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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to an internet program that is all about life. Just what is life? This seems like a strange question. We all know what is meant by the word \\"life\\". But how do we define it? Are all living things alike? In this internet program, you will watch several short movies and some slides. After you see each movie and slide, you will write something about the movie and slide. Our learning goal is to make a list of the traits that all living things have in common. Get out a pencil and a piece of paper. We are off on a great adventure to learn about living things! This first movie is called, \\"Is It Alive?\\" It will help you begin thinking about living things and what they all have in common. Write on your paper: \\"Living Things\\". As you watch this movie, write the names of the things that you think are alive. Copy the ...

Melenson, Richard S.

2005-11-21

2

Living and Non-living things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is intended to help students understand the difference between living and non-living things by teaching them the characteristics of living things. Introduction: We know what living things are, right? People are living things, aren't they? Can you think of any other living things? How do you know they are living? Task: If you were asked to explain what the difference between living and non-living things, how would you? This ...

Davies, Mrs.

2010-02-11

3

Living and non-living things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things often rely on non-living things to accomplish daily tasks. Living things have several characteristics that non-living things do not, such as the ability to move, eat, breathe, and reproduce. Living things and non-living things can interact even though they do not have the same characteristics.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-06-25

4

Living things and non-living things interact  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things and non-living things interact on a daily basis. The man is a human, a living thing. The corn crop and grass are also living things. The soil that the grass and corn crops are rooted in is a non-living thing.

Ken Hammond (USDA-ARS;)

2006-05-23

5

Living Things and their Habitats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will learn how to tell the difference between living and non-living organisms and their habitats. Our class has just learned about living things and their habitats. Use this webquest to create your own living things and their habitats. Remember a living thing: Grows Moves Reproduces A Habitat is a place (home) for living things. A habitat provides four important things: 1. Food 2. Shelter 3. Space 4. Water Now you get to decide ...

D., Mrs.

2006-10-11

6

Into Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource presents information about using living things like trees and coral reefs and everyday occurrences like snowfalls to look at what has happened in past climates in order to understand what is happening today, or what might happen in the future. Scientists who do this are called paleoclimatologists. Some of the things that can be learned from tree rings include insect outbreaks, glacial activity, volcanic events, fires, floods, and earthquakes that might have occurred in the area. Oxygen trapped in ice cores can provide information about past temperatures. Carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen peroxide in ice also give information about past climates. The tephra (volcanic ash) and sulfate in the ice allow reconstruction of the Earth's volcanic history and at low latitudes these layers can also preserve pollen, organic matter, and insects. There is also detailed information on what can be learned from coral reefs.

7

Fuel for Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners observe what happens when yeast cells are provided with a source of food (sugar). Red cabbage "juice" will serve as an indicator for the presence of carbon dioxide. Learners will observe how carbon dioxide gas is given off by yeast cells, as indicated by turning the mixture bright pink. This activity is broken up in three parts or sessions: making the indicator (can be done in advance), demonstration of cabbage juice indicator, and conducting the investigation.

Moreno, Nancy P.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Dresden, Judith

2011-01-01

8

Classification of Living Things: Introduction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Dennis O'Neal of Palomar College designed this site to introduce students to a tutorial on the Classification of Living Things. Topics addressed at this site include the Linnaen system of classification, amount of species in our world, the importance of biological diversity, the history of classification, and the relevancy of classification in the present day. There are links to the Main Menu, a Practice Quiz, and the other topics in the tutorial including Principals of Class, Kingdom to Subphylum, Class, and Subclass to Infraclass. Additionally, to link to a comprehensive glossary of relevant terms click on the Ecological Niches or Natural Selection links at the bottom of the site. For users with QuickTime there are several sound files that provide correct pronunciation of key terms.

O'Neal, Dennis

2008-08-26

9

The Concept of Living and Non-Living Things in the World of Primary School Students in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this research is to reveal how the concepts of living and non-living things are in the world of the primary school (4th and 5th classes) students, what they remember when they are told about living and non-living things and what the characteristics of living and non-living things are according to them. The research is a descriptive…

Topsakal, Unsal Umdu

2010-01-01

10

A Spurious Category-Specific Visual Agnosia for Living Things in Normal Human and Nonhuman Primates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with visual associative agnosia have a particular difficulty in identifying visually presented living things (plants and animals) as opposed to nonliving things. It has been claimed that this effect cannot be explained by differences in the inherent visual discriminability of living and nonliving things. To test this claim further, we performed two experiments with normal subjects. In Experiment 1

David Gaffan; Charles A. Heywood

1993-01-01

11

Demonstrating the Influence of UV Rays on Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes an experiment that introduces students to the different types of UV rays and their effects on living things by using appropriate teaching materials and equipment. Demonstrates the effects of exposure to UV-B (fluorescent) and UV-C (germicidal) lamps by using bananas, duckweed, and the fruit fly. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)|

Morimoto, Kouichi

2002-01-01

12

The Internet of Things for Ambient Assisted Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet. Technological advancements lead to smart objects being capable of identifying, locating, sensing and connecting and thus leading to new forms of communication between people and things and things themselves. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) encompasses technical systems to support elderly people in their daily routine to allow an

A. Dohr; R. Modre-Opsrian; Mario Drobics; Dieter Hayn; Günter Schreier

2010-01-01

13

A spurious category-specific visual agnosia for living things in normal human and nonhuman primates.  

PubMed

Abstract Patients with visual associative agnosia have a particular difficulty in identifying visually presented living things (plants and animals) as opposed to nonliving things. It has been claimed that this effect cannot be explained by differences in the inherent visual discriminability of living and nonliving things. To test this claim further, we performed two experiments with normal subjects. In Experiment 1 normal human observers were asked to identify objects in tachistoscopically presented line drawings. They made more errors with living things than with nonliving things. In Experiment 2 normal monkeys learned to discriminate among the same line drawings for food reward. They made many more errors in discriminating among living things than nonliving things. Agnosic patients' responses to the same line drawings were made available to us for correlative analysis with the subjects' responses to these drawings in Experiments 1 and 2. We conclude that a category-specific visual agnosia for living things can arise as a consequence of a modality-specific but not category-specific impairment in visual representation, since living things are more similar to each other visually than nonliving things are. PMID:23972123

Gaffan, D; Heywood, C A

1993-01-01

14

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they…

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-01-01

15

Mathematics and Living Things. Student Text. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed for grade eight to enrich and supplement the usual courses of instruction. Mathematics and Living Things (MALT) utilizes exercises in biological science to derive data through which mathematical concepts and principles may be introduced and expanded. Chapters included are: (1) Leaves and Natural Variation: Measurement of…

Faber, Norman J.; And Others

16

Mathematics and Living Things. Student Text. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is designed for grade eight to enrich and supplement the usual courses of instruction. Mathematics and Living Things (MALT) utilizes exercises in biological science to derive data through which mathematical concepts and principles may be introduced and expanded. Chapters included are: (1) Leaves and Natural Variation: Measurement of…

Faber, Norman J.; And Others

17

How to Care for Living Things in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) publication, the advantages of having living things in the classroom are discussed. Also given is a brief description of the facilities and environments required for various common mammals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and plants. (CP)

Pratt, Grace K.

18

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they demonstrated significantly longer reaction times for classifying plants compared to animals and for classifying dynamic objects compared to static inanimate objects. Findings indicated that, despite prior learning in biology, the intuitive conception of living things persists up to age 15-16 years, affecting related reasoning processes. Consideration of these findings may help educators in their decisions about the nature of examples they use in their classrooms.

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-02-01

19

How Do Young Children Deal with Hybrids of Living and Non-Living Things: The Case of Humanoid Robots  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this experiment, we tested children's intuitions about entities that bridge the contrast between living and non-living things. Three- and four-year-olds were asked to attribute a range of properties associated with living things and machines to novel category-defying complex artifacts (humanoid robots), a familiar living thing (a girl), and a…

Saylor, Megan M.; Somanader, Mark; Levin, Daniel T.; Kawamura, Kazuhiko

2010-01-01

20

Exploring Korean young children's ideas about living things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative study explored concepts of living things that five- and six-year-old Korean children held prior to formal instructional interventions and how their concepts were changed and developed over one semester in a kindergarten classroom. Six focal children in a class of 30 were interviewed in two phases and their hands-on classroom activities and teacher-children interactions were observed. The teacher's journal was also used to gather data. As the study was conducted, a number of alternative concepts related to the children's perceptions of living things were identified and described. The researcher interviewed the children to determine their initial ideas, using an informal interview guide; they responded whether certain objects were living or not, and how they told if the particular objects were living or not. The classroom activities were also observed in large/small groups and individually. An assisting observer viewed the classroom activities and simultaneously recorded science-related teacher-children interactions and the children's hands-on activities. Later the researcher made a transcription of the observer's notes. The data were also collected from the teacher's journal, in which she recorded everyday classroom activities and reflected on teaching and learning. Finally, after 8 weeks of the 16-week instructional intervention, the researcher interviewed the children, using a formal interview guide, as to how their concepts of living things had changed and developed. The researcher interviewed the children as to whether particular objects were plants or animals, neither or both, and the criteria they used to decide. The study showed that the kindergarten children had solid and unique ideas based on their everyday experience with living and non-living things prior to the formal instructional inventions. In the classroom activities, the children showed that they rejected or changed several of their own concepts of living things. The instructional interventions facilitated the children in developing scientific ideas about certain living things. Several of the children's ideas and concepts changed and corresponded to scientific viewpoints. However, others maintained their existing ideas, which were not scientifically based. The study revealed the complexity of teaching kindergarten children a scientific understanding of living things and that teaching the interconnectedness among objects was essential to elaborate concepts. The results of the research suggested improvements for the conceptual change teaching methodology used in the classroom. The study provided insight into the effects of teacher-children interactions and teaching interventions. The study also indicated that the interview and observation research methodology used in this study was a useful vehicle to explore the children's initial ideas and conceptual development in teaching and learning science. The findings of the study suggest that teacher education for teachers of young children should include a complex of instructions because teaching and learning concepts of living things and other related science concepts are complex processes.

Kwon, Young Re

21

Exploring Korean young children's ideas about living things  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study explored concepts of living things that five- and six-year-old Korean children held prior to formal instructional interventions and how their concepts were changed and developed over one semester in a kindergarten classroom. Six focal children in a class of 30 were interviewed in two phases and their hands-on classroom activities and teacher-children interactions were observed. The teacher's

Young Re Kwon

2003-01-01

22

Is it living or non living?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Once completed, students will have a deeper understanding of what is living and non living. Students will be able to identify the characteristics of non living and living things and will be able to classify them in an environment. Take this pretest to test your knowlege of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz Read this to learn more about living and non living things.Living vs Non Living Things Living things need 7 characteristics of life. Click on this link to learn more about what they are.7 Characteristics of Living Things Living and non living things have different characteristics. Look ...

Aitken, Miss

2009-04-17

23

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on students’ understanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its curriculum. For the first three years of school, Brunei children are taught in Malay and then for the remainder of their education, instruction is in English. This research is concerned with the influence that this bilingual education system has on children’s learning of science. The purpose was to document the patterns of Brunei students’ developing understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things and examine the impact in the change in language as the medium of instruction. A cross-sectional case study design was used in one primary school. Data collection included an interview ( n = 75), which consisted of forced-response and semi-structured interview questions, a categorisation task and classroom observation. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that the transition from Malay to English as the language of instruction from Primary 4 onwards restricted the students’ ability to express their understandings about living things, to discuss related scientific concepts and to interpret and analyse scientific questions. From a social constructivist perspective these language factors will potentially impact on the students’ cognitive development by limiting the expected growth of the students’ understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things.

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-07-01

24

The lived experience of doing the right thing: a parse method study.  

PubMed

The purposes of this research were to discover the structure of the experience of doing the right thing and to contribute to nursing knowledge. The Parse research method was used in this study to answer the research question: What is the structure of the lived experience of doing the right thing? Participants were 10 individuals living in the community. The central finding of this study was the following structure: The lived experience of doing the right thing is steadfast uprightness amid adversity, as honorableness with significant affiliations emerges with contentment. New knowledge extended the theory of humanbecoming and enhanced understanding of the experience of doing the right thing. PMID:22228528

Smith, Sandra Maxwell

2012-01-01

25

How do young children deal with hybrids of living and non-living things: the case of humanoid robots.  

PubMed

In this experiment, we tested children's intuitions about entities that bridge the contrast between living and non-living things. Three- and four-year-olds were asked to attribute a range of properties associated with living things and machines to novel category-defying complex artifacts (humanoid robots), a familiar living thing (a girl), and a familiar complex artifact (a camera). Results demonstrated that 4-year-olds tended to treat the category-defying entities like members of the inanimate group, while 3-year-olds showed more variability in their responding. This finding suggests that preschoolers' ability to classify complex artifacts that cross the living-non-living divide becomes more stable between the ages of 3 and 4 and that children at both ages draw on a range of properties when classifying such entities. PMID:21121470

Saylor, Megan M; Somanader, Mark; Levin, Daniel T; Kawamura, Kazuhiko

2010-11-01

26

Living Vs. Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First mouse over the objects to see some of the characteristics of living and non living things.Living Nonliving Characteristics 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Benson, Carrie

2012-10-08

27

Living Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First take this pretest to test your knowledge of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Benson, Mrs.

2010-02-23

28

Young Children Learning about Living Things: A Case Study of Conceptual Change from Ontological and Social Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although research from a developmental/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative…

Venville, Grady

2004-01-01

29

Revisiting Preschoolers' Living Things Concept: A Microgenetic Analysis of Conceptual Change in Basic Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological…

Opfer, John E.; Siegler, Robert S.

2004-01-01

30

Revisiting Preschoolers' Living Things Concept: A Microgenetic Analysis of Conceptual Change in Basic Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological…

Opfer, John E.; Siegler, Robert S.

2004-01-01

31

LED and Semiconductor Photo-effects on Living Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied LED irradiation effects on plants and animals in the visible to UV region of light from GaN LEDs. The results are as follows. Blue light considers to be effective for pearl cultivation or for attraction of small fishes living in near the surface of sea such as Pompano or Sardine, white light radiation is effective for cultivation of botanical plankton for shells. Other experiments of UV light irradiation attracting effect on baby sea turtle and the germination UV effect of mushroom, green light weight enhance effect on baby pigs, light vernalization effect of vegitable and Ge far infrared therapic effect on human body are also given.

Fujiyasu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takemitsu; Fujiyasu, Kentarou; Ujihara, Shirou; Watanabe, Naoharu; Sunayama, Shunji; Ikoma, Shuuji

32

Science K-12, Living Things Are Products of Their Heredity and Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, health, general science, physical science) and grade level. Concepts regarding characteristics of living things are stressed in objectives for the primary grades (K-5), and reproductive biology is covered…

Utica City School District, NY.

33

Young children learning about living things: A case study of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research from a developmental\\/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative data-collection methods to investigate the process of conceptual change from

Grady Venville

2004-01-01

34

War is not Healthy for Children and Other Living Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

War systematically destroys physical environments and ecosystems. Although the Machel Study contributed much to our understanding about the psychosocial impacts of war on children, the Study did not link their suffering to the habitat destruction always caused by armed conflict. This article extends the Machel Study by discussing the ways that damaged environments lead to children’s physical and psychological harm,

Deborah Du Nann Winter

1998-01-01

35

Invitations to the Matter-Energy Cycle. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about matter and energy which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

36

Invitations to Cells: Life's Building Blocks. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about cells which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

37

Invitations to Interdependence: Caught in the Web. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about ecosystems which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

38

Little Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey), which is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 dwarf irregular and 4 blue compact dwarf galaxies that is centered around H I-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The H I-line data are characterized by high sensitivity (<=1.1 mJy beam-1 per channel), high spectral resolution (<=2.6 km s-1), and high angular resolution (~6''). The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby (<=10.3 Mpc; 6'' is <=300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as H I map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, velocity-flux profiles, and surface gas density profiles. In addition to the H I data we have GALEX UV and ground-based UBV and H? images for most of the galaxies, and JHK images for some. Spitzer mid-IR images are available for many of the galaxies as well. These data sets are available online.

Hunter, Deidre A.; Ficut-Vicas, Dana; Ashley, Trisha; Brinks, Elias; Cigan, Phil; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Heesen, Volker; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Megan; Oh, Se-Heon; Rupen, Michael P.; Schruba, Andreas; Simpson, Caroline E.; Walter, Fabian; Westpfahl, David J.; Young, Lisa M.; Zhang, Hong-Xin

2012-11-01

39

LITTLE THINGS  

SciTech Connect

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey), which is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 dwarf irregular and 4 blue compact dwarf galaxies that is centered around H I-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The H I-line data are characterized by high sensitivity ({<=}1.1 mJy beam{sup -1} per channel), high spectral resolution ({<=}2.6 km s{sup -1}), and high angular resolution ({approx}6''). The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby ({<=}10.3 Mpc; 6'' is {<=}300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as H I map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, velocity-flux profiles, and surface gas density profiles. In addition to the H I data we have GALEX UV and ground-based UBV and H{alpha} images for most of the galaxies, and JHK images for some. Spitzer mid-IR images are available for many of the galaxies as well. These data sets are available online.

Hunter, Deidre A.; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Megan; Zhang Hongxin [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Ficut-Vicas, Dana; Brinks, Elias; Heesen, Volker [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, CP 204, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Cigan, Phil; Westpfahl, David J.; Young, Lisa M. [Physics Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Oh, Se-Heon [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Rupen, Michael P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-11-01

40

'Things you can't learn from books': teaching recovery from a lived experience perspective.  

PubMed

Mental health policy in Australia is committed to the development of recovery-focused services and facilitating consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery. Negative attitudes of mental health professionals have been identified as a major barrier to achieving these goals. Although the education of health professionals has been identified as a major strategy, there is limited evidence to suggest that consumers are actively involved in this education process. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate students' views and opinions at having been taught 'recovery in mental health nursing' by a person with a lived experience of significant mental health challenges. In-depth interviews were held with 12 students. Two main themes were identified: (i) 'looking through fresh eyes' - what it means to have a mental illness; and (ii) 'it's all about the teaching'. The experience was perceived positively; students referred to the impact made on their attitudes and self-awareness, and their ability to appreciate the impact of mental illness on the individual person. Being taught by a person with lived experience was considered integral to the process. This innovative approach could enhance consumer participation and recovery-focused care. PMID:23020070

Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Welch, Tony; Moxham, Lorna Jane

2012-10-01

41

Remembrance of things past: modelling the relationship between species' abundances in living communities and death assemblages  

PubMed Central

Accumulations of dead skeletal material are a valuable archive of past ecological conditions. However, such assemblages are not equivalent to living communities because they mix the remains of multiple generations and are altered by post-mortem processes. The abundance of a species in a death assemblage can be quantitatively modelled by successively integrating the product of an influx time series and a post-mortem loss function (a decay function with a constant half-life). In such a model, temporal mixing increases expected absolute dead abundance relative to average influx as a linear function of half-life and increases variation in absolute dead abundance values as a square-root function of half-life. Because typical abundance distributions of ecological communities are logarithmically distributed, species' differences in preservational half-life would have to be very large to substantially alter species' abundance ranks (i.e. make rare species common or vice-versa). In addition, expected dead abundances increase at a faster rate than their range of variation with increased time averaging, predicting greater consistency in the relative abundance structure of death assemblages than their parent living community.

Olszewski, Thomas D.

2012-01-01

42

Feature Types and Object Categories: Is Sensorimotoric Knowledge Different for Living and Nonliving Things?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Some models of semantic memory claim that items from living and nonliving domains have different feature-type profiles. Data from feature generation and perceptual modality rating tasks were compared to evaluate this claim. Results from two living (animals, fruits/vegetables) and two nonliving (tools, vehicles) categories showed that…

Ankerstein, Carrie A.; Varley, Rosemary A.; Cowell, Patricia E.

2012-01-01

43

A common processing system for the concepts of artifacts and actions? Evidence from a case of a disproportionate conceptual impairment for living things.  

PubMed

We report the results of a single-case study carried out with a brain-damaged patient, G.C., whose conceptual knowledge of living things (animals and plants) was significantly more impaired than his knowledge of artifacts and his knowledge of actions, which were similarly impaired. We examined whether this pattern of conceptual impairment could be accounted for by the "sensory/functional" or the "manipulability" account for category-specific conceptual impairments advocated within the feature-based organization theory. To this end, we assessed, first, the patient's knowledge of sensory compared to functional and motor features and, second, his knowledge of nonmanipulable compared to manipulable items. The findings showed that the patient's disproportionate impairment for living things compared to both artifacts and actions was not associated with a disproportionate impairment of sensory compared to functional or motor knowledge or with a relative sparing of manipulable compared to nonmanipulable items. We then discuss how alternative theories of conceptual knowledge organization could account for G.C.'s pattern of category-specific deficit. PMID:22114769

Pillon, Agnesa; d'Honincthun, Peggy

2011-02-01

44

Can We Make Definite Categorization of Student Attitudes? A Rough Set Approach to Investigate Students' Implicit Attitudinal Typologies toward Living Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates the possibility of analyzing educational data using the theory of rough sets which is mostly employed in the fields of data analysis and data mining. Data were collected using an open-ended conceptual understanding test of the living things administered to first-year high school students. The responses of randomly selected…

Narli, Serkan; Yorek, Nurettin; Sahin, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

2010-01-01

45

Selective impairment of living things and musical instruments on a verbal 'Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire' in a case of apperceptive visual agnosia.  

PubMed

Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes separately into account four categories of living beings (animals, fruits, vegetables and body parts) and of artefacts (furniture, tools, vehicles and musical instruments), does not require a visual analysis and allows to distinguish errors concerning super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic knowledge. When the total number of errors obtained on all the categories of living and non-living beings was considered, a non-significant trend toward a higher number of errors in living stimuli was observed. This difference, however, became significant when body parts and musical instruments were excluded from the analysis. Furthermore, the number of errors obtained on the musical instruments was similar to that obtained on the living categories of animals, fruits and vegetables and significantly higher of that obtained in the other artefact categories. This difference was still significant when familiarity, frequency of use and prototypicality of each stimulus entered into a logistic regression analysis. On the other hand, a separate analysis of errors obtained on questions exploring super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic attributes showed that the differences between living and non-living stimuli and between musical instruments and other artefact categories were mainly due to errors obtained on questions exploring perceptual features. All these data are at variance with the 'domains of knowledge' hypothesis', which assumes that the breakdown of different categories of living and non-living things respects the distinction between biological entities and artefacts and support the models assuming that 'category-specific semantic disorders' are the by-product of the differential weighting that visual-perceptual and functional (or action-related) attributes have in the construction of different biological and artefacts categories. PMID:22771855

Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

2012-07-07

46

Comparison of burning characteristics of live and dead chaparral fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wildfire spread in living vegetation, such as chaparral in southern California, often causes significant damage to infrastructure and ecosystems. The effects of physical characteristics of fuels and fuel beds on live fuel burning and whether live fuels differ fundamentally from dead woody fuels in their burning characteristics are not well understood. Toward this end, three common chaparral fuels prevalent in

Lulu Sun; Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

2006-01-01

47

Visual and Semantic Processing of Living Things and Artifacts: An fMRI Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We carried out an fMRI study with a twofold purpose: to investigate the relationship between networks dedicated to semantic and visual processing and to address the issue of whether semantic memory is subserved by a unique network or by different subsystems, according to semantic category or feature type. To achieve our goals, we administered a word– picture matching task, with

Gian Daniele Zannino; Ivana Buccione; Roberta Perri; Emiliano Macaluso; Emanuele Lo Gerfo; Carlo Caltagirone; Giovanni A. Carlesimo

2009-01-01

48

Why the Wild Things Are: Animals in the Lives of Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book examines children's many connections to animals and their developmental significance, exploring the growth of the human animal connection, and showing how children's innate interest in animals is shaped by their families and their social worlds, and may in turn shape the kind of people they will become. Chapter 1 documents how theory…

Melson, Gail F.

49

Disaster's Aftermath: Rebuilding Schools Is One Thing--Rebuilding Children's Lives Is Quite Another.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Children who experience disasters such as Hurricane Andrew in southern Florida, are prone to severe and debilitating stress. Districts can prepare by designating a disaster management commander, a search-and-rescue team, and a reuniting team. Planning should include drills, recovery, and restoration elements. (Contains 10 references.) (MLH)|

Black, Susan

2001-01-01

50

Emerging Differentiation of Folkbiology and Folkpsychology: Attributions of Biological and Psychological Properties to Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined whether children differentiate or confuse the domains of folk biology and folk psychology. Children and adult subjects were asked whether the animals depicted in pictures possessed certain biological and psychological properties. Results indicated that by kindergarten, notions of folk psychology and folk biology are sufficiently…

Coley, John D.

1995-01-01

51

Stars are Small Dark-Coloured Things That Live in Holes in the Ground  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter, attention is drawn to some indigenous stories about disguise and transformation, taken from this magnificent country Namibia and from southern Africa as a whole, with a focus on a complex of ideas about the stars. Astonishingly, these stories suggest a meeting of minds from different worlds - Ken Freeman's and that of the San or Bushmen 130 years ago. San stories about the stars contribute to our understanding of our relationship to the universe in a similar way to that which Ken Freeman's revelations of masking and shrouding help understand the universe itself. The cosmology of the San universe construed at times through the agency of masked and shrouded beings known as therianthropes was partly illuminated by the work of George Stow (the father of San rock art research in southern Africa), two !kun San boys, a group of ?xam San and a remarkable woman called Lucy Lloyd.

Skotnes, Pippa

52

Yersinia pestis Live Vaccine with Improved Characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The live plague vaccine strain Y. pestis EV line NIIEG widely used for human and animal immunisation proves a high level of specific immunity against both bubonic and pneumonic plague. We constructed an EV NIIEG mutant in the acyltransferase gene lpxM that resulted in the production of a less toxic penta-acylated lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Y. pestis, tested

V. A. Feodorova; L. N. Pan’kina; E. P. Savostina; O. S. Kuznetsov; N. P. Konnov; L. V. Sayapina; S. V. Dentovskaya; R. Z. Shaikhutdinova; S. A. Ageev; B. Lindner; A. N. Kondakova; N. A. Kocharova; S. N. Senchenkova; O. Holst; G. B. Pier; Y. A. Knirel; A. P. Anisimov; V. L. Motin

2009-01-01

53

"The Second Thing to Hell is Living under that Bridge": Narratives of Women Living with Victimization, Serious Mental Illness, and in Homelessness.  

PubMed

The increasing rates of violence committed against homeless women living with serious mental illness (SMI) have been well documented. These increasing rates of violence need attention as they are a serious public health concern. The purpose of this qualitative study is to increase our understanding of victimization among this population as perceived by those who have lived the experience. The study sample consists of 15 homeless adult women who self-reported having been diagnosed with a SMI. The findings highlight the reality that, provided with the right type of resources, positive growth can occur among these women despite lifelong events of trauma, victimization, and loss. PMID:24131415

Bonugli, Rebecca; Lesser, Janna; Escandon, Socorro

2013-11-01

54

Words are not things  

PubMed Central

On a traditional view, words are the fundamental units of verbal behavior. They are independent, autonomous things that symbolically represent or refer to other independent, autonomous things, often in some other dimension. Ascertaining what those other things are constitutes determining the meaning of a word. On a behavior-analytic view, verbal behavior is ongoing, functional operant activity occasioned by antecedent factors and reinforced by its consequences, particularly consequences that are mediated by other members of the same verbal community. Functional relations rather than structure select the response unit. The behavior-analytic point of view clarifies such important contemporary issues in psychology as (a) the role of scientific theories and explanations, (b) educational practices, and (c) equivalence classes, so that there is no risk of strengthening the traditional view that words are things that symbolically represent other things.

Moore, J.

2000-01-01

55

Living or Nonliving?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Categorizing organisms as living or nonliving things may seem to be intuitive by nature. Yet, it is regulated by scientific criteria. Students come to school with rules already in place. Their categorizing criteria have already been influenced by their personal experiences, also known as observations and inferences. They believe that all things

Legaspi, Britt; Straits, William

2011-01-01

56

Book review: Things That Make Us Smart by Donald A Norman (Addison-Wesley, 1993)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Donald Norman's new book 'Things That Make Us Smart' develops the themes raised earlier in his 'The Psychology of Everyday Things' (POET). POET was concerned with the ways in which designed things can help or hinder us in completing everyday activities like opening doors, operating drinks machines, or using the bathroom. He convincingly showed how many of our artifacts are

1994-01-01

57

Science K-12, Living Things in Continuous Change. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, general science, physical science, earth science) and grade level. In grades K-6, objectives for topics of science study include conditions for plants and animals to live, adaptation, conservation,…

Utica City School District, NY.

58

Living by the \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines empirically the effects of multimarket contact on pricing in the U.S. airline industry. The analysis of the time-series and cross-sectional variability of airline fares in the 1,000 largest domestic city-pair routes reveals the presence of statistically significant and quantitatively important multimarket effects--fares are higher in city-pair markets served by carriers with extensive interroute contacts. These findings are

William N. Evans; Ioannis N. Kessides

1994-01-01

59

Running Things.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Despite the differences between the military and industry, the practice of leadership and management in the two arenas is not so dissimilar as one might think. Cut to the bone, it's a matter of running things. That is what leaders and managers do, whether...

D. A. Starry

1987-01-01

60

String Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

String Thing is an interactive online game in which learners change a virtual string's tension, length, and gauge to create different musical pitches. Educators can use this game as an introduction to sound and before completing any activities on music or building instruments. Alternatively, educators can use this game to review or assess these concepts.

Wgbh

2010-01-01

61

The Childhood Living Arrangements of Children and the Characteristics of Their Marriages  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, the author uses data from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth to examine the impact of childhood living arrangements on the characteristics of marriages formed by womenbetween 1970and 1989.The focus is on sociodemographic characteristics of marriage that may be taken to indicate a heightened risk of marital stress or marital disruption. With the exception of parental

Jay D. Teachman

2004-01-01

62

Lively Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintaining living things in a classroom requires knowledge and preparation. It also requires the proper equipment and space. There are two primary goals in the study of living things: first, we want our students to respect life, and second, we want them to appreciate its complexity in nature. Observing healthy living things in school accomplishes both goals. This chapter describes the appropriate precautions that should be taken into consideration when bringing living organisms into classrooms.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2002-01-01

63

Telechelic polymers by living and controlled\\/living polymerization methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Telechelic polymers, defined as macromolecules that contain two reactive end groups, are used as cross-linkers, chain extenders, and important building blocks for various macromolecular structures, including block and graft copolymers, star, hyperbranched or dendritic polymers. This review article describes the general techniques for the preparation of telechelic polymers by living and controlled\\/living polymerization methods; namely atom transfer radical polymerization, nitroxide

Mehmet Atilla Tasdelen; Muhammet U. Kahveci; Yusuf Yagci

2011-01-01

64

GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON THE ORGANISATION OF SEMANTIC MEMORY IN THE BRAIN:IS “LIVING THINGS” AN INNATE CATEGORY?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The organisation of semantic memory into separately lesionable or imageable components must be determined by some combination of genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the relative contributions of these two factors in establishing the functional architecture of semantic memory. By assessing the semantic memory impairment of an individual who sustained brain damage as a newborn, it is possible

Martha J. Farah; Carol Rabinowitz

2003-01-01

65

Energy Cycle in Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This diagram shows how energy from the sun cycles through plants and animals. Plants create sugars through photosynthesis which animals can then use for energy. ATP, glucose, and the mitochondria are also explained. Many key terms are hyperlinked to provide more detailed definitions.

2012-01-01

66

Macromolecular architectures by living and controlled\\/living polymerizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery of living anionic polymerization by Szwarc 50 years ago opened the way to the synthesis of model polymers. This ground-breaking discovery inspired many researchers to develop controlled\\/living routes for a plethora of monomers including those not compatible with anionic polymerization. These methods and their combinations serve as an arsenal for the synthesis of well-defined polymeric materials with predetermined

Nikos Hadjichristidis; Hermis Iatrou; Marinos Pitsikalis; Jimmy Mays

2006-01-01

67

How Things Fly  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the National Air and Space Museum, this site allows users to visit the special exhibit How Things Fly. In How Do Things Fly? the following topics are discussed in a question and answer format: Can you fly?, Air is "stuff"!, Balloons, Animal flight, Airplanes, and Spacecraft. The physics behind flight for each topic is at a general level, making this site an excellent source for K-12 education. Specific science activities, along with recommended reading, are found in the Resource Center. Additional links contain interesting comments and activities for particular topics.

1999-01-01

68

Revealing Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Revealing Things is the Smithsonian Institution's first specifically web based exhibit; both the content and design of the site are fascinating. This work in progress is a prototype of a future, more fully-developed exhibit. It concentrates on "common, everyday objects to tell stories about people, their cultures, and the meanings they associate with their possessions." Items discussed include a 1937 chemistry set, a Vietnam memorial offering, a duckpin bowling ball, an early TV, and a celery vase, among many others. Organized according to theme, era, and object, the exhibit is presented in a new pop-up browser window. Within that window, navigation takes place via "maplets," a connected series of moving colored labels representing the three ways that the exhibit is organized. Users can move slider bars to effect the placement of the labels, and search on terms to create their own thematic or object-based exhibit. When the cursor is placed over an object label, scrolling text introduces it. Alternatively, the site can be navigated via a series of icons that run down the middle of the exhibition page. When an icon is clicked, the series of icons may rearrange. Each exhibit contains a photo of the object, along with written commentary on it. In addition, sound is sometimes available to play period music, or render out loud the exhibition text. The most fully-developed object at this time is "Patched Bellbottoms." Users are advised to read the help files on both the main page and the exhibit page for navigation tips. The exhibit is a fascinating precursor of what could be a new way to interactively view museum exhibits, allowing the user to cast off the restraints of a linear orientation. Note that the exhibit is extremely browser and bandwidth intensive.

1998-01-01

69

Teaching the Nature of Science Through the Concept of Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By virtue of its connection with scientific literacy, the nature of science has been considered essential subject matter for the science curriculum. With this in mind, seventh-grade students were introduced to three aspects of the nature of science: (1) the distinction between observation and inference, (2) the subjective, and (3) the tentative aspects of the nature of science (Lederman et al., 2002). These three aspects of the nature of science were incorporated into lessons on the characteristics of living things.

Kim, Byoung-Sug; Mckinney, Mary

2007-11-01

70

Doing the right thing by incorporating evidence and professional goals in the ethics consult.  

PubMed

Classic ethical decision-making models are discussed, and two recommendations are provided. The author proposes applying evidence-based position statements to ethical deliberation and suggests acknowledging the differing philosophical underpinnings and goals of various stakeholders, including nurses, physicians, families, institutions, and the nation. Examples are provided throughout. When combined with evidence-based information and consideration of group goals, traditional ethical analysis may help nurses "do the right thing." PMID:23772802

Catlin, Anita

2013-06-17

71

A stylistic approach to the god of small things written by Arundhati Roy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis presents a creative-analytical hybrid production in relation to the stylistic distinctiveness in The God of Small Things, the debut novel of Arundhati Roy. Roy’s text drew the world’s gaze after winning the Booker Prize in 1997. Many studies have been written on diverse aspects of the book, and much has been said regarding the writer’s style. However, those

CHAN Wing Yi Monica

2007-01-01

72

Youth Safety On a Living Internet: Report of the Online Safety and Technology Working Group.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Internet is a living thing. It mirrors and serves as a platform for a spectrum of humanity's lives, sociality, publications and productions. And as with all living things, its current state is guided and molded by the years of evolution it has gone th...

2010-01-01

73

Demographic and Disease Characteristics of People With Multiple Sclerosis Living in Urban and Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares demographic and disease-related characteristics of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) living in urban and rural areas. The data analyzed for this study were collected from a survey of 1518 people with MS living throughout the United States from October 2004 through January 2005. We found significant urban-rural differences in various MS characteristics, including type of MS. A

Robert J. Buchanan; Randolph Schiffer; Alexa Stuifbergen; Li Zhu; Suojin Wang; Bonnie J. Chakravorty; MyungSuk Kim

74

Living arrangements in Europe: exploring gender differences and institutional characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

While several social, economic and financial indicators point to a growing convergence among European countries, striking differences still emerge in the timing of leaving home for adult children. In Southern countries (as Spain, Italy or Portugal) in 2001 more than 70 percent of young adults between 18 and 34 years of age live with their parents, whereas the corresponding number

Maria Concetta Chiuri; Daniela Del Boca

2007-01-01

75

The Edges of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the radial column density distribution in a sample of 9 galaxies taken from the THINGS survey. The HI data have been used to probe the extent of the neutral (atomic) gas disks down to column densities of less than 0.1 ?? pc-2. The size of the disks might be set simply by the amount of available gas that has contributed to the formation of the galaxy or truncated by ionisation by the extragalactic radiation field once the HI column density has dropped below a certain threshold.

Portas, A.; Brinks, E.; Usero, A.; Walter, F.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Kennicutt, R. C.

2012-09-01

76

Sources and Formation of the Ribbon Observed by IBEX: ``... Good Things may be Close by''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taking the first images of heliospheric boundary with Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) discovered a giant structure across the sky, called “the Ribbon”. The location and the orientation of the Ribbon seem to be associated with the interstellar magnetic field. Fine structures as well as temporal variations^{1} have been found in the Ribbon. While there are first model attempts to explain its location in the sky and its possible formation, the source of this Ribbon is not yet known. It could well consist of several components, for instance, a static component whose source is deeper in the heliosheath or beyond and a dynamic component that is close to or at the termination shock. IBEX data show that the peak energy is around 1 keV, which strongly indicates a close association with the solar wind, either the bulk ions or the entrained pickup ions. Models have been proposed using a distant source region well beyond the heliopause (HP) that extend over several hundred AU into the interstellar medium, in which pickup ions from neutral solar wind produce ENAs by charge exchange. Such a model could produce a ribbon structure, however, temporal variations are difficult to explain. In this alternative model, we concentrate on a population of reflected solar wind ions reflected and gyrating at the termination shock (TS). A large fraction of the incident ions forms a gyrotropic distribution concentrated perpendicular to the upstream magnetic field direction. These ions will charge exchange with interstellar neutral atoms and thus may form a major source for the observed ENA flux, which forms the Ribbon. One advantage of such a model is that it allows relatively rapid time variations of the observed ENA flux. In this model, it is the global shape of the TS, mediated by the interstellar magnetic field, which controls the location of the enhanced ENA intensity as well as the width of the ribbon. The model assumption is that the external magnetic and/or gas dynamic pressure in the outer heliosheath shifts the HP and the TS closer to the Sun. This may result in a narrow ridge of pressure on the inner side of the heliopause. Hence, this would also provide a possibility to remotely sense the global structure of the TS with the Ribbon. We will discuss advantages, limitations, and new possibilities of such a model for the ribbon formation. ^{1} McComas et al, JGR, 2010, in press

Kucharek, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Lee, M. A.; Moebius, E.; Wurz, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Funsten, H. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Janzen, P. H.

2010-12-01

77

"MSN Was the next Big Thing after Beanie Babies": Children's Virtual Experiences as an Interface to Their Identities and Their Everyday Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article the author explores the seamlessness between children's online and offline worlds. For children, there is no dichotomy of online and offline, or virtual and real; the digital is so much intertwined into their lives and psyche that the one is entirely enmeshed with the other. Despite early research pointing to the differences that…

Thomas, Angela

2006-01-01

78

“All of Those Things We Don't Eat”: A Culture-Centered Approach to Dietary Health Meanings for Asian Indians Living in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article applies a culture-centered approach to analyze the dietary health meanings for Asian Indians living in the United States. The data were collected as part of a health promotion program evaluation designed to help Asian Indians reduce their risk of chronic disease. Community members who used two aspects of the program participated in two focus groups to learn about

Christopher J. Koenig; Mohan J. Dutta; Namratha Kandula; Latha Palaniappan

2012-01-01

79

What Things Still Don’t Do  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek’s What Things Do (2006). The four things that Verbeek does well are: (1) remind us of the importance of technological things; (2) bring Karl Jaspers\\u000a into the conversation on technology; (3) explain how technology “co-shapes” experience by reading Bruno Latour’s actor-network\\u000a theory in light of Don Ihde’s post-phenomenology; (4) develop a material aesthetics

David M. Kaplan

2009-01-01

80

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes: Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) is a randomized controlled trial designed to translate the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention into a community setting using community health workers engaged through an existing Diabetes Care Center (DCC). Overweight and obese (BMI 25-40 kg/m2) individuals with pre-diabetes (fasting blood glucose 95-125 mg/dl) with no medical contraindications to participate in a lifestyle intervention were recruited for participation in this study. Standard recruitment strategies were employed, including mass mailing, direct provider referral, and community events. Participant recruitment and randomization for this trial began in 2007 and was concluded in 2009. 1818 screenings were conducted; of these, 326 (17.9%) qualified and 301 (16.6%) participants were randomized over a 21 month period. 23.8% of potential participants were excluded during the initial telephone screening, primarily for BMI and recent history of CVD. The majority of participants (220, 73.1%) reported mass mailing as their primary source of information about the study. Mass mailing was more effective with participants who identified themselves as white when compared to African Americans. The cost of recruitment per randomized participant was $816, which includes direct costs and staff effort. 41% of the randomized participants were male and approximately 27% reported a race or ethnicity other than white. In comparison to the DPP study cohort, the HELP PD population is older, more educated and predominately white. These differences, reflecting in part the community in which HELP PD was conducted, may have implications for retention and adherence in the lifestyle intervention group.

Blackwell, Caroline S.; Foster, Kara A.; Isom, Scott; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Rosenberger, Erica L.; Goff, David C.

2010-01-01

81

Frequency and spatial characteristics of the electrophysical parameters of a living tree trunk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The method of vertical electrical sounding is applied to derive the spatial characteristic of the dc resistivity ? of a living pine trunk, ? = L-0.85, and the frequency characteristic of the ac resistance R of the same pine trunk, R = f-0.053. The results are simulated by the methods of fractal geometry, according to which ? = L - h + 2 and R ˜ f^{ - tfrac{3} {h} + 1} , where h is the walk dimension of the electric current in the trunk. From comparison between the experimental and theoretical results, it follows that h = 2.85 and fractal dimension D = 1/h = 0.35. Since D = 1, conducting layers form a Cantor set.

Balkhanov, V. K.; Advokatov, V. R.; Bashkuev, Yu. B.

2010-02-01

82

A Few New Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Citing the website "43 Things" (http://www.43things.com/) and derivatives Learning 2.0 (http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.com/) and California's School Library Learning 2.0 (http://www.schoollibrarylearning2.blogspot.com/), the author suggests other activities to help librarians and teacher-librarians train themselves for leadership in new…

Valenza, Joyce Kasman

2008-01-01

83

The Active Living by Design National Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health advocates have increasingly highlighted the importance of implementing comprehensive physical activity interventions that use an ecologic framework. Such a framework can broadly address physical activity barriers, such as the lack of opportunities, social support, policies, built environments, and community awareness. The Active Living by Design (ALbD) was a community grant program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF),

Philip Bors MPH; Mark Dessauer MA; Rich Bell MCP; Risa Wilkerson MA; Sarah L. Strunk MHA

2009-01-01

84

THINGS: The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present "The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)," a high spectral (<=5.2 km s-1) and spatial (~6'') resolution survey of H I emission in 34 nearby galaxies obtained using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The overarching scientific goal of THINGS is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the interstellar medium (ISM) related to galaxy morphology, star formation, and mass distribution across the Hubble sequence. Unique characteristics of the THINGS database are the homogeneous sensitivity as well as spatial and velocity resolution of the H I data, which is at the limit of what can be achieved with the VLA for a significant number of galaxies. A sample of 34 objects at distances 2 <~ D <~ 15 Mpc (resulting in linear resolutions of ~100 to 500 pc) are targeted in THINGS, covering a wide range of star formation rates (~10-3 to 6 M sun yr-1), total H I masses M HI (0.01 to 14 × 109 M sun), absolute luminosities M B (-11.5 to -21.7 mag), and metallicities (7.5 to 9.2 in units of 12+log[O/H]). We describe the setup of the VLA observations, the data reduction procedures, and the creation of the final THINGS data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the velocity fields, the second moment (velocity dispersion) maps and individual channel maps of each THINGS galaxy. The THINGS data products are made publicly available through a dedicated webpage. Accompanying THINGS papers (in this issue of the Astronomical Journal) address issues such as the small-scale structure of the ISM, the (dark) matter distribution in THINGS galaxies, and the processes leading to star formation.

Walter, Fabian; Brinks, Elias; de Blok, W. J. G.; Bigiel, Frank; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Thornley, Michele D.; Leroy, Adam

2008-12-01

85

THINGS: THE H I NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)', a high spectral ({<=}5.2 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution survey of H I emission in 34 nearby galaxies obtained using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The overarching scientific goal of THINGS is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the interstellar medium (ISM) related to galaxy morphology, star formation, and mass distribution across the Hubble sequence. Unique characteristics of the THINGS database are the homogeneous sensitivity as well as spatial and velocity resolution of the H I data, which is at the limit of what can be achieved with the VLA for a significant number of galaxies. A sample of 34 objects at distances 2 {approx}< D {approx}< 15 Mpc (resulting in linear resolutions of {approx}100 to 500 pc) are targeted in THINGS, covering a wide range of star formation rates ({approx}10{sup -3} to 6 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), total H I masses M{sub HI} (0.01 to 14 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), absolute luminosities M{sub B} (-11.5 to -21.7 mag), and metallicities (7.5 to 9.2 in units of 12+log[O/H]). We describe the setup of the VLA observations, the data reduction procedures, and the creation of the final THINGS data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the velocity fields, the second moment (velocity dispersion) maps and individual channel maps of each THINGS galaxy. The THINGS data products are made publicly available through a dedicated webpage. Accompanying THINGS papers (in this issue of the Astronomical Journal) address issues such as the small-scale structure of the ISM, the (dark) matter distribution in THINGS galaxies, and the processes leading to star formation.

Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Thornley, Michele D., E-mail: walter@mpia.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States)

2008-12-15

86

The LITTLE THINGS Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have assembled a multi-wavelength dataset on 41 relatively normal, nearby (<10 Mpc) gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies for the purpose of determining the drivers for star formation in these systems. This project is called LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our data include GALEX UV images, ground-based UBV and Halpha images, some ground-based JHK images, Spitzer archival mid-IR images, and HI-line maps. The HI maps, obtained with the VLA, go deep (12/6/2 hrs in B/C/D arrays) and are characterized by high spectral resolution (by random turbulent compression in dwarf galaxies? What happens to the star formation process in the outer parts of disks? What happens to the star formation process at breaks in the exponential light profiles? And, what happens in Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies? The LITTLE THINGS team is grateful to the National Science Foundation for funding through grants AST-0707563, AST-0707426, AST-0707468, and AST-0707835 to DAH, BGE, CES, and LMY.

Hunter, Deidre Ann; LITTLE THINGS Team

2012-01-01

87

Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced is an interactive screen-based work developed by The Ohio State University's Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design and the Department of Dance in collaboration with renowned choreographer William Forsythe. Pivoting on Forsythe's masterwork of visual complexity, One Flat Thing, reproduced (OFTr), the Synchronous Objects project seeks to enrich cross-disciplinary investigation and

Maria Palazzi; Norah Zuniga Shaw; William Forsythe; Matthew Lewis; Beth Albright; Michael Andereck; Sucheta Bhatawadekar; Hyowon Ban; Andrew Calhoun; Jane Drozd; Joshua Fry; Melissa Quintanilha; Anna Reed; Benjamin Schroeder; Lily Skove; Ashley Thorndike; Mary Twohig; Ola Ahlqvist; Peter Chan; Noel Cressie; Stephen Turk; Jill Johnson; Christopher Roman; Elizabeth Waterhouse; Scott deLahunta; Patrick Haggard; Alva Noe

2009-01-01

88

Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

2008-01-01

89

Universal Blood Donor Type: Is There Such a Thing?  

MedlinePLUS

... be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Universal blood donor type: Is there such a thing? By Mayo Clinic ... your e-mail address Sign up Question Universal blood donor type: Is there such a thing? Is there a ...

90

The Things They Carried: Vietnam War Literature by and about Women in the Secondary Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the importance of Vietnam War literature by and about women and provides ideas for incorporating it into the reading/English language arts curriculum. Provides a rationale for such literature; discusses types of Vietnam War literature by and about women; and addresses pedagogical aspects. (RS)|

Kazemek, Francis E.

1998-01-01

91

Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Probiotics  

MedlinePLUS

... to Talk Tips 5 Things To Know About Probiotics Probiotics are live microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are ... microorganisms, you might have a better understanding of probiotics. The body, especially the lower gastrointestinal tract (the ...

92

Selective Impairment of Living Things and Musical Instruments on a Verbal "Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire" in a Case of Apperceptive Visual Agnosia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes…

Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

2012-01-01

93

An Overview of The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) is a high spectral (? 5.2 km s-1) and spatial (˜ 6'') resolution survey of HI emission in 34 nearby galaxies obtained using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The overarching scientific goal of THINGS is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the interstellar medium (ISM) related to galaxy morphology, star formation and mass distribution across the Hubble sequence. Here we summarize some of the recent results obtained with THINGS.

de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, F.; Brinks, E.; Bigiel, F.; Bagetakos, I.; Leroy, A.; Oh, S.-H.; Portas, A.; Rich, J. W.; Tamburro, D.; Trachternach, C.; Usero, A.; Zwaan, M.

2009-09-01

94

LibraryThing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Books are meant to be shared, so why not share your personal favorites with others around the world? LibraryThing makes it easy to do just this, and visitors can catalog their books online here after creating a profile. After entering their books, visitors can offer their own sage wisdom on each title, and cross-reference their thoughts with others on the network who have read similar titles. Visitors can take a virtual tour before signing up, and there's also a series of discussion boards. Users can catalog their first 100 books at no charge, and LibraryThing is compatible across all platforms, including Linux.

95

The LITTLE THINGS Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes that lead to star formation on galactic scales are poorly understood even in the simplest systems in the universe, dwarf galaxies. At best we have incomplete knowledge of certain processes in certain environments. Here we present preliminary HI images of a small subset of galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS Survey: a complete dataset on a sample of 41 dIm galaxies chosen to span a range of luminosities. We are tracing their stellar populations, gas content, dynamics, and star formation indicators. We were granted over 300 hours of time with the VLA in B, C, and D array configurations to obtain deep HI-line maps of the sample with high angular and velocity resolution to combine with our optical, UV, and IR data to answer the following questions: 1) What regulates cloud/star formation in tiny galaxies? 2) How is star formation occurring in the outer parts of dwarf galaxies, where the gas is gravitationally stable? 3) What happens to the star formation process at breaks in the exponential stellar light profiles? 4) And, what is going on with Blue Compact Dwarfs? More information can be found at http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation with grants to DAH (AST-0707563) and CES (AST-0707468). The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Rupen, Michael P.; LITTLE THINGS Team

2010-01-01

96

Nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a new kind of real-time, high-speed and single-molecule technique. It is used to detect the kinetic characteristics of fluorescent dye such as diffusion coefficient in the aqueous solution. Combined with confocal microscope optics, it has been now widely applied in cell biological research. Through a time correlation analysis of spontaneous intensity fluctuations, this technique with EGFP as a probe is capable of determining viscosity of fluids according to Stokes-Einstein equation. Nucleoplasmic viscosity is an important physical parameter to quantify the rheological characteristics of the nucleoplasm. Investigation on nucleoplasmic viscosity plays an important role in further understanding intranuclear environment. In this paper, FCS is introduced to noninvasively investigate nucleoplasmic viscosity of living cells. The results show that nucleoplasmic viscosity of lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells is 2.55+/-0.61 cP and nucleoplasmic viscosity is larger than cytoplasmic viscosity at 37 °C (pH 7.4). In addition, significant changes in nucleoplasmic viscosity are detected by FCS when cells are exposed to hyper or hypotonic medium. Our study suggests that FCS can be used to detect the kinetic characteristics of biomolecules in living cells and thus helps to investigate the dynamic changes of the microenvironment in the cell.

Liang, Lifang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongshen; Pei, Yihui

2007-10-01

97

How to put things together.  

PubMed

Instructions for putting things together or understanding how things work are notoriously frustrating. Performance relies on constructing mental models of the object and the actions of the object from text or diagrams or both. Here, we show that instructions can be improved by turning users into designers and deriving design principles from their designs. People first assembled an object and then crafted assembly instructions, using text alone or text and diagrams. Some were required to be brief and to include only the most essential information. Users' instructions had a narrative structure with an introduction, a middle, and an end. The essential middle described or depicted the step-by-step sequence of actions on parts. Diagrams were regarded as fundamental, and redundancy of depictions and descriptions desirable. These design principles have wide applicability to many kinds of explanations. PMID:22923042

Daniel, Marie-Paule; Tversky, Barbara

2012-08-26

98

The World of Tiny Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the culturing of microorganisms as a laboratory activity emphaszing the growth of microorganisms in food. Provides background and safety information, procedures, and additional ideas. The complete unit (teacher's guide, student worksheets, evaluation and assessment, and resources for students and teachers) is available from the author.…

Karstaedt, Debbrah A.

1984-01-01

99

Relationship between system-level characteristics of assisted living facilities and the health and safety of unlicensed staff.  

PubMed

This study examined system-level characteristics of assisted living facilities and the association between these characteristics and the health and safety outcomes of unlicensed staff. Forty-two unlicensed direct care workers completed a survey related to system-level stressors and the individual stress responses of staff. Measurement tools included the Work Stressor Inventory (WSI), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). High levels of emotional exhaustion, psychiatric distress, and work-related injuries were reported by unlicensed staff. Providing care to residents with dementia-related behaviors and supporting families were the most frequently reported work stressors. System-level factors were significantly associated with staff role competence, job commitment, and emotional exhaustion. These results support the need for continued exploration, development, and evaluation of strategies to reduce occupational stressors at multiple levels in assisted living facilities. PMID:21462900

McKenzie, Glenise L; Teri, Linda; Salazar, Mary K; Farran, Carol J; Beck, Cornelia; Paun, Olimpia

2011-04-01

100

More about Charging Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the first chapter, you charged things up with excess electrons and saw what could happen as a result. Now we're going to get an idea of how to measure how much charge something has, figure out whether an object is positively or negatively charged, and make up a new concept called the electric field.

Robertson, William C.

2005-01-01

101

How Things Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book is a collection of 66 "How Things Work" columns from the journal "The Physics Teacher," 1983-1991. All the devices and phenomena are ones that are met in everyday life, involve physics principles, and require explanations that are not immediately obvious. Topics include: touch panels in elevators, liquid crystal displays, metal…

Crane, H. Richard

102

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complete Computer Solutions makes available the How Things Work Website. This is an excellent learning resource for anyone who has ever wondered about the workings of items such as oxygen tents or speedometers or materials such as porcelain. The site briefly summarizes a plethora of topics ranging from accordions to X-rays. This site is well worth a visit.

103

THINGS about MOND  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of 12 high-resolution galactic rotation curves from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) in the context of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). These rotation curves were selected to be the most reliable for mass modelling, and they are the highest quality rotation curves currently available for a sample of galaxies spanning a wide range of luminosities. We fit the rotation curves with the "simple" and "standard" interpolating functions of MOND, and we find that the "simple" function yields better results. We also redetermine the value of a0, and find a median value very close to the one determined in previous studies, a0 = (1.22 ± 0.33) × 10-8 cm s-2. Leaving the distance as a free parameter within the uncertainty of its best independently determined value leads to excellent quality fits for 75% of the sample. Among the three exceptions, two are also known to give relatively poor fits in Newtonian dynamics plus dark matter. The remaining case (NGC 3198) presents some tension between the observations and the MOND fit, which might, however, be explained by the presence of non-circular motions, by a small distance, or by a value of a0 at the lower end of our best-fit interval, 0.9 × 10-8 cm s-2. The best-fit stellar M/L ratios are generally in remarkable agreement with the predictions of stellar population synthesis models. We also show that the narrow range of gravitational accelerations found to be generated by dark matter in galaxies is consistent with the narrow range of additional gravity predicted by MOND.

Gentile, G.; Famaey, B.; de Blok, W. J. G.

2011-03-01

104

Different Things Make Different People Happy: Examining Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being by Gender and Parental Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses a number of key challenges in current subjective well-being (SWB) research: A new wave of studies should\\u000a take into account that different things may make different people happy, thus going beyond a unitary ‘happiness formula’.\\u000a Furthermore, empirical results need to be connected to broader theoretical narratives. Using a re-examination of the social\\u000a context of well-being as its

Christian Kroll

2011-01-01

105

All Things Considered: Drug Wars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This sites is the companion to National Public radio's (NPR) 2000 special on All Things Considered.. The NPR site is a bit modest, but it does offer the excellent radio reports from this week's All Things Considered special series.

2000-01-01

106

Priming by DNA immunization augments T-cell responses induced by modified live bovine herpesvirus vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA vaccines have several advantages over conventional vaccines. One of the most important characteristics is the presentation of antigen via both MHC class I and class II receptors. Although this generally results in strong T-cell responses, antibody production and protection achieved by DNA immunization are unfortunately not always adequate. In contrast, modified live virus (MLV) vaccines usually induce adequate antibody

B. I. Loehr; R. Pontarollo; R. Rankin; L. Latimer; P. Willson; L. A. Babiuk; S. van Drunen; Littel-van den Hurk

107

Synchronous objects for one flat thing, reproduced  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synchronous Objects for One Flat Thing, reproduced (http:\\/\\/synchronousobjects.osu.edu) is an interactive screen-based work developed by The Ohio State University's Advanced Computing Center for the Arts and Design (ACCAD) and the Department of Dance in collaboration with renowned choreographer William Forsythe. Pivoting on Forsythe's masterwork of visual complexity, One Flat Thing, Reproduced, as its research resource, the Synchronous Objects project seeks

Maria Palazzi; Norah Zuniga Shaw

2009-01-01

108

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

2007-11-07

109

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

1997-01-01

110

Doing things with music  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an “esthetic technology”\\u000a to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination\\u000a that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived\\u000a as an affordance-laden structure.

Joel W. Krueger

2011-01-01

111

Remnant living cells that escape cell loss in late-stage tumors exhibit cancer stem cell-like characteristics.  

PubMed

A balance between cell proliferation and cell loss is essential for tumor progression. Although up to 90% of cells are lost in late-stage carcinomas, the progression and characteristics of remnant living cells in tumor mass are unclear. Here we used molecular imaging to track the progression of living cells in a syngeneic tumor model, and ex vivo investigated the properties of this population at late-stage tumor. The piggyBac transposon system was used to stably introduce the dual reporter genes, including monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) genes for fluorescence-based and radionuclide-based imaging of tumor growth in small animals, respectively. Iodine-123-labeled 5-iodo-2'-fluoro-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil was used as a radiotracer for HSV1-tk gene expression in tumors. The fluorescence- and radionuclide-based imaging using the single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography revealed that the number of living cells reached the maximum at 1 week after implantation of 4T1 tumors, and gradually decreased and clustered near the side of the body until 4 weeks accompanied by enlargement of tumor mass. The remnant living cells at late-stage tumor were isolated and investigated ex vivo. The results showed that these living cells could form mammospheres and express cancer stem cell (CSC)-related biomarkers, including octamer-binding transcription factor 4, SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 2, and CD133 genes compared with those cultured in vitro. Furthermore, this HSV1-tk-expressing CSC-like population was sensitive to ganciclovir applied for the suicide therapy. Taken together, the current data suggested that cells escaping from cell loss in late-stage tumors exhibit CSC-like characteristics, and HSV1-tk may be considered a theranostic agent for targeting this population in vivo. PMID:23034334

Chen, Y L; Wang, S Y; Liu, R S; Wang, H E; Chen, J C; Chiou, S H; Chang, C A; Lin, L T; Tan, D T W; Lee, Y J

2012-10-04

112

Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate molecular/cellular functions.

Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

2011-11-01

113

Career Counseling: 101+ Things You Can Do with a Degree in Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of…

Eyster, Kathleen M.

2007-01-01

114

Characteristics of live animal allometric measurements associated with body fat in fat-tailed sheep  

Microsoft Academic Search

Body weight (LW), condition score (BCS), tail length on inner side of tail (TL), tail volume measured by water displacement (TV) and tail circumference (TC), width (TW) as well as thickness at the base (TT) were measured in live Menz (n=303) and Horro (n=151) sheep to determine their possible use in breeding programmes aimed at improving ability to deposit fat

Ewnetu Ermias; J. E. O. Rege

2003-01-01

115

Long-lived radicals produced by ?-irradiation or vital activity in plants, animals, cells, and protein solution: their observation and inhomogeneous decay dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-lived radicals produced by /?-irradiation or vital activity in plants, animals, cells, and protein (albumin) solution were studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Long-lived radicals produced by vital activity exist in biological systems, such as plants, animals, and cells, in the range of 0.1-20nmolg-1. Since vital organs keep the radicals at a constant concentration, the radicals are probably related to life conservation. Long-lived radicals are also produced by /?-irradiation of cells or protein solution. The radicals decay after death of living things or after /?-irradiation. We found that the decay dynamics in all biological systems can be expressed by the same kinetic equation of an inhomogeneous reaction.

Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Morikawa, Akiyuki; Kumagai, Jun; Ikehata, Masateru; Koana, Takao; Kikuchi, Shoshi

2002-09-01

116

Structure and Function in Living Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. In this particular publication, provided a wide variety of resources to enrich your content knowledge of the characteristics of living things, including their diversity, extinction, and evolution. Other topics include bacteria, plants, fungi, and protists.

Lefever, Mary

2007-08-01

117

Elaphoidella grandidieri (Harpacticoida: Copepoda): demographic characteristics and possible use as live prey in aquaculture.  

PubMed

In freshwater ecosystems, rotifers and cladocerans are ideal prey for fish larvae whereas copepods, due to their purported low growth rate and predatory tendency, are not. We recently isolated the parthenogenetic Elaphoidella grandidieri (Gueme et Richard, 1893) a benthic freshwater harpacticoid, from a fish farm in the State of Morelos, central Mexico and tested its potential as a live prey organism for larval vertebrates. Population growth and life table demography experiments were conducted, in 100 ml recipients with 50 ml of test medium on a diet of Scenedesmus acutus at a density of 1.0 X 10(6) cell ml(-1); the former on live algae alone while the latter on live algae as well as detritus. We also conducted experiments to document the prey preference for this copepod by the larval Ameca splendens (Pisces: Goodeidae) and Ambystoma mexicanum (Amphibia: Ambystomatidae), fed the rotifer Plationus patulus, the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens, and the cladocerans Moina macrocopa and Daphnia pulex. Elaphoidella grandidieri is relatively easy to maintain under laboratory conditions, reaching densities (copepodites and adults) of more than 10,000 l(-1). The generation time ranged between 30-45 days, depending on the diet. The net reproductive rate was as high as 60 nauplii female(-1) day (1). Population growth rates ranged between 0.03 and 0.11 d(-1), live algae being the superior diet compared to detritus. Both predators showed no preference for E. grandidieri, but in the absence of alternate prey they consumed 80% of the harpacticoids offered. The data have been discussed in relation to the potential of E. grandidierias live food for aquaculture. PMID:22315830

Nandini, S; Nunez Ortiz, Alma Rosa; Sarma, S S S

2011-07-01

118

Contemplation of Things Past  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On August 12, 1925, it was very hot in Philadelphia, the Perseid meteors raced across the sky, and my mother stopped shelling lima beans and went upstairs to her bedroom to give birth to me. At this point I skip over further details of this kind and get right to the central theme of my life. I didn't even know there was a theme until I was faced with the deadline for writing this essay. I assumed that I had just blundered along doing what seemed best at the moment. But now I see that what always seemed the best thing to do was also an opportunity to try to see further back in time than people had seen before and to contemplate about how it would be to have been there.

Wetherill, George W.

119

Characteristics of people living with HIV who use community-based services in Ontario, Canada: implications for service providers.  

PubMed

Community-based AIDS service organizations (CBAOs) direct services to multiple-needs people living with HIV/AIDS who are less likely to use mainstream health promotion services. As people live longer with HIV, the potential to enhance quality of life increases, yet little is known about who uses CBAOs or how this use affects other health and social services. This study of people living with AIDS in Ontario, Canada (n = 297) examined the demographic and health-related characteristics of people with AIDS who do and do not use CBAOs and their patterns of mainstream service utilization. It found that users of CBAOs were significantly less healthy, less able to sustain normal activities, and more often depressed. They reported physical disabilities significantly more often. Their quality of life was also lower along certain dimensions. They were significantly poorer and more reliant on government income supports. They consumed significantly more nonhospital health and social services and had significantly higher out-of-pocket costs. These results suggest CBAOs are being accessed appropriately by those most vulnerable. In an effort to strengthen CBAO capacity to recognize and address depression and physical health problems prevalent among their clients, links to other mainstream health promotion and social services is recommended. PMID:16435530

Williams, Peter; Narciso, Lea; Browne, Gina; Roberts, Jacqueline; Weir, Robin; Gafni, Amiram

120

Compressive force generation by a bundle of living biofilaments.  

PubMed

To study the compressional forces exerted by a bundle of living stiff filaments pressing on a surface, akin to the case of an actin bundle in filopodia structures, we have performed particulate molecular dynamics simulations of a grafted bundle of parallel living (self-assembling) filaments, in chemical equilibrium with a solution of their constitutive monomers. Equilibrium is established as these filaments, grafted at one end to a wall of the simulation box, grow at their chemically active free end, and encounter the opposite confining wall of the simulation box. Further growth of filaments requires bending and thus energy, which automatically limit the populations of longer filaments. The resulting filament sizes distribution and the force exerted by the bundle on the obstacle are analyzed for different grafting densities and different sub- or supercritical conditions, these properties being compared with the predictions of the corresponding ideal confined bundle model. In this analysis, non-ideal effects due to interactions between filaments and confinement effects are singled out. For all state points considered at the same temperature and at the same gap width between the two surfaces, the force per filament exerted on the opposite wall appears to be a function of a rescaled free monomer density ??1 (eff). This quantity can be estimated directly from the characteristic length of the exponential filament size distribution P observed in the size domain where these grafted filaments are not in direct contact with the wall. We also analyze the dynamics of the filament contour length fluctuations in terms of effective polymerization (U) and depolymerization (W) rates, where again it is possible to disentangle non-ideal and confinement effects. PMID:23947885

Ramachandran, Sanoop; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

2013-08-14

121

Compressive force generation by a bundle of living biofilaments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study the compressional forces exerted by a bundle of living stiff filaments pressing on a surface, akin to the case of an actin bundle in filopodia structures, we have performed particulate molecular dynamics simulations of a grafted bundle of parallel living (self-assembling) filaments, in chemical equilibrium with a solution of their constitutive monomers. Equilibrium is established as these filaments, grafted at one end to a wall of the simulation box, grow at their chemically active free end, and encounter the opposite confining wall of the simulation box. Further growth of filaments requires bending and thus energy, which automatically limit the populations of longer filaments. The resulting filament sizes distribution and the force exerted by the bundle on the obstacle are analyzed for different grafting densities and different sub- or supercritical conditions, these properties being compared with the predictions of the corresponding ideal confined bundle model. In this analysis, non-ideal effects due to interactions between filaments and confinement effects are singled out. For all state points considered at the same temperature and at the same gap width between the two surfaces, the force per filament exerted on the opposite wall appears to be a function of a rescaled free monomer density ??1eff. This quantity can be estimated directly from the characteristic length of the exponential filament size distribution P observed in the size domain where these grafted filaments are not in direct contact with the wall. We also analyze the dynamics of the filament contour length fluctuations in terms of effective polymerization (U) and depolymerization (W) rates, where again it is possible to disentangle non-ideal and confinement effects.

Ramachandran, Sanoop; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

2013-08-01

122

What is this thing called pain?  

PubMed Central

To paraphrase Cole Porter’s famous 1926 song, “What is this thing called pain? This funny thing called pain, just who can solve its mystery?” Pain, like love, is all consuming: when you have it, not much else matters, and there is nothing you can do about it. Unlike love, however, we are actually beginning to tease apart the mystery of pain. The substantial progress made over the last decade in revealing the genes, molecules, cells, and circuits that determine the sensation of pain offers new opportunities to manage it, as revealed in this Review series by some of the foremost experts in the field.

Woolf, Clifford J.

2010-01-01

123

Relation Between Science and Living Conditions in Physical Lessons - as Exemplified by the Subject of Nuclear Power Plants.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

After having explained the relevant characteristics of the fields of physics and living conditions the author investigates the relation between these two fields and its effects on school instruction as exemplified by the subject of nuclear power plants. F...

H. Mikelskis

1979-01-01

124

Metabolic pathway visualization in living yeast by DNP-NMR.  

PubMed

Central carbon metabolism of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae is visualized by DNP-NMR. Experiments are conducted as real time assays that detect metabolic bottlenecks, pathway use, reversibility of reactions and reaction mechanisms in vivo with subsecond time resolution. PMID:21720636

Meier, Sebastian; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille R; Lerche, Mathilde H; Duus, Jens Ø

2011-07-01

125

Periodic Tornado Production by Long-Lived Parent Thunderstorms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The implication, found in earlier studies, of fairly uniform time intervals between the successive tornadoes produced by a single long-lived parent thunderstorm is further examined with a much larger collection of well documented case studies. It is found...

G. L. Darkow

1971-01-01

126

The Pleasure of Finding Things out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"The pleasure of finding things out" is a collection of short works by the Nobel Prize winning scientist Richard Feynman. The book provides insights into his infectious enthusiasm for science and his love of sharing ideas about the subject with anyone who wanted to listen. Feynman has been widely acknowledged as one of the greatest physicists of…

Loxley, Peter

2005-01-01

127

Things in words: Ferenczi and language.  

PubMed

Ferenczi defends the mimesis between words and things from the moment he enters the psychoanalytical movement. He emphasizes the sensitive dimension of language and the magical experience of words. This paper intends to view such use of language by contemporary patients in a non-pathologizing, constructive way, avoiding characterizing them as deficient in their capacity to symbolize and create metaphors. PMID:22143502

Gondar, Jô

2011-12-01

128

Survival of freezing by free-living Antarctic soil nematodes.  

PubMed

Free-living microbivorous nematodes become numerically dominant in Antarctic terrestrial faunas as environmental conditions become more severe, while also reaching very high levels of abundance in moist, vegetated habitats. Nematodes have little resistance to freezing via exogenous ice nucleation, such as would occur as their microhabitat freezes. We report the results of experiments testing the ability of seven maritime Antarctic nematode taxa to survive freezing in small water droplets at high sub-zero temperatures. Isolated individuals of these species possessed supercooling characteristics similar to those previously reported (supercooling points -6 to -25 degree C). When frozen in water at -3 to -6 degree C, most showed high (> 70%) survival both (i) after rapid cooling (1 degree C/min) to c. -60 degree C followed by immediate rewarming, and (ii) when held for 7-12 h at either -10 or -30 degree C, although the proportions surviving varied between species. We propose that the ability to survive freezing while fully hydrated at high sub-zero temperatures is one of the most important aspects of these species' survival tactics. PMID:12148024

Convey, P; Worland, M R

129

Why there is no such thing as “critical discourse analysis”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article argues that there is no such thing as Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in the sense of a method of political or ideological critique based on the application of conventional linguistic constructs. All of us, as language users and makers, are continuously engaged in the critical examination of and response to communication in our everyday lives. The article argues

Peter E. Jones

2007-01-01

130

Where the Wild Things Are: Informal Experience and Ecological Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Category-based induction requires selective use of different relations to guide inferences; this article examines the development of inferences based on ecological relations among living things. Three hundred and forty-six 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children from rural, suburban, and urban communities projected novel "diseases" or "insides" from one…

Coley, John D.

2012-01-01

131

Hearing Voices and Seeing Things  

MedlinePLUS

... things that may scare or upset them. The wind at night, a creak in the house, or ... or recommended. Illegal drugs such as alcohol, marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine and LSD are a frequent cause of ...

132

Stanford How Things Work Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We provide an overview of the Stanford How Things Work (HTW) project, an ongoing integrated collection of research activities in the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. The project is developing technology for representing knowledge about...

R. Fikes T. Gruber Y. Iwasaki

1994-01-01

133

Where the wild things are: informal experience and ecological reasoning.  

PubMed

Category-based induction requires selective use of different relations to guide inferences; this article examines the development of inferences based on ecological relations among living things. Three hundred and forty-six 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children from rural, suburban, and urban communities projected novel diseases or insides from one species to an ecologically or taxonomically related species; they were also surveyed about hobbies and activities. Frequency of ecological inferences increased with age and with reports of informal exploration of nature, and decreased with population density. By age 10, children preferred taxonomic inferences for insides and ecological inferences for disease, but this pattern emerged earlier among rural children. These results underscore the importance of context by demonstrating effects of both domain-relevant experience and environment on biological reasoning. PMID:22548352

Coley, John D

2012-03-30

134

An Observational Examination of Long-Lived Supercells. Part I: Characteristics, Evolution, and Demise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of supercells and their longevity across the central and eastern United States are examined, with the primary focus on understanding the properties of long-lived supercells (defined as supercells lasting 4 h). A total of 224 long-lived supercells, occurring in 184 separate events, are investigated. These properties are compared with those of short-lived supercells (lifetimes 2 h) to determine the

Matthew J. Bunkers; Mark R. Hjelmfelt; Paul L. Smith

2006-01-01

135

Changes of immunophysiological characteristics in neonatal calves experimentally challenged with mixture of live bacteria and virus.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to define efficient immunophysiological parameters in neonatal Holstein calves with an experimentally induced microbial infection. Calves (n = 15) were challenged with classical swine fever virus (LOM strain) and Erysipelothrix insidiosa live vaccine by intravenous injection at 3 wk of age except for control calves (n = 4). The level of total serum IgA was significantly increased at 14 and 19 d post-experimental challenge (DPEC) compared with that in calves at -2 DPEC. At 5 DPEC, relative amounts of bacterial- and viral-specific IgA increased significantly and were sustained until 26 DPEC. In the hematology assay, the neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio (%) in whole blood was significantly decreased at 14 DPEC because of a significant increase in lymphocytes and a coincident decrease in neutrophils. The percentages of CD4+ and CD25+ T cells were significantly decreased at 14 DPEC and returned to initial levels at 19 DPEC. It is intriguing to note that the level of serum lactoferrin was significantly decreased by the microbial challenge within 1 d. The concentration of haptoglobin was increased within 3 d and gradually decreased in calves after microbial challenge. Our results suggest that 1) bovine serum lactoferrin plays an important role in the innate immune response against microbial infection at an early stage and 2) experimentally induced microbial challenge using porcine live bacterial and viral vaccine in calves could be a good experimental model to evaluate the effect of diet or stress induced by environmental change on the immune responses against microbial infection. PMID:19841216

Kim, M H; Yun, C H; Ko, J Y; Kang, J S; Kim, H S; Kang, S J; Lee, W S; Kim, J H; Ha, J K

2009-11-01

136

Effects of Facility Characteristics on Departures from Assisted Living: Results from a National Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Assisted living is an increasingly important residential setting for the frail elderly person. How often and why residents leave such facilities are important issues for consumers, for clinicians advising frail patients on their options for living arrangements, and for policymakers. This research investigated the impact of facility and…

Phillips, Charles D.; Munoz, Yolanda; Sherman, Michael; Rose, Miriam; Spector, William; Hawes, Catherine

2003-01-01

137

America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2003. Population Characteristics. Current Population Reports. P20-553  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The data in this report is from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the 2003 Current Population Survey (CPS). The population represented (the population universe) in the ASEC is the civilian non institutionalized population living in the United States. Members of the Armed Forces living off post or with their families on post are…

Fields, Jason

2004-01-01

138

Effects of Facility Characteristics on Departures from Assisted Living: Results from a National Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Assisted living is an increasingly important residential setting for the frail elderly person. How often and why residents leave such facilities are important issues for consumers, for clinicians advising frail patients on their options for living arrangements, and for policymakers. This research investigated the impact of facility and…

Phillips, Charles D.; Munoz, Yolanda; Sherman, Michael; Rose, Miriam; Spector, William; Hawes, Catherine

2003-01-01

139

Some Demographic and Economic Characteristics of the Puerto Rican Population Living on the Mainland, USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report separates Puerto Ricans into four major subgroups: those who were born on the mainland and live either in New York City, or elsewhere in the United States, and those who were born in Puerto Rico and live either in New York City, or elsewhere in the United States. The report places considerable emphasis on those born on the mainland. A…

Jaffe, A. J.; Carleton, Zaida Carreras

140

Big things start in small ways.  

PubMed

This statement from the President of the 31st December Women's Movement in Ghana was part of a larger text presented at the World NGO Conference in Tokyo, July 1-4, 1990. The women's movement in Ghana strives to achieve equal opportunity, social justice, and sustainable development against social discrimination for women. Planning and development have focused on women in socioeconomic development. Specific projects at the core of creating positive conditions for socioeconomic growth, raising the standard of living, and expanding the economy, involve cover food and cash-crop production, food processing, food preparation, and small scale industrial activities such as ceramics and crafts. Income supplementation helps parents to send children to school instead of work. Daycare centers operating near work places benefit mothers in terms of providing a vacation, adult literacy programs, and family counseling sessions. The Movement actively mobilizes women to have children vaccinated. Access to credit for women and utilization of technology enriches life for women, and reduces backbreaking labor. The Movement is building wells in rural areas to reduce parasitic infection and creating easy access to a water supply. 252 projects have been completed and 100 are in process. The Movement provides a development model for integrating the resources of government, NGO's, and members of the community. Self-confidence of women has assured the success of projects. The Sasakawa Foundation has contributed technology and Japanese volunteers to improve the cultivation of food crops and by example express humble, respectful, hard working, and happy models of big things staring in small ways. PMID:12283889

Rawlings, N

1990-12-01

141

Do-Gooders May Be Doing Good Things for Their Genes  

MedlinePLUS

... Be Doing Good Things for Their Genes: Study Happiness derived from living a purposeful life found to ... WEDNESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Different routes to happiness have varying effects on your genes and your ...

142

Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks  

PubMed Central

With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places—categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left-lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and subcortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with “embodied” and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may underlie organizational principles for hearing perception.

Engel, Lauren R.; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A.; Lewis, James W.

2009-01-01

143

Inspecting for Quality. California's Lowest-Achieving Schools are Routinely Visited by Inspectors on the Lookout for, among Other things, Inadequate Textbook Supplies, Dirty Drinking Water, and Evidence of Vermin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author describes how the California's lowest-achieving schools are routinely visited by inspectors on the lookout for, among other things, inadequate textbook supplies, dirty drinking water, and evidence of vermin. Following the settlement from the case "Williams v. California," the laws known as the "Williams legislation"…

Jacobson, Linda

2006-01-01

144

49 CFR 510.8 - Written requests for the production of documents and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...requests for the production of documents and things. 510.8 Section 510.8 Transportation...requests for the production of documents and things. The NHTSA may, by the issuance of...request for the production of documents and things, require any person, sole...

2012-10-01

145

49 CFR 510.8 - Written requests for the production of documents and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...requests for the production of documents and things. 510.8 Section 510.8 Transportation...requests for the production of documents and things. The NHTSA may, by the issuance of...request for the production of documents and things, require any person, sole...

2010-10-01

146

49 CFR 510.8 - Written requests for the production of documents and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...requests for the production of documents and things. 510.8 Section 510.8 Transportation...requests for the production of documents and things. The NHTSA may, by the issuance of...request for the production of documents and things, require any person, sole...

2011-10-01

147

49 CFR 510.8 - Written requests for the production of documents and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...requests for the production of documents and things. 510.8 Section 510.8 Transportation...requests for the production of documents and things. The NHTSA may, by the issuance of...request for the production of documents and things, require any person, sole...

2009-10-01

148

Implementation of the Internet of Things on Public Security  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of the Internet of Things will occur within a new ecosystem that will be driven by a number of key players. The public security as one of the key players is going to make real-time communications will be possible not only by humans but also by things at anytime and from anywhere. This research will present the advent of the Internet of Things to create a plethora of innovative applications and services, which will enhance quality of life and reduce inequalities.

Lu, Kesheng; Li, Xichun

149

Study of the live body weight and body characteristics of the African Muscovy duck (Caraina moschata).  

PubMed

Three hundred and twenty 1-week old ducklings (160 males and 160 females) were used to evaluate the body weight, body parts and carcass characteristics of the African Muscovy duck. Sexual dimorphism was in favour of the male for all the parameters throughout the experimental period, however the difference was significant (P<0.05) only after week 2. The 12-week old male weighed 1832.0+/-180.4 g while the female reached only 68.2% of the male weight. Metatarsus diameter, thoracic perimeter, body length, length of bill, foot and wing in cm were respectively 1.3, 29.5, 57.5, 7.0, 27.1 and 27.8 for the male as compared with 1.2, 25.8, 51.0, 6.3, 23.3 and 26.9 for the female. Body measurements were highly (P<0.01) correlated with body weight for both sexes, however the highest correlation coefficients were obtained with wing length (0.990 and 0.995) and thoracic perimeter (0.993 and 0.973) for female and male respectively. Live body weight had a linear relationship with both wing length (R2=0.991 and 0.81) and thoracic perimeter (R2=0.948 and 0.986) for male and female respectively. The female duck yielded higher percent ready-to-cook carcass (66.3%), breast (13.6%), liver (2.8%), heart (1.5%) and gizzard (3.8%) as compared to the male (65.0%, 12.0%, 2.5%, 1.1% and 3.4% respectively) although the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The male small intestine (185.1+/-3.4 cm), colon (14.8+/-1.0 cm) and caecum (17.9+/-0.4 cm) were significantly (P<0.05) longer than that of the female (152.2+/-1.8, 10.8+/-0.7 and 14.85+/-0.6 cm respectively). PMID:18551772

Téguia, A; Mafouo Ngandjou, H; Defang, H; Tchoumboue, J

2008-01-01

150

Provider Characteristics Desired by African American Women in Prenatal Care  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe provider characteristics African American pregnant women identified as important when interacting with their prenatal care providers in an outpatient office setting. Study Design and Method A descriptive qualitative design was used to explore provider characteristics desired by African American women receiving prenatal care at two inner-city hospital–based obstetric clinics. A total of 22 African American women between the ages of 19 and 28 years participated in the study. Findings Four major provider characteristic themes emerged from the data: (a) demonstrating quality patient–provider communication, (b) providing continuity of care, (c) treating the women with respect, and (d) delivering compassionate care. Discussion and Conclusion An overarching theme revealed by the data analysis was the desire by African American women in this study to have their prenatal providers know and remember them. They wanted their providers to understand the context of their lives from their prenatal interactions. Incorporating findings from this study to improve patient–provider interactions during prenatal care could provide an increased understanding of the many complex variables affecting African American women’s lives. Implications for Practice and Research Prenatal care provides an opportunity for African American women to develop a trusting relationship with a provider. Developing models of prenatal care congruent with the realities of African American women’s lives has the potential to improve patient–provider interactions and potentially affect birth outcomes.

Lori, Jody R.; Yi, Chin Hwa; Martyn, Kristy K.

2012-01-01

151

Forensic artefacts left by Windows Live Messenger 8.0  

Microsoft Academic Search

Windows Live Messenger – commonly referred by MSN Messenger – is the most used instant messaging client worldwide, and is mostly used on Microsoft Windows XP.Previous examination into MSN Messenger concludes that few traces reside on the hard disk after MSN usage [Dickson M. An examination into MSN Messenger 7.5 contact identification. Digit Investig 2006;3]. In this article the opposite

Wouter S. Van Dongen

2007-01-01

152

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS AND ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER. ORIGINAL 1-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOW AT PHOTO RIGHT. CEILING VENT TO CHIMNEY AT RIGHT UPPER PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

153

Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been used successfully as an intracellular contrast agent for nuclear MRI cell tracking in vivo .W e present a method of detecting intracellular SPIO colloid uptake in live cells using cell magnetophoresis, with potential applications in measuring intracellular MRI con- trast uptake. The method was evaluated by measuring shifts in mean and distribution of

Ying Jing; Niladri Mal; P. Stephen Williams; Maritza Mayorga; Marc S. Penn; Jeffrey J. Chalmers; Maciej Zborowski

2008-01-01

154

How Everyday Things Are Made  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is difficult for many individuals to fathom the exacting and complex processes used to manufacture an airplane, car, or even candy. Stepping in to help explain how many everyday things are made is this fine Web site developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing at Stanford University and design 4x, a company that develops online courses on manufacturing topics. The site begins with a brief introductory video clip orienting new visitors to the materials available on the site, and on how best to navigate the site's features. Dozens of products are covered here, including airplanes, motorcycles, cars, jelly beans, chocolate, glass bottles, crayons, and golf clubs. Additionally, the site also contains information on various careers in manufacturing, along with a list of books on the field of manufacturing. Another helpful aspect of the site is the Think About It feature, where visitors are asked to offer their comments on how they think a certain process works, along with reading the previous comments of other visitors.

155

Structure and Dynamics in Nearby Galaxies from THINGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) has imaged the spectral line emission from atomic hydrogen in 34 nearby (d = 2-15 Mpc) spiral and dwarf irregular galaxies at the highest feasible resolution (6-12? and <5.2 km s-1) with the Very Large Array. THINGS detects HI emission and kinematics over the entire optical disk and generally to larger radii, enabling consistent and careful examination of a number of astrophysical problems, both global and local, relating to the structure and dynamics of galaxies. Work pursued by the THINGS team is described here, and readers are encouraged to download the data to pursue analyses of their own.

Thornley, M. D.; Leroy, A. K.; Schruba, A.; Bagetakos, I.; Portas, A.; Usero, A.; Bigiel, F.; Foyle, K.

2010-12-01

156

Age-related characteristics of brain development in children living in the north.  

PubMed

The morphofunctional age-related development of the brain was studied in schoolchildren living in the difficult climatological-geographic and socioeconomic conditions of the north (Arkhangel'sk region). Of the 62 students in country middle schools, EEG amplitude-frequency, time, and spatial measures corresponded to age norms (European norms) in only 10 cases (16%). A further 26 children (53%) showed minor abnormalities in the form of an inadequate degree of organization of the temporospatial EEG pattern, mainly in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, with increases in the levels of the theta and delta rhythms, and the absence of any marked "functional nucleus" in the alpha rhythm. In the remaining 14 children (29%), EEG measures showed more marked delays in mental development (DMD), which were combined with learning difficulties and abnormal behavior. The retardation in the morphofunctional development of the brain in northern children averaged 1.5-2 years, which coincides with delays in hormonal and physical development described by other authors. PMID:16841152

Soroko, S I; Burykh, E A; Sidorenko, G V

2006-09-01

157

Live cell isolation by laser microdissection with gravity transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser microdissection by pulsing ultraviolet laser allows the isolation and recultivation of live cells based on morphological features or/and fluorescent labelling from adherent cell cultures. Previous investigations described only the use of the laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) for live cell isolation. But LMPC requires complex manipulations and some skill. Furthermore, single-cell cloning using laser microdissection has not yet been demonstrated. The first evidence of successful application of laser microdissection with gravity transfer (LMDGT) for capturing and recultivation of live cells is presented. A new strategy for LMDGT is presented because of the failure to reproduce the manufacturer's protocol. Using the new strategy, successful capturing and recultivation of circle-shaped samples from confluent monolayer of HeLa cells was demonstrated. It was found that LMDGT is easier than LMPC because it doesn't require personal participation of investigator in transferring of isolated samples to final culture dishes. Moreover, for the first time, the generation of clonal colonies from single live cells isolated by laser microdissection was demonstrated. Data obtained in this study confirm that LMDGT is a reliable and high-yield method allowing isolation and expansion of both cell clusters and single cells from adherent cell cultures.

Podgorny, Oleg V.

2013-05-01

158

Is death a bad thing?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Death is a bad thing; so, consolation that minimizes that badness must fail The philosophers whose reasoning this is do not offer any consolation of their own. That death is bad seems so obvious to them that they concentrate on explaining why it is bad and do not explain what needs explaining, how the claim that it is bad is

Don S. Levi

1998-01-01

159

10 Things Never to Say  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some individualized education plan (IEP) meetings are grueling for parents and educators alike, and too often things are said that have unintended consequences. Slips of the tongue can lead to bigger problems, such as due process hearings and complaints to the state education agency, not to mention accusations of discrimination and the legal…

Croyle, Kimberly

2007-01-01

160

Make cool things with microcontrollers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anyone can learn how to make cool things with microcontrollers! Even if you've never even sewn a button, you can actually make a fun, intriguing project at this studio. Blink lights, hack your brain, play video games, turn off TVs in public places -- microcontrollers can do it all. This is for all skill and experience levels. Ages 5 to

Mitch Altman

2010-01-01

161

Spicing Things up by Adding Color and Relieving Pain: The Use of "Napoleon's Buttons" in Organic Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For some students, organic chemistry can be a distant subject and unrelated to any courses they have seen in their college careers. To develop a more contextual learning experience in organic chemistry, an additional text, "Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History," by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson, was incorporated as a…

Bucholtz, Kevin M.

2011-01-01

162

Searching for two things at once: establishment of multiple attentional control settings on a trial-by-trial basis.  

PubMed

Recent work has demonstrated that attention can be configured to multiple potential targets in spatial search. However, this previous work relied on a fixed set of targets across multiple trials, allowing observers to offload attentional control settings to longer-term representations. In the present experiments, we demonstrate multiple attentional control settings that operate independently of space (Experiments 1 and 2). More important, we show that observers can be cued to different control settings on a trial-by-trial basis (Experiment 3). The latter result suggests that observers were capable of maintaining multiple control settings when the demands of the task required an attentional search for specific feature values. Attention can be configured to extract multiple feature values in a goal-directed manner, and this configuration can be can be dynamically engaged on a trial-by-trial basis. These results support recent findings that reveal the high precision, complexity, and flexibility of attentional control settings. PMID:22971903

Roper, Zachary J J; Vecera, Shaun P

2012-12-01

163

Ways to Join the Living Conversation about Young Adult Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Rarely do students and teachers see themselves as people who have the authority to talk back to the gatekeepers; instead, they are on the receiving end of a conversation begun by others. But the conversation about young adult (YA) books--like the authors who write them--is a living thing. Students and teachers can help to shape it. In this…

Buehler, Jennifer

2009-01-01

164

Epigenetic programming by maternal behavior and pharmacological intervention. Nature versus nurture: let's call the whole thing off.  

PubMed

The nature of maternal care that an infant receives can effect the child's emotional and cognitive development, which is endured into adulthood. Similarly, maternal behavior in rodents is associated with long-term programming of individual differences in behavioral and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal responses to stress in the offspring. One critical question is how is such 'environmental programming' established and sustained in the offspring? This review discusses a novel mechanism to explain how maternal licking/grooming behavior in the rat can alter the hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in the offspring, which concomitantly alters the HPA axis and the stress responsiveness of these animals. Both in vivo and in vitro studies show that maternal behavior increases GR expression in the offspring via increased hippocampal serotonergic tone accompanied by increased histone acetylase transferase activity, histone acetylation and DNA demethylation mediated by the transcription factor NGFI-A. In summary, this research demonstrates that an epigenetic state of a gene can be established through early-in-life experience, and is potentially reversible in adulthood. Accordingly, epigenetic modifications of specific genomic regions in response to variations in environmental conditions might serve as a major source of variation in biological and behavioral phenotypes. PMID:17965624

Weaver, Ian C G

2007-01-15

165

Go West, Young Men: Conspicuous consumption in Dinaw Mengestus The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, as prefigured by V. S. Naipauls A Bend in the River  

Microsoft Academic Search

The broken promises of capitalism have been explored recently in Dinaw Mengestu’s The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears, a work with antecedents in V. S. Naipaul’s A Bend in the River. Dayo Olopade looks closely at these incisive yet literary critiques of conspicuous consumption.

Dayo Olopade

2009-01-01

166

Sharing Roles, Sharing Custody? Couples' Characteristics and Children's Living Arrangements at Separation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines children's living arrangements when parents separate, during a period of rapid increase in shared physical custody in the 1990s. With prospective data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N= 758 families) and a sample of families experiencing parental separation between successive survey cycles, we…

Juby, Heather; Le Bourdais, Celine; Marcil-Gratton, Nicole

2005-01-01

167

The thermodynamics of ion concentration by living plant cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1.The method is briefly outlined for calculating the free energy change of ion concentration by living plant cells from the thermodynamic viewpoint, in which ionic strengths and activity coefficients are employed.2.ForNitella under three different conditions and forValonia under natural conditions, the?F per mol, the corresponding E.M.F., and the?F per liter of sap are calculated for each important ion from

1930-01-01

168

Destruction of living cells by pulsed high-voltage application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Destruction of living cells in liquid has been formed by pulsed high-voltage application to the liquid. S. cerevsaie (yeast cell) or Bacillus natto, dispersed in deionized water and one- and three-percent NaCl solution, were used in this experiment. Four different electrodes (plate-plate, needle-plate wire-cylinder, and rod-rod electrode) were tested. The survival rate of cells was measured against peak electric field

A. Mizuno; Y. Hori

1988-01-01

169

Studying single living cells and chromosomes by confocal Raman microspectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

MANY indirect methods have been developed to study the constitu-tion and conformation of macromolecules inside the living cell. Direct analysis by Raman spectroscopy is an ideal complement to techniques using directly labelled fluorescent probes or of indirect labelling with mono- and polyclonal antibodies. The high information content of Raman spectra can characterize biological macromolecules both in solution and in crystals1,2.

G. J. Puppels; F. F. M. de Mul; C. Otto; J. Greve; M. Robert-Nicoud; D. J. Arndt-Jovin; T. M. Jovin

1990-01-01

170

The PinkThing for analysing ChIP profiling data in their genomic context  

PubMed Central

Background Current epigenetic research makes frequent use of whole-genome ChIP profiling for determining the in vivo binding of proteins, e.g. transcription factors and histones, to DNA. Two important and recurrent questions for these large scale analyses are: 1) What is the genomic distribution of a set of binding sites? and 2) Does this genomic distribution differ significantly from another set of sites? Findings We exemplify the functionality of the PinkThing by analysing a ChIP profiling dataset of cohesin binding sites. We show the subset of cohesin sites with no CTCF binding have a characteristic genomic distribution different from the set of all cohesin sites. Conclusions The PinkThing is a web application for fast and easy analysis of the context of genomic loci, such as peaks from ChIP profiling experiments. The output of the PinkThing analysis includes: categorisation of position relative to genes (intronic, exonic, 5’ near, 3’ near 5’ far, 3’ far and distant), distance to the closest annotated 3’ and 5’ end of genes, direction of transcription of the nearest gene, and the option to include other genomic elements like ESTs and CpG islands. The PinkThing enables easy statistical comparison between experiments, i.e. experimental versus background sets, reporting over- and underrepresentation as well as p-values for all comparisons. Access and use of the PinkThing is free and open (without registration) to all users via the website: http://pinkthing.cmbi.ru.nl

2013-01-01

171

Material civilization: things and society.  

PubMed

This paper argues that although classical sociology has largely overlooked the importance of social relations with the material world in shaping the form of society, Braudel's concept of 'material civilization' is a useful way to begin to understand the sociological significance of this relationship. The limitations of Braudel's historical and general concept can be partially overcome with Elias's analysis of the connection between 'technization' and 'civilization' that allows for both a civilizing and a de-civilizing impact of emergent forms of material relation that both lengthen and shorten the chains of interdependence between the members of a society. It is suggested that the concept of the 'morality of things' employed by a number of commentators is useful in summarizing the civilizing effects of material objects and addressing their sociological significance. From the sociology of consumption the idea of materiality as a sign of social relationships can be drawn, and from the sociology of technology the idea of socio-technical systems and actor-networks can contribute to the understanding of material civilization. It is argued that the concept of 'material capital' can usefully summarize the variable social value of objects but to understand the complexity of material civilization as it unfolds in everyday life, an analysis of 'material interaction' is needed. Finally the paper suggests some initial themes and issues apparent in contemporary society that the sociological study of material civilization might address; the increased volume, functional complexity and material specificity of objects and the increased social complexity, autonomy and substitutability that is entailed. A theory of 'material civilization' is the first step in establishing a sociology of objects. PMID:16759196

Dant, Tim

2006-06-01

172

Replicating characteristics by SR lithography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Process optimization and pattern replication on various substrates by synchrotron radiation lithography was carried out to evaluate the problems for 0.15 micrometers level resists patters for 1-Gbit dynamic random access memory. It was found that the exposure latitude was rather restricted by the resist residue remaining between lines (scum) and the pattern collapse than the normally used +\\/- 10-percent critical

Hiroaki Sumitani; Kenji Itoga; Masami Inoue; Hiroshi Watanabe; Norikazu Yamamoto; Kenji Marumoto; Yasuji Matsui

1995-01-01

173

Characteristic Profiles of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Different Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The purposes of this study were to describe restrictions in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to assess different patterns of IADL in each MCI subtype. Methods: A total of 566 participants, those not cognitively impaired (NCI; n = 311) and MCI patients (n = 255), 60–94 years old (71.25 ± 6.00), were

Kyung Ran Kim; Kang Soo Lee; Hae-Kwan Cheong; Jin-Sup Eom; Byoung Hoon Oh; Chang Hyung Hong

2009-01-01

174

Lighthouse independent living program: Characteristics of youth served and their outcomes at discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the outcomes of 455 young people who entered the Lighthouse Independent Living Program during the period 2001–2006. On average, clients were admitted shortly before their 18th birthdays, and remained in the program for just under 10 months. At discharge, 60% had completed high school\\/GED program, 31% were employed, and 33% were independently housed. However, there were significant differences

Mark J. Kroner; Alvin S. Mares

2009-01-01

175

Use of long-lived tracer observations to examine transport characteristics in the lower stratosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) CH4 data were used in a modified Lagrangian-mean (MLM) analysis. The implemented MLM analysis is advantageous in that it provides a unique method for capturing tracer distributions and identifying so-called transport barriers (i.e., regions where quasi-horizontal transport is inhibited) and mixing regions, knowing only the mixing ratios of long-lived tracers. This analysis can be used

Gretchen S. Lingenfelser; William L. Grose

2002-01-01

176

Live-animal imaging of renal function by multiphoton microscopy.  

PubMed

Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

Dunn, Kenneth W; Sutton, Timothy A; Sandoval, Ruben M

2012-10-01

177

101 Things to Learn in Art School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|What is the first thing to learn in art school? "Art can be anything." The second thing? "Learn to draw." With "101 Things to Learn in Art School", artist and teacher Kit White delivers and develops such lessons, striking an instructive balance between technical advice and sage concepts. These 101 maxims, meditations, and demonstrations offer…

White, Kit

2011-01-01

178

How Things Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the physics of liquid crystal displays (LCD) which is based on polarizing properties of crystals controlled by electric command. Production of alphanumerics, display control, and input are considered. (JM)

Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

1983-01-01

179

Learning to Order Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many applications in which it is desirable to order rather than classify instances. Here we consider the problem of learning how to order, given feedback in the form of preference judgments, i.e., statements to the effect that one instance should be ranked ahead of another. We outline a two-stage approach in which one first learns by conventional means

William W. Cohen; Robert E. Schapire; Yoram Singer

1999-01-01

180

Remembrance of Things Partly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By studying forgetfulness in humans and monkeys, scientists are learning about the anatomy of normal memory. Results of amnesia studies, indicating that memory collapse occurs in a selective fashion depending on the cause, may help resolve a fundamental dispute among learning theorists. (JN)

Herbert, Wray

1983-01-01

181

Reminiscences of Things Past.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers a personalistic view of the history of school psychology. A brief biographical sketch, of the author is presented, followed by an exposition centered on the development of school psychology as a specialty. Two historical streams of intellectual thought, intervention methods, and professional affiliation, are described. (JAC)

Phillips, Beeman N.

1984-01-01

182

All Things Being Equal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this game, learners strategize to win the most cards by building number equations. Learners practice operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) to construct their equations. This activity guide contains sample questions to ask, literary connections, extensions, and alignment to local and national standards.

Houston, Children'S M.

2013-05-15

183

Breaking Things on Purpose  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

*Materials such as metals (aluminum, iron, copper, etc.), ceramics (silicon carbide, porcelain) or polymers (milk jugs made of polyethylene) are tested by scientists and engineers to reveal certain mechanical properties such as the maximum stress a material can withstand. The stress at which a material breaks is a measure of its strength. In this lesson you will be testing the strength of a delicious material you know as chocolate!

Wpsu

2007-12-20

184

On Naming Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding of human behavioral changes during the later Middle to earlier Late Pleistocene, encoded in the rudimentary\\u000a record of stone artifacts, is impeded by problems of communication among archaeologists. For example: continued use of broad-scale\\u000a developmental stage terms, such as “Earlier” vs. “Middle Stone Age” impedes understanding because of the multiplicity of implied meanings; continued widespread application\\u000a of the term

M. R. Kleindienst

185

PINing for Things Past  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Long-term memories are thought to be maintained by persistent changes in the strength of synaptic connections among neurons, but how such changes can persist for days to years has been one of the fundamental enigmas of neuroscience. Recently, however, one mechanism that is dependent on the persistent increased activity of an enzyme has been shown to be necessary for the persistence of long-term memory. The transient inhibition of the brain-specific, constitutively active protein kinase C isoform PKMζ erases memories that are even months old. This finding raises a number of issues; chief among them is the question, how can PKMζ maintain memories for months when its half-life is probably much shorter? New data suggest how the high abundance of PKMζ can be maintained over long periods of time. The synthesis of PKMζ is inhibited by Pin1 (protein interacting with NIMA 1), a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that represses dendritic translation. Signals mediated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which induces long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation, inhibit Pin1, enabling PKMζ synthesis. PKMζ, once translated, in turn inhibits Pin1, permitting persistent PKMζ synthesis. In this way, PKMζ may be up-regulated to the appropriate amounts for maintaining LTP and perpetuating our mental representations of the past.

Todd Charlton Sacktor (Downstate Medical Center;State University of New York REV)

2010-03-09

186

Ten Tips about 23 Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning 2.0--aka the "23 Things"--is a self-paced online learning program that the author designed in 2006 as a one-person crusade to move an entire organization of 500-plus staff onto the Web 2.0 bandwagon. Along with numerous requests to duplicate the program, many seek insight on how to do this successfully. In this article, the author shares…

Blowers, Helene

2008-01-01

187

Lecture and Lab Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page, created by David Howell of the University of Vermont, is a collection of examples, demonstrations, and exercises that can be used to motivate a lecture, demonstrate an important point, or create a laboratory exercise for students. Topics include the following: descriptives, normal distribution, sampling distributions, probability, Chi-square, t-tests, power, correlation/regression, one-way ANOVA, multiple comparisons, factorial ANOVA, repeated measures, multiple regression, general linear model, log linear models, and distribution-free tests. This is a large collection of materials pertaining to statistics.

Howell, David

2009-08-03

188

All things coherence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interaural coherence is a crucial element of binaural hearing. However, the nature of real-world environments is to reduce coherence through reverberation (especially in rooms) and extraneous noise. It becomes necessary to understand coherence discrimination and how somewhat-coherent sounds influence the use of auditory cues. Because coherence is closely related to interaural time differences (ITDs), coherence discrimination may diminish for frequencies above the 1500 Hz "limit" where sinusoidal ITD cues lose effectiveness. Listeners' sensitivity to coherence in 100-Hz wide bands above and below that limit was tested. Some listeners' thresholds dropped at high frequencies, while other listeners were consistent on both sides of the limit. These results were attributed to variable envelope coherence sensitivity. Listeners showed poorer coherence discrimination as the stimulus duration decreased below 100 mus and when the stimulus level lowered from 64 to 34 dB SPL. While it is possible for human listeners to lateralize high-frequency noise on the basis of ITDs in the envelope, the ability to do so makes great demands on the interaural coherence of the noise. Chapter III explores listeners' ability to lateralize a broadband, high-passed, coherent-noise signal in the presence of a broadband incoherent masker. Results showed that as the high-pass cutoff frequency increased through a critical region from 1 to 4 kHz, the required interaural coherence increased rapidly, especially for small changes in lateral position. This can be predicted by a neural model of lateralization based on the centroids of bandwise cross-correlation functions of model peripheral inputs that have been rectified and low-pass filtered [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 1754--1763 (1996)]. Coherent noise produces a compact lateralized image, and incoherent noise (independent signals to left and right ears) produces a diffuse image that fills the head. Nevertheless, listening experiments showed that coherent and incoherent noise images seem to be equally affected by small interaural level differences (ILD). The ILD threshold for lateralizing incoherent noise is less than 0.5 dB greater than that for coherent noise. In this sense, the human binaural system appears to behave like an ideal level meter, insensitive to the waveform and envelope fine structures that determine coherence. The small discrepancy (less than 0.5 dB) can be understood from a standard model of loudness perception---incorporating critical band filtering, half-wave rectification, amplitude compression (0.6 power law), and temporal integration (300 ms). A final goal was to discover if listeners were sensitive to the incoherence produced by head dispersion. The dispersion was modeled using Kuhn's (JASA 62, 157--167, 1977) derivation for pressure on a spherical surface due to a plane wave, which led to synthetic head-related transfer functions. In a headphone experiment, listeners attempted to distinguish these artificial head-related dispersions from perfectly-coherent stimuli of constant ITD. The results showed that listeners could discriminate the two stimuli, but only on the basis of lateral position. Another experiment, designed to eliminate the lateral cue, found listeners unable to consistently identify the head-dispersed sound.

Constan, Zachary Andrew

189

The effect of lipoic acid on macro and trace metal levels in living tissues exposed to oxidative stress.  

PubMed

Environmental pollution resulting from fast-paced industrialization, various chemicals used in agriculture, additives in food, smoking and use of alcohol, radiation, some viruses and poor dietary habits all have currently increased the incidence and types of cancer. Polycyclic hydrocarbons are an example of this type of carcinogens. Living things are exposed to this free radical-increasing substance due to various reasons. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species has an important place in the etiology of cancer, which develops in relation to many factors. Injury caused by cancer in the organism may affect other organs, as well as the tumors organs and tissues. In addition, it is known that some changes take place in the content of macro and trace elements due to cancer in the organism. Our study is intended to explore the protective role of alpha-lipoic acid, which has antioxidant characteristics in living tissues exposed to oxidative stress, in the macro and trace element levels. PMID:19519297

Ciftci, Harun; Bakal, Unal

2009-06-01

190

Precise synthesis of polymers containing functional end groups by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP): Efficient tools for synthesis of block\\/graft copolymers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes recent examples for precise synthesis of (co)polymers containing functional end groups prepared by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using molybdenum, ruthenium complex catalysts. In particular, this article reviews recent examples for synthesis of amphiphilic block\\/graft copolymers by adopting transition metal-catalyzed living ROMP technique. Unique characteristics of the living ROMP initiated by the molybdenum alkylidene complexes (so-called Schrock

Kotohiro Nomura; Mohamed Mehawed Abdellatif

2010-01-01

191

Internalization of ferromagnetic nanowires by different living cells  

PubMed Central

The ability of living cells, either adherent or suspended, to internalize nickel nanowires is demonstrated for MC3T3-E1, UMR106-tumour and Marrow-Stromal cells. Nanowires were produced by electrodeposition, 20 ?m long and 200 nm in diameter. Cell separation and manipulation was achieved for the three cell types. Applied magnetic field successfully oriented the internalized nanowires but no clear anisotropy is induced on the adherent cells. Nanowires tend to bind to cytoplasm metalloproteins and trigger lysosome reorganization around the nucleus. This work demonstrates the applications of nanowires in adherent and suspended cells for cell separation and manipulation, and further explore into their role in nanobiotechnology.

Prina-Mello, Adriele; Diao, Zhu; Coey, John Michael David

2006-01-01

192

Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change  

PubMed Central

Introduction Changing the built environment to promote active lifestyles requires collaboration among diverse sectors. Multisectoral collaborative groups in the United States promote active lifestyles through environmental and policy changes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of these collaborative groups and the extent to which they have achieved change. Methods We identified, recruited, and interviewed the coordinators of active living collaborative groups in the United States. We used descriptive statistics to characterize groups by composition, stakeholder engagement, and the extent of environmental and policy change in 8 strategic areas. Results Fifty-nine groups from 22 states participated in the study. Most groups had a diverse set of partners and used a range of activities to advance their agendas. Most groups achieved some form of environmental or policy change. On average, groups reported working on 5 strategy areas; parks and recreation (86%) and Safe Routes to School (85%) were named most frequently. More than half of groups reported their environmental initiatives as either in progress or completed. Groups reported the most success in changing policy for public plazas, street improvements, streetscaping, and parks, open space, and recreation. Complete Streets policy and zoning ordinances were the most frequently cited policy types. Engaging in media activities and the policy-making process in addition to engaging stakeholders appear to influence success in achieving change. Conclusion Although many groups successfully worked on parks and recreation improvements, opportunities remain in other areas, including transit and infill and redevelopment. Additional time and resources may be critical to realizing these types of changes.

Reed, Hannah L.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Zieff, Susan G.; Eyler, Amy A.; Lyn, Rodney; Goins, Karin Valentine; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara

2013-01-01

193

The Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT): methodological issues and participant characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health problems and risk behaviours among young people are of great public health concern. Consequently, within the VII Framework Programme, the European Commission funded the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) project. This Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted in eleven European countries, with Sweden as the coordinating centre, and was designed to identify an effective way to promote mental health and reduce suicidality and risk taking behaviours among adolescents. Objective To describe the methodological and field procedures in the SEYLE RCT among adolescents, as well as to present the main characteristics of the recruited sample. Methods Analyses were conducted to determine: 1) representativeness of study sites compared to respective national data; 2) response rate of schools and pupils, drop-out rates from baseline to 3 and 12 month follow-up, 3) comparability of samples among the four Intervention Arms; 4) properties of the standard scales employed: Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (Z-SAS), Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), World Health Organization Well-Being Scale (WHO-5). Results Participants at baseline comprised 12,395 adolescents (M/F: 5,529/6,799; mean age=14.9±0.9) from Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain. At the 3 and 12 months follow up, participation rates were 87.3% and 79.4%, respectively. Demographic characteristics of participating sites were found to be reasonably representative of their respective national population. Overall response rate of schools was 67.8%. All scales utilised in the study had good to very good internal reliability, as measured by Cronbach’s alpha (BDI-II: 0.864; Z-SAS: 0.805; SDQ: 0.740; WHO-5: 0.799). Conclusions SEYLE achieved its objective of recruiting a large representative sample of adolescents within participating European countries. Analysis of SEYLE data will shed light on the effectiveness of important interventions aimed at improving adolescent mental health and well-being, reducing risk-taking and self-destructive behaviour and preventing suicidality. Trial registration US National Institute of Health (NIH) clinical trial registry (NCT00906620) and the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000214).

2013-01-01

194

Study of the live body weight and body characteristics of the African Muscovy duck ( Caraina moschata )  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hundred and twenty 1-week old ducklings (160 males and 160 females) were used to evaluate the body weight, body parts\\u000a and carcass characteristics of the African Muscovy duck. Sexual dimorphism was in favour of the male for all the parameters\\u000a throughout the experimental period, however the difference was significant (P?

A. Téguia; H. Mafouo Ngandjou; H. Defang; J. Tchoumboue

2008-01-01

195

Relative microelastic mapping of living cells by atomic force microscopy.  

PubMed Central

The spatial and temporal changes of the mechanical properties of living cells reflect complex underlying physiological processes. Following these changes should provide valuable insight into the biological importance of cellular mechanics and their regulation. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to indent soft samples, and the force versus indentation measurement provides information about the local viscoelasticity. By collecting force-distance curves on a time scale where viscous contributions are small, the forces measured are dominated by the elastic properties of the sample. We have developed an experimental approach, using atomic force microscopy, called force integration to equal limits (FIEL) mapping, to produce robust, internally quantitative maps of relative elasticity. FIEL mapping has the advantage of essentially being independent of the tip-sample contact point and the cantilever spring constant. FIEL maps of living Madine-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells show that elasticity is uncoupled from topography and reveal a number of unexpected features. These results present a mode of high-resolution visualization in which the contrast is based on the mechanical properties of the sample.

A-Hassan, E; Heinz, W F; Antonik, M D; D'Costa, N P; Nageswaran, S; Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

1998-01-01

196

Natural infection by endoparasites among free-living wild animals.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of occurrence and variety of intestinal parasites among free-living wild animals. Fecal samples from wild mammals and birds at rehabilitation centers in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo were analyzed by sedimentation and flotation-centrifugation methods. Parasite eggs, oocysts, cysts and/or trophozoites were found in 71% of the samples. Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were detected in fecal samples from oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus) and scaly-headed parrots (Pionus maximiliani). Giardia cysts were identified in the feces of a gray brocket (Mazama gouazoubira). Among the most common parasites found, there were eggs from Toxocara cati, Toxascaris leonina and Ancylostoma tubaeforme, and from Cestoda. Several Enterobius sp. eggs were found in the feces of red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus). It can be concluded from this study that despite the small number of samples, the diversity of parasites found was noteworthy. Additional information about parasite endofauna in wild animals is needed, since their presence might suggest that there could be proximity to and interactions with domestic animals and/or humans. In addition, further studies on parasites from free-living wild animals are of prime importance for understanding the intensity of anthropic changes in wild environments. PMID:23778826

Holsback, Luciane; Cardoso, Mauro José Lahm; Fagnani, Rafael; Patelli, Thaís Helena Constantino

197

Living with uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

In the electric utility industry, only one thing can be guaranteed with absolute certainty: one lives and works with many unknowns. Thus, the industry has embraced probability methods to varying degrees over the last 25 years. These techniques aid decision makers in planning, operations, and maintenance by quantifying uncertainty. Examples include power system reliability, production costing simulation, and assessment of environmental factors. A series of brainstorming sessions was conducted by the Application of Probability Methods (APM) Subcommittee of the IEEE Power Engineering Society to identify research and development needs and to ask the question, ''where should we go from here '' The subcommittee examined areas of need in data development, applications, and methods for decision making. The purpose of this article is to share the thoughts of APM members with a broader audience to the findings and to invite comments and participation.

Rau, N.; Fong, C.C.; Grigg, C.H.; Silverstein, B.

1994-11-01

198

Gravitational Rotation Curves for the THINGS Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of Galactic Rotation Curves has long been thought to provide evidence for the existence of Dark Matter. Although dark matter is currently the commonly accepted solution to the discrepancies found in galactic rotation curves between observation and theory, numerous dark matter alternative theories are beginning to emerge as possible solutions as well, in part because the galactic halos used in dark matter fits involve one or two extra external free parameters per galaxy. Among these alternative theories, the Conformal Gravity theory first presented by Weyl and recently advanced by Mannheim and Kazanas presents a renormalizable, fourth order theory, which does not assume the existence of dark matter, nor is inferred as an ad hoc addition to standard gravity. Moreover, Conformal Gravity can serve to define the rotation curves of spiral and dwarf galaxies with no external free parameters, thus eliminating the ambiguity of the current dark matter halo mass models. The THINGS survey is a recent sample of 18 galaxies, consisting of both dwarf and spiral galaxies, at distances between 2 and 15 Mpc. We thus apply the conformal theory to the THINGS data to produce rotation curves that fit the data with very high accuracy without the need for dark matter. The results yield rotation curves, which being parameter free, are strikingly more convincing than those of the standard gravity with dark matter. )

O'Brien, James

2010-02-01

199

Writing social psychology: fictional things and unpopulated texts.  

PubMed

This paper presents the author's position on the question how to write social psychology. It reflects the author's long-term interest in rhetoric and his more recent concerns about the writing of social scientists. The author argues that social psychologists tend to produce unpopulated texts, writing about 'fictional things' rather than people. Social psychologists assume that their technical terms are more precise than ordinary language terms. The author contests this assumption. He suggests that when it comes to describing human actions, ordinary language on the whole tends to be more precise. The paper analyses why this should be the case, drawing on ideas from linguistics and Vaihinger's notion of fictions. The author presents examples to show how psychological writers, by using passives and nominals, can omit information about the agents of action and the nature of the actions that they are performing. Although their texts may appear impressively technical, they can, in fact, be highly imprecise. Moreover, social psychologists, by using this nominal style of writing, tend to write about processes as if they were things and then attribute actions to these things. In so doing, they create 'fictional things', which they treat as if they were real things. The author offers six recommendations for writing in simpler, clearer ways. PMID:21366609

Billig, Michael

2011-03-01

200

Metabolic characteristics and response to high altitude in Phrynocephalus erythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), a lizard dwell at altitudes higher than any other living lizards in the world.  

PubMed

Metabolic response to high altitude remains poorly explored in reptiles. In the present study, the metabolic characteristics of Phrynocephaluserythrurus (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits high altitudes (4500 m) and Phrynocephalusprzewalskii (Lacertilia: Agamidae), which inhabits low altitudes, were analysed to explore the metabolic regulatory strategies for lizards living at high-altitude environments. The results indicated that the mitochondrial respiratory rates of P. erythrurus were significantly lower than those of P. przewalskii, and that proton leak accounts for 74~79% of state 4 and 7~8% of state3 in P. erythrurus vs. 43~48% of state 4 and 24~26% of state3 in P. przewalskii. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in P. erythrurus was lower than in P. przewalskii, indicating that at high altitude the former does not, relatively, have a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. A higher activity related to ?-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HOAD) and the HOAD/citrate synthase (CS) ratio suggested there was a possible higher utilization of fat in P. erythrurus. The lower expression of PGC-1? and PPAR-? in P. erythrurus suggested their expression was not influenced by cold and low PO2 at high altitude. These distinct characteristics of P. erythrurus are considered to be necessary strategies in metabolic regulation for living at high altitude and may effectively compensate for the negative influence of cold and low PO2. PMID:23951275

Tang, Xiaolong; Xin, Ying; Wang, Huihui; Li, Weixin; Zhang, Yang; Liang, Shiwei; He, Jianzheng; Wang, Ningbo; Ma, Ming; Chen, Qiang

2013-08-07

201

The AMEL study, a cross sectional population-based survey on aging and malnutrition in 1200 elderly Lebanese living in rural settings: protocol and sample characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Lebanon is faced with a particular challenge because of large socioeconomic inequality and accelerated demographic transition. Rural residents seem more vulnerable because of limited access to transport, health and social services. No information is available regarding health, nutrition and living conditions of this specific population. The purpose of the AMEL (Aging and Malnutrition in Elderly Lebanese) study is to assess the nutritional status of community dwelling elderly people, aged 65 years and above, living in a rural settings in Lebanon, in line of socioeconomic factors, health and living conditions. The present paper will describe the gender specific characteristics of the study population. Methods AMEL is a cross-sectional population based study conducted between April 2011 and April 2012 including 1200 elderly individuals living in the 24 rural Caza (districts) of Lebanon. People aged greater than or equal to 65 y were randomly selected through multistage cluster sampling. Subjects were interviewed at their homes by trained interviewers. The questionnaire included the following measures: socio-demographic factors, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA), health related characteristics, functional ability, cognitive status, mood and social network. Results The sample included 591 men (49.3%) and 609 women (50.8%). Mean age was 75.32 years and similar between genders. Malnutrition (MNA?living conditions of community dwelling rural residents of Lebanon. These findings may alert policy makers to plan appropriate intervention in order to improve the quality of life and increase successful aging.

2013-01-01

202

Microenvironments and different nanoparticle dynamics in living cells revealed by a standard nanoparticle.  

PubMed

For quantitative analysis of nanoparticle diffusions and submicro-environments in living cells, use of newly synthesized silica-based fluorescent nanoparticle (Si-FNP) as a standard nanoprobe is successfully demonstrated. The appropriate characteristics of a standard probe were fully analyzed in vitro by single molecule detection, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Using fluorescence correlation analysis in single living cells, we quantitatively compared the diffusional properties of the standard Si-FNP with a diameter of 50 nm, peptide coated Si-FNP, streptavidin coated Qdot, and GFP molecule which have different sizes and surface properties. The result demonstrates that the standard Si-FNP without coat is minimally trapped in the vesicles in the process of cellular endocytosis. Interestingly, a large proportion of Si-FNP introduced into the cells by electroporation diffuses freely in the cells during a cell cycle suggesting free diffusing NPs are hardly trapped in the vesicles. The simple but highly sensitive method will provide insight into strategies to understanding the hydrodynamic process of nanoparticle delivery into living cells as well as the cellular microenvironment in the view of submicro-size. PMID:22922061

Pack, Chan Gi; Song, Mi Ryoung; Tae, Eunju Lee; Hiroshima, Michio; Byun, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jun Sung; Sako, Yasushi

2012-08-16

203

BOUNDARY CONDITION IDENTIFICATION BY SOLVING CHARACTERISTIC EQUATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behaviour of a mechanical structure in the lower frequencies is dominated by constraints at the boundaries. Most structures have elastic supports and specifying the boundary conditions requires knowledge of the support parameters. In this paper, a new method is developed to determine the boundary parameters based on the solution of reduced order characteristic equations. The order of these non-linear

H. Ahmadian; J. E. MOTTERSHEAD; M. I. Friswell

2001-01-01

204

Comparison of the biosorption and desorption of hazardous organic pollutants by live and dead biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

and 2-chlorobiphenyl by living and dead cells of the fungus R. arrhizus and activated sludge was studied. A generalization concerning the relative magnitude of biosorptive uptake between live and dead biomass cannot be made using the experimental data. Uptakes by live and dead cells are similarly correlated to the octanol\\/water partition coefficient of the organic pollutants. The desorption of the

M. TSEZOS; J. P. BELL

1989-01-01

205

Career counseling: 101+ things you can do with a degree in biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of this discussion is to assist biology students and the career counselors who work with them in identifying satisfying careers that build upon their interest and foundation in biology. The categories of career options include research, healthcare, teaching, science writing, administration/management, government, industry, and miscellaneous careers that do not fit into the other categories.

Kathleen M. Eyster (Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

2007-12-01

206

Cadmium biosorption by non-living aquatic macrophytes Egeria densa.  

PubMed

In this work the removal potential on Cd(2+ ) by the non-living Egeria densa biomass has been studied. The influence of the metal solution pH, the plant drying and the metal solution temperature, and biosorbent grain size was previously studied in batch systems. The cadmium adsorption rate has increased when the pH was increasing, but at pH 5, the cadmium precipitation has begun to occur, avoiding such high pH values in other tests. The cadmium removal was around 70% at 30 degrees C biomass dried and solution temperatures, assuming as the best temperature conditions. No significant influence was observed in cadmium removal due to the grain size effect. The biosorption kinetic data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order model. The equilibrium time in experiments was around 45 min with a 70% Cd removal. The equilibrium data at pH 5 were described rather better by the Langmuir isotherm than the Freundlich one, with an adsorption rate and maximum metal content values of 0.40 L g(-1) and 1.28 meq g(-1), respectively, for Langmuir model. The kinetic parameter values are near to other biosorbents, indicating that the macrophytes E. densa could be used as biosorbent material in industrial effluent treatment system. PMID:19633370

Módenes, A N; de Abreu Pietrobelli, J M T; Espinoza-Quiñones, F R

2009-01-01

207

The Librarian Who Loves "LibraryThing"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"LibraryThing" is a great way for library media specialists to keep track of the books they personally read. "LibraryThing" allows them to create a personal library, give their books tags, choose book covers, give star ratings, generate citations, and review books. Library media specialists can also connect to other readers and see their reviews.…

Sibley, Roberta

2008-01-01

208

IL-10 Restrains IL-17 to Limit Lung Pathology Characteristics following Pulmonary Infection with Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain.  

PubMed

IL-10 production during intracellular bacterial infections is generally thought to be detrimental because of its role in suppressing protective T-helper cell 1 (Th1) responses. Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that activates both Th1 and Th17 protective immune responses. Herein, we report that IL-10-deficient mice (Il10(-/-)), despite having increased Th1 and Th17 responses, exhibit increased mortality after pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain. We demonstrate that the increased mortality observed in Il10(-/-)-infected mice is due to exacerbated IL-17 production that causes increased neutrophil recruitment and associated lung pathology. Thus, although IL-17 is required for protective immunity against pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain, its production is tightly regulated by IL-10 to generate efficient induction of protective immunity without mediating pathology. These data suggest a critical role for IL-10 in maintaining the delicate balance between host immunity and pathology during pulmonary infection with F. tularensis live vaccine strain. PMID:24007881

Slight, Samantha R; Monin, Leticia; Gopal, Radha; Avery, Lyndsay; Davis, Marci; Cleveland, Hillary; Oury, Tim D; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A

2013-09-03

209

[Characteristics of the antioxidant system of healthy people of main ethnic groups living near Baikal Lake].  

PubMed

The antioxidant system of blood is the important factor that characterizes the adaptive possibilities of human organism. The estimation of state of the antioxidant protection and lipid peroxidation systems at men and women of two Baikal Lake ethnic groups was carried out. Spectrophotometric and fluorometric methods were used during the study. Increase of by-products of lipid peroxidation with decrease of activity of the antioxidant protection system was observed at men of the Buryat ethnicity in comparison with Russian ones. At women of the Buryat ethnicity was observed the increase of the primary products of lipid peroxidation with the adequate antioxidant response in comparison with Russian ones. PMID:22888671

Kolesnikova, L I; Darenskaia, M A; Grebenkina, L A; Suturina, L V; Labygina, A V; Semenova, N V; Tsyrenov, T B; Darzhaev, Z Iu; Kurashova, N A; Tolpygina, O A

2012-01-01

210

Possibility of High Performance Quantum Computation by Using Evanescent Photons in Living Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Penrose and Hameroff suggested that microtubles in living systems functioned as quantum computers by utilizing evanescent photons. On the basis of the theorem that the evanescent photon is a superluminal particle, the possibility of high performance computation in living systems has been studied. From the theoretical analysis, it is shown that the living system can achieve large quantum bits computation

Takaaki Musha

2008-01-01

211

Research on Mobile Digital Health System Based on Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The application of the internet of things in the medical profession, the domestic and overseas research status of mobile digital\\u000a medical system, the existing problems and key technology were analyzed, in view of the medical industry application characteristics,\\u000a mobile digital medical system based on the internet of things was designed. This system mainly includes perception layer,\\u000a network layer and application

Jingzhao Li; Xueqin Wu; Hui Chen

212

Analysis of long-lived isotopes by liquid scintillation spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Neutron production cross sections are reported for reactions leading to long-lived isotopes in fusion reactor materials. Pure elements and separated isotopes were irradiated with 14.6 to 14.8 MeV neutron fluences up to 10 Y n/cmS. Undesired activities were chemically separated and the long-lived activities were measured using both liquid scintillation and x-ray spectrometry. Results are presented for the reactions VWFe(n,2n)VVFe (2.73 y), WUNi(n,2n)WTNi (100 y), WTCu(n,P)WTNi, and WNi(n,2n)VZNi (76,000 y).

Bowers, D.L.; Greenwood, L.R.

1987-01-01

213

Live weight assessment based on easily accessible morphometric characteristics in the double-muscled Belgian Blue beef breed  

Microsoft Academic Search

Live weight is an important trait in cattle farming. Weighing is not always feasible and therefore live weight is often estimated from easily accessible data. In this study, data on live weight, age and gender, and four body measurements, withers height (WH), heart girth (HG) and width of the shoulders (SW) and hind quarters (BcW) of double-muscled Belgian Blue beef

Frank Coopman; Stefaan De Smet; Hans Laevens; Alex Van Zeveren; Luc Duchateau

2009-01-01

214

Academics 2000: First Things First. Evaluation Report, 1998-99.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This evaluation report profiles Academics 2000: First Things First, the Texas initiative under the Goals 2000 Educate America Act to raise the level of academic achievement of all Texas students by ensuring that each child achieves fourth-grade mastery of the foundation subjects by the end of fourth grade. The report states that, at the local…

Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Program Evaluation.

215

Observation of living cells by x-ray microscopy with a laser-plasma x-ray source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied laser-produced plasma as an x-ray source for x-ray microscopy. Using water- window x rays, contact x-ray images of living sea urchin sperm were taken by a 500 picosecond x-ray pulse. The resist relief was examined by atomic force microscope and informations characteristic of x-ray microscopy were obtained. The finest feature noticed in the x-ray image was 0.1 micrometers .

Tomie, Toshihisa; Shimizu, Hazime; Majima, Toshikazu; Yamada, Mitsuo; Kanayama, Toshihiko; Yano, M.; Kondo, H.

1991-12-01

216

Living area contamination by chlordane used for termite treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past several years, the United States Air Force has experienced incidences of living quarters contamination with airborne chlordane. The first noted incident occurred in two houses at a southwestern Air Force base (CALLAHAN 1970). Chlordane was inadvertently introduced into heating ducts during subslab injection for termite control. When furnaces were activated, chlordane vaporized and was disseminated throughout the

J. M. Livingston; C. R. Jones

1981-01-01

217

Amperometric estimation of BOD by using living immobilized yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A microbial electrode consisting of immobilized living whole cells of yeasts, porous membrane and an oxygen electrode was prepared for continuous estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Immobilized Trichosporon cutaneum was employed for the microbial electrode sensor for BOD. When a sample solution containing the equivalent amount of glucose and glutamic acid was injected into the sensor system, the current

Motohiko Hikuma; Hiroshi Suzuki; Yakeo Yasuda; Isao Karube; Shuichi Suzuki

1979-01-01

218

The Negotiation of Lived Spaces by Unauthorized College Aged Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Throughout the United States, undocumented students live in constant fear of their legal status being disclosed, and despite their educational success and professional objectives, face uncertainty and an unknown future. This study has put forward the question of what are the effects of the symbiotic relationship of a historical anti-Mexican…

Jacobo, Rodolfo

2010-01-01

219

Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

2011-01-01

220

Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis, (3) Orem's Systems of Nursing Care, and (4) regular in-service education. We

Charles E. Blair; Judy Glaister; Alston Brown; Carolyn Phillips

2007-01-01

221

The Negotiation of Lived Spaces by Unauthorized College Aged Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Throughout the United States, undocumented students live in constant fear of their legal status being disclosed, and despite their educational success and professional objectives, face uncertainty and an unknown future. This study has put forward the question of what are the effects of the symbiotic relationship of a historical anti-Mexican…

Jacobo, Rodolfo

2010-01-01

222

Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

2007-01-01

223

Occurrence and Characteristics of Chronic Pain in a Community-Based Cohort of Indigent Adults Living With HIV Infection  

PubMed Central

Pain is common among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), but little is known about chronic pain in socioeconomically disadvantaged HIV-infected populations with high rates of substance abuse in the post-antiretroviral era. This cross-sectional study describes the occurrence and characteristics of pain in a community-based cohort of 296 indigent PLWHA. Participants completed questionnaires about sociodemographics, substance use, depression and pain. Cut-point analysis was used to generate categories of pain severity. Of the 270 participants who reported pain or the use of a pain medication in the past week, 8.2% had mild pain, 38.1% had moderate pain, and 53.7% had severe pain. Female sex and less education were associated with more severe pain. Depression was more common among participants with severe pain than among those with mild pain. Increasing pain severity was associated with daily pain and with chronic pain. Over half of the participants reported having a prescription for an opioid analgesic. Findings from this study suggest that chronic pain is a significant problem in this high risk, socioeconomically disadvantaged group of patients with HIV disease and high rates of previous or concurrent use of illicit drugs.

Miaskowski, Christine; Penko, Joanne M.; Guzman, David; Mattson, Jennifer E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Kushel, Margot B.

2011-01-01

224

Mechanics of living cells measured by laser tracking microrheology.  

PubMed Central

To establish laser-tracking microrheology (LTM) as a new technique for quantifying cytoskeletal mechanics, we measure viscoelastic moduli with wide bandwidth (5 decades) within living cells. With the first subcellular measurements of viscoelastic phase angles, LTM provides estimates of solid versus liquid behavior at different frequencies. In LTM, the viscoelastic shear moduli are inferred from the Brownian motion of particles embedded in the cytoskeletal network. Custom laser optoelectronics provide sub-nanometer and near-microsecond resolution of particle trajectories. The kidney epithelial cell line, COS7, has numerous spherical lipid-storage granules that are ideal probes for noninvasive LTM. Although most granules are percolating through perinuclear spaces, a subset of perinuclear granules is embedded in dense viscoelastic cytoplasm. Over all time scales embedded particles exhibit subdiffusive behavior and are not merely tethered by molecular motors. At low frequencies, lamellar regions (820 +/- 520 dyne/cm(2)) are more rigid than viscoelastic perinuclear regions (330 +/- 250 dyne/cm(2), p < 0.0001), but spectra converge at high frequencies. Although the actin-disrupting agent, latrunculin A, softens and liquefies lamellae, physiological levels of F-actin, alone (11 +/- 1.2 dyne/cm(2)) are approximately 70-fold softer than lamellae. Therefore, F-actin is necessary for lamellae mechanics, but not sufficient. Furthermore, in time-lapse of apparently quiescent cells, individual lamellar granules can show approximately 4-fold changes in moduli that last >10 s. Over a broad range of frequencies (0.1-30, 000 rad/s), LTM provides a unique ability to noninvasively quantify dynamic, local changes in cell viscoelasticity.

Yamada, S; Wirtz, D; Kuo, S C

2000-01-01

225

Survival characteristics of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes and Helicobacter pylori during passage through the free-living ciliate, Tetrahymena sp.  

PubMed

Free-living protozoa have been implicated in the survival and transport of pathogens in the environment, but the relationship between non-Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli or Helicobacter pylori and ciliates has not been characterized. Six diarrheagenic pathotypes of E. coli and an isolate of H. pylori were evaluated for their susceptibility to digestion by Tetrahymena, an aquatic ciliate. Tetrahymena strain MB125 was fed E. coli or H. pylori, and the ciliate's egested products examined for viable bacterial pathogens by the BacLight(™) LIVE/DEAD (™) assay, a cell elongation method, and by colony counts. All six diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes survived digestion, whereas H. pylori was digested. Growth of E. coli on agar plates indicated that the bacteria were able to replicate after passage through the ciliate. Transmission electron micrographs of E. coli cells as intact rods vs. degraded H. pylori cells corroborated these results. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a net-like matrix around intact E. coli cells in fecal pellets. These results suggest a possible role for Tetrahymena and its egested fecal pellets in the dissemination of diarrheagenic E. coli in the environment. This bacterial-protozoan interaction may increase opportunities for transmission of diarrheagenic E. coli to mammalian hosts including humans. PMID:22680607

Smith, Charlotte D; Berk, Sharon G; Brandl, Maria T; Riley, Lee W

2012-07-03

226

Ten Cool Things from the First Year of LRO  

NASA Video Gallery

To celebrate one year in orbit, here are ten cool things already observed by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Note that the stories here are just a small sample of what the LRO team has released and barely touch on the major scientific accomplishments of the mission. Visit www.nasa.gov/LRO to read about these images and many more!

gsfcvideo

2010-06-23

227

How Things Work: Front and Rear Bicycle Brakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from How Things Work, by Lou Bloomfield, provides an explanation of why it can be hard to stop a bike with the rear brakes alone. The site contains a description of how friction and torque produce a rotation of the bicycle that makes the rear brakes ineffective.

2006-11-08

228

Improving Internet of Things communications through compression and classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amount of data produced and exchanged in the Internet of Things is continuously increasing. The associated management costs for information transmission and classification are becoming an almost unbearable burden due to the unprecedented number of data sources and the intrinsic vastness of the dataset. In this paper, we propose a novel lightweight approach capable of alleviating both aspects by

Matteo Danieletto; Nicola Bui; Michele Zorzi

2012-01-01

229

A survey on facilities for experimental internet of things research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The initial vision of the Internet of Things was of a world in which all physical objects are tagged and uniquely identified by RFID transponders. However, the concept has grown into multiple dimensions, encompassing sensor networks able to provide real-world intelligence and goal-oriented collaboration of distributed smart objects via local networks or global interconnections such as the Internet. Despite significant

Alexander Gluhak; Srdjan Krco; Michele Nati; Dennis Pfisterer; Nathalie Mitton; Tahiry Razafindralambo

2011-01-01

230

Live adult worms detected by ultrasonography in human Bancroftian filariasis.  

PubMed

Ultrasonographic examination of the scrotal area was performed in 14 asymptomatic individuals with bancroftian filariasis and microfilaremia. While in seven subjects (50%) the ultrasonographic findings were normal, lymphatic dilation and tortuosity were observed in the other seven. In these vessels, structures with peculiar aleatory movements (filaria dance sign) were detected. A segment of the lymphatic tract containing these mobile intraluminal structures that was resected surgically from the left spermatic cord of one individual confirmed that these structures were living Wuchereria bancrofti adult worms (two females and one male). Our study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using a low-cost, widely available, noninvasive technique (ultrasonography) to detect and monitor living adult worms and lymphatic dilation in patients with bancroftian filariasis. PMID:8024070

Amaral, F; Dreyer, G; Figueredo-Silva, J; Noroes, J; Cavalcanti, A; Samico, S C; Santos, A; Coutinho, A

1994-06-01

231

Putting Thought in Accordance with Things: The Demise of Animal-Based Analogies for Plant Functions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Advances six practical suggestions in transpiration whereby teachers can support students in their struggle to put their thoughts, especially everyday mental models, in accordance with classroom experimental evidence. Discusses the wider implications for how to teach about living things and how to view the status of analogies in science…

Barker, Miles

2002-01-01

232

Teacher's Resource Book. Small Things. Grade 5. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document introduces fifth-grade children to the microscopic world, to the instruments needed to make it accessible, and to the appearance and structure of cells in nonliving as well as living things. Aims of the unit include providing children with an instrument which extends their senses in a radical manner, and leading them in using this…

Anchorage School District, AK.

233

Putting Thought in Accordance with Things: The Demise of Animal-Based Analogies for Plant Functions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advances six practical suggestions in transpiration whereby teachers can support students in their struggle to put their thoughts, especially everyday mental models, in accordance with classroom experimental evidence. Discusses the wider implications for how to teach about living things and how to view the status of analogies in science generally.…

Barker, Miles

2002-01-01

234

How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life, 3rd Edition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book is an unconventional introduction to physics and science that starts with whole objects and looks inside them to see what makes them work. It's written for students who seek a connection between science and the world in which they live. How Things Work brings science to the reader rather than the reverse. Like the course in which it

Louis A. Bloomfield

2005-01-01

235

Scattering properties of gradient heteropolymers obtained by ``living'' free-radical copolymerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An original, quantitative, theory of “living” radical copolymerization has been developed proceeding from the current concepts of its kinetics and mechanism. This theory enables one to calculate both the dependence of monomers' conversion on time and any statistical characteristics of the chemical structures of the copolymers formed. Expressions have been derived describing the angular dependence of the scattering amplitude of the copolymerization products. The results of quantitative calculations of these characteristics have been also presented to exemplify the potentialities of the theory.

Kuchanov, S. I.; Zharnikov, T. V.

2002-02-01

236

Quality of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS under the New Epidemic Characteristics in China and the Associated Factors  

PubMed Central

Background Improvement of quality of life has been one of goals in health care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). In China, the epidemic characteristics have changed and transmission is now most commonly sexual contact. However, the assessment of quality of life of PLWHA under new characteristics has limited reporting. This study was designed to assess the quality of life among PLWHA who contracted disease mainly via sexual contact and to clarify the associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Liaoning Province. Sample size (800) was calculated based on the fatality rate and enlarged with consideration on the loss of response. Participants were sampled by tables of random numbers among all registered PLWHA. Questionnaires pertaining to quality of life (SF-36) and related factors (demographic characteristics, social support and network, HIV/AIDS awareness, and behavior factors) were distributed during December 2010-April 2011. 783 effective responses were obtained. Results The average scores of physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and total score (TS) were 66.8±21.9 (Mean±SD), 62.2±20.9, and 64.5±20.2. General linear model analysis revealed that, in standardized estimate (?) sequence, PCS was significantly associated with monthly income, perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, transmission, and ethnicity; MCS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, condom use, monthly income, transmission, ethnicity, and alcohol consumption; whereas TS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, monthly income, transmission, condom use, and ethnicity. Conclusions Quality of life for PLWHA who contracted HIV mainly via sexual contact was worse and both physical conditions and social integration were impacted. Under current epidemic characteristics, efforts to increase social support and enhance the implementation of supporting policy are necessary to improve the quality of life of PLWHA.

Sun, Wei; Wu, Ming; Qu, Peng; Lu, Chunming; Wang, Lie

2013-01-01

237

Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo

2013-09-01

238

An Inventory of Supershells in nearby Galaxies: First Results from THINGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS), is a 21-cm H I line survey of a sample of 34 nearby (2-15 Mpc) galaxies. The observations were carried out with the VLA and have a velocity resolution of 5 km s-1 or better and an angular resolution of 6 arcsec which at this istance range corresponds to a linear resolution of 60-440 pc. One of the primary goals of THINGS is to look at the fine-scale structure of the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and examine how it varies as a function of Hubble type, star formation rate, galaxy mass, metallicity, etc. Previous studies have shown that the morphology of the neutral ISM is greatly affected by massive stars through the combined effects of stellar winds and supernova explosions. Because massive stars tend to form in associations they will end their lives within the same, relatively short time span and within a small volume, which leads to the formation of expanding bubbles of coronal gas in the ISM. These structures compress the neutral gas and can trigger secondary or induced star formation on their rims where presumably molecular clouds are formed. We present an inventory of more than 1000 holes and shells in 20 nearby galaxies, and some first results from a comparison between these galaxies as far as the properties of their H I holes are concerned. These properties include the size of the holes, their expansion velocities, energy requirements and kinematic ages.

Bagetakos, I.; Brinks, E.; Walter, F.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Rich, J. W.; Usero, A.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

2009-01-01

239

In vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites of living organisms by mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:23811725

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-01-01

240

In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-07-01

241

[Characteristics of the medical status and living conditions of the homeless registered as tuberculosis patients in Nagoya City].  

PubMed

An Investigation by questionnaire was conducted in 1996 to know the tuberculosis (TB) status and living conditions of 50 homeless people registered as TB patients at one of Nagoya city's 16 health centers. 1. All patients had one or more symptoms of TB, 64% of them showed positive TB bacilli on smear, and 35.3% of them had a previous history of TB treatment. However, only 15.2% suspected they had TB at the onset of symptoms. 2. Main reasons of seeking medical treatment: 28.6% arrived by ambulance after falling down from exhaustion, 25.7% had consulted with welfare agencies after the onset of symptoms, and 20.0% had been diagnosed during the treatment of other diseases. 3. When they were admitted to the hospital they had many concerns: 29.0% loss of income, 19.4% living expenses, 19.4% smoking prohibition, 12.9% admission fee, and 9.7% privacy. 4. They lived in the following: 42.9% construction camps, 20.0% parks or streets, 17.1% single room occupancy hotels, 17.1% daily or monthly paid apartments, and 11.4% sauna baths. 5. Past medical histories of the subjects included 40.6% injuries by labor accidents, and 25.0% stomach ulcers. Current diseases were 15.6% mental diseases, 15.6% liver diseases, 15.6% diabetes mellitus, and 9.4% alcoholic dependence. Seventy percent of them consumed alcohol daily (average pure ethanol 125 ml per day). 6. From the results outlined above, the following proposals relating to TB control of the homeless should be considered. 1) Educating the homeless as to the need for a health check when TB symptoms are present. 2) Opening a clinic for the homeless for easy access to consultation on TB. 3) Directly observed therapy short-course, for TB in the homeless. 4) Health examination of the employees of single-room occupancy hotels and sauna baths which are used frequently by the homeless. 5) A fundamental countermeasure to deal with alcoholic dependency among the homeless. PMID:10191602

Yamanaka, K; Akashi, T; Miyao, M; Ishihara, S

1999-02-01

242

Assessment of transferrin recycling by Triplet Lifetime Imaging in living cells  

PubMed Central

An optical method is presented that allows the measurement of the triplet lifetime of a fluorescent molecule. This is a characteristic specific to each fluorophore. Based on differences in triplet lifetimes of two fluorescent species (autofluorescence versus label), this novel approach measures relative quantities of a transmembrane receptor and associated fluorescently labeled ligand during its recycling in living cells. Similarly to fluorescence-lifetime based methods, our approach is almost insensitive to photobleaching. A simple theory for unmixing two known triplet lifetimes is presented along with validation of the method by measurements of transferrin recycling in a model system based on chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO). Transferrin is the delivery carrier for Fe3+ to the cell.

Geissbuehler, Matthias; Kadlecova, Zuzana; Klok, Harm-Anton; Lasser, Theo

2012-01-01

243

Characteristic Multiorgan Pathology of Cystic Fibrosis in a Long-Living Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Knockout Murine Model  

PubMed Central

The lack of an appropriate animal model with multiorgan pathology characteristic of the human form of cystic fibrosis has hampered our understanding of the pathobiology of the disease. We evaluated multiple organs of congenic C57BL/6J cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (Cftr)?/? and Cftr+/+ mice maintained from weaning on a liquid diet then sacrificed between 1 and 24 months of age. The lungs of the Cftr?/? animals showed patchy alveolar overdistention, interstitial thickening, and fibrosis, with progression up to 6 months of age. The proximal and distal airway surface was encased with mucus-like material but lacked overt evidence of chronic bacterial infections or inflammation. All Cftr?/? animals showed progressive liver disease, with hepatosteatosis, focal cholangitis, inspissated secretions, and bile duct proliferation; after 1 year of age there was progression to focal biliary cirrhosis. The intercalated, intralobular and interlobular ducts and acinar lumina of the exocrine pancreas, the parotid and submaxillary glands of the Cftr?/? animals were dilated and filled with inspissated material, as well as mild inflammation and acinar cell drop out. Quantitative measurements of the pancreas showed significant acinar atrophy and increased acinar volume in comparison with age-matched Cftr+/+ littermates. The ileal lumen and crypts were filled with adherent fibrillar material. After 3 months of age the vas deferens of the Cftr?/? animals could not be identified. None of the aforementioned pathological changes were observed in the Cftr+/+ littermates fed the same liquid diet. We show, for the first time, that long-lived C578L/6J Cftr?/? mice develop manifestations of cystic fibrosis-like disease in all pathologically affected organs in the human form of cystic fibrosis.

Durie, Peter R.; Kent, Geraldine; Phillips, M. James; Ackerley, Cameron A.

2004-01-01

244

Perceptions of the character of God as narrated by East African women living with HIV.  

PubMed

Two qualitative research studies conducted with women living with HIV in Malawi (N = 72) and Kenya (N = 54) separately revealed personal faith as a primary coping mechanism that mitigates the effects of stigma and promotes spiritual, physical, and mental health. Fourth characteristics of God emerged that sustain the women in daily life. PMID:22866377

Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah M; Kibicho, Jennifer W

245

The Characteristics of a Model Technology Education Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The things that make the quality of a teacher stand out can cover a wide range of characteristics, actions, words, and experiences. The mark left on a student by a teacher, for good or bad, is written in an ink that will last a lifetime. This article describes a study that identifies the characteristics of exceptional technology education…

Kaufman, Andrew R.; Warner, Scott A.; Buechele, Jessica R.

2011-01-01

246

Internet of things technology applied in medical information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of things technology used in medical information is adopt in this paper. Firstly the structure feature of internet of things technology is researched .Then analyzing the development of EPC System Network, especially Internet of things technology applied in medical information. Therefore the remote consultation System based on internet of things is adopted ,it is helpful to solve the area

Yan-Wei Wang; Hui-Li Yu; Ya Li

2011-01-01

247

Control Strategy of Group Behavior for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of the information techniques, Internet of Things has caused extensive concern. The burden of Internet of Things increases as the number of users rises. In order to ease the burden on Internet of Things and improve efficiency of user accessing the Internet of Things, this paper proposed a control strategy of group behavior. We count resources user

Qingkui Chen; He Jia

2011-01-01

248

The Corporeal Order of Things: The Spiel of Usability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Things make sense to us. The identity of a thing is a meaningful style that expresses the usability of the thing. The usability is a dynamic order of the praxis in which the thing is embedded and in which we are ourselves de-centered. According to Merleau-Ponty, this sociocultural and psychosocial order is a formation of practical understanding and interpretation that

Kurt Dauer Keller

2005-01-01

249

Participation in physical activity by persons living with HIV disease.  

PubMed

Physical activity (PA) may offer substantial health benefits for persons with HIV disease. The purpose of this study is to describe and explore physical activity behaviors in a sample of persons living with HIV disease. This descriptive correlational study surveyed 78 persons (n = 70 men; n = 8 women) from two outpatient settings. Results showed somewhat fewer of the participants met Healthy People 2010 PA recommendations than persons in the general population. Walking was the preferred PA. Average functional social support was significantly correlated with (a) weekly frequency of performing moderate 30-minute PA (r = .38, p < .01) and (b) HIV-RNA (viral load) values (r = -.37, p < .05). Significant correlations were also found between scores on general health status self-reported CD4+ cell counts (.33, p < .05) and HIV-RNA (.39, p < .05) values. Total friend functional social support was significantly (.32, p < .01) correlated with weekly frequency of moderate or vigorous PA. PMID:14571687

Clingerman, Evelyn M

250

Healthy living? By whose standards? Engaging mental health service recipients to understand their perspectives of, and barriers to, healthy living.  

PubMed

Objective: It is well recognized that mental health service recipients experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders, have poorer diets, and exercise less than the general population. This study sought to explore the meaning of a healthy lifestyle for this population and the barriers they experience to healthy living. Method: Focus groups were conducted with 23 individuals who experience serious mental health issues. The meaning of a healthy lifestyle and the barriers participants experience to living healthily were explored. Results: Participants perceived a healthy lifestyle in broader terms than professional guidelines for exercise and diet. A broad framework including friendship, affordable safe housing, employment, spiritual, and emotional good health, as well as healthy eating and exercise, is described. Barriers identified by participants were poor mental and physical health and stigma (structural, social, and self). An unexpected result was the group problem solving that occurred during the focus groups. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Health care professionals need to understand mental health service recipients' perspectives of a "healthy lifestyle." An understanding of barriers within this context is required, as only then will we be able to empathize and assist as health care professionals. This study also shows that realistic, innovative, and pragmatic solutions occur when mental health service recipients are empowered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23876179

Graham, Candida; Griffiths, Brenda; Tillotson, Sherri; Rollings, Crystal

2013-07-22

251

Characteristics and prognosis of lymphoproliferative disorders post-renal transplantation in living versus deceased donor allograft recipients.  

PubMed

In this study, we compared the features and prognosis of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) occurring in living donor recipients with those of deceased donor kidney transplant patients. A comprehensive search was performed for finding studies reporting data of PTLD in living and deceased donor renal recipients in the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines. Finally, international data from 14 different studies were included in the analysis. Overall, 122 renal recipients with PTLD were entered into this analysis. Chi square test showed that renal recipients from living donors significantly less frequently represented any remission episodes during the course of their disease (41% vs. 63%, respectively; P = 0.05). Living donor renal recipients were significantly more likely to develop metastasis in comparison with deceased donor recipients (64% vs. 23%, respectively; P = 0.035). Histopathological evaluations were comparable between the two patient groups. Survival analysis did not show any difference between the patient groups, even when patients were adjusted for the type of immuno-suppression. The mortality rate of the transplant patients with PTLD was 55.3% and the 1- and 5-year patients survival rates were 50% and 37%, respectively, for the deceased donor renal recipients compared with 60% and 34%, respectively, for the living donors group. We conclude that living donor kidney transplant recipients who develop PTLD have a higher rate of metastasis and a lower rate of remission episodes. Further prospective studies with a large patient population are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24029253

Khedmat, Hossein; Taheri, Saeed

2013-09-01

252

Anti-influenza virus effects of both live and non-live Lactobacillus acidophilus L-92 accompanied by the activation of innate immunity.  

PubMed

The antiviral effects of both a live and non-live Lactobacillus acidophilus strain L-92 (L-92) were investigated by oral administration (10 mg/mouse per d) daily for 21 d in a mouse model infected intranasally with influenza virus (H1N1). Virus titres in the lung of mice administered either live or non-live L-92 cells daily for 15 d were repressed 6 d after virus infection compared with the control group. Natural killer (NK) activity in the orally administered non-live L-92 group was higher compared with that of the control group before virus infection and on day 6. In contrast, NK activity in the live L-92 group compared with the control group was not significantly changed on both days, but was significantly higher on day 1. In contrast, live L-92 showed a greater repression of virus proliferation compared with non-live L-92, 6 d after the infection. Live L-92 decreased the number of neutrophils in the lung and suppressed lung weight, leading to the consequent deterioration of consolidation scores of the lung. These results indicated that pretreatment of live or non-live L-92 cells had protective effects against influenza virus infection. Among the measured cytokines and chemokines, eotaxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-1?, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) and interferon-? were significantly increased in the lung: IL-17 was significantly increased in Peyer's patch of the live L-92 group compared with the control group. A mechanistic study suggested that the enhancement of NK activity in the lung caused by stimulating various antiviral cytokines and chemokines after the oral administration of L-92 cells might be important in protecting against virus infection. PMID:23594927

Goto, Hiroaki; Sagitani, Atsuhiro; Ashida, Nobuhisa; Kato, Shinji; Hirota, Tatsuhiko; Shinoda, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

2013-04-18

253

Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae  

PubMed Central

Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae. N. fowleri causes Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous encephalitis. Acanthamoeba spp. also can cause cutaneous lesions and Amoebic Keratitis, a sight-threatening infection of the cornea that is associated with contact lens use or corneal trauma. Sappinia pedata has been identified as the cause of a nonlethal case of amoebic encephalitis. In view of the potential health consequences due to infection with these amoebae, rapid diagnosis is critical for early treatment. Microscopic examination and culture of biopsy specimens, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and corneal scrapings have been used in the clinical laboratory. For amoebic keratitis, confocal microscopy has been used to successfully identify amoebae in corneal tissue. More recently, conventional and real-time PCR assays have been developed that are sensitive and specific for the amoebae. In addition, multiplex PCR assays are available for the rapid identification of these pathogens in biopsy tissue, CSF, and corneal specimens.

da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

2009-01-01

254

Engaging rehabilitation technologies: making things happen.  

PubMed

For some people, the word "technology" in rehabilitation brings to mind equipment and assistive devices. For others - it is a brave new frontier where robotic advance means many of the functional consequences of impairment are/will be alleviated, and many roles health professionals and carers currently perform will disappear. Like most things in life, a simplistic interpretation in complexity rarely capture what is truly going on. This is certainly true for rehabilitation technologies where devices are clearly important for our clients and for our professions but, it is not just about gadgets - it is far more than that. Of the numerous definitions available, most have in common a notion of tools to apply knowledge to practical issues or, as noted in the Britannica Concise Encyclopaedia [ 1 ]: "Whereas science is concerned with how and why things happen, technology focuses on making things happen". PMID:22494397

McPherson, Kathryn M; Kayes, Nicola M; Hale, Leigh A

2012-04-12

255

Screaming String Thing: How Much Noise Can You Make?!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this simple and fun activity, learners discover the relationship between vibration and sound by making a squeaky toy instrument out of simple household materials. Participants explore how increasing and decreasing friction on a string changes the sound of a pitch. They also experience how sound is amplified. Learners can expand the activity by linking their string things to create a "telephone" or making different instruments from other recycled materials.

Wgbh

2009-01-01

256

Honesty in a regulatory context – good thing or bad?  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is often taken for granted that if more firms were innately honest or ethical this would be a good thing. We use the example of pollution policy to dispute such a claim. If regulation is by pollution tax social welfare is non-monotonic in population honesty. The choice of policy instrument may itself be characterised by ‘reversals’, with command-and-control methods

Anthony Heyes

2001-01-01

257

THE FREE ENERGY OF NITROGEN FIXATION BY LIVING FORMS  

PubMed Central

Fixation of nitrogen even with liberation of energy or free energy, will take place if either oxygen gas or hydrogen gas, or other substances, especially gases, whose standard free energies are close to zero, are involved to form either nitrates, ammonia, or cyanide, not to speak of still other compounds. It has been pointed out that there are two and only two general conditions where nitrogen fixation can require energy. These are, first, if nitrogen reacts with some compound like water with an already high negative free energy of formation and where negligible oxidation of nitrogen would occur; second, if the plant does not take advantage of working at concentrations where the process would yield free energy. If nitrogen fixation is exothermic and free energy-yielding, how is the carbohydrate requirement of nitrogen-fixing organisms to be interpreted? Are the experimental determinations of the carbon to nitrogen ratio purely circumstantial? Is further hope given to those who may experimentally try to narrow this ratio to where the carbon used is only for the carbon requirements of general metabolism, exclusive of fixation? Do not hypotheses concerning the fixation of nitrogen in the evolutionary process, which are based on the conception that energy is required, lose some of their significance? Does it not suggest that perhaps fixation is far more universal than is supposed among living forms, particularly among the higher green plants, and thereby give encouragement to those who may wish to demonstrate this experimentally? Does it not indicate that perhaps the function of fixation is often to obtain energy for use in general metabolism? Is the general carbohydrate metabolism of the fixation forms to be regarded as being merely extremely inefficient? Or most suggestive of all, is the carbohydrate serving some unobserved function?

Burk, Dean

1927-01-01

258

Stable Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Live Benthic Foraminifera from the Okhotsk Sea: Effects of Oceanography, Food Supply, and Microhabitat Patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleoceanographic studies use benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes as proxies for interpretations of numerous parameters such as past oceanic circulation patterns, food supply, primary productivity, etc. However, only few studies have used live (rose Bengal-stained) populations to reliably calibrate stable isotope characteristics to bottom water and sediment chemistry of the surrounding environment. We report results from a study in the Okhotsk Sea, a region characterized by extreme climatic and oceanographic settings. Not only does this marginal basin of the NW-Pacific experience the southermost extent of seasonal ice cover in the entire Northern Hemisphere, it also shows extremely high primary productivity. These boundary conditions lead many to consider the Okhotsk Sea both as a modern analog for ecological and oceanographic conditions in ocean basins during past and a sensitive recorder of potential future climate change in high latitudes. We compare results of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes from the most abundant taxa to oxygen isotopic compositions of bottom water and carbon isotopes of bottom water DIC, nutrient inventories from the water column and productivity proxy-data from sediment surface profiles (chlorines, TOC, biogenic opal). Multicorer samples from the upper 10 cm at 15 sites were taken from a variety of settings with water depths ranging from less than 100 m to more than 3200 m. Results obtained show a wide range of interspecific carbon isotope values exceeding 2 per mil variability within neighbouring samples. Minimum values occur in deep endobenthic groups like Globobulima spp., whereas species living in a relatively wide depth range like V. sadonica or U. peregrina exhibit intermediate values between -0.7 and -1 per mil. Most measurements conducted to address intraspecific variability remain within a narrow range of less than 0.4 per mil. However, we do observe vertical trends with both increasing and decreasing carbon isotope gradients within the sediment column. Obtained carbon isotope values from both living and dead specimen of widely used the Cibicides spp. group stay within the range of bottom water DIC, with no systematic negative phytodetritus- effect occuring throughout the sample set despite etremely pronounced seasonality in organic matter supply on most sites. Combined with a proxy-dataset about primary productivity, we give an evaluation of benthic-pelagic coupling and the impact on benthic species adaption to the pronounced subarctic seasonal cycle and the strongly pulsed food fluxes to the ocean floor.

Lembke-Jene, L.; Tiedemann, R.; Bubenshchikova, N.; Erlenkeuser, H.; Dullo, W.

2008-12-01

259

Stable Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Live Benthic Foraminifera from the Okhotsk Sea: Effects of Oceanography, Food Supply and Microhabitat Patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleoceanographic studies use benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes as proxies for interpretations of numerous parameters such as past oceanic circulation patterns, food supply, primary productivity, etc. However, only few studies have used live (rose Bengal-stained) populations to reliably calibrate stable isotope characteristics to bottom water and sediment chemistry of the surrounding environment. We report data from a study in the Okhotsk Sea, a region characterized by extreme climatic and oceanographic settings. Not only does this marginal basin of the NW-Pacific experience the southermost extent of seasonal ice cover in the entire Northern Hemisphere, it also shows extremely high primary productivity. These boundary conditions lead many to consider the Okhotsk Sea both as a modern analog for ecological and oceanographic conditions in ocean basins during past and a sensitive recorder of potential future climate change in high latitudes. We compare results of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes from the most abundant taxa to oxygen isotopic compositions of bottom water and carbon isotopes of bottom water DIC, nutrient inventories from the water column and productivity proxy-data from sediment surface profiles (chlorines, TOC, biogenic opal). Multicorer samples from the upper 10 cm at 15 sites were taken from a variety of settings with water depths ranging from less than 100 m to more than 3200 m. Results obtained show a wide range of interspecific carbon isotope values exceeding 2 per mil variability within neighbouring samples. Minimum values occur in deep endobenthic groups like Globobulima spp., whereas species living in a relatively wide depth range like V. sadonica or U. peregrina exhibit intermediate values between -0.7 and -1 per mil. Most measurements conducted to address intraspecific variability remain within a narrow range of less than 0.4 per mil. However, we do observe vertical trends with both increasing and decreasing carbon isotope gradients within the sediment column. Obtained carbon isotope values from both living and dead specimen of widely used the Cibicides spp. group stay within the range of bottom water DIC, with no systematic negative phytodetritus-effect occuring throughout the sample set despite etremely pronounced seasonality in organic matter supply on most sites. Combined with a proxy-dataset about primary productivity, we give an evaluation of benthic-pelagic coupling and the impact on benthic species adaption to the pronounced subarctic seasonal cycle and the strongly pulsed food fluxes to the ocean floor.

Lembke-Jene, L.; Tiedemann, R.; Bubenshchikova, N.; Erlenkeuser, H.

2009-04-01

260

Characteristics of biofilm formation by Candida tropicalis and antifungal resistance.  

PubMed

Candida tropicalis is a common species related to nosocomial candidemia and candiduria. Most Candida spp. infections are associated with biofilm formation on implanted medical devices or on host epithelial cell surfaces. Sessile cells display phenotypic traits dramatically different from those of their free-living, planktonic counterparts, such as increased resistance to antimicrobial agents and to host defenses. The characteristics of C. tropicalis biofilm formation in vitro are described. By an XTT-reduction assay, an increase in metabolic activity was observed up to 24 h of biofilm formation, and this activity showed a linear relationship with sessile cell density. Scanning electron microscopy was used to further characterize C. tropicalis biofilms. The initial adherence of yeast cells was followed by germination, microcolony formation, filamentation and maturation at 24-48 h. Mature biofilms consisted of a dense network of yeast cells and filamentous forms of C. tropicalis. Increased resistance of sessile cells against fluconazole and amphotericin B was also demonstrated. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantification showed that sessile cells overexpressed ERG11 (coding for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase) and MDR1 (coding for an efflux protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily). These mechanisms may contribute to the fluconazole resistance of the C. tropicalis biofilm. PMID:18248413

Bizerra, Fernando César; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Poersch, Celina; Estivalet Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez; Borsato Quesada, Regina Mariuza; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

2008-01-29

261

ESF - An Extensive Service Foundation from Internet of Things Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing interest in the Internet of Things (IoT) has brought lots of opportunities and challenges to researchers. Cyber-space and physical world are more and more amalgamated by smart devices with networking capability. Making appropriate adaptations to satisfy new processing requirements is necessary for the extensive service in such an environment. In this paper, we propose a three-layer architecture for

Jianqi Shi; Xin Ye; Liangyu Chen; Pei Zhang; Ningkang Jiang

2012-01-01

262

‘The best thing ever’: how children's popular culture matters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reflects upon a popular cultural event which was, briefly, for a particular grouping of children in the UK, ‘the best thing ever’: namely the release of the CD-single Reach, by the British pop group S Club 7. I suggest that this event was illustrative of manifold cultural forms and practices which—being ostensibly banal, fun, faddish, lowbrow and ‘childish’—continue

John Horton

2010-01-01

263

Detection and Identification of Free-living Amoeba from Environmental Water in Taiwan by PCR Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Balamuthia and Hartmannella all belong to free-living amoebae that are present ubiquitously in the environment including water, soil, and air. Free-living amoebae are parasites which can infect humans and can lead to serious illness and even death. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of free-living amoebae in aquatic environment in Taiwan, and to compare the differences between Acanthamoeba and Naegleria in diverse cultivation methods and conditions. In this study, we used molecular method by PCR amplification with specific primers to analyze the occurrence of free-living amoebae. We collected 176 samples from environmental water including drinking water treatment plants, stream water, and hot spring recreational areas in Taiwan. Based on the results of PCR, 43 water samples (24.4%) were detected positive for free-living amoebae. The most common Acanthamoeba genotype isolated from samples including T2, T4, T5, T12, and T15. N. australiensis and N. lovaniensis were also identified by molecular biology techniques. Furthermore, we found that both Acanthamoeba and Naegleria can be cultured by PYG in 30° C, but not all free-living amoebae can be isolated and enriched by using storage-cultivation method. Because of the widespread presence of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria in aquatic environments, the water quality and safety of aquatic environments should be more conscious in Taiwan and worldwide. Keywords: free-living amoebae; Acanthamoeba; Naegleria; Balamuthia; Hartmannella; PCR

Tsai, H. F.; Hsu, B. M.; Huang, K. H.; She, C. Y.; Kao, P. M.; Shen, S. M.; Tseng, S. F.; Chen, J. S.

2012-04-01

264

Living in living cities.  

PubMed

Abstract This article presents an overview of current and potential applications of living technology to some urban problems. Living technology can be described as technology that exhibits the core features of living systems. These features can be useful to solve dynamic problems. In particular, urban problems concerning mobility, logistics, telecommunications, governance, safety, sustainability, and society and culture are presented, and solutions involving living technology are reviewed. A methodology for developing living technology is mentioned, and supraoptimal public transportation systems are used as a case study to illustrate the benefits of urban living technology. Finally, the usefulness of describing cities as living systems is discussed. PMID:23834590

Gershenson, Carlos

2013-07-08

265

Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Sometimes a single word changes everything. In his groundbreaking book "Choice Words", Peter Johnston demonstrated how the things teachers say (and don't say) have surprising consequences for the literate lives of students. Now, in "Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives", Peter shows how the words teachers choose affect the worlds…

Johnston, Peter H.

2012-01-01

266

Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure of Amerindian women living alongside the Beni River (Amazonian Bolivia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Populations in Bolivian Amazonia are exposed to mercury contamination through fish ingestion. A group of 170 Amerindian women living along the banks of the Beni River were examined in order to detect any adverse effects on their health consistent with the toxic effects of mercury. The mercury content of the women's hair (H-Hg) was used as the bio-indicator of mercury

Eric Benefice; Selma Luna-Monrroy; Ronald Lopez-Rodriguez

2010-01-01

267

Loneliness and living arrangements.  

PubMed

Adults with ID/DD live in increasingly small community settings, where the risk of loneliness may be greater. We examined self-reported loneliness among 1,002 individuals with ID/DD from 5 states in relation to community residence size, personal characteristics, social contact, and social climate. One third reported being lonely sometimes and one sixth said they were often lonely, but loneliness was not more common for people living alone or in very small settings. More loneliness was reported by residents of larger community living settings of 7 to 15 people. More social contact and liking where one lives were associated with less loneliness. Social climate variables, such as being afraid at home or in one's local community, were strongly associated with greater loneliness. PMID:17997614

Stancliffe, Roger J; Lakin, K Charlie; Doljanac, Robert; Byun, Soo-Yong; Taub, Sarah; Chiri, Giuseppina

2007-12-01

268

The computer science of everyday things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology is fashionable, wonderful and getting better; Moore's Law predicts substantial, sustained improvement (G. Moore, 1996). Yet the usability of `everyday things' is low (video recorders being a notorious example). It seems to follow that improvements must be sought in areas outside technology, such as human factors. But a premise is wrong: in fact, the technology, i.e., the embedded computer

Harold Thimbleby

2001-01-01

269

The Internet of Things: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the Internet of Things. Main enabling factor of this promising paradigm is the integration of several technologies and communications solutions. Identification and tracking technologies, wired and wireless sensor and actuator networks, enhanced communication protocols (shared with the Next Generation Internet), and distributed intelligence for smart objects are just the most relevant. As one can easily imagine, any

Luigi Atzori; Antonio Iera; Giacomo Morabito

2010-01-01

270

Science 101: What causes things to rust?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The simple answer is that things rust when you leave them out in the rain. But maybe you want a more thorough answer. Rust is a form of corrosion, which is broadly defined as the wearing away of materials due to chemical reactions. So corrosion applies to

2010-12-01

271

Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Relaxation Techniques for Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... 5 Things To Know About Relaxation Techniques for Stress When you’re under stress, your body reacts by releasing hormones that produce ... vessels narrow (restricting the flow of blood). Occasional stress is a normal coping mechanism. But over the ...

272

Basic structural and functional characteristics of the epidermal barrier in wild mammals living in different habitats and climates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the combination of standard light and transmission electron microscopy, cryo-SEM, immunohistochemistry and a new\\u000a sensitive glycolipid histochemical technique (5-hexadecanoylaminofluorescein staining, laser scanning microscopy), including\\u000a densitometrical evaluation, our approach gives for the first time an overview of the specific biology of the epidermal permeability\\u000a barrier in wild mammals (20 species from five orders), living under varying (aquatic or moist

Wilfried Meyer; Judith Schmidt; Johannes Kacza; Roger Busche; Hassan Y. Naim; Ralf Jacob

273

Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo  

Microsoft Academic Search

We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the

Harumi Itoh; Tsunenori Arai; Makoto Kikuchi

1997-01-01

274

35 CFR 61.225 - Plague; vessels; persons; things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...1998-07-01 1998-07-01 false Plague; vessels; persons; things. 61.225...Arrival at the Panama Canal § 61.225 Plague; vessels; persons; things. (a) Persons ill from plague shall be isolated until...

1998-07-01

275

Family Living and Personal Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for various projects for Family Living and Personal Living classes. FAMILY LIVING Wayne County Clerk - Marriage License *Travel Planning Sites* Northwest Airlines Amtrak Travelocity Spirit Air Orbitz PERSONAL LIVING (and Parenting): *Alcohol Research* Alcohol and Public Health - CDC MedlinePlus: Alcoholism NIAAA National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism *Birth Control* Health and Wellness Resource Center - - start at this site by typing Birth Control in the search bar on the right of the screen and select "full text articles" and consumer heatlh. It will list a range of birth ...

Schultz, Ms.

2007-11-05

276

Living by the calendar: how plants know when to flower  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive processes in plants and animals are usually synchronized with favourable seasons of the year. It has been known for 80 years that organisms anticipate seasonal changes by adjusting developmental programmes in response to daylength. Recent studies indicate that plants perceive daylength through the degree of coincidence of light with the expression of CONSTANS, which encodes a clock-regulated transcription factor

Marcelo J. Yanovsky; Steve A. Kay

2003-01-01

277

Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Live Cells by Effective Cytosolic Delivery of Probes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMicroscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited

Marzia Massignani; Irene Canton; Tao Sun; Vanessa Hearnden; Sheila MacNeil; Adam Blanazs; Steven P. Armes; Andrew Lewis; Giuseppe Battaglia; Giuseppe Chirico

2010-01-01

278

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) can double the resolution of the wide-field fluorescence microscope, but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed SIM that is capable of 100 nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time frames. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in living Drosophila S2 cells in the total internal reflection (TIRF) mode.

Chhun, Bryant B.

279

Intelligent Cargo – Using Internet of Things Concepts to Provide High Interoperability for Logistics Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The advancements in technology and increased need for streamlined business operations demand new ways in cooperation. In recent\\u000a years, the Internet of Things has been recognised to be an important future technology, providing new opportunities for enhancing\\u000a the exchange of information and status updates on real-time regarding business operations. Therefore, Internet of Things concepts\\u000a have been adopted by several businesses

Jens Schumacher; Mathias Rieder; Manfred Gschweidl; Philip Masser

280

A phenomenological exploration of reflections on lived space by child sexual abusers.  

PubMed

Child sexual abusers may be better understood by phenomenological exploration of reflections on childhood lived space. Child sexual abusers often suffer from child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and neglect in their childhood lived space. These experiences may be considered a limitation or deformation of the child's lived space, resulting in a distorted self view that contributes to adult behavior. Child sexual abuse is not a new phenomenon; it is a problem that has existed throughout history but has rarely enjoyed the publicity and concern of recent times. Child sexual abusers' reflections on their lived space during childhood were explored by interviewing eight incarcerated child sexual abusers in a US correctional center. Van Manen's descriptive-interpretive theoretical process was used to guide abusers' existential reflections on their childhood lived space. van Manen's phenomenological method is dynamic and was used to organize and analyze data into essential categorical themes, one of which is "failure to root." While the viewpoint is retrospective, participants in this study provided unique perspectives on childhood reflections on lived space. These experiences, as reported by the participants, could be used to assist child victims to cope and to guide nursing practice, education, and future research related to Healthy People 2010's Goal 15 (Healthy People 2010, n.d.). PMID:21142595

Garrett, Linda H

2010-12-01

281

A swimming robot actuated by living muscle tissue  

PubMed Central

Biomechatronics is the integration of biological components with artificial devices, in which the biological component confers a significant functional capability to the system, and the artificial component provides specific cellular and tissue interfaces that promote the maintenance and functional adaptation of the biological component. Based upon functional performance, muscle is potentially an excellent mechanical actuator, but the larger challenge of developing muscle-actuated, biomechatronic devices poses many scientific and engineering challenges. As a demonstratory proof of concept, we designed, built, and characterized a swimming robot actuated by two explanted frog semitendinosus muscles and controlled by an embedded microcontroller. Using open loop stimulation protocols, the robot performed basic swimming maneuvers such as starting, stopping, turning (turning radius ~400 mm) and straight-line swimming (max speed >1/3 body lengths/second). A broad spectrum antibiotic/antimycotic ringer solution surrounded the muscle actuators for long term maintenance, ex vivo. The robot swam for a total of 4 hours over a 42 hour lifespan (10% duty cycle) before its velocity degraded below 75% of its maximum. The development of functional biomechatronic prototypes with integrated musculoskeletal tissues is the first critical step toward the long term objective of controllable, adaptive and robust biomechatronic robots and prostheses.

Herr, Hugh; Dennis, Robert G

2004-01-01

282

Manipulating of living cells by micropattern-immobilized biosignal molecules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent progress in biological science has revealed many types of biosignal proteins. The signal proteins regulate various cell functions such as growth, differentiation, mobility, secretion, and apotosis. It was known that the proteins interact with the cognate receptor on the cell surface to form complexes, and that the complexes are internalized into the cells and are decomposed in the cell. Recently we found that immobilized biosignal proteins had the potential to regulate the cell's functions without internalization. This was confirmed by micropattern-immobilization of biosignal molecules. Micropattern immobilization of proteins was peformed by photolithography as follows. The protein was mixed with photo-reactive polymers synthesized and the mixture was deposited on a polymeric plate. The cast plate was covered with photo-mask and photo-irradiated. Protein just on the irraditated regions was immobilized. Micropattern-immobilized insulin or epidermal growth factor significantly enhanced cell growth. In addition, icropattern-immobilized tumor necrosis factor and nerve growth factor induced apotosis and neural differentiation of cells, respectively. Micropatterning technology enabled us not only to visualize the effects of immobilized proteins on the cell functions, but also to make new micro-fabricated biomaterials.

Ito, Yoshihiro

2001-03-01

283

42 CFR 71.32 - Persons, carriers, and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Persons, carriers, and things. 71.32 Section 71.32 Public... § 71.32 Persons, carriers, and things. (a) Whenever the Director...that any arriving carrier or article or thing on board the carrier is or may be...

2012-10-01

284

42 CFR 71.32 - Persons, carriers, and things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Persons, carriers, and things. 71.32 Section 71.32 Public... § 71.32 Persons, carriers, and things. (a) Whenever the Director...that any arriving carrier or article or thing on board the carrier is or may be...

2011-10-01

285

Heirlooms, Nikes and Bribes: Towards a Sociology of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do things come to embody meaning? In much anthropological and sociological writings, things have mainly been considered in two ways: either as commodities or as gifts. Correspondingly, people's relationships to things and to other people seem to fall in two broad categories, often regarded as mutually exclusive: either as impersonal, economic or market relationships with strangers, or as personal

Aafke Komter

2001-01-01

286

Consent to forensic radiologic examinations by living crime victims.  

PubMed

The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate whether people approve radiological examinations specifically for the documentation of findings for the use in criminal proceedings. Forty two crime victims and 42 controls without a history of sustained violence were asked via telephone interview whether they would agree to forensic radiological examinations and if radiation exposure and the duration of the examination were factors influencing their consent. The consent to specifically forensic radiological examinations was high in both groups, however, higher in victims than in controls (85-96 % compared to 64-77 %, respectively, depending on the imaging modality). All of the victims and 93 % of the controls consented to at least one of the proposed imaging modalities, i.e. X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Most of the interviewees did not consider the duration of the examination to be relevant to their consent (79 % of the crime victims and 93 % of the controls); however, the radiation exposure associated with the examination was relevant for 55 % of the controls but only for 19 % of the victims. These results show that there is a great consent to the application of radiological methods for forensic purposes. This is important for the growing field of forensic radiology as the approval of the examination by the victim is a legal prerequisite. PMID:23381578

Scheurer, Eva; Schoelzke, Stefanie

2013-02-01

287

The laying of live larvae by the blowfly Calliphora varifrons (Diptera: Calliphoridae).  

PubMed

This study examined larviposition in Calliphora varifrons Malloch (Diptera: Calliphoridae), an ovoviviparous blowfly of forensic importance in Western Australia. Females took 1.5 min (mean 89±10.0s, n=42) to deposit their live, first instar larvae (average body length 2.5 mm) on fresh liver in the laboratory. Females laid an average of 30 live larvae (mean of 29.9±1.2, n=50) at a rate of 1 larva every 2 s (mean of 0.46±0.05 larvae/s, n=42). Most females (66%) laid live larvae only, but 18% laid fully developed eggs (half of the egg masses laid by individual females were viable) and 16% laid live larvae and some eggs at the same time. Females laying only eggs laid a mean of 24.1±3.0, n=10 eggs on each occasion. Field females carried between 20 and 44 live larvae (mean of 33.4±1.0, n=49) with a strong linear relationship between female size and number of live larvae. In the laboratory, females typically laid larvae in multiple locations. Very few females (<8%) retained some larvae in their ovisacs, retaining on average, half of their complement of developed larvae. Those larvae retained had begun to be resorbed by the female with necrosis evident on the posterior segments. PMID:22921421

Cook, David F; Voss, Sasha C; Dadour, Ian R

2012-08-24

288

CHEP: The Net of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

PART A: Forced by operational inefficiencies in its own business model, CHEP, the market leader in the rental pallet business, became an early adopter of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. Having proven the effectiveness of the technology for internal operations with a pilot test, CHEP now had to find clients who want to adopt the technology-enabled services in order to

Sascha Vitzthum; Benn Konsynski

2008-01-01

289

Where the Wild Things Are  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few people realize that coyotes prowl the country's major urban areas. By tracking them on their turf, one Boston-area high school teacher and his students are helping scientists to learn more about the oft-misunderstood animals. Here, the author features David Eatough, a science teacher at Revere High School just north of Boston, and his…

Capone, Lisa

2005-01-01

290

Where the Wild Things Are  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Few people realize that coyotes prowl the country's major urban areas. By tracking them on their turf, one Boston-area high school teacher and his students are helping scientists to learn more about the oft-misunderstood animals. Here, the author features David Eatough, a science teacher at Revere High School just north of Boston, and his…

Capone, Lisa

2005-01-01

291

Kinetics: The Pace of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is a chapter of a geochemistry book by Dr. W. M. White used in a geochemistry course at Cornell University. The 55-page PDF document discusses reaction kinetics, the path an earth system takes in achieving equilibrium, as a function of temperature. The relationship between thermodynamics and kinetics is discussed, as well as dissolution, leaching, diffusion, adsorption, catalysis, interface processes, and diagenesis. Problems and figures accompany the text.

White, William M.; Association, International M.

292

PERSONALIZED HEALTHCARE COMMUNICATION IN INTERNET OF THINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personalized healthcare is a challenge because supports the sustainability of care. Internet of Things is a paradigm promising to manage the digital identity, so the personalization of care services. Different equipment is used in extra-wall healthcare and assistive services, requiring different sorts of objects to communicate and to make the ubiquitous system-of-system. Extended entities and mixed roles are becoming inter-operable.

Mikhail Simonov; Riccardo Zich; Flavia Mazzitelli

293

The hottest thing in remediation.  

PubMed Central

Scientists and engineers are exploring a new way to decontaminate toxic waste sites by literally turning up the heat on pollutants. The method heats the ground using electricity or steam, which mobilizes the contaminants so they can either be extracted from the ground and destroyed or actually destroyed in place. Among the targets for this method are pollutants such as creosote, solvents, and gasoline. These in situ thermal technologies also offer the benefit of reaching contaminants not previously amenable to cleanup, such as those found beneath structures and below the water table.

Black, Harvey

2002-01-01

294

Metabolic characteristics of muscles in the spiny lobster, Jasus edwardsii, and responses to emersion during simulated live transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The metabolic characteristics of five muscle groups in the spiny lobster Jasus edwardsii were examined in order to compare their anaerobic and oxidative capacities. Enzyme activities of phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were highest in abdominal muscles supporting anaerobic burst activity. Hexokinase, citrate synthase, and HOAD activities in the leg and antennal muscles indicated higher aerobic potential. Arginine

S. R. Speed; J. Baldwin; R. J. Wong; R. M. G. Wells

2001-01-01

295

Experienced surgeons can do more than one thing at a time: effect of distraction on performance of a simple laparoscopic and cognitive task by experienced and novice surgeons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  While operating, surgeons are required to make cognitive decisions and often are interrupted to attend to questions from other\\u000a members of the health care team. Technical automatization may be achieved by experienced surgeons such that these distractions\\u000a have little effect on performance of either the surgical or the cognitive task. This study assessed the effect of adding a\\u000a distracting cognitive

K. E. Hsu; F.-Y. Man; R. A. Gizicki; L. S. Feldman; G. M. Fried

2008-01-01

296

"One more thing to think about…" Cognitive burden experienced by intensive care unit nurses when implementing a tight glucose control protocol.  

PubMed

Critically ill patients require intensive nursing care. Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses, who care for these physiologically unstable patients, are continuously occupied with the integration of assessments, monitoring, and interventions that are responsive to a patient's evolving state. Since 2005, numerous evidenced-based clinical protocols have been implemented in the critical care unit. Individually, each may not appear to be burdensome but, collectively, these clinical protocols add to the cognitive work of ICU nurses. While nurses are central to the successful implementation of these protocols, little is written about the cognitive burden imposed on them by the addition of these clinical protocols. This article explores the impact of clinical protocols on the cognitive burden of ICU nurses, using a tight glucose control (TGC) protocol as an exemplar case. Research from management, ergonomics, systems engineering, and nursing is used to build the concept of cognitive burden. Future research can build upon this understanding to facilitate successful implementation of clinical protocols. PMID:22401323

Ng, Lit Soo; Curley, Martha A Q

2012-01-01

297

Both Free-Living and Parasitic Nematodes Induce a Characteristic Th2 Response That Is Dependent on the Presence of Intact Glycans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infection with parasitic nematodes is characterized by the induction of a profound type 2 immune response. We have studied the role of glycans in the induction of the skewed type 2 response by antigens of the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi as well as the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Lymph node cells from BALB\\/c mice immunized with soluble extracts of the

Salah Tawill; L. Le Goff; F. Ali; M. Blaxter; J. E. Allen

2004-01-01

298

The effect of pre-natal maternal environment on live weight, reproductive and semen characteristics in ram lambs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of different maternal uterine environments on the reproductive characteristics of Cheviot and Suffolk ram lambs were investigated. Thirty-two, singleton, male lambs born following AI and embryo transfer were allocated to four groups: Cheviot lambs born to Cheviot ewes (CinC), Suffolk lambs born to Cheviot ewes (SinC), Cheviot lambs born to Suffolk ewes (CinS) and Suffolk lambs born to

Y. Jafariahangari; S. Smith; R. K. Sharma; S. Zerehdaran; H. Blair

299

15 things you need to know about healthy eating.  

PubMed

Good nutrition is essential to good health during all phases of living with HIV. Good nutrition helps the body fight infections, enables HIV-fighting drugs to work properly, and in some cases may ease drug-related side effects. The author suggests fifteen things people should know to get the most out of their daily diet. These include: eat foods from the five basic food groups; increase calorie intake; eat a combination of foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, and moderate amounts of fat; consume small frequent meals; avoid junk foods; drink plenty of liquids; maintain usual body weight; take a multi-vitamin and mineral supplement, but beware of megadosing; take charge when dining out; have regular dental checkups; establish a regular exercise program; and consult a registered dietitian specializing in HIV. Weight loss is of special concern for those living with HIV. The author suggests taking a short walk before eating and exploring the variety of nutritional supplements to increase calorie intake. PMID:11362372

Chavez, C

300

On design of sensor nodes in the rice planthopper monitoring system based on the internet of things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate records and prediction of the number of the rice planthopper's outbreaks and the environmental information of farmland are effective measures to control pests' damages. On the other hand, a new round of technological revolution from the Internet to the Internet of things is taking place in the field of information. The application of the Internet of things in rice planthopper and environmental online monitoring is an effective measure to solve problems existing in the present wired sensor monitoring technology. Having described the general framework of wireless sensor nodes in the Internet of things in this paper, the software and hardware design schemes of wireless sensor nodes are proposed, combining the needs of rice planthopper and environmental monitoring. In these schemes, each module's design and key components' selection are both aiming to the characteristics of the Internet of things, so it has a strong practical value.

Wang, Ke Qiang; Cai, Ken

2011-01-01

301

Modifications in food consumption patterns reported by people from India, living in Cincinnati, Ohio  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surprisingly little research has been conducted to identify modifications of food habits made by people who have immigrated to the United States from India, South Asia. This study helps to bridge an information gap by assessing previous and present food habits reported by a group of people from India living in Cincinnati, Ohio. Acculturation of food consumption patterns of Indian

Najia Karim; David S. Bloch; Grace Falciglia; Lalitha Murthy

1986-01-01

302

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... of residences participating in the research have lower fees and half have higher fees. The rental rate includes the base rent and service fees charged by the assisted living community. While 86. ...

303

What makes an excellent mental health nurse? A pragmatic inquiry initiated and conducted by people with lived experience of service use.  

PubMed

Mental health nurses are in challenging positions. They have the opportunity to support people hospitalized for the treatment of mental illnesses on their recovery journeys, but are simultaneously required to manage a burgeoning administrative burden, maintain organizational 'order', and contain risk. While obliged by policy to engender an environment that promotes recovery, they receive little guidance about how this should be achieved. When feedback from people hospitalized in our service indicated the experience of care was variable, we undertook a pragmatic inquiry examining consumers' views about what makes an excellent mental health nurse. We interviewed 20 people with lived experience of hospitalization and analysed transcripts thematically. To ensure findings were relevant and useful, we consulted mental health nurses about nurses' needs, and incorporated this with the views of service users. The analysis demonstrated that personal qualities, professional skills, and environmental factors all influence the experience of mental health nursing. Our findings highlight a need for renewed attention to the basics of relationships and the importance for nurses of self-awareness and support. We urge nurses to make time to really get to know the people for whom they provide care, and to work to maintain passion for mental health nursing. It seems likely that attention to the simple things has the potential to improve levels of satisfaction among service users, decrease distress, and support the development of an environment in which can nurture recovery. PMID:23718869

Gunasekara, Imani; Pentland, Tina; Rodgers, Tracey; Patterson, Sue

2013-05-29

304

Dietary intakes of energy and macronutrients by lactating women of different ethnic groups living in Yakutia  

PubMed Central

Background There should be a substantial increase in the intake of dietary energy, protein and other nutrients by lactating women, though these special increments can be different in different ethnic groups. Objective To evaluate the influence of maternal ethnicity and diet on the quality of breast milk and its potential effect on early childhood development. Design A total of 185 mothers (150 Native and 35 Russian) living in settlements and small towns of rural Yakutia and 54 mothers (26 Native and 28 Russian) living in Yakutsk were surveyed and average food intake was recorded during 3 successive days before the survey was analyzed. Results The amount of protein varied from 18 to 168.3 g/day, fat – from 12 to 176.1 g/day, energy – from 900 to 3680.4 kcal/day. Protein intake was at the level of current recommended dietary allowances (RDA) in Russians and was higher than in Natives living in rural settlements and small towns (p=0.02) and in Yakutsk (p=0.03). Carbohydrate intake was higher, though not significantly, in both ethnic groups compared with the current recommendations. Protein, fat, carbohydrates and, therefore, energy intake were lower (p<0.03) in Native women living in Yakutsk compared with the intake of Native women living in rural settlements and small towns. Conclusions The dietary intakes of energy and macronutrients depended on the place where a woman lived rather than on her ethnicity. Overall, energy intake was considered to be at the lower limit (basal energy expenditure 2002/2005) for lactating women, with the exception of Native women living in Yakutsk whose energy intake was below the lower limit.

Burtseva, Tatiana; Solodkova, Irina; Savvina, Maya; Dranaeva, Galina; Shadrin, Victor; Avrusin, Sergei; Sinelnikova, Elena; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav

2013-01-01

305

Orca Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The brainchild of orca biologist Dr. Paul Spong, this Nature Network Web site aims to "relay live sound and images of the orcas in the natural environment of Hanson Island," near Vancouver Island, Canada. Live sound and image feeds are available at 56K and 300K connections, and, by completing a simple registration, visitors will be alerted via email whenever orcas are near the cameras and mikes. Click on Highlights 2000 to see and hear past Web casts of orcas activity. This Web site links to others that relay live images and sounds from animals located around the world.

306

Characteristics of Drivers Stopped by Police, 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Drivers in the United States totaled 192.7 million persons in 2002, or about 89% of the 215.5 million U.S. residents age 16 or older. Approximately 16.8 million, or 8.7%, of those drivers were stopped by police at least once that year. These traffic stops...

E. L. Smith M. R. Durose

2006-01-01

307

Water Hammer Analysis by Characteristic Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid changes in the velocity of fluid in closed conduits generate large pressure, which are transmitted through the system with the speed of sound. When the fluid medium is a liquid the pressure surges and related phenomena are described as water hammer. Water hammer is caused by normal operation of the system, such as valve opening or closure, pump starts

A. R. Lohrasbi

308

Assessment of packing characteristics by computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most relevant engineering mechanical properties of normal concretes such as compressive strength are to a large extent governed by the density and the uniformity of the aggregate packing as the load-bearing structure. Nevertheless, the integrity of this skeleton will gradually break down under increased loadings. In cementitious materials this is due to debonding of particle-matrix interfaces, which leads to crack

Piet Stroeven; Martijn Stroeven

1999-01-01

309

Characteristics of intuitive nurses.  

PubMed

A description is provided of the process used to verify characteristics of intuitive nurses that had been reported in the literature. These characteristics supplied the framework for construction of the Miller Intuitiveness Instrument (MII) reported earlier (Miller, 1993). Evidence for validity of the MII was provided in the Miller (1993) study by examining factor analyses and correlations with the intuitive component of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The following characteristics were subsequently verified: Intuitive nurses are willing to act on their intuitions, are skilled clinicians, and incorporate a spiritual component in their practices. In addition, intuitive nurses express an interest in the abstract nature of things and are risk takers. Intuitive nurses prefer intuition to sensing (as reflected by the MBTI) as a way to take in information. They are extroverted and express confidence in their intuitions. Likewise, nurses who delay making decisions until all the information is in are more intuitive than those who make decisions abruptly. PMID:7778312

Miller, V G

1995-06-01

310

Direct targeting of proteins to lipid droplets demonstrated by time-lapse live cell imaging.  

PubMed

A protein that specifically targets lipid droplets (LDs) was created by connecting two domains of nonstructural protein 4B containing amphipathic helices from hepatitis C virus. We demonstrated its direct targeting and accumulation to the LD surface by time-lapse live cell imaging, comparable to those observed with adipose differentiation-related protein. PMID:23742748

Tanaka, Torahiko; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Kazufumi; Makishima, Makoto

2013-06-04

311

Energy and the Way We Live. Article Booklet for the Twelfth Course by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 15 articles in this booklet were written for the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Reader/Study Guide (SO 012 724) and the Source…

Newman, Dorothy K.; And Others

312

A Sourcebook for Energy and the Way We Live. Courses by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide presents teaching suggestions and lists resources to be used with the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Article Booklet (SO 012…

Elwood, Ann

313

Energy and the Way We Live. Article Booklet for the Twelfth Course by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 15 articles in this booklet were written for the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Reader/Study Guide (SO 012 724) and the Source…

Newman, Dorothy K.; And Others

314

A Sourcebook for Energy and the Way We Live. Courses by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The guide presents teaching suggestions and lists resources to be used with the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Article Booklet (SO…

Elwood, Ann

315

The influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure on the overall health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background There remains limited evidence on how armed conflict affects overall physical and mental well-being rather than specific physical or mental health conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on general physical and mental health in Southern Sudan which is emerging from 20 years of armed conflict. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1228 adults was conducted in November 2007 in the town of Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the associations and relative influence of variables in three models of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure, on general physical and mental health status. These models were run separately and also as a combined model. Data quality and the internal consistency of the health status instrument (SF-8) were assessed. Results The variables in the multivariate analysis (combined model) with negative coefficients of association with general physical health and mental health (i.e. worse health), respectively, were being female (coef. -2.47; -2.63), higher age (coef.-0.16; -0.17), absence of soap in the household (physical health coef. -2.24), and experiencing within the past 12 months a lack of food and/or water (coef. -1.46; -2.27) and lack of medical care (coef.-3.51; -3.17). A number of trauma variables and cumulative exposure to trauma showed an association with physical and mental health (see main text for data). There was limited variance in results when each of the three models were run separately and when they were combined, suggesting the pervasive influence of these variables. The SF-8 showed good data quality and internal consistency. Conclusions This study provides evidence on the pervasive influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on the general physical and mental health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan, and highlights the importance of addressing all these influences on overall health.

2010-01-01

316

The Next Big Thing - Eric Haseltine  

ScienceCinema

Eric Haseltine, Haseltine Partners president and former chief of Walt Disney Imagineering, presented "The Next Big Thing," on Sept. 11, at the ORNL. He described the four "early warning signs" that a scientific breakthrough is imminent, and then suggested practical ways to turn these insights into breakthrough innovations. Haseltine is former director of research at the National Security Agency and associate director for science and technology for the director of National Intelligence, former executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering and director of engineering for Hughes Aircraft. He has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web and Discover Magazine.

317

Association between Maternal Characteristics and Neonatal Birth Weight in a Korean Population Living in the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea: A Birth Cohort Study (COCOA)  

PubMed Central

Previous studies suggest that maternal characteristics may be associated with neonatal outcomes. However, the influence of maternal characteristics on birth weight (BW) has not been adequately determined in Korean populations. We investigated associations between maternal characteristics and BW in a sample of 813 Korean women living in the Seoul metropolitan area, Korea recruited using data from the prospective hospital-based COhort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA) between 2007 and 2011. The mean maternal age at delivery was 32.3 ± 3.5 yr and prepregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI) was 20.7 ± 2.5 kg/m2. The mean BW of infant was 3,196 ± 406 g. The overall prevalence of a maternal history of allergic disease was 32.9% and the overall prevalence of allergic symptoms was 65.1%. In multivariate regression models, prepregnancy maternal BMI and gestational age at delivery were positively and a maternal history of allergic disease and nulliparity were negatively associated with BW (all P < 0.05). Presence of allergic symptoms in the mother was not associated with BW. In conclusion, prepregnancy maternal BMI, gestational age at delivery, a maternal history of allergic disease, and nulliparity may be associated with BW, respectively.

Shin, Youn Ho; Choi, Suk-Joo; Kim, Kyung Won; Yu, Jinho; Ahn, Kang Mo; Kim, Hyung Young; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Shim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Woo Kyung; Song, Dae Jin; Lee, So-Yeon; Lee, Soo Young; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Kwon, Ja-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ju; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, Pil Ryang; Won, Hye-Sung

2013-01-01

318

Spark Discharge Characteristics of Vehicles Energized by AC Electric Fields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study examined certain characteristics of spark discharges from vehicles energized by an electric field. Vehicles were placed in an electric field produced by a 500-kv transmission line. Spark dischargers were delivered through a resistor to a driven...

J. P. Reilly

1980-01-01

319

Effects of Assignment of Living Units by Personality Types on Environmental Perceptions and Student Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Grouping by type may increase a sense of community in residence halls. Residence life staff can develop programs that better address the unique needs of these different groups. Students who feel better about their living circumstances have more energy to devote to the intellectual requirements of college. (Author)|

Schroeder, Charles C.; And Others

1980-01-01

320

Intracellular Confinement of Magnetic Nanoparticles by Living Cells: Impact for Imaging and Therapeutic Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superparamagnetic properties of iron-oxide nanoparticles paved the way for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic targeting of drug vectors or magnetically-induced therapeutic hyperthermia. Living cells interact with nanoparticles by internalizing them within intracellular compartments, called lysosomes. In the course of cellular uptake, the spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles changes from dilute isolated nanoparticles to a highly

Florence Gazeau; Michael Lévy; Claire Wilhelm

2011-01-01

321

Capture of an activated receptor complex from the surface of live cells by affinity receptor chromatography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell surface receptors and their associated signaling pathways on the plasma membrane are key targets in understanding cellular responses. However, the isolation and identification of receptor complexes has been elusive. The Fc receptor was captured from the surface of live cells using microbeads coated with the receptor’s cognate ligand, gamma globulin (IgG), and analyzed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass

Andy Jankowski; Peihong Zhu; John G. Marshall

2008-01-01

322

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6-LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ONE OF TWO 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOWS AT PHOTO RIGHT, AND OPEN DOORWAY TO BEDROOM NUMBER ONE (AND BEDROOM NUMBER TWO IN BACKGROUND) AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

323

Defining the genome content of live plague vaccines by use of whole-genome DNA microarray  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yersinia pestis whole-genome DNA microarrays were developed to perform genomic comparison of a collection of live plague vaccines. By using the genomic DNA to probe the DNA microarrays, we detected dozens of deletions and amplifications of the genomic regions in the 19 vaccine strains analyzed. The revealed genomic differences within the vaccine strains of different origins provide us an unprecedented

Dongsheng Zhou; Yanping Han; Erhei Dai; Yajun Song; Decui Pei; Junhui Zhai; Zongmin Du; Jin Wang; Zhaobiao Guo; Ruifu Yang

2004-01-01

324

Perceived Aspects of Home Environment and Home Modifications by Older People Living in Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationships between the “perceived aspects” of current home environment of elderly people living in rural areas and their home modification behavior. To investigate this perception, home satisfaction, perception of home capability, and home safety were used as perceived aspects of the home. Data were collected by a questionnaire. The response rate was 43.1%, with 317 eligible

Mira Ahn; Asha L. Hegde

2011-01-01

325

Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

2012-01-01

326

PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION BY FREE-LIVING ORGANISMS: APPLICATIONS OF A SIGMOIDAL MODEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of contaminants by free-living organisms has traditionally been de- termined with permutations of the deterministic model: Ct = Ce(1 - e -kt). However, studies uti- lizing a variety of species and exposure scenarios now suggest that significant deviations may occur from this classic form. In many cases noted to date, these deviations have involved a sigmoidal pat- tern

I. Lehr Brisbin; Michael C. Newman; Susan G. McDowell; Eric L. Peters

1990-01-01

327

All Things Cultured: An Analysis of Popular Culture Coverage on National Public Radio's All Things Considered  

Microsoft Academic Search

National Public Radio's flagship news program All Things Considered has long been known for its sophisticated style of political and cultural news coverage. In past years the program has increased the number and types of popular culture stories covered to reflect the changing interests of listeners. This content analysis found that coverage of popular culture significantly increased in relation to

Sara Magee

2011-01-01

328

Pursuing Goals with Others: Group Identification and Motivation Resulting from Things Done versus Things Left Undone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article addresses what factors best motivate individuals to work toward shared goals. We propose that when individuals do not identify highly with a group, their contributions will mimic others': An emphasis on things done will increase their contributions toward achieving a goal, because such emphasis suggests the goal is worth pursuing.…

Fishbach, Ayelet; Henderson, Marlone D.; Koo, Minjung

2011-01-01

329

Things that signify and things that work: Recent studies in material culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Garlake, P. The Hunter's Vision: The Prehistoric Art of Zimbabwe. Seattle: University of Washington Press and London: British Museum, 1995. 176 pp. including line drawings and color plates, references and index.Kingery, W. D., ed. Learning From Things: Method and Theory of Material Culture Studies. Washington and London: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1996. x + 262 pp. including figures and chapter references.Michaels,

Robert Layton

2001-01-01

330

Changes in activities of daily living (ADL) among elderly Chinese by marital status, living arrangement, and availability of healthcare over a 3-year period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The purpose of this study was to assess how changes from different baselines of activities of daily living (ADL) can be explained\\u000a by marital status, living arrangement and healthcare.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Health Longevity Study conducted in 2002 and 2005, 8,099 surviving and 3,822 deceased\\u000a elderly aged 65 years and over were evaluated using multinomial logistic regression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  After

Dewen Wang; Jianmin Zheng; Michiko Kurosawa; Yutaka Inaba; Noriko Kato

2009-01-01

331

An Architectural Approach Towards the Future Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Many of the initial developments towards the Internet of Things have focused on the combination of Auto-ID and networked infrastructures\\u000a in businessto- business logistics and product life cycle applications. However, a future Internet of Things can provide a\\u000a broader vision and also enable everyone to access and contribute rich information about things and locations. The success\\u000a of social networks to

Dieter Uckelmann; Mark Harrison; Florian Michahelles

332

Smart u-Things - Challenging Real World Complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The real physical things are called u-things if they are attached, embedded or blended with computers, networks, and\\/or some other devices such as sensors, actors, e-tags and so on. Smart u-things are ones that can sense, compute, communicate and take some responsive or automatic actions\\/reactions\\/proactions according to their goals, situated contexts, users' needs, etc. After clarifying the basic features and

Jianhua Ma

333

Real-time molecular imaging of organelles in living cell by multifocus excitation CARS microscope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrated real-time imaging of organelles in a living HeLa cell using a multi-focus excitation CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) microscope. Chemical selective CARS imaging of lipids and proteins was demonstrated by observing CH2 and CH3 vibrations. Real-time imaging of lipid rich organelles such as the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and lipid rich vesicles was achieved by observing CH2 stretching vibrations of lipids. The image acquisition rate of 5 frames per second was achieved without any staining. We also demonstrated real-time CARS imaging of laser-induced disruption and reaction of organelles in a living HeLa cell. A near-infrared pulsed laser beam tightly focused on an organelle in a living cell produces ablation at the focal point, causing local disruption of the organelle. We visualized the spatial and temporal distributions of a lipid rich organelles in the cytoplasm of a living HeLa cell in laser-induced dissection. We also demonstrated real-time CARS imaging of disruption of a plasma membrane and its repair.

Minamikawa, Takeo; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

2010-02-01

334

Movements of Individual BKCa Channels in Live Cell Membrane Monitored by Site-Specific Labeling Using Quantum Dots  

PubMed Central

The movements of BKCa channels were investigated in live cells using quantum dots (QDs). The extracellular N-terminus was metabolically tagged with biotin, labeled with streptavidin-conjugated QDs and then monitored using real-time time-lapse imaging in COS-7 cells and cultured neurons. By tracking hundreds of channels, we were able to determine the characteristics of channel movements quantitatively. Channels in COS-7 cells exhibited a confined diffusion in an area of 1.915 ?m2, with an initial diffusion coefficient of 0.033 ?m2/s. In neurons, the channel movements were more heterogeneous and highly dependent on subcellular location. While the channels in soma diffused slowly without clear confinement, axodendritic channels showed more rapid and pseudo-one-dimensional movements. Intriguingly, the channel movement in somata was drastically increased by the neuronal ?4 subunit, in contrast to the channels in the axodendritic area where the mobility were significantly decreased. Thus, our results demonstrate that the membrane mobility of BKCa channels can be greatly influenced by the expression system used, subunit composition, and subcellular location. This QD-based, single-molecule tracking technique can be utilized to investigate the cellular mechanisms that determine the mobility as well as the localization of various membrane proteins in live cells.

Won, Sehoon; Kim, Hae-Deun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Byoung-Cheol; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Chul-Seung

2010-01-01

335

Group Living Enhances Individual Resources Discrimination: The Use of Public Information by Cockroaches to Assess Shelter Quality  

PubMed Central

In group-living organisms, consensual decision of site selection results from the interplay between individual responses to site characteristics and to group-members. Individuals independently gather personal information by exploring their environment. Through social interaction, the presence of others provides public information that could be used by individuals and modulates the individual probability of joining/leaving a site. The way that individual's information processing and the network of interactions influence the dynamics of public information (depending on population size) that in turn affect discrimination in site quality is a central question. Using binary choice between sheltering sites of different quality, we demonstrate that cockroaches in group dramatically outperform the problem-solving ability of single individual. Such use of public information allows animals to discriminate between alternatives whereas isolated individuals are ineffective (i.e. the personal discrimination efficiency is weak). Our theoretical results, obtained from a mathematical model based on behavioral rules derived from experiments, highlight that the collective discrimination emerges from competing amplification processes relying on the modulation of the individual sheltering time without shelters comparison and communication modulation. Finally, we well demonstrated here the adaptive value of such decision algorithm. Without any behavioral change, the system is able to shift to a more effective strategy when alternatives are present: the modification of the spatio-temporal distributions of individuals leading to the collective selection of the best resource. This collective discrimination implying such parsimonious and widespread mechanism must be shared by many group living-species.

Canonge, Stephane; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Sempo, Gregory

2011-01-01

336

Group living enhances individual resources discrimination: the use of public information by cockroaches to assess shelter quality.  

PubMed

In group-living organisms, consensual decision of site selection results from the interplay between individual responses to site characteristics and to group-members. Individuals independently gather personal information by exploring their environment. Through social interaction, the presence of others provides public information that could be used by individuals and modulates the individual probability of joining/leaving a site. The way that individual's information processing and the network of interactions influence the dynamics of public information (depending on population size) that in turn affect discrimination in site quality is a central question. Using binary choice between sheltering sites of different quality, we demonstrate that cockroaches in group dramatically outperform the problem-solving ability of single individual. Such use of public information allows animals to discriminate between alternatives whereas isolated individuals are ineffective (i.e. the personal discrimination efficiency is weak). Our theoretical results, obtained from a mathematical model based on behavioral rules derived from experiments, highlight that the collective discrimination emerges from competing amplification processes relying on the modulation of the individual sheltering time without shelters comparison and communication modulation. Finally, we well demonstrated here the adaptive value of such decision algorithm. Without any behavioral change, the system is able to shift to a more effective strategy when alternatives are present: the modification of the spatio-temporal distributions of individuals leading to the collective selection of the best resource. This collective discrimination implying such parsimonious and widespread mechanism must be shared by many group living-species. PMID:21701692

Canonge, Stéphane; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Sempo, Grégory

2011-06-20

337

Detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction and distinguishing live from dead cysts.  

PubMed Central

A method was developed for the detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the giardin gene as the target. DNA amplification by PCR, using giardin DNA as the target, resulted in detection of both live and dead cysts. When giardin mRNA was used as the target, the ability to amplify cDNA by PCR depended on the mode of killing. Cysts killed by freezing were not detected by PCR when giardin mRNA was the target. Cysts killed by heating or exposure to monochloramine, however, gave positive detection signals for both DNA and giardin mRNA targets. The amount of giardin mRNA and total RNA was significantly increased in live cysts following the induction of excystation. Cysts killed by freezing, heating, or exposure to monochloramine did not show a change in RNA content. The detection of the giardin gene by PCR permits a sensitive and specific diagnosis for Giardia spp. Discrimination between live and dead cysts can be made by measuring the amounts of RNA or PCR-amplified product from the giardin mRNA target before and after the induction of excystation. Images

Mahbubani, M H; Bej, A K; Perlin, M; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Atlas, R M

1991-01-01

338

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living Assisted Living Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... t need round-the-clock nursing care. Assisted living facilities provide an alternative. Assisted living is for ...

339

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... Text Printer Friendly Download Reader Online Chat Assisted Living Assisted living facilities offer a housing alternative for ... to top What is the Cost for Assisted Living? Although assisted living costs less than nursing home ...

340

Living Donation  

MedlinePLUS

... Living Donation Costs Insurance Legislation Living Donation Living organ donation dates back to 1954, when a kidney from ... a deceased donor. To learn more about living organ donation, choose an option below: Facts Types Being a ...

341

How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life, 3rd Edition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This book is an unconventional introduction to physics and science that starts with whole objects and looks inside them to see what makes them work. It's written for students who seek a connection between science and the world in which they live. How Things Work brings science to the reader rather than the reverse. Like the course in which it developed, this book has always been for nonscientists and is written with their interests in mind. Nonetheless, it has attracted students from the sciences, engineering, architecture, and other technical fields who wish to put scientific concepts into context. This book is written in English and organized in a case-study fashion. It conveys an understanding and appreciation for physics by finding physics concepts and principles within the familiar objects of everyday experience. Because its structure is defined by real-life examples, this book necessarily discusses concepts as they're needed and then revisits them later on when they reappear in other objects. Lou Bloomfield is a highly dedicated teacher and one of the most popular professors at University of Virginia, and was the recipient of the 1998 State of Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award. Lou has given talks all over the country on teaching physics through everyday objects. He has extreme attention to detail and knowledge of technical physics. He is very tech savvy and has been able to provide many of the photos and illustrations for the text himself.

Bloomfield, Louis A.

2005-09-01

342

Improving service management in the internet of things.  

PubMed

In the Internet of Things (IoT) research arena, many efforts are devoted to adapt the existing IP standards to emerging IoT nodes. This is the direction followed by three Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Working Groups, which paved the way for research on IP-based constrained networks. Through a simplification of the whole TCP/IP stack, resource constrained nodes become direct interlocutors of application level entities in every point of the network. In this paper we analyze some side effects of this solution, when in the presence of large amounts of data to transmit. In particular, we conduct a performance analysis of the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP), a widely accepted web transfer protocol for the Internet of Things, and propose a service management enhancement that improves the exploitation of the network and node resources. This is specifically thought for constrained nodes in the abovementioned conditions and proves to be able to significantly improve the node energetic performance when in the presence of large resource representations (hence, large data transmissions). PMID:23112688

Sammarco, Chiara; Iera, Antonio

2012-08-29

343

Cancer-cell killing by engineered Salmonella imaged by multiphoton tomography in live mice.  

PubMed

Our laboratory has previously developed a bacterial cancer therapy strategy by targeting tumors using engineered Salmonella typhimurium auxotrophs (S. typhimurium A1-R) that were generated to grow in viable as well as necrotic areas of tumors but not in normal tissue. The mechanism by which A1-R kills cancer cells is unknown. In the present report, high-resolution multiphoton tomography was used to investigate the cellular basis of bacteria killing of cancer cells in live mice. Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) were genetically labeled with red fluorescent protein (RFP) and injected subcutaneously in nude mice. After tumor growth was observed, the mice were treated with A1-R bacteria expressing GFP, via tail-vein injection. Mice without A1-R treatment served as untreated controls. The imaging system was 3D scan head mounted on a flexible mechano-optical articulated arm. A tunable 80 MHz titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser (710-920 nm) was used for the multiphoton tomography. We applied this high-resolution imaging tool to visualize A1-R bacteria targeting the Lewis lung cancer cells growing subcutaneously in nude mice. The tomographic images revealed that bacterially-infected cancer cells greatly expanded and burst and thereby lost viability. Similar results were seen in vitro using confocal microscopy. The bacteria targeted the tumor within minutes of tail-vein injection. Using mice in which the nestin-promoter drives GFP and in which blood vessels are labeled with GFP, the bacteria could be imaged in and out of the blood vessels. Collagen scaffolds within the tumor were imaged by second harmonic generation (SHG). The multiphoton tomographic system described here allows imaging of cancer cell killing by bacteria and can therefore be used to further understand its mechanism and optimization for clinical application. PMID:23060555

Uchugonova, Aisada; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten; Hoffman, Robert M

2012-10-01

344

HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by people living with HIV from Buea, Cameroon.  

PubMed

The universal access to treatment and care for people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is a major problem especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV infected people live. However, equally important is the fact that HIV/AIDS-related stigma is recognized to be a major obstacle to successfully control the spread of this disease. In this study we measured the HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by PLWHIV in Cameroon using "The people living with HIV stigma index" questionnaire developed by UNAIDS, International Planned Parenthood Federation and Global Network of PLWHIV/AIDS among others. A total of 200 questionnaires were anonymously administered to PLWHIV in the HIV/AIDS treatment center of the Regional Hospital Annex Buea in the South West Region of Cameroon by trained academics who were themselves PLWHIV. In this setting the major problems faced by the PLWHIV with regard to stigmatization and discrimination were gossiping and verbal insults, which was felt by about half of the interviewees. Equally important was internal stigma, half of the PLWHIV felt ashamed and guilty to be HIV infected. This is the first report of this kind in Cameroon. These results will help to better understand HIV/AIDS-related stigma in this setting and in turn will improve the quality of life of PLWHIV by promoting their acceptance by the community. PMID:22852551

Jacobi, Christoph A; Atanga, Pascal N J I; Bin, Leonard K; Mbome, Victor N; Akam, Wilfred; Bogner, Johannes R; Kropf, Siegfried; Malfertheiner, Peter

2012-08-01

345

Quantitative FRET Analysis by Fast Acquisition Time Domain FLIM at High Spatial Resolution in Living Cells  

PubMed Central

Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments in live cells for protein interaction studies is still a challenging issue. In a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), fitting of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data gives the fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (fD) and the intrinsic transfer efficiency. But when fast FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are not reliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the new concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), coming from the mathematical minimization of fD. We find particular advantage in the use of mfD because it can be obtained without fitting procedures and it is derived directly from FLIM data. mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for live cell studies because it is related to the minimal relative concentration of interacting proteins. For multi-lifetime donors, the process of fitting complex fluorescence decays to find at least four reliable lifetimes is a near impossible task. Here, mfD extension for multi-lifetime donors is the only quantitative determinant. We applied this methodology for imaging the interaction between the bromodomains of TAFII250 and acetylated histones H4 in living cells at high resolution. We show the existence of discrete acetylated chromatin domains where the minimal fraction of bromodomain interacting with acetylated H4 oscillates from 0.26 to 0.36 and whose size is smaller than half of one micron cube. We demonstrate that mfD by itself is a useful tool to investigate quantitatively protein interactions in live cells, especially when using fast FRET-FLIM acquisition times.

Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Auduge, Nicolas; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Tramier, Marc

2008-01-01

346

Rapid development of vaccine protection in macaques by live-attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Convincing data on experimental vaccines against AIDS have been obtained in the simian immuno- deficiency virus (SIV) macaque model by preinfec- tion with a virus attenuated by a nef deletion. To investigate the efficacy of a nef deletion mutant of SIVmac32H called pC8 as a live-attenuated vaccine after shorter preinfection periods and to learn more about the nature of the

C. Stahl-Hennig; U. Dittmer; T. Nisslein; H. Petry; E. Jurkiewicz; D. Fuchs; H. Wachter; K. Matz-Rensing; E.-M. Kuhn; F.-J. Kaup; E. W. Rud; G. Hunsmann

1996-01-01

347

Natural pigments: carotenoids, anthocyanins, and betalains--characteristics, biosynthesis, processing, and stability.  

PubMed

Pigments are present in all living matter and provide attractive colors and play basic roles in the development of organisms. Human beings, like most animals, come in contact with their surroundings through color, and things can or cannot be acceptable based on their color characteristics. This review presents the basic information about pigments focusing attention on the natural ones; it emphasizes the principal plant pigments: carotenoids, anthocyanins, and betalains. Special considerations are given to their salient characteristics; to their biosynthesis, taking into account the biochemical and molecular biology information generated in their elucidation; and to the processing and stability properties of these compounds as food colorants. PMID:10850526

Delgado-Vargas, F; Jiménez, A R; Paredes-López, O

2000-05-01

348

Rapid detection of live methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by using an integrated microfluidic system capable of ethidium monoazide pre-treatment and molecular diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium resistant to all existing penicillin and lactam-based antimicrobial drugs and, therefore, has become one of the most prevalent antibiotic-resistant pathogens found in hospitals. The multi-drug resistant characteristics of MRSA make it challenging to clinically treat infected patients. Therefore, early diagnosis of MRSA has become a public-health priority worldwide. Conventionally, cell-culture based methodology and microscopic identification are commonly used for MRSA detection. However, they are relatively time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, molecular diagnosis based on nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been widely investigated for the rapid detection of MRSA. However, genomic DNA of both live and dead pathogens can be distinguished by conventional PCR. These results thus could not provide sufficient confirmation of an active infection for clinicians. In this study, live MRSA was rapidly detected by using a new integrated microfluidic system. The microfluidic system has been demonstrated to have 100% specificity to detect live MRSA with S. aureus and other pathogens commonly found in hospitals. The experimental results showed that the limit of detection for live MRSA from biosamples was approximately 102 CFU/?l. In addition, the entire diagnostic protocol, from sample pre-treatment to fluorescence observation, can be automatically completed within 2.5?h. Consequently, this microfluidic system may be a powerful tool for the rapid molecular diagnosis of live MRSA.

Liu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

2012-01-01

349

Innovative Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Innovative Lives Web Site is offered by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation and the Smithsonian Institution. "Innovative Lives counters commonly held stereotypes about inventors by featuring speakers with diverse backgrounds," such as Dr. Patricia Bath, an African-American woman who invented the Laserphaco Probe for the treatment of cataracts and founded the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. Over thirty inventors are featured on the site, which gives excellent information about each, telling of their lives and what they have accomplished. Although it is intended for kids, the site will be of interest to anyone looking to learn about many of the most important and unknown contributors to the scientific world.

2002-01-01

350

Star Formation Laws in LITTLE THINGS Dwarfs: The Case of DDO133 and DDO168  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of our pilot study of the star formation (SF) characteristics of two LITTLE THINGS dwarfs: DDO133 and DDO168. For each galaxy, we combine HI spectral line VLA radio interferometric observations in B-, C-, and D-configurations into one data set of high resolution and quality which allows an in depth investigation of their HI distribution and kinematics. We focus our interest on their SF characteristics extending current investigations of the Schmidt-Kennicutt law to the low luminosity, low metallicity regime. To do this, we combine our HI maps with GALEX ultraviolet, Spitzer infrared and, where available, CO data in order to measure the surface densities of HI, H2 and the SFR surface density for the galaxies in our sample. We find a general lack of Spitzer 24 micron emission which fits in with our result that internal extinction is less than 0.1 mag, indicating a dust-poor ISM. Our results overlap with those published on a number of THINGS dwarfs and confirm the finding that the SF characteristics of dwarfs resemble those in the outskirts of spirals. The study applied to DDO133 and DDO168 is being extended to a larger LITTLE THINGS subsample, which will be the subject of a future paper.

Ficut-Vicas, Dana

2012-01-01

351

Self-Recognition in Live Videos by Young Children: Does Video Training Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overall aim of the experiment reported here was to establish whether self-recognition in live video can be facilitated when live video training is provided to children aged 2-2.5 years. While the majority of children failed the test of live self-recognition prior to video training, more than half exhibited live self-recognition post video…

Demir, Defne; Skouteris, Helen

2010-01-01

352

Efficient adsorption of waterborne short-lived radon decay products by glass fiber filters.  

PubMed

Glass fiber filters of a certain brand were found to be very efficient (retention > 95%) for adsorption of short-lived radon decay products during filtration of water. Carrier-free samples are obtained in a convenient geometry for efficient gross beta counting. Adsorption of "hot atoms" is not disturbed by the presence of "cold" lead ions. Approximate radioactive equilibrium between radon and its short-lived decay products may or may not exist in water at the source, but does exist after 3 h in PET bottles. These bottles are shown to be gas-tight for radon. Calibration of activity concentration in Bq L(-1) (radon gas concentration approximately equilibrium equivalent radon concentration) was performed by several standard procedures. Limit of detection is 2 Bq L(-1) within 10 min (total time) or 10 Bq L(-1) within 5 min for a net signal of 5 times standard deviation. PMID:9003713

von Philipsborn, H

1997-02-01

353

Monodisperse cylindrical micelles by crystallization-driven living self-assembly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Non-spherical nanostructures derived from soft matter and with uniform size-that is, monodisperse materials-are of particular utility and interest, but are very rare outside the biological domain. We report the controlled formation of highly monodisperse cylindrical block copolymer micelles (length dispersity <= 1.03 length range, ~200 nm to 2 µm) by the use of very small (~20 nm) uniform crystallite seeds that serve as initiators for the crystallization-driven living self-assembly of added block-copolymer unimers with a crystallizable, core-forming metalloblock. This process is analogous to the use of small initiator molecules in classical living polymerization reactions. The length of the nanocylinders could be precisely controlled by variation of the unimer-to-crystallite seed ratio. Samples of the highly monodisperse nanocylinders of different lengths that are accessible using this approach have been shown to exhibit distinct liquid-crystalline alignment behaviour.

Gilroy, Joe B.; Gädt, Torben; Whittell, George R.; Chabanne, Laurent; Mitchels, John M.; Richardson, Robert M.; Winnik, Mitchell A.; Manners, Ian

2010-07-01

354

Pronominal reference in sentences about persons or things: an electrophysiological approach.  

PubMed

German pronouns (er(MALE/masculine), sie(FEMALE/feminine)) that refer to a person are determined by the biological gender (MALE/FEMALE) and/or syntactic gender (masculine/feminine) of the person. Pronouns (er(masculine), sie(feminine)) that refer to a thing are determined by the syntactic gender of this thing (Garten [garden]masculine, Tasche [hand-bag]feminine). The study aimed to investigate whether semantic integration, syntactic integration, or both are involved in establishing co-reference between pronoun and subject/antecedent in sentences. Here we focused on two event-related potential components: the SPS/P600, related to syntactic violation and reanalysis, and the N400 component, related to semantic integration problems. In one condition, a person was introduced as antecedent and later referred to by a pronoun, which either agreed in biological/syntactic gender or not (biological/syntactic gender violation). In a second condition, a thing was introduced as antecedent and the corresponding pronoun either agreed in syntactic gender or not (syntactic gender violation). Results at critical pronouns showed a P600 effect for incongruent compared with congruent pronouns in both conditions with a centro-parietal maximum. This effect was larger for the person compared to the thing condition. We interpreted this finding as reflecting a syntactic integration process that can be influenced by conceptual/semantic and syntactic information of the antecedent type. Furthermore, at the word following the pronoun, we observed an N400 for the thing but not for the person condition. We suggest, supported by the results of a control experiment, that this effect reflects continuous integration processes for things, whereas for persons the integration seems to be finished at pronoun position. PMID:15811235

Hammer, Anke; Jansma, Bernadette M; Lamers, Monique; Münte, Thomas F

2005-02-01

355

[Live coral predation by fish in Tayrona Nature National Park, Colombian Caribbean].  

PubMed

Live coral predation by fish was evaluated in two bays of the Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombia), as a possible biological agent causing coral mortality. Visual censuses were used to identify the most important predator. Predation incidence was determined by examining all colonies present in permanent belt transects (20 x 2 m) in two reef environments (one dominated by Colpophyllia natans and the other one by Montastraea faveolata), for two climatic seasons (rainy and dry seasons). The parrotfish Sparisoma viride was the most important predator due to its biting frequency and bite size. S. viride adults of the initial and terminal phases, removed live tissue and part of the calcareous matrix of M. faveolata, M. annularis, Porites astreoides and C. natans, of which, the last one lost a major amount of tissue per area (3.51 cm2) and volume (3.22 cm3) per bite. A negative exponential tendency (r2=0.94), between coral density and volume removed was found, indicating that the coral density determines the bite's damage. There is no clear relationship between predation incidence and climatic seasons at the sites studied. At Chengue and Gayraca bays, live coral predation is one of the factors contributing to coral tissue loss and could have important consequences on the dynamic of these reefs. PMID:17354397

Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto

2004-12-01

356

Positive Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Positive Lives project is "a unique international project that photographs and documents the social and emotional impact of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, illuminating positive human responses to this world crisis." Sponsored by the Levi Strauss Foundation and the Terrence Higgins Trust, the project has sponsored photographers from across the world to photograph various persons living with HIV/AIDS in a host of very different settings. While the project has sponsored a number of various photographic exhibits, this online collection represents a small portion of the work thus far. Using an interactive map of the world, users can click on different geographic areas to view photographic exhibits documenting the lived experience of this condition. In South Africa, visitors can learn about the work and the residents of Nazareth House, which is a children's home in Cape Town taking care of abandoned children with HIV or AIDS. In Edinburgh, visitors are taken through the lives of young drug abusers at the Muirhouse Estate who are also living with either HIV or AIDS. In the words of photographer John Sturrock, "In Muirhouse I witnessed the emotional struggle of people enduring a tragedy..." However, hope is present in these photographic essays as well, as they represent a broad range of emotions.

357

Discovery of antiproton trapping by long-lived metastable states in liquid helium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Delayed annihilation of antiprotons stopped in liquid helium has been observed, revealing that about 3.6% of stopped antiprotons are trapped in long-lived metastable states. No delayed component was found either in liquid nitrogen or in liquid argon. The observed time distribution of delayed annihilation shows fast-decaying components followed by a major part with a decay time constant of 3 musec.

M. Iwasaki; S. N. Nakamura; K. Shigaki; Y. Shimizu; H. Tamura; T. Ishikawa; R. S. Hayano; E. Takada; E. Widmann; H. Outa; M. Aoki; P. Kitching; T. Yamazaki

1991-01-01

358

Chromosome Organization by a Nucleoid-Associated Protein in Live Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial chromosomes are confined in submicrometer-sized nucleoids. Chromosome organization is facilitated by nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs), but the mechanisms of action remain elusive. In this work, we used super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, in combination with a chromosome-conformation capture assay, to study the distributions of major NAPs in live Escherichia coli cells. Four NAPs---HU, Fis, IHF, and StpA---were largely scattered throughout the nucleoid.

Wenqin Wang; Gene-Wei Li; Chongyi Chen; X. Sunney Xie; Xiaowei Zhuang

2011-01-01

359

Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET  

Microsoft Academic Search

D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to

Lars Farde; Hakan Hall; Erling Ehrin; Goran Sedvall

1986-01-01

360

Efficient adsorption of waterborne short-lived radon decay products by glass fiber filters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass fiber filters of a certain brand were found to be very efficient (retention > 95%) for adsorption of short-lived radon decay products during filtration of water. Carrier-free samples are obtained in a convenient geometry for efficient gross beta counting. Adsorption of {open_quotes}hot atoms{close_quotes} is not disturbed by the presence of {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} lead ions. Approximate radioactive equilibrium between radon and

H. Von Philipsborn; H. von

1997-01-01

361

Infant abuse by a wild-born group-living Japanese macaque mother  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports on a nonexperimentally induced case of infant abuse by a 6-yr-old Japanese macaque mother. The mother was born and reared in the wild and was living in a stable social group at the time of delivery––unlike the conditions in most previous reports. There were unusual findings from the quantitative study of the maternal behavior outside of the abuse (e.g.,

Alfonso Troisi; Francesca R. DAmato; Roberto Fuccillo; Stefano Scucchi

1982-01-01

362

Storm time, short-lived bursts of relativistic electron precipitation detected by subionospheric radio wave propagation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we report on ground-based observations of short bursts of relativistic electron precipitation (REP), detected by a subionospheric propagation sensor in Sodankylä, Finland during 2005. In two ~4 hour case study periods from L = 5.2, around local midnight, several hundred short-lived radio wave perturbations were observed, covering a wide range of arrival azimuths. The vast majority (~99%)

Craig J. Rodger; Mark A. Clilverd; David Nunn; Pekka T. Verronen; Jacob Bortnik; Esa Turunen

2007-01-01

363

Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis Reactions Catalyzed by a Long-Lived Negatively Charged Leptonic Particle  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accurate quantum three-body calculation is performed for the new type of big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) reactions that are catalyzed by a hypothetical long-lived negatively charged, massive leptonic particle (called X^-) such as the supersymmetric (SUSY) particle stau, the scalar partner of the tau lepton. It is known that if the X^- particle has a lifetime tau_X ≳ 10^3 s, it

Masayasu Kamimura; Yasushi Kino; Emiko Hiyama

2009-01-01

364

Synthesis of well-defined star-branched polymers by stepwise iterative methodology using living anionic polymerization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the synthesis of regular and asymmetric star-branched polymers with well-defined structures by methodologies using living anionic polymerization, especially focusing on the synthetic approaches accessible for precisely controlled architectures of star-branched polymers concerning molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, arm number, and composition. The reason for selecting living anionic polymerization from many living\\/controlled polymerization systems so far developed is

Tomoya Higashihara; Mayumi Hayashi; Akira Hirao

2011-01-01

365

The Thing Growing: Autonomous Characters in Virtual Reality Interactive Fiction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes “The Thing Growing”, a work of interactive fiction implemented in virtual reality, in which the user is the main protagonist and interacts with computer controlled characters. This work of fiction depends on the user's emotional investment in the story and on her relationship to a central character, the Thing

Josephine Anstey; Dave Pape; Daniel J. Sandin

2000-01-01

366

Paraimpu: a platform for a social web of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Web of Things is a scenario where potentially billions of connected smart objects communicate using the Web protocols, HTTP in primis. A Web of Things envisioning and design has raised several research issues, from protocols adoption and communication models to architectural styles and social aspects facing. In this demo we present the prototype of a scalable architecture for a

Antonio Pintus; Davide Carboni; Andrea Piras

2012-01-01

367

Quantitative estimation of the total sulfide concentration in live tissues by two-photon microscopy.  

PubMed

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a newly recognized transmitter, which protects various organs from oxidative stress. In this article, we report a ratiometric two-photon probe, TFCA, which can be excited by 750 nm femtosecond pulses, shows a 110-fold increase in the intensity ratio upon reaction with HS(-) and high selectivity for HS(-) and can visualize the total sulfide ([H2S] + [HS(-)]) distribution in live tissue by two-photon microscopy (TPM). We also developed a kinetic method to quantitatively estimate the total sulfide concentration ([H2S] + [HS(-)]) in live tissues. The kinetic method allowed us to measure the observed rate constants (kobs) for the sulfide-induced deazidation reaction of TFCA in live cells and tissues using TPM. The total sulfide concentration was calculated by using kobs = k2[HS(-)], with the k2 value determined in HEPES/EtOH (1/1, pH = 7.2), and [H2S]/[HS(-)] = [H(+)]/Ka. The total sulfide concentration was found to be nearly zero in HeLa cells and 4-7 ?M in rat colon tissues. PMID:23998564

Lim, Chang Su; Das, Sajal Kumar; Yang, Sun Young; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Cho, Bong Rae

2013-09-18

368

Live production and carcass characteristics of broilers fed a blend of poultry fat and corn oil derived from distillers dried grains with solubles.  

PubMed

Corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) are now being further processed to remove corn oil, which may be used as a dietary energy source for poultry. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of a poultry fat (PF) and a new DDGS-derived corn oil blend (CO) on live performance and carcass characteristics of 49-d-old broilers. Four corn-soybean meal based diets were formulated with differing blends of PF and CO. All diets contained the same percentage of total fat, but differed in the fat source. One diet had the sole source of fat as PF (100:0% PF:CO) and was then replaced with 25% CO, 75% CO, and a 100% replacement of CO. Each of the diets was fed in a 3-phase feeding program to 6 replicate pens. At day of hatch, Ross × Ross 708 broilers were randomly allocated to 24 pens composed of 42 birds of equal sex. On d 49, 10 birds from each pen were processed, and carcass, abdominal fat pad, and breast muscle components were determined. There were no significant differences in live performance for the starter phase (0-18 d). For the grower phase (19-35 d), birds fed 75:25% PF:CO significantly (P ? 0.05) increased BW, BW gain, and decreased feed conversion compared with the control (100:0% PF:CO). Birds fed 0:100% PF:CO also observed similar improvements in BW, BW gain, and feed conversion during the grower phase. There were no significant differences for the finisher phase (36-48 d). On d 49, live weights for birds fed the 0:100% PF:CO diets were significantly lower compared with other treatments. A trend for lower carcass and breast weights and increased abdominal fat was also observed for birds fed the 0:100% PF:CO. The addition of CO led to significant improvements in pellet durability for grower and finisher pellets. The results of this study indicate that DDGS-derived CO can be used to partially replace PF in broiler diets without any detrimental effects. PMID:24046421

Kim, E J; Purswell, J L; Davis, J D; Loar, R E; Karges, K

2013-10-01

369

Towards a dynamic social-network-based approach for service composition in the Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The User-Generated Service (UGS) concept allows end-users to create their own services as well as to share and manage the lifecycles of these services. The current development of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) has brought new challenges to the UGS area. Creating smart services in the IoT environment requires a dynamic social network that considers the relationship between people and things. In this paper, we consider the know-how required to best organize exchanges between users and things to enhance service composition. By surveying relevant aspects including service composition technology, social networks and a recommendation system, we present the first concept of our framework to provide recommendations for a dynamic social network-based means to organize UGSs in the IoT.

Xu, Wen; Hu, Zheng; Gong, Tao; Zhao, Zhengzheng

2011-12-01

370

In Search of the Social: Steamboats, Square Wheels, Reindeer and Other Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper examines the concept of the ‘social,’ particularly from an archaeological perspective, and explores how it relates to the ways in which we seek to understand the processes of technological innovation and change. It is demonstrated that the concept ‘social’ is far from well defined and that enquiry is bedevilled by artificial polarization between subject-centred approaches and object-centred particularism. Through the medium of early United States steamboat technology a different approach is forged through the melding of people and things with the idea of viewing artefacts as active social actors along with people. Ultimately, it is argued that maritime archaeologists should be more bullish in their approaches to material things—instead of adopting social theories ‘wholesale,’ we should insist that they include the things we study: boats, material objects, people, artefacts, landscapes and animals.

Dolwick, Jim S.

2008-06-01

371

Selective Labeling of Living Cells by a Photo-Triggered Click Reaction  

PubMed Central

Photo-triggering of the metal-free azide to acetylene cycloaddition reaction was achieved by masking the triple bond of dibenzocyclooctynes as cyclopropenone. Such masked cyclooctynes do not react with azides in the dark. Irradiation of cyclopropenones results in the efficient (?355 = 0.33) and clean regeneration of the corresponding dibenzocyclooctynes, which then undergo facile catalyst-free cycloadditions with azides to give corresponding triazoles under ambient conditions. In-situ light activation of a cyclopropenone linked to biotin made it possible to label living cells expressing glycoproteins containing N-azidoacetyl-sialic acid. The cyclopropenone-based photo-triggered click chemistry offers exciting opportunities to label living organisms in a temporally and spatially controlled manner and may facilitate the preparation of microarrays.

Poloukhtine, Andrei A.; Mbua, Ngalle Eric; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan; Popik, Vladimir V.

2009-01-01

372

The emotional design of everyday things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Donald Norman changed and continues to change the way in which we live our technology-infused and technology-based lives. Norman was one of the founders of the field of cognitive science and based on that work, he went on to create the field of user-centered design. It is the latter work for which he was awarded the 2006 Benjamin Franklin award

Beth Adelson

2010-01-01

373

Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Eibl, Robert H.

374

Vibrationally resonant imaging of a single living cell by supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has been applied to vibrational imaging of a living fission yeast cell. We have successfully extracted only a vibrationally resonant CARS image from a characteristic spectral profile in the C-H stretching vibrational region. Using our simple but sensitive analysis, the vibrational contrast is significantly improved in comparison with a CARS imaging at a fixed Raman shift. The CARS image of a living yeast cell indicates several areas at which the signal is remarkably strong. They are considered to arise from mitochondria.

Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-O.

2005-02-01

375

Science Oxford Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first things visitors will see when visiting the Science Oxford Live website are a few shots from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit that will soon be at the brick and mortar location of Science Oxford Live. It's hard to decide which is cuter: the hippo, the monkey, or the giraffe's tail. Visitors will certainly want to check out the video podcasts available through iTunes, and even may even subscribe to the podcasts to receive the latest episodes. These webcasts, found under the Watch Us tab, are recordings of live events that took place at Science Oxford Live. They cover topics such as Parkinson's disease, the sleep versus wake balance, the science and history of chocolate, the curse of consciousness, and how "doctors and other health professionals sometimes do more harm than good to patients, despite acting with the best of intentions." The Discovery Zone is a place for kids which is best experienced in person, but online it still has valuable lessons to teach, and it's worth a look.

2012-02-10

376

In vitro growth and starch digestion by Entodinium exiguum as influenced by the presence or absence of live bacteria1  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a preliminary study, the addition of antibiotics was shown to reduce bacterial concentra- tions in Entodinium exiguum cultures by more than 99% in 4 h, whereas the protozoal population was ap- parently unaffected. Using this procedure, the growth and amylolytic capability of Entodinium exiguum ,i n the presence or absence of live bacteria, was studied in vitro. Treatments for

M. Fondevila; B. A. Dehority

377

Effect of Breed and Plane of Nutrition on the Estimation of Live Weight by Heart Girth in Dual Purpose Heifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between heart girth and live weight was analysed with respect to effects of breed and plane of nutrition in dual purpose heifers using data from three experiments. A simple empirical equation for estimation of live weight by heart girth was established. In an experiment with two breeds (Red Danish and Danish Black and White) and three planes of

Jan Tind Sørensen; John Foldager

1991-01-01

378

Challenges Experienced by Rural Women in India Living With AIDS and Implications for the Delivery of HIV\\/AIDS Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and they investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women's adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a primary health center (PHC) near Chennai, India, and with nurses,

Adeline M. Nyamathi; Sanjeev Sinha; Kalyan K. Ganguly; Ravi Raj William; Anisa Heravian; Padma Ramakrishnan; Barbara Greengold; Maria Ekstrand; Pantangi Venkata Rama Rao

2011-01-01

379

Living Heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living Heritage is a website that celebrates New Zealand heritage through the help of the schools and students of New Zealand. The "About Living Heritage" link states that the website is "an online bilingual initiative that enables New Zealand schools to develop and publish an online resource, based on a heritage treasure in their community." Visitors can also read about the five or so groups these stories "Benefit", including New Zealand and the World, in the About Living Heritage link. The "Schools' Stories" link takes visitors to 26 schools' websites produced since 2008, and an archive of 79 schools' websites produced before 2008. By browsing through the stories, visitors can learn about Paddy, the much-loved wandering Airedale who lived on Island Bay in Wellington in the 1930s. The story of Mitiaro High School in the Cook Islands describes how they learned how to build a canoe called a paiere. Finally, a group of Year 1 and 2 students at Russley School write about their discovery that a tree near their school is protected by the city council.

380

39 CFR 3001.27 - Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery. 3001.27...Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery. (a) Service...inspect and copy any designated documents or things that constitute or contain...

2010-07-01

381

39 CFR 3001.27 - Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery. 3001.27...Requests for production of documents or things for purpose of discovery. (a) Service...inspect and copy any designated documents or things that constitute or contain...

2009-07-01

382

46 CFR 201.127 - Subpoena of Administration employees, documents, or things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Administration employees, documents, or things. 201.127 Section 201.127 Shipping...Administration employees, documents, or things. No subpoena for the attendance...production of Administration documents or things shall be complied with except upon...

2012-10-01

383

16 CFR 3.37 - Production of documents and things; access for inspection and other purposes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Production of documents and things; access for inspection and other purposes...3.37 Production of documents and things; access for inspection and other purposes...and copy, test, or sample any tangible things which are within the scope...

2009-01-01

384

46 CFR 201.127 - Subpoena of Administration employees, documents, or things.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Administration employees, documents, or things. 201.127 Section 201.127 Shipping...Administration employees, documents, or things. No subpoena for the attendance...production of Administration documents or things shall be complied with except upon...

2011-10-01

385

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc.

Lu, Wei-yang (Pleasanton, CA); Min, Shermann (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01

386

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

1998-09-08

387

Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

2013-03-01

388

Direct drug metabolism monitoring in a live single hepatic cell by video mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

The metabolism of anti-breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, in a single human hepatocellular carcinoma cell, HepG2, was directly monitored by a video-mass spectroscope. The cytoplasm, a vacuole or nucleus of the cell was directly sucked by a nano-spray tip under a video-microscope, and then was introduced into a mass spectrometer. Unchanged drug molecules were found in cytoplasm and a vacuole, but the metabolites were only found in the cytoplasm. This direct detection of drug metabolites in a live single cell is useful for speedy drug metabolism monitoring. PMID:22451357

Date, Sachiko; Mizuno, Hajime; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Harada, Takanori; Masujima, Tsutomu

2012-01-01

389

Stable expressions of nine genes within human oocytes and live birth by in vitro fertilisation.  

PubMed

The development of new methods to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life of female cancer patients. Here, we show that stable expressions of nine genes within human oocytes by using a supercooling procedure are necessary in order to produce human mature eggs and experience live births with high safety profiles by in vitro fertilisation. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve the fertility of female cancer patients or healthy women. PMID:23605829

Moriguchi, Hisashi; Madson, Joren

2013-04-18

390

Disparate mechanisms of induction of procoagulant activity by live and inactivated bacteria and viruses.  

PubMed Central

This study describes the dose response, time course, and lymphocyte requirements of procoagulant activity (PCA) induction following stimulation of thioglycolate-elicited BALB/c peritoneal macrophages with live and inactivated bacteria (Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus) and murine hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV-3). Induction of PCA by MHV-3 was significantly more rapid and the maximal PCA achieved was significantly greater than by the three bacterial species studied. In relation to induction of PCA by bacteria, the PCA response was more rapid and of greater magnitude with S. aureus and E. coli than with B. fragilis. MHV-3 induced an augmented PCA response at all concentrations of virus studied in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas higher titers of live bacteria (greater than 10(7) CFU/ml) inhibited PCA, suggesting the production of an inhibitory factor. Significant PCA induction was observed when macrophages were incubated with bacteria or virus in the absence of lymphocytes. At low titers of B. fragilis (10(3) CFU/ml), addition of lymphocytes greatly augmented PCA production, whereas at higher titers (10(7) CFU/ml), the addition of lymphocytes only slightly augmented the PCA response. In contrast, MHV-3 induction of PCA was enhanced by the addition of lymphocytes at all concentrations of virus studied, suggesting a lymphocyte-dependent process. Heat-inactivated bacteria were as effective as live bacteria in inducing PCA, suggesting that induction of PCA by bacteria requires only a bacterial surface component. In contrast, UV-inactivated MHV-3 did not induce PCA, suggesting that viral replication is a necessary step in PCA induction. These results suggest that the cellular and metabolic requirements for induction of PCA differ among viral and bacterial pathogens and may partly explain their differences in pathogenicity.

Sinclair, S B; Rotstein, O D; Levy, G A

1990-01-01

391

Characteristics and Qualities Needed for Success by School Nutrition Directors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose/Objectives: The purpose was to identify the leadership characteristics and qualities perceived by school nutrition (SN) directors as necessary for success and determine whether training is needed to develop these attributes. Methods: A panel of seven SN professionals was assembled to ascertain their opinions regarding leadership…

Rushing, Keith; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

2009-01-01

392

Being a good nurse and doing the right thing: a replication study.  

PubMed

This qualitative research study, a replication of a study published in 2002, investigated the qualities of a good nurse and the role ethics plays in decision making. After reviewing the limitations of the published work, the current study implemented modifications related to the research questions, sample selection, data collection, and use of software for data analysis. The original study identified seven categories that related to being a good nurse and doing the right thing. In the present study, the use of relational analysis led to the recognition of four categories: (1) personal traits and attributes; (2) technical skills and management of care; (3) work environment and co-workers; and (4) caring and caring behaviors. To understand what it means to be a good nurse and do the right thing is a complex task; however, this research adds to the small amount of empirical data that exists to describe those characteristics. PMID:21285197

Catlett, Shelia; Lovan, Sherry R

2011-01-01

393

Capture of an activated receptor complex from the surface of live cells by affinity receptor chromatography.  

PubMed

Cell surface receptors and their associated signaling pathways on the plasma membrane are key targets in understanding cellular responses. However, the isolation and identification of receptor complexes has been elusive. The Fc receptor was captured from the surface of live cells using microbeads coated with the receptor's cognate ligand, gamma globulin (IgG), and analyzed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) alongside several controls. Live-cell affinity receptor chromatography (LARC) resulted in a partially nonredundant list of 288 proteins that were specific to the Fc receptor complex. The proteins identified were in close agreement with previously determined factors in the Fc receptor complex as demonstrated by genetic and biochemical methods and revealed novel complex members. Confocal microscopy was used to confirm recruitment of SRC, SYK, PLC, PKC, PI3K, SHIP, TEC, CDC42, RAP, PAK, GAP, GEF, GRP, and CRK to the receptor complex upon activation by the same ligand microbeads. The expression of mutants and silencing RNA against specific isoforms were used to demonstrate a functional role for novel members of the Fc receptor complex, including RHOG (RAS homologue member G), p115 RhoGEF (protein of 115-kDa RAS homologue guanine exchange factor), and CRKL (CRK-like). The recruitment of AKT pleckstrin homology (PH) domain green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to quantify the production of phosphorylated inositol at the activated receptor complex. We conclude that it is feasible to capture an activated receptor complex from the surface of live cells using ligand-coated microbeads for identification of members of a receptor complex or pathway by LC-MS/MS. PMID:18601892

Jankowski, Andy; Zhu, Peihong; Marshall, John G

2008-06-04

394

Simulation and Result Analysis of AMEsim for the Relief Valve Dynamic Characteristics Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

For indicators of relief valve's dynamic characteristics, most important things are both stability and rapid response ability. However, up to the present there is no effective design parameter to satisfy its demand. So, a pilot-operated relief valve and its dynamic experiment system's simulation model were established, by means of AMEsim software technology. Through the batch parameters simulating show that the

Lei Xiu; Wu Yajun

2010-01-01

395

Dark and Luminous Matter in THINGS Dwarf Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present mass models for the dark matter component of seven dwarf galaxies taken from "The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey" (THINGS) and compare these with those taken from numerical ? cold dark matter (?CDM) simulations. The THINGS high-resolution data significantly reduce observational uncertainties and thus allow us to derive accurate dark matter distributions in these systems. We here use the bulk velocity fields when deriving the rotation curves of the galaxies. Compared to other types of velocity fields, the bulk velocity field minimizes the effect of small-scale random motions more effectively and traces the underlying kinematics of a galaxy more properly. The "Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey" 3.6 ?m and ancillary optical data are used for separating the baryons from their total matter content in the galaxies. The sample dwarf galaxies are found to be dark matter dominated over most radii. The relation between total baryonic (stars + gas) mass and maximum rotation velocity of the galaxies is roughly consistent with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation calibrated from a larger sample of gas-dominated low-mass galaxies. We find discrepancies between the derived dark matter distributions of the galaxies and those of ?CDM simulations, even after corrections for non-circular motions have been applied. The observed solid body-like rotation curves of the galaxies rise too slowly to reflect the cusp-like dark matter distribution in cold dark matter halos. Instead, they are better described by core-like models such as pseudo-isothermal halo models dominated by a central constant-density core. The mean value of the logarithmic inner slopes of the mass density profiles is ? = -0.29 ± 0.07. They are significantly different from the steep slope of ~ - 1.0 inferred from previous dark-matter-only simulations, and are more consistent with shallower slopes found in recent ?CDM simulations of dwarf galaxies in which the effects of baryonic feedback processes are included.

Oh, Se-Heon; de Blok, W. J. G.; Brinks, Elias; Walter, Fabian; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

2011-06-01

396

Determination of the PSI/PSII ratio in living plant cells at room temperature by spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Leaf cells of living plants exhibit strong fluorescence from chloroplasts, the reaction centers of photosynthesis. Mutations in the photosystems change their structure and can, thus, be monitored by recording the fluorescence spectra of the emitted chlorophyll light. These measurements have, up to now, mostly been carried out at low temperatures (77 K), as these conditions enable the differentiation between the fluorescence of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). In contrast, at room temperature, energy transfer processes between the various photosynthetic complexes result in very similar fluorescence emissions, which mainly consist of fluorescence photons emitted by PSII hindering a discrimination based on spectral ROIs (regions of interest). However, by statistical analysis of high resolution fluorescence spectra recorded at room temperature, it is possible to draw conclusions about the relative PSI/PSII ratio. Here, the possibility of determining the relative PSI/PSII ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated in living maize plants. Bundle-sheath chloroplasts of mature maize plants have a special morphologic characteristic; they are agranal, or exhibit only rudimentary grana, respectively. These chloroplasts are depleted in PSII activity and it could be shown that PSII is progressively reduced during leaf differentiation. A direct comparison of PSII activity in isolated chloroplasts is nearly impossible, since the activity of PSII in both mesophyll- and bundle-sheath chloroplasts decays with time after isolation and it takes significantly longer to isolate bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Considering this fact the measurement of PSI/PSII ratios with the 77K method, which includes taking fluorescence spectra from a diluted suspension of isolated chloroplasts at 77K, is questionable. These spectra are then used to analyze the distribution of energy between PSI and PSII. After rapid cooling to 77K secondary biochemical influences, which attenuate the fluorescence emanated from PSI, are frozen out. Due to their characteristic morphology, maize chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells are an appropriate system for demonstrating the applicability of our in vivo method which, unlike the common 77K method, does not require the isolation of chloroplasts. In mesophyll chloroplasts of higher land plants, the thylakoids have a heterogenic morphology of appressed and non-appressed membrane domains, called the grana and the stroma lamellae. PSII is enriched in the grana, whereas PSI is enriched in the stroma lamellae. Changes in chloroplast membrane structure and composition, according to changes in the PSI/ PSII ratio, can be triggered by light quality and carbon source deficiency. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of statistical analysis of fluorescence spectra to detect changes in the PSI/PSII ratio resulting from structure changes in the thylakoid membrane.

Elgass, Kirstin; Zell, Martina; Maurino, Veronica G.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

2011-02-01

397

Strain-specific protective effect of the immunity induced by live malarial sporozoites under chloroquine cover.  

PubMed

The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n = 5), or the PcCeylon (n = 4) strain, by the bites of 2-4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n = 4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2-5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites' circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the parasite stage at which the strain-specific protective immunity is directed, it is possible that the target of this immunity could be either the pre-erythrocytic stage, or the blood-stage, or both. PMID:23029282

Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

2012-09-24

398

Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. (Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, D-6500 Mainz (Federal Republic of Germany)); Audi, G. (Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Laboratoire Rene Bernas, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay (France)); Moore, R.B. (Foster Radiation Laboratory, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)); The ISOLDE Collaboration

1990-12-17

399

Strain-Specific Protective Effect of the Immunity Induced by Live Malarial Sporozoites under Chloroquine Cover  

PubMed Central

The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n?=?5), or the PcCeylon (n?=?4) strain, by the bites of 2–4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n?=?4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2–5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites’ circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the parasite stage at which the strain-specific protective immunity is directed, it is possible that the target of this immunity could be either the pre-erythrocytic stage, or the blood-stage, or both.

Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

2012-01-01

400

Assessment of blood lead levels in children living in a historic mining and smelting community.  

PubMed

Lead poisoning in childhood is an important public health problem, and thus, it is important to determine how children are exposed to lead. In 1987, the authors conducted an exposure assessment and blood lead screening for children aged 6-71 months living in Leadville, Colorado. High levels of lead had been found in the soil as a result of both past mining and smelting activities and natural mineralization. Blood was collected from each child for lead analysis, and behavioral characteristics were identified through an interview with a parent or guardian. Three sources of exposure to lead were associated with blood lead levels: lead in a core sample taken from the backyard of the family's home, lead brought home on the clothes of a miner, and lead from soldering in the home. Two pathways of exposure were associated with blood lead levels: the child swallowing things other than food, and taking food or a bottle outside to play. Multivariate regression using these variables found effect modification by age. For children aged 6-36 months, only sources of exposure were independent predictors of blood lead levels, while in children aged 37-71 months, a pathway of exposure in addition to sources of exposure independently predicted blood lead levels. PMID:8460625

Cook, M; Chappell, W R; Hoffman, R E; Mangione, E J

1993-02-15

401

Introduction to “Where the Wired Things Are: Children and Technology in Treatment”  

Microsoft Academic Search

On October 2, 2010, a conference for child therapists was held in New York City, co-sponsored by the Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy and Section II (Child and Adolescent) of Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) of the American Psychological Association. The conference was called Where the Wired Things Are: Children and Technology in Treatment and was subtitled An Exciting Age

Jill Bellinson

2011-01-01

402

All things work together for good'? Theodicy and post-traumatic spirituality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idea that evil things may have a positive outcome is a classic way of making sense of negative events. It is even at the heart of conversion narratives. Its expression in Romans 8.28 is paralleled by many formal and informal statements about the teleological meaning of human suffering. In the catalogue of theodicy- models, such views can be labeled

R. Ruard Ganzevoort

2009-01-01

403

Augmented reality as an enabling factor for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the vision of a world of networked smart objects moves from a futuristic idea by visionary researchers to an emerging reality that shapes the cities of the future around the world a number of issues arise. Novel approaches such as those of ubiquitous computing have proven the technological feasibility of that Internet of Things, but they still lack a

Rafael Giménez; Marc Pous; Bdigital Centre Tecnològic

404

A small world based routing approach of heterogeneous strategy in the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

RFID readers of various organizations deployed in the Internet of Things environment are interconnected for service data relay, however heterogeneous readers' forward strategies increases routing failure and routing overhead. Our main contribution is to propose a novel small world based routing protocol. Distributed hubs are generated by shared peer statuses so that a logical small world is constructed. Hence a

Wenmao Liu; Binxing Fang; Lihua Yin; Hongli Zhang

2011-01-01

405

Characteristics of nitrogenous substrate conversion by anammox enrichment.  

PubMed

The characteristics of nitrogenous substrates conversion by anammox enrichment were investigated using batch experiments. The anammox enrichment was proved able to convert hydroxylamine to hydrazine, as well as convert hydrazine to ammonia anaerobically, with the average conversion rates of 0.207 and 0.031 mmol gVSS(-1) h(-1). It could convert hydroxylamine and nitrite simultaneously, with ammonia as an intermediate product. The maximum conversion rates of hydroxylamine and nitrite were 0.535 and 0.145 mmol gVSS(-1) h(-1), respectively. Their conversion rates were enhanced by 26.7% and 120.7%, respectively, by raising the ratio of hydroxylamine to nitrite from 1:1 to 2:1. The characteristics of nitrogenous substrate conversion by anammox enrichment could be explained using the speculative anammox pathway based on van de Graaf model. PMID:20729076

Hu, Anhui; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Lidong; Ding, Shuang

2010-08-21

406

Photoporation of Biomolecules into Single Cells in Living Vertebrate Embryos Induced by a Femtosecond Laser Amplifier  

PubMed Central

Introduction of biomolecules into cells in living animals is one of the most important techniques in molecular and developmental biology research, and has potentially broad biomedical implications. Here we report that biomolecules can be introduced into single cells in living vertebrate embryos by photoporation using a femtosecond laser amplifier with a high pulse energy and a low repetition rate. First, we confirmed the efficiency of this photoporation technique by introducing dextran, morpholino oligonucleotides, or DNA plasmids into targeted single cells of zebrafish, chick, shark, and mouse embryos. Second, we demonstrated that femtosecond laser irradiation efficiently delivered DNA plasmids into single neurons of chick embryos. Finally, we successfully manipulated the fate of single neurons in zebrafish embryos by delivering mRNA. Our observations suggest that photoporation using a femtosecond laser with a high pulse energy and low repetition rate offers a novel way to manipulate the function(s) of individual cells in a wide range of vertebrate embryos by introduction of selected biomolecules.

Ochi, Haruki; Iino, Takanori; Hiraoka, Akihiro

2011-01-01

407

Physical world as an internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

A concept of the physical Universe that does not address the issue of the difference in the behavior of dead and living matter is not just incomplete, it simply cannot be correct. We have developed a cellular automaton model of the Universe where the appearing material configurations share the information control under global content-addressable holographic memory. As a result, biological

Simon Berkovich

2011-01-01

408

The new world order of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

These are truly fearful times that we are living through. In the United Nations, attempts to arrive at a diplomatic resolution of the crisis continue apace. The choreography of process serves little though to conceal the absolute certainty of outcome. The script of this war was crafted in Washington many months ago. In the next few days, the full military

Colin Coulter

2003-01-01

409

Science K-12, Interdependency of Living Things and Living Things With Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, physical science), and grade level. Choices of environmental topics such as weather, conservation of natural resources, and the interdependence of organisms and environment dominate objectives written for grades…

Utica City School District, NY.

410

Homicide by ligature strangulation in Finland: Offence and offender characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Finland, homicide by ligature strangulation is a rare event. The purpose of this study was to investigate recent homicide cases by ligature strangulation and to analyse offence and offender characteristics. All forensic psychiatric evaluation statements of offenders accused of ligature strangulation homicides during the 7-year period 1996–2002 (n=19) were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-five percent of the victims were females. In

Helinä Häkkänen

2005-01-01

411

Characteristics of Sexual Homicides Committed by Psychopathic and Nonpsychopathic Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the relationship between psychopathy and the perpetration of sexual homicide was investigated. The official file descriptions of sexual homicides committed by 18 psychopathic and 20 nonpsychopathic Canadian offenders were coded (by coders unaware of Psychopathy Checklist—Revised [PCL—R] scores) for characteristics of the victim, victim\\/perpetrator relationship, and evidence of gratuitous and sadistic violent behavior. Results indicated that most

Stephen Porter; Michael Woodworth; Jeff Earle; Jeff Drugge; Douglas Boer

2003-01-01

412

Molecular Dynamics in Living Cells Observed by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy with One and Two-Photon Excitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiphoton excitation (MPE) of fluorescent probes has become an attractive alternative in biological applications of laser scanning microscopy because many problems encountered in spectroscopic measurements of living tissue such as light scattering, autofluorescence, and photodamage can be reduced. The present study investigates the characteristics of two-photon excitation (2PE) in comparison with confocal one-photon excitation (1PE) for intracellular applications of fluorescence

Petra Schwille; Ulrich Haupts; Sudipta Maiti; Watt W. Webb

1999-01-01

413

The shape of things to come.  

PubMed

Basic projections for the future made by various international and national planning organizations form the basis for a report on the demographic, economic, and social implications of population growth for the year 2000, both as to the statistics involved and what they mean. The most signficiant factor is that by the end of the century, global population will be greater than 6 billion. Statistics on population patterns are presented for Asia; India; China; Africa; Latin America; North America; Europe, Oceania, and the USSR, including population growth; birthrate; mortality; population projections; population distribution; age of populations; and urbanization. The realities that stand behind these abstract and impersonal statistics of population change will pose significant problems in several major respects: how these increasing populations will support themselves; where they will live; and how they will be fed. These question are closely related, but the need to create jobs might come 1st since decisions about the kind of employment opportunities to be offered and where will directly affect the rural-urban population equation. It is clear that an enormous number of jobs must be found in developing countries by the end of the century, estimated at 500 million more. The economic implications of increasing urbanization in the developing world are explored, and it is noted that Asia, Latin America, and Africa now face the prospect of having to feed as many as 800 million more urbanites by the year 2000. Also, rural population will also continue to grow, and whether agricultural resources can be increased to what extent and how is a critical question. It is concluded that no matter how agriculture is improved or jobs found in developing countries, many will be poorly nourished, badly housed, and inadequately educated. It is finally suggested that by 2000 the Third World as such will no longer exist; instead the world will consist of older developed countries; rapidly developing countries; middle-income countries; oil-surplus countries; and still poor countries, with a movement toward a constantly more diversified echelon of socioeconomic levels of development, both among and within countries. PMID:12179855

Gallagher, C F

1979-01-01

414

Bioerosion by euendoliths decreases in phosphate-enriched skeletons of living corals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the role of microboring organisms, or euendoliths, is relatively well known in dead coral skeletons, their function in live corals remains poorly understood. They are suggested to behave like ectosymbionts or parasites, impacting their host's health. However, the species composition of microboring communities, their abundance and dynamics in live corals under various environmental conditions have never been explored. Here, the effect of phosphate enrichment on boring microorganisms in live corals was tested for the first time. Stylophora pistillata nubbins were exposed to 3 different treatments (phosphate concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 2.5 ?mol l-1) during 15 weeks. After 15 weeks of phosphate enrichment, petrographic thin sections were prepared for observation with light microscopy, and additional samples were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Euendoliths comprised mainly phototrophic Ostreobium sp. filaments. Rare filaments of heterotrophic fungi were also observed. Filaments were densely distributed in the central part of nubbins, and less abundant towards the apex. Unexpectedly, there was a visible reduction of filament abundance in the most recently calcified apical part of phosphate-enriched nubbins. The overall abundance of euendoliths significantly decreased, from 9.12 ± 1.09% of the skeletal surface area in unenriched corals, to 5.81 ± 0.77% and 5.27 ± 0.34% in 0.5 and 2.5 ?mol l-1-phosphate enriched corals respectively. SEM observations confirmed this decrease. Recent studies have shown that phosphate enrichment increases coral skeletal growth and metabolic rates, while it decreases skeletal density and resilience to mechanical stress. We thus hypothesize that increased skeletal growth in the presence of phosphate enrichment occurred too fast for an effective expansion of euendolith growth. They could not keep up with coral growth, so they became diluted in the apex areas as nubbins grew with phosphate enrichment. Results from the present study suggest that coral skeletons of S. pistillata will not be further weakened by euendoliths under phosphate enrichment.

Godinot, C.; Tribollet, A.

2012-07-01

415

Living Systems are Dynamically Stable by Computing Themselves at the Quantum Level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The smallest details of living systems are molecular devices that operate between the classical and quantum levels, i.e. between the potential dimension (microscale) and the actual three-dimensional space (macroscale). They realize non-demolition quantum measurements in which time appears as a mesoscale dimension separating contradictory statements in the course of actualization. These smaller devices form larger devices (macromolecular complexes), up to living body. The quantum device possesses its own potential internal quantum state (IQS), which is maintained for prolonged time via error-correction being a reflection over this state. Decoherence-free IQS can exhibit itself by a creative generation of iteration limits in the real world. To avoid a collapse of the quantum information in the process of correcting errors, it is possible to make a partial measurement that extracts only the error-information and leaves the encoded state untouched. In natural quantum computers, which are living systems, the error-correction is internal. It is a result of reflection, given as a sort of a subjective process allotting optimal limits of iteration. The IQS resembles the properties of a quasi-particle, which interacts with the surround, applying decoherence commands to it. In this framework, enzymes are molecular automata of the extremal quantum computer, the set of which maintains stable highly ordered coherent state, and genome represents a concatenation of error-correcting codes into a single reflective set. Biological systems, being autopoietic in physical space, control quantum measurements in the physical universe. The biological evolution is really a functional evolution of measurement constraints in which limits of iteration are established possessing criteria of perfection and having selective values.

Igamberdiev, Abir U.

2003-06-01

416

Living Well  

MedlinePLUS

... are here: Parkinson's Disease > Living Well Text Size Living Well While living with PD can be challenging there is hope. Hope in the fact, that there ... healthy diet How to navigate daily activities of living like grooming and sleeping. Ways to make your ...

417

Labeling Live Cells by Copper-Catalyzed Alkyne-Azide Click Chemistry  

PubMed Central

The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, optimized for biological molecules in aqueous buffers, has been shown to rapidly label mammalian cells in culture with no loss in cell viability. Metabolic uptake and display of the azide derivative of N-acetylmannosamine developed by Bertozzi, followed by CuAAC ligation using sodium ascorbate and the ligand tris(hydroxypropyltriazolyl)methylamine (THPTA), gave rise to abundant covalent attachment of dye-alkyne reactants. THPTA serves both to accelerate the CuAAC reaction and to protect the cells from damage by oxidative agents produced by the Cu-catalyzed reduction of oxygen by ascorbate, which is required to maintain the metal in the active +1 oxidation state. This procedure extends the application of this fastest of azide-based bioorthogonal reactions to the exterior of living cells.

Hong, Vu; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Manchester, Marianne

2010-01-01

418

The Infrared Properties of Dwarf Galaxies: New Results from SINGS and THINGS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new observations of dwarf galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) Legacy Program dataset. The unprecedented sensitivity of these data offers a unique opportunity for a detailed exploration of the properties of these faint systems in the infrared. We compare these data to sensitive HI observations obtained in The HI Nearby Galaxies Survey (THINGS) to study the correlation between local gas density and PAH and dust emission. PAH emission is detected in all systems that are actively forming stars, while more quiescent systems show no diffuse emission in the 7.7 micron PAH band. The sensitive MIPS data show warm dust in most galaxies, including two systems with abundances ˜ 10% of the solar value. Using model fitting to the far-infrared spectral energy distributions, we investigate the characteristics of the dust and PAH emission in the M81 group dwarfs Holmberg II and IC 2574, and in the dwarf galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 6822. These results are important for understanding the nature of star formation and the heating and cooling processes in the low-metallicity dwarf galaxy interstellar medium. Support for this work, part of the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Science Program ``The Spitzer Nearby Galaxies Survey'', was provided by NASA through contract 1224769 issued by JPL/Caltech under NASA contract 1407.

Cannon, J. M.; Walter, F.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Bendo, G.; Brinks, E.; Calzetti, D.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Engelbracht, C.; Gordon, K. D.; Kewley, L.; Li, A.; Meyer, M.; Regan, M.; Roussel, H.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M.

2005-05-01

419

Formation of long-lived gas-phase antiprotonic helium atoms and quenching by H2  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN 1964 Condo1 suggested that the decay characteristics of negative (pi- and K-) mesons in helium bubble chambers could be explained by the capture of these particles in large-angular-momentum meta-stable orbitals of exotic helium atoms. Russell2 predicted that similar \\

T. Yamazaki; E. Widmann; R. S. Hayano; M. Iwasaki; S. N. Nakamura; K. Shigaki; F. J. Hartmann; H. Daniel; T. von Egidy; P. Hofmann; Y.-S. Kim; J. Eades

1993-01-01

420

These medicines all have one thing in common . . . the same ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... These medicines all have one thing in common . . . the same active ingredient. (print public service announcement). PDF version (220KB). ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers

421

Things to Think about Before You're Pregnant  

MedlinePLUS

... hot tub – during the first 3 months may cause birth defects. Am I around things at work or at ... harmful to children and adults, but it can cause birth defects, including blindness and brain damage. You can also ...

422

5 Things Kids Should Tell Their Asthma Doctor  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. 5 Things Kids Should Tell Their Asthma Doctor Experts list key topics to discuss for ... Preidt Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Asthma in Children Talking With Your Doctor WEDNESDAY, July ...

423

Thermoregulatory changes anticipate hibernation onset by 45 days: data from free-living arctic ground squirrels.  

PubMed

Hibernation is a strategy of reducing energy expenditure, body temperature (T(b)) and activity used by endotherms to escape unpredictable or seasonally reduced food availability. Despite extensive research on thermoregulatory adjustments during hibernation, less is known about transitions in thermoregulatory state, particularly under natural conditions. Laboratory studies on hibernating ground squirrels have demonstrated that thermoregulatory adjustments may occur over short intervals when animals undergo several brief, preliminary torpor bouts prior to entering multiday torpor. These short torpor bouts have been suggested to reflect a resetting of hypothalamic regions that control T(b) or to precondition animals before they undergo deep, multiday torpor. Here, we examined continuous records of T(b) in 240 arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) prior to hibernation in the wild and in captivity. In free-living squirrels, T(b) began to decline 45 days prior to hibernation, and average T(b) had decreased 4.28 °C at the onset of torpor. Further, we found that 75 % of free-living squirrels and 35 % of captive squirrels entered bouts of multiday torpor with a single T(b) decline and without previously showing short preliminary bouts. This study provides evidence that adjustments in the thermoregulatory component of hibernation begin far earlier than previously demonstrated. The gradual reduction in T(b) is likely a component of the suite of metabolic and behavioral adjustments, controlled by an endogenous, circannual rhythm, that vary seasonally in hibernating ground squirrels. PMID:22526260

Sheriff, Michael J; Williams, Cory T; Kenagy, G J; Buck, C Loren; Barnes, Brian M

2012-04-19

424

ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS  

SciTech Connect

We use time-series ultraviolet full sun images to construct limb-synoptic maps of the Sun. On these maps, large-scale, long-lived coronal streamers appear as repetitive sinusoid-like arcs projected over the polar regions. They are caused by high altitude plasma produced from sunspot-rich regions at latitudes generally far from the poles. The non-uniform longitudinal distribution of these streamers reveals four longitudinal zones at the surface of the Sun from which sunspots erupt preferentially over the 5 year observing interval (2006 January to 2011 April). Spots in these zones (or clusters) have individual lifetimes short compared to the lifetimes of the coronal features which they sustain, and they erupt at different times. The four sunspot clusters contain >75% of all numbered sunspots in this period. They occupy two distinct longitudinal zones separated by {approx}180{sup 0} and each spanning {approx}100{sup 0} in longitude. The rotation rates of the spot clusters are {approx}5% faster than the rates at both the surface and the bottom of the convection zone. While no convincing theoretical framework exists to interpret the sunspot clusters in the longitude-time space, their persistent and nonuniform distribution indicates long-lived, azimuthal structures beneath the surface, and are compatible with the existence of previously reported active longitudes on the Sun.

Li Jing, E-mail: jli@igpp.ucla.edu [Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)

2011-07-10

425

Protection conferred by a live Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine against fowl typhoid in laying hens.  

PubMed

Fowl typhoid is under control in poultry farms of developed countries, but it still endemically subsists in commercial laying hen farms of some countries. It has been demonstrated that Salmonella live vaccines can elicit cross-immunity against members of the same Kauffmann-White scheme serogroup. In this work, we explored the protection conferred by TAD Salmonella vac E, a live Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis vaccine, against fowl typhoid. Three groups of laying hens were vaccinated with different vaccination schedules starting on the first day of life, and afterwards were infected with 2 x 10(5) CFU of a virulent Salmonella Gallinarum strain, either at wk 28 or wk 52. Mortality, fecal shedding, and organ invasion of Salmonella Gallinarum were assessed. In this work we demonstrated that this Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine is able to cross-immunize against Salmonella Gallinarum. At wk 28, hens vaccinated with three oral doses or with two oral doses combined with one subcutaneous dose were protected by the vaccine. At wk 52, when hens were infected 36 wk after the final immunization, the vaccine was not able to confer protection. Thus, revaccination every 3 mo would be highly recommended. In countries where Salmonella Gallinarum subsists together with Salmonella Enteritidis, control programs should include vaccination of laying hens using safe attenuated Salmonella strains. PMID:16863082

Chacana, P A; Terzolo, H R

2006-06-01

426

Efficient adsorption of waterborne short-lived radon decay products by glass fiber filters  

SciTech Connect

Glass fiber filters of a certain brand were found to be very efficient (retention > 95%) for adsorption of short-lived radon decay products during filtration of water. Carrier-free samples are obtained in a convenient geometry for efficient gross beta counting. Adsorption of {open_quotes}hot atoms{close_quotes} is not disturbed by the presence of {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} lead ions. Approximate radioactive equilibrium between radon and its short-lived decay products may or may not exist in water at the source, but does exist after 3 b in PET bottles. These bottles are shown to be gas-tight for radon. Calibration of activity concentration in Bq L{sup -1} (radon gas concentration - equilibrium equivalent radon concentration) was performed by several standard procedures. Limit of detection is 2 Bq L{sup - 1} within 10 min (total time) or 10 Bq L{sup -1} within 5 min for a net signal of 5 times standard deviation. 13 refs., 5 figs.

Philipsborn, H. von [Univ. of Regensburg (Germany)

1997-02-01

427

Real-time detecting gelatinases activity in living cells by FRET imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Degradation of the extracellular matrix by Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) not only enhances tumor invasion, but also affects tumor cell behaviour and leads to cancer progression. To monitor gelatinases (contain MMP2 and MMP9) activity in living cells, we constructed a vector that encoded a gelatinases recognition site (GRS) between citrine (mutation of EYFP Q69M) in N terminal and ECFP in C terminal. Because Gelatinases are secretory proteins and act outside of cell, an expressing vector displayed the fusion protein on cellular surface was used for this FRET gene probe. On expression of YFP-GRS-ECFP in MCF-7 cells that expressed no gelatinases, we were able to observe the efficient transfer of energy from excited ECFP to YFP within the YFP-GRS-ECFP molecule. However, the fusion protein YFP-GRS-ECFP was expressed in MDA-MB 453s cell line with high secretory gelatinases, so YFP-GRS-ECFP was cleaved by gelatinases, no such transfer of energy was detected and fluorescence signal disappeared in YFP channel since YFP protein was cut down. Moreover, Doxycycline, a MMP inhibitor, could make FRET signal increase and fluorescence signal appeared in YFP channel. Thus, the FRET probe YFP-GRS-ECFP can sensitively and reliably monitor gelatinases activation in living cells and can be used for screening MMP inhibitors.

Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Bifeng; Luo, Qingming

2006-01-01

428

Bovine serum albumin nanoparticle vaccine reduces lung pathology induced by live Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice.  

PubMed

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes severe infections in immunocompromised patients and also in cystic fibrosis patients. The aim of this work was to study if a bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with entrapped antigens extracted from P. aeruginosa would be able to protect mice from nasal infection by this pathogen. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous route using P. aeruginosa antigens, empty nanoparticles or nanoparticles with entrapped P. aeruginosa antigens on days 0, 7 and 14. The total IgG antibody production and specific IgG1 and IgG2a titer were measured by ELISA. Immunized mice were challenged with live P. aeruginosa and their lungs were collected for histopathology studies. Our data showed that NPPa-vaccinated mice presented a high anti-Pseudomonas IgG1 and a low IgG2a antibody titles and decreased inflammatory signs, with significant reduction in intensity and concentration of inflammatory cells, lower hemorrhagic, edema and hyperemia signs in the lungs of challenge mice with live P. aeruginosa if compared to the other groups. Therefore, this formulation is able to induce a functional response in an animal model of infection and thereby is a promising platform for P. aeruginosa vaccines. PMID:24021308

Rodrigues, Naiara Ferreira; van Tilburg Bernardes, Erik; Rocha, Raissa Prado; da Costa, Lauro César Felipe; Coutinho, Ana Carolina Amaral; Dos Santos Muniz, Miriam; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; da Silva, Paulo Henrique Braz; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

2013-09-07

429

Optimization of antitumor immunotherapy mediated by type III secretion system-based live attenuated bacterial vectors.  

PubMed

Recently, due to their effective ability to deliver antigen to antigen-presenting cells in vivo, type III secretion system-based attenuated bacterial vectors have increasingly attracted attention for their potential interest in cancer vaccine development. We have previously developed live attenuated Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system-based vectors to deliver in vivo tumor antigens. In this work, we improved the performance of these bacterial vectors through several approaches in different murine cancer models involving non-self-antigens or self-antigens. First, by modulating injection frequency and interval, bacterial vaccination-activated immune response could be enhanced and the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of bacterial vaccines could be improved. The optimized vaccination scheme induced long-lasting CD8+ T cells' response. Second, a dual antigen delivery pattern was successfully applied in our bacterial vectors. Compared with a single antigen delivery vector, biantigen delivery vectors demonstrated several advantages including better tumor rejection efficiency, simplicity of use, and safety. Third, 1 more attenuated mutant-CHA-OAL strain that is totally avirulent in mice was further adapted to grow in a chemically defined medium to comply with current good manufacturing processes. The poor infectivity of this new strain could be overcome by vaccinations at multiple loci, yielding an efficiently improved vaccination performance. Taken together, our results highlight the potential of our live attenuated P. aeruginosa vectors for applications in relevant clinical trials. PMID:22421940

Wang, Yan; Gouëllec, Audrey Le; Chaker, Hichem; Asrih, Hoda; Polack, Benoit; Toussaint, Bertrand

2012-04-01

430

DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES IN ANDRA'S ASSESSMENT OF ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT BY RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATORS AND AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF IL-LL SHORT-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES AND HL-IL LONG-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

In both cases of packages for either low-level and intermediate-level short-lived (LL-IL/SL) or high-level and intermediate-level long-lived (HL-IL/LL) radioactive waste, Andra has defined a quality reference system, manages it, follows up its appropriate implementation in production plants and verifies its effectiveness in production. The purpose of such a reference system is to ensure, in the first case, that waste packages comply with the Centre de l'Aube's acceptance criteria and, in the second case, that the characteristics submitted by the waste generators to Andra as input data for the deep geological repository project reflect the actual production conditions. In that context, the three management steps of the quality reference system include differences due to the fact that HL-IL/SL packages have not been submitted yet to any technical acceptance criterion. Compliance with any such criterion should be the subject of a characterization report during the qualification phase and of a examination during the verification phase. The management of the quality reference system also involves similarities that facilitate the joint work carried out by Andra with the waste generators, especially in the facilities where both package types are produced.

Trentesaux, C.; Cairon, P.; Dumont, J.-N.; Felix, B.; Losada, F.

2003-02-27

431

Propagation characteristics of shock waves driven by gaseous detonation waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

We experimentally investigated propagation characteristics of the shock wave driven by a gaseous detonation wave emerging\\u000a from the open end of a cylindrical detonation tube. In the present study, we visualized the shock wave and exhaust flowfields\\u000a using a shadowgraph optical system and we obtained peak overpressure in the tube axial direction and the continuous shape\\u000a transformation of shock waves

S. Kato; S. Hashimoto; A. Uemichi; J. Kasahara; A. Matsuo

2010-01-01

432

Transformation characteristics of functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, functionally graded steel has been produced via diffusion of the alloying elements during electroslag refining. As the alloying element diffuses, it creates alternating\\u000a regions with different transformation characteristics. Thus, it is possible to obtain steel composites with various combinations\\u000a of ferrite, bainite, martensite, and austenite phases. By choosing the appropriate thickness of the slices used to set

J. Aghazadeh Mohandesi; M. H. Shahosseinie

2005-01-01

433

The physicochemical characteristics of modified carbon fibers by Fluorination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The surface of PAN-based carbon fiber was directly modified with fluorine-oxygen mixtures at room temperature. The surface\\u000a characteristics of the modified fiber were determined by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD),\\u000a and dynamic contact angle analyzer. The surface free energy was also calculated with the Owens-Wendt geometric mean method\\u000a using water and methylene iodide contact angle. The surface

Young-Seak Lee; Byoung-Ky Lee; Jae-Seong Rho

2003-01-01

434

Elastic Membrane Heterogeneity of Living Cells Revealed by Stiff Nanoscale Membrane Domains  

PubMed Central

Many approaches have been developed to characterize the heterogeneity of membranes in living cells. In this study, the elastic properties of specific membrane domains in living cells are characterized by atomic force microscopy. Our data reveal the existence of heterogeneous nanometric scale domains with specific biophysical properties. We focused on glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, which play an important role in membrane trafficking and cell signaling under both physiological and pathological conditions and which are known to partition preferentially into cholesterol-rich microdomains. We demonstrate that these GPI-anchored proteins reside within domains that are stiffer than the surrounding membrane. In contrast, membrane domains containing the transferrin receptor, which does not associate with cholesterol-rich regions, manifest no such feature. The heightened stiffness of GPI domains is consistent with existing data relating to the specific condensation of lipids and the slow diffusion rates of lipids and proteins therein. Our quantitative data may forge the way to unveiling the links that exist between membrane stiffness, molecular diffusion, and signaling activation.

Roduit, Charles; van der Goot, F. Gisou; De Los Rios, Paolo; Yersin, Alexandre; Steiner, Pascal; Dietler, Giovanni; Catsicas, Stefan; Lafont, Frank; Kasas, Sandor

2008-01-01

435

Elastic membrane heterogeneity of living cells revealed by stiff nanoscale membrane domains.  

PubMed

Many approaches have been developed to characterize the heterogeneity of membranes in living cells. In this study, the elastic properties of specific membrane domains in living cells are characterized by atomic force microscopy. Our data reveal the existence of heterogeneous nanometric scale domains with specific biophysical properties. We focused on glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, which play an important role in membrane trafficking and cell signaling under both physiological and pathological conditions and which are known to partition preferentially into cholesterol-rich microdomains. We demonstrate that these GPI-anchored proteins reside within domains that are stiffer than the surrounding membrane. In contrast, membrane domains containing the transferrin receptor, which does not associate with cholesterol-rich regions, manifest no such feature. The heightened stiffness of GPI domains is consistent with existing data relating to the specific condensation of lipids and the slow diffusion rates of lipids and proteins therein. Our quantitative data may forge the way to unveiling the links that exist between membrane stiffness, molecular diffusion, and signaling activation. PMID:17981897

Roduit, Charles; van der Goot, F Gisou; De Los Rios, Paolo; Yersin, Alexandre; Steiner, Pascal; Dietler, Giovanni; Catsicas, Stefan; Lafont, Frank; Kasas, Sandor

2007-11-02

436

Ultrafast dynamics in a live cell irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ultrafast video microscope (UVM), the frame rate of which reaches one million per second has been developed. Our UVM system provides pictures with high-contrast and high-resolution for differential interference contrast (DIC), phase contrast, or dark field imaging. It allows us to observe fast events that occur in live cells when irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to manipulate, stimulate, and destroy specific cells and organelles under the microscope. The irradiation of such an intense laser immediately results in some physical events, such as microbubble generation, plasma formation, and photoporation. We investigate biophysical mechanisms underlying the ultrafast processes. Our data will contribute to development of new bio-imaging modalities, which implement laser cell transfection. We also present a new method to observe side views of live cells on a substrate. We used a polymer material CYTOP as the substrate for HeLa cells. CYTOP has a refractive index of 1.34, which is close to 1.33 of water. We investigate generation of microbubbles beneath the plasma membranes with a time resolution of one microsecond for the purpose of improving the efficiency of photoporation.

Kawano, Hiroyuki; Hara, Chikako; Etoh, Takeharu G.; Miyawaki, Atsushi

2007-06-01

437

Kidney Function in Living Donors Undergoing Nephrectomy by Sevoflurane or Desflurane Anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Although there is no clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity with the volatile anesthetics currently used in general anesthesia, a better agent should be needed in terms of preserving postoperative renal function in living kidney donors who have only single remaining kidney. The purpose of the current retrospective, single-center study was to evaluate and compare renal function of living kidney donors after nephrectomy under either sevoflurane or desflurane anesthesia. Materials and Methods From January 2006 through December 2011, a total of 228 donors undergoing video assisted minilaparotomy surgery nephrectomy for kidney donation were retrospectively enrolled in the current study. The donors were categorized into a sevoflurane group or desflurane group based on the type of volatile anesthetic used. We collected laboratory data from the patients preoperatively, immediately after the operation, on the first postoperative day and on the third postoperative day. We also compared renal function of the kidney donors after donor nephrectomy by comparing creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results The decrease in renal function after surgery in both groups was the most prominent on the first postoperative day. There were no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative changes of creatinine or eGFR. Conclusion Sevoflurane and desflurane can be used safely as volatile anesthetics in donors undergoing nephrectomy.

Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Ham, Sung-Yeon

2013-01-01

438

Detection and characterization of protein interactions in vivo by a simple live-cell imaging method.  

PubMed

Over the last decades there has been an explosion of new methodologies to study protein complexes. However, most of the approaches currently used are based on in vitro assays (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray, electron microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry etc). The accurate measurement of parameters that define protein complexes in a physiological context has been largely limited due to technical constrains. Here, we present PICT (Protein interactions from Imaging of Complexes after Translocation), a new method that provides a simple fluorescence microscopy readout for the study of protein complexes in living cells. We take advantage of the inducible dimerization of FK506-binding protein (FKBP) and FKBP-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain to translocate protein assemblies to membrane associated anchoring platforms in yeast. In this assay, GFP-tagged prey proteins interacting with the FRB-tagged bait will co-translocate to the FKBP-tagged anchor sites upon addition of rapamycin. The interactions are thus encoded into localization changes and can be detected by fluorescence live-cell imaging under different physiological conditions or upon perturbations. PICT can be automated for high-throughput studies and can be used to quantify dissociation rates of protein complexes in vivo. In this work we have used PICT to analyze protein-protein interactions from three biological pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade (Ste5-Ste11-Ste50), exocytosis (exocyst complex) and endocytosis (Ede1-Syp1). PMID:23658712

Gallego, Oriol; Specht, Tanja; Brach, Thorsten; Kumar, Arun; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Kaksonen, Marko

2013-05-01

439

In situ detection of live cancer cells by using bioprobes based on Au nanoparticles.  

PubMed

We fabricate the high-performance probes based on Au nanoparticles (AuNP) for detection of live cancer cell. AuNP were synthesized with narrow sized distribution (ca. 10 nm) by Au salt reduction method and deposited onto the aminated substrate as a cross-linker and hot spot. Herein, AuNP has enabled the easy and efficient immobilization of the antibody (Cetuximab), which can selectively interact with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of epidermal cancer, as detecting moiety onto the AuNP-deposited substrate without nanolithography process. After conjugation of Cetuximab with AuNP-deposited substrate, Cetuximab-conjugated probe as a live cancer cell detector (LCCD) could detect EGFR-highexpressed A431 cells related to epithelial cancer with 54-times larger specificity and sensitivity in comparison with EGFR-deficient MCF7 cells. This implies that AuNP-based probes demonstrate abundant potentials for detection and separation of small biomolecules, cells and other chemicals. PMID:18826263

Yang, Jaemoon; Eom, Kilho; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Jinsung; Kang, Yoonah; Yoon, Dae Sung; Na, Sungsoo; Koh, Eui Kwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Kwon, Tae Yun; Haam, Seungjoo

2008-10-01

440

Filming a live cell by scanning electrochemical microscopy: label-free imaging of the dynamic morphology in real time  

PubMed Central

The morphology of a live cell reflects the organization of the cytoskeleton and the healthy status of the cell. We established a label-free platform for monitoring the changing morphology of live cells in real time based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The dynamic morphology of a live human bladder cancer cell (T24) was revealed by time-lapse SECM with dissolved oxygen in the medium solution as the redox mediator. Detailed local movements of cell membrane were presented by time-lapse cross section lines extracted from time-lapse SECM. Vivid dynamic morphology is presented by a movie made of time-lapse SECM images. The morphological change of the T24 cell by non-physiological temperature is in consistence with the morphological feature of early apoptosis. To obtain dynamic cellular morphology with other methods is difficult. The non-invasive nature of SECM combined with high resolution realized filming the movements of live cells.

2012-01-01

441

Real-time analysis of endosomal lipid transport by live cell scintillation proximity assay  

PubMed Central

A scintillation proximity assay has been developed to study the endosomal trafficking of radiolabeled cholesterol in living cells. Mouse macrophages were cultured in the presence of tritiated cholesterol and scintillant microspheres. Microspheres were taken up by phagocytosis and stored in phagolysosomes. Absorption of tritium ? particles by the scintillant produces light signals that can be measured in standard scintillation counters. Because of the short range of tritium ? particles and for geometric reasons, scintillant microspheres detect only that fraction of tritiated cholesterol localized inside phagolysosomes or within a distance of ~600 nm. By incubating cultures in a temperature-controlled microplate reader, the kinetics of phagocytosis and cholesterol transport could be analyzed in near-real time. Scintillation signals were significantly increased in response to inhibitors of lysosomal cholesterol export. This method should prove a useful new tool for the study of endosomal trafficking of lipids and other molecules.

Stockinger, Walter; Castoreno, Adam B.; Wang, Yan; Pagnon, Joanne C.; Nohturfft, Axel

2007-01-01

442

Inhibition of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Replication by CD81 T Lymphocytes from Macaques Immunized with Live Attenuated SIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Characterization of immune responses induced by live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains may yield clues to the nature of protective immunity induced by this vaccine approach. We investigated the ability of CD81 T lymphocytes from rhesus macaques immunized with the live, attenuated SIV strain SIVmac239Dnef or SIVmac239D3 to inhibit SIV replication. CD81 T lymphocytes from immunized animals were able

MARIE-CLAIRE GAUDUIN; RHONA L. GLICKMAN; ROBERT MEANS

443

Polypeptoids by living ring-opening polymerization of N-substituted N-carboxyanhydrides from solid supports.  

PubMed

The nucleophilic living ring-opening polymerization of N-substituted glycine N-carboxyanhydrides using solid-phase synthesis resins is reported. By variation of experimental parameters, products with near Poisson distributions are obtained. As opposed to reversible deactivation radical polymerization, the living polymerization is demonstrated to be viable to high monomer conversion and through multiple monomer addition steps. Successful preparation of a multiblock copolypeptoid is proof for a highly living and robust character of the solid-phase peptoid polymerization. PMID:23661431

Gangloff, Niklas; Fetsch, Corinna; Luxenhofer, Robert

2013-05-10

444

A Possible Mechanism for Evading Temperature Quantum Decoherence in Living Matter by Feshbach Resonance  

PubMed Central

A new possible scenario for the origin of the molecular collective behaviour associated with the emergence of living matter is presented. We propose that the transition from a non-living to a living cell could be mapped to a quantum transition to a coherent entanglement of condensates, like in a multigap BCS superconductor. Here the decoherence-evading qualities at high temperature are based on the Feshbach resonance that has been recently proposed as the driving mechanism for high Tc superconductors. Finally we discuss how the proximity to a particular critical point is relevant to the emergence of coherence in the living cell.

Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Innocenti, Davide; Bianconi, Antonio

2009-01-01

445

Detection of a live cell in a microfluidic system by scanning capacitance microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, many studies on the biosensors using a microfluidic system have been performed. The system fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has many advantages such that it is portable, disposable, cost effective, and automatable. Scanning capacitance microscope (SCM) that has a good capacitance pickup sensor attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of measuring the capacitance variation with a resolution of better than 10-18F/V between a conducting tip and the sample. In this work, we present possibility of SCM as a biosensor by measuring a live cell which flows in the microchannel. By measuring the consecutive capacitance line profiles of a cell, which represent the charge distribution of a cell surface resulting from the ion channel or cell activity, we can get more information on the cell analysis and provide one solution for the realization of a lab-on-a-chip.

Sung, S. Y.; Yi, I. J.; Choi, Y. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kang, C. J.

2007-03-01

446

Intracellular Confinement of Magnetic Nanoparticles by Living Cells: Impact for Imaging and Therapeutic Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superparamagnetic properties of iron-oxide nanoparticles paved the way for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic targeting of drug vectors or magnetically-induced therapeutic hyperthermia. Living cells interact with nanoparticles by internalizing them within intracellular compartments, called lysosomes. In the course of cellular uptake, the spatial distribution of magnetic nanoparticles changes from dilute isolated nanoparticles to a highly concentrated assembly of nanoparticles confined in micrometric lysosomes. This local organization of nanoparticles, which is induced by the intracellular environment, may have important consequences for their superparamagnetic behaviour. In particular, it may deeply affect their magnetic properties used for biomedical purposes and therefore must be considered when optimizing the properties of nanoparticles for a peculiar application. In this paper, we review the role of intracellular confinement of nanoparticles for their three main biomedical uses: MR cellular imaging, magnetic targeting of cells and magnetically induced hyperthermia.

Gazeau, Florence; Lévy, Michael; Wilhelm, Claire

2011-03-01

447

Manipulation of living cells by using PC-controlled micro-pattern projection system.  

PubMed

In order to meet the diversifying demand for the cell manipulation in the rapid progress of cell engineering, we developed a novel technique to capture the living cells on a culture substrate by irradiating light in a multiple manner. In clear contrast to the conventional cell patterning using the previously patterned substrate, the cell-retaining area can be defined even after cell seeding, and the captured cells can continue to grow freely beyond the defined area afterwards. After the light irradiation in arbitrary micropattern by using a newly developed apparatus and the process to remove non-captured cells including EDTA treatment, the highly contrasted cell patterns were formed with the precision of single cell size. Moreover, it was determined that the cell capturing arose just after light irradiation and diminished gradually in a time scale of 10h. It was confirmed that the cells maintained their viability well after the manipulation process including photo-induced cell capturing. PMID:17045471

Sumaru, Kimio; Edahiro, Jun-ichi; Ooshima, Yuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Shinbo, Toshio

2006-10-11

448

Live imaging reveals active infiltration of mitotic zone by its stem cell niche.  

PubMed

Stem cells niches are increasingly recognized as dynamic environments that play a key role in transducing signals that allow an organism to exert control on its stem cells. Live imaging of stem cell niches in their in vivo setting is thus of high interest to dissect stem cell controls. Here we report a new microfluidic design that is highly amenable to dissemination in biology laboratories that have no microfluidics expertise. This design has allowed us to perform the first time lapse imaging of the C. elegans germline stem cell niche. Our results show that this niche is strikingly dynamic, and that morphological changes that take place during development are the result of a highly active process. These results lay the foundation for future studies to dissect molecular mechanisms by which stem cell niche morphology is modulated, and by which niche morphology controls stem cell behavior. PMID:23695198

Wong, Brandon G; Paz, Adrian; Corrado, Michael A; Ramos, Brian R; Cinquin, Amanda; Cinquin, Olivier; Hui, Elliot E

2013-05-22

449

Characterization of Curli A Production on Living Bacterial Surfaces by Scanning Probe Microscopy  

PubMed Central

Curli are adhesive surface fibers produced by many Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. They are implicated in bacterial attachment and invasion to epithelial cells. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to determine the effects of curli on topology and mechanical properties of live E. coli cells. Young's moduli of both curli-deficient and curli-overproducing mutants were significantly lower than that of their wild-type (WT) strain, while decay lengths of the former strains were higher than that of the latter strain. Surprisingly, topological images showed that, unlike the WT and curli-overproducing mutant, the curli-deficient mutant produced a large number of flagella-like fibers, which may explain why the strain had a lower Young's modulus than the WT. These results suggest that the mechanical properties of bacterial surfaces are greatly affected by the presence of filamentous structures such as curli and flagella.

Oh, Yoo Jin; Cui, Yidan; Kim, Hyunseok; Li, Yinhua; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Park, Sungsu

2012-01-01

450

Mucosal immunity induced by parenteral immunization with a live attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccine candidate.  

PubMed

Induction of a mucosal immune response is generally thought to require introduction of an immunogen directly onto the mucosal surface. It has been observed, however, that live, attenuated mutants of the alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), induce protection from virulent challenge at the respiratory mucosa even after parenteral inoculation. In this report, we propose a mechanism by which subcutaneous immunization with a molecularly cloned, attenuated double mutant of VEE is able to stimulate the production of mucosal anti-VEE IgA. Our results showed that the immunizing virus spread to, and replicated within, lymphoid tissues throughout the mouse. Several tissues known to be inductive sites of the mucosal immune system were found to be positive for the presence of VEE RNA by 48 hr postimmunization. Moreover, this mucosal lymphotropism resulted in the production of virus-specific IgA antibody detectable in vaginal secretions of immunized mice. PMID:9123821

Charles, P C; Brown, K W; Davis, N L; Hart, M K; Johnston, R E

1997-02-17

451

Sustained oscillations generated by mutually inhibiting neurons with adaptation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autonomic oscillatory activities exist in almost every living thing and most of them are produced by rhythmic activities of the corresponding neural systems (locomotion, respiration, heart beat, etc.). This paper mathematically discusses sustained oscillations generated by mutual inhibition of the neurons which are represented by a continuous-variable model with a kind of fatigue or adaptation effect. If the neural network

Kiyotoshi Matsuoka

1985-01-01

452

Activation of Human Monocytes by Live Borrelia burgdorferi Generates TLR2-Dependent and -Independent Responses Which Include Induction of IFN-?  

PubMed Central

It is widely believed that innate immune responses to Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) are primarily triggered by the spirochete's outer membrane lipoproteins signaling through cell surface TLR1/2. We recently challenged this notion by demonstrating that phagocytosis of live Bb by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited greater production of proinflammatory cytokines than did equivalent bacterial lysates. Using whole genome microarrays, we show herein that, compared to lysates, live spirochetes elicited a more intense and much broader transcriptional response involving genes associated with diverse cellular processes; among these were IFN-? and a number of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which are not known to result from TLR2 signaling. Using isolated monocytes, we demonstrated that cell activation signals elicited by live Bb result from cell surface interactions and uptake and degradation of organisms within phagosomes. As with PBCMs, live Bb induced markedly greater transcription and secretion of TNF-?, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1? in monocytes than did lysates. Secreted IL-18, which, like IL-1?, also requires cleavage by activated caspase-1, was generated only in response to live Bb. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production by TLR2-deficient murine macrophages was only moderately diminished in response to live Bb but was drastically impaired against lysates; TLR2 deficiency had no significant effect on uptake and degradation of spirochetes. As with PBMCs, live Bb was a much more potent inducer of IFN-? and ISGs in isolated monocytes than were lysates or a synthetic TLR2 agonist. Collectively, our results indicate that the enhanced innate immune responses of monocytes following phagocytosis of live Bb have both TLR2-dependent and -independent components and that the latter induce transcription of type I IFNs and ISGs.

Salazar, Juan C.; Duhnam-Ems, Star; La Vake, Carson; Cruz, Adriana R.; Moore, Meagan W.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Velez-Climent, Leonor; Shupe, Jonathan; Krueger, Winfried; Radolf, Justin D.

2009-01-01

453

gamma-Aminobutyric acid uptake by a bacterial system with neurotransmitter binding characteristics.  

PubMed Central

gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), an amino acid, has been found in every class of living organisms. In higher organisms, GABA is a neurotransmitter and binds with high affinity and specificity to GABA receptors on neurons in a sodium-independent reaction that is saturable. The role of GABA in organisms lacking nervous tissue is not known. This report describes, in a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a GABA uptake system with binding characteristics like those of the GABA (type A) brain receptor. The binding was saturable and specific for GABA, was sodium-independent, was of high affinity (Km = 65 nM), and was inhibited competitively by muscimol, a potent GABA analogue. The bacterial GABA system included a homogeneous binding site, and no cooperative interaction was found between sites. To our knowledge, such a system for GABA, or other neurotransmitters, in a bacterium has not been reported.

Guthrie, G D; Nicholson-Guthrie, C S

1989-01-01

454

TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTIC FOR PRODUCTION OF CO2 BY PHASEOLUS SEEDLINGS  

PubMed Central

The temperature characteristic for respiratory production of CO2 by young seedlings of Phaseolus aureus (Roxb.) is µ = 16,500 calories, 12–21°C., even when the analyses depend upon the use of many seedlings crowded in a small respiration chamber, provided reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury and to permit proper thermal adaptation. There is evidence of a definite critical temperature at 20–21°. These findings agree quantitatively with those obtained with other similar seedlings, and contradict the results reported by Kurbatov and Leonov (1930); the reasons for this are analysed.

Crozier, W. J.; Navez, A. E.

1931-01-01

455

Attenuation by intravenous 2-chloroadenosine of acute lung injury induced by live escherichia coli or latex particles added to endotoxin in the neutropenic state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although neutrophil depletion can reduce the level of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin, that induced by live E coli cannot be attenuated even in neutropenia. This suggests that live E coli cause ALI by way of an mechanism independent of circulating neutrophil. Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), which is released from monocytes and macrophages, is a proinflammatory

Fumio Sakamaki; Akitoshi Ishizaka; Tetsuya Urano; Koichi Sayama; Hidetoshi Nakamura; Takeshi Terashima; Yasuhiro Waki; Kenzo Soejima; Sadatomo Tasaka; Makoto Sawafuji; Kouichi Kobayashi; Kazuhiro Yamaguchi; Minoru Kanazawa

2003-01-01

456

Test for antioxidant ability by scavenging long-lived mutagenic radicals in mammalian cells and by blood test with intentional radicals: an application of gallic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antioxidant ability of gallic acid (GA) are determined both by electron spin resonance measurement of long-lived radicals produced in ?-ray irradiated Syrian golden hamster embryo cells with GA and by hemolysis measurement with GA when blood cells are submitted to radicals. Scavenging properties of GA are determined by the reaction rate constant with long-lived mutagenic radicals in the cells while

Jun Kumagai; Tomoko Kawaura; Tetsuo Miyazaki; Michel Prost; Emmanuelle Prost; Masami Watanabe; Joëlle Quetin-Leclercq

2003-01-01

457

Analysis of the business model innovation of the technology of internet of things in postal logistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the application of the internet of thing technology in postal logistics, prospects the potential structure of the technology of Internet of Things in postal logistics and its impact on the construction of the business model of Internet of Things. It primarily analyses the main way for the technology of Internet of Things to make profitability in postal

Peng-fei Fan; Guang-zhao Zhou

2011-01-01

458

Casting new physicochemical light on the fundamental biological processes in single living cells by using Raman microspectroscopy.  

PubMed

This Personal Account highlights the capabilities of spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy for studying fundamental biological processes in a single living cell. Raman microspectroscopy provides time- and space-resolved vibrational Raman spectra that contain detailed information on the structure and dynamics of biomolecules in a cell. By using yeast as a model system, we have made great progress in the development of this methodology. The results that we have obtained so far are described herein with an emphasis placed on how three cellular processes, that is, cell-division, respiration, and cell-death, are traced and elucidated with the use of time- and space-resolved structural information that is extracted from the Raman spectra. For cell-division, compositional- and structural changes of various biomolecules are observed during the course of the whole cell cycle. For respiration, the redox state of mitochondrial cytochromes, which is inferred from the resonance Raman bands of cytochromes, is used to evaluate the respiration activity of a single cell, as well as that of isolated mitochondrial particles. Special reference is made to the "Raman spectroscopic signature of life", which is a characteristic Raman band at 1602 cm(-1) that is found in yeast cells. This signature reflects the cellular metabolic activity and may serve as a measure of mitochondrial dysfunction. For cell-death, "cross-talk" between the mitochondria and the vacuole in a dying cell is suggested. PMID:23129551

Kaliaperumal, Venkatesh; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

2012-11-05

459

Investigation of Live Influenza Vaccines in a Controlled Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A comparative study of the effectiveness of several live influenza vaccines differing in means of application, characteristics and set of strains, applying the principles of strictly controlled epidemiological investigations can be made with success by fo...

A. A. Sumarokov V. F. Popov L. A. Nefedova

1971-01-01

460

Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis infection in living raccoon dogs assessed by hematological examination.  

PubMed

The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis in free-ranging raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus) was examined in the southeast region of Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, using a rapid immunomigration (RIM) test kit. Between April 2007 and March 2010, we examined 108 raccoon dogs rescued and housed by the Kanazawa Zoological Garden. D. immitis infection was found in 8 (7.4%) raccoon dogs. This is the first report to reveal the prevalence of D. immitis infection in living raccoon dogs. The prevalence of the infection was lower than previously reported values obtained on postmortem examination. One reason might be that the present study included young raccoon dogs infected with immature worms. Significant high-risk areas of D. immitis infection in the raccoon dogs were not observed. PMID:21293077

Kido, Nobuhide; Wada, Yuko; Takahashi, Maya; Kamegaya, Chihiro; Omiya, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

2011-01-31

461

High-content super-resolution imaging of live cell by uPAINT.  

PubMed

In this chapter, we present the uPAINT method (Universal Point Accumulation Imaging in Nanoscale Topography), a simple single-molecule super-resolution method which can be implemented on any wide field fluorescence microscope operating in oblique illumination. The key feature of uPAINT lies in recording high numbers of single molecules at the surface of a cell by constantly labeling while imaging. In addition to generating super-resolved images, uPAINT can provide dynamical information on a single live cell with large statistics revealing localization-specific diffusion properties of membrane biomolecules. Interestingly, any membrane biomolecule that can be labeled with a fluorescent ligand can be studied, making uPAINT an extremely versatile method. PMID:23086872

Giannone, Grégory; Hosy, Eric; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Cognet, Laurent

2013-01-01

462

Optimizing DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 for assessment of chromatin organization in living cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest for applications of fluorescence measurements to studies on many physiological mechanisms in living cells. However, few studies have taken advantage of DNA quantification by fluorometry for dynamic assessment of chromatin organization. This type of approach involves both optimal conditions for DNA staining and the use of several investigation methods such as flow cytometry, image cytometry, laser scanning confocal microscopy and spectral imaging. In this context, this report describes a stoichiometric method for nuclear DNA specific staining, using bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33342 associated with verapamil, a calcium membrane channel blocker. This method makes it possible to follow variations of nuclear DNA content in cells that are maintained alive.

Paillasson, Sylvain; Robert-Nicoud, Michel; Ronot, Xavier

1995-02-01

463

Reversion of a long-living, undifferentiated mutant of Podospora anserina by copper  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Podospora anserina nuclear mutant grisea displays an undifferentiated growth phenotype (diminished production of aerial hyphae), is female sterile (lack of perithecia), has a prolonged life-span compared to the wild-type strain, and lacks detectable phenoloxidase (laccase and tyrosinase) activity. Reversion of all of these characteristics to those of the wild-type phenotype was accomplished by supplementing the growth medium with extra

Karin Marbach; Juan Fernfindez-Larrea; Ulf Stahl

1994-01-01

464

Designing assisted living technologies 'in the wild': preliminary experiences with cultural probe methodology  

PubMed Central

Background There is growing interest in assisted living technologies to support independence at home. Such technologies should ideally be designed ‘in the wild’ i.e. taking account of how real people live in real homes and communities. The ATHENE (Assistive Technologies for Healthy Living in Elders: Needs Assessment by Ethnography) project seeks to illuminate the living needs of older people and facilitate the co-production with older people of technologies and services. This paper describes the development of a cultural probe tool produced as part of the ATHENE project and how it was used to support home visit interviews with elders with a range of ethnic and social backgrounds, family circumstances, health conditions and assisted living needs. Method Thirty one people aged 60 to 98 were visited in their homes on three occasions. Following an initial interview, participants were given a set of cultural probe materials, including a digital camera and the ‘Home and Life Scrapbook’ to complete in their own time for one week. Activities within the Home and Life Scrapbook included maps (indicating their relationships to people, places and objects), lists (e.g. likes, dislikes, things they were concerned about, things they were comfortable with), wishes (things they wanted to change or improve), body outline (indicating symptoms or impairments), home plan (room layouts of their homes to indicate spaces and objects used) and a diary. After one week, the researcher and participant reviewed any digital photos taken and the content of the Home and Life Scrapbook as part of the home visit interview. Findings The cultural probe facilitated collection of visual, narrative and material data by older people, and appeared to generate high levels of engagement from some participants. However, others used the probe minimally or not at all for various reasons including limited literacy, physical problems (e.g. holding a pen), lack of time or energy, lim