroff have suggested that microtubules in living systems function as quantum computers by utilizing evanescent photons. On the basis of the theorem that the evanescent photon is a superluminal particle, the possibility of high performance computation in living systems has been studied. From the theoretical analysis, it is shown that the biological brain can achieve large quantum bits computation compared with the conventional processors at room temperature. PMID:19758549

Musha, Takaaki

2009-06-01

265

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination.  

PubMed

Structured-illumination microscopy can double the resolution of the widefield fluorescence microscope but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed structured-illumination microscope that is capable of 100-nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time points. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in living Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in the total internal reflection mode. PMID:19404253

Kner, Peter; Chhun, Bryant B; Griffis, Eric R; Winoto, Lukman; Gustafsson, Mats G L

2009-05-01

266

Red blood cells Things NaturalThings Natural Things ManmadeThings Manmade  

E-print Network

nanomaterials with dimensions of less than 100 nanometers. This definition excludes biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates) and materials for which an occupational exposure limit (OEL), national this definition. #12;Unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP) are defined by the DOE to mean those engineered

Wechsler, Risa H.

267

Measuring the Right Thing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Economic analysis of the quality of life in America must consider personal values and social indicators as well as economic indicators. Although the technical procedures and statistical techniques of economic research are constantly improving, the validity of the research is hampered by problems of definition and measurement. Definition and…

Campbell, Angus

268

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn that it is incorrect to believe that heavier objects fall faster than lighter objects. By close observation of falling objects, they see that it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

269

It's the Little Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology (IT) departments are ruled by a kind of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: The big-tech stuff--the operating systems, the networks, the data centers--gets the priority, food-and-shelter attention, while upgrading the backup power supplies, evaluating new projector mounts, and taming that rat's nest of classroom cords fall…

Waters, John K.

2007-01-01

270

Characteristics of Adventure Programs Valued by Adolescents in Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identified characteristics of adventure programs valued by adolescents in treatment. Subjects included 11 experts in the field of adventure programming and 207 participants in adventure programs at 12 adolescent treatment programs. The experts, through a modified Delphi process, identified valued program characteristics. Program…

Witman, Jeffrey P.

271

Mapping Biological Behaviors by Application of Longer-Lived Positron Emitting Radionuclides  

PubMed Central

With the technological development of positron emission tomography (PET) and the advent of novel antibody-directed drug delivery systems, longer-lived positron-emitting radionuclides are moving to the forefront to take important roles in tracking the distribution of biotherapeutics such as antibodies, and for monitoring biological processes and responses. Longer half-life radionuclides possess advantages of convenient on-site preparation procedures for both clinical and non-clinical applications. The suitability of the long half-life radionuclides for imaging intact monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their respective fragments, which have inherently long biological half-lives, has attracted increased interest in recent years. In this review, we provide a survey of the recent literature as it applies to the development of nine-selected longer-lived positron emitters with half-lives of 9–140 hours (e.g., 124I, 64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr), and describe the biological behaviors of radionuclide-labeled mAbs with respect to distribution and targeting characteristics, potential toxicities, biological applications, and clinical translation potentials. PMID:23123291

Zhou, Yang; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

2012-01-01

272

Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: Source characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed ofintensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

Keefer, D.K.

1984-01-01

273

When Things Get Small  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This television program provides a humorous look at the nanoscale world and nanotechnology. It provides an idea of how small a nanomemter is by using familiar objects such as a human hair, peanuts, and others, and discusses the physical laws that govern the behavior of matter and energy at extremely small scales. Other materials include information on viewing the program online or purchasing a recording, reviews, and information on the show's creators and personnel.

274

Breaking Things on Purpose  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

*Materials such as metals (aluminum, iron, copper, etc.), ceramics (silicon carbide, porcelain) or polymers (milk jugs made of polyethylene) are tested by scientists and engineers to reveal certain mechanical properties such as the maximum stress a material can withstand. The stress at which a material breaks is a measure of its strength. In this lesson you will be testing the strength of a delicious material you know as chocolate!

WPSU

2007-12-20

275

PINing for Things Past  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Long-term memories are thought to be maintained by persistent changes in the strength of synaptic connections among neurons, but how such changes can persist for days to years has been one of the fundamental enigmas of neuroscience. Recently, however, one mechanism that is dependent on the persistent increased activity of an enzyme has been shown to be necessary for the persistence of long-term memory. The transient inhibition of the brain-specific, constitutively active protein kinase C isoform PKM? erases memories that are even months old. This finding raises a number of issues; chief among them is the question, how can PKM? maintain memories for months when its half-life is probably much shorter? New data suggest how the high abundance of PKM? can be maintained over long periods of time. The synthesis of PKM? is inhibited by Pin1 (protein interacting with NIMA 1), a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that represses dendritic translation. Signals mediated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which induces long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation, inhibit Pin1, enabling PKM? synthesis. PKM?, once translated, in turn inhibits Pin1, permitting persistent PKM? synthesis. In this way, PKM? may be up-regulated to the appropriate amounts for maintaining LTP and perpetuating our mental representations of the past.

Todd Charlton Sacktor (Downstate Medical Center; State University of New York REV)

2010-03-09

276

Ten Tips about 23 Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning 2.0--aka the "23 Things"--is a self-paced online learning program that the author designed in 2006 as a one-person crusade to move an entire organization of 500-plus staff onto the Web 2.0 bandwagon. Along with numerous requests to duplicate the program, many seek insight on how to do this successfully. In this article, the author shares…

Blowers, Helene

2008-01-01

277

Inanimorata: The Dread of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Some time ago, my friend and colleague Prof. Charles Harvey wrote a paper concerning inanimate objects and their possible\\u000a deontologization.1 In that article, Charlie proposes that inanimate matter is at odds with animate beings and that this animus causes events which leave us puzzled: socks disappear, books move from place to place, cars re-park themselves, and things\\u000a get lost and

Micheal Vanpelt

278

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-print Network

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01

279

Honeycomblike architecture produced by living bacteria, Gluconacetobacter xylinus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial cellulose (BC)-producing bacterium, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (ATCC53582), was found to move along linear microgrooves of a stripe-patterned cellulosic scaffold. On the basis of this finding, fabrication of honeycomb-patterned BC was attempted by controlling the bacterial movement using a agarose film scaffold with honeycomb-patterned grooves (concave type). The patterned agarose film was prepared by three steps. The first was transcription of

Yasumitsu Uraki; Junji Nemoto; Hiroyuki Otsuka; Yutaka Tamai; Junji Sugiyama; Takao Kishimoto; Makoto Ubukata; Hiroshi Yabu; Masaru Tanaka; Masatsugu Shimomura

2007-01-01

280

Lecture and Lab Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page, created by David Howell of the University of Vermont, is a collection of examples, demonstrations, and exercises that can be used to motivate a lecture, demonstrate an important point, or create a laboratory exercise for students. Topics include the following: descriptives, normal distribution, sampling distributions, probability, Chi-square, t-tests, power, correlation/regression, one-way ANOVA, multiple comparisons, factorial ANOVA, repeated measures, multiple regression, general linear model, log linear models, and distribution-free tests. This is a large collection of materials pertaining to statistics.

Howell, David

281

Do the right thing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a model of opinion formation where the opinions in conflict are not equivalent. This is the case when the subject of the decision is to respect a norm or a law. In such scenarios, one of the possible behaviors is to abide by the norm and the other to ignore it. The evolution of the dynamics is implemented through an imitation mechanism, in which agents can change their opinions based on the opinions of a set of partners and their own state. We determine, for different social situations, the minimum percentage of supporters of the law necessary to arrive at a state of consensus of law abiders.

Laguna, M. F.; Abramson, G.; Risau-Gusman, S.; Iglesias, J. R.

2010-03-01

282

Engineering living functional materials.  

PubMed

Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID:25592034

Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

2015-01-16

283

Family Living and Personal Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for various projects for Family Living and Personal Living classes. FAMILY LIVING Wayne County Clerk - Marriage License The Knot Martha Stewart Weddings *Travel Planning Sites* Northwest Airlines Amtrak Travelocity Spirit Air Orbitz PERSONAL LIVING (and Parenting): *Alcohol Research* Alcohol and Public Health - CDC MedlinePlus: Alcoholism NIAAA National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism *Birth Control* Health and Wellness Resource Center - - start at this site by typing Birth Control in the search bar on the right of the screen and select "full text articles" and consumer heatlh. It will list a range of birth ...

Ms. Schultz

2007-11-05

284

Living by the calendar: how plants know when to flower  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive processes in plants and animals are usually synchronized with favourable seasons of the year. It has been known for 80 years that organisms anticipate seasonal changes by adjusting developmental programmes in response to daylength. Recent studies indicate that plants perceive daylength through the degree of coincidence of light with the expression of CONSTANS, which encodes a clock-regulated transcription factor

Marcelo J. Yanovsky; Steve A. Kay

2003-01-01

285

Nuffield Secondary Science, Theme 1, Interdependence of Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nuffield Secondary Science is a set of tested materials from which teachers can prepare courses for students in grades 9-11 (approximately) who do not intend to major in science. The materials are designed for British secondary schools. The Teachers' Guide to the entire set of Themes is described in SE 015 440. Each Theme is a teachers' guide to a…

Marson, J. Eric

286

Learn more about the most abundant group of living things!  

E-print Network

://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1f/W http://hyenas.zoology.msu.edu/research/crocuta/interspecific-competition - - Competition + + Mutualism + - Predation or Parasitism Your Muddy Points 2011 Spring 58 replies · Intraspecific vs. Interspecific (3) · Self thinning (6) · Competitive Exclusion Principle (10) · Mathematical

Mitchell, Randall J.

287

The Classification of Living Things: Nature in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Use of a classification system in teaching biology is presented as a concept aiding students' understanding of the diversity of plants and animals. The principles of classification are summarized and six learning strategies are given to show relationships among groups. (CM)

Doyle, Charles

1982-01-01

288

Thermoresponsive Polyphosphazene-Based Molecular Brushes by Living Cationic Polymerization  

PubMed Central

Summary A series of polyphosphazenes with molecular brush type structures have been prepared with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities. The polymers show lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) between 18 and 90 °C, which can be easily tailored by choice of side-substituent to suit the required application. A temperature triggered self-assembly is observed to give stable colloidal aggregates with dimensions in the region of 100–300 nm. PMID:24926189

Wilfert, Sandra; Iturmendi, Aitziber; Henke, Helena; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

2014-01-01

289

A swimming robot actuated by living muscle tissue  

PubMed Central

Biomechatronics is the integration of biological components with artificial devices, in which the biological component confers a significant functional capability to the system, and the artificial component provides specific cellular and tissue interfaces that promote the maintenance and functional adaptation of the biological component. Based upon functional performance, muscle is potentially an excellent mechanical actuator, but the larger challenge of developing muscle-actuated, biomechatronic devices poses many scientific and engineering challenges. As a demonstratory proof of concept, we designed, built, and characterized a swimming robot actuated by two explanted frog semitendinosus muscles and controlled by an embedded microcontroller. Using open loop stimulation protocols, the robot performed basic swimming maneuvers such as starting, stopping, turning (turning radius ~400 mm) and straight-line swimming (max speed >1/3 body lengths/second). A broad spectrum antibiotic/antimycotic ringer solution surrounded the muscle actuators for long term maintenance, ex vivo. The robot swam for a total of 4 hours over a 42 hour lifespan (10% duty cycle) before its velocity degraded below 75% of its maximum. The development of functional biomechatronic prototypes with integrated musculoskeletal tissues is the first critical step toward the long term objective of controllable, adaptive and robust biomechatronic robots and prostheses. PMID:15679914

Herr, Hugh; Dennis, Robert G

2004-01-01

290

Parkinson's Disease: To Live or Die by Autophagy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal survival continues to be the subject of intensive research efforts as the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases rises. Amid a complex mélange of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to disease manifestation, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the underlying signaling mechanisms that regulate neuronal survival. A recent study by Yang et al. sheds new light on an intracellular quality-control system that regulates the constitutive abundance of a neuronal survival factor through chaperone-mediated autophagy and links the deregulation of this pathway to Parkinson’s disease. Although the primary function of autophagy in most cell types has commonly been thought to be an adaptive response to starvation, it has been proposed that proper functioning of this system is essential for neuronal survival and that its deregulation leads to neurodegeneration.

Isabella Irrcher (University of Ottawa; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine REV)

2009-04-07

291

Consent to forensic radiologic examinations by living crime victims.  

PubMed

The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate whether people approve radiological examinations specifically for the documentation of findings for the use in criminal proceedings. Forty two crime victims and 42 controls without a history of sustained violence were asked via telephone interview whether they would agree to forensic radiological examinations and if radiation exposure and the duration of the examination were factors influencing their consent. The consent to specifically forensic radiological examinations was high in both groups, however, higher in victims than in controls (85-96% compared to 64-77%, respectively, depending on the imaging modality). All of the victims and 93% of the controls consented to at least one of the proposed imaging modalities, i.e. X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Most of the interviewees did not consider the duration of the examination to be relevant to their consent (79% of the crime victims and 93% of the controls); however, the radiation exposure associated with the examination was relevant for 55% of the controls but only for 19% of the victims. These results show that there is a great consent to the application of radiological methods for forensic purposes. This is important for the growing field of forensic radiology as the approval of the examination by the victim is a legal prerequisite. PMID:23381578

Scheurer, Eva; Schoelzke, Stefanie

2014-03-01

292

The western mining camps as described by women who lived in them  

E-print Network

THE WESTERN MINING CAMPS AS DESCRIBED BY WOMEN WHO LIVED IN THEM A Thesis by Gail McBride Smith Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May..., 1968 History THE WESTERN MINING CAMPS AS DESCRIBED BY WOMEN WHO LIVED IN THEM A Thesis by Gail McBride Smith Approved as to style and content by: C airman o emmet ee e 'd o epartment e er ember May, 1968 PREFACE The gold rush period has...

Smith, Gail McBride

1968-01-01

293

Career counseling: 101+ things you can do with a degree in biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of this discussion is to assist biology students and the career counselors who work with them in identifying satisfying careers that build upon their interest and foundation in biology. The categories of career options include research, healthcare, teaching, science writing, administration/management, government, industry, and miscellaneous careers that do not fit into the other categories.

Kathleen M. Eyster (Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

2007-12-01

294

Design of an Improved Echo Canceller System Based on Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper focuses on a modified echo canceller system developed to satisfy the requirements of long network time-delay in the Internet of Things. The NLMS algorithm used in it is modified to reduce the computational complexity with the characteristics of fast convergence speed and low steady-state mean-square error (MSE). Hardware platform and software program have been designed to verify this algorithm. The simulation results by MATLAB and practical system are presented in support of the feasibility and validity of the proposed algorithm and echo canceller system.

Li, Yi; Lu, Yi; An, Douwa

295

Pursuing goals with others: group identification and motivation resulting from things done versus things left undone.  

PubMed

This article addresses what factors best motivate individuals to work toward shared goals. We propose that when individuals do not identify highly with a group, their contributions will mimic others': An emphasis on things done will increase their contributions toward achieving a goal, because such emphasis suggests the goal is worth pursuing. Conversely, we propose that when individuals identify highly with a group, their contributions will compensate for others': An emphasis on things left undone will increase their own contributions, because missing contributions suggest insufficient progress toward a goal they already consider worthwhile. Five studies lend support to these predictions by measuring contributions to goals centered on idea generation and helping victims of various global disasters (earthquake in Haiti, wildfires in Southern California, rioting in Kenya). PMID:21668127

Fishbach, Ayelet; Henderson, Marlone D; Koo, Minjung

2011-08-01

296

Activities of daily living and lesion position among multiple sclerosis patients by Bayes network?  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance imaging is a highly sensitive approach for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and T2-weighted images can reveal lesions in the cerebral white matter, gray matter, and spinal cord. However, the lesions have a poor correlation with measurable clinical disability. In this study, we performed a large-scale epidemiological survey of 238 patients with multiple sclerosis in eleven districts by network member hospitals in Shanghai, China within 1 year. The involved patients were scanned for position and size of lesions by MRI. Results showed that lesions in the cerebrum, spinal cord, or supratentorial position had an impact on the activities of daily living in multiple sclerosis patients, as assessed by the Bayes network. On the other hand, brainstem lesions were very unlikely to influence the activities of daily living, and were not associated with the position of lesion, patient's gender, and patient's living place. PMID:25206427

Pan, Zhifang; Lu, Hongtao; Cheng, Qi

2013-01-01

297

How Everyday Things Are Made  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how things are made - products like candy, cars, airplanes, or bottles - or if you've been interested in manufacturing processes, like forging, casting, or injection molding, then you've come to the right place. AIM has developed an introductory website for kids and adults showing how various items are made. It covers over 40 different products and manufacturing processes, and includes almost 4 hours of manufacturing video. It is targeted towards non-engineers and engineers alike. Think of it as your own private online factory tour, or a virtual factory tour, if you wish.A good introduction to the world of manufacturing.

298

Expectations about future use of long-term services and supports vary by current living arrangement.  

PubMed

Most Americans know little about options for long-term services and supports and underestimate their likely future needs for such assistance. Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, we examined expectations about future use of long-term services and supports among adults ages 40-65 and how these expectations varied by current living arrangement. We found differences by living arrangement in expectations about both future need for long-term services and supports and who would provide such care if needed. Respondents living with minor children were the least likely to expect to need long-term services and supports and to require paid care if the need arose. In contrast, respondents living alone were the most likely to expect that it was "very likely" that they would need long-term services and supports and to rely on paid care. Overall, we found a disconnect between expectations of use and likely future reality: 60 percent of respondents believed that they were unlikely to need long-term services and supports in the future, whereas the evidence suggests that nearly 70 percent of older adults will need them at some point. These findings both underscore the need for programs that encourage people to plan for long-term services and supports and indicate that information about living arrangements can be useful in developing and targeting such programs. PMID:25561642

Henning-Smith, Carrie E; Shippee, Tetyana P

2015-01-01

299

Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sometimes a single word changes everything. In his groundbreaking book "Choice Words", Peter Johnston demonstrated how the things teachers say (and don't say) have surprising consequences for the literate lives of students. Now, in "Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives", Peter shows how the words teachers choose affect the worlds students…

Johnston, Peter H.

2012-01-01

300

Increased Surface Fatigue Lives of Spur Gears by Application of a Coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hard coatings have potential for increasing gear surface fatigue lives. Experiments were conducted using gears both with and without a metal-containing, carbonbased coating. The gears were case-carburized AISI 9310 steel spur gears. Some gears were provided with the coating by magnetron sputtering. Lives were evaluated by accelerated life tests. For uncoated gears, all of fifteen tests resulted in fatigue failure before completing 275 million revolutions. For coated gears, eleven of the fourteen tests were suspended with no fatigue failure after 275 million revolutions. The improved life owing to the coating, approximately a six-fold increase, was a statistically significant result.

Krantz, Timothy L.; Cooper, Clark V.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Hansen, Bruce D.

2003-01-01

301

Living carbocationic polymerization of isobutylene and synthesis of ABA block copolymers by conventional laboratory techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Living polymerization of isobutylene (IB) and subsequent controlled synthesis of ABA block copolymers, such as poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) (PSt-PIB-PSt) and poly(p-methylstyrene-b-isobutylene-b-p-methylstyrene) (PpMeSt-PIB-PpMeSt), have been carried out by a simple and inexpensive conventional laboratory technique. The homo- and block copolymers obtained by using this technique have exhibited excellent molecular weight control and low polydispersity indexes. The living nature of IB polymerization has been

Hanne Everland; Jørgen Kops; Anders Nielsen; Béla Iván

1993-01-01

302

External beam analysis of living sycamore xylem infected by pathogenic fungi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interactions between the living xylem (sapwood) of sycamore ( Acer pseudoplatanus) and wood inhabiting fungi have been investigated using a number of techniques including conventional histochemical and biochemical methods, non-invasive NMR imaging and external beam micro PIXE analysis using a 200 ?m diameter beam of 3 MeV protons from the new external beam facility on the Oxford Scanning Proton Microprobe. The site of the fungal lesion on a living tree was exposed by a fresh cut immediately prior to analysis and both longitudinal and radial profiles through the infected regions were obtained in a point-by-point fashion. Profiles of several inorganic elements were obtained which correlated well with the observed discoloration due to the infection. The new external beamline at Oxford is described and results are presented. These are discussed in relation to the investigation of anti-microbial defence mechanisms in living trees.

Grime, G. W.; Pearce, R. B.

1995-09-01

303

Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate  

E-print Network

the national average in the expenditure categories of groceries, utilities, transportation, and health care and by Category Composite index Groceries Housing Utilities Transportation Health Care Misc. Morgantown, WV 105, transportation, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. #12;2 Cost of Living by Expenditure Category

Mohaghegh, Shahab

304

Economic Consequences Incurred by Living Kidney Donors: A Canadian Multi-Center Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Some living kidney donors incur economic consequences as a result of donation; however, these costs are poorly quantified. We developed a framework to comprehensively assess economic consequences from the donor perspective including out-of-pocket cost, lost wages and home productivity loss. We prospectively enrolled 100 living kidney donors from seven Canadian centers between 2004 and 2008 and collected and valued economic consequences ($CAD 2008) at 3 months and 1 year after donation. Almost all (96%) donors experienced economic consequences, with 94% reporting travel costs and 47% reporting lost pay. The average and median costs of lost pay were $2144 (SD 4167) and $0 (25th–75th percentile 0, 2794), respectively. For other expenses (travel, accommodation, medication and medical), mean and median costs were $1780 (SD 2504) and $821 (25th–75th percentile 242, 2271), respectively. From the donor perspective, mean cost was $3268 (SD 4704); one-third of donors incurred cost >$3000, and 15% >$8000. The majority of donors (83%) reported inability to perform usual household activities for an average duration of 33 days; 8% reported out-of-pocket costs for assistance with these activities. The economic impact of living kidney donation for some individuals is large. We advocate for programs to reimburse living donors for their legitimate costs. In a prospective costing study, the authors find that economic consequences incurred by living kidney donors are frequent and nontrivial, and a notable proportion of donors experience significant costs. PMID:24597854

Klarenbach, S; Gill, J S; Knoll, G; Caulfield, T; Boudville, N; Prasad, G V R; Karpinski, M; Storsley, L; Treleaven, D; Arnold, J; Cuerden, M; Jacobs, P; Garg, A X

2014-01-01

305

Orca Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The brainchild of orca biologist Dr. Paul Spong, this Nature Network Web site aims to "relay live sound and images of the orcas in the natural environment of Hanson Island," near Vancouver Island, Canada. Live sound and image feeds are available at 56K and 300K connections, and, by completing a simple registration, visitors will be alerted via email whenever orcas are near the cameras and mikes. Click on Highlights 2000 to see and hear past Web casts of orcas activity. This Web site links to others that relay live images and sounds from animals located around the world.

306

Writing social psychology: fictional things and unpopulated texts.  

PubMed

This paper presents the author's position on the question how to write social psychology. It reflects the author's long-term interest in rhetoric and his more recent concerns about the writing of social scientists. The author argues that social psychologists tend to produce unpopulated texts, writing about 'fictional things' rather than people. Social psychologists assume that their technical terms are more precise than ordinary language terms. The author contests this assumption. He suggests that when it comes to describing human actions, ordinary language on the whole tends to be more precise. The paper analyses why this should be the case, drawing on ideas from linguistics and Vaihinger's notion of fictions. The author presents examples to show how psychological writers, by using passives and nominals, can omit information about the agents of action and the nature of the actions that they are performing. Although their texts may appear impressively technical, they can, in fact, be highly imprecise. Moreover, social psychologists, by using this nominal style of writing, tend to write about processes as if they were things and then attribute actions to these things. In so doing, they create 'fictional things', which they treat as if they were real things. The author offers six recommendations for writing in simpler, clearer ways. PMID:21366609

Billig, Michael

2011-03-01

307

How Things Work: a Novel Approach for Teaching Physics to Non-Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How Things Work has been taught at the University of Virginia for the past 5 years as an introduction to the physics of everyday life. This course focuses on common objects and looks within them for the physics that makes them work. How Things Work is conceptual in character, requiring the students to think about the world around them and to generalize ideas discussed in class and in the text (Louis A. Bloomfield, How Things Work: the Physics of Everyday Life) (John Wiley, New York, 1997). to things they encounter in their lives. It has been extremely successful at UVA, attracting 500 students each semester and giving over 40% of the 9,000 students in the College of Arts and Sciences a one or two semester introduction to physics before they graduate.

Bloomfield, Louis

1996-11-01

308

How Things Work: a Novel Approach for Teaching Physics to Non-Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How Things Work has been taught at the University of Virginia for the past 5 years as an introduction to the physics of everyday life. This course focuses on common objects and looks within them for the physics that makes them work. How Things Work is conceptual in character, requiring the students to think about the world around them and to generalize ideas discussed in class and in the text (Louis A. Bloomfield, How Things Work: the Physics of Everyday Life) (John Wiley, New York, 1997). to things they encounter in their lives. It has been extremely successful at UVA, attracting 500 students each semester and giving over 40% of the 9,000 students in the College of Arts and Sciences a one or two semester introduction to physics before they graduate.

Bloomfield, Louis

1997-04-01

309

Sensing in the collaborative internet of things.  

PubMed

We are entering a new era of computing technology, the era of Internet of Things (IoT). An important element for this popularization is the large use of off-the-shelf sensors. Most of those sensors will be deployed by different owners, generally common users, creating what we call the Collaborative IoT. This collaborative IoT helps to increase considerably the amount and availability of collected data for different purposes, creating new interesting opportunities, but also several challenges. For example, it is very challenging to search for and select a desired sensor or a group of sensors when there is no description about the provided sensed data or when it is imprecise. Given that, in this work we characterize the properties of the sensed data in the Internet of Things, mainly the sensed data contributed by several sources, including sensors from common users. We conclude that, in order to safely use data available in the IoT, we need a filtering process to increase the data reliability. In this direction, we propose a new simple and powerful approach that helps to select reliable sensors. We tested our method for different types of sensed data, and the results reveal the effectiveness in the correct selection of sensor data. PMID:25808766

Borges Neto, João B; Silva, Thiago H; Assunção, Renato Martins; Mini, Raquel A F; Loureiro, Antonio A F

2015-01-01

310

Compartmental Genomics in Living Cells Revealed by Single-Cell Nanobiopsy  

PubMed Central

The ability to study the molecular biology of living single cells in heterogeneous cell populations is essential for next generation analysis of cellular circuitry and function. Here, we developed a single-cell nanobiopsy platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) for continuous sampling of intracellular content from individual cells. The nanobiopsy platform uses electrowetting within a nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular milieu. We demonstrate the subcellular resolution of the nanobiopsy platform by isolating small subpopulations of mitochondria from single living cells, and quantify mutant mitochondrial genomes in those single cells with high throughput sequencing technology. These findings may provide the foundation for dynamic subcellular genomic analysis. PMID:24279711

Actis, Paolo; Maalouf, Michelle; Kim, Hyunsung John; Lohith, Akshar; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R. Adam; Pourmand, Nader

2014-01-01

311

Live-cell imaging of alkyne-tagged small biomolecules by stimulated Raman scattering  

PubMed Central

Functional small biomolecules play indispensable roles inside cells. However, sensitive and specific visualization of these molecules in living systems has proven to be highly challenging. Herein, we report stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne tags as a general strategy for studying a broad spectrum of small biomolecules in live cells and animals. We demonstrate this technique by tracking alkyne-bearing drugs in mouse tissues, and visualizing de novo synthesis of DNA, RNA, proteomes, phospholipids and triglycerides, respectively, through metabolic incorporation of alkyne-tagged small precursors. PMID:24584195

Wei, Lu; Hu, Fanghao; Shen, Yihui; Chen, Zhixing; Yu, Yong; Lin, Chih-Chun; Wang, Meng C.; Min, Wei

2014-01-01

312

Prevalence and clinical characteristics of wheezing in children in the first year of life, living in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of wheezing in infants aged 12 to 15 months in the city of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso State, Midwest Brazil. METHODS: Parents and/or guardians of infants were interviewed and completed a written standardized questionnaire of the Estudio Internacional de Sibilancia en Lactantes (EISL) - phase 3 at primary healthcare clinics at the same day of children vaccination or at home, from August of 2009 to November of 2010. RESULTS: 1,060 parents and/or guardians completed the questionnaire, and 514 (48.5%) infants were male. Among the studied infants, 294 (27.7%) had at least one episode of wheezing during the first year of life, beggining at 5.8±3.0 months of age, with a predominance of male patients. The prevalence of occasional wheezing (<3 episodes of wheezing) was 15.0% and recurrent wheezing (?3 episodes) was 12.7%. Among the infants with recurrent wheezing, the use of inhaled ?2-agonist, oral corticosteroid, leukotriene receptor antagonist, as well as night symptoms, respiratory distress, and hospitalization due to severe episodes were significantly more frequent. Physician-diagnosed asthma was observed in 28 (9.5%) of the wheezing infants. Among the wheezing infants, 80 (27.7%) were diagnosed with pneumonia, of whom 33 (11.2%) required hospitalization; neverthless, no differences between occasional and recurrent wheezing infants were found. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of recurrent wheezing and physician-diagnosed asthma in infants were lower compared with those observed in other Brazilian studies. Recurrent wheezing had early onset and high morbity. PMID:25510994

Moraes, Lillian Sanchez Lacerda; Takano, Olga Akiko; Mallol, Javier; Solé, Dirceu

2014-01-01

313

Synthetic Ion Channel Activity Documented by Electrophysiological Methods in Living Cells  

E-print Network

into the membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells and significantly increase membrane conductance. The altered membrane permeability is reversible, and the cells under study remain vital during the experimentSynthetic Ion Channel Activity Documented by Electrophysiological Methods in Living Cells W

Huettner, James E.

314

Remembering the Soul of Our Work. Stories by the Staff of Options in Community Living.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The personal stories in this collection are by the staff of an agency which provides "supported living" services to adults with mental retardation and other disabilities. The stories were written to be read at monthly staff meetings when time is set aside to clarify and renew the organization's values. Introductory material offers suggestions for…

O'Brien, John, Ed.; O'Brien, Connie Lyle, Ed.

315

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6-LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ONE OF TWO 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOWS AT PHOTO RIGHT, AND OPEN DOORWAY TO BEDROOM NUMBER ONE (AND BEDROOM NUMBER TWO IN BACKGROUND) AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

316

Maintenance of living space by sweeper tentacles of Montastrea cavernosa , a caribbean reef coral  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reef-building coral Montastrea cavernosa Linnaeus possesses sweeper tentacles which have enlarged nematocyst batteries. Sweeper tentacles appear to be used in defense of the coral's living space and may successfully deter mesenterial filament attacks from the more aggressive coral M. annularis. M. cavernosa therefore possesses a specialized defensive strategy that has not been taken into account by present models describing

C. A. Richardson; P. Dustan; J. C. Lang

1979-01-01

317

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter  

E-print Network

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter Laurent CANER-labelled beech litter and 15 N analysis of soil fauna. 15 N- labelled beech litter was deposited on the topsoil stand at Sorø (Denmark) with moder humus. The fate of the tracer isotope was measured in litter and soil

318

Musical Meaning in the Lives of Those Affected by the Holocaust: Implications for Music Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study investigated the role of music in the lives of those affected by the Holocaust. Participants were identified through purposeful and snowball sampling techniques, and a total of five were selected based on their connection to the Holocaust. Participants included those incarcerated in camps and ghettos, those who escaped…

Cunningham, Deborah A.

2014-01-01

319

Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging and correlated  

E-print Network

Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging apparatus. This or- ganelle disassembles at the onset of mitosis and, after a sequence of poorly understood during mitosis remains unclear, partly due to limitations of molecular markers and the resolution

Tsien, Roger Y.

320

Mass spectrometry of atomic ions produced by in-trap decay of short-lived nuclides  

E-print Network

Mass spectrometry of atomic ions produced by in-trap decay of short-lived nuclides A Herlert1 demonstrated the feasibility of mass spectrometry of in-trap-decay product ions. This novel technique gives is required. Experiments at radioactive-beam facilities that employ Penning traps for mass spectrometry have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

321

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011 Americans.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 Compost Basics Why Compost? 1 Emissions avoidance from compost

Wolfe, Patrick J.

322

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 What is Compost? Compost is the product of a biological process

Wolfe, Patrick J.

323

PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION BY FREE-LIVING ORGANISMS: APPLICATIONS OF A SIGMOIDAL MODEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of contaminants by free-living organisms has traditionally been de- termined with permutations of the deterministic model: Ct = Ce(1 - e -kt). However, studies uti- lizing a variety of species and exposure scenarios now suggest that significant deviations may occur from this classic form. In many cases noted to date, these deviations have involved a sigmoidal pat- tern

I. Lehr Brisbin; Michael C. Newman; Susan G. McDowell; Eric L. Peters

1990-01-01

324

Research on Mobile Digital Health System Based on Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The application of the internet of things in the medical profession, the domestic and overseas research status of mobile digital\\u000a medical system, the existing problems and key technology were analyzed, in view of the medical industry application characteristics,\\u000a mobile digital medical system based on the internet of things was designed. This system mainly includes perception layer,\\u000a network layer and application

Jingzhao Li; Xueqin Wu; Hui Chen

325

Rehabilitation of living conditions in territories contaminated by the Chernobyl accident: the ETHOS project.  

PubMed

The ETHOS Project, supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (EC), was implemented in the mid-1990's with the support of the Belarus authorities as a pilot project to initiate a new approach for the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the Republic. This initiative followed a series of studies performed in the context of the EC Community of Independent States cooperation program to evaluate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident (1991-1995), which clearly brought to the fore that a salient characteristic of the situation in these territories was the progressive and general loss of control of the population on its daily life. Furthermore, due to the economic difficulties during the years following the breakdown of the USSR, the population was developing private production and, in the absence of know-how and adequate means to control the radiological quality of foodstuffs, the level of internal exposure was rising significantly. The aim of the project was primarily to involve directly the population wishing to stay in the territories in the day-to-day management of the radiological situation with the goal of improving their protection and their living conditions. It was based on clear ethical principles and implemented by an interdisciplinary team of European experts with specific skills in radiation protection, agronomy, social risk management, communication, and cooperation in complex situations, with the support of local authorities and professionals. In a first phase (1996-1999), the ETHOS Project was implemented in a village located in the Stolyn District in the southern part of Belarus. During this phase, a few tens of villagers were involved in a step-by-step evaluation of the local radiological situation to progressively regain control of their daily life. In a second phase (1999-2001), the ETHOS Project was extended to four other localities of the District with the objective to evaluate the feasibility of the application of the ETHOS approach by local professionals and authorities. The ETHOS experience has shown that the direct involvement of the population in the day-to-day management of the radiological situation was a necessary approach to complement the rehabilitation program implemented by public authorities in contaminated territories. It also demonstrated that to be effective and sustainable, this involvement must rely on the dissemination of a "practical radiological protection culture" within all segments of the population, and especially among professionals in charge of public health and education. This paper discusses the post-Chernobyl context in the early- and mid-1990's, which led Belarus authorities to look for new approaches to protect the population residing in the long-term contaminated territories of the Republic. It then describes the ETHOS methodology and its main results. It also summarizes the general conclusions that can be drawn from the ETHOS Project. PMID:18049229

Lochard, Jacques

2007-11-01

326

Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass  

E-print Network

Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass Hak Sung Lee1, * and Bohumil by different methods is capable of taking up more than 10% (11 mEq/g) of its dry weight in aluminum at pH 4.5. There are indications that the biomass hydroxyl groups were involved in sequestering the aluminum in the form

Volesky, Bohumil

327

Controllably moving individual living cell in an array by modulating signal phase difference based on dielectrophoresis.  

PubMed

This paper reports a novel dielectrophoresis (DEP) based method for manipulating individual living cells by modulating phase difference of electrical signals applied on DEP electrodes. A novel microchip with an array structure is also proposed, consisting of a plurality of quadrupole-electrode units patterned into array on a glass substrate with a pair of center electrodes locating at the center of each quadrupole-electrode unit. Living cells can be trapped and positioned at the center of each quadrupole-electrode unit by using negative DEP (nDEP) manipulation and form an array. The trapped cells in the array can be controllably moved from one position to another and even from one of quadrupole-electrode units to adjacent unit by changing the phase difference of the signals applied on the two pairs of opposite electrodes in each quadrupole-electrode unit. The microchip allows an efficient and flexible manipulation of individual living cells that can be applied to study single cells. The experiments are performed to verify that different types of cells (MCF-7 cell and HeLa cell) can be effectively distinguished between each other using the method without label and fluorometric measurements. An identification of individual living cell from dead cells is also well demonstrated. PMID:25638795

Guo, Xiaoliang; Zhu, Rong

2015-06-15

328

Physics of Life: A Model for Non-Newtonian Properties of Living Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This innovation proposes the reconciliation of the evolution of life with the second law of thermodynamics via the introduction of the First Principle for modeling behavior of living systems. The structure of the model is quantum-inspired: it acquires the topology of the Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced with the information potential. As a result, the model captures the most fundamental property of life: the progressive evolution; i.e. the ability to evolve from disorder to order without any external interference. The mathematical structure of the model can be obtained from the Newtonian equations of motion (representing the motor dynamics) coupled with the corresponding Liouville equation (representing the mental dynamics) via information forces. All these specific non-Newtonian properties equip the model with the levels of complexity that matches the complexity of life, and that makes the model applicable for description of behaviors of ecological, social, and economical systems. Rather than addressing the six aspects of life (organization, metabolism, growth, adaptation, response to stimuli, and reproduction), this work focuses only on biosignature ; i.e. the mechanical invariants of life, and in particular, the geometry and kinematics of behavior of living things. Living things obey the First Principles of Newtonian mechanics. One main objective of this model is to extend the First Principles of classical physics to include phenomenological behavior on living systems; to develop a new mathematical formalism within the framework of classical dynamics that would allow one to capture the specific properties of natural or artificial living systems such as formation of the collective mind based upon abstract images of the selves and non-selves; exploitation of this collective mind for communications and predictions of future expected characteristics of evolution; and for making decisions and implementing the corresponding corrections if the expected scenario is different from the originally planned one. This approach postulates that even a primitive living species possesses additional, non-Newtonian properties that are not included in the laws of Newtonian or statistical mechanics. These properties follow from a privileged ability of living systems to possess a self-image (a concept introduced in psychology) and to interact with it. The proposed mathematical system is based on the coupling of the classical dynamical system representing the motor dynamics with the corresponding Liouville equation describing the evolution of initial uncertainties in terms of the probability density and representing the mental dynamics. The coupling is implemented by the information-based supervising forces that can be associated with self-awareness. These forces fundamentally change the pattern of the probability evolution, and therefore, lead to a major departure of the behavior of living systems from the patterns of both Newtonian and statistical mechanics. This innovation is meant to capture the signature of life based only on observable behavior, not on any biochemistry. This will not prevent the use of this model for developing artificial living systems, as well as for studying some general properties of behavior of natural, living systems.

Zak, Michail

2010-01-01

329

Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction  

PubMed Central

Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

330

Rapid detection of live methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by using an integrated microfluidic system capable of ethidium monoazide pre-treatment and molecular diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium resistant to all existing penicillin and lactam-based antimicrobial drugs and, therefore, has become one of the most prevalent antibiotic-resistant pathogens found in hospitals. The multi-drug resistant characteristics of MRSA make it challenging to clinically treat infected patients. Therefore, early diagnosis of MRSA has become a public-health priority worldwide. Conventionally, cell-culture based methodology and microscopic identification are commonly used for MRSA detection. However, they are relatively time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, molecular diagnosis based on nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been widely investigated for the rapid detection of MRSA. However, genomic DNA of both live and dead pathogens can be distinguished by conventional PCR. These results thus could not provide sufficient confirmation of an active infection for clinicians. In this study, live MRSA was rapidly detected by using a new integrated microfluidic system. The microfluidic system has been demonstrated to have 100% specificity to detect live MRSA with S. aureus and other pathogens commonly found in hospitals. The experimental results showed that the limit of detection for live MRSA from biosamples was approximately 102 CFU/?l. In addition, the entire diagnostic protocol, from sample pre-treatment to fluorescence observation, can be automatically completed within 2.5?h. Consequently, this microfluidic system may be a powerful tool for the rapid molecular diagnosis of live MRSA. PMID:24019858

Liu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

2012-01-01

331

Searching in a Web-based Infrastructure for Smart Things  

E-print Network

: Web technologies for application-layer interoperability of smart things Thing + Internet connection3. Hierarchy on the left) Conclusions Application of REST patterns in the design of an Internet of Things. From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and Best Practices

332

A scheme of data management in the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things is a large network which integrates the current devices, such as RFID devices, sensors and other equipment and services. It extends the form of interaction between people to the interaction between people and things as well as things and things, and then, establishes a new ecological environment. In the Internet of Things, the heterogeneity of devices

Tongrang Fan; Yanzhao Chen

2010-01-01

333

The Librarian Who Loves "LibraryThing"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"LibraryThing" is a great way for library media specialists to keep track of the books they personally read. "LibraryThing" allows them to create a personal library, give their books tags, choose book covers, give star ratings, generate citations, and review books. Library media specialists can also connect to other readers and see their reviews.…

Sibley, Roberta

2008-01-01

334

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes test essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argumentation, students need to know certain things in order to write effectively. In 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know, Jeff Anderson focuses on developing the concepts and application of ten essential aspects of good writing--motion, models, focus,…

Anderson, Jeff

2011-01-01

335

Speaking Things: Latour and the Representation Question  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latour obviously doesn?t wish that things enter into democratic deliberations about the environment via the representations of scientists, at least in the way scientists have been acting politically throughout modernity. That leaves open the question what form the voice of things would take. Is he suggesting that someone else, other than scientists, serve as translators? More likely, he is suggesting

Bill Chaloupka

336

Imagining the Cognitive Life of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human interaction is complex. An embodied perspective on interaction shows that it is richly multimodal. The complexity of the interaction system allows for a surprising variety of emergent cognitive effects. This paper attempts to place the cognitive life of things in the context of rich multimodal interactions. Part I: The cognitive life of things is manifest in the ways people

Edwin Hutchins

337

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

1998-09-08

338

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc.

Lu, Wei-yang (Pleasanton, CA); Min, Shermann (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01

339

Putting Thought in Accordance with Things: The Demise of Animal-Based Analogies for Plant Functions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advances six practical suggestions in transpiration whereby teachers can support students in their struggle to put their thoughts, especially everyday mental models, in accordance with classroom experimental evidence. Discusses the wider implications for how to teach about living things and how to view the status of analogies in science generally.…

Barker, Miles

2002-01-01

340

Teacher's Resource Book. Small Things. Grade 5. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document introduces fifth-grade children to the microscopic world, to the instruments needed to make it accessible, and to the appearance and structure of cells in nonliving as well as living things. Aims of the unit include providing children with an instrument which extends their senses in a radical manner, and leading them in using this…

Anchorage School District, AK.

341

An Autonomic-oriented Architecture for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic tags, usually referred as RFIDs, sensors, wireless VoIP terminals are likely to create a technological and cultural revolution similar to the one initiated by the Internet technology in the early nineties. These very cheap components are manufactured by billions, and are going to be inserted in quite all our everyday objects. Internet of things is a paradigm dealing with

Guy Pujolle

2006-01-01

342

Academics 2000: First Things First. Evaluation Report, 1998-99.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This evaluation report profiles Academics 2000: First Things First, the Texas initiative under the Goals 2000 Educate America Act to raise the level of academic achievement of all Texas students by ensuring that each child achieves fourth-grade mastery of the foundation subjects by the end of fourth grade. The report states that, at the local…

Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Program Evaluation.

343

Stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV by healthcare providers, Southwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Stigma and discrimination against people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are obstacles in the way of effective responses to HIV. Understanding the extent of stigma / discrimination and the underlying causes is necessary for developing strategies to reduce them. This study was conducted to explore stigma and discrimination against PLHIV amongst healthcare providers in Jimma zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study, employing quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in 18 healthcare institutions of Jimma zone, during March 14 to April 14, 2011. A total of 255 healthcare providers responded to questionnaires asking about sociodemographic characteristics, HIV knowledge, perceived institutional support and HIV-related stigma and discrimination. Factor analysis was employed to create measurement scales for stigma and factor scores were used in one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), T-tests, Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression analyses. Qualitative data collected using key-informant interviews and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were employed to triangulate with the findings from the quantitative survey. Results Mean stigma scores (as the percentages of maximum scale scores) were: 66.4 for the extra precaution scale, 52.3 for the fear of work-related HIV transmission, 49.4 for the lack of feelings of safety, 39.0 for the value-driven stigma, 37.4 for unethical treatment of PLHIV, 34.4 for discomfort around PLHIV and 31.1 for unofficial disclosure. Testing and disclosing test results without consent, designating HIV clients and unnecessary referral to other healthcare institutions and refusal to treat clients were identified. Having in-depth HIV knowledge, the perception of institutional support, attending training on stigma and discrimination, educational level of degree or higher, high HIV case loads, the presence of ART service in the healthcare facility and claiming to be non-religious were negative predictors of stigma and discrimination as measured by the seven latent factors. Conclusions Higher levels of stigma and discrimination against PLHIV were associated with lack of in-depth knowledge on HIV and orientation about policies against stigma and discrimination. Hence, we recommend health managers to ensure institutional support through availing of clear policies and guidelines and the provision of appropriate training on the management of HIV/AIDS. PMID:22794201

2012-01-01

344

‘All those things together made me retire’: qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees  

PubMed Central

Background Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. Methods A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60–64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). Results For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement (‘push factors’), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement (‘pull factors’) included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. Conclusion To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and the abilities and wishes of the employee on the other hand. Alongside improvements in the work environment that enable and motivate employees to prolong their careers, a continuous dialogue between the employer and employee on the (future) person-job fit and tailored interventions might be helpful. PMID:23714371

2013-01-01

345

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2013-10-01

346

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2011-10-01

347

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2012-10-01

348

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2010-10-01

349

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2014-10-01

350

Fracture characteristics of uranium alloys by scanning electron microscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fracture characteristics of uranium alloys were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The fracture mode of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of uranium-7.5 weight percent niobium-2.5 weight percent zirconium (Mulberry) alloy, uranium--niobium alloys, and uranium--molybdenum alloys in aqueous chloride solutions is intergranular. The SCC fracture surface of the Mulberry alloy is characterized by very clean and smooth grain facets. The tensile-overload fracture

J. W. Koger; R. K. Jr. Bennett

1976-01-01

351

Personal resources supporting living at home as described by older home care clients.  

PubMed

This study describes the personal resources of older (> or = 75 years) home care clients in Finland and their perceptions of factors that enhance and constrain their ability to live independently at home. The data were collected by unstructured interviews with 21 older home care clients. Inductive content analysis were used to analyse the data. The resources of older people consisted of a sense of control over one's life and a determination to remain active. Factors enhancing older people's resources were their involvement in leisure activities and social networks, factors undermining their resources were conditions on living imposed by outsiders, declining health and loneliness. The results show that home care professionals do not yet have sufficient skills and abilities to identify and support older people's existing resources. As well as having access to necessary resources, it is also crucial that older people know how to use them. PMID:18715393

Eloranta, Sini; Routasalo, Pirkko; Arve, Seija

2008-08-01

352

Getting By on the Minimum: The Lives of Working-Class Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lives of working-class women were explored through interviews with 63 middle-aged women, most of whom were employed in working-class jobs and living working-class lives in Baltimore, Maryland. The following were among the areas covered in the interviews: the women's lives on and off the job; their job satisfaction; the reasons they work and…

Johnson, Jennifer

353

Self-Recognition in Live Videos by Young Children: Does Video Training Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overall aim of the experiment reported here was to establish whether self-recognition in live video can be facilitated when live video training is provided to children aged 2-2.5 years. While the majority of children failed the test of live self-recognition prior to video training, more than half exhibited live self-recognition post video…

Demir, Defne; Skouteris, Helen

2010-01-01

354

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things, an interactive website from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), introduces visitors to the art of Richard Tuttle, using video of Tuttle at work and commentary by the artist and SFMOMA curators, as well as images and sound. For example, one of the movies shows Tuttle working on one of his Wire Pieces, which are assembled from scratch each time they are installed in a gallery; Tuttle draws on the gallery wall, and traces the lines with florists' wire. The Web exhibition feature is strong on process, but may leave some visitors wishing to see more of Tuttle's finished art. For them, there is the 388-page illustrated catalogue, and "The Art of Richard Tuttle," on view at SFMOMA through October 16, 2005, featuring 300 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from the artist's 40-year career.

2005-01-01

355

finding god in all things  

E-print Network

Jesuits struggled to describe what they called "our way of proceed- ing." Their distinctive spirituality of the heart is to communi- cate with God and trust that the hand of God is at work fortifying and directing us creatures. From the womb, we live in relationships with others, growing up in cultural, social

Huang, Jianyu

356

Architectural Solutions for Mobile RFID Services for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile RFID services for Internet of Things can be created by using RFID as an enabling technology on mobile devices. Humans, devices and things are the content providers and users of these services. Mobile RFID services can be provided either on mobile devices as stand-alone services or combining with end- to-end systems. When different service solutions are considered, there are

Martin Peter Michael; Mohsen Darianian

2008-01-01

357

Connecting your Mobile Shopping Cart to the Internet-of-Things  

E-print Network

Connecting your Mobile Shopping Cart to the Internet-of-Things Nicolas Petitprez, Romain Rouvoy MACCHIATO as a user-centered plat- form leveraging online shopping. MACCHIATO implements the principles of the Internet-of-Things by adopting the REST architectural style and semantic web standards to navigate product

Boyer, Edmond

358

IOT Gateway: BridgingWireless Sensor Networks into Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of sensor, wireless mobile communication, embedded system and cloud computing, the technologies of Internet of Things have been widely used in logistics, Smart Meter, public security, intelligent building and so on. Because of its huge market prospects, Internet of Things has been paid close attention by several governments all over the world, which is regarded as the

Qian Zhu; Ruicong Wang; Qi Chen; Yan Liu; Weijun Qin

2010-01-01

359

Design and Make I look for ways to use evolution to design things. Robotics is the  

E-print Network

#12;Design and Make I look for ways to use evolution to design things. Robotics is the visible part produced by the best teams of human engineers. If it is done in nature, however, I know it is possible, and while you might be able to reprogram them to do different things, the actual physical body is fixed

Napp, Nils

360

Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET  

Microsoft Academic Search

D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to

Lars Farde; Hakan Hall; Erling Ehrin; Goran Sedvall

1986-01-01

361

Intraoperative measurement of the graft oxygenation state in living related liver transplantation by near infrared spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graft oxygenation plays an important role in successful liver transplantation. Intraoperative changes in the oxygenation state of the liver graft were measured by near infrared spectroscopy in 28 cases of living related liver transplantation. Oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in the liver (hepatic SO2) changed from 81.2%±1.5% (mean±SEM) before donation (in the donor) to 49.7%±4.2% after portal reflow, to 58.4%±5.0% after

Toshiyuki Kitai; Akira Tanaka; Atsuo Tokuka; Bunpei Sato; Shigeto Mori; Nobuharu Yanabu; Takuya Inomoto; Shinji Uemoto; Koichi Tanaka; Yoshio Yamaoka; Kazue Ozawa; Hitoshi Someda; Masazumi Fujimoto; Fuminori Moriyasu; Konomu Hirao

1995-01-01

362

Evolutionary costs of aggression revealed by testosterone manipulations in free-living male lizards  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the hypothesis that increased aggression results in decreased survivorship. We tested this hypothesis by increasing aggression of free-living male lizards Sceloporus jarrovi with testosterone implants and evaluating the effects on survivorship. A previous study showed that testosterone-implanted males were more aggressive than controls, suggesting a greater degree of success in male-male competition. Results of the present study show

C. A. Marler; M. C. Moore

1988-01-01

363

Connected objects and the Internet of things — A paradigm shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging and future network requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) or Connected Objects (CO) cannot be met by the networks and solutions we envisage today. The vision of IoT includes millions of objects that interact with the network using a plethora of applications. Some of these objects will require little attention and will generate little traffic, while on the

E. Zouganeli; I. E. Svinnset

2009-01-01

364

Culture is a good thing: A welfare-economic judgment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Culture comprises some of the best, most valuable things life has to offer. People involved in a cultural activity or interested in its products instinctively feel it to be so; but instinctive beliefs are not always easy to substantiate by logical reasoning. In the ease of cultural activities, however, a very simple argument establishes them as superior sources of satisfaction,

Tibor Scitovsky

1989-01-01

365

A survey on facilities for experimental internet of things research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The initial vision of the Internet of Things was of a world in which all physical objects are tagged and uniquely identified by RFID transponders. However, the concept has grown into multiple dimensions, encompassing sensor networks able to provide real-world intelligence and goal-oriented collaboration of distributed smart objects via local networks or global interconnections such as the Internet. Despite significant

Alexander Gluhak; Srdjan Krco; Michele Nati; Dennis Pfisterer; Nathalie Mitton; Tahiry Razafindralambo

2011-01-01

366

Scob Attack: A Sign of Bad Things to Come?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent Internet attack that exploited a powerful new assault technique has computer security officials worried that it could be a harbinger of worse things to come. The attack was based on a Trojan horse - a nonreplicating program that hides malicious code inside apparently harmless programming, data, or Web pages - dubbed JS.Scob.Trojan by antivirus experts. These servers hosted

Neal Leavitt

2004-01-01

367

Things I Should Have or Could Have Accomplished  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author wishes to divide this essay into two sections, one indicating things he might have added to a few earlier works, and a second indicating a project or two that he did not complete but would like to have done. First he discusses the incomplete projects. He begins by saying that he has done a lot of work on teacher organizations and has…

Urban, Wayne J.

2013-01-01

368

Innovative Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Innovative Lives Web Site is offered by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and the Smithsonian Institution. "Innovative Lives counters commonly held stereotypes about inventors by featuring speakers with diverse backgrounds," such as Dr. Patricia Bath, an African-American woman who invented the Laserphaco Probe for the treatment of cataracts and founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. Over thirty inventors are featured on the site, which gives excellent information about each, telling of their lives and what they have accomplished. Although it is intended for kids, the site will be of interest to anyone looking to learn about many of the most important and unknown contributors to the scientific world.

369

Hygienic evaluation of terraria inhabited by amphibians and reptiles: cryptosporidia, free-living amebas, salmonella.  

PubMed

Amphibians and reptiles are popular pet animals in about 90.000 Austrian households despite their frequently debated capacity to transmit diseases associated with animal keeping. We studied the epidemiological significance of the triangle animal keeper, exotic pet animal, and feed mice by investigating the frequency of three intestinal infestations, caused by cryptosporidia, opportunistic free-living amebas and salmonella, in amphibians and reptiles living in a public vivarium. In addition to recording the first known occurrence of Naegleria australiensis in Austria, and of this species and of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in the feces of reptiles worldwide, we also detected a strong association between Salmonella subspecies I and captive reptiles and between S. sub-species III and free-living lizards. Thus, animal keeper, the exotic animals kept, and the feed mice may constitute an epidemiological pool for the interchange of these infectious agents. This new epidemiological situation may cause an increase of some opportunistic and exotic diseases such as reptile-borne salmonellosis. Despite the perceived benefits of keeping exotic animals in a household, the general public and especially those who have an immunodeficiency must be made aware of the danger of infectious diseases possibly being spread by their pets. PMID:15508784

Hassl, Andreas; Benyr, Gerald

2003-01-01

370

Baseline Socio-demographic characteristics and self-reported diet and physical activity shifts among recent immigrants participating in the randomized controlled lifestyle intervention: "Live Well".  

PubMed

The goal of this paper is to describe the baseline characteristics of Live Well (intervention to prevent weight gain in recent immigrant mother-child dyads from Brazil, Haiti, and Latin America) participants, and to explore self-reported changes in diet and physical activity post-immigration. Baseline data from 383 mothers were used for this study. Dyads attended a measurement day where they completed self-administered surveys collecting information about socio-demographics, diet, physical activity, other psychosocial variables, and height and weight. Haitian mothers' socio-demographic profile differed significantly from that of Brazilians' and Latinas': they have been in the US for a shorter period of time, have higher rates of unemployment, are less likely to be married, more likely to have ?3 children, more likely to be obese, and have immigrated for family or other reasons. In multivariate models, self-reported changes in diet and physical activity since migrating to the US were significantly associated with BMI with non-linear relationships identified. Future research is needed to understand how diet and physical activity change while acculturating to the US and explore the adoption of both healthy and unhealthy dietary changes. PMID:23334749

Tovar, Alison; Boulos, Rebecca; Sliwa, Sarah; Must, Aviva; Gute, David M; Metayer, Nesly; Hyatt, Raymond R; Chui, Kenneth; Pirie, Alex; Luongo, Christina Kamis; Economos, Christina

2014-06-01

371

Selective Labeling of Living Cells by a Photo-Triggered Click Reaction  

PubMed Central

Photo-triggering of the metal-free azide to acetylene cycloaddition reaction was achieved by masking the triple bond of dibenzocyclooctynes as cyclopropenone. Such masked cyclooctynes do not react with azides in the dark. Irradiation of cyclopropenones results in the efficient (?355 = 0.33) and clean regeneration of the corresponding dibenzocyclooctynes, which then undergo facile catalyst-free cycloadditions with azides to give corresponding triazoles under ambient conditions. In-situ light activation of a cyclopropenone linked to biotin made it possible to label living cells expressing glycoproteins containing N-azidoacetyl-sialic acid. The cyclopropenone-based photo-triggered click chemistry offers exciting opportunities to label living organisms in a temporally and spatially controlled manner and may facilitate the preparation of microarrays. PMID:19860481

Poloukhtine, Andrei A.; Mbua, Ngalle Eric; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan; Popik, Vladimir V.

2009-01-01

372

Positive Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Positive Lives project is "a unique international project that photographs and documents the social and emotional impact of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, illuminating positive human responses to this world crisis." Sponsored by the Levi Strauss Foundation and the Terrence Higgins Trust, the project has sponsored photographers from across the world to photograph various persons living with HIV/AIDS in a host of very different settings. While the project has sponsored a number of various photographic exhibits, this online collection represents a small portion of the work thus far. Using an interactive map of the world, users can click on different geographic areas to view photographic exhibits documenting the lived experience of this condition. In South Africa, visitors can learn about the work and the residents of Nazareth House, which is a children's home in Cape Town taking care of abandoned children with HIV or AIDS. In Edinburgh, visitors are taken through the lives of young drug abusers at the Muirhouse Estate who are also living with either HIV or AIDS. In the words of photographer John Sturrock, "In Muirhouse I witnessed the emotional struggle of people enduring a tragedy..." However, hope is present in these photographic essays as well, as they represent a broad range of emotions.

373

Estimating live fuel status by drought indices: an approach for assessing local impact of climate change on fire danger  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mediterranean shrubs are an important component of both Mediterranean vegetation communities and understorey vegetation. They also constitute the surface fuels primarily responsible for the ignition and the spread of wildland fires in Mediterranean forests. Although fire spread and behaviour are dependent on several factors, the water content of live fuel plays an important role in determining fire occurrence and spread, especially in the Mediterranean shrubland, where live fuel is often the main component of the available fuel which catches fire. According to projections on future climate, an increase in risk of summer droughts is likely to take place in Southern Europe. More prolonged drought seasons induced by climatic changes are likely to influence general flammability characteristics of fuel, affecting load distribution in vegetation strata, floristic composition, and live and dead fuel ratio. In addition, variations in precipitation and mean temperature could directly affect fuel water status, and consequently flammability, and length of critical periods of high ignition danger for Mediterranean ecosystems. The main aim of this work was to propose a methodology for evaluating possible impacts of future climate change on moisture dynamic and length of fire danger period at local scale. Specific objectives were: i) evaluating performances of meteorological drought indices in describing seasonal pattern of live fuel moisture content (LFMC), and ii) simulating the potential impacts of future climate changes on the duration of fire danger period. Measurements of LFMC seasonal pattern of three Mediterranean shrub species were performed in North Western Sardinia (Italy) for 8 years. Seasonal patterns of LFMC were compared with the Drought Code of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index and the Keetch-Byram Drought Index. Analysis of frequency distribution and cumulative distribution curves were carried out in order to evaluate performance of codes and to identify threshold values of indices useful to determine the end of the potential fire season due to fuel status. A weather generator linked to climate change scenarios derived from 17 available General Circulation Models (GCMs) was used to produce synthetic weather series, representing present and future climates, for four selected sites located in North Sardinia, Italy. Finally, impacts of future climate change on fire season length at local scale were simulated. Results confirmed that the projected climate scenarios over the Mediterranean area will determine an overall increase of the fire season length.

Pellizzaro, Grazia; Dubrovsky, Martin; Bortolu, Sara; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Bachisio; Masia, Pierpaolo; Duce, Pierpaolo

2014-05-01

374

Cell cycle dependent TN-C promoter activity determined by live cell imaging.  

PubMed

The extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C plays a critical role in development, wound healing, and cancer progression, but how it is controlled and how it exerts its physiological responses remain unclear. By quantifying the behavior of live cells with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, the dynamic regulation of TN-C promoter activity is examined. We employ an NIH 3T3 cell line stably transfected with the TN-C promoter ligated to the gene sequence for destabilized green fluorescent protein (GFP). Fully automated image analysis routines, validated by comparison with data derived from manual segmentation and tracking of single cells, are used to quantify changes in the cellular GFP in hundreds of individual cells throughout their cell cycle during live cell imaging experiments lasting 62 h. We find that individual cells vary substantially in their expression patterns over the cell cycle, but that on average TN-C promoter activity increases during the last 40% of the cell cycle. We also find that the increase in promoter activity is proportional to the activity earlier in the cell cycle. This work illustrates the application of live cell microscopy and automated image analysis of a promoter-driven GFP reporter cell line to identify subtle gene regulatory mechanisms that are difficult to uncover using population averaged measurements. PMID:22045641

Halter, Michael; Sisan, Daniel R; Chalfoun, Joe; Stottrup, Benjamin L; Cardone, Antonio; Dima, Alden A; Tona, Alessandro; Plant, Anne L; Elliott, John T

2011-03-01

375

Living with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease: not letting the disease conquer life.  

PubMed

This article reports the findings of what it means to live with intestinal failure caused by Crohn disease and how it influences daily life. Ten patients, 7 with an ostomy and 7 on home parenteral nutrition followed up at an outpatient clinic for patients with intestinal failure, were interviewed using a qualitative, phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The analysis of the transcribed data is described thematically and resulted in 3 main themes; (a) struggling to not be controlled by the disease, (b) walking on a thin thread, and (c) being seen as a person, not just as a patient. These themes led to the comprehensive understanding that living with intestinal failure was interpreted as the criticality of maintaining control over one's life and body while maintaining autonomy and not letting the disease conquer life. Life entails a constant struggle with much planning to live as normally as possible and get the most out of life. It was of great importance to be seen as a person and not just as a disease, affirm that life as it is has meaning, there is a state of suffering related to the disease, there are existential issues, and suffering is related to care. PMID:25636009

Carlsson, Eva; Persson, Eva

2015-01-01

376

The Active Living by Design national program: community initiatives and lessons learned.  

PubMed

Public health advocates have increasingly highlighted the importance of implementing comprehensive physical activity interventions that use an ecologic framework. Such a framework can broadly address physical activity barriers, such as the lack of opportunities, social support, policies, built environments, and community awareness. The Active Living by Design (ALbD) was a community grant program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), which was established to help 25 communities create environments that support active living. Each funded site established a multidisciplinary community partnership and implemented the 5P strategies: preparation, promotions, programs, policy, and physical projects. The community partnerships worked within neighborhoods, schools, worksites, and other organizations to increase physical and social supports for physical activity. Ten community examples illustrate the 5Ps. Throughout the 5-year grant, the ALbD national program office provided community partnerships with group and individualized learning opportunities. Technical assistance and peer-to-peer learning was facilitated by ALbD project officers, who also coached each community partnership via site visits, regular phone calls, and electronic communications. The ALbD grant program provided valuable lessons for communities, technical assistance organizations, and funders. Community partnerships experienced success in a variety of settings and their collaborative approaches encouraged multiple organizations, including funders, to participate in improving conditions for active living. Strong local leadership was a key to success and community partnerships benefited considerably from peer-to-peer learning. The 5P model, while challenging to implement comprehensively, proved to be a useful model for community change. PMID:19944930

Bors, Philip; Dessauer, Mark; Bell, Rich; Wilkerson, Risa; Lee, Joanne; Strunk, Sarah L

2009-12-01

377

Recruitment characteristics of nerve fascicles stimulated by a multigroove electrode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recruitment characteristics of fascicle-selective nerve stimulation by a multigroove electrode have been investigated both theoretically and in acute experiments. A three-dimensional (3-D) volume conductor model of fascicles in a multigroove device and a model of myelinated nerve fiber stimulation were used to calculate threshold stimuli of nerve fibers in these fascicles. After their exposition, fascicles from rat sciatic nerve

Paul Koole; Jan Holsheimer; Johannes J. Struijk; Anton J. Verloop

1997-01-01

378

Imaging complex protein metabolism in live organisms by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with isotope labeling.  

PubMed

Protein metabolism, consisting of both synthesis and degradation, is highly complex, playing an indispensable regulatory role throughout physiological and pathological processes. Over recent decades, extensive efforts, using approaches such as autoradiography, mass spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy, have been devoted to the study of protein metabolism. However, noninvasive and global visualization of protein metabolism has proven to be highly challenging, especially in live systems. Recently, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic labeling of deuterated amino acids (D-AAs) was demonstrated for use in imaging newly synthesized proteins in cultured cell lines. Herein, we significantly generalize this notion to develop a comprehensive labeling and imaging platform for live visualization of complex protein metabolism, including synthesis, degradation, and pulse-chase analysis of two temporally defined populations. First, the deuterium labeling efficiency was optimized, allowing time-lapse imaging of protein synthesis dynamics within individual live cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. Second, by tracking the methyl group (CH3) distribution attributed to pre-existing proteins, this platform also enables us to map protein degradation inside live cells. Third, using two subsets of structurally and spectroscopically distinct D-AAs, we achieved two-color pulse-chase imaging, as demonstrated by observing aggregate formation of mutant hungtingtin proteins. Finally, going beyond simple cell lines, we demonstrated the imaging ability of protein synthesis in brain tissues, zebrafish, and mice in vivo. Hence, the presented labeling and imaging platform would be a valuable tool to study complex protein metabolism with high sensitivity, resolution, and biocompatibility for a broad spectrum of systems ranging from cells to model animals and possibly to humans. PMID:25560305

Wei, Lu; Shen, Yihui; Xu, Fang; Hu, Fanghao; Harrington, Jamie K; Targoff, Kimara L; Min, Wei

2015-03-20

379

Leaf Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor fall activity, learners find out what living in or under a layer of leaves is like. Learners will discover that animals that live in leaf litter use different senses to find prey, avoid predators, and to navigate through the litter. Learners role play predator and prey—the "prey" hides in a large pile of leaves, and the "predator" tries to "strike" by reaching straight into the leaf pile to grab the "prey." Learners also consider what body adaptations help organisms that spend part of their life under the leaves.

Lawrence Hall of Science

1981-01-01

380

Comparison of sit-to-stand strategies used by older adults and people living with dementia.  

PubMed

Physiotherapists routinely retrain sit-to-stand (STS) during rehabilitation using strategies such as sliding forward, moving the feet backwards, leaning forward, and pushing through the armrests. It is unknown if people living with dementia use the same strategies as other older adults and if a table positioned in front alters their performance. Twenty participants 65 years or older (10 with Alzheimer's disease or mixed dementia; 10 without dementia) performed six STS trials from a standard chair with armrests, including three trials without and three with a table in front. Trials were digitally recorded and the starting position and type and order of strategies used were rated by a blinded assessor. Starting position was similar between the groups. The most common strategy was leaning forward (119 out of 120 trials) while the least used was sliding forward (four out of 120 trials). People living with dementia used significantly more strategies (p=0.037), pushed through the armrests more than older adults (p=0.038) and moved feet backwards more frequently in trials without the table in front (p=0.010). Presence of the table had no significant effect on STS performance of older adults (p>0.317). Our results demonstrated that people living with dementia had a similar starting position but used more strategies to stand up, pushing through their arms more than older adults without dementia and moved their feet backwards more often when no table was in front. People living with dementia should be provided with chairs with armrests and space to move feet backwards. PMID:25623858

Dolecka, Urszula E; Ownsworth, Tamara; Kuys, Suzanne S

2015-01-01

381

Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Eibl, Robert H.

382

Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

2013-01-01

383

Resilience processes demonstrated by young gay and bisexual men living with HIV: implications for intervention.  

PubMed

Given the increasing numbers of young gay/bisexual men (YGBM) diagnosed with HIV, it is important to understand the resilience processes enacted by this population in order to develop interventions that support their healthy development. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 YGBM (ages 17 to 24; 57% African American, 22% Latino) living with HIV from four geographically diverse clinics in the United States. Resilience processes clustered into four primary thematic areas: (1) engaging in health-promoting cognitive processes; (2) enacting healthy behavioral practices; (3) enlisting social support from others; and (4) empowering other young gay/bisexual men. These data suggest that YGBM living with HIV demonstrate resilience across multiple dimensions, including intrapersonal-level resilience related to individual cognitions and behaviors, as well as interpersonal-level resilience related to seeking support and providing support to others. Implications for the development of culturally-appropriate and strengths-based secondary prevention and other psychosocial interventions for YGBM living with HIV are discussed. PMID:25329778

Harper, Gary W; Bruce, Douglas; Hosek, Sybil G; Fernandez, M Isabel; Rood, Brian A

2014-12-01

384

Deinterlacing based on modularization by local frequency characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new deinterlacing algorithm based on modularization by the local frequency characteristics of images. The input patterns of an image are divided into two regions-the edge region and the smooth region. Each region is assigned to one neural network. The local frequency characteristics of patterns are similar within each region, resulting in more accurate training for each network. The regional neural networks are composed of two modules. One is for the low-frequency components of the input pattern, and the other is for the high-frequency components. Both modules are combined in the output. Therefore, each module compensates for the drawbacks of the other. In simulation, the proposed algorithm showed better performances in both still images and video sequences than other algorithms.

Woo, Dong H.; Eom, Il Kyu; Kim, Yoo S.

2006-02-01

385

A living shoreline utilizes a management practice that addresses erosion by providing for long-term protection, restoration or  

E-print Network

A living shoreline utilizes a management practice that addresses erosion by providing for long, river or creek below the low tide line; in Virginia this area is generally mud or sand, and may have that can affect a living shoreline design. In the Legislative Perspectives section we review some current

386

CentreforMicrobialChemicalBiology great things  

E-print Network

CentreforMicrobialChemicalBiology Where great things begin #12;2 Locatedonthesecondfloorofthe pressing medical and biological questions with advanced chemical technology, leading to new drugs, a clearer understanding of fundamental biology, the development of new analytical techniques and technology

Thompson, Michael

387

Making Things Right: Tales of Redemption.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the theme of redemption and examines characters who try to make things right in literature and film. Reviews six books and two films and suggests creative activities for middle school students that tie in with the works cited. (LRW)

Zingher, Gary

2001-01-01

388

Identities in the Future Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are two problem areas of the current Internet to be solved in Future Internet scenarios—security and putting the user\\u000a back in control despite the move to the Internet of things. With this in mind, we address problems associated with the diversifying\\u000a of the Internet towards an Internet of things, and with increased ways to be reachable, whether the user

Amardeo C. Sarma; João Girão

2009-01-01

389

Future internet: The Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, the main communication form on the Internet is human-human. But it is foreseeable that in a near soon that any object will have a unique way of identification and can be addressed so that every object can be connected. The Internet will become to the Internet of Things. The communicate forms will expand from human-human to human-human, human-thing and

Lu Tan; Neng Wang

2010-01-01

390

Some characteristics of waves broken by a longshore bar  

E-print Network

-historic werc obtaineR before and after the bar. Pro. r. the in. , ight inio t!lc rave citarac. . icristics gain d frow these rccordlllgs! i!los- citaractcristlcs whic!! I!. c wave posses ed be!'ore reaching the bar vere comps rrd?ith the characteristics of...'nc period of thc gener- ator was coni. ro] led by regulating 4hc angular speed of the i'lywheel wiih the elccLric motor whose si!eed could. be adjusted by the . et. ? ting oi' a potentiometer. A w7rc-mesh wave fi] Ler was ins'-al]cd near the gencrai...

McNair, Ernest Clark

1970-01-01

391

Production of respirable vesicles containing live Legionella pneumophila cells by two Acanthamoeba spp.  

PubMed

Two Acanthamoeba species, fed at three temperatures, expelled vesicles containing living Legionella pneumophila cells. Vesicles ranged from 2.1 to 6.4 microns in diameter and theoretically could contain several hundred bacteria. Viable L. pneumophila cells were observed within vesicles which had been exposed to two cooling tower biocides for 24 h. Clusters of bacteria in vesicles were not dispersed by freeze-thawing and sonication. Such vesicles may be agents for the transmission of legionellosis associated with cooling towers, and the risk may be underestimated by plate count methods. PMID:9435080

Berk, S G; Ting, R S; Turner, G W; Ashburn, R J

1998-01-01

392

Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

2013-03-01

393

Determination of the PSI/PSII ratio in living plant cells at room temperature by spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Leaf cells of living plants exhibit strong fluorescence from chloroplasts, the reaction centers of photosynthesis. Mutations in the photosystems change their structure and can, thus, be monitored by recording the fluorescence spectra of the emitted chlorophyll light. These measurements have, up to now, mostly been carried out at low temperatures (77 K), as these conditions enable the differentiation between the fluorescence of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). In contrast, at room temperature, energy transfer processes between the various photosynthetic complexes result in very similar fluorescence emissions, which mainly consist of fluorescence photons emitted by PSII hindering a discrimination based on spectral ROIs (regions of interest). However, by statistical analysis of high resolution fluorescence spectra recorded at room temperature, it is possible to draw conclusions about the relative PSI/PSII ratio. Here, the possibility of determining the relative PSI/PSII ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated in living maize plants. Bundle-sheath chloroplasts of mature maize plants have a special morphologic characteristic; they are agranal, or exhibit only rudimentary grana, respectively. These chloroplasts are depleted in PSII activity and it could be shown that PSII is progressively reduced during leaf differentiation. A direct comparison of PSII activity in isolated chloroplasts is nearly impossible, since the activity of PSII in both mesophyll- and bundle-sheath chloroplasts decays with time after isolation and it takes significantly longer to isolate bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Considering this fact the measurement of PSI/PSII ratios with the 77K method, which includes taking fluorescence spectra from a diluted suspension of isolated chloroplasts at 77K, is questionable. These spectra are then used to analyze the distribution of energy between PSI and PSII. After rapid cooling to 77K secondary biochemical influences, which attenuate the fluorescence emanated from PSI, are frozen out. Due to their characteristic morphology, maize chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells are an appropriate system for demonstrating the applicability of our in vivo method which, unlike the common 77K method, does not require the isolation of chloroplasts. In mesophyll chloroplasts of higher land plants, the thylakoids have a heterogenic morphology of appressed and non-appressed membrane domains, called the grana and the stroma lamellae. PSII is enriched in the grana, whereas PSI is enriched in the stroma lamellae. Changes in chloroplast membrane structure and composition, according to changes in the PSI/ PSII ratio, can be triggered by light quality and carbon source deficiency. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of statistical analysis of fluorescence spectra to detect changes in the PSI/PSII ratio resulting from structure changes in the thylakoid membrane.

Elgass, Kirstin; Zell, Martina; Maurino, Veronica G.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

2011-02-01

394

Generation of heterogeneous memory T cells by live attenuated tularemia vaccine in humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is very limited evidence concerning the phenotype, function, and homing characteristics of memory T (TM) cells elicited by vaccination against intracellular bacteria in humans. Here we studied TM subsets elicited by exposure to Francisella tularensis in humans as a model of immunity to intracellular bacteria. To this end, TM cells were evaluated in two groups: (1) subjects immunized with

Rosangela Salerno-Gonçalves; Matthew J. Hepburn; Sina Bavari; Marcelo B. Sztein

2009-01-01

395

Living Heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living Heritage is a website that celebrates New Zealand heritage through the help of the schools and students of New Zealand. The "About Living Heritage" link states that the website is "an online bilingual initiative that enables New Zealand schools to develop and publish an online resource, based on a heritage treasure in their community." Visitors can also read about the five or so groups these stories "Benefit", including New Zealand and the World, in the About Living Heritage link. The "Schools' Stories" link takes visitors to 26 schools' websites produced since 2008, and an archive of 79 schools' websites produced before 2008. By browsing through the stories, visitors can learn about Paddy, the much-loved wandering Airedale who lived on Island Bay in Wellington in the 1930s. The story of Mitiaro High School in the Cook Islands describes how they learned how to build a canoe called a paiere. Finally, a group of Year 1 and 2 students at Russley School write about their discovery that a tree near their school is protected by the city council.

396

Orca Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A great combination of art and science, the Orca Live Web site provides live Webcam viewing of Orca whales off Hanson Island, in the Johnstone Strait between Vancouver Island and British Columbia. Founded by Dr. Paul Spong, the Orca Lab on Hanson Island and underwater video cameras and microphones at Cracroft Point, monitor the whales' voices and movements 24 hours a day, covering an approximately 20 km. (12.5 mi) area around Hanson Island. If there is not too much happening on the live camera, the site offers archived video highlights from 2000 and 2002. To orient yourself, the Visit Hanson Island section allows you to zoom in and find the location of Hanson Island on Earth (an html version for those with slower connection is also provided). Also at the site, subscribe to a newsletter announcing the best times for live viewing, chat with other orca watchers, or simply open a window for peaceful underwater viewing, accompanied by the sounds of water, birds, and whales.

Spong, Anna

397

Gender Differences in Drinking and Alcohol Expectancies as Modified by Gender Stereotypes and Living Arrangements.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' drinking, gender stereotypes, and alcohol expectancies were examined in relation to three living arrangements: living either at home, on-campus, or independently. The results highlight the importance of gender stereotypes and living arrangements as influences on drinking behavior and sex differences within the student population. (EMK)

Ricciardelli, Lina A.; Williams, Robert J.

1997-01-01

398

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... regulatory framework. Typical Services Offered in Assisted Living Communities: Assisted living communities provide more personal care services ... with dignity and respect. Finding a Senior Living Community That's Right for You! Before you start your ...

399

Internet of things technology applied in medical information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of things technology used in medical information is adopt in this paper. Firstly the structure feature of internet of things technology is researched .Then analyzing the development of EPC System Network, especially Internet of things technology applied in medical information. Therefore the remote consultation System based on internet of things is adopted ,it is helpful to solve the area

Yan-Wei Wang; Hui-Li Yu; Ya Li

2011-01-01

400

Living Longer, Healthier Lives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contrary to popular images that portray a bleak future, important life tasks and accomplishments characterize the lives of\\u000a older women. Midlife women are more likely than not to work full-time, and some will earn the highest salaries of their careers.\\u000a A high percentage of women in public service or elected office are in their 50s and 60s. Bernadine Healy was

Susan D. Lonborg; Cheryl B. Travis

401

The phenomena of auditory hallucination as described by Indonesian people living with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

This study was a phenomenological inquiry of the experience of auditory hallucinations as described by 13 Indonesian people diagnosed with schizophrenia. The interviewees included 6 men and 7 women and they were aged between 19 and 56 years. Four themes emerged from this study: feeling more like a robot than a human being; voices of contradiction--a point of confusion; tattered relationships and family disarray; and normalizing the presence of voices as part of everyday life. The findings of this study have the potential to contribute to new understandings of how people live with and manage auditory hallucinations and so enhance client-centered nursing care. PMID:24238012

Suryani, Suryani; Welch, Anthony; Cox, Leonie

2013-12-01

402

Imaging of green fluorescent protein in live plant by scanning near-field optical microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An auxin/IAA induced in vivo green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a living plant Arabidopsis root has been studied by a scanning near-field microscope in transmission mode. The promising near-field images of the inducible GFPs at sub- surface of a plant cell suggest that they may locate proximity to the cell wall, i.e. both sides of and in the cytoplasm membrane. The clear and faint fluorescent spots with 1-3 micrometers showed that the proteins localized nearer and farther to the cell wall, respectively. All GFP molecules gathered together in a cell, and no individual GFP was observed in the experiment.

Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Tao; Sun, Jialin; Guo, Jihua; Zhao, Jun

2002-04-01

403

Imaging topographic growth by long-lived postseismic afterslip at Sefidabeh, east Iran  

E-print Network

.1002/2013TC003462. Received 9 OCT 2013 Accepted 17 FEB 2014 Accepted article online 25 FEB 2014 Published online 26 MAR 2014 Imaging topographic growth by long-lived postseismic afterslip at Sefidabeh, east Iran Alex Copley1 and Kirsty Reynolds1 1COMET... in a zone 9.5 km long and 20 m wide and located on the crest of a topographic ridge at Sefidabeh that runs parallel to the earthquake nodal plane strikes. The bedding planes that slipped were within isoclinally folded and vertically dipping Upper...

Copley, Alex; Reynolds, Kirsty

2014-02-25

404

Regulation of RNA polymerase II activation by histone acetylation in single living cells.  

PubMed

In eukaryotic cells, post-translational histone modifications have an important role in gene regulation. Starting with early work on histone acetylation, a variety of residue-specific modifications have now been linked to RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) activity, but it remains unclear if these markers are active regulators of transcription or just passive byproducts. This is because studies have traditionally relied on fixed cell populations, meaning temporal resolution is limited to minutes at best, and correlated factors may not actually be present in the same cell at the same time. Complementary approaches are therefore needed to probe the dynamic interplay of histone modifications and RNAP2 with higher temporal resolution in single living cells. Here we address this problem by developing a system to track residue-specific histone modifications and RNAP2 phosphorylation in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. This increases temporal resolution to the tens-of-seconds range. Our single-cell analysis reveals histone H3 lysine-27 acetylation at a gene locus can alter downstream transcription kinetics by as much as 50%, affecting two temporally separate events. First acetylation enhances the search kinetics of transcriptional activators, and later the acetylation accelerates the transition of RNAP2 from initiation to elongation. Signatures of the latter can be found genome-wide using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing. We argue that this regulation leads to a robust and potentially tunable transcriptional response. PMID:25252976

Stasevich, Timothy J; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Sato, Yuko; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tokunaga, Makio; Nagase, Takahiro; Nozaki, Naohito; McNally, James G; Kimura, Hiroshi

2014-12-11

405

The lived experience of adults bereaved by suicide: a phenomenological study.  

PubMed

In recent years, a plethora of research studies have attempted to delineate the grief experiences associated with suicide from those of other sudden traumatic deaths. The emerging consensus suggests that bereavement through suicide is more similar than different to other bereavements, but is characterized by the reactions of shame, stigma, and self-blame. The causal nature of these reactions has yet to be fully understood. This study reports on the lived experiences of eight adults bereaved by suicides, which were obtained through in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes dominated the relatives' grief experiences. First, the early months were checkered by attempts to "control the impact of the death." The second theme was the overwhelming need to "make sense of the death" and this was coupled with a third theme, a marked "social uneasiness." Finally, participants had an eventual realization of a sense of "purposefulness" in their lives following the suicide death. Overall, the findings suggest that suicide bereavement is molded and shaped by the bereaved individual's life experiences with the deceased and their perceptions following social interactions after the event. The findings from this study suggest that "meaning making" may be an important variable in furthering our understanding of the nuances in suicide bereavement. PMID:17555030

Begley, Mary; Quayle, Ethel

2007-01-01

406

Human and Drosophila Cryptochromes Are Light Activated by Flavin Photoreduction in Living Cells  

PubMed Central

Cryptochromes are a class of flavoprotein blue-light signaling receptors found in plants, animals, and humans that control plant development and the entrainment of circadian rhythms. In plant cryptochromes, light activation is proposed to result from photoreduction of a protein-bound flavin chromophore through intramolecular electron transfer. However, although similar in structure to plant cryptochromes, the light-response mechanism of animal cryptochromes remains entirely unknown. To complicate matters further, there is currently a debate on whether mammalian cryptochromes respond to light at all or are instead activated by non–light-dependent mechanisms. To resolve these questions, we have expressed both human and Drosophila cryptochrome proteins to high levels in living Sf21 insect cells using a baculovirus-derived expression system. Intact cells are irradiated with blue light, and the resulting cryptochrome photoconversion is monitored by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that light induces a change in the redox state of flavin bound to the receptor in both human and Drosophila cryptochromes. Photoreduction from oxidized flavin and subsequent accumulation of a semiquinone intermediate signaling state occurs by a conserved mechanism that has been previously identified for plant cryptochromes. These results provide the first evidence of how animal-type cryptochromes are activated by light in living cells. Furthermore, human cryptochrome is also shown to undergo this light response. Therefore, human cryptochromes in exposed peripheral and/or visual tissues may have novel light-sensing roles that remain to be elucidated. PMID:18597555

Hoang, Nathalie; Schleicher, Erik; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Picot, Marie; Wu, William; Berndt, Albrecht; Wolf, Eva; Bittl, Robert; Ahmad, Margaret

2008-01-01

407

Photoporation of Biomolecules into Single Cells in Living Vertebrate Embryos Induced by a Femtosecond Laser Amplifier  

PubMed Central

Introduction of biomolecules into cells in living animals is one of the most important techniques in molecular and developmental biology research, and has potentially broad biomedical implications. Here we report that biomolecules can be introduced into single cells in living vertebrate embryos by photoporation using a femtosecond laser amplifier with a high pulse energy and a low repetition rate. First, we confirmed the efficiency of this photoporation technique by introducing dextran, morpholino oligonucleotides, or DNA plasmids into targeted single cells of zebrafish, chick, shark, and mouse embryos. Second, we demonstrated that femtosecond laser irradiation efficiently delivered DNA plasmids into single neurons of chick embryos. Finally, we successfully manipulated the fate of single neurons in zebrafish embryos by delivering mRNA. Our observations suggest that photoporation using a femtosecond laser with a high pulse energy and low repetition rate offers a novel way to manipulate the function(s) of individual cells in a wide range of vertebrate embryos by introduction of selected biomolecules. PMID:22110717

Ochi, Haruki; Iino, Takanori; Hiraoka, Akihiro

2011-01-01

408

Mechanisms governing the visco-elastic responses of living cells assessed by foam and tensegrity models.  

PubMed

The visco-elastic properties of living cells, measured to date by various authors, vary considerably, depending on the experimental methods and/or on the theoretical models used. In the present study, two mechanisms thought to be involved in cellular visco-elastic responses were analysed, based on the idea that the cytoskeleton plays a fundamental role in cellular mechanical responses. For this purpose, the predictions of an open unit-cell model and a 30-element visco-elastic tensegrity model were tested, taking into consideration similar properties of the constitutive F-actin. The quantitative predictions of the time constant and viscosity modulus obtained by both models were compared with previously published experimental data obtained from living cells. The small viscosity modulus values (10(0)-10(3) Pa x s) predicted by the tensegrity model may reflect the combined contributions of the spatially rearranged constitutive filaments and the internal tension to the overall cytoskeleton response to external loading. In contrast, the high viscosity modulus values (10(3)-10(5) Pa x s) predicted by the unit-cell model may rather reflect the mechanical response of the cytoskeleton to the bending of the constitutive filaments and/or to the deformation of internal components. The present results suggest the existence of a close link between the overall visco-elastic response of micromanipulated cells and the underlying architecture. PMID:14686600

Cañadas, P; Laurent, V M; Chabrand, P; Isabey, D; Wendling-Mansuy, S

2003-11-01

409

Adsorption characteristics of ammonium ion by zeolite 13X.  

PubMed

With synthetic wastewater, lab-scale batch experiments and column experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption characteristics of ammonium ion by zeolite 13X which is a hydrothermally synthetic byproduct accompanied with preparation of potassium carbonate from insoluble potash ores. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms for ammonium ion uptake and the Langmuir model agrees very well with experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters including changes in the standard free energy (DeltaG(0)), enthalpy (DeltaH(0)) and entropy (DeltaS(0)) were also calculated. The results show that the exchange process of ammonium ion by zeolite 13X is spontaneous and exothermic. The pseudo second-order kinetic model was found to provide excellent kinetic data fitting (R(2)>0.999). The effects of relevant dynamic parameters, such as influent flow rate, adsorbent bed height and initial ammonium ion concentration on the adsorption of ammonium ion were examined, respectively. The Thomas model was applied to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of column useful for process design and was found suitable for describing the adsorption process of the dynamic behavior of the zeolite 13X column. The total adsorbed quantities, equilibrium uptakes and total removal percents of ammonium ion related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained at different conditions. PMID:18359556

Zheng, Hong; Han, Lijie; Ma, Hongwen; Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Donghong; Liang, Shuping

2008-10-30

410

Characteristics of microwave plasma induced by lasers and sparks.  

PubMed

Characteristics of the plasma light source of microwave (MW) plus laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) or spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) were studied. The plasma was initially generated by laser- or spark-induced breakdown as a plasma seed. A plasma volume was then grown and sustained by MWs in air. This MW plasma had a long lifetime, large volume, strong emission intensity, and high stability with time. These characteristics are suitable for applications in the molecular analysis of gases such as OH or N(2). Because the plasma properties did not depend on laser or spark plasma seeds, the resulting plasma was easily controllable by the input power and duration of the MWs. Therefore, a significant improvement was achieved in the spectral intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. For example, the peak intensity of the Pb spectra of LIBS increased 15 times, and that of SIBS increased 880 times without increases in their background noise. A MW-enhanced plasma light source could be used to make the total system smaller and cheaper than a conventional LIBS system, which would be useful for real-time and in situ analysis of gas molecules in, for example, food processing, medical applications, chemical exposure, and gas turbine or automobile air-to-fuel ratio and exhaust gas measurement. PMID:22410918

Ikeda, Yuji; Tsuruoka, Ryoji

2012-03-01

411

Investigating the Role of F-Actin in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assembly by Live-Cell Microscopy  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles assemble at the plasma membrane, which is lined by a dense network of filamentous actin (F-actin). Large amounts of actin have been detected in HIV-1 virions, proposed to be incorporated by interactions with the nucleocapsid domain of the viral polyprotein Gag. Previous studies addressing the role of F-actin in HIV-1 particle formation using F-actin-interfering drugs did not yield consistent results. Filamentous structures pointing toward nascent HIV-1 budding sites, detected by cryo-electron tomography and atomic force microscopy, prompted us to revisit the role of F-actin in HIV-1 assembly by live-cell microscopy. HeLa cells coexpressing HIV-1 carrying fluorescently labeled Gag and a labeled F-actin-binding peptide were imaged by live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIR-FM). Computational analysis of image series did not reveal characteristic patterns of F-actin in the vicinity of viral budding sites. Furthermore, no transient recruitment of F-actin during bud formation was detected by monitoring fluorescence intensity changes at nascent HIV-1 assembly sites. The chosen approach allowed us to measure the effect of F-actin-interfering drugs on the assembly of individual virions in parallel with monitoring changes in the F-actin network of the respective cell. Treatment of cells with latrunculin did not affect the efficiency and dynamics of Gag assembly under conditions resulting in the disruption of F-actin filaments. Normal assembly rates were also observed upon transient stabilization of F-actin by short-term treatment with jasplakinolide. Taken together, these findings indicate that actin filament dynamics are dispensable for HIV-1 Gag assembly at the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 particles assemble at the plasma membrane of virus-producing cells. This membrane is lined by a dense network of actin filaments that might either present a physical obstacle to the formation of virus particles or generate force promoting the assembly process. Drug-mediated interference with the actin cytoskeleton showed different results for the formation of retroviral particles in different studies, likely due to general effects on the cell upon prolonged drug treatment. Here, we characterized the effect of actin-interfering compounds on the HIV-1 assembly process by direct observation of virus formation in live cells, which allowed us to measure assembly rate constants directly upon drug addition. Virus assembly proceeded with normal rates when actin filaments were either disrupted or stabilized. Taken together with the absence of characteristic actin filament patterns at viral budding sites in our analyses, this indicates that the actin network is dispensable for HIV-1 assembly. PMID:24789789

Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Koch, Peter; Weichsel, Julian; Godinez, William J.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Rohr, Karl; Lamb, Don C.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

2014-01-01

412

Live-Cell Superresolution Imaging by Pulsed STED Two-Photon Excitation Microscopy  

PubMed Central

Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) allows fluorescence imaging in thick biological samples where absorption and scattering typically degrade resolution and signal collection of one-photon imaging approaches. The spatial resolution of conventional 2PLSM is limited by diffraction, and the near-infrared wavelengths used for excitation in 2PLSM preclude the accurate imaging of many small subcellular compartments of neurons. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is a superresolution imaging modality that overcomes the resolution limit imposed by diffraction and allows fluorescence imaging of nanoscale features. Here, we describe the design and operation of a superresolution two-photon microscope using pulsed excitation and STED lasers. We examine the depth dependence of STED imaging in acute tissue slices and find enhancement of 2P resolution ranging from approximately fivefold at 20 ?m to approximately twofold at 90-?m deep. The depth dependence of resolution is found to be consistent with the depth dependence of depletion efficiency, suggesting resolution is limited by STED laser propagation through turbid tissue. Finally, we achieve live imaging of dendritic spines with 60-nm resolution and demonstrate that our technique allows accurate quantification of neuronal morphology up to 30-?m deep in living brain tissue. PMID:23442955

Takasaki, Kevin T.; Ding, Jun B.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

2013-01-01

413

Biosorption of pentachlorophenol by Anthracophyllum discolor in the form of live fungal pellets.  

PubMed

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is an extremely dangerous pollutant for every ecosystem. In this study we have detected how PCP concentration and pH levels can influence PCP adsorption by Anthracophyllum discolor in the form of live fungal pellets. PCP adsorption was evaluated after 24 hours in KCl 0.1 M electrolyte solution with initial PCP concentrations of 5 and 10 mg L (-1) and with pH values between 4 and 9 (at intervals of 0.5). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify functional groups of fungal biomass that can interact with PCP. The amount of PCP that was adsorbed by A. discolor was >80% at pH values between 5 and 5.5, whatever the concentration tested. PCP adsorption significantly decreased in liquid medium of pH > 6.0. FTIR results showed that amides, alkanes, carboxylates, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups may be important to the PCP adsorption for pellets of A. discolor. Live fungal pellets of A. discolor may be used as a natural biosorbent for liquid solutions contaminated by PCP. PMID:25154034

Bosso, Luciano; Lacatena, Federica; Cristinzio, Gennaro; Cea, Mara; Diez, Maria Cristina; Rubilar, Olga

2015-01-25

414

Defining the Subcellular Interface of Nanoparticles by Live-Cell Imaging  

PubMed Central

Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes. PMID:23637951

Hemmerich, Peter H.; von Mikecz, Anna H.

2013-01-01

415

Gaelic Lives!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Characterizes the situation regarding the Gaelic language in Great Britain today, and sketches, by means of examples, some characteristic differences between Gaelic and English, pointing out also certain peculiarities in the field of area studies. (IFS/WGA)

Broderick, George

1980-01-01

416

Olig1 and ID4 interactions in living cells visualized by bimolecular fluorescence complementation technique.  

PubMed

Olig1, a member of class B basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH), plays key roles in early oligodendrocyte specification. Inhibitors of DNA binding (Id) is another sub-class of HLH proteins, act as dominant-negative regulators of bHLH proteins, which can form heterodimers with class A or B bHLH proteins, but lack the critical basic DNA binding domain. Id4 was recently found to interact with olig1 and inhibit oligodendrocyte differentiation. However, there still no direct evidence to reveal the spatial and temporal interaction of olig1 and ID4 in living cells. In this study, we performed bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis to further characterize the distinct subcellular localization of olig1, ID4 and their dimer in living SW1116 cells. To examine the subcellular localization of olig1 and ID4 by themselves, the olig1-EGFP or ID4-DsRed2 fusion proteins were also expressed in SW1116 cells, respectively. As predicted, the olig1-EGFP fusion proteins were located in the nucleus, and ID4-DsRed2 fusion proteins were located in the cytoplasm. When olig1-EGFP and ID4-DsRed2 fusion proteins were co-expressed, the green and red signals were co-located in the cytoplasm. Using BiFC, the strong BiFC signals could be detected in pBiFC-olig1VN173 and pBiFC-ID4VC155 co-transfected cells and the fluorescence signal was located in the cytoplasm. These results collectively confirmed that olig1 and ID4 could interact and form dimer in living cells, and ID4 could block the transport of olig1 from cytoplasm to nucleus. PMID:21132377

Guo, Shu-Jun; Hu, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Bao-Ming; Shen, Lin; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Lü, He-Zuo

2011-10-01

417

Create the Internet of Your Things The Internet of Things (IoT) is here today, and it begins  

E-print Network

Create the Internet of Your Things The Internet of Things (IoT) is here today, and it begins you create the Internet of Your Things, beginning with what matters most to your business. Using Microsoft Azure Internet of Things services, your business can: Increase efficiency. Quickly track device

Chaudhuri, Surajit

418

"How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things away  

E-print Network

1 "How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things Away Over the Internet? When the Internet Makes It Easier to Give Things Away", in NA - Advances of Management, France [ to cite ]: Valérie Guillard and Céline Del Bucchia (2012) ,"How About Giving My Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Challenges Experienced by Rural Women in India Living with AIDS and Implications for the Delivery of HIV/AIDS Care  

PubMed Central

Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women’s adherence to anti-retroviral therapy. Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a Primary Health Center near Chennai, India and with nurses, physicians and Accredited Social Health Activists (Ashas), lay health care workers. The most prevalent barriers expressed by the women were sickness-related, psychological, financial issues with childcare, and distance and/or transportation to the site. Women living with AIDS reviewed Ashas favorably. PMID:21409663

Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K.; William, Ravi Raj; Heravian, Anisa; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Greengold, Barbara; Ekstrand, Maria; Rao, Pantangi Venkata Rama

2012-01-01

420

Challenges experienced by rural women in India living with AIDS and implications for the delivery of HIV/AIDS care.  

PubMed

Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and they investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women's adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a primary health center (PHC) near Chennai, India, and with nurses, physicians, and Accredited Social Health Activists (Ashas), who are lay health care workers. The most prevalent barriers expressed by the women were sickness-related, psychological, financial issues with childcare, and distance, or transportation to the site. Women living with AIDS reviewed Ashas favorably. PMID:21409663

Nyamathi, Adeline M; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K; William, Ravi Raj; Heravian, Anisa; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Greengold, Barbara; Ekstrand, Maria; Rao, Pantangi Venkata Rama

2011-04-01

421

Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method  

SciTech Connect

The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

Halsall, M.J. (U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Dorchester (United Kingdom))

1993-01-01

422

Freezing of living cells  

SciTech Connect

It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

Mazur, P.

1985-01-01

423

Engineering Multifunctional Living Paints: Thin, Convectively-Assembled Biocomposite Coatings of Live Cells and Colloidal Latex Particles Deposited by Continuous Convective-Sedimentation Assembly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced composite materials could be revolutionized by the development of methods to incorporate living cells into functional materials and devices. This could be accomplished by continuously and rapidly depositing thin ordered arrays of adhesive colloidal latex particles and live cells that maintain stability and preserve microbial reactivity. Convective assembly is one method of rapidly assembling colloidal particles into thin (<10 microm thick), ordered films with engineered compositions, thicknesses, and particle packing that offer several advantages over thicker randomly ordered composites, including enhanced cell stability and increased reactivity through minimized diffusion resistance to nutrients and reduced light scattering. This method can be used to precisely deposit live bacteria, cyanobacteria, yeast, and algae into biocomposite coatings, forming reactive biosensors, photoabsorbers, or advanced biocatalysts. This dissertation developed new continuous deposition and coating characterization methods for fabricating and characterizing <10 microm thick colloid coatings---monodispersed latex particle or cell suspensions, bimodal blends of latex particles or live cells and microspheres, and trimodal formulations of biomodal latex and live cells on substrates such as aluminum foil, glass, porous Kraft paper, polyester, and polypropylene. Continuous convective-sedimentation assembly (CSA) is introduced to enable fabrication of larger surface area and long coatings by constantly feeding coating suspension to the meniscus, thus expanding the utility of convective assembly to deposit monolayer or very thin films or multi-layer coatings composed of thin layers on a large scale. Results show thin, tunable coatings can be fabricated from diverse coating suspensions and critical coating parameters that control thickness and structure. Particle size ratio and charge influence deposition, convective mixing or demixing and relative particle locations. Substrate wettability and suspension composition influence coating microstructure by controlling suspension delivery and spreading across the substrate. Microbes behave like colloidal particles during CSA, allowing for deposition of very thin stable biocomposite coatings of latex-live cell blends. CSA of particle-cell blends result in open-packed structures (15-45% mean void space), instead of tightly packed coatings attainable with single component systems, confirming the existence of significant polymer particle-cell interactions and formation of particle aggregates that disrupt coating microstructure during deposition. Tunable process parameters, such as particle concentration, fluid sonication, and fluid density, influence coating homogeneity when the meniscus is continuously supplied. Fluid density modification and fluid sonication affect particle sedimentation and distribution in the coating growth front whereas the suspended particle concentration strongly affects coating thickness, but has almost no effect on void space. Changing the suspension delivery mode (topside versus underside CCSA) yields disparate meniscus volumes and uneven particle delivery to the drying front, which enables control of the coating microstructure by varying the total number of particles available for deposition. The judicious combination of all these parameters will enable deposition of uniform, thin, latex-cell monolayers over areas on the order of tens of square centimeters or larger. To demonstrate the utility of biocomposite coatings, this dissertation investigated photoreactive coatings (artificial leaves) from suspensions of latex particles and nitrogen-limited Rps. palustris CGA009 or sulfur-limited C. reinhardtii CC-124. These coatings demonstrated stable, sustained (>90 hours) photohydrogen production under anoxygenic conditions. Nutrient reduction slows cell division, minimizing coating outgrowth, and promotes photohydrogen generation, improving coating reactivity. Scanning electron microscopy of microstructure revealed how coating reactivity can be controlled by the size

Jenkins, Jessica Shawn

424

When is one thing equal to some other thing? Barry Mazur  

E-print Network

When is one thing equal to some other thing? Barry Mazur June 12, 2007 In memory of Saunders Mac? Are we to think of them as equivalence 1 #12;classes of integers, where the equivalence relation the scaffolding of the presentation, to say when two of these super-objects--possibly presented to us in wildly

Mazur, Barry

425

Detection of live Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells by PMA-qPCR.  

PubMed

A unique open reading frame (ORF) Z3276 was identified as a specific genetic marker for E. coli O157:H7. A qPCR assay was developed for detection of E. coli O157:H7 by targeting ORF Z3276. With this assay, we can detect as low as a few copies of the genome of DNA of E. coli O157:H7. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were confirmed by intensive validation tests with a large number of E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 369) and non-O157 strains (n = 112). Furthermore, we have combined propidium monoazide (PMA) procedure with the newly developed qPCR protocol for selective detection of live cells from dead cells. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited in contrast to virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated live cells. Additionally, the protocol has been modified and adapted to a 96-well plate format for an easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. This method is expected to have an impact on accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental source. PMID:24513664

Li, Baoguang; Hu, Zonglin; Elkins, Christopher A

2014-01-01

426

Phase imaging by atomic force microscopy: analysis of living homoiothermic vertebrate cells.  

PubMed Central

Atomic force microscope-based phase imaging in air is capable of elucidating variations in material properties such as adhesion, friction, and viscoelasticity. However, the interpretation of phase images of specimens in a fluid environment requires clarification. In this report, we systematically analyzed atomic force microscope-derived phase images of mica, glass, and collagen under the same conditions as used for living cells at various tapping forces; the resulting data provide critical information for the interpretation of phase images of living cells. The peripheral regions of COS-1 cells consistently show a more negative phase shift than the glass substrate in phase images at set-point amplitude: free amplitude (Asp/A0) = 0.6-0.8. In addition, at all Asp/A0 values suitable for phase imaging, tapping frequency appears to be high enough to ensure that phase shifts are governed primarily by stiffness. Consequently, phase imaging is capable of high resolution studies of the cellular surface by detecting localized variations in stiffness. We demonstrate that phase imaging of a bifurcating fiber in COS-1 cell cytoplasm is readily capable of a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. PMID:10354454

Nagao, E; Dvorak, J A

1999-01-01

427

Estimating solar radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton from satellite ocean-color data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Primary production, PP, or the quantity of organic matter synthesized by phytoplankton per unit of surface and time, depends on the photo-synthetically available radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton, APAR. Computing APAR requires knowledge of the absorption coefficient of live phytoplankton and the total absorption coefficient, quantities that are difficult to retrieve accurately from satellite ocean-color data. In the proposed approach, APAR is estimated directly from a linear combination of marine reflectance in the PAR spectral range. Feasibility is demonstrated theoretically from simulations using a marine reflectance model, and experimentally using data collected at 19 biooptical stations during the February-March 2011 R/V Melville oceanographic cruise in the Southern Atlantic and Southeastern Pacific. Improvements in APAR accuracy are quantified in comparisons with estimates obtained from absorption coefficients or chlorophyll concentration determined from marine reflectance via standard satellite algorithms. The linear combination of marine reflectance is fairly robust to atmospheric correction errors. Due to the linear nature of the algorithm, their impact may be further reduced when using space- or time-averaged reflectance. The methodology is applied to actual MODIS imagery over the Southern Atlantic, and variability in the resulting APAR field is analyzed. The study suggests that determining APAR directly from marine reflectance has the potential to improve PP estimates from space.

Frouin, Robert J.; Ruddorff, Natalia M.; Kampel, Milton

2014-11-01

428

The Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils as Affected by Surface Roughness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect on airfoil characteristics of surface roughness of varying degrees and types at different locations on an airfoil was investigated at high values of the Reynolds number in a variable density wind tunnel. Tests were made on a number of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) 0012 airfoil models on which the nature of the surface was varied from a rough to a very smooth finish. The effect on the airfoil characteristics of varying the location of a rough area in the region of the leading edge was also investigated. Airfoils with surfaces simulating lap joints were also tested. Measurable adverse effects were found to be caused by small irregularities in airfoil surfaces which might ordinarily be overlooked. The flow is sensitive to small irregularities of approximately 0.0002c in depth near the leading edge. The tests made on the surfaces simulating lap joints indicated that such surfaces cause small adverse effects. Additional data from earlier tests of another symmetrical airfoil are also included to indicate the variation of the maximum lift coefficient with the Reynolds number for an airfoil with a polished surface and with a very rough one.

HOCKER RAY W

1933-01-01

429

Science Oxford Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first things visitors will see when visiting the Science Oxford Live website are a few shots from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit that will soon be at the brick and mortar location of Science Oxford Live. It's hard to decide which is cuter: the hippo, the monkey, or the giraffe's tail. Visitors will certainly want to check out the video podcasts available through iTunes, and even may even subscribe to the podcasts to receive the latest episodes. These webcasts, found under the Watch Us tab, are recordings of live events that took place at Science Oxford Live. They cover topics such as Parkinson's disease, the sleep versus wake balance, the science and history of chocolate, the curse of consciousness, and how "doctors and other health professionals sometimes do more harm than good to patients, despite acting with the best of intentions." The Discovery Zone is a place for kids which is best experienced in person, but online it still has valuable lessons to teach, and it's worth a look.

2012-02-10

430

Protection from SARS coronavirus conferred by live measles vaccine expressing the spike glycoprotein.  

PubMed

The recent identification of a novel human coronavirus responsible of a SARS-like illness in the Middle-East a decade after the SARS pandemic, demonstrates that reemergence of a SARS-like coronavirus from an animal reservoir remains a credible threat. Because SARS is contracted by aerosolized contamination of the respiratory tract, a vaccine inducing mucosal long-term protection would be an asset to control new epidemics. To this aim, we generated live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine (MV) candidates expressing either the membrane-anchored SARS-CoV spike (S) protein or its secreted soluble ectodomain (Ssol). In mice susceptible to measles virus, recombinant MV expressing the anchored full-length S induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies and fully protected immunized animals from intranasal infectious challenge with SARS-CoV. As compared to immunization with adjuvanted recombinant Ssol protein, recombinant MV induced stronger and Th1-biased responses, a hallmark of live attenuated viruses and a highly desirable feature for an antiviral vaccine. PMID:24606680

Escriou, Nicolas; Callendret, Benoît; Lorin, Valérie; Combredet, Chantal; Marianneau, Philippe; Février, Michèle; Tangy, Frédéric

2014-03-01

431

Presynaptic structure of Aplysia single live neuron by atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscope.  

PubMed

The structural and functional plasticity of Aplysia mechanosensory presynaptic neurons has been studied in relation with the mechanism underlying learning and memory. Long-term facilitation (LTF), which is a well-known cellular model for long-term memory in Aplysia, is accompanied by new synaptic structural growth or change. We developed a combined atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (AFM-CLSM) system integrated with a MATLAB routine for image processing to concurrently obtain high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) outer-surface morphological images and 3D interior fluorescence images. With our combined AFM-CLSM system, volumetric changes in the presynaptic structures (varicosities) of Aplysia live sensory-motor neuron cocultures were observed. The spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle molecules in the preexisting varicosities was monitored together with a volumetric change in the varicosities. Our combined AFM-CLSM system is successfully adapted for measuring learning-related structural changes and the movement of synaptic molecules in the single live neuron through interaction force and fluorescence imaging. PMID:23594081

Park, Aee-Young; Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Seonghoon

2013-05-01

432

Kidney Function in Living Donors Undergoing Nephrectomy by Sevoflurane or Desflurane Anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Although there is no clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity with the volatile anesthetics currently used in general anesthesia, a better agent should be needed in terms of preserving postoperative renal function in living kidney donors who have only single remaining kidney. The purpose of the current retrospective, single-center study was to evaluate and compare renal function of living kidney donors after nephrectomy under either sevoflurane or desflurane anesthesia. Materials and Methods From January 2006 through December 2011, a total of 228 donors undergoing video assisted minilaparotomy surgery nephrectomy for kidney donation were retrospectively enrolled in the current study. The donors were categorized into a sevoflurane group or desflurane group based on the type of volatile anesthetic used. We collected laboratory data from the patients preoperatively, immediately after the operation, on the first postoperative day and on the third postoperative day. We also compared renal function of the kidney donors after donor nephrectomy by comparing creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results The decrease in renal function after surgery in both groups was the most prominent on the first postoperative day. There were no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative changes of creatinine or eGFR. Conclusion Sevoflurane and desflurane can be used safely as volatile anesthetics in donors undergoing nephrectomy. PMID:23918580

Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Ham, Sung-Yeon

2013-01-01

433

High-resolution nonlinear optical imaging of live cells by second harmonic generation.  

PubMed Central

By adapting a laser scanning microscope with a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser and transmission optics, we are able to produce live cell images based on the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second harmonic generation (SHG). Second harmonic imaging (SHIM) is an ideal method for probing membranes of living cells because it offers the high resolution of nonlinear optical microscopy with the potential for near-total avoidance of photobleaching and phototoxicity. The technique has been implemented on three cell lines labeled with membrane-staining dyes that have large nonlinear optical coefficients. The images can be obtained within physiologically relevant time scales. Both achiral and chiral dyes were used to compare image formation for the case of single- and double-leaflet staining, and it was found that chirality plays a significant role in the mechanism of contrast generation. It is also shown that SHIM is highly sensitive to membrane potential, with a depolarization of 25 mV resulting in an approximately twofold loss of signal intensity. PMID:10585956

Campagnola, P J; Wei, M D; Lewis, A; Loew, L M

1999-01-01

434

High-resolution nonlinear optical imaging of live cells by second harmonic generation.  

PubMed

By adapting a laser scanning microscope with a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser and transmission optics, we are able to produce live cell images based on the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second harmonic generation (SHG). Second harmonic imaging (SHIM) is an ideal method for probing membranes of living cells because it offers the high resolution of nonlinear optical microscopy with the potential for near-total avoidance of photobleaching and phototoxicity. The technique has been implemented on three cell lines labeled with membrane-staining dyes that have large nonlinear optical coefficients. The images can be obtained within physiologically relevant time scales. Both achiral and chiral dyes were used to compare image formation for the case of single- and double-leaflet staining, and it was found that chirality plays a significant role in the mechanism of contrast generation. It is also shown that SHIM is highly sensitive to membrane potential, with a depolarization of 25 mV resulting in an approximately twofold loss of signal intensity. PMID:10585956

Campagnola, P J; Wei, M D; Lewis, A; Loew, L M

1999-12-01

435

Hydrogen Evolution from Alfalfa and Clover Nodules and Hydrogen Uptake by Free-Living Rhizobium meliloti†  

PubMed Central

A series of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii strains were used as inocula for alfalfa and clover, respectively, grown under bacteriologically controlled conditions. Replicate samples of nodules formed by each strain were assayed for rates of H2 evolution in air, rates of H2 evolution under Ar and O2, and rates of C2H2 reduction. Nodules formed by all strains of R. meliloti and R. trifolii on their respective hosts lost at least 17% of the electron flow through nitrogenase as evolved H2. The mean loss from alfalfa nodules formed by 19 R. meliloti strains was 25%, and the mean loss from clover nodules formed by seven R. trifolii strains was 35%. R. meliloti and R. trifolii strains also were cultured under conditions that were previously established for derepression of hydrogenase synthesis. Only strains 102F65 and 102F51 of R. meliloti showed measurable activity under free-living conditions. Bacteroids from nodules formed by the two strains showing hydrogenase activity under free-living conditions also oxidized H2 at low rates. The specific activity of hydrogenase in bacteroids formed by either strain 102F65 or strain 102F51 of R. meliloti was less than 0.1% of the specific activity of the hydrogenase system in bacteroids formed by H2 uptake-positive Rhizobium japonicum USDA 110, which has been investigated previously. R. meliloti and R. trifolii strains tested possessed insufficient hydrogenase to recycle a substantial proportion of the H2 evolved from the nitrogenase reaction in nodules of their hosts. Additional research is needed, therefore, to develop strains of R. meliloti and R. trifolii that possess an adequate H2-recycling system. PMID:16345361

Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Maier, Robert J.; Evans, Harold J.

1979-01-01

436

Effects of activation by proton irradiation on silicon particle detector electric characteristics  

SciTech Connect

After irradiation with 7 and 9 MeV protons, activation-induced effects were encountered in measurements of current-voltage (IV) and capacitance-voltage (CV) characteristics for Czochralski and float-zone grown silicon particle detectors prepared on printed circuit boards with copper electrodes. With the present detector construction, the {sup 30}Si(p,n){sup 30}P and {sup 63}Cu(p,n){sup 63}Zn reactions induce dominant interference in such measurements. The daughter nuclides are positron emitters with half-lives of 2.5 and 38.5 min, respectively, and the slowing down of the emitted positrons generates a significantly large concentration of electron-hole pairs in the detector volume increasing the leakage current level and decreasing the breakdown voltage. The observed time-dependent characteristics were verified by modeling the activation of the detector structure and the resulting leakage current. As a result, the electrical measurements cannot be performed immediately after irradiation due to silicon activation, and, generally, materials becoming easily activated should be avoided in the detector concept.

Vaeyrynen, S.; Raeisaenen, J.; Tikkanen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kassamakov, I. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 3000, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Tuominen, E. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

2009-07-15

437

Late cataractogenesis caused by particulate radiations and photons in long-lived mammalian species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation cataractogenesis induced by small acute doses of particulate radiations and photons in the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), the beagle dog (Canis familiaris) and the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is discussed in the context of the use of animal models to assess the radiation hazards faced by humans during lengthy sojourns in deep space. Attention is paid to: 1) the importance of lifespan studies with long-lived species - the above animals have median lifespans in captivity of 5-7, 13-14 and -25 years, respectively; 2) the magnitudes of possible dose thresholds for cataractogenesis from sparsely ionizing radiations and the modifications of those thresholds by the late degenerative phase of the phenomenon.

Lett, J. T.; Lee, A. C.; Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.

438

Late cataractogenesis caused by particulate radiations and photons in long-lived mammalian species  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radiation cataractogenesis induced by small acute doses of particulate radiations and photons in the New Zealand white rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), the beagle dog (Canis familiaris) and the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is discussed in the context of the use of animal models to assess the radiation hazards faced by humans during lengthy sojourns in deep space. Attention is paid to (1) the importance of lifespan studies with long-lived species - the above animals have median lifespans in captivity of 5-7, 13-14 and 25 years, respectively; and (2) the magnitudes of possible dose thresholds for cataractogenesis from sparsely ionizing radiations and the modifications of those thresholds by the late degenerative phase of the phenomenon.

Lett, J. T.; Lee, A. C.; Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.

1989-01-01

439

Research on the Chemical Logistics Management Information Platform Based on Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared with logistics of ordinary things, Chemical Logistics is flammable, explosive, toxic and corrosive and other characteristics. Storage and transport of specialty chemicals has inevitably brought a series of serious problems and potential problems because of its particularity, so the safety of chemical logistics management is very important. How to achieve real-time monitoring chemical logistics process, researchers and logistics operators

Hehua Li; Yahui Liu

2010-01-01

440

Short-lived Isotopes from a Close-by AGB Star Triggering the Protosolar Nebula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The presence of short-lived isotopes in the early solar system, in particular 26Al, 41Ca, 60Fe, and 107Pd, point to a close-by and fresh nucleosynthesis source, possibly triggering the collapse of the protosolar nebula. We present the results of nucleosynthesis calculations based on an AGB polluting hypothesis. A general concordance of the predicted yields of the above radioactivities relative to 26Al can be obtained in the case of an intermediate mass AGB star with hot bottom burning in the envelope (thus producing 26Al), and mixing through a series of third dredge-up episodes a fraction of the C-rich and s-processed material from the He intershell with the extended envelope. Polution of the protosolar nebula with freshly synthesized material may derive from the efficient winds of the AGB star. In AGB stars, the s-process nucleosynthesis occurs both during the maximum phase of every thermal runaway, driven by the partial activation of the 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg reaction, and in the interpulse phase, where the 13C nuclei are fully consumed in radiative conditions by the activation of the 13C(alpha,n)16O reaction. We have used different prescriptions for the amount of the 13C nuclei present in the intershell. A minimum amount of 13C is naturally expected in the ashes of H-shell burning. Possible formation of an extra "13C-pocket" derives from the injection of a small amount of protons from the envelope into the 12C-rich intershell during any third dredge-up episode, when the H-shell is inactivated. Prediction for other short-lived, 36Cl, 135Cs, and 205Pb, are given. General consequences for the pollution of the protosolar nebula with newly synthesized stable isotopes from the AGB winds are outlined. The origin of other detected short-lived nuclei, in particular 53Mn, 129I, and 182Hf, which cannot come from an AGB source, is analysed. The alternative trigger hypothesis by a close-by Supernova is discussed.

Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Straniero, O.

441

Engaging rehabilitation technologies: making things happen.  

PubMed

For some people, the word "technology" in rehabilitation brings to mind equipment and assistive devices. For others - it is a brave new frontier where robotic advance means many of the functional consequences of impairment are/will be alleviated, and many roles health professionals and carers currently perform will disappear. Like most things in life, a simplistic interpretation in complexity rarely capture what is truly going on. This is certainly true for rehabilitation technologies where devices are clearly important for our clients and for our professions but, it is not just about gadgets - it is far more than that. Of the numerous definitions available, most have in common a notion of tools to apply knowledge to practical issues or, as noted in the Britannica Concise Encyclopaedia [ 1 ]: "Whereas science is concerned with how and why things happen, technology focuses on making things happen". PMID:22494397

McPherson, Kathryn M; Kayes, Nicola M; Hale, Leigh A

2012-01-01

442

Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling  

SciTech Connect

We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

Charriere, Guillaume M. [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Cousin, Beatrice [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Arnaud, Emmanuelle [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Saillan-Barreau, Corinne [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Andre, Mireille [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massoudi, Ali [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Dani, Christian [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Penicaud, Luc [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Casteilla, Louis [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

2006-10-15

443

A Possible Mechanism for Evading Temperature Quantum Decoherence in Living Matter by Feshbach Resonance  

PubMed Central

A new possible scenario for the origin of the molecular collective behaviour associated with the emergence of living matter is presented. We propose that the transition from a non-living to a living cell could be mapped to a quantum transition to a coherent entanglement of condensates, like in a multigap BCS superconductor. Here the decoherence-evading qualities at high temperature are based on the Feshbach resonance that has been recently proposed as the driving mechanism for high Tc superconductors. Finally we discuss how the proximity to a particular critical point is relevant to the emergence of coherence in the living cell. PMID:19564941

Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Innocenti, Davide; Bianconi, Antonio

2009-01-01

444

Visualization of Dopamine Transporter Trafficking in Live Neurons by Use of Fluorescent Cocaine Analogs  

PubMed Central

The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft and is a target for widely abused psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Nonetheless, little is known about the cellular distribution and trafficking of natively expressed DAT. Here we use novel fluorescently tagged cocaine analogs to visualize DAT and DAT trafficking in cultured live midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The fluorescent tags were extended from the tropane N-position of 2?-carbomethoxy-3?-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)tropane using an ethylamino-linker. The rhodamine-, OR Green-, or Cy3-labeled ligands had high binding affinity for DAT and enabled specific labeling of DAT in live neurons and visualization by confocal imaging. In the dopaminergic neurons, DAT was uniformly distributed in the plasma membrane of the soma, the neuronal extensions, and varicosities along these extensions. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) experiments demonstrated bidirectional movement of DAT in the extensions and indicated that DAT is highly mobile both in the extensions and in the varicosities (immobile fraction less than ?30%). DAT was constitutively internalized into vesicular structures likely representing intracellular transporter pools. The internalization was blocked by lentiviral-mediated expression of dominant-negative dynamin and internalized DAT displayed partial colocalization with the early endosomal marker EGFP-Rab5 and with the transferrin receptor. DAT internalization and function was not affected by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or by inhibition with staurosporine or GF109203X. These data are in contrast to findings for DAT in transfected heterologous cells and challenge the paradigm that trafficking and cellular distribution of endogenous DAT is subject to regulation by PKC. PMID:19474307

Eriksen, Jacob; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Rasmussen, Trine Nygaard; Vaegter, Christian Bjerggaard; Cha, Joo Hwan; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck

2009-01-01

445

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics  

E-print Network

This paper presents a method for indexing human ac- tivities in videos captured from a wearable camera being worn by patients, for studies of progression of the dementia diseases. Our method aims to produce indexes to facilitate the navigation throughout the individual video recordings, which could help doctors search for early signs of the dis- ease in the activities of daily living. The recorded videos have strong motion and sharp lighting changes, inducing noise for the analysis. The proposed approach is based on a two steps analysis. First, we propose a new approach to segment this type of video, based on apparent motion. Each segment is characterized by two original motion de- scriptors, as well as color, and audio descriptors. Second, a Hidden-Markov Model formulation is used to merge the multimodal audio and video features, and classify the test segments. Experiments show the good properties of the ap- proach on real data.

Karaman, Svebor; Dartigues, Jean-François; Gaëstel, Yann; Mégret, Rémi; Pinquier, Julien

2011-01-01

446

Protein delivery into live cells by incubation with an endosomolytic agent  

PubMed Central

We report on how a dimer of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT, dfTAT, penetrates live cells by escaping from endosomes with a particularly high efficiency. By mediating endosomal leakage, dfTAT also delivers proteins into cultured cells after a simple co-incubation procedure. Cytosolic delivery is achieved in most cells in a culture and only a relatively small amount of material remains trapped inside endosomes. Delivery does not require binding interactions between dfTAT and a protein, multiple molecules can be delivered at once, and delivery can be repeated. Remarkably, dfTAT-mediated delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation, or gene expression. This new delivery strategy should be extremely useful for cell-based assays, cellular imaging applications, and the ex vivo manipulation of cells. PMID:24930129

Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Dayani, Laila; Wang, Ting-Yi; Johnson, Gregory A.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

2014-01-01

447

Live imaging reveals active infiltration of mitotic zone by its stem cell niche  

PubMed Central

Stem cells niches are increasingly recognized as dynamic environments that play a key role in transducing signals that allow an organism to exert control on its stem cells. Live imaging of stem cell niches in their in vivo setting is thus of high interest to dissect stem cell controls. Here we report a new microfluidic design that is highly amenable to dissemination in biology laboratories that have no microfluidics expertise. This design has allowed us to perform the first time lapse imaging of the C. elegans germline stem cell niche. Our results show that this niche is strikingly dynamic, and that morphological changes that take place during development are the result of a highly active process. These results lay the foundation for future studies to dissect molecular mechanisms by which stem cell niche morphology is modulated, and by which niche morphology controls stem cell behavior. PMID:23695198

Wong, Brandon G.; Paz, Adrian; Corrado, Michael A.; Ramos, Brian R.; Cinquin, Amanda

2013-01-01

448

Utilization of Soil C and N by Microbial Groups in the Presence of Living Roots  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of living plant roots and N on belowground C dynamics were examined in a CA annual grassland soil (Haploxeralf) during a 2-y greenhouse study. The fate of 13C-labeled plant roots ( Avena barbata L.) and soil were followed under planted and unplanted conditions; and with and without N addition (20 kg N ha-1 season-1). The treatments were applied during 2 growing seasons and each growing season was followed by a dry, fallow period (~ 150-d long). Living roots increased the turnover rate and loss of belowground 13 C during and after 2 seasons compared with unplanted soils. After 2 seasons, planted soils had 21% less belowground 13C present than in unplanted soils. However, total soil C increased in planted soils by 4.6% compared to unplanted after 2 seasons. N additions decreased belowground 13C turnover during the first treatment season in both planted and unplanted soils, however no effect of N on soil C was observed thereafter. Planted soils had larger microbial biomass and the community structure differed compared with unplanted soils. Planted soils had higher proportions of gram (-) bacteria, while unplanted soils had higher proportions of gram (+) bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi. New root and exudate C supplied from living roots increased the turnover of microbial assimilated 13C compared with unplanted for all microbial groups. This greater turnover of belowground 13C was especially significant for gram (-) bacteria, which were stimulated in the planted soil. In contrast, the activity among microbial groups in unplanted soils was similar to that prior to the initiation of the treatments and soil wet-up. Our findings suggest that A. barbata roots increased soil C levels over time because root and exudate C inputs are significant, however that C increase will be moderated by an overall faster C mineralization rate of belowground C. Increased N deposition may slow soil C losses, however, they appear minor and temporary at the rates applied and for the plant-soil system studied.

Bird, J.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M.

2007-12-01

449

Changes In Events and Changes In Things  

E-print Network

in so far as it concerns me, but is irreducibly general as far as the thief is concerned. (There may indeed be 110 thief-1 am perhaps mistaken about the whole thing-but this is another question; our present point is that there may be no one who... is even said or thought to be a thief, though it is said or thought tbat tlm·e is a thief). Returning now to Queen Anne, what I am suggesting is that the sort of thing that we unquestionably do have with "It is said that" and "It is thought that," we...

Prior, Arthur N.

1962-01-01

450

Live Birth and Cumulative Live Birth Rates in Expected Poor Ovarian Responders Defined by the Bologna Criteria Following IVF/ICSI Treatment  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the live birth and cumulative live birth rates of expected poor ovarian responders according to the Bologna criteria and to compare their outcomes with those of expected normal responders Design Retrospective analysis Setting University infertility clinic Patients A total of 1,152 subfertile women undergoing their first in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle Interventions Women were classified into 4 groups according to the Bologna criteria for comparison Main Outcome Measure(s) Live birth and cumulative live birth rates Results Women with expected poor response (POR) had the lowest live birth rate than the other 3 groups (23.8%, p = 0.031). Cumulative live birth rates were significantly lower in those with expected POR than those with expected normal ovarian response (NOR) (35.8% vs 62.8%, p<0.0001). In the subgroup analysis, the cumulative live birth rates in expected PORs were significantly lower in those who had ?3 oocytes retrieved (18.6% for ?3 oocytes vs 44.0% for >3 oocytes, p = 0.006) whereas the live birth rates in fresh cycle did not differ (17.8% vs 30.9%, p = 0.108). Conclusion Women who were expected POR according to the Bologna criteria had lower live birth and cumulative live birth than expected NOR but they still can achieve reasonable treatment outcomes and IVF treatment should not be precluded. PMID:25748478

Chai, Joyce; Lee, Vivian Chi-Yan; Yeung, Tracy Wing-Yee; Li, Raymond Wun-Hang; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ng, Ernest Hung-Yu

2015-01-01

451

Research on Key Technology and Applications for Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet of Things (IOT) has been paid more and more attention by the academe, industry, and government all over the world. The concept of IOT and the architecture of IOT are discussed. The key technologies of IOT, including Radio Frequency Identification technology, Electronic Product Code technology, and ZigBee technology are analyzed. The framework of digital agriculture application based on IOT is proposed.

Chen, Xian-Yi; Jin, Zhi-Gang

452

The Q-List manifesto: How to get things right in generalist medical practice.  

PubMed

Checklists have become popular in medical practice since the publication of surgeon Atul Gawande's book, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right. Based on his 26 years of practice as a family physician and informed by scholarly works from other professional disciplines, the author suggests that although checklists are helpful for promoting habitual reflection, they are limited in scope and meaning, and more suited for procedural undertakings than the bio-psycho-social-existential orientation of generalist practice. The author reviews the characteristics of generalist practice and suggests that clinicians develop a list of questions to help them recall and examine concepts key to the exploration and management of routine and challenging situations with patients. He proposes his own Question-List, or Q-List, and recommends its adaptation for use as a manifesto to the rich and engaging work of generalist medicine. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25603309

Ventres, William B

2015-03-01

453

Live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus prevents super-infection by cloned SIVmac251 in cynomolgus monkeys.  

PubMed

The ability of a live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to protect against challenge with cloned SIVmac251/BK28 was evaluated in four cynomolgus macaques. The intravenous infection of the C8 variant of the SIVmac251/32H virus, carrying an in-frame 12 bp deletion in the nef gene, did not affect the CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts, and a persistent infection associated with an extremely low virus burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was established. After 40 weeks, these monkeys were challenged intravenously with a 50 MID50 dose of SIVmac251/BK28 virus grown on macaque cells. Four naive monkeys were infected as controls. Monkeys were monitored for 62 weeks following challenge. Attempts to rescue virus from either PBMCs or bone marrow from the C8-vaccinated monkeys were unsuccessful, but in two cases virus was re-isolated from lymph node cells. The presence of the SIV provirus with the C8 variant genotype maintaining its original nef deletion was shown by differential PCR in PBMCs, lymph nodes and bone marrow. Furthermore, in contrast to the control monkeys, the vaccinated monkeys showed normal levels for CD4+ and CD8+ cells, minimal lymphoid hyperplasia and no clinical signs of infection. Our results confirm that vaccination with live attenuated virus can confer protection. This appears to be dependent on the ability of the C8 variant to establish a persistent but attenuated infection which is necessary for inducing an immune response, as suggested by the persistence of a strong immune B cell memory and by the over-expression of interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma and IL-15 mRNAs in PBMCs of C8-vaccinated monkeys but not in those of control monkeys. PMID:9349474

Titti, F; Sernicola, L; Geraci, A; Panzini, G; Di Fabio, S; Belli, R; Monardo, F; Borsetti, A; Maggiorella, M T; Koanga-Mogtomo, M; Corrias, F; Zamarchi, R; Amadori, A; Chieco-Bianchi, L; Verani, P

1997-10-01

454

Dynamic auxin transport patterns preceding vein formation revealed by live-imaging of Arabidopsis leaf primordia  

PubMed Central

Self-regulatory patterning mechanisms capable of generating biologically meaningful, yet unpredictable cellular patterns offer unique opportunities for obtaining mathematical descriptions of underlying patterning systems properties. The networks of higher-order veins in leaf primordia constitute such a self-regulatory system. During the formation of higher-order veins, vascular precursors are selected from a homogenous field of subepidermal cells in unpredictable positions to eventually connect in complex cellular networks. Auxin transport routes have been implicated in this selection process, but understanding of their role in vascular patterning has been limited by our inability to monitor early auxin transport dynamics in vivo. Here we describe a live-imaging system in emerging Arabidopsis thaliana leaves that uses a PIN1:GFP reporter to visualize auxin transport routes and an Athb8:YFP reporter as a marker for vascular commitment. Live-imaging revealed common features initiating the formation of all higher-order veins. The formation of broad PIN1 expression domains is followed by their restriction, leading to sustained, elevated PIN1 expression in incipient procambial cells files, which then express Athb8. Higher-order PIN1 expression domains (hPEDs) are initiated as freely ending domains that extend toward each other and sometimes fuse with them, creating connected domains. During the restriction and specification phase, cells in wider hPEDs are partitioned into vascular and non-vascular fates: Central cells acquire a coordinated cell axis and express elevated PIN1 levels as well as the pre-procambial marker Athb8, while edge cells downregulate PIN1 and remain isodiametric. The dynamic nature of the early selection process is underscored by the instability of early hPEDs, which can result in dramatic changes in vascular network architecture prior to Athb8 expression, which is correlated with the promotion onto vascular cell fate. PMID:24966861

Marcos, Danielle; Berleth, Thomas

2014-01-01

455

Communication characteristics of young children with HIV in South Africa as reported by some physicians.  

PubMed

HIV has been shown to have significant effects on the development of a child. Currently, there is limited South African research regarding HIV and specific characteristics of communication development, and the treatment thereof, in the child infected with HIV. The objective of the research was to describe the communication characteristics of a group of children between the ages of 0 and 5 years infected with HIV at a hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. Clinic records of 203 children infected with HIV between the ages of 0 and 5 years were reviewed using a pre-designed checklist within the outreach clinic of a large regional hospital. A questionnaire was completed by four medical practitioners working with this population within the outreach clinic. A total of 91.62% of the infected children were diagnosed as being either in Stage III or IV of the disease (according to the WHO classification system of 2005), with all infants presenting with a CD4 count of ? 60. Most (75.37% of the total sample) were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) at the time the data were collected. According to their medical, social, communication and general development, almost all the children qualified for Early Communication Intervention (ECI) but were not recorded as being referred for such services. A large proportion of the target population presented with opportunistic infections and/or HIV associated conditions. The results highlight the developmental characteristics of children living with HIV, and identify the need for medical doctors and allied health professionals to be provided with relevant literature or training regarding the communication development of children infected with HIV. This will facilitate appropriate referrals for ECI services. PMID:25555103

Hattam, Michelle; Louw, Brenda; Geertsema, Salome

2014-01-01

456

The Journey through the SPACE IN THE TEXT to WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the psychological and mythical themes suggested by Maurice Sendak's WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. States that, although the quest myth is central to the story, equally important is how Sendak expanded the quest both spatially and temporally. (MM)

Moseley, Ann

1988-01-01

457

RFID as a key enabler of the internet of things : localization and communication  

E-print Network

By having everything in our physical world digitally connected, the Internet of Things is expected to transform how we interact with our environments and unlock tremendous business values through advance analytics. Owing ...

Wang, Jue, 1986-

2014-01-01

458

Embedded Interaction: Interacting with the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things assumes that objects have digital functionality\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009and can be identified and tracked automatically. The main goal of\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009embedded interaction is to look at new opportunities that arise for\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interactive systems and the immediate value users gain. The authors\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009developed various prototypes to explore novel ways for human-computer\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interaction (HCI), enabled by the Internet of Things and

Matthias Kranz; Albrecht Schmidt

2010-01-01

459

Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to 17 picomoles per cubic centimeter and dissociation constants from 3.4 to 4.7 nanomolar. Maximum binding for human putamen at autopsy was 15 picomoles per cubic centimeter. Studies of [11C]raclopride binding indicate that clinically effective doses of chemically distinct neuroleptic drugs result in 85 to 90 percent occupancy of D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of schizophrenic patients.

Farde, Lars; Hall, Hakan; Ehrin, Erling; Sedvall, Goran

1986-01-01

460

Long-Lived Quasistationary Coherences in a V-type System Driven by Incoherent Light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical study of noise-induced quantum coherences in a model three-level V-type system interacting with incoherent radiation, an important prototype for a wide range of physical systems ranging from trapped ions to biomolecules and quantum dots. By solving the quantum optical equations of motion, we obtain analytic expressions for the noise-induced coherences and show that they exhibit an oscillating behavior in the limit of large excited level spacing ? (? /??1, where ? is the radiative decay width). Most remarkably, we find that in the opposite limit of small level spacing ?/??1, appropriate for large molecules, (a) the coherences can survive for an extremely long time ? =(2/?)(?/?)-2 before eventually decaying to zero, and (b) coherences at short times can be substantial. We further show that the long-lived coherences can survive environmental relaxation and decoherence, suggesting implications to the design of quantum heat engines and to incoherent light excitation of biological systems.

Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

2014-09-01

461

Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies  

SciTech Connect

The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

Loucaides, Eva M. [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Kirchbach, Johann C. von [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Foeglein, Agnes [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Park Road, Oxford, OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Digard, Paul, E-mail: pd1@mole.bio.cam.ac.u [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom)

2009-11-10

462

Structure, Genetics and Function of an Exopolysaccharide Produced by a Bacterium Living within Fungal Hyphae.  

PubMed

The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus has an unusual symbiosis with a bacterium, Burkholderia rhizoxinica, which lives within the fungal cytosol and produces a potent phytotoxin that causes severe losses in agriculture. To gain insight into symbiosis factors we investigated the endosymbiont's exopolysaccharide (EPS), a secreted matrix that plays pivotal roles in mediating cell-environment interactions. By a combination of homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR experiments, we elucidated a previously unknown EPS structure: a repeating tetrasaccharide unit bearing a nonstoichiometric acetyl group on a mannose residue. We also analyzed the EPS biosynthesis gene cluster and generated a targeted mutant to compare the phenotypes. Scanning electron microscope images revealed a reduced ability of the mutant to form extracellular polymers around cell aggregates. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the symbiont's EPS genes are retained through evolutionary processes. PMID:25530287

Uzum, Zerrin; Silipo, Alba; Lackner, Gerald; De Felice, Antonia; Molinaro, Antonio; Hertweck, Christian

2015-02-01

463

Removal of long-lived $^{222}$Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

E-print Network

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the $^{222}$Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double-beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener's energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

R. W. Schnee; M. A. Bowles; R. Bunker; K. McCabe; J. White; P. Cushman; M. Pepin; V. E. Guiseppe

2014-04-23

464

A Videophone Prototype System Evaluated by Elderly Users in the Living Lab Schwechat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elderly people often experience difficulties in using modern Information and Communication Technologies. This paper presents findings of an evaluation and a field test of a touch screen based internet videophone system mounted in a wooden frame in order to provide a non technical appearance. During a 14-day lasting field test in real-life environment the goal was to evaluate if and to what extent the elderly participants would benefit from using such a modern multimodal way of communication. Four prototype systems were installed in four private homes and were tested successfully by six persons. It was found that the elderly users actually benefited from the touchscreen control, the proportionally large-scale GUI and the VoIP-and video-telephone functions. Despite the small scale of the evaluation the gathered data demonstrates the potential this technology might have in daily life in particular for the emerging ambient assisted living (AAL) area.

Oberzaucher, Johannes; Werner, Katharina; Mairböck, Harald P.; Beck, Christian; Panek, Paul; Hlauschek, Walter; Zagler, Wolfgang L.

465

An ethical analysis of the terminology of living donors proposed by ELPAT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apart from the practical problems that we are faced with in the case of organ donation, there lay a series of terminological issues in need of a thorough clarification. Recently, the ELPAT group on living donors (Ethical, Legal and Psychological Aspects of Organ Transplantation) has proposed a new clarification for living organ donors. This classification (F. M. Dor et al,

2011-01-01

466

Understanding Stöber silica's pore characteristics measured by gas adsorption.  

PubMed

Controversial reports regarding Stöber silica's microporosity and specific surface area remain in the literature despite decades of widespread applications. In this work, Stöber silica samples prepared under controlled reaction time and postsynthesis washing/drying conditions were characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and evolved gas analysis. Our experimental results demonstrated the important but often overlooked effects of reaction time and postsynthesis treatments on Stöber silica's pore characteristics, as evidenced by the strikingly large range of BET specific surface area (11.3-309.7 m(2)/g). A simple micropore filling and blocking mechanism compatible with an existing Stöber silica growth model incorporating both aggregation and monomer addition steps was proposed to explain all our experimental findings. The carbon and nitrogen contents appear to serve well as the indicative link between our experimental variables and the resulting pore blocking by TEOS and its derivatives. A suitable combination of experimental conditions is recommended in order to make microporous Stöber silica samples with large specific surface area, including a short reaction time, water washing, and drying at moderate temperature preferably under vacuum. PMID:25514625

Li, Shanshan; Wan, Quan; Qin, Zonghua; Fu, Yuhong; Gu, Yuantao

2015-01-20

467

Mapping live cell viscosity with an aggregation-induced emission fluorogen by means of two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.  

PubMed

Intracellular viscosity is a crucial parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of TPE-Cy, a cell-permeable dye with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property, in mapping the viscosity inside live cells. Owing to the AIE characteristics, both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of this dye are increased along with an increase in viscosity. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells stained with TPE-Cy reveals that the lifetime in lipid droplets is much shorter than that from the general cytoplasmic region. The loose packing of the lipids in a lipid droplet results in low viscosity and thus shorter lifetime of TPE-Cy in this region. It demonstrates that the AIE dye could provide good resolution in intracellular viscosity sensing. This is also the first work in which AIE molecules are applied in fluorescence lifetime imaging and intracellular viscosity sensing. PMID:25645956

Chen, Sijie; Hong, Yuning; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Engui; Bai, Gongxun; Qu, Jianan; Hao, Jianhua; Tang, Ben Zhong

2015-03-01

468

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY  

E-print Network

FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space by a group of logistics companies, research organisations, universities, and IT providers that includes NICTA

Heiser, Gernot

469

Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal  

MedlinePLUS

What is live, attenuated influenza vaccine—LAIV (nasal spray)?You are getting a live, attenuated influenza vaccine (called LAIV), which is sprayed ... and ''recombinant'' flu vaccines that do not contain live virus. These ''flu shots'' are given by injection ...

470

Like most things in life, we can approach aging with a glass half full or half empty approach! Change is inevitable. Hopefully for most, the process of aging has been one that has focused on living a somewhat healthy life, eating fruits  

E-print Network

Keeps Weight Off 2 Raw and Pasteurized Milk Update 3 Healthy Habits Associated With Financial Success 6! Change is inevitable. Hopefully for most, the process of aging has been one that has focused on living

Garfunkel, Eric

471

Problems Faced by Complete Denture-Wearing Elderly People Living in Jammu District  

PubMed Central

Context: Poor oral health is increasing dramatically among old people especially those living in rural and remote areas. Various factors such as low education background, low income, poor living conditions, unhealthy lifestyle, inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco use lead to poor oral health among older people which in turn lead to risks to their general health. The older people especially from rural areas are apprehensive about seeing a dentist and do not visit them regularly. This may lead to various problems which may have a detrimental influence on their quality of life. Aim: To know the problems faced by complete denture wearers in rural areas in Jammu district. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients from rural area Bishna, initially treated with a complete denture in the maxilla or mandibles were examined. The data were collected with the help of a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that majority of respondents were in the age – group of 65-70 y. Majority of respondents complained of "difficulty chewing", "sore spots”, “painful and swollen gums". Majority of respondents had difficulty in speech, it was difficult for them to interact and communicate with their dentures on. Most of the respondents had lost confidence and had low self esteem. Clinical observations revealed that the commonest condition associated with denture wearing was Oral Stomatitis/ Burning mouth Syndrome, Superimposed infection and Angular cheilitis. Conclusion: Older people should Communicate and visit dentists, regularly, so that the dentists can adjust the treatment and pace according to their needs. Behavioural therapy techniques can make dental visits relatively anxiety and pain-free. PMID:25654025

Sharma, Sumeet; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil; Raina, Rajiv

2014-01-01

472

Semantic middleware for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to extending the Internet to devices such as home appliances, consumer electronics, and sensor networks. As multiple heterogeneous devices attempt to create area networks, one of the major challenges is the interoperability and composability of their services. The traditional way to address interoperability is to define standards; however, there are many standards and specifications

Zhexuan Song; Alvaro A. Cárdenas; Ryusuke Masuoka

2010-01-01

473

The Internet of nano-things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology promises new solutions for many applications in the biomedical, industrial and military fields as well as in consumer and industrial goods. The interconnection of nanoscale devices with existing communication networks and ultimately the Internet defines a new networking paradigm that is further referred to as the Internet of Nano-Things. Within this context, this paper discusses the state of the

I. F. Akyildiz; J. M. Jornet

2010-01-01

474

The Internet of Things: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the Internet of Things. Main enabling factor of this promising paradigm is the integration of several technologies and communications solutions. Identification and tracking technologies, wired and wireless sensor and actuator networks, enhanced communication protocols (shared with the Next Generation Internet), and distributed intelligence for smart objects are just the most relevant. As one can easily imagine, any

Luigi Atzori; Antonio Iera; Giacomo Morabito

2010-01-01

475

Creating the Internet of Your Things  

E-print Network

Creating the Internet of Your Things Barb Edson General Manager Microsoft Corp. Executive Summary you have, and incorporate today's and tomorrow's technology breakthroughs to ensure your business, and technology partners to help you stop running your business and start making it thrive. Microsoft recognizes

Chaudhuri, Surajit

476

Creating the Internet of Your Things  

E-print Network

Creating the Internet of Your Things Barb Edson, General Manager Executive Summary Where is your today's and tomorrow's technology breakthroughs to ensure your business is set up for the long term? How, and technology partners to help you stop running your business and start making it thrive. While technology

Chaudhuri, Surajit

477

The Adult Learner: Some Things We Know  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses the "warrior" who rises to the challenge of teaching the adult learner. The discussion is designed as a catalyst for dialogue about the adult learner and to uncover the complexities of teaching this rare and riveting species. This book is organized around three interlocking themes: some things we know about the adult learner;…

Fogarty, Robin J.; Pete, Brian M.

2007-01-01

478

Connecting islands in the internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increasing pace of change in computing technology, islands of relative stability become important to reaping the benefits of geospatial information. Geospatial standards are bases for persistent developments in the complex adaptive ecosystem of geospatial computing technology. Standards are the backbone of the Geoweb and will be also for the Internet of Things (IoT). At COM. Geo 2011, the

George Percivall

2012-01-01

479

RFID, ENERGY, AND INTERNET OF THINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Digital Enterprise is the free flow of real-time information to be exchanged between suppliers and consumers. RFID transforms the energy into data, and it is suggested as an enabling technology of the Internet of Things. Industries, Hospitals, Homes use the fieldbus systems to exchange data. Powerline communication extends the space enabling the wider interoperability and the remote management of energy-consuming

Mikhail Simonov; Riccardo Zich; Flavia Mazzitelli

480

The Essential Rule: Do the Right Thing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students can avoid poor choices if educators teach them to stop and ask themselves, "Is this the right thing to do?" To be effective, schools must create a climate of high expectations, not only in terms of academic performance, but also to elevate the levels of students' decision-making processes. Educators can do this through coaching, modeling,…

Corum, Brad

2004-01-01

481

Swing that thing: moving to move  

Microsoft Academic Search

Swing That Thing... is a practice-based doctoral research project that examines how technology in on and around the body might be used to poeticise experience. Outcomes include a range of body-worn devices that encourage people to explore and move in playful ways. The works have evolved from a common design intent: 'to move the body through real and virtual extension'.

Danielle Wilde

2010-01-01

482

Science 101: What causes things to rust?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The simple answer is that things rust when you leave them out in the rain. But maybe you want a more thorough answer. Rust is a form of corrosion, which is broadly defined as the wearing away of materials due to chemical reactions. So corrosion applies to

2010-12-01

483

[Characteristics of iodine uptake and accumulation by vegetables].  

PubMed

With seaweed iodine and KI as exogenous iodine sources, a pot experiment was conducted to study the characteristics of iodine uptake and accumulation by pakchoi cabbage, celery, capsicum, and radish. The results showed that the iodine content in the edible parts of test vegetables increased with increasing amount of exogenous iodine, but the iodine accumulation rate differed with the kinds of vegetables, in the order of pakchoi > celery > radish > capsicum. The majority of iodine was accumulated in roots, with lesser amount transferred to shoots. The distribution of iodine in vegetables was commonly in the order of root > leaf > stem > fruit, but the iodine in radish is lower in its rhizome than in its shoot. Low concentrations (0-25 mg x kg(-1)) of exogenous iodine had little effects on the growth of vegetables, while high concentrations (> or = 50 mg x kg(-1)) of it had inhibitory effects, resulting in a decreased vegetable biomass. The sensitivity of test vegetables to the adverse effect of exogenous iodine was in the order of capsicum > pachoi > celery > radish. Compared with seaweed iodine, KI decreased the biomass of first cutting significantly (P < 0.05), but for the second cutting, little difference was observed between these two iodine sources. The uptake and accumulation of these two iodine sources by vegetables also differed with cuttings, i.e., the first cutting vegetables absorbed more KI, while the second cutting vegetables absorbed more seaweed iodine (P < 0.05), suggesting that seaweed iodine had a longer efficacy than KI. PMID:18163316

Hong, Chun-Lai; Weng, Huan-Xin; Yan, Ai-Lan; Xie, Ling-Li

2007-10-01

484

Living Clocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about daily rhythms (on page 17 of the PDF), learners will explore circadian patterns in humans, animals and plants. They will observe that some behaviors and functions of living organisms vary predictably every 24 hours and many regular functions are governed by internal "clocks," which run independently but are cued or reset by the environment. Groups of learners can conduct one of four (or more) body clock investigations: body temperature, animal behavior, bean leaf, and alertness/heart rate. Materials required for each group will vary, depending on the investigation(s) being conducted. This lesson guide includes background information, setup and management tips, extensions and a handout.

Nancy P. Moreno

2009-01-01

485

Meteor trail characteristics observed by high time resolution lidar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report and analyse the characteristics of 1382 meteor trails based on a sodium data set of ~ 680 h. The observations were made at Yanqing (115.97° E, 40.47° N), China by a ground-based Na fluorescence lidar. The temporal resolution of the raw profiles is 1.5 s and the altitude resolution is 96 m. We discover some characteristics of meteor trails different from those presented in previous reports. The occurrence heights of the trails follow a double-peak distribution with the peaks at ~ 83.5 km and at ~ 95.5 km, away from the peak height of the regular Na layer. 4.7% of the trails occur below 80 km, and 3.25% above 100 km. 75% of the trails are observed in only one 1.5 s profile, suggesting that the dwell time in the laser beam is not greater than 1.5 s. The peak density of the trails as a function of height is similar to that of the background sodium layer. The raw occurrence height distribution is corrected taking account of three factors which affect the relative lifetime of a trail as a function of height: the meteoroid velocity (which controls the ratio of Na/Na+ ablated); diffusional spreading of the trail; and chemical removal of Na. As a result, the bi-modal distribution is more pronounced. Modelling results show that the higher peak corresponds to a meteoroid population with speeds between 20 and 30 km s-1, whereas the lower peak should arise from much slower particles in a near-prograde orbit. It is inferred that most meteoroids in this data set have masses of ~ 1 mg, in order for ablation to produce sufficient Na atoms to be detected by lidar. Finally, the evolution of longer-duration meteor trails is investigated. Signals at each altitude channel consist of density enhancement bursts with the growth process usually faster than the decay process, and there exists a progressive phase shift among these altitude channels.

Liu, Y. J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Clemesha, B. R.; Wang, J. H.; Cheng, X. W.

2014-10-01

486

Intersecting the Architecture of the Internet of Things with the Future Retail Industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses the approach of SAP Research in Switzerland to investigate, develop and evaluate future Internet of Things architectures and prototypes with their unique combination of three scientific pillars: SAP Research combines an environment of co-located academic education at leading universities ("Campus-Based Engineering Centers") with the concept of living laboratories in which real-world prototypes and systems are rigorously tested. SAP Research Switzerland hosts the "Future Retail Center" (FRC) in order to validate innovations in the retail industry. As an orthogonal element, we also structure our research activities in technological dimensions as opposed to the industry-specific living labs. The "Smart Items Research Program" bundles and focuses all research topics that are related to Ambient Intelligence (AmI), Internet of Things, and Pervasive Computing. With the researchers from the engineering centers, the industry focus in the living labs, and the different research projects and research programs, a holistic research perspective is created that ensures a highly effective and focused execution of research, unifying technical Internet of Things architectures with the corresponding business needs and forming a unique landscape of innovation.

Magerkurth, Carsten; Haller, Stephan; Hagedorn, Pascal

487

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

488