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1

Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to an internet program that is all about life. Just what is life? This seems like a strange question. We all know what is meant by the word \\"life\\". But how do we define it? Are all living things alike? In this internet program, you will watch several short movies and some slides. After you see each movie and slide, you will write something about the movie and slide. Our learning goal is to make a list of the traits that all living things have in common. Get out a pencil and a piece of paper. We are off on a great adventure to learn about living things! This first movie is called, \\"Is It Alive?\\" It will help you begin thinking about living things and what they all have in common. Write on your paper: \\"Living Things\\". As you watch this movie, write the names of the things that you think are alive. Copy the ...

Richard S. Melenson

2005-11-21

2

Living things and non-living things interact  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things and non-living things interact on a daily basis. The man is a human, a living thing. The corn crop and grass are also living things. The soil that the grass and corn crops are rooted in is a non-living thing.

Ken Hammond (USDA-ARS;)

2006-05-23

3

Primary students' conceptions of living things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elementary school teachers are pressed for time throughout the instructional day to teach all curricular areas as expected by states and districts because of the current focus on reading and mathematics. Thus, foundational science concepts may be overlooked. For example, students' understandings of living and nonliving things may be overlooked by teachers, yet is useful in understanding the nature of living things. In this qualitative study, K-3 grade students were asked to sort objects as either living or nonliving and to give rationales for their choices. It was found that K-3 students readily used physical characteristics, such as having body parts, and physical abilities, such as being able to move, as criteria for living things. Students in grades 1 through 3 were able to articulate their reasons with more adult-like logic based on Jean Piaget' s research on developmental stages.

Legaspi, Britt Anne

4

Living Things and Where They Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on living things and their habitats includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

5

Fuel for Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners observe what happens when yeast cells are provided with a source of food (sugar). Red cabbage "juice" will serve as an indicator for the presence of carbon dioxide. Learners will observe how carbon dioxide gas is given off by yeast cells, as indicated by turning the mixture bright pink. This activity is broken up in three parts or sessions: making the indicator (can be done in advance), demonstration of cabbage juice indicator, and conducting the investigation.

2011-09-19

6

Interactions Between Living and Nonliving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When you finish this webquest you will know more about how living things interact with each other and with nonliving things in their environment. 1. What are the basic parts of a food chain? Read this page and write down the three main parts of a food chain onto your worksheet along with a one sentence description of each one. Parts of a food chain 2. So, what do decomposers do for each environment? Write a sentence telling what ...

Benson, Carrie

2012-10-09

7

Consumers Get Energy from Other Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson where learners explore how animals obtain and store energy, and draw conclusions about the interconnectedness of living things in the flow of energy. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson four in the Astro-Venture Biology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

8

The Internet of Things for Ambient Assisted Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet. Technological advancements lead to smart objects being capable of identifying, locating, sensing and connecting and thus leading to new forms of communication between people and things and things themselves. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) encompasses technical systems to support elderly people in their daily routine to allow an

A. Dohr; R. Modre-Opsrian; Mario Drobics; Dieter Hayn; Günter Schreier

2010-01-01

9

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they…

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-01-01

10

Mathematics and Living Things. Student Text. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed for grade eight to enrich and supplement the usual courses of instruction. Mathematics and Living Things (MALT) utilizes exercises in biological science to derive data through which mathematical concepts and principles may be introduced and expanded. Chapters included are: (1) Leaves and Natural Variation: Measurement of…

Faber, Norman J.; And Others

11

How to Care for Living Things in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) publication, the advantages of having living things in the classroom are discussed. Also given is a brief description of the facilities and environments required for various common mammals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and plants. (CP)

Pratt, Grace K.

12

Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure about "Living Thing"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study aims to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structure on the concept of "living thing" through revealing their conceptual framework. Qualitative research method was applied in this study. The data were collected from 44 biology student teachers. A free word association test was used as a data collection…

Kurt, Hakan

2013-01-01

13

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they demonstrated significantly longer reaction times for classifying plants compared to animals and for classifying dynamic objects compared to static inanimate objects. Findings indicated that, despite prior learning in biology, the intuitive conception of living things persists up to age 15-16 years, affecting related reasoning processes. Consideration of these findings may help educators in their decisions about the nature of examples they use in their classrooms.

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-02-01

14

Exploring Korean young children's ideas about living things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative study explored concepts of living things that five- and six-year-old Korean children held prior to formal instructional interventions and how their concepts were changed and developed over one semester in a kindergarten classroom. Six focal children in a class of 30 were interviewed in two phases and their hands-on classroom activities and teacher-children interactions were observed. The teacher's journal was also used to gather data. As the study was conducted, a number of alternative concepts related to the children's perceptions of living things were identified and described. The researcher interviewed the children to determine their initial ideas, using an informal interview guide; they responded whether certain objects were living or not, and how they told if the particular objects were living or not. The classroom activities were also observed in large/small groups and individually. An assisting observer viewed the classroom activities and simultaneously recorded science-related teacher-children interactions and the children's hands-on activities. Later the researcher made a transcription of the observer's notes. The data were also collected from the teacher's journal, in which she recorded everyday classroom activities and reflected on teaching and learning. Finally, after 8 weeks of the 16-week instructional intervention, the researcher interviewed the children, using a formal interview guide, as to how their concepts of living things had changed and developed. The researcher interviewed the children as to whether particular objects were plants or animals, neither or both, and the criteria they used to decide. The study showed that the kindergarten children had solid and unique ideas based on their everyday experience with living and non-living things prior to the formal instructional inventions. In the classroom activities, the children showed that they rejected or changed several of their own concepts of living things. The instructional interventions facilitated the children in developing scientific ideas about certain living things. Several of the children's ideas and concepts changed and corresponded to scientific viewpoints. However, others maintained their existing ideas, which were not scientifically based. The study revealed the complexity of teaching kindergarten children a scientific understanding of living things and that teaching the interconnectedness among objects was essential to elaborate concepts. The results of the research suggested improvements for the conceptual change teaching methodology used in the classroom. The study provided insight into the effects of teacher-children interactions and teaching interventions. The study also indicated that the interview and observation research methodology used in this study was a useful vehicle to explore the children's initial ideas and conceptual development in teaching and learning science. The findings of the study suggest that teacher education for teachers of young children should include a complex of instructions because teaching and learning concepts of living things and other related science concepts are complex processes.

Kwon, Young Re

15

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on students’ understanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its curriculum. For the first three years of school, Brunei children are taught in Malay and then for the remainder of their education, instruction is in English. This research is concerned with the influence that this bilingual education system has on children’s learning of science. The purpose was to document the patterns of Brunei students’ developing understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things and examine the impact in the change in language as the medium of instruction. A cross-sectional case study design was used in one primary school. Data collection included an interview ( n = 75), which consisted of forced-response and semi-structured interview questions, a categorisation task and classroom observation. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that the transition from Malay to English as the language of instruction from Primary 4 onwards restricted the students’ ability to express their understandings about living things, to discuss related scientific concepts and to interpret and analyse scientific questions. From a social constructivist perspective these language factors will potentially impact on the students’ cognitive development by limiting the expected growth of the students’ understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things.

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-07-01

16

Why are living things sensitive to weak magnetic fields?  

PubMed

There is evidence for robust interactions of weak ELF magnetic fields with biological systems. Quite apart from the difficulties attending a proper physical basis for such interactions, an equally daunting question asks why these should even occur, given the apparent lack of comparable signals in the long-term electromagnetic environment. We suggest that the biological basis is likely to be found in the weak (?50?nT) daily swing in the geomagnetic field that results from the solar tidal force on free electrons in the upper atmosphere, a remarkably constant effect exactly in phase with the solar diurnal change. Because this magnetic change is locked into the solar-derived everyday diurnal response in living things, one can argue that it acts as a surrogate for the solar variation, and therefore plays a role in chronobiological processes. This implies that weak magnetic field interactions may have a chronodisruptive basis, homologous to the more familiar effects on the biological clock arising from sleep deprivation, phase-shift employment and light at night. It is conceivable that the widespread sensitivity of biological systems to weak ELF magnetic fields is vestigially derived from this diurnal geomagnetic effect. PMID:23915203

Liboff, Abraham R

2014-09-01

17

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous Exploration and Evaluation  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 ­ Report Final hal-00940078,version1-31Jan2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 ­ Report on IOT

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous Exploration and Evaluation  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous,version1-7Mar2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

19

Young children learning about living things: A case study of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although research from a developmental/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative data-collection methods to investigate the process of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives when Year 1 (5- and 6-year-old) students were learning about living things. Most students were found to think about living things with either stable, nonscientific or stable, scientific framework theories. Transitional phases of understanding also were identified. Patterns of conceptual change observed over the 5-week period of instruction included theory change and belief revision as well as reversals in beliefs. The predominant pattern of learning, however, was the assimilation of facts and information into the students' preferred framework theory. The social milieu of the classroom context exposed students' scientific and nonscientific beliefs that influenced other individuals in a piecemeal fashion. Children with nonscientific theories of living things were identified as being least able to benefit from socially constructed, scientific knowledge; hence, recommendations are made for teaching that focuses on conceptual change strategies rather than knowledge enrichment.

Venville, Grady

2004-05-01

20

The disparity mutagenesis model predicts rescue of living things from catastrophic errors  

PubMed Central

In animals including humans, mutation rates per generation exceed a perceived threshold, and excess mutations increase genetic load. Despite this, animals have survived without extinction. This is a perplexing problem for animal and human genetics, arising at the end of the last century, and to date still does not have a fully satisfactory explanation. Shortly after we proposed the disparity theory of evolution in 1992, the disparity mutagenesis model was proposed, which forms the basis for an explanation for an acceleration of evolution and species survival. This model predicts a significant increase of the mutation threshold values if the fidelity difference in replication between the lagging and leading strands is high enough. When applied to biological evolution, the model predicts that living things, including humans, might overcome the lethal effect of accumulated deleterious mutations and be able to survive. Artificially derived mutator strains of microorganisms, in which an enhanced lagging-strand-biased mutagenesis was introduced, showed unexpectedly high adaptability to severe environments. The implications of the striking behaviors shown by these disparity mutators will be discussed in relation to how living things with high mutation rates can avoid the self-defeating risk of excess mutations.

Furusawa, Mitsuru

2014-01-01

21

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API  

E-print Network

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API Geoffrey C. Fox Indiana University, Bloomington IN 47408 USA rdhartma@indiana.edu ABSTRACT The Internet of Things (Io systems [2,3]. This is the vision of the Internet of Things. We present a cloud-compatible open source

22

A Cloud-Based Internet of Things Platform for Ambient Assisted Living  

PubMed Central

A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

2014-01-01

23

A cloud-based Internet of Things platform for ambient assisted living.  

PubMed

A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

2014-01-01

24

Revisiting Preschoolers' Living Things Concept: A Microgenetic Analysis of Conceptual Change in Basic Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological…

Opfer, John E.; Siegler, Robert S.

2004-01-01

25

CELLS: The smallest living things... Purpose: To gain familiarity with cell structures and to learn  

E-print Network

1 CELLS: The smallest living things... Purpose: To gain familiarity with cell structures and to learn the differences between plant cells and animal cells. You have already learned about the parts of these cells in class; in this lab we will observe celery cells (plant cells) and human cheek cells (animal

Rose, Michael R.

26

LED and Semiconductor Photo-effects on Living Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have studied LED irradiation effects on plants and animals in the visible to UV region of light from GaN LEDs. The results are as follows. Blue light considers to be effective for pearl cultivation or for attraction of small fishes living in near the surface of sea such as Pompano or Sardine, white light radiation is effective for cultivation of botanical plankton for shells. Other experiments of UV light irradiation attracting effect on baby sea turtle and the germination UV effect of mushroom, green light weight enhance effect on baby pigs, light vernalization effect of vegitable and Ge far infrared therapic effect on human body are also given.

Fujiyasu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takemitsu; Fujiyasu, Kentarou; Ujihara, Shirou; Watanabe, Naoharu; Sunayama, Shunji; Ikoma, Shuuji

27

Science K-12, Living Things Are Products of Their Heredity and Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, health, general science, physical science) and grade level. Concepts regarding characteristics of living things are stressed in objectives for the primary grades (K-5), and reproductive biology is covered…

Utica City School District, NY.

28

Invitations to Cells: Life's Building Blocks. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about cells which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures, extension…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

29

Invitations to Heredity: Generation to Generation. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about heredity and genetics which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

30

Invitations to Interdependence: Caught in the Web. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about ecosystems which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

31

Invitations to the Matter-Energy Cycle. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about matter and energy which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

32

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 -Project Presentation #4 (M32) Date 30/04/2013  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 - Project Final hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things................................................................................................4 hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

33

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 Serious Gaming approach Date 2011-02-29  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious Gaming2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

34

Active Living by Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Members of the public health community and those from the world of urban planning have teamed up to create the Active Living By Design program, and by extension, this fine website. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and an academic home at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health, the program was created â??to increase physical activity through community design, public policies and communications strategies.â?ť On the siteâ??s homepage, visitors can browse through sections that include information on â??Active Living Essentialsâ?ť, â??Active Living Programsâ?ť, and â??Active Living Resourcesâ?ť. The â??Essentialsâ?ť section is a good place to start as visitors can learn about the organizationâ??s major fields, which include information on the links between physical activity, urban design, and health. Visitors who are looking to learn about the specific â??on the groundâ?ť programs will want to look over the â??Community Partnershipsâ?ť area, as it contains information on initiatives in Chicago, Nashville, Orlando, and Cleveland.

35

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers  

E-print Network

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers.Huysmans@gmail.com {Peter.Rigole,Yolande.Berbers}@cs.kuleuven.be Abstract. In the Internet of Things, physical objects of the presented solution is illustrated by a concrete scenario. Keywords: RFID, Internet of Things, ontologies 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

'Things you can't learn from books': teaching recovery from a lived experience perspective.  

PubMed

Mental health policy in Australia is committed to the development of recovery-focused services and facilitating consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery. Negative attitudes of mental health professionals have been identified as a major barrier to achieving these goals. Although the education of health professionals has been identified as a major strategy, there is limited evidence to suggest that consumers are actively involved in this education process. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate students' views and opinions at having been taught 'recovery in mental health nursing' by a person with a lived experience of significant mental health challenges. In-depth interviews were held with 12 students. Two main themes were identified: (i) 'looking through fresh eyes' - what it means to have a mental illness; and (ii) 'it's all about the teaching'. The experience was perceived positively; students referred to the impact made on their attitudes and self-awareness, and their ability to appreciate the impact of mental illness on the individual person. Being taught by a person with lived experience was considered integral to the process. This innovative approach could enhance consumer participation and recovery-focused care. PMID:23020070

Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Welch, Tony; Moxham, Lorna Jane

2013-06-01

37

Yersinia pestis Live Vaccine with Improved Characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The live plague vaccine strain Y. pestis EV line NIIEG widely used for human and animal immunisation proves a high level of specific immunity against both bubonic and pneumonic plague. We constructed an EV NIIEG mutant in the acyltransferase gene lpxM that resulted in the production of a less toxic penta-acylated lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Y. pestis, tested

V. A. Feodorova; L. N. Pan’kina; E. P. Savostina; O. S. Kuznetsov; N. P. Konnov; L. V. Sayapina; S. V. Dentovskaya; R. Z. Shaikhutdinova; S. A. Ageev; B. Lindner; A. N. Kondakova; N. A. Kocharova; S. N. Senchenkova; O. Holst; G. B. Pier; Y. A. Knirel; A. P. Anisimov; V. L. Motin

2009-01-01

38

Little Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey), which is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 dwarf irregular and 4 blue compact dwarf galaxies that is centered around H I-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The H I-line data are characterized by high sensitivity (<=1.1 mJy beam-1 per channel), high spectral resolution (<=2.6 km s-1), and high angular resolution (~6''). The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby (<=10.3 Mpc; 6'' is <=300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as H I map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, velocity-flux profiles, and surface gas density profiles. In addition to the H I data we have GALEX UV and ground-based UBV and H? images for most of the galaxies, and JHK images for some. Spitzer mid-IR images are available for many of the galaxies as well. These data sets are available online.

Hunter, Deidre A.; Ficut-Vicas, Dana; Ashley, Trisha; Brinks, Elias; Cigan, Phil; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Heesen, Volker; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Megan; Oh, Se-Heon; Rupen, Michael P.; Schruba, Andreas; Simpson, Caroline E.; Walter, Fabian; Westpfahl, David J.; Young, Lisa M.; Zhang, Hong-Xin

2012-11-01

39

LITTLE THINGS  

SciTech Connect

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey), which is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 dwarf irregular and 4 blue compact dwarf galaxies that is centered around H I-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The H I-line data are characterized by high sensitivity ({<=}1.1 mJy beam{sup -1} per channel), high spectral resolution ({<=}2.6 km s{sup -1}), and high angular resolution ({approx}6''). The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby ({<=}10.3 Mpc; 6'' is {<=}300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as H I map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, velocity-flux profiles, and surface gas density profiles. In addition to the H I data we have GALEX UV and ground-based UBV and H{alpha} images for most of the galaxies, and JHK images for some. Spitzer mid-IR images are available for many of the galaxies as well. These data sets are available online.

Hunter, Deidre A.; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Johnson, Megan; Zhang Hongxin [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Ficut-Vicas, Dana; Brinks, Elias; Heesen, Volker [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, CP 204, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Cigan, Phil; Westpfahl, David J.; Young, Lisa M. [Physics Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Oh, Se-Heon [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Rupen, Michael P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-11-01

40

Determination of living cell characteristics and behavior using biophotonic methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of methods for the determination of the characteristics and the behavior of living neural cells. A technology which is used is the deep ultraviolet (DUV) modification of methylmethacrylate polymers which leads to a new surface chemistry affecting the selective absorption of proteins and the adhesion of living cells in vitro. The bi-functionality of the modified

Dominik G. Rabus; Alexander Welle; R. Adam Seger; Yasuhisa Ichihashi; Mathias Bruendel; Jeremy Hieb; Michael Isaacson

2006-01-01

41

Can We Make Definite Categorization of Student Attitudes? A Rough Set Approach to Investigate Students' Implicit Attitudinal Typologies toward Living Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the possibility of analyzing educational data using the theory of rough sets which is mostly employed in the fields of data analysis and data mining. Data were collected using an open-ended conceptual understanding test of the living things administered to first-year high school students. The responses of randomly selected…

Narli, Serkan; Yorek, Nurettin; Sahin, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

2010-01-01

42

Descriptive Characteristics and Health Outcomes of the Food by Prescription Nutrition Supplementation Program for Adults Living with HIV in Nyanza Province, Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background The clinical effects and potential benefits of nutrition supplementation interventions for persons living with HIV remain largely unreported, despite awareness of the multifaceted relationship between HIV infection and nutrition. We therefore examined descriptive characteristics and nutritional outcomes of the Food by Prescription (FBP) nutrition supplementation program in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Methods Demographic, health, and anthropometric data were gathered from a retrospective cohort of 1,017 non-pregnant adult patients who enrolled into the FBP program at a Family AIDS Care and Education Services (FACES) site in Nyanza Province between July 2009 and July 2011. Our primary outcome was FBP treatment success defined as attainment of BMI>20, and we used Cox proportional hazards to assess socio-demographic and clinical correlates of FBP treatment success. Results Mean body mass index was 16.4 upon enrollment into the FBP program. On average, FBP clients gained 2.01 kg in weight and 0.73 kg/m2 in BMI over follow-up (mean 100 days), with the greatest gains among the most severely undernourished (BMI <16) clients (p<0.001). Only 13.1% of clients attained a BMI>20, though 44.5% achieved a BMI increase ?0.5. Greater BMI at baseline, younger age, male gender, and not requiring highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were associated with a higher rate of attainment of BMI>20. Conclusion This study reports significant gains in weight and BMI among patients enrolled in the FBP program, though only a minority of patients achieved stated programmatic goals of BMI>20. Future research should include well-designed prospective studies that examine retention, exit reasons, mortality outcomes, and long-term sustainability of nutrition supplementation programs for persons living with HIV. PMID:24646586

Nagata, Jason M.; Cohen, Craig R.; Young, Sera L.; Wamuyu, Catherine; Armes, Mary N.; Otieno, Benard O.; Leslie, Hannah H.; Dandu, Madhavi; Stewart, Christopher C.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Weiser, Sheri D.

2014-01-01

43

Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice  

PubMed Central

Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH) release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor I. Long-lived GH-resistant GHR-KO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1df) and Snell dwarf (Pit1dw) mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH), are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHR-KO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHR-KO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g) of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO2) were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO2 did not differ between GHR-KO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHR-KO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of GHR-KO mice. PMID:23248643

Bartke, Andrzej; Westbrook, Reyhan

2012-01-01

44

Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice.  

PubMed

Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH) release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor I. Long-lived GH-resistant GHR-KO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1(df)) and Snell dwarf (Pit1(dw)) mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH), are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHR-KO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHR-KO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g) of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO(2)) were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO(2) did not differ between GHR-KO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHR-KO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of GHR-KO mice. PMID:23248643

Bartke, Andrzej; Westbrook, Reyhan

2012-01-01

45

How Living Things Function  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on biological organisms and their systems includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

46

Interactions Among Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

47

Organization of LIving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

48

Living Things: Habitats & Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Text and photographs regarding habitats, populations and communities, biomes, niches and ecosystems in general with numerous links to lessons, activities, and organizations on specific subtopics in ecology.

2009-01-01

49

Heavy metal contents (Cd, Cu, Zn) in spiders ( Pirata piraticus) living in intertidal sediments of the river Scheldt estuary (Belgium) as affected by substrate characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metals are transferred into the food web by ground-dwelling organisms, among others. This study aimed to identify the most important factors that determine the bioavailability of heavy metals to the spider Pirata piraticus living in the intertidal sediments of the Scheldt estuary (Flanders, Belgium). At five locations, which represent a varying degree of metal contamination and salinity, the superficial layer

Gijs Du Laing; Nicolas Bogaert; Filip M. G. Tack; Marc G. Verloo; Frederik Hendrickx

2002-01-01

50

Living by the Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Quantitation of an article's worth by the impact of the journal in which it appears is a path to undermining scientific enterprise. Through a process analogous to rating medical care, rating journals can lead to loss of research effort in the most challenging questions. A paper should be evaluated on its own impact, not by some arbitrary score for the journal as a whole.

Michael B. Yaffe (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Chief Scientific Editor of Science Signaling REV)

2009-12-01

51

The Childhood Living Arrangements of Children and the Characteristics of Their Marriages  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses data from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth to examine the impact of childhood living arrangements on the characteristics of marriages formed by women between 1970 and 1989.The focus is on sociodemographic characteristics of marriage that may be taken to indicate a heightened risk of marital stress or…

Teachman, Jay D.

2004-01-01

52

7 Things You Should Know About Your Health Coverage Provided by UHS & Aetna Student Health  

E-print Network

the purchase of several less expensive prescriptions. Aetna Student Health tracks your expenditures so always7 Things You Should Know About Your Health Coverage Provided by UHS & Aetna Student Health Information from UHS and GOG for students enrolled in Aetna Student Health for 2010-2011. 1. Visits to see

Mahon, Bradford Z.

53

Characteristics of elderly people living in non-air-conditioned homes.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to clarify the characteristics of elderly people living in non-air-conditioned homes. A questionnaire survey conducted in Misato city in July 2013 revealed that 96.1 % of elderly individuals lived in air-conditioned homes. Elderly individuals living without air conditioners tended to be men, and those who were unmarried, living alone, or living in an apartment. The results suggest that most elderly individuals without air conditioners lived in multi-unit apartments. PMID:25417009

Kayaba, Momoko; Kondo, Masahide; Honda, Yasushi

2015-01-01

54

Lively Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintaining living things in a classroom requires knowledge and preparation. It also requires the proper equipment and space. There are two primary goals in the study of living things: first, we want our students to respect life, and second, we want them to appreciate its complexity in nature. Observing healthy living things in school accomplishes both goals. This chapter describes the appropriate precautions that should be taken into consideration when bringing living organisms into classrooms.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2002-01-01

55

Science K-12, Living Things in Continuous Change. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, general science, physical science, earth science) and grade level. In grades K-6, objectives for topics of science study include conditions for plants and animals to live, adaptation, conservation,…

Utica City School District, NY.

56

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic investigation of mental phenomena, behaviour and the problems of adjustment to an environment. The  

E-print Network

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic goal of Psychology is to understand the causes of human behaviour. Psychologists investigate how.They examine biological, cognitive and social determinants of behaviour. Psychology is a broad science

Seldin, Jonathan P.

57

Using the Real Thing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program to bring farm animals into the classroom. Topics discussed include using the senses, health and safety for both children and animals, and rewards of using animals in special situations. Talks given include "Similarities and Differences of Living Things"; "From a Sheep to a Ball of Wool"; and "Food from the Farm." (PVD)

Watson, Gwendy

1998-01-01

58

Nature, Education and Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay it is argued that the educational philosophy of John Dewey gains in depth and importance by being related to his philosophy of nature, his metaphysics. The result is that any experiental process is situated inside an event, an existence, a thing, and I try to interpret this "thing" as schools or major cultural events such…

Rřmer, Thomas Aastrup

2013-01-01

59

Words are not things  

PubMed Central

On a traditional view, words are the fundamental units of verbal behavior. They are independent, autonomous things that symbolically represent or refer to other independent, autonomous things, often in some other dimension. Ascertaining what those other things are constitutes determining the meaning of a word. On a behavior-analytic view, verbal behavior is ongoing, functional operant activity occasioned by antecedent factors and reinforced by its consequences, particularly consequences that are mediated by other members of the same verbal community. Functional relations rather than structure select the response unit. The behavior-analytic point of view clarifies such important contemporary issues in psychology as (a) the role of scientific theories and explanations, (b) educational practices, and (c) equivalence classes, so that there is no risk of strengthening the traditional view that words are things that symbolically represent other things. PMID:22477219

Moore, J.

2000-01-01

60

20 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT BROWSERS AND THE WEB Illustrated by Christoph Niemann. Written by the Google Chrome Team.  

E-print Network

and web apps. Then, we'll introduce the building blocks of web pages like HTML and JavaScript, and review20 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT BROWSERS AND THE WEB Illustrated by Christoph Niemann. Written on the World Wide Web to bring the world's information to our fingertips, and put us in touch with people

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

61

GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON THE ORGANISATION OF SEMANTIC MEMORY IN THE BRAIN:IS “LIVING THINGS” AN INNATE CATEGORY?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The organisation of semantic memory into separately lesionable or imageable components must be determined by some combination of genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the relative contributions of these two factors in establishing the functional architecture of semantic memory. By assessing the semantic memory impairment of an individual who sustained brain damage as a newborn, it is possible

Martha J. Farah; Carol Rabinowitz

2003-01-01

62

Texts of Our Institutional Lives: Translucency, Coursepacks, and the Post-Historical University--An Investigation into Pedagogical Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contemporary university's reliance on coursepacks, whether they take print or digital form, is illuminated by Bruno Latour's theories and by consideration of a nineteenth-century copyright case involving noted textbook author William McGuffey. In particular, these contexts remind individuals that coursepacks are situated within shifting…

Pflugfelder, Ehren Helmut

2012-01-01

63

Haptic Characteristics of some Activities of Daily Living  

E-print Network

- ing Company, and Intel Research, Seattle. The authors also thank Diana Friedman and members of Washington I. ABSTRACT Activities of daily living (ADLs) are of interest in rehabilitation, independent to acknowledge National Science Foundation grant IIS-0303750 and support for undergraduate researchers from Boe

64

Demographic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Mobile Phone Ownership and Usage among Youth Living in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The use of mobile phones and other technology for improving health through research and practice is growing quickly, in particular in areas with difficult-to-reach population or where the research infrastructure is less developed. In Sub-Saharan Africa, there appears to be a dramatic increase in mobile phone ownership and new initiatives that capitalize on this technology to support health promotion campaigns to change behavior and to increase health literacy. However, the extent to which difficult-to-reach youth in the slums of Kampala may own and use mobile phones has not been reported despite the burden of injuries, substance use, and HIV that they face. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of mobile phone ownership and use in this high-risk population and to identify psychosocial characteristics that may differentiate those owning and using a phone from those who do not. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of the Kampala Youth Survey (N=457). Data collection took place in 2011, and the survey was designed to quantify high-risk behaviors in a convenience sample of urban youth living on the streets or in the slums, 14–24 years of age, who were participating in a Uganda Youth Development Link drop-in center for disadvantaged street youth. We computed chi-square analyses to determine any significant differences in psychosocial characteristics based on phone ownership and use. Results: Overall, 46.9% of youth reported owning a mobile phone and ownership did not vary by sex but was more common among youth older than 18 years of age. Mobile phone ownership was also more common among those who reported taking care of themselves at night, who reported current drug use and who reported trading sex for money, food or other things. Conclusion: Given that nearly half of the youth own and use phones daily, new research is needed to determine next steps for mobile health (mhealth), including the feasibility of using mobile phones for data collection and interventions with this hard-to-reach population. Moreover, this technology may also be suitable for injury-specific research given that there were few differences with respect to injury-related variables in mobile phone ownership and usage. PMID:25157308

Swahn, Monica H.; Braunstein, Sarah; Kasirye, Rogers

2014-01-01

65

Anthropometric Characteristics of Pakistani School Children Living in Bahrain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background This survey was designed to study the gender difference in physical growth of 1113 Pakistani children (646 male and 467 female)\\u000a living in Bahrain and to compare growth with their Bahraini and Pakistani counterparts. Methods Measurements of height, weight, mid-arm circumference, biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thickness were\\u000a carried out using the standard methods, and the median values

Abdulrahman O. Musaiger; Reshma D’Souza

2009-01-01

66

Living Things in Their Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-contained module on ecology includes a range of fun activities that students can perform in the classroom and at home with family members. They impart important concepts such as observation, identification, measurement, and differentiation.

Houghton Mifflin Science

67

Energy Cycle in Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This diagram shows how energy from the sun cycles through plants and animals. Plants create sugars through photosynthesis which animals can then use for energy. ATP, glucose, and the mitochondria are also explained. Many key terms are hyperlinked to provide more detailed definitions.

2012-01-01

68

String Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

String Thing is an interactive online game in which learners change a virtual string's tension, length, and gauge to create different musical pitches. Educators can use this game as an introduction to sound and before completing any activities on music or building instruments. Alternatively, educators can use this game to review or assess these concepts.

Wgbh

2010-01-01

69

HIV Stigma Experienced by Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) Living With HIV Infection.  

PubMed

Stigma can compromise the health of persons living with HIV. Although HIV is increasingly affecting young men who have sex with men (MSM), little is known about their experiences with HIV stigma. We used narrative data to examine HIV stigma experienced by young MSM living with HIV. Data came from 28 qualitative interviews with young MSM. We used inductive content analysis to identify themes across these interviews. Participants commonly discussed negative perceptions and treatment of persons living with HIV. Stigma could result in nondisclosure of HIV status, internalized stigma, and avoidance of HIV-related things. Some men discussed strategies that might combat stigma. Findings suggest that HIV stigma might challenge young MSM's health by undermining health-conducive resources (e.g., social support) and contributing to HIV vulnerability. Interventions that counteract HIV stigma may help to create environments that promote well-being among young MSM living with HIV. PMID:25646730

Jeffries, William L; Townsend, Ebony Symone; Gelaude, Deborah J; Torrone, Elizabeth A; Gasiorowicz, Mari; Bertolli, Jeanne

2015-02-01

70

Red blood cells Things NaturalThings Natural Things ManmadeThings Manmade  

E-print Network

Red blood cells (~7-8 m) Things NaturalThings Natural Things ManmadeThings Manmade Fly ash ~ 10 of ThingsThe Scale of Things ­­ Nanometers and MoreNanometers and More MicroElectroMechanical (MEMS) devices materials are of considerable scientific interest because some material properties can change at this scale

Wechsler, Risa H.

71

Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Probiotics  

MedlinePLUS

... Menu Time to Talk Tips 5 Things To Know About Probiotics Probiotics are live microorganisms (e.g., ... probiotics. Here are some other things you should know: There is some evidence that probiotics may be ...

72

Internet of "printed" Things: low-cost fabrication of autonomous sensing nodes by inkjet printing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"What if electronics devices are printed using an inkjet printer even at home?" "What if those devices no longer need a battery?" I will introduce two enabling technologies for the Internet of Things concept. 1. Instant Inkjet Circuits: A low cost, fast and accessible technology to support the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. We demonstrated that "sintering-free" silver nano particle ink with a commodity inkjet printer can be used to fabricate printed circuit board and high-frequency applications such as antennas and sensors. The technology is now commercialized by AgIC, Inc. 2. Wireless Power: Although large amounts of data can be exchanged over a wireless communication link, mobile devices are still tethered by power cables. We are trying to solve this problem by two different approaches: energy harvesting. A simple circuitry comprised of diodes and capacitor can convert ambient radio signals into DC current. Our research revealed the signals from TV tower located 6.5km apart could be used to feed 100 microwatts to power microcontrollers.

Kawahara, Yoshihiro

2014-11-01

73

How Things Fly  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the National Air and Space Museum, this site allows users to visit the special exhibit How Things Fly. In How Do Things Fly? the following topics are discussed in a question and answer format: Can you fly?, Air is "stuff"!, Balloons, Animal flight, Airplanes, and Spacecraft. The physics behind flight for each topic is at a general level, making this site an excellent source for K-12 education. Specific science activities, along with recommended reading, are found in the Resource Center. Additional links contain interesting comments and activities for particular topics.

1999-01-01

74

Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

2008-01-01

75

Wondering About Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here you will find facts about and the opinions of an American astrophysicist who practiced in the second half of the twentieth century. The title explains why I did it. I invented some new ideas, I applied them to some astro objects, I computed things with pen and paper; I ended up thinking that I had succeeded in pushing the field ahead a bit. Attracted by Newtonian theory, I did some experiments too. I love hydrodynamics and magnetic fields in space. The math is beautiful, and the objects are stupendous in their brilliant displays. For some reason I meditated on gases between the stars, their pressures and motions. I left the stars to others, believing that their physics was under control. As I grew older, I had to decide whether to direct others rather than just myself and ended up at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics doing both. It was thrilling because I had never had management experience and was flying by the seat of my pants, as I guess other astrodirectors do. In the process, I advised the US government on future directions in astronomy, chairing a number of committees. It is astonishing that the government is interested in astronomy, and it is exciting to interact with the people in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Congress, and the Executive branch who have dedicated their lives to enable the expansion of our knowledge of astronomy. Along the way I studied more abstract concepts in physics, including magnetic helicity and its relation to the winding numbers of nonabelian particle physics. These are topological concepts that I should have learned in grad school but did not. This review has two parts. The first part is for scientists, and covers my life in chronological order. The second part is for laymen who are interested in science. It gives a flavor of my scientific work with no math and a minimum of jargon.

Field, George B.

2014-08-01

76

The internet of things for personalized health.  

PubMed

Advances in information and communications technologies (ICT) enable new personalized health care concepts which are often characterized by four "P" terms, i.e. personalized, predictive, preventive and participatory. However, real world implementations of the complete 4P spectrum hardly exist today. The Internet of Things (IoT) has been defined as an extension to the current Internet that enables pervasive communication between the physical and the virtual world. Smart devices and enabling elements like Near Field Communication (NFC) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology already exist and increasingly will be a mainstream element of our lives. This future vision paper attempts to assess if and how the Internet of Things for personalized health (IoT4pH) can help to facilitate the 4P healthcare paradigm and discusses related challenges and opportunities. PMID:24851958

Schreier, Günter

2014-01-01

77

Doing the right thing by incorporating evidence and professional goals in the ethics consult.  

PubMed

Classic ethical decision-making models are discussed, and two recommendations are provided. The author proposes applying evidence-based position statements to ethical deliberation and suggests acknowledging the differing philosophical underpinnings and goals of various stakeholders, including nurses, physicians, families, institutions, and the nation. Examples are provided throughout. When combined with evidence-based information and consideration of group goals, traditional ethical analysis may help nurses "do the right thing." PMID:23772802

Catlin, Anita

2013-07-01

78

“All of Those Things We Don't Eat”: A Culture-Centered Approach to Dietary Health Meanings for Asian Indians Living in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article applies a culture-centered approach to analyze the dietary health meanings for Asian Indians living in the United States. The data were collected as part of a health promotion program evaluation designed to help Asian Indians reduce their risk of chronic disease. Community members who used two aspects of the program participated in two focus groups to learn about

Christopher J. Koenig; Mohan J. Dutta; Namratha Kandula; Latha Palaniappan

2012-01-01

79

Promoting health related sport by using living lab  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the Living Lab project. Increasing physical activity is one of the main objectives in the prevention and treatment of lifestyle-related diseases. The aim of this project is to develop new innovative services of physical activity for sedentary populations. The services of physical activity will be developed by using a Living Lab. Living

Paula M J Harmokivi-Saloranta; Satu Parjanen

2010-01-01

80

Sources and Formation of the Ribbon Observed by IBEX: ``... Good Things may be Close by''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Taking the first images of heliospheric boundary with Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), the Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) discovered a giant structure across the sky, called “the Ribbon”. The location and the orientation of the Ribbon seem to be associated with the interstellar magnetic field. Fine structures as well as temporal variations^{1} have been found in the Ribbon. While there are first model attempts to explain its location in the sky and its possible formation, the source of this Ribbon is not yet known. It could well consist of several components, for instance, a static component whose source is deeper in the heliosheath or beyond and a dynamic component that is close to or at the termination shock. IBEX data show that the peak energy is around 1 keV, which strongly indicates a close association with the solar wind, either the bulk ions or the entrained pickup ions. Models have been proposed using a distant source region well beyond the heliopause (HP) that extend over several hundred AU into the interstellar medium, in which pickup ions from neutral solar wind produce ENAs by charge exchange. Such a model could produce a ribbon structure, however, temporal variations are difficult to explain. In this alternative model, we concentrate on a population of reflected solar wind ions reflected and gyrating at the termination shock (TS). A large fraction of the incident ions forms a gyrotropic distribution concentrated perpendicular to the upstream magnetic field direction. These ions will charge exchange with interstellar neutral atoms and thus may form a major source for the observed ENA flux, which forms the Ribbon. One advantage of such a model is that it allows relatively rapid time variations of the observed ENA flux. In this model, it is the global shape of the TS, mediated by the interstellar magnetic field, which controls the location of the enhanced ENA intensity as well as the width of the ribbon. The model assumption is that the external magnetic and/or gas dynamic pressure in the outer heliosheath shifts the HP and the TS closer to the Sun. This may result in a narrow ridge of pressure on the inner side of the heliopause. Hence, this would also provide a possibility to remotely sense the global structure of the TS with the Ribbon. We will discuss advantages, limitations, and new possibilities of such a model for the ribbon formation. ^{1} McComas et al, JGR, 2010, in press

Kucharek, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Lee, M. A.; Moebius, E.; Wurz, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Funsten, H. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; McComas, D. J.; Janzen, P. H.

2010-12-01

81

Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate molecular/cellular functions.

Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

2012-03-01

82

Molecular signaling in live cells studied by FRET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. We have used FRET to assess temporal and spatial characteristics for signaling molecules, including tyrosine kinases Src and FAK, small GTPase Rac, calcium, and a membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP. Activations of Src and Rac by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) led to distinct subcellular patterns during cell migration on micropatterned surface, and these two enzymes interact with each other to form a feedback loop with differential regulations at different subcellular locations. We have developed FRET biosensors to monitor FAK activities at rafts vs. non-raft regions of plasma membrane in live cells. In response to cell adhesion on matrix proteins or stimulation by PDGF, the raft-targeting FAK biosensor showed a stronger FRET response than that at non-rafts. The FAK activation at rafts induced by PDGF is mediated by Src. In contrast, the FAK activation at rafts induced by adhesion is independent of Src activity, but rather is essential for Src activation. Thus, Src is upstream to FAK in response to chemical stimulation (PDGF), but FAK is upstream to Src in response to mechanical stimulation (adhesion). A novel biosensor has been developed to dynamically visualize the activity of membrane type-1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which proteolytically remodels the extracellular matrix. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed active MT1-MMP to the leading edge of migrating live cancer cells with local accumulation of EGF receptor via a process dependent on an intact cytoskeletal network. In summary, FRET-based biosensors enable the elucidation of molecular processes and hierarchies underlying spatiotemporal regulation of biological and pathological processes, thus advancing our knowledge on how cells perceive mechanical/chemical cues in space and time to coordinate molecular/cellular functions.

Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

2011-11-01

83

Seeing Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An innovative examination of Rostand's "Cyrano" in an advanced placement program at the high school level is described. The class reads the original play, mostly out loud in class and memorizes three passages; then the film by Steve Martin is shown in class and comparisons are made. (MLW)

Lewis, Flossie

1989-01-01

84

“All of Those Things We Don't Eat”: A Culture-Centered Approach to Dietary Health Meanings for Asian Indians Living in the United States  

PubMed Central

This article applies a culture-centered approach to analyze the dietary health meanings for Asian Indians living in the United States. The data were collected as part of a health promotion program evaluation designed to help Asian Indians reduce their risk of chronic disease. Community members who used two aspects of the program participated in two focus groups to learn about their health care experiences and to engage them in dialogue about how culture impacts their overall health. Using constructionist grounded theory, we demonstrate that one aspect of culture, the discourses around routine dietary choice, is an important, but under-recognized, aspect of culture that influences community members’ experiences with health care. We theorize community members’ dietary health meanings operate discursively through a dialectic tension between homogeneity and heterogeneity, situated amid culture, structure, and agency. Participants enacted discursive homogeneity when they affirmed dietary health meanings around diet as an important means through which members of the community maintain a sense of continuity of their identity while differentiating them from others. Participants enacted discursive heterogeneity when they voiced dietary health meanings that differentiated community members from one another due to unique life-course trajectories and other membership affiliations. Through this dialectic, community members manage unique Asian Indian identities and create meanings of health and illness in and through their discourses around routine dietary choice. Through making these discursive health meanings audible, we foreground how community members’ agency is discursively enacted and to make understandable how discourses of dietary practice influence the therapeutic alliance between primary care providers and members of a minority community. PMID:22364189

Koenig, Christopher J.; Dutta, Mohan J.; Kandula, Namratha; Palaniappan, Latha

2015-01-01

85

Elaphoidella grandidieri (Harpacticoida: Copepoda): demographic characteristics and possible use as live prey in aquaculture.  

PubMed

In freshwater ecosystems, rotifers and cladocerans are ideal prey for fish larvae whereas copepods, due to their purported low growth rate and predatory tendency, are not. We recently isolated the parthenogenetic Elaphoidella grandidieri (Gueme et Richard, 1893) a benthic freshwater harpacticoid, from a fish farm in the State of Morelos, central Mexico and tested its potential as a live prey organism for larval vertebrates. Population growth and life table demography experiments were conducted, in 100 ml recipients with 50 ml of test medium on a diet of Scenedesmus acutus at a density of 1.0 X 10(6) cell ml(-1); the former on live algae alone while the latter on live algae as well as detritus. We also conducted experiments to document the prey preference for this copepod by the larval Ameca splendens (Pisces: Goodeidae) and Ambystoma mexicanum (Amphibia: Ambystomatidae), fed the rotifer Plationus patulus, the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens, and the cladocerans Moina macrocopa and Daphnia pulex. Elaphoidella grandidieri is relatively easy to maintain under laboratory conditions, reaching densities (copepodites and adults) of more than 10,000 l(-1). The generation time ranged between 30-45 days, depending on the diet. The net reproductive rate was as high as 60 nauplii female(-1) day (1). Population growth rates ranged between 0.03 and 0.11 d(-1), live algae being the superior diet compared to detritus. Both predators showed no preference for E. grandidieri, but in the absence of alternate prey they consumed 80% of the harpacticoids offered. The data have been discussed in relation to the potential of E. grandidierias live food for aquaculture. PMID:22315830

Nandini, S; Nunez Ortiz, Alma Rosa; Sarma, S S S

2011-07-01

86

User Empowerment in the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

This paper focuses on the characteristics of two big triggers that facilitated wide user adoption of the Internet: Web 2.0 and online social networks. We detect brakes for reproduction of these events in Internet of things. To support our hypothesis we first compare the difference between the ways of use of the Internet with the future scenarios of Internet of things. We detect barriers that could slow down apparition of this kind of social events during user adoption of Internet of Things and we propose a conceptual framework to solve these problems.

Munjin, Dejan

2011-01-01

87

Compressive force generation by a bundle of living biofilaments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study the compressional forces exerted by a bundle of living stiff filaments pressing on a surface, akin to the case of an actin bundle in filopodia structures, we have performed particulate molecular dynamics simulations of a grafted bundle of parallel living (self-assembling) filaments, in chemical equilibrium with a solution of their constitutive monomers. Equilibrium is established as these filaments, grafted at one end to a wall of the simulation box, grow at their chemically active free end, and encounter the opposite confining wall of the simulation box. Further growth of filaments requires bending and thus energy, which automatically limit the populations of longer filaments. The resulting filament sizes distribution and the force exerted by the bundle on the obstacle are analyzed for different grafting densities and different sub- or supercritical conditions, these properties being compared with the predictions of the corresponding ideal confined bundle model. In this analysis, non-ideal effects due to interactions between filaments and confinement effects are singled out. For all state points considered at the same temperature and at the same gap width between the two surfaces, the force per filament exerted on the opposite wall appears to be a function of a rescaled free monomer density hat{? }_1^eff. This quantity can be estimated directly from the characteristic length of the exponential filament size distribution P observed in the size domain where these grafted filaments are not in direct contact with the wall. We also analyze the dynamics of the filament contour length fluctuations in terms of effective polymerization (U) and depolymerization (W) rates, where again it is possible to disentangle non-ideal and confinement effects.

Ramachandran, Sanoop; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

2013-08-01

88

Selective Impairment of Living Things and Musical Instruments on a Verbal "Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire" in a Case of Apperceptive Visual Agnosia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes…

Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

2012-01-01

89

A Few New Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Citing the website "43 Things" (http://www.43things.com/) and derivatives Learning 2.0 (http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.com/) and California's School Library Learning 2.0 (http://www.schoollibrarylearning2.blogspot.com/), the author suggests other activities to help librarians and teacher-librarians train themselves for leadership in new information…

Valenza, Joyce Kasman

2008-01-01

90

How to Make a Claim to FEMA If you need to make a FEMA claim, the first thing to do is register by  

E-print Network

How to Make a Claim to FEMA If you need to make a FEMA claim, the first thing to do is register by: a. Calling 800 621 FEMA(3362), or b. Online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov, or c. From a smart phone at http://m.fema.gov. When you register, you will need to have seven pieces of information ready: 1

Taylor, Jerry

91

Simple Things You Can Do To Help All Children Read Well and Independently by the Third Grade. America Reads Challenge: Read*Write*Now!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents suggestions for things people can do to help meet the America Reads Challenge of having all children read well and independently by the end of third grade. One of the ways to meet this challenge is through the research-based community reading initiative, called READ*WRITE*NOW!, which encourages students to read and write at…

Chatis, Corey; Thompson-Hoffman, Susan; de Kanter, Adriana; Moles, Ollie; Steele, Shirley; Howes, Sarah; Doyle, Michelle; Colmenares, Margarita; Vosburgh, Leah; Herman, Menahem; Ballen, Jennifer; Arnold, Chandler

92

The Igbo People of Nigeria as Seen Through "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe. An Instructional Unit for Tenth Grade English.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide is intended to aid tenth grade English classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on the Igbo-speaking people of Nigeria. The source material for this unit is "Things Fall Apart," by Chinua Achebe. The guide is a product of an interdisciplinary summer workshop for teachers on development of…

Talley, Odessa B.

93

Things Come Together with "Things Fall Apart."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recommends using C. Achebe's English language novel, "Things Fall Apart," in a unit on tragedy. Provides plot summary and topics for discussion of cultural values and socialization. Notes that besides illustrating character traits, themes and plot structure of the tragic genre, the novel provides an opportunity for learning Nigerian colonial…

Puhr, Kathleen M.

1987-01-01

94

WHAT MAKES THINGS GO, TEACHER'S GUIDE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SIX FIFTH-GRADE SCIENCE UNITS ARE PRESENTED--SOUND AND LIGHT IN COMMUNICATION, LIVING THINGS, WEATHER, EARTH AND ITS RESOURCES, MOTION AND FOREIGN TRANSPORTATION, AND ELECTROMAGNETS. THE INTEREST LEVEL IS APPROPRIATE FOR FIFTH-GRADERS, BUT THREE READING ABILITY LEVELS, GRADES 1, 3, AND 5, ARE PROVIDED. THE TEACHER IS THUS ENABLED TO MOTIVATE…

BRODY, LARRY; AND OTHERS

95

All Things Green  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation by Bob Feldmaier of the Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT) was presented at the 2013 All Things Green conference and discusses the topics of green fleets, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), and PEV charging infrastructure. Provided in the presentation is a basic overview of PEVs and the types of PEVs, factors that affect PEV efficiency and range, the benefits of driving PEVs, the types and costs of installation of PEV charging infrastructure, and information on the federal Green Fleets program. This conference is annual and is hosted by the Macomb County Chamber. Other presenters at this conference came from Clean Light Green Light, Consumers Energy, General Motors, New Haven Schools, NextEnergy, Waste Management, and more.

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT)

96

Spatial and seasonal variations in the ecological characteristics of the free-living nematode assemblages in a large microtidal estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study has determined the ways in which the density, number of species, species composition and trophic structure of free-living nematode assemblages in the subtidal waters of a large southern hemisphere microtidal estuary change spatially and seasonally, and has explored whether those four biotic characteristics are related to certain environmental factors. Based on data derived from samples collected seasonally at

M. Hourston; I. C. Potter; R. M. Warwick; F. J. Valesini; K. R. Clarke

2009-01-01

97

Structure and Function in Living Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. In this particular publication, provided a wide variety of resources to enrich your content knowledge of the characteristics of living things, including their diversity, extinction, and evolution. Other topics include bacteria, plants, fungi, and protists.

Lefever, Mary

2007-08-01

98

Compulsive Exercise: Too Much of a Good Thing? Contributed by Suzanne Girard Eberle, MS, RD  

E-print Network

and osteoporosis). To undo the Female Athlete Triad you must correct the energy (caloric) imbalance by consuming for the lack of estrogen. You will also need to address your exercise habits and coping strategies for dealing

Walker, Matthew P.

99

Plasticity characteristic obtained by indentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dimensionless parameter ?H = ?p\\/?t (where ?p and ?t are the average values of plastic and total deformation of material on the contact area indenter–specimen) may be used as the plasticity characteristic of materials, which made it possible to characterize the plasticity of materials that are brittle in standard mechanical tests. ?H may be calculated from the values of

Yu V Milman

2008-01-01

100

Differences in Adult Day Services Center Participant Characteristics by Center Ownership: United States, 2012  

MedlinePLUS

... Brief Number 164, September 2014 Differences in Adult Day Services Center Participant Characteristics by Center Ownership: United ... activities of daily living The majority of adult day services center participants were aged 65 and over. ...

101

Effects of Facility Characteristics on Departures from Assisted Living: Results from a National Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Assisted living is an increasingly important residential setting for the frail elderly person. How often and why residents leave such facilities are important issues for consumers, for clinicians advising frail patients on their options for living arrangements, and for policymakers. This research investigated the impact of facility and…

Phillips, Charles D.; Munoz, Yolanda; Sherman, Michael; Rose, Miriam; Spector, William; Hawes, Catherine

2003-01-01

102

Some Demographic and Economic Characteristics of the Puerto Rican Population Living on the Mainland, USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report separates Puerto Ricans into four major subgroups: those who were born on the mainland and live either in New York City, or elsewhere in the United States, and those who were born in Puerto Rico and live either in New York City, or elsewhere in the United States. The report places considerable emphasis on those born on the mainland. A…

Jaffe, A. J.; Carleton, Zaida Carreras

103

America's Families and Living Arrangements: 2003. Population Characteristics. Current Population Reports. P20-553  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data in this report is from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the 2003 Current Population Survey (CPS). The population represented (the population universe) in the ASEC is the civilian non institutionalized population living in the United States. Members of the Armed Forces living off post or with their families on post are…

Fields, Jason

2004-01-01

104

Embryo production by ovum pick up from live donors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Embryo production by in vitro techniques has increased steadily over the years. For cattle where this technology is more advanced and is applied more, the number of in vitro produced embryos transferred to final recipients was over 30,000 in 1998. An increasing proportion of in vitro produced embryos are coming from oocytes collected from live donors by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration

C. Galli; G. Crotti; C. Notari; P. Turini; R. Duchi; G. Lazzari

2001-01-01

105

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY SLIDING GLASS WINDOWS AND ELECTRICAL WALL HEATER. ORIGINAL 1-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOW AT PHOTO RIGHT. CEILING VENT TO CHIMNEY AT RIGHT UPPER PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

106

LibraryThing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Books are meant to be shared, so why not share your personal favorites with others around the world? LibraryThing makes it easy to do just this, and visitors can catalog their books online here after creating a profile. After entering their books, visitors can offer their own sage wisdom on each title, and cross-reference their thoughts with others on the network who have read similar titles. Visitors can take a virtual tour before signing up, and there's also a series of discussion boards. Users can catalog their first 100 books at no charge, and LibraryThing is compatible across all platforms, including Linux.

107

Domain knowledge Interoperability to build the Semantic Web of Things W3C Workshop on the Web of Things, 2526 June 2014, Berlin, Germany  

E-print Network

of Things (SWoT) is a new field to combine Internet of Things (IoT) and semantic web technologies. We, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine-to- Machine (M2M), Linked Open Rules, Linked Open Data, Linked Open guidelines not known by the Internet of Things community 1. Guidelines summary We sum up some basic

Gesbert, David

108

Career Counseling: 101+ Things You Can Do with a Degree in Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of…

Eyster, Kathleen M.

2007-01-01

109

Psychology of everyday things  

Microsoft Academic Search

This topic considers the design of everyday things. It begins with examples of bad design. The goal here is to have students realize that human problems and errors when dealing with technology are usually a result of design failure, and that good design accounts for human capabilities. It then introduces concepts and design principles that help us analyze bad design

Donald A. Norman

1988-01-01

110

More about Charging Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the first chapter, you charged things up with excess electrons and saw what could happen as a result. Now we're going to get an idea of how to measure how much charge something has, figure out whether an object is positively or negatively charged, and make up a new concept called the electric field.

Robertson, William C.

2005-01-01

111

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complete Computer Solutions makes available the How Things Work Website. This is an excellent learning resource for anyone who has ever wondered about the workings of items such as oxygen tents or speedometers or materials such as porcelain. The site briefly summarizes a plethora of topics ranging from accordions to X-rays. This site is well worth a visit.

112

74 Published by the IEEE Computer Society 1089-7801/09/$26.00 2009 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING InternetofThingsTrack  

E-print Network

to the real world is the Internet of Things,2 which connects such resources with everyday objects's based on the Internet of Things and its technologies. Their framework for integrating Web services-Essen Heinrich HuĂ?mann University of Munich Perci: Pervasive Service Interaction with the Internet of Things #12

113

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS  

E-print Network

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS George Malaty, University of Joensuu, Finland "Life is good for only two things, discovering mathematics and teaching mathematics". Siméon Poisson (1781-1840) Mathematics for living and living for mathematics are related to the goals of mathematics

Spagnolo, Filippo

114

Developing network software and communications protocols towards the internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most profound changes today is the increase in mobility of portable yet powerful wireless devices capable of communicating via several different kinds of wireless radio networks of varying link-level characteristics. This paper addresses how the design and implementation of future applications and protocols can be facilitated by network programming frameworks. For the Internet of Things, upholding a

Bilhanan Silverajan; Jarmo Harju

2009-01-01

115

Floodflow characteristics of Honcut Creek at State Highway 70 bridges near Live Oak, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

State Highway 70 crosses Honcut Creek about 3.2 miles upstream from its confluence with the Feather River, by three bridges separated by short approach embankments. The California Department of Transportation is planning to replace or widen these bridges; this report evaluates flow characteristics of the existing and proposed crossings. Agricultural improvements on the flood plain and low levees affect the magnitufe and distribution of flow to the bridges. Water-surface elevations of Honcut Creek are affected by levees on the flood plain, a natural channel constriction about 3,000 feet downstream from the bridges, and by high water levels on the Feather River. The average recurrence interval for overbank flow is less than 2 years. A flood with an average recurrence interval of 50 years would be about 19,000 cubic feet per second. For flows of 20,000 cubic feet per second on Honcut Creek, and with present bridge conditions, backwater caused by the bridge is about 0.4 foot. If the left-bank bridge is eliminated, backwater would increase to 0.5 foot. The bridges and approach embankments occupy about 66 percent of the channel. The average velocity of flow at the bridge ranges from 1 to 3.2 feet per second. For present channel and bridge conditions, overbank flows are distributed among the three bridges in a proportion of about 10, 40, and 50 percent for flows between 2,850 and 8,480 cubic feet per second. (USGS)

Blodgett, J.C.

1982-01-01

116

Five Things Right, Five Wrong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a brief description of a young librarians' first six months in the profession. The article lists five things the librarian knows he has done wrong, and five things he knows he has done right.

Morley, Gabriel

2005-01-01

117

All Things Considered: Drug Wars  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This sites is the companion to National Public radio's (NPR) 2000 special on All Things Considered.. The NPR site is a bit modest, but it does offer the excellent radio reports from this week's All Things Considered special series.

2000-01-01

118

Lighthouse independent living program: Characteristics of youth served and their outcomes at discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the outcomes of 455 young people who entered the Lighthouse Independent Living Program during the period 2001–2006. On average, clients were admitted shortly before their 18th birthdays, and remained in the program for just under 10 months. At discharge, 60% had completed high school\\/GED program, 31% were employed, and 33% were independently housed. However, there were significant differences

Mark J. Kroner; Alvin S. Mares

2009-01-01

119

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, and technological. Enterprises are  

E-print Network

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated the time. The Internet of Things is here today, and it starts with your things-- your line's the Internet of Your Things. By implementing a strategy to capitalize on the Internet of Things trend

Chaudhuri, Surajit

120

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

121

First Things First  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Tomorrows Professor Listserve submission quotes a story about time management for faculty. The short story points to the importance of setting aside blocks of time for long-term important things (proposal writing, developing a new course, and writing up your research results) and the tendency to spend too much time on short-term urgent matters, and leave little or no time for reflection and long-term thinking essential to personal and professional success.

Steven R. Covey

122

The Nature of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features interactive tools related to The Nature of Things television show. The tools include different videos and descriptions of a wide variety of subjects. Some examples include biomimicry, human illness, indoor pollution, and other issues affecting humans. The subject area covered is a very wide range, but users studying or interested in the human brain, biology of human beings, or relationships between animals will no doubt find this site intriguing.

123

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal.  

PubMed

Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems, logic circuits and robotics. The molecule also interfaces naturally with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have already been demonstrated. Here, we show that DNA origami can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof of principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully used the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets their cells. PMID:24705510

Amir, Yaniv; Ben-Ishay, Eldad; Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

2014-05-01

124

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal  

PubMed Central

Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems1-3, logic circuits4-6 and robotics7-9. The molecule also naturally interfaces with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have previously been demonstrated10-13. Here we show that DNA origami14-16 can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other17-18 in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof-of-principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT, and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully employed the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets the cells of the animal. PMID:24705510

Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

2014-01-01

125

Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change  

PubMed Central

Introduction Changing the built environment to promote active lifestyles requires collaboration among diverse sectors. Multisectoral collaborative groups in the United States promote active lifestyles through environmental and policy changes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of these collaborative groups and the extent to which they have achieved change. Methods We identified, recruited, and interviewed the coordinators of active living collaborative groups in the United States. We used descriptive statistics to characterize groups by composition, stakeholder engagement, and the extent of environmental and policy change in 8 strategic areas. Results Fifty-nine groups from 22 states participated in the study. Most groups had a diverse set of partners and used a range of activities to advance their agendas. Most groups achieved some form of environmental or policy change. On average, groups reported working on 5 strategy areas; parks and recreation (86%) and Safe Routes to School (85%) were named most frequently. More than half of groups reported their environmental initiatives as either in progress or completed. Groups reported the most success in changing policy for public plazas, street improvements, streetscaping, and parks, open space, and recreation. Complete Streets policy and zoning ordinances were the most frequently cited policy types. Engaging in media activities and the policy-making process in addition to engaging stakeholders appear to influence success in achieving change. Conclusion Although many groups successfully worked on parks and recreation improvements, opportunities remain in other areas, including transit and infill and redevelopment. Additional time and resources may be critical to realizing these types of changes. PMID:23391295

Reed, Hannah L.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Zieff, Susan G.; Eyler, Amy A.; Lyn, Rodney; Goins, Karin Valentine; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara

2013-01-01

126

Cephalometric characteristics of Class II division 1 malocclusion in a Saudi population living in the western region  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe and analyze the cephalometric dento-skeletal characteristics associated with Angle’s Class II, division 1 malocclusion in Saudi population living in the western region. Materials and methods The material examined included 149 lateral head radiographs comprising two series: (1) 85 films of children with Class II, division 1 malocclusion and (2) 62 films of children with “normal” occlusion. Age range of the representing children was 10–13 years. Results In Class II division 1 subjects, the maxilla was prognathic in relation to anterior cranial base. The mandible was normally positioned in relation to anterior cranial base. Upper incisors were proclined and lower incisors were normally positioned. The cranial base angle was not different between the two groups. Conclusions In the western region of Saudi Arabia, Class II division 1 malocclusion has specific characteristics. The presence of prognathic maxilla, in this sample, indicates that the use of head gear therapy might be more appropriate than functional appliances when treating Class II division 1 malocclusion in Saudis living in the Western region. PMID:23960498

Hassan, Ali H.

2010-01-01

127

Descriptive models for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a semantic analysis for Internet of things, a conclusion is drawn that the word thing here indicates actually the thing's information and the Internet here is actually the Internet application. Internet of Things is a new type of Internet application which makes the thing's information be shared on a global scale. Internet of Things has two attributes: being an

Yinghui Huang; Guanyu Li

2010-01-01

128

Capturing community change: Active Living by Design's progress reporting system.  

PubMed

The Active Living by Design (ALbD) National Program Office (NPO) developed an evaluation system to track progress of 25 community partnerships, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). Between June 2004 and October 2008, partnerships documented their actions and accomplishments through ALbD's online Progress Reporting System (PRS) database. All entries were verified and analyzed by the NPO. Results from the PRS suggest that the ALbD partnerships were successful fundraisers, leveraging $256 million from grants, policy decisions, in-kind and direct sources. The partnerships also documented newspaper coverage, TV, and radio air time and they developed physical activity programs such as exercise clubs and "walking school buses." Partnerships were adept at influencing decision makers to create or rewrite policies and improve built environments. Selected policy examples included, but were not limited to, approvals for capital improvements, street design standards, and development ordinances. Partnerships also contributed to the completion and approval of influential planning products, such as comprehensive land use, neighborhood, and roadway corridor plans. The most common built-environment changes were street improvements for safer pedestrian and bicycle travel, including new crosswalks, bicycle facilities, and sidewalks. The ALbD community partnerships' accomplishments and challenges contribute to knowledge and best practices in the active living field. Five years after their grant began, RWJF's initial investment showed substantial and measurable results. PMID:23079260

Bors, Philip A

2012-11-01

129

"The Things That Are inside of You Are Horrible": Children and Young Men with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Talk about the Impact of Living with a Long-Term Condition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited, progressive and life-limiting neuromuscular disease that affects boys. During their lives, they experience a series of medical and surgical interventions. Research reported in this paper took place in England with 37 young men living with DMD and their families and explored their experiences of…

Abbott, David; Carpenter, John

2015-01-01

130

Chemical imaging of live fibroblasts by SERS effective nanofilm.  

PubMed

Reliable and strong surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signatures of intracellular compartments in live NIH3T3 fibroblasts are collected in real time by means of SERS active thin nanofilm (30 nm) on colloidal silica (1.5 ?m). Nanofilm is composed of preformed silver nanoparticles in the matrix of polyacrylic acid, protecting against heating (37 °C) in water, or culture medium or phosphate buffered saline aqueous solution. The SERS enhancement factors (EFs) of the order 10(8) allow single biomolecule detection in the native environment of a single live cell. Primary and secondary SERS hot spots of nanofilm are responsible for such high EFs. A slow SERS EF intensity decay occurs over a broader distance of micron silica with nanofilm, not achievable in a common core-shell model (silver nanoparticle coated with a thin silica layer). Extensive local field EFs and SERS EFs are mainly delivered by prolate silver nanoparticles ("rugby-like" shape). This is achieved if an incident field is polarized along the z-axis and the direction of incident polarization and main axis (z) are perpendicular to each other, not observable in water or on gold. PMID:25311048

Radziuk, D; Schuetz, R; Masic, A; Moehwald, H

2014-11-28

131

Near-term climate mitigation by short-lived forcers  

PubMed Central

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate-forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes, such as methane (CH4) and black carbon, have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and black carbon would likely have only a modest impact on near-term global climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 would be reduced by 0.16 °C, with a range of 0.04–0.35 °C because of uncertainties in carbonaceous aerosol emissions and aerosol forcing per unit of emissions. The high end of this range is only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is relatively small. More realistic emission reductions would likely provide an even smaller climate benefit. We find that the climate benefit from reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated. These near-term climate benefits of targeted reductions in short-lived forcers are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits from a comprehensive climate policy. PMID:23940357

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew

2013-01-01

132

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? 243.9 Section...OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a)...

2013-04-01

133

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? 243.9 Section...OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a)...

2010-04-01

134

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

... false Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? 243.9 Section...OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a)...

2014-04-01

135

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... true Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? 243.9 Section...OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a)...

2012-04-01

136

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? 243.9 Section...OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means? (a)...

2011-04-01

137

Implantation characteristics by boron cluster ion implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, boron cluster implantation (i.e. decaborane: B10Hx+) is regarded as a promising technology for the formation of P-type Ultra Shallow Junction (USJ) because of the equivalent high beam current with less beam divergence compared to the conventional B+ or BF2+ implantation. Also as-implanted and after-annealing characteristics are different due to the appearance of self-amorphized layer by the cluster ion bombardment, which suppresses the channeling and enhances the boron activation. However, it is anticipated that the properties caused by this amorphous layer will vary with different implantation conditions or a presence of Pre Amorphization Implantation (PAI) process, which should be understood well to maintain a good process control. From this point of view, we have measured the decaborane implantation characteristics by a couple of different related conditions, for instance, the beam energy and current. Sheet resistance vs junction depth (Rs-Xj) are also evaluated in different annealing methods with combination of PAI processes. In addition, a brief comparison is made by implanting the different boron cluster ions (i.e. B8Hx+) by mass selecting the ions extracted from decaborane ionization chamber. In this paper, these characteristics of boron cluster implantations are reviewed.

Nagayama, Tsutomu; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Umisedo, Sei; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Aoyama, Takayuki

2006-11-01

138

Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-08-12

139

Adaptations for Independent Living by Older Frail Households.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined how well older frail households cope with requirements of independent living (household operation activities, housing consumption adjustments, health-related activities). Found that those lacking financial resources and informal supports were less likely to cope with independent living requirements and that families carried major burden…

Reschovsky, James D.; Newman, Sandra J.

1990-01-01

140

Personal Control and the Ecology of Community Living Settings: Beyond Living-Unit Size and Type.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personal control exercised by 74 adults from community living settings in Minnesota were evaluated. Individuals living semi-independently exercised more personal control than did residents of HCBS Waiver-funded supported living services, who had more personal control than did those living in community ICFs/MR. Personal characteristics and…

Stancliffe, Roger J.; Abery, Brian H.; Smith, John

2000-01-01

141

Privacy Preservation Technologies in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Since the beginning of the Internet thirty years ago, we have witnessed a number of changes in the application of communication technologies. Today, the Internet can be described to a large extent as a ubiquitous infrastructure that is always accessible. After the era of connecting places and connecting people, the Internet of the future will also connect things. The idea behind the resulting Internet of Things is to seamlessly gather and use information about objects of the real world during their entire lifecycle. In this paper, we consider different approaches to technological protection of user data privacy in the world of Internet of Things. In particular,we consider what kind of security problems are being faced and what level of protection can be provided by applying approaches based on secure multi-party computations.

Sen, Jaydip

2010-01-01

142

IV: When Things Get Hard  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is definitely easier to write about work when things are going well, but it is even more important to write about what happens when things get challenging. The act of writing about the challenging times can be challenging in itself but can also provide invaluable insights into the process of teaching: important for the writer and just as…

Rosenfeld, Malke; Mahoney, Meg Robson; Jordan, Kim; Jackson, Spoon; Gabel, Bonnie; Adams, Holly; Plemons, Anna

2014-01-01

143

Learning by Living: Life-Altering Medical Education through Nursing Home-Based Experiential Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning by Living Project (referred to as Learning by Living) was piloted in 2006 as an experiential medical education learning model. Since its inception, medical and other health professions students have been "admitted" into nursing homes to live the life of an older adult nursing…

Gugliucci, Marilyn R.; Weiner, Audrey

2013-01-01

144

Natural Pigments: Carotenoids, Anthocyanins, and Betalains — Characteristics, Biosynthesis, Processing, and Stability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pigments are present in all living matter and provide attractive colors and play basic roles in the development of organisms. Human beings, like most animals, come in contact with their surroundings through color, and things can or cannot be acceptable based on their color characteristics. This review presents the basic information about pigments focusing attention on the natural ones; it

F. Delgado-Vargas; A. R. Jiménez; O. Paredes-López

2000-01-01

145

Making things alive/Making them move Traditional Animation  

E-print Network

1 Animation Making things alive/Making them move Traditional Animation Interpolating between key it takes for whoever knocked it off the ledge to spiral down twenty flights to attempt to capture. Cartoon cats possess even more deaths than the traditional nine lives might comfortably afford. They can

Jacobs, David

146

Why there is no such thing as “critical discourse analysis”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article argues that there is no such thing as Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in the sense of a method of political or ideological critique based on the application of conventional linguistic constructs. All of us, as language users and makers, are continuously engaged in the critical examination of and response to communication in our everyday lives. The article argues

Peter E. Jones

2007-01-01

147

Wing Sections and their Stalling Characteristics By  

E-print Network

Summary.--Over a period of years a considerable amount of stalling research on various aeroplanes was completed at the Royal Aircraft Establishment and it was considered desirable that the main results should be summarised and reviewed.. The report includes a general discussion of the effect on stalling b~haviour of wing section, plan form, washout, flaps, nacelles, gills, slipstream, antomatic wing-tip slots and Hudson-type slits. The important part that is played by the longitudinal trim and stability at incidences near the stall is emphasised. The relation between wing sections and their stalling characteristics is discussed and it is shown that the stalling characteristics can be broadly predicted from an examination of the form of the wing-section upper-surface pressure distribution at high incidences. The results indicate that vicious stalling behaviou) can be avoided by the use of wing sections towards the tip of fairly high camber (3 to 4 per cent.) and moderate thickness (>12 per cent.). For some types of aeroplanes there are, however, serious objections to tile use of high camber towards the tips; the designer is then advised to avoid wing sections which experiments and theory indicate have particularly bad stalling characteristics. The worst tip thickness for stalling appears to be in the region of 9 per cent. High taper tends to worsen the stalling behaviour and it is advisable to consider taper ratios greater than 2:1 only in conjunction with wing-tip sections having good stalling characteristics. The use of part-span flaps does not appear to cause any marked deterioration in stalling behaviour,

A Review Of Some Taxxing; A. D. Yowo; H. B. Sgvlr; A. D. Young

148

Preerythrocytic, live-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidates by design.  

PubMed

Falciparum malaria is initiated when Anopheles mosquitoes transmit the Plasmodium sporozoite stage during a blood meal. Irradiated sporozoites confer sterile protection against subsequent malaria infection in animal models and humans. This level of protection is unmatched by current recombinant malaria vaccines. However, the live-attenuated vaccine approach faces formidable obstacles, including development of accurate, reproducible attenuation techniques. We tested whether Plasmodium falciparum could be attenuated at the early liver stage by genetic engineering. The P. falciparum genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) harbor individual deletions or simultaneous deletions of the sporozoite-expressed genes P52 and P36. Gene deletions were done by double-cross-over recombination to avoid genetic reversion of the knockout parasites. The gene deletions did not affect parasite replication throughout the erythrocytic cycle, gametocyte production, mosquito infections, and sporozoite production rates. However, the deletions caused parasite developmental arrest during hepatocyte infection. The double-gene deletion line exhibited a more severe intrahepatocytic growth defect compared with the single-gene deletion lines, and it did not persist. This defect was assessed in an in vitro liver-stage growth assay and in a chimeric mouse model harboring human hepatocytes. The strong phenotype of the double knockout GAP justifies its human testing as a whole-organism vaccine candidate using the established sporozoite challenge model. GAPs might provide a safe and reproducible platform to develop an efficacious whole-cell malaria vaccine that prevents infection at the preerythrocytic stage. PMID:19625622

VanBuskirk, Kelley M; O'Neill, Matthew T; De La Vega, Patricia; Maier, Alexander G; Krzych, Urszula; Williams, Jack; Dowler, Megan G; Sacci, John B; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Kneteman, Norman M; Heppner, Donald G; Murdock, Brant A; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Aly, Ahmed S I; Cowman, Alan F; Kappe, Stefan H I

2009-08-01

149

Preerythrocytic, live-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidates by design  

PubMed Central

Falciparum malaria is initiated when Anopheles mosquitoes transmit the Plasmodium sporozoite stage during a blood meal. Irradiated sporozoites confer sterile protection against subsequent malaria infection in animal models and humans. This level of protection is unmatched by current recombinant malaria vaccines. However, the live-attenuated vaccine approach faces formidable obstacles, including development of accurate, reproducible attenuation techniques. We tested whether Plasmodium falciparum could be attenuated at the early liver stage by genetic engineering. The P. falciparum genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) harbor individual deletions or simultaneous deletions of the sporozoite-expressed genes P52 and P36. Gene deletions were done by double-cross-over recombination to avoid genetic reversion of the knockout parasites. The gene deletions did not affect parasite replication throughout the erythrocytic cycle, gametocyte production, mosquito infections, and sporozoite production rates. However, the deletions caused parasite developmental arrest during hepatocyte infection. The double-gene deletion line exhibited a more severe intrahepatocytic growth defect compared with the single-gene deletion lines, and it did not persist. This defect was assessed in an in vitro liver-stage growth assay and in a chimeric mouse model harboring human hepatocytes. The strong phenotype of the double knockout GAP justifies its human testing as a whole-organism vaccine candidate using the established sporozoite challenge model. GAPs might provide a safe and reproducible platform to develop an efficacious whole-cell malaria vaccine that prevents infection at the preerythrocytic stage. PMID:19625622

VanBuskirk, Kelley M.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; De La Vega, Patricia; Maier, Alexander G.; Krzych, Urszula; Williams, Jack; Dowler, Megan G.; Sacci, John B.; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Kneteman, Norman M.; Heppner, Donald G.; Murdock, Brant A.; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Aly, Ahmed S. I.; Cowman, Alan F.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

2009-01-01

150

Department of Chemistry "Some Interesting things about the  

E-print Network

Department of Chemistry "Some Interesting things about the Polysiloxanes" Presented by: Professor sponsored cookout from 4:30-6:00 #12;SOME INTERESTING THINGS ABOUT THE POLYSILOXANES. JAMES E. MARK elastomers, (iv) bimodal network chain-length distributions, and (v) cross linking in solution. Interesting

Mark, James E.

151

WHY ISN'T MY POCKET CALCULATOR A THINKING THING?  

E-print Network

WHY ISN'T MY POCKET CALCULATOR A THINKING THING? Essay, Comments, and Reply Larry Hauser Department: "Why Isn't My Pocket Calculator a Thinking Thing?", by Larry Hauser; "Because Mere Calculating Isn calculator (Cal) has certain arithmetical abilities: it seems Cal calculates. That calculating is thinking

Rapaport, William J.

152

Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

HISPANICS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute One of the leading causes of cancer?related deaths among ... a rare but often fatal disease known as pancreatic cancer. This cancer, which is often detected only after ...

153

The Pleasure of Finding Things out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The pleasure of finding things out" is a collection of short works by the Nobel Prize winning scientist Richard Feynman. The book provides insights into his infectious enthusiasm for science and his love of sharing ideas about the subject with anyone who wanted to listen. Feynman has been widely acknowledged as one of the greatest physicists of…

Loxley, Peter

2005-01-01

154

Internet of things and privacy preserving technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we consider different approaches to technological protection of users' privacy in the world of internet of things. Particularly, we consider what kind of problems and which level of protection can be achieved by applying approaches using secure multi-party computations.

Vladimir Oleshchuk

2009-01-01

155

Dispossession: The tenacity of things  

E-print Network

- ceiver will not want the thing. If belongings that are invested with one's identity do not find heirs or interest among kin or friends, the failure to place them can be a source of grief (Marcoux, 2001; Marx, Solomon, and Miller, 2004). A common reason...4 Dispossession: The Tenacity of Things! David J. Ekerdt The goal of this chapter is to map the problem of dispossession, that is, the parting of people and their things that occurs at the end of the consumptioncycle.As opposedto a focus...

Ekerdt, David

2009-01-01

156

Characteristics of the Colombian armed conflict and the mental health of civilians living in active conflict zones  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the fact that the Colombian armed conflict has continued for almost five decades there is still very little information on how it affects the mental health of civilians. Although it is well established in post-conflict populations that experience of organised violence has a negative impact on mental health, little research has been done on those living in active conflict zones. Médecins Sans Frontičres provides mental health services in areas of active conflict in Colombia and using data from these services we aimed to establish which characteristics of the conflict are most associated with specific symptoms of mental ill health. Methods An analysis of clinical data from patients (N = 6,353), 16 years and over, from 2010–2011, who consulted in the Colombian departments (equivalent to states) of Narińo, Cauca, Putumayo and Caquetá. Risk factors were grouped using a hierarchical cluster analysis and the clusters were included with demographic information as predictors in logistic regressions to discern which risk factor clusters best predicted specific symptoms. Results Three clear risk factor clusters emerged which were interpreted as ‘direct conflict related violence’, ‘personal violence not directly conflict-related’ and ‘general hardship’. The regression analyses indicated that conflict related violence was more highly related to anxiety-related psychopathology than other risk factor groupings while non-conflict violence was more related to aggression and substance abuse, which was more common in males. Depression and suicide risk were represented equally across risk factor clusters. Conclusions As the largest study of its kind in Colombia it demonstrates a clear impact of the conflict on mental health. Among those who consulted with mental health professionals, specific conflict characteristics could predict symptom profiles. However, some of the highest risk outcomes, like depression, suicide risk and aggression, were more related to factors indirectly related to the conflict. This suggests a need to focus on the systemic affects of armed conflict and not solely on direct exposure to fighting. PMID:23171497

2012-01-01

157

Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2013-09-15

158

Where We Live: Fun With Compiling Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will find what is common and what is unique about where we live. Learners will count how many people, pets, windows, televisions and other things exist where they live. Everyone fills in information on a chart and then the group explores the data. Young learners focus on most, least, and simple comparisons; older ones look for typical responses and relationships among categories. For instance, does anyone have twice as many pets as people? Do those with more people mostly have more doors? This works well as a group activity or a display to which passers-by contribute. Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

Terc

2010-01-01

159

9 CFR 203.4 - Statement with respect to the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...provides, in part, that every packer, live poultry dealer, stockyard owner,...

2010-01-01

160

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, and technological. Healthcare providers  

E-print Network

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated the time or budget. The Internet of Things is here today, and it starts with your things--your assets and business intelligence tools. That's the Internet of Your Things. By implementing a strategy to capitalize

Chaudhuri, Surajit

161

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, and technological. Enterprises are  

E-print Network

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated don't have the time. The Internet of Things is here today, and it starts with your things--your line tools. By implementing a strategy to capitalize on the Internet of Things trend with Microsoft Azure

Chaudhuri, Surajit

162

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, and technological. Enterprises are  

E-print Network

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, or simply don't have the time. The Internet of Things is here today, and it starts with your things tools. That's the Internet of Your Things. By implementing a strategy to capitalize on the Internet

Chaudhuri, Surajit

163

Inspecting for Quality. California's Lowest-Achieving Schools are Routinely Visited by Inspectors on the Lookout for, among Other things, Inadequate Textbook Supplies, Dirty Drinking Water, and Evidence of Vermin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes how the California's lowest-achieving schools are routinely visited by inspectors on the lookout for, among other things, inadequate textbook supplies, dirty drinking water, and evidence of vermin. Following the settlement from the case "Williams v. California," the laws known as the "Williams legislation"…

Jacobson, Linda

2006-01-01

164

SPRING THING 2008: " Swamp Feast! "  

E-print Network

SPRING THING 2008: " Swamp Feast! " DATE: Saturday April 19, 2008 TIME: 1:00 PM - `til the evening; Affiliates, Partners and Friends, Plus any high level UCF administrator wanting to feast on fine food

Van Stryland, Eric

165

Quality of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS under the New Epidemic Characteristics in China and the Associated Factors  

PubMed Central

Background Improvement of quality of life has been one of goals in health care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). In China, the epidemic characteristics have changed and transmission is now most commonly sexual contact. However, the assessment of quality of life of PLWHA under new characteristics has limited reporting. This study was designed to assess the quality of life among PLWHA who contracted disease mainly via sexual contact and to clarify the associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Liaoning Province. Sample size (800) was calculated based on the fatality rate and enlarged with consideration on the loss of response. Participants were sampled by tables of random numbers among all registered PLWHA. Questionnaires pertaining to quality of life (SF-36) and related factors (demographic characteristics, social support and network, HIV/AIDS awareness, and behavior factors) were distributed during December 2010-April 2011. 783 effective responses were obtained. Results The average scores of physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and total score (TS) were 66.8±21.9 (Mean±SD), 62.2±20.9, and 64.5±20.2. General linear model analysis revealed that, in standardized estimate (?) sequence, PCS was significantly associated with monthly income, perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, transmission, and ethnicity; MCS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, condom use, monthly income, transmission, ethnicity, and alcohol consumption; whereas TS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, monthly income, transmission, condom use, and ethnicity. Conclusions Quality of life for PLWHA who contracted HIV mainly via sexual contact was worse and both physical conditions and social integration were impacted. Under current epidemic characteristics, efforts to increase social support and enhance the implementation of supporting policy are necessary to improve the quality of life of PLWHA. PMID:23741340

Sun, Wei; Wu, Ming; Qu, Peng; Lu, Chunming; Wang, Lie

2013-01-01

166

Relative Microelastic Mapping of Living Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial and temporal changes of the mechanical properties of living cells reflect complex underlying physiological processes. Following these changes should provide valuable insight into the biological importance of cellular mechanics and their regulation. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to indent soft samples, and the force versus indentation measurement provides information about the local

Emad A-Hassan; William F. Heinz; Matthew D. Antonik; Neill P. D’Costa; Soni Nageswaran; Cora-Ann Schoenenberger; Jan H. Hoh

1998-01-01

167

In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-07-01

168

What is this thing called \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY. Background - Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is supposed to be caused by lack of daylight in winter. Yet the population of Northern Norway, living without sun for two winter months, does not spontaneously complain about depression during the dark period. Aims - To summarize research bearing upon the validity of the concept of SAD. Method - Review of rel-

VIDJE HANSEN; INGUNN SKRE; EILIV LUND

2008-01-01

169

Application of the Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet of Things is not yet very widespread, many people have little information about Internet of things. But, for magical properties of the Internet of things , its appearance immediately aroused people's great interest. This paper, aiming application of the Internet of Things , use AHP to analyze and look forward to prospects of IOT in many fields.

Qin, Xiaming; Zhang, Guoqing

2011-12-01

170

Creating the Internet of Your Things  

E-print Network

Creating the Internet of Your Things Barb Edson General Manager Microsoft Corp. Executive Summary. The Internet of Things, also known as IoT, is one such trend. The Internet of Things provides vast opportunities, but it can also pose a challenge to enterprises. The Internet of Things has kept plenty

Chaudhuri, Surajit

171

Study of Short-Lived Nuclear Decays by Digital Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new generation of pulse processing electronics based on digital signal processing technology has been successfully tested on-line and applied for the first time in particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. Systems based on commercially available Digital Gamma Finder (DGF) modules [1] were used to study the decays of short-lived states in exotic nuclei. Since the DGFs incorporate a RTPU, they

C. R. Bingham; E. Badura; J. C. Batchelder; C. J. Gross; R. Grzywacz; Z. Janas; M. Karny; W. Krolas; C. Mazzocchi; J. W. McConnell; M. Momayezi; M. Pfützner; K. Rykaczewski; K. Schmidt

2001-01-01

172

Past Lives (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site allows students to interactively explore the answers to basic questions regarding fossils. It explains what we can learn from fossils and demonstrates how their characteristics can be used as clues to the past.

173

Connecting your Mobile Shopping Cart to the Internet-of-Things  

E-print Network

and the emergence of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) raisewhich is representati a growing interest for the retail inConnecting your Mobile Shopping Cart to the Internet-of-Things Nicolas Petitprez, Romain Rouvoy of the Internet-of-Things by adopting the REST architectural style and semantic web standards to navigate product

Boyer, Edmond

174

TEN THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU: FERC and the Pacific Northwest  

E-print Network

TEN THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU: FERC and the Pacific Northwest Power Markets Presentation by Eric Lee (EPAct § 1241) "National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors" Federal Siting & Eminent Domain Integration Litigation "Too Much of a Good Thing Can Be Taxing" -- Mae West #12;Too Much of a Good Thing #12

175

Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution  

E-print Network

1 Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution Sara Hachem.issarny}@inria.fr Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is characterized by a wide penetration in the regular user's life and fulfill users' queries for Thing-based measurements/actions. I. INTRODUCTION The Internet of today

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Implementation of the Internet of Things on Public Security  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of the Internet of Things will occur within a new ecosystem that will be driven by a number of key players. The public security as one of the key players is going to make real-time communications will be possible not only by humans but also by things at anytime and from anywhere. This research will present the advent of the Internet of Things to create a plethora of innovative applications and services, which will enhance quality of life and reduce inequalities.

Lu, Kesheng; Li, Xichun

177

Spicing Things up by Adding Color and Relieving Pain: The Use of "Napoleon's Buttons" in Organic Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For some students, organic chemistry can be a distant subject and unrelated to any courses they have seen in their college careers. To develop a more contextual learning experience in organic chemistry, an additional text, "Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History," by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson, was incorporated as a…

Bucholtz, Kevin M.

2011-01-01

178

Internet of Things Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT)  

E-print Network

Internet of Things Peng Du #12;Content Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT) Challenges IPv6 / 6LoWPAN ROLL #12;What is Internet of Things (IoT) Internet TCP/IP Things Criteria #12;Elements A brief idea what Internet ofThings is and why it is interesting to us Appreciated IPv6 is one

Roussos, George

179

Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.  

PubMed

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

2006-10-01

180

Discussion on the Application of Internet of Things in Logistics Production Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the bar code's disadvantage, information flow cann't match the physical flow in the logistics production industry this causes the efficiency very slowly. Internet of Things overcomes the shortcomings of the bar code, it will revolutionize logistics production management. This paper describes basic principles and characteristics of Internet of Things, and discusses the application of it in logistics production

Mao Cuiyun; Han Yuanhang

2010-01-01

181

An unusual long-lived relativistic electron enhancement event excited by sequential CMEs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

unusual long-lived intense relativistic electron enhancement event from July to August 2004 is examined using data from Fengyun-1, POES, GOES, ACE, the Cluster Mission, and geomagnetic indices. During the initial 6 days of this event, the observed fluxes in the outer zone enhanced continuously, and their maximum increased from 2.1 × 102 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 to 3.5 × 104 cm-2 sr-1 s-1, the region of enhanced fluxes extended from L = 3.5-6.5 to L = 2.5-6.5, and the flux peak location shifted inward from L ~ 4.2 to L ~ 3.3. During the following 7 days, without any locational movement, the flux peak increased slowly and exceeded the prestorm fluxes by about 4 orders of magnitude. Subsequently, the decay rate of relativistic electrons is so slow that the peak remains over 104 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 for about 30 days. The drift resonance between ULF waves, which arose from high-speed solar wind and frequent impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure, and energetic electrons injected by substorms could be an important acceleration mechanism in this event. The local acceleration by whistler mode chorus could be another mechanism contributing to this enhancement. The plasmaspheric response to the interplanetary disturbances reveals that the enhanced outer zone is divided into two portions by the plasmapause. Accordingly, the slow loss rate in the plasmasphere due to hiss primarily contributed to the long-lived characteristic of this event. This event reveals that the outer zone population behaviors are dominated by the interplanetary variations together with the responses of geomagnetic field and plasmasphere to these variations.

Yang, Xiao C.; Zhu, Guang W.; Zhang, Xiao X.; Sun, Yue Q.; Liang, Jin B.; Wei, Xin H.

2014-11-01

182

Object Recognition for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a system which allows to request information on physical objects by taking a picture of them. This way, using a\\u000a mobile phone with integrated camera, users can interact with objects or ”things” in a very simple manner. A further advantage\\u000a is that the objects themselves don’t have to be tagged with any kind of markers. At the core

Till Quack; Herbert Bay; Luc J. Van Gool

2008-01-01

183

Embedded security for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of Things (IoT) consists of several tiny devices connected together to form a collaborative computing environment. IoT imposes peculiar constraints in terms of connectivity, computational power and energy budget, which make it significantly different from those contemplated by the canonical doctrine of security in distributed systems. In order to circumvent the problem of security in IoT domain, networks and

Arijit Ukil; Jaydip Sen; Sripad Koilakonda

2011-01-01

184

Sequence-regulated oligomers and polymers by living cationic polymerization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A new trimer (3) and a tetramer (4) of vinyl ethers with controlled repeat unit sequences were prepared through the living\\u000a cationic polymerization initiated with the hydrogen iodide\\/zinc iodide (HI\\/ZnI2) system in toluene at 40C; for example, 4 consisted of the following sequence, H?CH2CH(OnBu)?CH2CH[OCH2CH2CH(COOEt)2]?CH2CH(OCH2CH2OCOC6H5)?CH2CH[OCH2CH2?OCOC(CH3)=CH2]?OCH3, and is a new methacrylate-type macromonomer. The synthesis involved sequential and successive reactions of the corresponding

Masahiko Minoda; Mitsuo Sawamoto; Toshinobu Higashimura

1990-01-01

185

Excerpt: Living at the Pole by Paul Siple  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online article vividly and sensitively describes what it was like to live at the South Pole during Antarctica's long winter night. When a nationwide search was conducted to select a Boy Scout to accompany Richard E. Byrd on on his first Antarctic expedition in 1918, Paul Siple (1908-1968) was chosen, and it profoundly influenced the rest of his life. Returning to the continent several times, he became an Antarctic expert. He was chief biologist of Byrd's 1933-35 expedition and the scientific leader of the United State's first permanent station at the South Pole. Siple was among the small group of men who first wintered over at the Pole, and here describes that historic experience.

186

African Americans and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

AFRICAN AMERICANS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute BETHESDA, MD ? When NFL Hall of Famer Gene Upshaw died of pancreatic cancer in 2008, it was the first time that ...

187

PROVIDE "OUT TOGETHER FEELING" BY SHARING PANORAMA LIVE IMAGE BETWEEN OUTDOOR AND INDOOR  

E-print Network

user wears a head-mounted display (HMD) and watches live video from a pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) camera Feeling equally to both indoor and outdoor users. Using WithYou2, the indoor user wears a head-mounted display (HMD) and watches live video captured by a 360Âş panoramic camera mounted on the outdoor user

Takahashi, Shin

188

14 Conversations about Three Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, the author tries to look forward into the 21st century to divine three things: (i) What skills will researchers in the future need to solve the most pressing problems? (ii) What are some of the most likely candidates to be those problems? and (iii) What are some current areas of research that seem mined out and should not distract…

Wainer, Howard

2010-01-01

189

Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

1997-06-01

190

Comparison of long-term mortality after acute myocardial infarction treated by percutaneous coronary intervention in patients living alone versus not living alone at the time of hospitalization.  

PubMed

Living alone was reported to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There are, however, limited data on the relation between living alone and all-cause mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The Coronary REvascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto (CREDO-Kyoto) AMI registry was a cohort study of patients with AMI enrolled in 26 hospitals in Japan from 2005 through 2007. For the current analysis, we included those patients who underwent PCI within 24 hours of symptom onset, and we assessed their living status to determine if living alone would be an independent prognostic risk factor. Among 4,109 patients eligible for the current analysis of 5,429 patients enrolled in the CREDO-Kyoto AMI registry, 515 patients (12.5%) were living alone at the time of hospital admission. The cumulative 5-year incidence of all-cause death was 18.3% in the living alone group and 20.1% in the not living alone group (log-rank p = 0.77). After adjusting for potential confounders, risk of the living alone group relative to the not living alone group for all-cause death was not significantly different (adjusted hazard ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 1.02, p = 0.08). In a subgroup analysis stratified by age, the adjusted risk for all-cause death was also not different between the living alone group and the not living alone group both in the older population (aged ?75 years) and the younger population (aged <75 years). In conclusion, living alone was not associated with higher long-term mortality in patients with AMI who underwent PCI. PMID:24998090

Nakatsuma, Kenji; Shiomi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hiroki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Toyota, Toshiaki; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Horie, Minoru; Kimura, Takeshi

2014-08-15

191

Metal hydride characteristics by Zr and Ti  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen absorption experiments were carried out using zirconium (Zr) and titanium (Ti) in the form of a metal sponge, strip\\u000a and rod to investigate the metal hydride characteristics. The Zr and Ti sponges showed a high hydrogen absorption capacity\\u000a despite a low reaction temperature. The H\\/M, which indicates the capacity of hydrogen absorption, was measured at 2.0 for\\u000a the Zr\\/Ti

Sung Ho Lee; Jae Hyung Yoo; Hongsuk Chung

2001-01-01

192

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw  

E-print Network

. Politics K. State Department Advisories Returning Home A. Study Abroad Program Evaluation B. Processing of International Programs Florida Atlantic University 561-297-1208 goabroad@fau.edu #12;1 Studying abroad life forever and influence how you live your life in the future. Studying abroad allows you to explore

Fernandez, Eduardo

193

Live Combined Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecium Ameliorate Murine Experimental Colitis by Immunosuppression  

PubMed Central

Live combined Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecium ameliorate murine experimental colitis by immunosuppression manifested by downregulation of TLRs, macrophages, Th1, and Th2 but upregulation of Tregs. PMID:25276470

Chen, S.; Fu, Y.; Liu, L. L.; Gao, W.; Liu, Y. L.; Fei, S. H.; Tan, Y.; Zou, K. F.

2014-01-01

194

Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in flow cytometry, open up new possibilities for analyzing cellular processes occurring in single microbial and eukaryotic cells.

Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

2007-01-09

195

Research: Putting Things Graphically  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs don't always show what the graphers say they do. The most notorious recent example of a misleading graph is the one produced by the U.S. Department of Education that plots National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading scores against total federal spending on education. This graph was taken apart by Howard Wainer and Daniel…

Bracey, Gerald W.

2004-01-01

196

Attachment Security among Mothers and Their Young Children Living in Poverty: Associations with Maternal, Child, and Contextual Characteristics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied variability in mother-child attachment security among high-risk families living in poverty. Maternal sensitivity and the presence of appropriate play materials were assessed. Findings indicated that maternal, child, and contextual variables were significantly associated with attachment security. Furthermore, greater cumulative assets were…

Diener, Marissa L.; Nievar, M. Angela; Wright, Cheryl

2003-01-01

197

101 Things to Learn in Art School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is the first thing to learn in art school? "Art can be anything." The second thing? "Learn to draw." With "101 Things to Learn in Art School", artist and teacher Kit White delivers and develops such lessons, striking an instructive balance between technical advice and sage concepts. These 101 maxims, meditations, and demonstrations offer both…

White, Kit

2011-01-01

198

Creating the Internet of Your Things  

E-print Network

Creating the Internet of Your Things Barb Edson, General Manager Executive Summary Where is your perspective and challenging to drive business value from. The Internet of Things, also known as IoT, is one such trend. The Internet of Things provides vast opportunities, but it can also pose a challenge

Chaudhuri, Surajit

199

Internet of Things in college application prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things to China's development will bring about profound changes in university management and far-reaching impact. This paper analyzes the Internet of things and working principle of key technologies, combined with our college management problems; make things networking technology in the future development of Chinese universities and applications.

Jianhua Wang; Yongsheng Song; Yan Yu; Jun Zhang

2010-01-01

200

Things are Heating Up  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this demonstration, students learn that heat makes air expand and rise, and learn how pressure systems are formed by observing the creation of a convection current. A large rectangular pan, a salad dressing bottle, a small latex balloon and water are required materials. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Phenomenal Weather. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

201

All Things Cretaceous  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This assortment of digital resources relevant to the Cretaceous Period (145.5-65.5 million years ago) covers a broad range of topics and includes an array of media types. A variety of images, maps, visualizations, virtual field trips, databases, technical papers and general information are among the resource types found here. Features include key topics, self-guide discovery pathways, guided activities for students that use internet resources, and a list of internet resources that is searchable by subject or by type of resource (map, activity, etc.).

Aschoff, Jen

2002-01-01

202

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn that it is incorrect to believe that heavier objects fall faster than lighter objects. By close observation of falling objects, they see that it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls.

Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

203

It's the Little Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology (IT) departments are ruled by a kind of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: The big-tech stuff--the operating systems, the networks, the data centers--gets the priority, food-and-shelter attention, while upgrading the backup power supplies, evaluating new projector mounts, and taming that rat's nest of classroom cords fall…

Waters, John K.

2007-01-01

204

SINGLE-CELL PIGMENT IDENTIFICATION IN LIVING PHOTOTROPHIC COMMUNITIES BY CONFOCAL IMAGING SPECTROPHOTOMETRY  

E-print Network

SINGLE-CELL PIGMENT IDENTIFICATION IN LIVING PHOTOTROPHIC COMMUNITIES BY CONFOCAL IMAGING using pure pigments, cyanobacterial and green algae cultures and natural assemblages from hypogean pigments from a single cell in situ into thick samples without isolation and the discrimination

205

Synthetic Ion Channel Activity Documented by Electrophysiological Methods in Living Cells  

E-print Network

Synthetic Ion Channel Activity Documented by Electrophysiological Methods in Living Cells W ion channels that use crown ethers as entry portals and that span phospholipid bilayer membranes removal, metabolism, signal transduction, and osmolyte homeostasis. Ion channels play a critical role

Huettner, James E.

206

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics  

E-print Network

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics Svebor Karaman as long as possible. The aging diseases re- sult in a loss of autonomy. Dementia diseases of the elderly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

207

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose by the rumen anaerobic  

E-print Network

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose fermentation patterns and to increase numbers of rumen bacteria, especially cellulolytic species (Wallace and fermentation of cellulose by an anaerobic fungus, Neocallimastix frontalis MCH3, which is particularly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Breaking Things on Purpose  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

*Materials such as metals (aluminum, iron, copper, etc.), ceramics (silicon carbide, porcelain) or polymers (milk jugs made of polyethylene) are tested by scientists and engineers to reveal certain mechanical properties such as the maximum stress a material can withstand. The stress at which a material breaks is a measure of its strength. In this lesson you will be testing the strength of a delicious material you know as chocolate!

Wpsu

2007-12-20

209

When Things Get Small  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This television program provides a humorous look at the nanoscale world and nanotechnology. It provides an idea of how small a nanomemter is by using familiar objects such as a human hair, peanuts, and others, and discusses the physical laws that govern the behavior of matter and energy at extremely small scales. Other materials include information on viewing the program online or purchasing a recording, reviews, and information on the show's creators and personnel.

210

The Size of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this hands-on activity, learners begin by estimating the size of each planet in our Solar System and Pluto and making each out of playdough or a similar material. Then, learners follow specific instructions to divide a mass of playdough into the size of each planet and Pluto and compare the actual modeled sizes to the students' own predictions. This activity requires a large amount of playdough material per group of learners. Three pounds is the minimum amount required for each group.

211

The Way Things Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides an introduction to the motion of objects due to gravity. Topics covered include free fall and acceleration due to gravity, with or without an initial velocity, and the effects of air resistance. Simple equations are integrated along with a short experiments related to Galileo's classic ramp experiment. A lesson plan for teachers is provided. This item is part of an extensive collection, "From Stargazers to Starships" that uses space exploration and space science to introduce concepts in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

212

The Logical Thing to Do  

E-print Network

THING TO DO .. .. . , ' , , , , ' . .... , " , , . , ,0 " " . . 'I.: . , , . ' Simona , , :, ) , :', ' \\ i ? '.of . ------------ "'~:'!I''!''"'~ ....... ~ .Api; ~,~C.", ., . 7. :. -:,"'" ..... ,. t:r", w::If .? "".t... to attend with her fe.ther, a very high official in the Foreign Office of the old days, now called the l!iinistry of Extra-Terrestrial Affairs. This meant that receptions involved aliens, and she enjoyed this contact with people from far al-my worlds. A...

Mason, Simone

1977-01-01

213

Ten Tips about 23 Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning 2.0--aka the "23 Things"--is a self-paced online learning program that the author designed in 2006 as a one-person crusade to move an entire organization of 500-plus staff onto the Web 2.0 bandwagon. Along with numerous requests to duplicate the program, many seek insight on how to do this successfully. In this article, the author shares…

Blowers, Helene

2008-01-01

214

Homogeneous phenomenon of the graft when using different genotype characteristic of recipients/donors in living donor liver transplantation  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the evidence of homogeneous phenomenon on CYP3A5*3 MDR1-3435 and CYP3A4*18 of the liver graft after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). METHODS: We identified the proportional change of the CYP3A5*3, MDR1-3435 and CYP3A4*18 from the peripheral blood mononuclear cell of 41 pairs recipient/donor with different genotype polymorphisms and 119 liver graft biopsy samples used with the pyrosequencing technique after LDLT. Polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction assay and restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed for genotyping the CYP3A5*3 and CYP3A4*18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). All of the recipients and donors expressed with the similar SNP genotype of CYP3A5*3, MDR1-3435 or CYP3A4*18 were excluded. RESULTS: The final genetic polymorphisms of the liver graft biopsy samples of CYP3A5*3, MDR1-3435 and CYP3A4*18 was predominated depends on the donor with restriction fragment length polymorphism and seems to be less related to the recipient. The proportional changes of G to A alleles of the 119 samples of CYP3A5*3 (included A > A/G, A/G > A, A/G > G, G > A, G > A/G and A > G), C to T alleles of the 108 samples of MDR1-3435 (included C > C/T, C/T > C, C/T > T, T > C/T and T > C), and T to C alleles of 15 samples of CYP3A4*18 (included T/C > T and T > C/T) were significant different between the recipients and the liver graft biopsy samples (P < 0.0001) and less difference when compared with the donors in the pyrosequencing analysis after LDLT. CONCLUSION: The CYP3A5*3, MDR1-3435 and CYP3A4*18 of the recipient could be modified by the donor so-called homogenous phenomenon when the recipient’s blood drained into the liver graft. PMID:24303093

Chiu, King-Wah; Nakano, Toshiaki; Chen, Kuang-Den; Hsu, Li-Wen; Lai, Chia-Yun; Chiu, Ho-Ching; Huang, Ching-Yin; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long

2013-01-01

215

A Highly Specific Probe for Sensing Hydrogen Sulfide in Live Cells Based on Copper-Initiated Fluorogen with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Here we reported the first fluorescent probe with aggregation-induced emission characteristics, namely AIE-S, for the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. The detection system is selective for complicated biological application and the response is fast enough to complete within seconds. Moreover, the probe exhibits the unique advantage of being immune to aggregation-caused quenching which is a detrimental phenomenon limiting the application of most current available H2S fluorescent probes. The detection mechanism was investigated and postulated to be S2- initiated de-coordination and thereafter aggregation of the AIE-S complex. PMID:25285171

Li, Xin; Yang, Chengyu; Wu, Kai; Hu, Yongzhou; Han, Yifeng; Liang, Steven H.

2014-01-01

216

Learn more about the most abundant group of living things!  

E-print Network

common insects. · Learn to make and care for an insect collections Insect Natural History and Diversity://www.sfu.ca/biology/faculty/elle/CGOP_ · Learn to make and care for an insect collections · Explore how the natural history of insects affects are they the same? · Planthopper example (fig 13.6) http://www.everything.co.za/search/imhttp://visualsunlimited.photoshelter.com/image

Mitchell, Randall J.

217

Nuffield Secondary Science, Theme 1, Interdependence of Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nuffield Secondary Science is a set of tested materials from which teachers can prepare courses for students in grades 9-11 (approximately) who do not intend to major in science. The materials are designed for British secondary schools. The Teachers' Guide to the entire set of Themes is described in SE 015 440. Each Theme is a teachers' guide to a…

Marson, J. Eric

218

Living & Dining On-Campus Things You Must Know  

E-print Network

· Anteater Housing Network · University Town Center · Unsure of Status · Contact Housing AdministrativeAccess · Voluntary ("Anteater") Meal Plans · Campus Village · Arroyo Vista · Camino del Sol · Offcampus residents #12 Meals per Quarter 10 Meals per Quarter #12;Hospitality & Dining · Volunteer ("Anteater") Meal Plans

Rose, Michael R.

219

Super-Resolution Video Microscopy of Live Cells by Structured Illumination  

PubMed Central

Structured-illumination microscopy can double the resolution of the wide-field fluorescence microscope, but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed SIM that is capable of 100 nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time frames. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in living Drosophila S2 cells in the total internal reflection (TIRF) mode. PMID:19404253

Kner, Peter; Chhun, Bryant B.; Griffis, Eric R.; Winoto, Lukman; Gustafsson, Mats G. L.

2010-01-01

220

Mapping Biological Behaviors by Application of Longer-Lived Positron Emitting Radionuclides  

PubMed Central

With the technological development of positron emission tomography (PET) and the advent of novel antibody-directed drug delivery systems, longer-lived positron-emitting radionuclides are moving to the forefront to take important roles in tracking the distribution of biotherapeutics such as antibodies, and for monitoring biological processes and responses. Longer half-life radionuclides possess advantages of convenient on-site preparation procedures for both clinical and non-clinical applications. The suitability of the long half-life radionuclides for imaging intact monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their respective fragments, which have inherently long biological half-lives, has attracted increased interest in recent years. In this review, we provide a survey of the recent literature as it applies to the development of nine-selected longer-lived positron emitters with half-lives of 9–140 hours (e.g., 124I, 64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr), and describe the biological behaviors of radionuclide-labeled mAbs with respect to distribution and targeting characteristics, potential toxicities, biological applications, and clinical translation potentials. PMID:23123291

Zhou, Yang; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

2012-01-01

221

Family Living and Personal Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for various projects for Family Living and Personal Living classes. FAMILY LIVING Wayne County Clerk - Marriage License The Knot Martha Stewart Weddings *Travel Planning Sites* Northwest Airlines Amtrak Travelocity Spirit Air Orbitz PERSONAL LIVING (and Parenting): *Alcohol Research* Alcohol and Public Health - CDC MedlinePlus: Alcoholism NIAAA National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism *Birth Control* Health and Wellness Resource Center - - start at this site by typing Birth Control in the search bar on the right of the screen and select "full text articles" and consumer heatlh. It will list a range of birth ...

Ms. Schultz

2007-11-05

222

Engineering living functional materials.  

PubMed

Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID:25592034

Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

2015-01-16

223

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-print Network

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01

224

Living by the calendar: how plants know when to flower  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive processes in plants and animals are usually synchronized with favourable seasons of the year. It has been known for 80 years that organisms anticipate seasonal changes by adjusting developmental programmes in response to daylength. Recent studies indicate that plants perceive daylength through the degree of coincidence of light with the expression of CONSTANS, which encodes a clock-regulated transcription factor

Marcelo J. Yanovsky; Steve A. Kay

2003-01-01

225

Thermoresponsive Polyphosphazene-Based Molecular Brushes by Living Cationic Polymerization  

PubMed Central

Summary A series of polyphosphazenes with molecular brush type structures have been prepared with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities. The polymers show lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) between 18 and 90 °C, which can be easily tailored by choice of side-substituent to suit the required application. A temperature triggered self-assembly is observed to give stable colloidal aggregates with dimensions in the region of 100–300 nm. PMID:24926189

Wilfert, Sandra; Iturmendi, Aitziber; Henke, Helena; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

2014-01-01

226

Thermoresponsive Polyphosphazene-Based Molecular Brushes by Living Cationic Polymerization.  

PubMed

A series of polyphosphazenes with molecular brush type structures have been prepared with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities. The polymers show lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) between 18 and 90 °C, which can be easily tailored by choice of side-substituent to suit the required application. A temperature triggered self-assembly is observed to give stable colloidal aggregates with dimensions in the region of 100-300 nm. PMID:24926189

Wilfert, Sandra; Iturmendi, Aitziber; Henke, Helena; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

2014-03-01

227

A review of "John Donne's Professional Lives" by David Colclough.  

E-print Network

which Donne preached both at court and at Paul?s Cross. Jeremy Maule?s posthumously published ?Donne and the Words of the Law? argues that all his adult life Donne practiced law, even when he was without formal employment. Maule is par- ticularly... in this collection) concerning Donne?s drawing upon his legal training while dean of St. Paul?s to write the charter of a public school still in operation. Essays by Johann Sommerville and Alison Shell document Donne?s career as a controversialist. Sommerville...

Raymond-Jean Frontain

2004-01-01

228

A swimming robot actuated by living muscle tissue  

PubMed Central

Biomechatronics is the integration of biological components with artificial devices, in which the biological component confers a significant functional capability to the system, and the artificial component provides specific cellular and tissue interfaces that promote the maintenance and functional adaptation of the biological component. Based upon functional performance, muscle is potentially an excellent mechanical actuator, but the larger challenge of developing muscle-actuated, biomechatronic devices poses many scientific and engineering challenges. As a demonstratory proof of concept, we designed, built, and characterized a swimming robot actuated by two explanted frog semitendinosus muscles and controlled by an embedded microcontroller. Using open loop stimulation protocols, the robot performed basic swimming maneuvers such as starting, stopping, turning (turning radius ~400 mm) and straight-line swimming (max speed >1/3 body lengths/second). A broad spectrum antibiotic/antimycotic ringer solution surrounded the muscle actuators for long term maintenance, ex vivo. The robot swam for a total of 4 hours over a 42 hour lifespan (10% duty cycle) before its velocity degraded below 75% of its maximum. The development of functional biomechatronic prototypes with integrated musculoskeletal tissues is the first critical step toward the long term objective of controllable, adaptive and robust biomechatronic robots and prostheses. PMID:15679914

Herr, Hugh; Dennis, Robert G

2004-01-01

229

Parkinson's Disease: To Live or Die by Autophagy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal survival continues to be the subject of intensive research efforts as the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases rises. Amid a complex mélange of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to disease manifestation, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the underlying signaling mechanisms that regulate neuronal survival. A recent study by Yang et al. sheds new light on an intracellular quality-control system that regulates the constitutive abundance of a neuronal survival factor through chaperone-mediated autophagy and links the deregulation of this pathway to Parkinson’s disease. Although the primary function of autophagy in most cell types has commonly been thought to be an adaptive response to starvation, it has been proposed that proper functioning of this system is essential for neuronal survival and that its deregulation leads to neurodegeneration.

Isabella Irrcher (University of Ottawa; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine REV)

2009-04-07

230

Production of a short-lived filament by a surge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large surge was observed on September 17, 1971 part of which, after travelling 200,000 km across the surface, returned to the surface to form a filament. The filament lasted about 30 minutes, then rose up and returned to the source of the surge. This was interpreted as the filling of a semi-stable magnetic trap. Analysis of the microwave radio burst showed it to have been produced by a source optically thick at 8,800 MHz, with area 4 (arc min)squared and T approximately 275,000 deg, N squared sub eV approximately 7 x 10 to the 48th power. The soft x-ray burst showed a component at 12 x 1,00.000 deg with N squared sub eV approximately 3 x 10 to the 48th power.

Zirin, H.

1976-01-01

231

A long-lived lunar dynamo powered by core crystallization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Moon does not possess an internally generated magnetic field at the present day, but extensive evidence shows that such a field existed between at least 4.2 and 3.56 Ga ago. The existence of a metallic lunar core is now firmly established, and we investigate the influence of inner core growth on generating a lunar core dynamo. We couple the results of a 3-D spherical thermochemical convection model of the lunar mantle to a 1-D thermodynamic model of its core. The energy and entropy budget of the core are computed to determine the inner core growth rate and its efficiency to power a dynamo. Sulfur is considered to be the main alloying element and we investigate how different sulfur abundances and initial core temperatures affect the model outcomes. For reasonable initial conditions, a solid inner core between 100 and 200 km is always produced. During its growth, a surface magnetic field of about 0.3 ?T is generated and is predicted to last several billion years. Though most simulations predict the existence of a core dynamo at the present day, one way to stop magnetic field generation when the inner core is growing is by a transition between a bottom-up and top-down core crystallization scheme when the sulfur content becomes high enough in the outer core. According to this hypothesis, a model with about 6 to 8 wt.% sulfur in the core would produce a 120-160 km inner core and explain the timing of the lunar dynamo as constrained by paleomagnetic data.

Laneuville, M.; Wieczorek, M. A.; Breuer, D.; Aubert, J.; Morard, G.; Rückriemen, T.

2014-09-01

232

Career counseling: 101+ things you can do with a degree in biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of this discussion is to assist biology students and the career counselors who work with them in identifying satisfying careers that build upon their interest and foundation in biology. The categories of career options include research, healthcare, teaching, science writing, administration/management, government, industry, and miscellaneous careers that do not fit into the other categories.

Kathleen M. Eyster (Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

2007-12-01

233

Rock avalanches caused by earthquakes: Source characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Study of a worldwide sample of historical earthquakes showed that slopes most susceptible to catastrophic rock avalanches were higher than 150 meters and steeper than 25 degrees. The slopes were undercut by fluvial or glacial erosion, were composed ofintensely fractured rock, and exhibited at least one other indicator of low strength or potential instability.

Keefer, D.K.

1984-01-01

234

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated, and technological. City leaders are  

E-print Network

Concerns over complexity: the Internet of Things (IoT) can seem overly futuristic, complicated are reluctant to invest precious resources, or simply don't have the time or budget. The Internet of Things and business intelligence tools. That's the Internet of Your Things. By implementing a strategy to capitalize

Chaudhuri, Surajit

235

Some characteristics of protein precipitation by salts.  

PubMed

The solubilities of lysozyme, alpha-chymotrypsin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied in aqueous electrolyte solution as a function of ionic strength, pH, the chemical nature of salt, and initial protein concentration. Compositions were measured for both the supernatant phase and the precipitate phase at 25 degrees C. Salts studied were sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium phosphate. For lysozyme, protein concentrations in supernatant and precipitate phases are independent of the initial protein concentration; solubility can be represented by the Cohn salting-out equation. Lysozyme has a minimum solubility around pH 10, close to its isoelectric point (pH 10.5). The effectiveness of the three salts studied for precipitation were in the sequence sulfate > phosphate > chloride, consistent with the Hofmeister series. However, for alpha-chymotrypsin and BSA, initial protein concentration affects the apparent equillibrium solubility. For these proteins, experimental results show that the compositions of the precipitate phase are also affected by the initial protein concentration. We define a distribution coefficient kappa(e) to represent the equilibrium ratio of the protein concentration in the supernatant phase to that in the precipitate phase. When the salt concentration is constant, the results show that, for lysozyme, the protein concentrations in both phases are independent of the initial protein concentrations, and thus kappa(e) is a constant. For alpha-chymotrypsin and BSA, their concentrations in both phases are nearly proportional to the initial protein concentrations, and therefore, for each protein, at constant salt concentration, the distribution coefficient kappa(e) is independent of the initial protein concentration. However, for both lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsin, the distribution coefficient falls with increasing salt concentration. These results indicate that care must be used in the definition of solubility. Solubility is appropriate when the precipitate phase is pure, but when it is not, the distribution coefficient better describes the phase behavior. PMID:18601066

Shih, Y C; Prausnitz, J M; Blanch, H W

1992-12-01

236

Writing social psychology: fictional things and unpopulated texts.  

PubMed

This paper presents the author's position on the question how to write social psychology. It reflects the author's long-term interest in rhetoric and his more recent concerns about the writing of social scientists. The author argues that social psychologists tend to produce unpopulated texts, writing about 'fictional things' rather than people. Social psychologists assume that their technical terms are more precise than ordinary language terms. The author contests this assumption. He suggests that when it comes to describing human actions, ordinary language on the whole tends to be more precise. The paper analyses why this should be the case, drawing on ideas from linguistics and Vaihinger's notion of fictions. The author presents examples to show how psychological writers, by using passives and nominals, can omit information about the agents of action and the nature of the actions that they are performing. Although their texts may appear impressively technical, they can, in fact, be highly imprecise. Moreover, social psychologists, by using this nominal style of writing, tend to write about processes as if they were things and then attribute actions to these things. In so doing, they create 'fictional things', which they treat as if they were real things. The author offers six recommendations for writing in simpler, clearer ways. PMID:21366609

Billig, Michael

2011-03-01

237

Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sometimes a single word changes everything. In his groundbreaking book "Choice Words", Peter Johnston demonstrated how the things teachers say (and don't say) have surprising consequences for the literate lives of students. Now, in "Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives", Peter shows how the words teachers choose affect the worlds students…

Johnston, Peter H.

2012-01-01

238

Space and living conditions in Poland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space and living conditions are interesting both from the point of view of theory and practice. Social egalitarianism occupies much space in political declarations and programs. It is related, among other things, to the need to reduce spatial disparities in living conditions. Irrespective of the degree of feasibility of such expectations, it should be recognized that there is a permanent

Maria Ciechocinska

1988-01-01

239

How Things Work: a Novel Approach for Teaching Physics to Non-Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How Things Work has been taught at the University of Virginia for the past 5 years as an introduction to the physics of everyday life. This course focuses on common objects and looks within them for the physics that makes them work. How Things Work is conceptual in character, requiring the students to think about the world around them and to generalize ideas discussed in class and in the text (Louis A. Bloomfield, How Things Work: the Physics of Everyday Life) (John Wiley, New York, 1997). to things they encounter in their lives. It has been extremely successful at UVA, attracting 500 students each semester and giving over 40% of the 9,000 students in the College of Arts and Sciences a one or two semester introduction to physics before they graduate.

Bloomfield, Louis

1997-04-01

240

How Things Work: a Novel Approach for Teaching Physics to Non-Scientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How Things Work has been taught at the University of Virginia for the past 5 years as an introduction to the physics of everyday life. This course focuses on common objects and looks within them for the physics that makes them work. How Things Work is conceptual in character, requiring the students to think about the world around them and to generalize ideas discussed in class and in the text (Louis A. Bloomfield, How Things Work: the Physics of Everyday Life) (John Wiley, New York, 1997). to things they encounter in their lives. It has been extremely successful at UVA, attracting 500 students each semester and giving over 40% of the 9,000 students in the College of Arts and Sciences a one or two semester introduction to physics before they graduate.

Bloomfield, Louis

1996-11-01

241

Expectations about future use of long-term services and supports vary by current living arrangement.  

PubMed

Most Americans know little about options for long-term services and supports and underestimate their likely future needs for such assistance. Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, we examined expectations about future use of long-term services and supports among adults ages 40-65 and how these expectations varied by current living arrangement. We found differences by living arrangement in expectations about both future need for long-term services and supports and who would provide such care if needed. Respondents living with minor children were the least likely to expect to need long-term services and supports and to require paid care if the need arose. In contrast, respondents living alone were the most likely to expect that it was "very likely" that they would need long-term services and supports and to rely on paid care. Overall, we found a disconnect between expectations of use and likely future reality: 60 percent of respondents believed that they were unlikely to need long-term services and supports in the future, whereas the evidence suggests that nearly 70 percent of older adults will need them at some point. These findings both underscore the need for programs that encourage people to plan for long-term services and supports and indicate that information about living arrangements can be useful in developing and targeting such programs. PMID:25561642

Henning-Smith, Carrie E; Shippee, Tetyana P

2015-01-01

242

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... of residences participating in the research have lower fees and half have higher fees. The rental rate includes the base rent and service fees charged by the assisted living community. While 86. ...

243

Perceived Importance of Various Job Characteristics by West Point Graduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relative importance of various job characteristics to a select group of Army officers. Additionally, the study seeks to see if a need structure posited by Maslow exists among military officers. (Author/RK)

McLaughlin, Gerald W.; Butler, Richard P.

1973-01-01

244

Increased Surface Fatigue Lives of Spur Gears by Application of a Coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hard coatings have potential for increasing gear surface fatigue lives. Experiments were conducted using gears both with and without a metal-containing, carbonbased coating. The gears were case-carburized AISI 9310 steel spur gears. Some gears were provided with the coating by magnetron sputtering. Lives were evaluated by accelerated life tests. For uncoated gears, all of fifteen tests resulted in fatigue failure before completing 275 million revolutions. For coated gears, eleven of the fourteen tests were suspended with no fatigue failure after 275 million revolutions. The improved life owing to the coating, approximately a six-fold increase, was a statistically significant result.

Krantz, Timothy L.; Cooper, Clark V.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Hansen, Bruce D.

2003-01-01

245

The influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure on the overall health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background There remains limited evidence on how armed conflict affects overall physical and mental well-being rather than specific physical or mental health conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on general physical and mental health in Southern Sudan which is emerging from 20 years of armed conflict. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1228 adults was conducted in November 2007 in the town of Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the associations and relative influence of variables in three models of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure, on general physical and mental health status. These models were run separately and also as a combined model. Data quality and the internal consistency of the health status instrument (SF-8) were assessed. Results The variables in the multivariate analysis (combined model) with negative coefficients of association with general physical health and mental health (i.e. worse health), respectively, were being female (coef. -2.47; -2.63), higher age (coef.-0.16; -0.17), absence of soap in the household (physical health coef. -2.24), and experiencing within the past 12 months a lack of food and/or water (coef. -1.46; -2.27) and lack of medical care (coef.-3.51; -3.17). A number of trauma variables and cumulative exposure to trauma showed an association with physical and mental health (see main text for data). There was limited variance in results when each of the three models were run separately and when they were combined, suggesting the pervasive influence of these variables. The SF-8 showed good data quality and internal consistency. Conclusions This study provides evidence on the pervasive influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on the general physical and mental health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan, and highlights the importance of addressing all these influences on overall health. PMID:20799956

2010-01-01

246

Reconstructions of human history by mapping dental markers in living Eurasian populations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using advances in gene geography and anthropophenetics, the phenogeographical method for anthropological research was initiated and developed using dental data. Statistical and cartographical analyses are provided for 498 living Eurasian populations. Mapping principal components supplied evidence for the phene pool structure in Eurasian populations, and for reconstructions of Homo sapiens history on the continent. Longitudinal variability seems to be the most important regularity revealed by principal components analysis (PCA) and mapping, indicating the division of the whole area into western and eastern main provinces. So, the most ancient scenario in the history of Eurasian populations developed from two perspective different groups: a western group related to ancient populations of West Asia and an eastern one rooted in ancestry in South and/or East Asia. In spite of the enormous territory and the revealed divergence, the populations of the continent have undergone wide scale and intensive timeespace interaction. Many details in the revealed landscapes are background to different historical events. Migrations and assimilation are two essential phenomena in Eurasian history: the widespread of the western combination through the whole continent to the Pacific coastline and the movement of the paradoxical combinations of eastern and western markers from South or Central Asia to the east and west. Taking into account that no additional eastern combinations in the total variation in Asian groups have been found, but that mixed or western markers' sets and that eastern dental characteristics are traced in Asia since Homo erectus, the assumption is made in favour of the hetero-level assimilation in the eastern province and of net-like evolution of H. sapiens.

Kashibadze, Vera F.; Nasonova, Olga G.; Nasonov, Dmitry S.

2013-01-01

247

Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate  

E-print Network

the national average in the expenditure categories of groceries, utilities, transportation, and health care and by Category Composite index Groceries Housing Utilities Transportation Health Care Misc. Morgantown, WV 105, transportation, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. #12;2 Cost of Living by Expenditure Category

Mohaghegh, Shahab

248

Boosting the Sensitivity of Ligand-Protein Screening by NMR of Long-Lived States  

E-print Network

concentrations as small as 10 M. Our method is illustrated by screening of inhibitors of a target for cancer for established T1 methods, thus saving on costly proteins. The new LLS method was applied to the screeningBoosting the Sensitivity of Ligand-Protein Screening by NMR of Long-Lived States Nicola Salvi

249

A Sourcebook for Energy and the Way We Live. Courses by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide presents teaching suggestions and lists resources to be used with the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Article Booklet (SO 012…

Elwood, Ann

250

Energy and the Way We Live. A Courses by Newspaper Reader.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book of readings and a study guide on energy is part of the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Source Book (SO 012 722) and the…

Kranzberg, Melvin, Ed.; And Others

251

Orca Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The brainchild of orca biologist Dr. Paul Spong, this Nature Network Web site aims to "relay live sound and images of the orcas in the natural environment of Hanson Island," near Vancouver Island, Canada. Live sound and image feeds are available at 56K and 300K connections, and, by completing a simple registration, visitors will be alerted via email whenever orcas are near the cameras and mikes. Click on Highlights 2000 to see and hear past Web casts of orcas activity. This Web site links to others that relay live images and sounds from animals located around the world.

252

Economic Consequences Incurred by Living Kidney Donors: A Canadian Multi-Center Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Some living kidney donors incur economic consequences as a result of donation; however, these costs are poorly quantified. We developed a framework to comprehensively assess economic consequences from the donor perspective including out-of-pocket cost, lost wages and home productivity loss. We prospectively enrolled 100 living kidney donors from seven Canadian centers between 2004 and 2008 and collected and valued economic consequences ($CAD 2008) at 3 months and 1 year after donation. Almost all (96%) donors experienced economic consequences, with 94% reporting travel costs and 47% reporting lost pay. The average and median costs of lost pay were $2144 (SD 4167) and $0 (25th–75th percentile 0, 2794), respectively. For other expenses (travel, accommodation, medication and medical), mean and median costs were $1780 (SD 2504) and $821 (25th–75th percentile 242, 2271), respectively. From the donor perspective, mean cost was $3268 (SD 4704); one-third of donors incurred cost >$3000, and 15% >$8000. The majority of donors (83%) reported inability to perform usual household activities for an average duration of 33 days; 8% reported out-of-pocket costs for assistance with these activities. The economic impact of living kidney donation for some individuals is large. We advocate for programs to reimburse living donors for their legitimate costs. In a prospective costing study, the authors find that economic consequences incurred by living kidney donors are frequent and nontrivial, and a notable proportion of donors experience significant costs. PMID:24597854

Klarenbach, S; Gill, J S; Knoll, G; Caulfield, T; Boudville, N; Prasad, G V R; Karpinski, M; Storsley, L; Treleaven, D; Arnold, J; Cuerden, M; Jacobs, P; Garg, A X

2014-01-01

253

Dynamic Imaging of Genomic Loci in Living Human Cells by an Optimized CRISPR/Cas System  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The spatiotemporal organization and dynamics of chromatin play critical roles in regulating genome function. However, visualizing specific, endogenous genomic loci remains challenging in living cells. Here, we demonstrate such an imaging technique by repurposing the bacterial CRISPR/Cas system. Using an EGFP-tagged endonuclease-deficient Cas9 protein and a structurally optimized small guide (sg) RNA, we show robust imaging of repetitive elements in telomeres and coding genes in living cells. Furthermore, an array of sgRNAs tiling along the target locus enables the visualization of non-repetitive genomic sequences. Using this method, we have studied telomere dynamics during elongation or disruption, the subnuclear localization of the MUC4 loci, the cohesion of replicated MUC4 loci on sister chromatids, and their dynamic behaviors during mitosis. This CRISPR imaging tool has potential to significantly improve the capacity to study the conformation and dynamics of native chromosomes in living human cells. PMID:24360272

Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Cimini, Beth A.; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Zhang, Wei; Li, Gene-Wei; Park, Jason; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Qi, Lei S.; Huang, Bo

2014-01-01

254

Fundamental characteristics of the QFP measured by the dc SQUID  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the fundamental characteristics of the Quantum Flux Parametron (QFP) measured by a new method in which the output signals of the QFP are detected with a dc SQUID. The dc SQUID linearly and continuously converts the output current of the QFP to voltage, allowing the output signal of the QFP to be measured as the voltage of the dc SQUID. Thus, the fundamental characteristics of the QFP have been experimentally confirmed in detail.

Shimizu, N.; Harada, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Hosoya, M. (Quantum Magneto Flux Logic Project, Research Development Corp. of Japan, 1-280 Higashi-koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185 (JP)); Goto, E. (Dept. of Information Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (JP))

1989-06-01

255

Dietary Intake, Anthropometric Characteristics, and Iron and Vitamin D Status of Female Adolescent Ballet Dancers Living in New Zealand.  

PubMed

Ballet dancing is a multi-faceted activity requiring muscular power, strength, endurance, flexibility and agility; necessitating demanding training schedules. Furthermore dancers may be under aesthetic pressure to maintain a lean physique, and adolescent dancers require extra nutrients for growth and development. This cross-sectional study investigated the nutritional status of 47 female adolescent ballet dancers (13-18 years) living in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants who danced at least one hour per day five days per week completed a 4-day estimated food record, anthropometric measurements (Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry) and hematological analysis (iron and vitamin D). Mean BMI was 19.7 ± 2.4kg/m2 and percentage body fat, 23.5 ± 4.1%. The majority (89.4%) of dancers had a healthy weight (5th-85th percentile) using BMI-for-age growth charts. Food records showed a mean energy intake of 8097.3 ± 2155.6kJ/day (48.9% carbohydrate, 16.9% protein, 33.8% fat, 14.0% saturated fat). Mean carbohydrate and protein intakes were 4.8 ± 1.4 and 1.6 ± 0.5g/kg/day respectively. Over half (54.8%) of dancers consumed less than 5g carbohydrate/kg/day, and 10 (23.8%) less than 1.2 g protein/kg/day. Over 60% consumed less than the estimated average requirement for calcium, folate, magnesium and selenium. Thirteen (28.3%) dancers had suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin (SF) <20?g/L). Of these, four had iron deficiency (SF<12?g/L, hemoglobin (Hb) ?120g/L) and one iron deficiency anemia (SF<12?g/L, Hb<120g/L). Mean serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was 75.1 ± 18.6nmol/L, 41 (91.1%) had concentrations above 50nmol/L. Female adolescent ballet dancers are at risk of iron deficiency, and possibly inadequate nutrient intakes. PMID:25386731

Beck, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Sarah; Foskett, Andrew; Conlon, Cathryn A; von Hurst, Pamela R

2014-11-10

256

Musical Meaning in the Lives of Those Affected by the Holocaust: Implications for Music Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study investigated the role of music in the lives of those affected by the Holocaust. Participants were identified through purposeful and snowball sampling techniques, and a total of five were selected based on their connection to the Holocaust. Participants included those incarcerated in camps and ghettos, those who escaped…

Cunningham, Deborah A.

2014-01-01

257

Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

2012-01-01

258

Perceived Aspects of Home Environment and Home Modifications by Older People Living in Rural Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationships between the “perceived aspects” of current home environment of elderly people living in rural areas and their home modification behavior. To investigate this perception, home satisfaction, perception of home capability, and home safety were used as perceived aspects of the home. Data were collected by a questionnaire. The response rate was 43.1%, with 317 eligible

Mira Ahn; Asha L. Hegde

2011-01-01

259

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 What is Compost? Compost is the product of a biological process

Wolfe, Patrick J.

260

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011 Americans.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 Compost Basics Why Compost? 1 Emissions avoidance from compost

Wolfe, Patrick J.

261

Multicolor Live-Cell Chemical Imaging by Isotopically Edited Alkyne Vibrational Palette  

E-print Network

Multicolor Live-Cell Chemical Imaging by Isotopically Edited Alkyne Vibrational Palette Zhixing ABSTRACT: Vibrational imaging such as Raman microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing a variety-free modality, recent advance of coupling alkyne vibrational tags with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

Hone, James

262

PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION BY FREE-LIVING ORGANISMS: APPLICATIONS OF A SIGMOIDAL MODEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of contaminants by free-living organisms has traditionally been de- termined with permutations of the deterministic model: Ct = Ce(1 - e -kt). However, studies uti- lizing a variety of species and exposure scenarios now suggest that significant deviations may occur from this classic form. In many cases noted to date, these deviations have involved a sigmoidal pat- tern

I. Lehr Brisbin; Michael C. Newman; Susan G. McDowell; Eric L. Peters

1990-01-01

263

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM SHOWING 6-LIGHT FRONT DOOR FLANKED BY ONE OF TWO 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT SASH WINDOWS AT PHOTO RIGHT, AND OPEN DOORWAY TO BEDROOM NUMBER ONE (AND BEDROOM NUMBER TWO IN BACKGROUND) AT PHOTO LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

264

Recall of a Live and Personally Experienced Eyewitness Event by Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to (a) extend previous eyewitness research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using a live and personally experienced event; (b) examine whether witnesses with ASD demonstrate a facilitative effect in memory for self- over other-performed actions; (c) explore source monitoring abilities by witnesses with ASD in…

Maras, Katie L.; Memon, Amina; Lambrechts, Anna; Bowler, Dermot M.

2013-01-01

265

Dry amyloid fibril assembly in a yeast prion peptide is mediated by long-lived structures  

E-print Network

Dry amyloid fibril assembly in a yeast prion peptide is mediated by long-lived structures sequences using two amyloidogenic peptides, one a polar sequence from the N terminus of the yeast prion Sup interface formation characterizes protofilament assembly in the yeast prions. Indeed, as the two sheets

Thirumalai, Devarajan

266

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes test essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argumentation, students need to know certain things in order to write effectively. In 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know, Jeff Anderson focuses on developing the concepts and application of ten essential aspects of good writing--motion, models, focus,…

Anderson, Jeff

2011-01-01

267

"The whole women thing" University of Toronto  

E-print Network

, Present, and Future of Statistical Science saying "plus, you know, there's the whole women thing. I guess1 "The whole women thing" Nancy Reid University of Toronto CONTENTS 1.1 Introduction ............................................................... 5 1.2 "How many women are there in your department?" ..................... 6 1.3 "Should I ask

Reid, Nancy

268

The Internet of Things: A Reality Check  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, a new Internet player is rowing more important: things—that is, inanimate objects that can be programmed to communicate, sense, and interact with other things. But will an increasingly fragile ecosystem be able to sustain the amount of power necessary to run all these gadgets? And what other challenges must we overcome to realize a productive and reliable Internet of

George F. Hurlburt; Jeffrey Voas; Keith W. Miller

2012-01-01

269

Searching in a Web-based Infrastructure for Smart Things  

E-print Network

: Web technologies for application-layer interoperability of smart things Thing + Internet connection3. Hierarchy on the left) Conclusions Application of REST patterns in the design of an Internet of Things. From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and Best Practices

270

A scheme of data management in the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things is a large network which integrates the current devices, such as RFID devices, sensors and other equipment and services. It extends the form of interaction between people to the interaction between people and things as well as things and things, and then, establishes a new ecological environment. In the Internet of Things, the heterogeneity of devices

Tongrang Fan; Yanzhao Chen

2010-01-01

271

Relating to Things that Think Animated Toys, Artificial Creatures, V-Avatars  

Microsoft Academic Search

From music boxes to wind-up toys, from Tamaguchi to virtual Petz and Babyz, animated toys occupy a special place in children's lives. They are intriguing because they do things. Sometimes they even seem to have a mind of their own. They can be more or less responsive to a child's solicitations. In all cases, objects that behave are treated differently

Edith Ackermann

272

Teacher's Resource Book. Small Things. Grade 5. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document introduces fifth-grade children to the microscopic world, to the instruments needed to make it accessible, and to the appearance and structure of cells in nonliving as well as living things. Aims of the unit include providing children with an instrument which extends their senses in a radical manner, and leading them in using this…

Anchorage School District, AK.

273

Comparative effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and ractopamine hydrochloride on live performance and carcass characteristics of calf-fed Holstein steers.  

PubMed

Holstein steers (n = 2,275) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) a control diet containing no ?-agonists, 2) a diet that contained zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 8.3 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 20 d with a 3-d withdrawal period before harvest, and 3) a diet that contained ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 30.1 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 28 d before harvest. No differences (P ? 0.18) were detected between treatments for initial BW, BW at d 28, or DMI. Final BW, BW gain for the last 28 d, total BW gain, ADG for the last 28 d, and overall ADG were greater (P < 0.05) for steers fed ZH or RH than for steers fed the control diet. Additionally, G:F for the last 28 d and G:F for the entire trial was increased (P < 0.02) for steers fed ZH (0.147, 0.147) or RH (0.153, 0.151) compared to steers fed the control diet (0.134, 0.143), respectively. Steers fed ZH or RH had HCW that were 15.5 and 8.2 kg heavier (P ? 0.01) and LM areas that were 7.1 and 2.3 cm(2) larger (P < 0.01) than control cattle. Steers fed ZH also had dressed carcass yields that were 1.3% to 1.5% greater and USDA calculated yield grades that were decreased 0.16 to 0.23 units compared to RH and control steers. No differences (P ? 0.39) were found between treatments for marbling score, fat thickness, and percentage KPH. Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ? 0.04) percentage of yield grade 1 and 2 carcasses (15.1, 55.0) and a reduced (P ? 0.02) percentage of yield grade 3 carcasses (27.1) compared with those fed RH (10.5, 49.1, 36.1) or the control diet (9.0, 47.4, 36.4), respectively. Additionally, ZH-fed steers had a decreased (P ? 0.04) percentage of yield grade 4 and 5 carcasses (2.8) compared with steers fed the control diet (6.9). Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ? 0.01) percentage of USDA Select grading carcass (31.0%) and a decreased (P ? 0.01) percentage of USDA Choice grading carcasses (65.0%) compared with steers fed RH (25.8%, 70.2%) and no ?-agonist (24.8%, 72.0%), respectively. Feeding either ?-agonist to calf-fed Holstein steers increased live performance through increased BW, BW gain, and ADG. Furthermore, supplementing calf-fed Holstein steers with ZH provides greater improvements in HCW, LM area, and yield grade components, with a slight decrease in quality grade when compared to calf-fed Holstein steers supplemented with RH. PMID:25006068

Brown, T R; Sexten, A K; Lawrence, T E; Miller, M F; Thomas, C L; Yates, D A; Hutcheson, J P; Hodgen, J M; Brooks, J C

2014-09-01

274

Changes in activities of daily living (ADL) among elderly Chinese by marital status, living arrangement, and availability of healthcare over a 3-year period  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The purpose of this study was to assess how changes from different baselines of activities of daily living (ADL) can be explained\\u000a by marital status, living arrangement and healthcare.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using data from the Chinese Longitudinal Health Longevity Study conducted in 2002 and 2005, 8,099 surviving and 3,822 deceased\\u000a elderly aged 65 years and over were evaluated using multinomial logistic regression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  After

Dewen Wang; Jianmin Zheng; Michiko Kurosawa; Yutaka Inaba; Noriko Kato

2009-01-01

275

Prevalence and clinical characteristics of wheezing in children in the first year of life, living in Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of wheezing in infants aged 12 to 15 months in the city of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso State, Midwest Brazil. METHODS: Parents and/or guardians of infants were interviewed and completed a written standardized questionnaire of the Estudio Internacional de Sibilancia en Lactantes (EISL) - phase 3 at primary healthcare clinics at the same day of children vaccination or at home, from August of 2009 to November of 2010. RESULTS: 1,060 parents and/or guardians completed the questionnaire, and 514 (48.5%) infants were male. Among the studied infants, 294 (27.7%) had at least one episode of wheezing during the first year of life, beggining at 5.8±3.0 months of age, with a predominance of male patients. The prevalence of occasional wheezing (<3 episodes of wheezing) was 15.0% and recurrent wheezing (?3 episodes) was 12.7%. Among the infants with recurrent wheezing, the use of inhaled ?2-agonist, oral corticosteroid, leukotriene receptor antagonist, as well as night symptoms, respiratory distress, and hospitalization due to severe episodes were significantly more frequent. Physician-diagnosed asthma was observed in 28 (9.5%) of the wheezing infants. Among the wheezing infants, 80 (27.7%) were diagnosed with pneumonia, of whom 33 (11.2%) required hospitalization; neverthless, no differences between occasional and recurrent wheezing infants were found. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of recurrent wheezing and physician-diagnosed asthma in infants were lower compared with those observed in other Brazilian studies. Recurrent wheezing had early onset and high morbity. PMID:25510994

Moraes, Lillian Sanchez Lacerda; Takano, Olga Akiko; Mallol, Javier; Solé, Dirceu

2014-01-01

276

An Autonomic-oriented Architecture for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic tags, usually referred as RFIDs, sensors, wireless VoIP terminals are likely to create a technological and cultural revolution similar to the one initiated by the Internet technology in the early nineties. These very cheap components are manufactured by billions, and are going to be inserted in quite all our everyday objects. Internet of things is a paradigm dealing with

Guy Pujolle

2006-01-01

277

Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena.

Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

278

Rapid detection of live methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by using an integrated microfluidic system capable of ethidium monoazide pre-treatment and molecular diagnosis  

PubMed Central

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium resistant to all existing penicillin and lactam-based antimicrobial drugs and, therefore, has become one of the most prevalent antibiotic-resistant pathogens found in hospitals. The multi-drug resistant characteristics of MRSA make it challenging to clinically treat infected patients. Therefore, early diagnosis of MRSA has become a public-health priority worldwide. Conventionally, cell-culture based methodology and microscopic identification are commonly used for MRSA detection. However, they are relatively time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, molecular diagnosis based on nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been widely investigated for the rapid detection of MRSA. However, genomic DNA of both live and dead pathogens can be distinguished by conventional PCR. These results thus could not provide sufficient confirmation of an active infection for clinicians. In this study, live MRSA was rapidly detected by using a new integrated microfluidic system. The microfluidic system has been demonstrated to have 100% specificity to detect live MRSA with S. aureus and other pathogens commonly found in hospitals. The experimental results showed that the limit of detection for live MRSA from biosamples was approximately 102 CFU/?l. In addition, the entire diagnostic protocol, from sample pre-treatment to fluorescence observation, can be automatically completed within 2.5?h. Consequently, this microfluidic system may be a powerful tool for the rapid molecular diagnosis of live MRSA. PMID:24019858

Liu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

2012-01-01

279

Detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction and distinguishing live from dead cysts.  

PubMed Central

A method was developed for the detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the giardin gene as the target. DNA amplification by PCR, using giardin DNA as the target, resulted in detection of both live and dead cysts. When giardin mRNA was used as the target, the ability to amplify cDNA by PCR depended on the mode of killing. Cysts killed by freezing were not detected by PCR when giardin mRNA was the target. Cysts killed by heating or exposure to monochloramine, however, gave positive detection signals for both DNA and giardin mRNA targets. The amount of giardin mRNA and total RNA was significantly increased in live cysts following the induction of excystation. Cysts killed by freezing, heating, or exposure to monochloramine did not show a change in RNA content. The detection of the giardin gene by PCR permits a sensitive and specific diagnosis for Giardia spp. Discrimination between live and dead cysts can be made by measuring the amounts of RNA or PCR-amplified product from the giardin mRNA target before and after the induction of excystation. Images PMID:1785923

Mahbubani, M H; Bej, A K; Perlin, M; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Atlas, R M

1991-01-01

280

Observation of Live Ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) by Scanning Electron Microscopy under High Vacuum Pressure  

PubMed Central

Scanning electron microscopes (SEM), which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10?3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2–5 kV), many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs), they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition. PMID:22431980

Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Yano, Yasuhiro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Takegami, Tsutomu

2012-01-01

281

What kinds of things are psychiatric disorders?  

PubMed

This essay explores four answers to the question 'What kinds of things are psychiatric disorders?' Essentialist kinds are classes whose members share an essence from which their defining features arise. Although elegant and appropriate for some physical (e.g. atomic elements) and medical (e.g. Mendelian disorders) phenomena, this model is inappropriate for psychiatric disorders, which are multi-factorial and 'fuzzy'. Socially constructed kinds are classes whose members are defined by the cultural context in which they arise. This model excludes the importance of shared physiological mechanisms by which the same disorder could be identified across different cultures. Advocates of practical kinds put off metaphysical questions about 'reality' and focus on defining classes that are useful. Practical kinds models for psychiatric disorders, implicit in the DSM nosologies, do not require that diagnoses be grounded in shared causal processes. If psychiatry seeks to tie disorders to etiology and underlying mechanisms, a model first proposed for biological species, mechanistic property cluster (MPC) kinds, can provide a useful framework. MPC kinds are defined not in terms of essences but in terms of complex, mutually reinforcing networks of causal mechanisms. We argue that psychiatric disorders are objectively grounded features of the causal structure of the mind/brain. MPC kinds are fuzzy sets defined by mechanisms at multiple levels that act and interact to produce the key features of the kind. Like species, psychiatric disorders are populations with central paradigmatic and more marginal members. The MPC view is the best current answer to 'What kinds of things are psychiatric disorders?' PMID:20860872

Kendler, K S; Zachar, P; Craver, C

2011-06-01

282

College Students' Attitudes towards Living Organisms: The Influence of Experience and Knowledge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on the attitude variations between students who had direct experiences with another living thing and those who did not. All students who had direct experiences with another living thing showed a higher mean value in all the attitude categories that showed more concern for another species. Confirms the importance of students having direct…

Yore, Lola Boeck; Boyer, Stan

1997-01-01

283

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things, an interactive website from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), introduces visitors to the art of Richard Tuttle, using video of Tuttle at work and commentary by the artist and SFMOMA curators, as well as images and sound. For example, one of the movies shows Tuttle working on one of his Wire Pieces, which are assembled from scratch each time they are installed in a gallery; Tuttle draws on the gallery wall, and traces the lines with florists' wire. The Web exhibition feature is strong on process, but may leave some visitors wishing to see more of Tuttle's finished art. For them, there is the 388-page illustrated catalogue, and "The Art of Richard Tuttle," on view at SFMOMA through October 16, 2005, featuring 300 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from the artist's 40-year career.

2005-01-01

284

HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by people living with HIV from Buea, Cameroon.  

PubMed

The universal access to treatment and care for people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is a major problem especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV infected people live. However, equally important is the fact that HIV/AIDS-related stigma is recognized to be a major obstacle to successfully control the spread of this disease. In this study we measured the HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by PLWHIV in Cameroon using "The people living with HIV stigma index" questionnaire developed by UNAIDS, International Planned Parenthood Federation and Global Network of PLWHIV/AIDS among others. A total of 200 questionnaires were anonymously administered to PLWHIV in the HIV/AIDS treatment center of the Regional Hospital Annex Buea in the South West Region of Cameroon by trained academics who were themselves PLWHIV. In this setting the major problems faced by the PLWHIV with regard to stigmatization and discrimination were gossiping and verbal insults, which was felt by about half of the interviewees. Equally important was internal stigma, half of the PLWHIV felt ashamed and guilty to be HIV infected. This is the first report of this kind in Cameroon. These results will help to better understand HIV/AIDS-related stigma in this setting and in turn will improve the quality of life of PLWHIV by promoting their acceptance by the community. PMID:22852551

Jacobi, Christoph A; Atanga, Pascal N J I; Bin, Leonard K; Mbome, Victor N; Akam, Wilfred; Bogner, Johannes R; Kropf, Siegfried; Malfertheiner, Peter

2013-01-01

285

IOT Gateway: BridgingWireless Sensor Networks into Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of sensor, wireless mobile communication, embedded system and cloud computing, the technologies of Internet of Things have been widely used in logistics, Smart Meter, public security, intelligent building and so on. Because of its huge market prospects, Internet of Things has been paid close attention by several governments all over the world, which is regarded as the

Qian Zhu; Ruicong Wang; Qi Chen; Yan Liu; Weijun Qin

2010-01-01

286

RIOT OS: Towards an OS for the Internet of Things Emmanuel Baccelli and Oliver Hahm  

E-print Network

RIOT OS: Towards an OS for the Internet of Things Emmanuel Baccelli and Oliver Hahm INRIA, France, Germany Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is characterized by heterogeneous devices. They range from running on Internet hosts, nor a typical OS for sensor networks are capable to fulfill the diverse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Architectural Solutions for Mobile RFID Services for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile RFID services for Internet of Things can be created by using RFID as an enabling technology on mobile devices. Humans, devices and things are the content providers and users of these services. Mobile RFID services can be provided either on mobile devices as stand-alone services or combining with end- to-end systems. When different service solutions are considered, there are

Martin Peter Michael; Mohsen Darianian

2008-01-01

288

Magnetic coupling by using levitation characteristics of YBCO superconductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mechanical system which uses high lateral restoring forces of high-Tc materials as the driving force for a magnetic coupling is proposed. As the basic study of the superconducting magnetic coupling, the relationship between the lateral restoring force and levitation force, transmitted torque characteristics as a function of a twisting angle and clearance, and damping characteristics of the coupling were examined. Superiorities of the coupling such as high damping coefficients and high stability against time and twisting angle were revealed. A magnetic force sensor system was used to evaluate the superconducting characteristics of materials, and nonuniform distribution of repulsive force was observed for the YBCO pellet fabricated by the melt-powder-melt-growth process. The improvement of the homogeneity was achieved by compensating for the composition rate which had changed during the quenching process.

Ishigaki, H.; Ito, H.; Itoh, M.; Hida, A.; Takahata, R.

1993-03-01

289

Researchers create 'coldest thing in the universe' Home -Yahoo! -Help  

E-print Network

Researchers create 'coldest thing in the universe' Home - Yahoo! - Help News Finance Sports Movies Welcome Guest Sign In Yahoo! India News Sat, Sep 13, 2003 Search for Advanced News Home Top Stories ban for misconduct Pak beat Bangladesh by 74 runs News, Photos, more... Yahoo! Communities · Yahoo

290

How Things Work: Front and Rear Bicycle Brakes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from How Things Work, by Lou Bloomfield, provides an explanation of why it can be hard to stop a bike with the rear brakes alone. The site contains a description of how friction and torque produce a rotation of the bicycle that makes the rear brakes ineffective.

2006-11-08

291

Connected objects and the Internet of things — A paradigm shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging and future network requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) or Connected Objects (CO) cannot be met by the networks and solutions we envisage today. The vision of IoT includes millions of objects that interact with the network using a plethora of applications. Some of these objects will require little attention and will generate little traffic, while on the

E. Zouganeli; I. E. Svinnset

2009-01-01

292

Project NECESSITIES, Phase II. Volume II, People, Places and Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The activities and materials in this Project NECESSITIES social studies unit (People, Places and Things) are meant to act as a framework by which the teacher may devise additional content material appropriate to her own students' unique background. The unit, devised for use with primary school students, has as one of its primary emphases the use…

Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

293

Effects of increasing dose of live cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus (Strain NP 51) combined with a single dose of Propionibacterium freudenreichii (Strain NP 24) on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing beef steers.  

PubMed

Two experiments, each with a randomized complete block design, were conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding live cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus plus Propionibacterium freudenreichii on performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot cattle. British and British x Continental steers (240 steers in each experiment; 12 pens/treatment in each study; average initial BW = 370 +/- 6 kg) were fed a 92% concentrate diet based primarily on steam-flaked corn. Four treatments were evaluated, which included a control diet (lactose carrier only) or diets containing 1 x 10(9) cfu/(steer x d) of P. freudenreichii (strain NP 24) with 1 x 10(7) (L), 1 x 10(8) (M), or 1 x 10(9) (H) cfu of L. acidophilus strain NP 51/(steer x d). Data were pooled for the 2 experiments. No differences (P > 0.10) were detected among treatments for final BW, final BW based on HCW, or DMI during various stages of the feeding period or overall. Likewise, no differences among treatments were observed for either ADG or carcass-adjusted ADG (P > 0.10), except for the tendency for a quadratic effect of NP 51 dose for the overall feeding period (P = 0.10), in which cattle fed M had a lower ADG than those fed L and H. Gain efficiency on a live BW basis was improved (P = 0.02) by NP 51 treatments compared with the control, with G:F responding quadratically to NP 51 dose for the overall feeding period (P = 0.05). In contrast to G:F based on live BW, carcass-adjusted G:F tended (P = 0.14) to decrease linearly with increasing NP 51 dose because the dressing percent tended (P = 0.12) to be less for steers fed direct-fed microbial compared with control cattle. Within the direct-fed microbial treatments, there also was a tendency (P = 0.13) for a linear decrease in the dressing percent as the NP 51 dose increased. No differences were observed in other carcass characteristics (P > 0.10), except tendencies for a quadratic increase in marbling score (P = 0.11) and percentage of USDA Choice cattle (P = 0.10). These data indicate that live cultures of L. acidophilus strain NP 51 plus P. freudenreichii strain NP 24 increased G:F of feedlot cattle fed steam-flaked corn-based diets by approximately 2%, but the effects depended on the dose of Lactobacillus. PMID:18042817

Vasconcelos, J T; Elam, N A; Brashears, M M; Galyean, M L

2008-03-01

294

Relating Things and Stuff via Object Property Interactions.  

PubMed

In the last few years, substantially different approaches have been adopted for segmenting and detecting "things" (object categories that have a well defined shape such as people and cars) and "stuff" (object categories which have an amorphous spatial extent such as grass and sky). While things have been typically detected by sliding window or Hough transform based methods, detection of stuff is generally formulated as a pixel or segment-wise classification problem. This paper proposes a framework for scene understanding that models both things and stuff using a common representation while preserving their distinct nature by using a property list. This representation allows us to enforce sophisticated geometric and semantic relationships between thing and stuff categories via property interactions in a single graphical model. We use the latest advances made in the field of discrete optimization to efficiently perform maximum a posteriori (MAP) inference in this model. We evaluate our method on the Stanford dataset by comparing it against state-of-the-art methods for object segmentation and detection. We also show that our method achieves competitive performances on the challenging PASCAL'09 segmentation dataset. PMID:24101332

Sun, Min; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kohli, Pushmeet; Savarese, Silvio

2013-10-01

295

Effect of live weight and sex on physico-chemical and sensorial characteristics of Merino lamb meat.  

PubMed

Forty-eight lamb carcasses were divided into four groups (n=12) according to slaughter weight (24 and 29kg) and sex (male and female). Colour, pH, moisture, and intramuscular fat were not affected (p>0.05) by slaughter weight or sex. With respect to fatty acid composition, slaughter weight had significant effects on C12:0 (p<0.01), C14:0, C16:0, and C18:1 n-9 (p<0.05) in Longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle. The percentage of C12:0 and C14:0 decreased as slaughter weight increased, while C16:0 increased. In Semimembranosus (SM) m., only C18:3 n-3 and C20:2 n-6 were affected (p<0.001) by slaughter weight. Total PUFA in LL m. was greater (p<0.01) in females than in males. Although in general, sensorial quality was not significantly affected by slaughter weight or sex, meat from lighter lambs (24kg) had greater general acceptability than meat from heavier lambs (29kg). PMID:22063837

Tejeda, Juan Florencio; Peńa, Ramón E; Andrés, Ana I

2008-12-01

296

Load Characteristics of Induction Motor Manufactured by Soft Magnetic Composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The load characteristics of induction motor manufactured by soft magnetic composite (SMC) are presented. We manufactured three kinds of induction motors experimentally. One is a conventional laminated iron core motor. The others are SMC motors. One of the SMC motor uses SMC only for stator, while the other SMC motor uses SMC for stator and rotor. The experimental comparisons of load characteristics and loss analysis are shown. As a result, the difference between the efficiency of the SMC motor and the conventional laminated motor is 4.6%, in spite of the permeability of SMC being 20% lower than the conventional electromagnetic steel.

Fukuda, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Yutaka; Morimoto, Masayuki

297

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

1998-09-08

298

Tracking cancer drugs in living cells by thermal profiling of the proteome.  

PubMed

The thermal stability of proteins can be used to assess ligand binding in living cells. We have generalized this concept by determining the thermal profiles of more than 7000 proteins in human cells by means of mass spectrometry. Monitoring the effects of small-molecule ligands on the profiles delineated more than 50 targets for the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. We identified the heme biosynthesis enzyme ferrochelatase as a target of kinase inhibitors and suggest that its inhibition causes the phototoxicity observed with vemurafenib and alectinib. Thermal shifts were also observed for downstream effectors of drug treatment. In live cells, dasatinib induced shifts in BCR-ABL pathway proteins, including CRK/CRKL. Thermal proteome profiling provides an unbiased measure of drug-target engagement and facilitates identification of markers for drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:25278616

Savitski, Mikhail M; Reinhard, Friedrich B M; Franken, Holger; Werner, Thilo; Savitski, Maria Fälth; Eberhard, Dirk; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dovega, Rebecca Bakszt; Klaeger, Susan; Kuster, Bernhard; Nordlund, Pär; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard

2014-10-01

299

[Live coral predation by fish in Tayrona Nature National Park, Colombian Caribbean].  

PubMed

Live coral predation by fish was evaluated in two bays of the Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombia), as a possible biological agent causing coral mortality. Visual censuses were used to identify the most important predator. Predation incidence was determined by examining all colonies present in permanent belt transects (20 x 2 m) in two reef environments (one dominated by Colpophyllia natans and the other one by Montastraea faveolata), for two climatic seasons (rainy and dry seasons). The parrotfish Sparisoma viride was the most important predator due to its biting frequency and bite size. S. viride adults of the initial and terminal phases, removed live tissue and part of the calcareous matrix of M. faveolata, M. annularis, Porites astreoides and C. natans, of which, the last one lost a major amount of tissue per area (3.51 cm2) and volume (3.22 cm3) per bite. A negative exponential tendency (r2=0.94), between coral density and volume removed was found, indicating that the coral density determines the bite's damage. There is no clear relationship between predation incidence and climatic seasons at the sites studied. At Chengue and Gayraca bays, live coral predation is one of the factors contributing to coral tissue loss and could have important consequences on the dynamic of these reefs. PMID:17354397

Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto

2004-12-01

300

Unbiased Identification of Nonlinear Sorption Characteristics by Soil Column Breakthrough  

E-print Network

Unbiased Identification of Nonlinear Sorption Characteristics by Soil Column Breakthrough breakthrough as case studies, possi­ ble applications of the new approach will be shown and its features, the column effluent concentration history, i.e. the breakthrough curve, is analyzed employing either

Gugat, Martin

301

Load Characteristics of Induction Motor Manufactured by Soft Magnetic Composite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The load characteristics of induction motor manufactured by soft magnetic composite (SMC) are presented. We manufactured three kinds of induction motors experimentally. One is a conventional laminated iron core motor. The others are SMC motors. One of the SMC motor uses SMC only for stator, while the other SMC motor uses SMC for stator and rotor. The experimental comparisons of

Tomohiro Fukuda; Yutaka Sasaki; Masayuki Morimoto

2009-01-01

302

Wood Products Identification by Internal Characteristics Readings C. FUENTEALBA1  

E-print Network

Wood Products Identification by Internal Characteristics Readings C. FUENTEALBA1 , C. SIMON2 , D.fuentealba@cran.uhp-nancy.fr 5 LERMAB - Wood Research Laboratory, Epinal, France, e-mail: daniel- proving control of production tools and reacting to their defi- ciencies. For wood industries

Boyer, Edmond

303

Biosynthesis and structural characteristics of selenium nanoparticles by Pseudomonas alcaliphila  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we report that selenium (Se) nanoparticles were first biosynthesized by Pseudomonas alcaliphila with a simple and eco-friendly biological method. The structural characteristics of Se nanoparticles were examined. The results showed that spherical particles appeared with diameters ranging from 50 to 500nm during incubation and Se nanorods were present after incubating in an aqueous reaction solution for 24h.

Wenjie Zhang; Zhijuan Chen; Hao Liu; Liang Zhang; Ping Gao; Daping Li

2011-01-01

304

Self-Recognition in Live Videos by Young Children: Does Video Training Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overall aim of the experiment reported here was to establish whether self-recognition in live video can be facilitated when live video training is provided to children aged 2-2.5 years. While the majority of children failed the test of live self-recognition prior to video training, more than half exhibited live self-recognition post video…

Demir, Defne; Skouteris, Helen

2010-01-01

305

Living cationic polymerization of p -methoxystyrene by hydrogen iodide\\/zinc iodide at room temperature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cationic polymerization of p-methoxystyrene initiated by HI\\/ZnI2 in toluene afforded living polymers not only at low temperature (-15°C) but at room temperature (+25°C) as well. The number-average molecular weight of the polymers was directly proportional to monomer conversion and in excellent agreement with the calculated value assuming that one polymer chain forms per unit hydrogen iodide. On addition of a

Toshinobu Higashimura; Kazushige Kojima; Mitsuo Sawamoto

1988-01-01

306

LIMITED POTENTIAL FOR TRANSMISSION OF LIVE DENGUE VIRUS VACCINE CANDIDATES BY AEDES AEGYPTIAND AEDES ALBOPICTUS  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the transmission risk of four live dengue (DEN) vaccine candidates developed by the U. S. Army (DEN-1, 45AZ5 PDK 20; DEN-2, S16803 PDK 50; DEN-3, CH53489 PDK 20; and DEN-4, 341750 PDK 20), we tested 3,010 Aedes aegypti and 1,576 Aedes albopictus mosquitoes blood-fed on 21 volunteers who had been administered one of the four vaccine candidates or

MICHAEL R. SARDELIS; ROBERT EDELMAN; TERRY A. KLEIN; BRUCE L. INNIS; J. ROBERT PUTNAK; JAMES W. JONES; MICHAEL J. TURELL

307

Live Confocal Microscopy of Oligonucleotide Uptake by Keratinocytes in Human Skin Grafts on Nude Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anti-sense oligonucleotide uptake by keratinocytes in human skin grafts on athymic mice was examined using live confocal microscopy. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 15-mer C-5 propyne modified phosphorothioate anti-sense oligonucleotide (10–50 ?M) was intradermally injected into normal human skin grafts on athymic mice, and the localization of the anti-sense oligonucleotide was assessed after 1–24 h postinjection. Anti-sense oligonucleotide was found to localize in

Paul J. White; Rhys D. Fogarty; Ingrid J. Liepe; Peter M. Delaney; George A. Werther; Christopher J. Wraight

1999-01-01

308

Evolutionary costs of aggression revealed by testosterone manipulations in free-living male lizards  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the hypothesis that increased aggression results in decreased survivorship. We tested this hypothesis by increasing aggression of free-living male lizards Sceloporus jarrovi with testosterone implants and evaluating the effects on survivorship. A previous study showed that testosterone-implanted males were more aggressive than controls, suggesting a greater degree of success in male-male competition. Results of the present study show

C. A. Marler; M. C. Moore

1988-01-01

309

All the things I have - handling one's material room in old age.  

PubMed

The article explores how old people who live in their ordinary home, reason and act regarding their 'material room' (technical objects, such as household appliances, communication tools and things, such as furniture, personal belongings, gadgets, books, paintings, and memorabilia). The interest is in how they, as a consequence of their aging, look at acquiring new objects and phasing out older objects from the home. This is a broader approach than in most other studies of how old people relate to materiality in which attention is mostly paid either to adjustments to the physical environment or to the importance of personal possessions. In the latter cases, the focus is on downsizing processes (e.g. household disbandment or casser maison) in connection with a move to smaller accommodation or to a nursing home. The article is based on a study in which thirteen older people (median age 87), living in a Swedish town of medium size were interviewed (2012) for a third time. The questions concerned the need and desire for new objects, replacement of broken objects, sorting out the home or elsewhere, most cherished possessions, and the role of family members such as children and grandchildren. The results reveal the complexity of how one handles the material room. Most evident is the participants' reluctance to acquire new objects or even to replace broken things. Nearly all of them had considered, but few had started, a process of sorting out objects. These standpoints in combination resulted in a relatively intact material room, which was motivated by an ambition to simplify daily life or to facilitate the approaching dissolution of the home. Some objects of special value and other cherished objects materialized the connections between generations within a family. Some participants wanted to spare their children the burden of having to decide on what to do with their possessions. Others (mostly men), on the contrary, relied on their children to do the sorting out after they had died. PMID:25456628

Larsson Ranada, Asa; Hagberg, Jan-Erik

2014-12-01

310

Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by Atomic Force Microscopy with colloidal probes  

E-print Network

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells' fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cell elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured elastic modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in cell elasticity induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

Luca Puricelli; Massimiliano Galluzzi; Carsten Schulte; Alessandro Podestŕ; Paolo Milani

2014-09-14

311

Beef palatability as influenced by live animal characteristics, time-on-feed and carcass traits  

E-print Network

tenderness g F lavor des irabi I i ty Overal I pal atabi I ity Shear force, kg 521. 4 5. 0 4. 8 515. 3 45 A 68 SI 51 Gd 9. 44 75. 5 1. 9 287. 6 2. 4 42 Ch 78. 1 5. 0 5. 6 6. 1 5. 5 5. 5 5. 2 5. 0 440. 0 1. 0 1. 0 319. 8 10 A... 00 PD 00 St . 0 41. 9 . 5 135. 2 , 0 20 Gd 43. 9 3. 1 1. 9 4. 0 1. 8 3. 4 1. 9 2. 3 638. 0 9. 0 9. 0 767. 5 99 8 10 Ab 70 Pr 30. 5 110. 3 3. 5 477, 2 5. 3 80 Pr 110. 9 6. 9 7. 7 7. 9 7. 7 7. 0 7. 3 16. 0 a 9...

Dolezal, Howard Glen

1980-01-01

312

Selective Labeling of Living Cells by a Photo-Triggered Click Reaction  

PubMed Central

Photo-triggering of the metal-free azide to acetylene cycloaddition reaction was achieved by masking the triple bond of dibenzocyclooctynes as cyclopropenone. Such masked cyclooctynes do not react with azides in the dark. Irradiation of cyclopropenones results in the efficient (?355 = 0.33) and clean regeneration of the corresponding dibenzocyclooctynes, which then undergo facile catalyst-free cycloadditions with azides to give corresponding triazoles under ambient conditions. In-situ light activation of a cyclopropenone linked to biotin made it possible to label living cells expressing glycoproteins containing N-azidoacetyl-sialic acid. The cyclopropenone-based photo-triggered click chemistry offers exciting opportunities to label living organisms in a temporally and spatially controlled manner and may facilitate the preparation of microarrays. PMID:19860481

Poloukhtine, Andrei A.; Mbua, Ngalle Eric; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Boons, Geert-Jan; Popik, Vladimir V.

2009-01-01

313

Estimating live fuel status by drought indices: an approach for assessing local impact of climate change on fire danger  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mediterranean shrubs are an important component of both Mediterranean vegetation communities and understorey vegetation. They also constitute the surface fuels primarily responsible for the ignition and the spread of wildland fires in Mediterranean forests. Although fire spread and behaviour are dependent on several factors, the water content of live fuel plays an important role in determining fire occurrence and spread, especially in the Mediterranean shrubland, where live fuel is often the main component of the available fuel which catches fire. According to projections on future climate, an increase in risk of summer droughts is likely to take place in Southern Europe. More prolonged drought seasons induced by climatic changes are likely to influence general flammability characteristics of fuel, affecting load distribution in vegetation strata, floristic composition, and live and dead fuel ratio. In addition, variations in precipitation and mean temperature could directly affect fuel water status, and consequently flammability, and length of critical periods of high ignition danger for Mediterranean ecosystems. The main aim of this work was to propose a methodology for evaluating possible impacts of future climate change on moisture dynamic and length of fire danger period at local scale. Specific objectives were: i) evaluating performances of meteorological drought indices in describing seasonal pattern of live fuel moisture content (LFMC), and ii) simulating the potential impacts of future climate changes on the duration of fire danger period. Measurements of LFMC seasonal pattern of three Mediterranean shrub species were performed in North Western Sardinia (Italy) for 8 years. Seasonal patterns of LFMC were compared with the Drought Code of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index and the Keetch-Byram Drought Index. Analysis of frequency distribution and cumulative distribution curves were carried out in order to evaluate performance of codes and to identify threshold values of indices useful to determine the end of the potential fire season due to fuel status. A weather generator linked to climate change scenarios derived from 17 available General Circulation Models (GCMs) was used to produce synthetic weather series, representing present and future climates, for four selected sites located in North Sardinia, Italy. Finally, impacts of future climate change on fire season length at local scale were simulated. Results confirmed that the projected climate scenarios over the Mediterranean area will determine an overall increase of the fire season length.

Pellizzaro, Grazia; Dubrovsky, Martin; Bortolu, Sara; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Bachisio; Masia, Pierpaolo; Duce, Pierpaolo

2014-05-01

314

Identities in the Future Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are two problem areas of the current Internet to be solved in Future Internet scenarios—security and putting the user\\u000a back in control despite the move to the Internet of things. With this in mind, we address problems associated with the diversifying\\u000a of the Internet towards an Internet of things, and with increased ways to be reachable, whether the user

Amardeo C. Sarma; Joăo Girăo

2009-01-01

315

Future internet: The Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, the main communication form on the Internet is human-human. But it is foreseeable that in a near soon that any object will have a unique way of identification and can be addressed so that every object can be connected. The Internet will become to the Internet of Things. The communicate forms will expand from human-human to human-human, human-thing and

Lu Tan; Neng Wang

2010-01-01

316

Exploring Dynamics of Molybdate in Living Animal Cells by a Genetically Encoded FRET Nanosensor  

PubMed Central

Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element for almost all living organisms including animals. Mo is used as a catalytic center of molybdo-enzymes for oxidation/reduction reactions of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. Whilst living cells are known to import inorganic molybdate oxyanion from the surrounding environment, the in vivo dynamics of cytosolic molybdate remain poorly understood as no appropriate indicator is available for this trace anion. We here describe a genetically encoded Förester-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor composed of CFP, YFP and the bacterial molybdate-sensor protein ModE. The nanosensor MolyProbe containing an optimized peptide-linker responded to nanomolar-range molybdate selectively, and increased YFP:CFP fluorescence intensity ratio by up to 109%. By introduction of the nanosensor, we have been able to successfully demonstrate the real-time dynamics of molybdate in living animal cells. Furthermore, time course analyses of the dynamics suggest that novel oxalate-sensitive- and sulfate-resistant- transporter(s) uptake molybdate in a model culture cell. PMID:23472155

Nakanishi, Yoichi; Iida, Syuntaro; Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Tomioka, Rie; Maeshima, Masayoshi

2013-01-01

317

Diabetes increases stiffness of live cardiomyocytes measured by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation.  

PubMed

Stiffness of live cardiomyocytes isolated from control and diabetic mice was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin administration. Histological images of myocardium from mice that were diabetic for 3 mo showed disorderly lineup of myocardial cells, irregularly sized cell nuclei, and fragmented and disordered myocardial fibers with interstitial collagen accumulation. Phalloidin-stained cardiomyocytes isolated from diabetic mice showed altered (i.e., more irregular and diffuse) actin filament organization compared with cardiomyocytes from control mice. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) pump expression was reduced in homogenates obtained from the left ventricle of diabetic animals compared with age-matched controls. The apparent elastic modulus (AEM) for live control or diabetic isolated cardiomyocytes was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method in Tyrode buffer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (physiological condition), 100 nM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (low extracellular Ca(2+) condition), or 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 140 mM KCl (contraction condition). In the physiological condition, the mean AEM was 112% higher for live diabetic than control isolated cardiomyocytes (91 ± 14 vs. 43 ± 7 kPa). The AEM was also significantly higher in diabetic than control cardiomyocytes in the low extracellular Ca(2+) and contraction conditions. These findings suggest that the material properties of live cardiomyocytes were affected by diabetes, resulting in stiffer cells, which very likely contribute to high diastolic LV stiffness, which has been observed in vivo in some diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:25163520

Benech, Juan C; Benech, Nicolás; Zambrana, Ana I; Rauschert, Inés; Bervejillo, Verónica; Oddone, Natalia; Damián, Juan P

2014-11-15

318

Vibrational imaging of newly synthesized proteins in live cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.  

PubMed

Synthesis of new proteins, a key step in the central dogma of molecular biology, has been a major biological process by which cells respond rapidly to environmental cues in both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the selective visualization of a newly synthesized proteome in living systems with subcellular resolution has proven to be rather challenging, despite the extensive efforts along the lines of fluorescence staining, autoradiography, and mass spectrometry. Herein, we report an imaging technique to visualize nascent proteins by harnessing the emerging stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic incorporation of deuterium-labeled amino acids. As a first demonstration, we imaged newly synthesized proteins in live mammalian cells with high spatial-temporal resolution without fixation or staining. Subcellular compartments with fast protein turnover in HeLa and HEK293T cells, and newly grown neurites in differentiating neuron-like N2A cells, are clearly identified via this imaging technique. Technically, incorporation of deuterium-labeled amino acids is minimally perturbative to live cells, whereas SRS imaging of exogenous carbon-deuterium bonds (C-D) in the cell-silent Raman region is highly sensitive, specific, and compatible with living systems. Moreover, coupled with label-free SRS imaging of the total proteome, our method can readily generate spatial maps of the quantitative ratio between new and total proteomes. Thus, this technique of nonlinear vibrational imaging of stable isotope incorporation will be a valuable tool to advance our understanding of the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of newly synthesized proteome in vivo. PMID:23798434

Wei, Lu; Yu, Yong; Shen, Yihui; Wang, Meng C; Min, Wei

2013-07-01

319

Leaf Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this outdoor fall activity, learners find out what living in or under a layer of leaves is like. Learners will discover that animals that live in leaf litter use different senses to find prey, avoid predators, and to navigate through the litter. Learners role play predator and prey—the "prey" hides in a large pile of leaves, and the "predator" tries to "strike" by reaching straight into the leaf pile to grab the "prey." Learners also consider what body adaptations help organisms that spend part of their life under the leaves.

Lawrence Hall of Science

1981-01-01

320

Resilience processes demonstrated by young gay and bisexual men living with HIV: implications for intervention.  

PubMed

Given the increasing numbers of young gay/bisexual men (YGBM) diagnosed with HIV, it is important to understand the resilience processes enacted by this population in order to develop interventions that support their healthy development. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 YGBM (ages 17 to 24; 57% African American, 22% Latino) living with HIV from four geographically diverse clinics in the United States. Resilience processes clustered into four primary thematic areas: (1) engaging in health-promoting cognitive processes; (2) enacting healthy behavioral practices; (3) enlisting social support from others; and (4) empowering other young gay/bisexual men. These data suggest that YGBM living with HIV demonstrate resilience across multiple dimensions, including intrapersonal-level resilience related to individual cognitions and behaviors, as well as interpersonal-level resilience related to seeking support and providing support to others. Implications for the development of culturally-appropriate and strengths-based secondary prevention and other psychosocial interventions for YGBM living with HIV are discussed. PMID:25329778

Harper, Gary W; Bruce, Douglas; Hosek, Sybil G; Fernandez, M Isabel; Rood, Brian A

2014-12-01

321

Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Eibl, Robert H.

322

Direct light-up of cAMP derivatives in living cells by click reactions.  

PubMed

8-Azidoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-azido cAMP) was directly detected in living cells, by applying Cu-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition to probe cAMP derivatives by fluorescence light-up. Fluorescence emission was generated by two non-fluorescent molecules, 8-azido cAMP as a model target and difluorinated cyclooctyne (DIFO) reagent as a probe. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction between 8-azido cAMP and DIFO induces fluorescence in 8-azido cAMP. The fluorescence emission serves as a way to probe 8-azido cAMP in cells. PMID:24141242

Ito, Kenichiro; Liu, Hongshan; Komiyama, Makoto; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Xu, Yan

2013-01-01

323

Internet of things technology applied in medical information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of things technology used in medical information is adopt in this paper. Firstly the structure feature of internet of things technology is researched .Then analyzing the development of EPC System Network, especially Internet of things technology applied in medical information. Therefore the remote consultation System based on internet of things is adopted ,it is helpful to solve the area

Yan-Wei Wang; Hui-Li Yu; Ya Li

2011-01-01

324

Spectral Characteristics of Rice Plants Infested by Brown Planthoppers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectral characteristics of rice plants at various levels of infestation by the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stĺl), (Homoptera:Delphacidae), in the early grain-filling stage were measured and analyzed using a spectroradiometer. Plant damage was classified into six scales, i.e., 0 (CK), 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, based on the scale of infestation displayed on the surfaces of plant parts. Results

CHWEN-MING YANG; CHING-HUAN CHENG

325

Melting and breaking characteristics of OPGW strands by lightning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some strands were melted and broken in a 140 mm2 OPGW (composite fiber-optic ground wire) in a 187 kV transmission line. It was assumed that this was caused by a lightning strike. DC arc tests simulating lightning strikes were carried out, and the melting and breaking characteristics of OPGW strands were obtained. The electric charge of the lightning strike that

Yutaka Goda; Shigeru Yokoyama; Shunsuke Watanabe; Tadashi Kawano; Shinichi Kanda

2004-01-01

326

Recruitment characteristics of nerve fascicles stimulated by a multigroove electrode  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recruitment characteristics of fascicle-selective nerve stimulation by a multigroove electrode have been investigated both theoretically and in acute experiments. A three-dimensional (3-D) volume conductor model of fascicles in a multigroove device and a model of myelinated nerve fiber stimulation were used to calculate threshold stimuli of nerve fibers in these fascicles. After their exposition, fascicles from rat sciatic nerve

Paul Koole; Jan Holsheimer; Johannes J. Struijk; Anton J. Verloop

1997-01-01

327

Characteristics of Arsenic Accumulation by Pteris and non- Pteris Ferns  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research was conducted to understand the mechanisms of arsenic hyperaccumulation in Pteris vittata by comparing the characteristics of arsenic accumulation in Pteris and non-Pteris ferns. Seven Pteris (P.vittata, P. Cretica Rowerii, P. Cretica Parkerii, P. Cretica Albo-lineata, P. Quadriavrita, P. Ensiformis and P. Dentata) and six non-Pteris (Arachnoides simplicor, Didymochlaena truncatula, Dryopteris atrata, Dryopteris erythrosora, Cyrtomium falcatum, and Adiantum

T. Luongo; L. Q. Ma

2005-01-01

328

Living fluids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the major emerging fields of research of the beginning of this century concerns living fluids. By "living fluids", we mean two major categories of complex fluids: (i) fluids which are essential to life, like blood, and (ii) active fluids made of particles that are able to propel themselves in the suspending fluid by converting a form of their energy into mechanical motion. Studies on active fluids have known a considerable interest since the last decade. Blood might be viewed as an old topic, but the progresses in experimental techniques, analytical concepts and numerics, have contributed nowadays to a dramatic renewal of the interest in this field, with a great potential towards understanding physical and mechanical factors in cardiovascular diseases. These fields have considerably strengthened interdisciplinary research. The series of reviews of this dossier focus on the tremendous recent progress achieved in research on living fluids both from the experimental and theoretical points of views. These reviews present also the major open issues, making of this dossier a unique guide for future research in these fields. This project grew up thanks to the international summer school that we organized on the topic "living fluids" at the IES (Institut d'études scientifiques) of Cargčse (Corsica) in 2012.

Misbah, Chaouqi; Wagner, Christian

2013-06-01

329

Living Heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living Heritage is a website that celebrates New Zealand heritage through the help of the schools and students of New Zealand. The "About Living Heritage" link states that the website is "an online bilingual initiative that enables New Zealand schools to develop and publish an online resource, based on a heritage treasure in their community." Visitors can also read about the five or so groups these stories "Benefit", including New Zealand and the World, in the About Living Heritage link. The "Schools' Stories" link takes visitors to 26 schools' websites produced since 2008, and an archive of 79 schools' websites produced before 2008. By browsing through the stories, visitors can learn about Paddy, the much-loved wandering Airedale who lived on Island Bay in Wellington in the 1930s. The story of Mitiaro High School in the Cook Islands describes how they learned how to build a canoe called a paiere. Finally, a group of Year 1 and 2 students at Russley School write about their discovery that a tree near their school is protected by the city council.

330

Established breast cancer risk factors by clinically important tumour characteristics  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is a morphologically and clinically heterogeneous disease; however, it is less clear how risk factors relate to tumour features. We evaluated risk factors by tumour characteristics (histopathologic type, grade, size, and nodal status) in a population-based case–control of 2386 breast cancers and 2502 controls in Poland. Use of a novel extension of the polytomous logistic regression permitted simultaneous modelling of multiple tumour characteristics. Late age at first full-term birth was associated with increased risk of large (>2?cm) tumours (odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) 1.19 (1.07–1.33) for a 5-year increase in age), but not smaller tumours (P for heterogeneity adjusting for other tumour features (Phet)=0.007). On the other hand, multiparity was associated with reduced risk for small tumours (0.76 (0.68–0.86) per additional birth; Phet=0.004). Consideration of all tumour characteristics simultaneously revealed that current or recent use of combined hormone replacement therapy was associated with risk of small (2.29 (1.66–3.15)) and grade 1 (3.36 (2.22–5.08)) tumours (Phet=0.05 for size and 0.0008 for grade 1 vs 3), rather than specific histopathologic types (Phet=0.63 for ductal vs lobular). Finally, elevated body mass index was associated with larger tumour size among both pre- and postmenopausal women (Phet=0.05 and 0.0001, respectively). None of these relationships were explained by hormone receptor status of the tumours. In conclusion, these data support distinctive risk factor relationships by tumour characteristics of prognostic relevance. These findings might be useful in developing targeted prevention efforts. PMID:16755295

García-Closas, M; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Chatterjee, N; Peplonska, B; Anderson, W F; Szeszenia-D?browska, N; Bardin-Mikolajczak, A; Zatonski, W; Blair, A; Kalaylioglu, Z; Rymkiewicz, G; Mazepa-Sikora, D; Kordek, R; Lukaszek, S; Sherman, M E

2006-01-01

331

Perceived characteristics of psychiatric nurses: stigma by association.  

PubMed

The focus of this study was the concept of stigma by association, or the negative characteristics attributed to individuals (usually family members) who are in close contact with people who are stigmatized. Psychiatric nurses may likewise be affected by this stigma. Responses from 122 nurses indicated that psychiatric nursing is the least preferred specialty of 10 areas. Psychiatric nurses were least likely to be described as skilled, logical, dynamic, and respected. The findings suggest that psychiatric nursing may be stigmatized by association. Implications, especially in terms of the role of health care professionals in perpetuating stigma, are explored. PMID:18207053

Halter, Margaret J

2008-02-01

332

"How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things away  

E-print Network

1 "How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things Away Over the Internet? When the Internet Makes It Easier to Give Things Away", in NA - Advances of Management, France [ to cite ]: Valérie Guillard and Céline Del Bucchia (2012) ,"How About Giving My Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Create the Internet of Your Things The Internet of Things (IoT) is here today, and it begins  

E-print Network

Create the Internet of Your Things The Internet of Things (IoT) is here today, and it begins you create the Internet of Your Things, beginning with what matters most to your business. Using Microsoft Azure Internet of Things services, your business can: Increase efficiency. Quickly track device

Chaudhuri, Surajit

334

5 From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and  

E-print Network

. In such an architecture, popular Web technologies (e.g., HTML, JavaScript, Ajax, PHP, Ruby) can be used to build) proposed to link physi- cal objects with Web pages containing information and associated services. Using5 From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and Best

335

Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for 118-137Cs. A resolving power of over 106 and an accuracy of 1.4×10-7 have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, St.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Otto, Th.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Audi, G.; Moore, R. B.

1990-12-01

336

Vibrationally resonant imaging of a single living cell by supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supercontinuum-based multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has been applied to vibrational imaging of a living fission yeast cell. We have successfully extracted only a vibrationally resonant CARS image from a characteristic spectral profile in the C-H stretching vibrational region. Using our simple but sensitive analysis, the vibrational contrast is significantly improved in comparison with a CARS imaging at

Hideaki Kano; Hiro-O. Hamaguchi

2005-01-01

337

Human and Drosophila cryptochromes are light activated by flavin photoreduction in living cells.  

PubMed

Cryptochromes are a class of flavoprotein blue-light signaling receptors found in plants, animals, and humans that control plant development and the entrainment of circadian rhythms. In plant cryptochromes, light activation is proposed to result from photoreduction of a protein-bound flavin chromophore through intramolecular electron transfer. However, although similar in structure to plant cryptochromes, the light-response mechanism of animal cryptochromes remains entirely unknown. To complicate matters further, there is currently a debate on whether mammalian cryptochromes respond to light at all or are instead activated by non-light-dependent mechanisms. To resolve these questions, we have expressed both human and Drosophila cryptochrome proteins to high levels in living Sf21 insect cells using a baculovirus-derived expression system. Intact cells are irradiated with blue light, and the resulting cryptochrome photoconversion is monitored by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that light induces a change in the redox state of flavin bound to the receptor in both human and Drosophila cryptochromes. Photoreduction from oxidized flavin and subsequent accumulation of a semiquinone intermediate signaling state occurs by a conserved mechanism that has been previously identified for plant cryptochromes. These results provide the first evidence of how animal-type cryptochromes are activated by light in living cells. Furthermore, human cryptochrome is also shown to undergo this light response. Therefore, human cryptochromes in exposed peripheral and/or visual tissues may have novel light-sensing roles that remain to be elucidated. PMID:18597555

Hoang, Nathalie; Schleicher, Erik; Kacprzak, Sylwia; Bouly, Jean-Pierre; Picot, Marie; Wu, William; Berndt, Albrecht; Wolf, Eva; Bittl, Robert; Ahmad, Margaret

2008-07-01

338

DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES IN ANDRA'S ASSESSMENT OF ACTIVITIES CARRIED OUT BY RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATORS AND AFFECTING THE QUALITY OF IL-LL SHORT-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES AND HL-IL LONG-LIVED WASTE PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

In both cases of packages for either low-level and intermediate-level short-lived (LL-IL/SL) or high-level and intermediate-level long-lived (HL-IL/LL) radioactive waste, Andra has defined a quality reference system, manages it, follows up its appropriate implementation in production plants and verifies its effectiveness in production. The purpose of such a reference system is to ensure, in the first case, that waste packages comply with the Centre de l'Aube's acceptance criteria and, in the second case, that the characteristics submitted by the waste generators to Andra as input data for the deep geological repository project reflect the actual production conditions. In that context, the three management steps of the quality reference system include differences due to the fact that HL-IL/SL packages have not been submitted yet to any technical acceptance criterion. Compliance with any such criterion should be the subject of a characterization report during the qualification phase and of a examination during the verification phase. The management of the quality reference system also involves similarities that facilitate the joint work carried out by Andra with the waste generators, especially in the facilities where both package types are produced.

Trentesaux, C.; Cairon, P.; Dumont, J.-N.; Felix, B.; Losada, F.

2003-02-27

339

Investigating the Role of F-Actin in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assembly by Live-Cell Microscopy  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles assemble at the plasma membrane, which is lined by a dense network of filamentous actin (F-actin). Large amounts of actin have been detected in HIV-1 virions, proposed to be incorporated by interactions with the nucleocapsid domain of the viral polyprotein Gag. Previous studies addressing the role of F-actin in HIV-1 particle formation using F-actin-interfering drugs did not yield consistent results. Filamentous structures pointing toward nascent HIV-1 budding sites, detected by cryo-electron tomography and atomic force microscopy, prompted us to revisit the role of F-actin in HIV-1 assembly by live-cell microscopy. HeLa cells coexpressing HIV-1 carrying fluorescently labeled Gag and a labeled F-actin-binding peptide were imaged by live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIR-FM). Computational analysis of image series did not reveal characteristic patterns of F-actin in the vicinity of viral budding sites. Furthermore, no transient recruitment of F-actin during bud formation was detected by monitoring fluorescence intensity changes at nascent HIV-1 assembly sites. The chosen approach allowed us to measure the effect of F-actin-interfering drugs on the assembly of individual virions in parallel with monitoring changes in the F-actin network of the respective cell. Treatment of cells with latrunculin did not affect the efficiency and dynamics of Gag assembly under conditions resulting in the disruption of F-actin filaments. Normal assembly rates were also observed upon transient stabilization of F-actin by short-term treatment with jasplakinolide. Taken together, these findings indicate that actin filament dynamics are dispensable for HIV-1 Gag assembly at the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 particles assemble at the plasma membrane of virus-producing cells. This membrane is lined by a dense network of actin filaments that might either present a physical obstacle to the formation of virus particles or generate force promoting the assembly process. Drug-mediated interference with the actin cytoskeleton showed different results for the formation of retroviral particles in different studies, likely due to general effects on the cell upon prolonged drug treatment. Here, we characterized the effect of actin-interfering compounds on the HIV-1 assembly process by direct observation of virus formation in live cells, which allowed us to measure assembly rate constants directly upon drug addition. Virus assembly proceeded with normal rates when actin filaments were either disrupted or stabilized. Taken together with the absence of characteristic actin filament patterns at viral budding sites in our analyses, this indicates that the actin network is dispensable for HIV-1 assembly. PMID:24789789

Rahman, Sheikh Abdul; Koch, Peter; Weichsel, Julian; Godinez, William J.; Schwarz, Ulrich; Rohr, Karl; Lamb, Don C.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg

2014-01-01

340

Defining the Subcellular Interface of Nanoparticles by Live-Cell Imaging  

PubMed Central

Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes. PMID:23637951

Hemmerich, Peter H.; von Mikecz, Anna H.

2013-01-01

341

Defining the subcellular interface of nanoparticles by live-cell imaging.  

PubMed

Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes. PMID:23637951

Hemmerich, Peter H; von Mikecz, Anna H

2013-01-01

342

Live-cell superresolution imaging by pulsed STED two-photon excitation microscopy.  

PubMed

Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) allows fluorescence imaging in thick biological samples where absorption and scattering typically degrade resolution and signal collection of one-photon imaging approaches. The spatial resolution of conventional 2PLSM is limited by diffraction, and the near-infrared wavelengths used for excitation in 2PLSM preclude the accurate imaging of many small subcellular compartments of neurons. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is a superresolution imaging modality that overcomes the resolution limit imposed by diffraction and allows fluorescence imaging of nanoscale features. Here, we describe the design and operation of a superresolution two-photon microscope using pulsed excitation and STED lasers. We examine the depth dependence of STED imaging in acute tissue slices and find enhancement of 2P resolution ranging from approximately fivefold at 20 ?m to approximately twofold at 90-?m deep. The depth dependence of resolution is found to be consistent with the depth dependence of depletion efficiency, suggesting resolution is limited by STED laser propagation through turbid tissue. Finally, we achieve live imaging of dendritic spines with 60-nm resolution and demonstrate that our technique allows accurate quantification of neuronal morphology up to 30-?m deep in living brain tissue. PMID:23442955

Takasaki, Kevin T; Ding, Jun B; Sabatini, Bernardo L

2013-02-19

343

Dynamic activation of H-Ras induced by low power laser irradiation in living cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been shown to promote cell proliferation in various cell types, yet the mechanism of which has not been fully clarified. Studying the signaling pathways involved in the laser irradiation is important for understanding these processes. The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway is a network that governs proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Recent studies suggest that Ras/Raf signaling pathway is involved in the LPLI-induced cell proliferation, but the dynamic activation of Ras in living cells induced by LPLI has not been reported. In present study, to monitor the dynamic activation of H-Ras after LPLI treatment in living cells in real time, Raichu-Ras reporter was utilized, which was constructed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Our results show that the dynamic activation of H-Ras at the cell edges of the plasma membrane is monitored during cell proliferation induced by LPLI (0.8 J/cm2) in serum-starved COS-7 cells expressing Raichu-Ras reporter using FRET imaging on laser scanning confocal microscope, and that LPLI causes the redistribution of H-Ras from the cytoplasm to plasma membrane. The same results are observed in EGF treated COS-7 cells. Taken together, LPLI induces the COS-7 cells proliferation by activated Ras.

Gao, Xuejuan; Xing, Da; Pei, Yihui; Wang, Fang

2007-05-01

344

Biosorption of pentachlorophenol by Anthracophyllum discolor in the form of live fungal pellets.  

PubMed

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is an extremely dangerous pollutant for every ecosystem. In this study we have detected how PCP concentration and pH levels can influence PCP adsorption by Anthracophyllum discolor in the form of live fungal pellets. PCP adsorption was evaluated after 24 hours in KCl 0.1 M electrolyte solution with initial PCP concentrations of 5 and 10 mg L (-1) and with pH values between 4 and 9 (at intervals of 0.5). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to identify functional groups of fungal biomass that can interact with PCP. The amount of PCP that was adsorbed by A. discolor was >80% at pH values between 5 and 5.5, whatever the concentration tested. PCP adsorption significantly decreased in liquid medium of pH > 6.0. FTIR results showed that amides, alkanes, carboxylates, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups may be important to the PCP adsorption for pellets of A. discolor. Live fungal pellets of A. discolor may be used as a natural biosorbent for liquid solutions contaminated by PCP. PMID:25154034

Bosso, Luciano; Lacatena, Federica; Cristinzio, Gennaro; Cea, Mara; Diez, Maria Cristina; Rubilar, Olga

2015-01-25

345

Challenges Experienced by Rural Women in India Living with AIDS and Implications for the Delivery of HIV/AIDS Care  

PubMed Central

Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women’s adherence to anti-retroviral therapy. Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a Primary Health Center near Chennai, India and with nurses, physicians and Accredited Social Health Activists (Ashas), lay health care workers. The most prevalent barriers expressed by the women were sickness-related, psychological, financial issues with childcare, and distance and/or transportation to the site. Women living with AIDS reviewed Ashas favorably. PMID:21409663

Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K.; William, Ravi Raj; Heravian, Anisa; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Greengold, Barbara; Ekstrand, Maria; Rao, Pantangi Venkata Rama

2012-01-01

346

Labeling Live Cells by Copper-Catalyzed Alkyne-Azide Click Chemistry  

PubMed Central

The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, optimized for biological molecules in aqueous buffers, has been shown to rapidly label mammalian cells in culture with no loss in cell viability. Metabolic uptake and display of the azide derivative of N-acetylmannosamine developed by Bertozzi, followed by CuAAC ligation using sodium ascorbate and the ligand tris(hydroxypropyltriazolyl)methylamine (THPTA), gave rise to abundant covalent attachment of dye-alkyne reactants. THPTA serves both to accelerate the CuAAC reaction and to protect the cells from damage by oxidative agents produced by the Cu-catalyzed reduction of oxygen by ascorbate, which is required to maintain the metal in the active +1 oxidation state. This procedure extends the application of this fastest of azide-based bioorthogonal reactions to the exterior of living cells. PMID:20886827

Hong, Vu; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Manchester, Marianne

2010-01-01

347

Engineering Multifunctional Living Paints: Thin, Convectively-Assembled Biocomposite Coatings of Live Cells and Colloidal Latex Particles Deposited by Continuous Convective-Sedimentation Assembly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced composite materials could be revolutionized by the development of methods to incorporate living cells into functional materials and devices. This could be accomplished by continuously and rapidly depositing thin ordered arrays of adhesive colloidal latex particles and live cells that maintain stability and preserve microbial reactivity. Convective assembly is one method of rapidly assembling colloidal particles into thin (<10 microm thick), ordered films with engineered compositions, thicknesses, and particle packing that offer several advantages over thicker randomly ordered composites, including enhanced cell stability and increased reactivity through minimized diffusion resistance to nutrients and reduced light scattering. This method can be used to precisely deposit live bacteria, cyanobacteria, yeast, and algae into biocomposite coatings, forming reactive biosensors, photoabsorbers, or advanced biocatalysts. This dissertation developed new continuous deposition and coating characterization methods for fabricating and characterizing <10 microm thick colloid coatings---monodispersed latex particle or cell suspensions, bimodal blends of latex particles or live cells and microspheres, and trimodal formulations of biomodal latex and live cells on substrates such as aluminum foil, glass, porous Kraft paper, polyester, and polypropylene. Continuous convective-sedimentation assembly (CSA) is introduced to enable fabrication of larger surface area and long coatings by constantly feeding coating suspension to the meniscus, thus expanding the utility of convective assembly to deposit monolayer or very thin films or multi-layer coatings composed of thin layers on a large scale. Results show thin, tunable coatings can be fabricated from diverse coating suspensions and critical coating parameters that control thickness and structure. Particle size ratio and charge influence deposition, convective mixing or demixing and relative particle locations. Substrate wettability and suspension composition influence coating microstructure by controlling suspension delivery and spreading across the substrate. Microbes behave like colloidal particles during CSA, allowing for deposition of very thin stable biocomposite coatings of latex-live cell blends. CSA of particle-cell blends result in open-packed structures (15-45% mean void space), instead of tightly packed coatings attainable with single component systems, confirming the existence of significant polymer particle-cell interactions and formation of particle aggregates that disrupt coating microstructure during deposition. Tunable process parameters, such as particle concentration, fluid sonication, and fluid density, influence coating homogeneity when the meniscus is continuously supplied. Fluid density modification and fluid sonication affect particle sedimentation and distribution in the coating growth front whereas the suspended particle concentration strongly affects coating thickness, but has almost no effect on void space. Changing the suspension delivery mode (topside versus underside CCSA) yields disparate meniscus volumes and uneven particle delivery to the drying front, which enables control of the coating microstructure by varying the total number of particles available for deposition. The judicious combination of all these parameters will enable deposition of uniform, thin, latex-cell monolayers over areas on the order of tens of square centimeters or larger. To demonstrate the utility of biocomposite coatings, this dissertation investigated photoreactive coatings (artificial leaves) from suspensions of latex particles and nitrogen-limited Rps. palustris CGA009 or sulfur-limited C. reinhardtii CC-124. These coatings demonstrated stable, sustained (>90 hours) photohydrogen production under anoxygenic conditions. Nutrient reduction slows cell division, minimizing coating outgrowth, and promotes photohydrogen generation, improving coating reactivity. Scanning electron microscopy of microstructure revealed how coating reactivity can be controlled by the size

Jenkins, Jessica Shawn

348

Freezing of living cells  

SciTech Connect

It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

Mazur, P.

1985-01-01

349

Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.  

PubMed

Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the ?-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain. PMID:25196365

Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

2015-01-01

350

Kinesin-1 structural organization and conformational changes revealed by FRET stoichiometry in live cells  

PubMed Central

Kinesin motor proteins drive the transport of cellular cargoes along microtubule tracks. How motor protein activity is controlled in cells is unresolved, but it is likely coupled to changes in protein conformation and cargo association. By applying the quantitative method fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) stoichiometry to fluorescent protein (FP)–labeled kinesin heavy chain (KHC) and kinesin light chain (KLC) subunits in live cells, we studied the overall structural organization and conformation of Kinesin-1 in the active and inactive states. Inactive Kinesin-1 molecules are folded and autoinhibited such that the KHC tail blocks the initial interaction of the KHC motor with the microtubule. In addition, in the inactive state, the KHC motor domains are pushed apart by the KLC subunit. Thus, FRET stoichiometry reveals conformational changes of a protein complex in live cells. For Kinesin-1, activation requires a global conformational change that separates the KHC motor and tail domains and a local conformational change that moves the KHC motor domains closer together. PMID:17200416

Cai, Dawen; Hoppe, Adam D.; Swanson, Joel A.; Verhey, Kristen J.

2007-01-01

351

Real-time detecting gelatinases activity in living cells by FRET imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Degradation of the extracellular matrix by Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) not only enhances tumor invasion, but also affects tumor cell behaviour and leads to cancer progression. To monitor gelatinases (contain MMP2 and MMP9) activity in living cells, we constructed a vector that encoded a gelatinases recognition site (GRS) between citrine (mutation of EYFP Q69M) in N terminal and ECFP in C terminal. Because Gelatinases are secretory proteins and act outside of cell, an expressing vector displayed the fusion protein on cellular surface was used for this FRET gene probe. On expression of YFP-GRS-ECFP in MCF-7 cells that expressed no gelatinases, we were able to observe the efficient transfer of energy from excited ECFP to YFP within the YFP-GRS-ECFP molecule. However, the fusion protein YFP-GRS-ECFP was expressed in MDA-MB 453s cell line with high secretory gelatinases, so YFP-GRS-ECFP was cleaved by gelatinases, no such transfer of energy was detected and fluorescence signal disappeared in YFP channel since YFP protein was cut down. Moreover, Doxycycline, a MMP inhibitor, could make FRET signal increase and fluorescence signal appeared in YFP channel. Thus, the FRET probe YFP-GRS-ECFP can sensitively and reliably monitor gelatinases activation in living cells and can be used for screening MMP inhibitors.

Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Bifeng; Luo, Qingming

2006-01-01

352

[Subjective symptoms reported by people living in the vicinity of cellular phone base stations: review].  

PubMed

The problem of health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by cellular phone base stations evokes much interest in view of the fact that people living in their vicinity are fated to continuous exposure to EMF. None of the studies carried out throughout the world have revealed excessive values of standards adopted by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). A questionnaire was used as a study tool. The results of the questionnaire survey reveal that people living in the vicinity of base stations report various complaints mostly of the circulatory system, but also of sleep disturbances, irritability, depression, blurred vision, concentration difficulties, nausea, lack of appetite, headache and vertigo. The performed studies showed the relationship between the incidence of individual symptoms, the level of exposure, and the distance between a residential area and a base station. This association was observed in both groups of persons, those who linked their complaints with the presence of the base station and those who did not notice such a relation. Further studies, clinical and those based on questionnaires, are needed to explain the background of reported complaints. PMID:15620045

Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Zmy?lony, Marek; Szyjkowska, Agata; Gadzicka, Elzbieta

2004-01-01

353

Estimating solar radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton from satellite ocean-color data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Primary production, PP, or the quantity of organic matter synthesized by phytoplankton per unit of surface and time, depends on the photo-synthetically available radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton, APAR. Computing APAR requires knowledge of the absorption coefficient of live phytoplankton and the total absorption coefficient, quantities that are difficult to retrieve accurately from satellite ocean-color data. In the proposed approach, APAR is estimated directly from a linear combination of marine reflectance in the PAR spectral range. Feasibility is demonstrated theoretically from simulations using a marine reflectance model, and experimentally using data collected at 19 biooptical stations during the February-March 2011 R/V Melville oceanographic cruise in the Southern Atlantic and Southeastern Pacific. Improvements in APAR accuracy are quantified in comparisons with estimates obtained from absorption coefficients or chlorophyll concentration determined from marine reflectance via standard satellite algorithms. The linear combination of marine reflectance is fairly robust to atmospheric correction errors. Due to the linear nature of the algorithm, their impact may be further reduced when using space- or time-averaged reflectance. The methodology is applied to actual MODIS imagery over the Southern Atlantic, and variability in the resulting APAR field is analyzed. The study suggests that determining APAR directly from marine reflectance has the potential to improve PP estimates from space.

Frouin, Robert J.; Ruddorff, Natalia M.; Kampel, Milton

2014-11-01

354

A day to be lived. Elderly peoples' possessions for everyday life in assisted living.  

PubMed

This study is a qualitative interview study about the household possessions that elderly women and men brought with them when moving into assisted living. The move implied a substantial reduction of their possessions since, in all cases, they had left a larger dwelling than the one they moved to. The study gives a glimpse into the everyday life of the oldest old in assisted living. The things the elderly participants brought were of three types; cherished objects, representations of who they were, and mundane objects. The most important objects indicated by the elderly often belonged to the third type, and were preferred for the significance they had for the everyday life of the individual. These objects revealed a circumscribed but dignified life in their private bed-sitting room, often in solitude, where the elderly individuals pursued various interests and small-scale activities. However, this life was organized and preferred by the individuals themselves, in accordance with the principles of resident autonomy and individual choice that are promoted in assisted living. The author suggests that these self-engaged pursuits can contribute to bridging the gap between disengagement and activity theories. The study results also contribute to making visible the private life of the oldest old in assisted living. PMID:23561278

Nord, Catharina

2013-04-01

355

Science Oxford Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first things visitors will see when visiting the Science Oxford Live website are a few shots from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit that will soon be at the brick and mortar location of Science Oxford Live. It's hard to decide which is cuter: the hippo, the monkey, or the giraffe's tail. Visitors will certainly want to check out the video podcasts available through iTunes, and even may even subscribe to the podcasts to receive the latest episodes. These webcasts, found under the Watch Us tab, are recordings of live events that took place at Science Oxford Live. They cover topics such as Parkinson's disease, the sleep versus wake balance, the science and history of chocolate, the curse of consciousness, and how "doctors and other health professionals sometimes do more harm than good to patients, despite acting with the best of intentions." The Discovery Zone is a place for kids which is best experienced in person, but online it still has valuable lessons to teach, and it's worth a look.

2012-02-10

356

Biosynthesis and structural characteristics of selenium nanoparticles by Pseudomonas alcaliphila.  

PubMed

In this paper, we report that selenium (Se) nanoparticles were first biosynthesized by Pseudomonas alcaliphila with a simple and eco-friendly biological method. The structural characteristics of Se nanoparticles were examined. The results showed that spherical particles appeared with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm during incubation and Se nanorods were present after incubating in an aqueous reaction solution for 24h. However, the formation of Se nanorods was interrupted when 5% (w/v) poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) was added in the aqueous reaction solution, obtaining stable spherical Se nanoparticles with a diameter of about 200 nm. PMID:21752611

Zhang, Wenjie; Chen, Zhijuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Liang; Gao, Ping; Li, Daping

2011-11-01

357

‘The best thing ever’: how children's popular culture matters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reflects upon a popular cultural event which was, briefly, for a particular grouping of children in the UK, ‘the best thing ever’: namely the release of the CD-single Reach, by the British pop group S Club 7. I suggest that this event was illustrative of manifold cultural forms and practices which—being ostensibly banal, fun, faddish, lowbrow and ‘childish’—continue

John Horton

2010-01-01

358

Research on Key Technology and Applications for Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet of Things (IOT) has been paid more and more attention by the academe, industry, and government all over the world. The concept of IOT and the architecture of IOT are discussed. The key technologies of IOT, including Radio Frequency Identification technology, Electronic Product Code technology, and ZigBee technology are analyzed. The framework of digital agriculture application based on IOT is proposed.

Chen, Xian-Yi; Jin, Zhi-Gang

359

Talking of hallowed things: the silent poetry of Emily Dickinson  

E-print Network

things, or at least with treading gingerly around certain subjects at first glance seems an unusual preoccupation. But Emily Dickinson made clear, in both her letters and her poems, that she felt certain subjects ? nature, death and immortality... rather than frustration. In the poems linking silence to God or immortality, the poet displays a similarly complex response. Sometimes, God's silence iv leads her to suspect that God plays a game with mankind by giving His human creatures...

Matthews, Pamela R

1981-01-01

360

Biosorption of arsenic (III) from aqueous solution by living cells of Bacillus cereus.  

PubMed

In this work, removal of arsenic (III) from aqueous solution by living cells (Bacillus cereus), biosorption mechanism, and characterization studies have been reported. B. cereus cell surface was characterized using SEM-EDX and FTIR. Dependence of biosorption on pH of the solution, biosorbent dose, initial arsenic (III) concentration, contact time, and temperature had been studied to achieve optimum condition. The maximum biosorption capacity of living cells of B. cereus for arsenic (III) was found to be 32.42 mg/g at pH 7.5, at optimum conditions of contact time of 30 min, biomass dosage of 6 g/L, and temperature of 30 ± 2 °C. Biosorption data of arsenic (III) are fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with R (2) (correlation coefficient)?>0.99. The pseudo-second-order model description of the kinetics of arsenic (III) is successfully applied to predict the rate constant of biosorption. Thermodynamic parameters reveal the endothermic, spontaneous, and feasible nature of sorption process of arsenic (III) onto B. cereus biomass. The arsenic (III) ions are desorbed from B. cereus using both 1 M HCl and 1 M HNO(3). PMID:23093415

Giri, A K; Patel, R K; Mahapatra, S S; Mishra, P C

2013-03-01

361

Late cataractogenesis caused by particulate radiations and photons in long-lived mammalian species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation cataractogenesis induced by small acute doses of particulate radiations and photons in the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), the beagle dog (Canis familiaris) and the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is discussed in the context of the use of animal models to assess the radiation hazards faced by humans during lengthy sojourns in deep space. Attention is paid to: 1) the importance of lifespan studies with long-lived species - the above animals have median lifespans in captivity of 5-7, 13-14 and -25 years, respectively; 2) the magnitudes of possible dose thresholds for cataractogenesis from sparsely ionizing radiations and the modifications of those thresholds by the late degenerative phase of the phenomenon.

Lett, J. T.; Lee, A. C.; Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.

362

Career counseling: 101+ things you can do with a degree in biology.  

PubMed

Biology is the science of life and of how living things work. Our students choose to major in biology in college because of a fascination with understanding how living things function, but often they have difficulty in identifying a career that uses their foundation in biology despite the variety of biology-based careers available. The purpose of this discussion is to assist biology students and the career counselors who work with them in identifying satisfying careers that build upon their interest and foundation in biology. The categories of career options include research, healthcare, teaching, science writing, administration/management, government, industry, and miscellaneous careers that do not fit into the other categories. PMID:18057403

Eyster, Kathleen M

2007-12-01

363

How Things Work, an Enrichment Class for Middle School Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Middle School students are curious about their surroundings. They are always asking questions about how things work. So this semester two middle school science teachers and a physicist combined their strengths and taught HOW THINGS WORK, THE PHYSICS OF EVERYDAY LIFE (a book by Louis A. Bloomfield). The students studied the physics behind everyday objects to see how they worked. They read, discussed the physics, and completed laboratory exercises using lasers, cameras, and other objects. Each student then picked an inventor that interested him/her and used the INTERNET to research the inventor and made a class presentation. For the final project, each students use the physics they learned and became an inventor and made an invention.

Goller, Tamara; Watson, Nancy; Watson, James

1998-05-01

364

Embedded Interaction: Interacting with the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things assumes that objects have digital functionality\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009and can be identified and tracked automatically. The main goal of\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009embedded interaction is to look at new opportunities that arise for\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interactive systems and the immediate value users gain. The authors\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009developed various prototypes to explore novel ways for human-computer\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interaction (HCI), enabled by the Internet of Things and

Matthias Kranz; Albrecht Schmidt

2010-01-01

365

PERSONALITY PROCESSES AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES Optimism in Close Relationships: How Seeing Things  

E-print Network

PERSONALITY PROCESSES AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES Optimism in Close Relationships: How Seeing Things to be substantially affected by the cognitive dispositions of the individuals involved. As Coleridge might say, lovers

Gross, James J.

366

Top Ten things students need to know about the `rush for rentals'  

E-print Network

Top Ten things students need to know about the `rush for rentals' 1. It's a renters market! Unlike security deposit earn interest? Will your part of the deposit be affected by damages you didn't do? Learn

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

367

Time to Talk: 5 Things You Should Know about Dietary Supplements for Hepatitis C  

MedlinePLUS

... Things You Should Know About Dietary Supplements for Hepatitis C Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by a ... more years to happen. Without medical treatment, chronic hepatitis C can eventually cause liver cancer or liver ...

368

Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method  

SciTech Connect

The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

Halsall, M.J. (U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Dorchester (United Kingdom))

1993-01-01

369

Perceptions of arranged marriages by young Pakistani Muslim women living in a western society.  

E-print Network

??Exploration of attitudes towards arranged marriages were examined from the perspective of second-generation Pakistani Muslim women living in a western society. Symbolic Interactionism and Interpretive… (more)

Zaidi, Arshia Urooj.

1999-01-01

370

Characterization of Curli A Production on Living Bacterial Surfaces by Scanning Probe Microscopy  

PubMed Central

Curli are adhesive surface fibers produced by many Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. They are implicated in bacterial attachment and invasion to epithelial cells. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to determine the effects of curli on topology and mechanical properties of live E. coli cells. Young's moduli of both curli-deficient and curli-overproducing mutants were significantly lower than that of their wild-type (WT) strain, while decay lengths of the former strains were higher than that of the latter strain. Surprisingly, topological images showed that, unlike the WT and curli-overproducing mutant, the curli-deficient mutant produced a large number of flagella-like fibers, which may explain why the strain had a lower Young's modulus than the WT. These results suggest that the mechanical properties of bacterial surfaces are greatly affected by the presence of filamentous structures such as curli and flagella. PMID:23083709

Oh, Yoo Jin; Cui, Yidan; Kim, Hyunseok; Li, Yinhua; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Park, Sungsu

2012-01-01

371

Protein delivery into live cells by incubation with an endosomolytic agent  

PubMed Central

We report on how a dimer of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT, dfTAT, penetrates live cells by escaping from endosomes with a particularly high efficiency. By mediating endosomal leakage, dfTAT also delivers proteins into cultured cells after a simple co-incubation procedure. Cytosolic delivery is achieved in most cells in a culture and only a relatively small amount of material remains trapped inside endosomes. Delivery does not require binding interactions between dfTAT and a protein, multiple molecules can be delivered at once, and delivery can be repeated. Remarkably, dfTAT-mediated delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation, or gene expression. This new delivery strategy should be extremely useful for cell-based assays, cellular imaging applications, and the ex vivo manipulation of cells. PMID:24930129

Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Dayani, Laila; Wang, Ting-Yi; Johnson, Gregory A.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

2014-01-01

372

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics  

E-print Network

This paper presents a method for indexing human ac- tivities in videos captured from a wearable camera being worn by patients, for studies of progression of the dementia diseases. Our method aims to produce indexes to facilitate the navigation throughout the individual video recordings, which could help doctors search for early signs of the dis- ease in the activities of daily living. The recorded videos have strong motion and sharp lighting changes, inducing noise for the analysis. The proposed approach is based on a two steps analysis. First, we propose a new approach to segment this type of video, based on apparent motion. Each segment is characterized by two original motion de- scriptors, as well as color, and audio descriptors. Second, a Hidden-Markov Model formulation is used to merge the multimodal audio and video features, and classify the test segments. Experiments show the good properties of the ap- proach on real data.

Karaman, Svebor; Dartigues, Jean-François; Gaëstel, Yann; Mégret, Rémi; Pinquier, Julien

2011-01-01

373

Visualizing the endocytosis of phenylephrine in living cells by quantum dot-based tracking.  

PubMed

To study the intracellular receptor-drug transportation, a fluorescent probe consisting of phenylephrine-polyethylene glycol-quantum dots conjugate was employed to track endocytosis process of phenylephrine in living cells. This type of movement was studied by continuously filming fluorescent images in the same cell. We also calculated the movement parameters, and divided the endocytosis process into 6 stages. Furthermore, the movement parameters of this probe in different organelles were determined by co-localization of the probe fluorescent images and different cellular organelles. After comparing the parameters in cellular organelles with these in 6 stages, the whole endocytosis pathway was demonstrated. These results verified that this probe successfully tracked the whole intracellular dynamic endocytosis process of phenylephrine. Our method realized the visual tracking the whole receptor-mediated endocytosis, which is a new approach on investigating the molecular mechanisms and kinetic properties of intracellular receptor-drug transportation. PMID:24855959

Ma, Jing; Wu, Lina; Hou, Zhun; Song, Yao; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

2014-08-01

374

Science 101: What causes things to rust?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The simple answer is that things rust when you leave them out in the rain. But maybe you want a more thorough answer. Rust is a form of corrosion, which is broadly defined as the wearing away of materials due to chemical reactions. So corrosion applies to

2010-12-01

375

OPPORTUNITIES WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO MARKETING  

E-print Network

Strategy/Brand Management Consultant · Legal Intelligence Marketing research creates intelligence betterMARKETING OPPORTUNITIES WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO MARKETING PEOPLE DO?? #12;OVERVIEW Marketing can value: marketing and innovation ­ everything else is a cost. Marketing activities create value directly

Selmic, Sandra

376

The Internet of nano-things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology promises new solutions for many applications in the biomedical, industrial and military fields as well as in consumer and industrial goods. The interconnection of nanoscale devices with existing communication networks and ultimately the Internet defines a new networking paradigm that is further referred to as the Internet of Nano-Things. Within this context, this paper discusses the state of the

I. F. Akyildiz; J. M. Jornet

2010-01-01

377

Semantic middleware for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to extending the Internet to devices such as home appliances, consumer electronics, and sensor networks. As multiple heterogeneous devices attempt to create area networks, one of the major challenges is the interoperability and composability of their services. The traditional way to address interoperability is to define standards; however, there are many standards and specifications

Zhexuan Song; Alvaro A. Cárdenas; Ryusuke Masuoka

2010-01-01

378

The Internet of Things: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the Internet of Things. Main enabling factor of this promising paradigm is the integration of several technologies and communications solutions. Identification and tracking technologies, wired and wireless sensor and actuator networks, enhanced communication protocols (shared with the Next Generation Internet), and distributed intelligence for smart objects are just the most relevant. As one can easily imagine, any

Luigi Atzori; Antonio Iera; Giacomo Morabito

2010-01-01

379

Characteristic Gene Selection via Weighting Principal Components by Singular Values  

PubMed Central

Conventional gene selection methods based on principal component analysis (PCA) use only the first principal component (PC) of PCA or sparse PCA to select characteristic genes. These methods indeed assume that the first PC plays a dominant role in gene selection. However, in a number of cases this assumption is not satisfied, so the conventional PCA-based methods usually provide poor selection results. In order to improve the performance of the PCA-based gene selection method, we put forward the gene selection method via weighting PCs by singular values (WPCS). Because different PCs have different importance, the singular values are exploited as the weights to represent the influence on gene selection of different PCs. The ROC curves and AUC statistics on artificial data show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Moreover, experimental results on real gene expression data sets show that our method can extract more characteristic genes in response to abiotic stresses than conventional gene selection methods. PMID:22808018

Liu, Jin-Xing; Xu, Yong; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Wang, Yi; Yang, Jing-Yu

2012-01-01

380

The characteristics of sprays produced by coaxial airblast atomisers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of droplet size, velocity, liquid flux and concentration were made in sprays produced by a coaxial airblast atomizer using a phase Doppler anemometer. The atomizer comprised a liquid jet with exit diameter varied between 1.1 and 2.3 mm positioned in the center of a gaseous annular stream. The characteristics of the preburner sprays of the main engine of the space shuttle were simulated by using water and air respectively replacing liquid oxygen and hydrogen. Reduction of the diameter of the liquid tube was found to improve the atomization and reduce the rate of spread of sprays with similar gas-to-liquid velocity ratio. The presence of a converging nozzle at the exit of the gaseous jet improved the atomization and increased the rate of spread of sprays with gas-to-liquid velocity ratio up to around 45, but had no effect for higher velocity ratios.

Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

1993-01-01

381

Starting characteristics of direct current motors powered by solar cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct current motors are used in photovoltaic systems. Important characteristics of electric motors are the starting to rated current and torque ratios. These ratios are dictated by the size of the solar cell array and are different for the various dc motor types. Discussed here is the calculation of the starting to rated current ratio and starting to rated torque ratio of the permanent magnet, and series and shunt excited motors when powered by solar cells for two cases: with and without a maximum-power-point-tracker (MPPT) included in the system. Comparing these two cases, one gets a torque magnification of about 3 for the permanent magnet motor and about 7 for other motor types. The calculation of the torques may assist the PV system designer to determine whether or not to include an MPPT in the system.

Singer, S.; Appelbaum, J.

1989-01-01

382

Characteristics of Young Suicides by Violent Methods in Rural China*  

PubMed Central

Suicide is one of the most common public health problems in the world. Information on 392 completed suicides aged 15–34 years were consecutively collected from 16 counties in three provinces of China. Information on each suicide was obtained from two informants. The results showed ingesting pesticides or other poisons (73.5%) and hanging (10.5%) were the two most common methods of suicide. Suicides happened more in autumn (30.10%) or summer (27.29%), nighttime (68.3%), and at home (73.6%). However, suicides with violent methods were more common in winter and spring and outside of home. Season (autumn or summer), place (at home), and pesticide stored in home were negatively while depression was positively associated with violent methods of suicide. Characteristics of the suicides by violent methods are different from those by nonviolent methods. Investigations into the methods of rural young suicides are necessary for suicide prevention in China. PMID:21291472

Jia, Cun-Xian; Zhang, Jie

2011-01-01

383

Intersecting the Architecture of the Internet of Things with the Future Retail Industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses the approach of SAP Research in Switzerland to investigate, develop and evaluate future Internet of Things architectures and prototypes with their unique combination of three scientific pillars: SAP Research combines an environment of co-located academic education at leading universities ("Campus-Based Engineering Centers") with the concept of living laboratories in which real-world prototypes and systems are rigorously tested. SAP Research Switzerland hosts the "Future Retail Center" (FRC) in order to validate innovations in the retail industry. As an orthogonal element, we also structure our research activities in technological dimensions as opposed to the industry-specific living labs. The "Smart Items Research Program" bundles and focuses all research topics that are related to Ambient Intelligence (AmI), Internet of Things, and Pervasive Computing. With the researchers from the engineering centers, the industry focus in the living labs, and the different research projects and research programs, a holistic research perspective is created that ensures a highly effective and focused execution of research, unifying technical Internet of Things architectures with the corresponding business needs and forming a unique landscape of innovation.

Magerkurth, Carsten; Haller, Stephan; Hagedorn, Pascal

384

Mr. Neil Armstrong interviewed by Dr. P.J. Vorzimmar -MSC-April 6, 1967 ARMSTRONG: You remember which things change in the course of the  

E-print Network

Mr. Neil Armstrong interviewed by Dr. P.J. Vorzimmar - MSC- April 6, 1967 ARMSTRONG: You remember else can take over somebody else* Gemini mission because of the uniqueness of #12;ARMSTRONG- 2 each could easily substitute for some- body who is doing a rendezvous now.. ARMSTRONG: He cotid substitute

385

Optimizing DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 for assessment of chromatin organization in living cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest for applications of fluorescence measurements to studies on many physiological mechanisms in living cells. However, few studies have taken advantage of DNA quantification by fluorometry for dynamic assessment of chromatin organization. This type of approach involves both optimal conditions for DNA staining and the use of several investigation methods such as flow cytometry, image cytometry, laser scanning confocal microscopy and spectral imaging. In this context, this report describes a stoichiometric method for nuclear DNA specific staining, using bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33342 associated with verapamil, a calcium membrane channel blocker. This method makes it possible to follow variations of nuclear DNA content in cells that are maintained alive.

Paillasson, Sylvain; Robert-Nicoud, Michel; Ronot, Xavier

1995-02-01

386

Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis infection in living raccoon dogs assessed by hematological examination.  

PubMed

The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis in free-ranging raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus) was examined in the southeast region of Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, using a rapid immunomigration (RIM) test kit. Between April 2007 and March 2010, we examined 108 raccoon dogs rescued and housed by the Kanazawa Zoological Garden. D. immitis infection was found in 8 (7.4%) raccoon dogs. This is the first report to reveal the prevalence of D. immitis infection in living raccoon dogs. The prevalence of the infection was lower than previously reported values obtained on postmortem examination. One reason might be that the present study included young raccoon dogs infected with immature worms. Significant high-risk areas of D. immitis infection in the raccoon dogs were not observed. PMID:21293077

Kido, Nobuhide; Wada, Yuko; Takahashi, Maya; Kamegaya, Chihiro; Omiya, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

2011-06-01

387

Populational genetic structure of free-living maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) determined by proteic markers.  

PubMed

Electrophoretic analysis of presumptive twenty gene loci products was conducted in hemolisates and plasma samples of twenty-eight maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from an area in northeastern Săo Paulo State, Brazil. The area sampled was divided into three sub-areas, with the Mogi-Guaçu and Pardo rivers regarded as barriers to the gene flow. The polymorphism degree and heterozygosity level (intralocus and average) estimated in this study were similar to those detected by other authors for maned wolves and other species of wild free-living canids. The samples of each sub-area and the total sample exhibited genotype frequencies consistent with the genetic equilibrium model. The values of the F-statistics evidenced absence of inbreeding and population subdivision and, consequently, low genetic distances were found among the samples of each area. PMID:15620002

De Mattos, P S R; Del Lama, M A; Toppa, R H; Schwantes, A R

2004-08-01

388

Removal of long-lived 222Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the 222Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 ?m from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener's energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J.; Cushman, P.; Pepin, M.; Guiseppe, V. E.

2013-08-01

389

Long-Lived Quasistationary Coherences in a V-type System Driven by Incoherent Light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical study of noise-induced quantum coherences in a model three-level V-type system interacting with incoherent radiation, an important prototype for a wide range of physical systems ranging from trapped ions to biomolecules and quantum dots. By solving the quantum optical equations of motion, we obtain analytic expressions for the noise-induced coherences and show that they exhibit an oscillating behavior in the limit of large excited level spacing ? (? /??1, where ? is the radiative decay width). Most remarkably, we find that in the opposite limit of small level spacing ?/??1, appropriate for large molecules, (a) the coherences can survive for an extremely long time ? =(2/?)(?/?)-2 before eventually decaying to zero, and (b) coherences at short times can be substantial. We further show that the long-lived coherences can survive environmental relaxation and decoherence, suggesting implications to the design of quantum heat engines and to incoherent light excitation of biological systems.

Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

2014-09-01

390

Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells.  

PubMed

Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes. PMID:23455985

Etoc, F; Lisse, D; Bellaiche, Y; Piehler, J; Coppey, M; Dahan, M

2013-03-01

391

Removal of long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 ?m from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener’s energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Cushman, P.; Pepin, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

2013-08-08

392

Biosorption of Cd(II) by live and dead cells of Bacillus cereus RC-1 isolated from cadmium-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the biosorption capacity of live and dead cells of Bacillus cereus RC-1 for Cd(II). The biosorption characteristics were investigated as a function of initial pH, contact time, and initial cadmium concentration. Equilibrium biosorption was modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherm equations. It was found that the maximum biosorption capacities calculated from Langmuir isotherm were 31.95 mg/g and 24.01 mg/g for dead cells and live cells, respectively. The kinetics of the biosorption was better described by pseudo-second order kinetic model. Desorption efficiency of biosorbents was investigated at various pH values. These results indicated that dead cells have higher Cd(II) biosorption capacity than live cells. Furthermore, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies were carried out to understand the differences in the Cd(II) biosorption behavior for the both biosorbents. The bioaccumulation of Cd(II) by B. cereus RC-1 was found to depend largely on extracellular biosorption rather than intracellular accumulation. Based on the above studies, dead biomass appears to be a more efficient biosorbent for the removal of Cd(II) from aqueous solution. PMID:23466537

Huang, Fei; Dang, Zhi; Guo, Chu-Ling; Lu, Gui-Ning; Gu, Roy R; Liu, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Hui

2013-07-01

393

Long-lived waveguides and sound-wave generation by laser filamentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discover long-lived (microsecond-scale) optical waveguiding in the wake of atmospheric laser filaments. We also observe the formation and then outward propagation of the consequent sound wave. These effects may be used for remote induction of atmospheric long-lived optical structures from afar which could serve for a variety of applications.

Lahav, Oren; Levi, Liad; Orr, Itai; Nemirovsky, Ron A.; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Kaminer, Ido; Segev, Mordechai; Cohen, Oren

2014-08-01

394

Polymer/bacteria composite nanofiber non-wovens by electrospinning of living bacteria protected by hydrogel microparticles.  

PubMed

Physically crosslinked PVA-hydrogel microparticles are utilized for encapsulation of E. coli and M. luteus. The bacteria survive dry storage or treatment with bacteria-hostile organic solvents significantly better than unprotected bacteria as proven by culture-test experiments. The bacteria-protecting PVA microparticles are available for standard polymer-solution-processing techniques, as exemplarily shown by co-electrospinning of living bacteria encapsulated in dry PVA-hydrogel microparticles together with PVB-, PLLA-, and PCL-form organic solvents. PMID:21243634

Gensheimer, Marco; Brandis-Heep, Astrid; Agarwal, Seema; Thauer, Rudolf K; Greiner, Andreas

2011-03-10

395

[Setting characteristics of calcia-bonded investments by hydration].  

PubMed

Calcium oxide (CaO) slurry mixed with water hardens and expands by hydration. The authors used this setting characteristic as a binder of zirconia-refractory investments. If a mixed slurry was placed in air, unreacted residual calcia powders absorbed water and reverted to calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH)2). This resulted in a large setting expansion that continued for several days. A carbon dioxide (CO2) gas atmosphere controlled this expansion of calcia. When mixed slurry was placed in a carbon dioxide gas atmosphere, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was formed and prevented the further hydration of unreacted calcium oxide. Thus setting expansion values were controlled. The combined expansion of setting and thermal expansion, in CaO-CO2-bonded zirconia investments, was about 1.5-2.5%. On the whole, calcium oxide is expected to be a good binder for high temperature dental casting refractory. PMID:2491167

Nishimura, F; Watari, F; Nomoto, S

1989-07-01

396

Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling  

SciTech Connect

We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

Charriere, Guillaume M. [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Cousin, Beatrice [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Arnaud, Emmanuelle [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Saillan-Barreau, Corinne [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Andre, Mireille [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massoudi, Ali [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Dani, Christian [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Penicaud, Luc [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Casteilla, Louis [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

2006-10-15

397

Polishing Characteristics of Silicon Carbide by Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon carbide (SiC) is expected to be a promising semiconductor material for high-temperature, high-frequency, high-power and energy-saving applications. However, it is so hard and so chemically stable that there is no efficient method of machining it without causing damage to the machined surface. Plasma chemical vaporization machining (PCVM) is a gas-phase chemical etching method in which reactive species generated in atmospheric-pressure plasma are used. PCVM has a high removal rate equivalent to those of conventional machining methods such as grinding and lapping, because the radical density in atmospheric-pressure plasma is much higher than that in normal low-pressure plasma. In this paper, the polishing characteristics of silicon carbide by PCVM are described. As a result, a high machining rate (approximately 0.18 mm/min) and a very smooth surface (below 2 nm peak-to-valley in a 500 nm square area) are achieved.

Sano, Yasuhisa; Watanabe, Masayo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishida, Takeshi; Arima, Kenta; Kubota, Akihisa; Mori, Yuzo

2006-10-01

398

Making Difficult Things Easy and Easy Things Difficult.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggestions are offered to illustrate concepts and processes by using simple materials such as paper, paper clip, rubber band (bonding, entropy, endothermic processes). Also suggests using basic terminology: elementary ratios, percent, reaction chemistry for entropy function; equilibrium constants for Gibbs energies; and chemical mechanics for…

Campbell, J. Arthur; Bent, Henry A.

1982-01-01

399

Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001). Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%), career planning (59.6%), and experiences abroad (57.6%). Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvčre; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

2012-01-01

400

Things to Avoid When Breastfeeding  

MedlinePLUS

... the environment and that is increased by industrial pollution. Most people are not affected by these tiny ... varieties that contain less mercury, such as canned light tuna, shrimp, salmon, pollock, and catfish. Some people ...

401

Living Clocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about daily rhythms (on page 17 of the PDF), learners will explore circadian patterns in humans, animals and plants. They will observe that some behaviors and functions of living organisms vary predictably every 24 hours and many regular functions are governed by internal "clocks," which run independently but are cued or reset by the environment. Groups of learners can conduct one of four (or more) body clock investigations: body temperature, animal behavior, bean leaf, and alertness/heart rate. Materials required for each group will vary, depending on the investigation(s) being conducted. This lesson guide includes background information, setup and management tips, extensions and a handout.

Nancy P. Moreno

2009-01-01

402

Problems Faced by Complete Denture-Wearing Elderly People Living in Jammu District  

PubMed Central

Context: Poor oral health is increasing dramatically among old people especially those living in rural and remote areas. Various factors such as low education background, low income, poor living conditions, unhealthy lifestyle, inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco use lead to poor oral health among older people which in turn lead to risks to their general health. The older people especially from rural areas are apprehensive about seeing a dentist and do not visit them regularly. This may lead to various problems which may have a detrimental influence on their quality of life. Aim: To know the problems faced by complete denture wearers in rural areas in Jammu district. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients from rural area Bishna, initially treated with a complete denture in the maxilla or mandibles were examined. The data were collected with the help of a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that majority of respondents were in the age – group of 65-70 y. Majority of respondents complained of "difficulty chewing", "sore spots”, “painful and swollen gums". Majority of respondents had difficulty in speech, it was difficult for them to interact and communicate with their dentures on. Most of the respondents had lost confidence and had low self esteem. Clinical observations revealed that the commonest condition associated with denture wearing was Oral Stomatitis/ Burning mouth Syndrome, Superimposed infection and Angular cheilitis. Conclusion: Older people should Communicate and visit dentists, regularly, so that the dentists can adjust the treatment and pace according to their needs. Behavioural therapy techniques can make dental visits relatively anxiety and pain-free. PMID:25654025

Sharma, Sumeet; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil; Raina, Rajiv

2014-01-01

403

Calmodulin binding to M-type K+ channels assayed by TIRF/FRET in living cells.  

PubMed

Calmodulin (CaM) binds to KCNQ2-4 channels within their carboxy termini, where it regulates channel function. The existing data have not resolved the Ca2+ dependence of the interaction between the channels and CaM. We performed glutathione S-transferase (GST)-pull-down assays between purified KCNQ2-4 carboxy termini and CaM proteins to determine the Ca2+ dependence of the interaction in vitro. The assays showed substantial Ca2+ dependence of the interaction of the channels with wild-type (WT) CaM, but not with dominant-negative (DN) CaM. To demonstrate CaM-channel interactions in individual living cells, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between ECFP-tagged KCNQ2-4 channels and EYFP-tagged CaM expressed in CHO cells, performed under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, in which excitation light only penetrates several hundred nanometres into the cell, thus isolating membrane events. FRET was assayed between the channels and either WT or DN CaM, performed under conditions of normal [Ca2+]i, low [Ca2+]i or high [Ca2+]i induced by empirically optimized bathing solutions. The FRET data suggest a strong Ca2+ dependence for the interaction between WT CaM and KCNQ2, but less so for KCNQ3 and KCNQ4. FRET between all KCNQ2-4 channels and DN CaM was robust, and not significantly Ca2+ dependent. These data show interactions between CaM and KCNQ channels in living cells, and suggest that the interactions between KCNQ2-4 channels and CaM are likely to have Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent components. PMID:18339689

Bal, Manjot; Zaika, Oleg; Martin, Pamela; Shapiro, Mark S

2008-05-01

404

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

405

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... Chat Assisted Living Assisted living facilities offer a housing alternative for older adults who may need help ... part of a retirement community, nursing home, senior housing complex, or may stand-alone. Licensing requirements for ...

406

Living Terror  

Microsoft Academic Search

Living organisms move. They act. Their actions may be inimical to man's best interests. They inspire fear, dread, even terror. From time immemorial, humans have viewed with alarm, nay, with horror, the evil that lurks inside living consciousness.

Merlin X. Houdini

1977-01-01

407

Living Donation  

MedlinePLUS

... donors and transplant candidates Paired donation or paired exchange involves two pairs of living kidney donors and ... trans- plants are made possible. This type of exchange often involves multiple living kidney donor/transplant candidate ...

408

Communication characteristics of young children with HIV in South Africa as reported by some physicians.  

PubMed

HIV has been shown to have significant effects on the development of a child. Currently, there is limited South African research regarding HIV and specific characteristics of communication development, and the treatment thereof, in the child infected with HIV. The objective of the research was to describe the communication characteristics of a group of children between the ages of 0 and 5 years infected with HIV at a hospital in Gauteng, South Africa. Clinic records of 203 children infected with HIV between the ages of 0 and 5 years were reviewed using a pre-designed checklist within the outreach clinic of a large regional hospital. A questionnaire was completed by four medical practitioners working with this population within the outreach clinic. A total of 91.62% of the infected children were diagnosed as being either in Stage III or IV of the disease (according to the WHO classification system of 2005), with all infants presenting with a CD4 count of ?60. Most (75.37% of the total sample) were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) at the time the data were collected. According to their medical, social, communication and general development, almost all the children qualified for Early Communication Intervention (ECI) but were not recorded as being referred for such services. A large proportion of the target population presented with opportunistic infections and/or HIV associated conditions. The results highlight the developmental characteristics of children living with HIV, and identify the need for medical doctors and allied health professionals to be provided with relevant literature or training regarding the communication development of children infected with HIV. This will facilitate appropriate referrals for ECI services. PMID:25555103

Hattam, Michelle; Louw, Brenda; Geertsema, Salome

2014-12-01

409

Cell observation method under near-living conditions by scanning electron microscopy.  

PubMed

Most cells of multicellular organisms have "primary cilia", which are single, non-motile, and sensory cilia. They have been reported to detect mechanical stimulation and transform it into internal cell, but the mechanisms are not still well known. Dermal papilla (DP) cells, which locate in the skin and regulate hair follicle development and hair cycle, were reported to have their primary cilia by immune-fluorescent method [1], but their detailed structure and function is unclear.For observation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), biological specimens are conventionally fixed with glutaraldehyde and dehydrated in 30%, 50%, 70%, 90% and 100% ethanol. Then specimens are dried by butyl alcohol and coated with gold. It takes several days to prepare these specimens. Using many chemical reagent and many steps in this way may lead to destroy biological specimens structure. Here we attempted a recently proposed method using ionic liquid to prepare cell samples in near- living conditions observed the structure of DP cells (2D and clumps) with primary cilia.This time, we used ionic liquid for preparing specimens. First, cultured cells were fixed in glutaraldehyde, and immersed in ionic liquid. Next, the specimens were coated with gold and observed by SEM. Thus, it takes shorter time due to fewer step than conventional method and the process has no drying step. In a conventional way, we got the micrographs of 2D cultured DP cells and observed the cilium of DP cells (200-nm in diameter and 1.5um in length) on nucleus (15-um). In addition we could observe the clumps of DP cells and the cilia-like structure (?12-um), but they do not attach to scaffoldings of the surface, probably due to drying. In observation using ionic liquid, we got the micrographs of 2D cultured DP cells and observed the cilium- like structure (200-nm in diameter and 2.1-um in length) on nucleus (30-um), as well. In this case, we could not find the cilia- like structure in the clumps of DP cells yet, but they well attached to the scaffoldings and kept the extending structure such as filopodia, too.We here observed DP cells and their cilia in near-living conditions. Unfortunately, we could not primary cilia in clumps of DP cells immersed in ionic liquid yet, but we could reduce damage receiving in the process of specimen's preparation, especially drying. In addition, we are challenging the observation using not only ionic liquid but also nano-suits by detergents [2] and the observation the cilia by SEM after identifying them by fluorescence microscopy, such as CLEM. PMID:25359834

Tanaka, Misaki; Matsushima, Kazuyuki; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi; Yasunaga, Takuo

2014-11-01

410

Water hammer simulation by implicit method of characteristic  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Implicit Method of Characteristics is proposed in this paper to alleviate the shortcomings and limitations of the mostly used conventional Method of Characteristics (MOC). An element-wise definition is used for all the devices that may be used in a pipeline system and the corresponding equations are derived in an element-wise manner. The proper equations defining the behavior of each

M. H. Afshar; M. Rohani

2008-01-01

411

Clinical Characteristics of Peroneal Nerve Palsy by Posture  

PubMed Central

Objective Posture induced common peroneal nerve (CPN) palsy is usually produced during the prolonged squatting or habitual leg crossing while seated, especially in Asian culture and is manifested by the onset of foot drop. Because of its similarity to discogenic foot drop, patients may be diagnosed with a lumbar disc disorder, and in some patients, surgeons may perform unnecessary examinations and even spine surgery. The purpose of our study is to establish the clinical characteristics and diagnostic assessment of posture induced CPN palsy. Methods From June 2008 to June 2012, a retrospective study was performed on 26 patients diagnosed with peroneal nerve palsy in neurophysiologic study among patients experiencing foot drop after maintaining a certain posture for a long time. Results The inducing postures were squatting (14 patients), sitting cross-legged (6 patients), lying down (4 patients), walking and driving. The mean prolonged neural injury time was 124.2 minutes. The most common clinical presentation was foot drop and the most affected sensory area was dorsum of the foot with tingling sensation (14 patients), numbness (8 patients), and burning sensation (4 patients). The clinical improvement began after a mean 6 weeks, which is not related to neural injury times. Electrophysiology evaluation was performed after 2 weeks later and showed delayed CPN nerve conduction study (NCS) in 24 patients and deep peroneal nerve in 2 patients. Conclusion We suggest that an awareness of these clinical characteristics and diagnostic assessment methods may help clinicians make a diagnosis of posture induced CPN palsy and preclude unnecessary studies or inappropriate treatment in foot drop patients. PMID:23908699

Yu, Jeong Keun; Kang, Suk-Hyung; Cho, Yong-Jun

2013-01-01

412

Quantifying CO2 removal by living walls: a case study of the Center for Design Research  

E-print Network

levels. The research was designed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program, FloVENT, which allowed for comparisons of the CDR under the following conditions: without the living wall, with the living wall with the air on and off...Nair Scholars Program. As a McNair Scholar, I have had the opportunity to conduct and present research in communications systems and indoor air quality over the past two years. In fact, this research is a continuation of a literature review on living walls...

Rivera, Eric

2014-04-01

413

How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

How Things Work is different. Conventional physics textbooks introduce basic principles and laws, and, using mathematics appropriate to the intended readership, show how these principles and laws can be used to predict or explain how things behave. Occasionally, end-of-chapter examples may hint at everyday things that involve the physics discussed. Louis A Bloomfield, in this text for liberal arts students

John Ward

1998-01-01

414

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective  

E-print Network

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective Thiago Teixeira, Sara Hachem of Things plays a central role in the foreseen shift of the Internet to the Future Internet that the Internet of Things will cooperate with the Internet of Services to provide users with services

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Standardizing Generic Cross-Domain Applications in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Standardizing Generic Cross-Domain Applications in Internet of Things Amelie Gyrard, Soumya Kanti: karima@polytech.unice.fr Abstract--Domain-specific Internet of Things (IoT) applica- tions are becoming Network. Keywords--Linked Open Data; Linked Open Rules; Linked Open Vocabularies; Internet of Things

Gesbert, David

416

Reliability for emergency applications in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Reliability for emergency applications in Internet of Things Nourhene Maalel*, Enrico Natalizio.surname@cea.fr, name.surname@hds.utc.fr Abstract-- This paper addresses the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm, which and collaborate to accomplish a common task. This new paradigm is called Internet of Things (IoT) [1]. The major

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective  

E-print Network

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective (Invited Paper) Thiago. The Internet of Things plays a central role in the foreseen shift of the Internet to the Future Internet that the Internet of Things will cooperate with the Internet of Services to provide users with services

Teixeira, Thiago

418

Get started with the Internet of Things in  

E-print Network

Get started with the Internet of Things in your organization Introducing Microsoft Azure Internet the Internet of Things (IoT). When you see definitions and hype about IoT, it's easy to feel overwhelmed. When on the flexible and scalable Microsoft Cloud Platform. With Microsoft Azure Internet of Things services, you can

Chaudhuri, Surajit

419

EDITORIAL Open Access Editorial: Special issue on Internet of Things  

E-print Network

EDITORIAL Open Access Editorial: Special issue on Internet of Things: convergence of sensing, and computing devices, usually indicated as the Internet of Things (IoT). Several examples exist where wireless, in "Mashing Up the Internet of Things: A Framework for Smart Environ- ments" [1], a framework and an user

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

Monitoring and Security for the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Monitoring and Security for the Internet of Things A. Mayzaud, R. Badonnel and I. Chrisment of Internet of Things involves the deployment of Low power and Lossy Networks (LLN) allowing communications and Challenges The growing interest for the Internet of Things has resulted in the large-scale deployment of Low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

421

Advanced Internet of Things Lei Zhang, Nathalie Mitton  

E-print Network

Advanced Internet of Things Lei Zhang, Nathalie Mitton INRIA Lille - Nord Europe, Univ Lille Nord.mitton}@inria.fr Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is a network of Internet-enabled objects, whose original purpose scheme for a new paradigm: Advanced Internet of Things (AIoT), which is based on our proposed Unified

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

Mobile Interaction with the Internet of Things Sven Siorpaes1  

E-print Network

Mobile Interaction with the Internet of Things Sven Siorpaes1 , Gregor Broll1 , Massimo Paolucci2 hand the Internet of Things provides a set of standards and methods to tag objects in the real world and an early prototype currently under development for mobile interactions with the Internet of Things. Hereby

423

A Survey on Facilities for Experimental Internet of Things Research  

E-print Network

1 A Survey on Facilities for Experimental Internet of Things Research Alexander Gluhak , Srdjan The initial vision of the Internet of Things (IoT) was of a world in which all physical objects are tagged Internet of Things, Experimental environment, Testbed 1 INTRODUCTION The IoT is a multidisciplinary domain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Layered Structure and Management in Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development for Internet of Things and RFID technology is described in this paper. A feasible scheme and layered structure is proposed for Internet of Things. Its management is presented according to the demand for Internet of Things in China. The general system contains two parts: computer information subsystem and RFID terminal subsystem, the latter of which is the main

Huansheng Ning; Na Ning; Shenfeng Qu; Yan Zhang; Huiping Yang

2007-01-01

425

Towards Unified Tag Data Translation for the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Towards Unified Tag Data Translation for the Internet of Things Lo¨ic Schmidt, Nathalie Mitton. INTRODUCTION The "Internet of Things" aims at creating a large wireless network in which all objects would have defines, with partners, several standards for the Internet of things. These standards can be found under

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

HIP-tags architecture implementation for the Internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a possible implementation for the innovative and highly secure networking architecture dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT). We propose an infrastructure that works with a new type of tags, supporting the upcoming standard Host Identity Protocol (HIP). Our main concern is to ensure RFID tags privacy, while enabling things to things communications.

Pascal Urien; Simon Elrharbi; Dorice Nyamy; Hervé Chabanne; Thomas Icart; François Lecocq; Cyrille Pépin; Khalifa Toumi; Mathieu Bouet; Guy Pujolle; Patrice Krzanik; Jean-Ferdinand Susini

2009-01-01

427

An Unusual Long-lived Intensive Relativistic Electron Enhancement Excited By Sequential CMEs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An unusual long-lived relativistic electron enhancement in July to August,2004 is firstly examined utilizing data from Fengyun-1, POES, GOES, ACE and geomagnetic indexes. Three CMEs stimulate complex fluctuations of interplanetary and magnetospheric environment from 22 to 28 July. The solar wind speed exceeds 500 km/s for 92 percent of the duration from 23 to 28 July and, furthermore, the maximum speed is more than 1000 km/s. Simultaneously, there are 16 positive impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure of which the amplitudes are more than 2nPa, and the amplitude of the largest one is 10nPa. This kind of disturbed solar wind tends to excite magnetospheric ULF waves by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the impulse of solar wind dynamic pressure impinging to magnetosphere. Sequential CMEs characterized by continuing north interplanetary magnetic field induce durable tremendous geomagnetic substorms. Data from POES reveals that so numerous energetic electrons are injected into outer zone of radiation belt that the energetic electron flux in this region enhances observably. Data from Fengyun-1 indicates that the relativistic electron flux begins to enhance on 25 July and increases by 4 orders of magnitude in following 5 days. Comparing energetic electron flux, the flux of relativistic electron enhances about 3 days later. It would be reasonable that radial diffusion excited by strong ULF waves injects energetic electrons as 'seeds' into deep magnetosphere, and accelerates them to relativistic energy, then eventually the relativistic electron flux of outer zone enhances intensively. After coming to a head, the relativistic electron populations at L<4 lose slowly, especially at the location of flux peak(L~3.3), the relativistic electron loss is so slow that the living-time is up to 22 days. According to model calculation, the plasmapause is contracted inward into L<3 in the period of three CMEs. Subsequently, the location of plasmapause recovers to the condition before CMEs, and stands at L>3.6 on almost whole August. This means that the flux peak of relativistic electrons is left in the plasmasphere for a long time. In the plasmaphere, relativistic electron populations lose by resonating with hiss. The rate of this kind of loss mechanism is slow, and would eventually result in the unusual long-lived characterizer of this enhancement event. In 30 august, a strong interplanetary disturbance contracts the plasmapause inward to L<3 again, then the relativistic electron populations of outer zone deduce promptly. Fengyun-1 is a polar orbit satellite at low altitude, so that it is impossible to obtain the variation of outer zone in the magnetopheric equatorial plane. Despite of this, the enhancement and loss properties of this event imply that it is similar to the 'Relativistic Electron Storage Ring' detected by Van Allen Probes in September, 2012.

Yang, X.; Zhu, G.; Sun, Y.; Wang, C.; Zhang, X.

2013-12-01

428

Noninvasive detection of neural progenitor cells in living brains by MRI  

PubMed Central

The presence of pericytes in brain regions undergoing repair is evident of the recruitment of bone marrow-derived multipotent regenerative cells to the neurovascular unit during angiogenesis. At present, post mortem sampling is the only way to identify them. Therefore, such cell typing is inadequate for preserving neural progenitor cells for any meaningful stem cell therapy. We aimed to target cerebral pericytes in vivo using dual gene transcript-targeted MRI (GT-tMRI) in male C57black6 mice after a 60-min bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). We attached superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to phosphorothioate-modified micro-DNA that targets actin or nestin mRNA. Because BCAO compromises the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induces expression of ?-smooth muscle (?SM)-actin and nestin antigens by pericytes in new vessels, we delivered pericyte-specific magnetic resonance contrast agents (SPION-actin or SPION-nestin at 4 mg Fe/kg) by i.p. injection to C57black6 mice that had experienced BCAO. We demonstrated that the surge in cerebral iron content by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry matched the increase in the frequency of relaxivity. We also found that SPION-nestin was colocalized in ?SM- actin- and nestin-expressing pericytes in BCAO-treated C57black6 or transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg(CAG-mRFP1) 1F1Hadj/J, expressing red fluorescent protein by actin promoter]. We identified pericytes in the repair patch in living brains after BCAO with a voxel size of 0.03 mm3. The presence of electron-dense nanoparticles in vascular pericytes in the region of BBB injury led us to draw the conclusion that GT-tMRI can noninvasively reveal neural progenitor cells during vascularization.—Liu, C. H., Ren, J. Q., You, Z., Yang, J., Liu, C.-M., Uppal, R., Liu, P. K. Noninvasive detection of neural progenitor cells in living brains by MRI. PMID:22198388

Liu, Christina H.; Ren, Jia Q.; You, Zerong; Yang, Jinsheng; Liu, Charng-Ming; Uppal, Ritika; Liu, Philip K.

2012-01-01

429

Characteristics of pulsed power generator by versatile inductive voltage adder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pulsed power generator by inductive voltage adder, versatile inductive voltage adder (VIVA-I), which features a high average potential gradient (2.5 MV/m), was designed and is currently in operation,. It was designed to produce an output pulse of 4 MV/60 ns by adding 2 MV pulses in two-stages of induction cells, where amorphous cores are installed. As a pulse forming line, we used a Blumlein line with the switching reversed, where cores are automatically biased due to the presence of prepulse. Good reproducibility was obtained even in the absence of the reset pulse. Within [similar]40% of full charge voltage, pulsed power characteristics of Marx generator, pulse forming line (PFL), transmission line (TL), and induction cells were tested for three types of loads; open-circuit, dummy load of liquid (CuSO4) resistor, and electron beam diode. In the open-circuit test, [similar]2.0 MV of output voltage was obtained with good reproducibility. Dependences of output voltage on diode impedances were evaluated by using various dummy loads, and the results were found as expected. An electron-beam diode was operated successfully, and [similar]18 kA of beam current was obtained at the diode voltage of [similar]1 MV.

Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Shimiya, Kouichi; Masugata, Katsumi; Shigeta, Masao; Shibata, Kazuhiko

2005-10-01

430

Genetically distant American Canine distemper virus lineages have recently caused epizootics with somewhat different characteristics in raccoons living around a large suburban zoo in the USA  

PubMed Central

Background Mortality rates have differed during distemper outbreaks among free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor) living around a large Chicago-area zoo, and appeared higher in year 2001 than in 1998 and 2000. We hypothesized that a more lethal variant of the local Canine distemper virus (CDV) lineage had emerged in 2001, and sought the genetic basis that led to increased virulence. However, a more complex model surfaced during preliminary analyses of CDV genomic sequences in infected tissues and of virus isolated in vitro from the raccoons. Results Phylogenetic analyses of subgenomic CDV fusion (F) -, phosphoprotein (P) -, and complete hemagglutinin (H) – gene sequences indicated that distinct American CDV lineages caused the distemper epizootics. The 1998 outbreak was caused by viruses that are likely from an old CDV lineage that includes CDV Snyder Hill and Lederle, which are CDV strains from the early 1950's. The 2000 and 2001 viruses appear to stem from the lineage of CDV A75/17, which was isolated in the mid 1970's. Only the 2001 viruses formed large syncytia in brain and/or lung tissue, and during primary isolation in-vitro in Vero cells, demonstrating at least one phenotypic property by which they differed from the other viruses. Conclusions Two different American CDV lineages caused the raccoon distemper outbreaks. The 1998 viruses are genetically distant to the 2000/2001 viruses. Since CDV does not cause persistent infections, the cycling of different CDV lineages within the same locale suggests multiple reintroductions of the virus to area raccoons. Our findings establish a precedent for determining whether the perceived differences in mortality rates are actual and attributable in part to inherent differences between CDV strains arising from different CDV lineages. PMID:15507154

Lednicky, John A; Dubach, Jean; Kinsel, Michael J; Meehan, Thomas P; Bocchetta, Maurizio; Hungerford, Laura L; Sarich, Nicolene A; Witecki, Kelley E; Braid, Michael D; Pedrak, Casandra; Houde, Christiane M

2004-01-01

431

HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma felt by people living with HIV from Buea, Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The universal access to treatment and care for people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is a major problem especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV infected people live. However, equally important is the fact that HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma is recognized to be a major obstacle to successfully control the spread of this disease. In this study we measured the HIV\\/AIDS-related

Christoph A. Jacobi; Pascal N. J. I. Atanga; Leonard K. Bin; Victor Njie Mbome; Wilfred Akam; Johannes R. Bogner; Siegfried Kropf; Peter Malfertheiner

2012-01-01

432

High resolution tumor targeting in living mice by means of multispectral optoacoustic tomography  

PubMed Central

Background Tumor targeting is of high clinical and biological relevance, and major efforts have been made to develop molecular imaging technologies for visualization of the disease markers in tissue. Of particular interest is apoptosis which has a profound role within tumor development and has significant effect on cancer malignancy. Methods Herein, we report on targeting of phosphatidylserine-exposing cells within live tumor allograft models using a synthetic near infrared zinc(II)-dipicolylamine probe. Visualization of the probe biodistribution is performed with whole body multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) system and subsequently compared to results attained by planar and tomographic fluorescence imaging systems. Results Compared to whole body optical visualization methods, MSOT attains remarkably better imaging capacity by delivering high-resolution scans of both disease morphology and molecular function in real time. Enhanced resolution of MSOT clearly showed that the probe mainly localizes in the vessels surrounding the tumor, suggesting that its tumor selectivity is gained by targeting the phosphatidylserine exposed on the surface of tumor vessels. Conclusions The current study demonstrates the high potential of MSOT to broadly impact the fields of tumor diagnostics and preclinical drug development. PMID:22464315

2012-01-01

433

Pollutants emitted by a cement plant: health risks for the population living in the neighborhood.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the health risks due to combustor emissions in the manufacturing of Portland cement for the population living in the neighborhood of a cement kiln in Catalonia, Spain. Pollutants emitted to the atmosphere in the course of cement production were modeled. The ISC3-ST model was applied to estimate air dispersion of the contaminants emitted by the cement plant. Air concentrations of NO(2), SO(2), PM(10), metals, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), as well as the potential exposure in the vicinity of the facility, were assessed via models based on US EPA guidance documents. PCDD/F and metal concentrations were also modeled for soil and vegetation. Based on these concentrations, the levels of human exposure were calculated. Individual cancer and noncancer risks for the emissions of the cement kiln were assessed. Health effects due to NO(2), SO(2), and PM(10) emissions were also evaluated. Risk assessment was performed as a deterministic analysis. The main individual risk in the population was evaluated in a central-tendency and a high-end approach. The results show that the incremental individual risk due to emissions of the cement plant is very low not only with regard to health effects, but also in relation to toxicological and cancer risks produced by pollutants such as metals and PCDD/Fs emitted by the cement kiln. PMID:15147925

Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, Jose L; Garreta, Josepa

2004-06-01

434

Evaluation of YadC protein delivered by live attenuated Salmonella as a vaccine against plague.  

PubMed

Yersinia pestis YadB and YadC are two new outer membrane proteins related to its pathogenicity. Here, codon-optimized yadC, yadC810 (aa 32-551), or yadBC antigen genes delivered by live attenuated Salmonella strains are evaluated in mice for induction of protective immune responses against Y. pestis CO92 through subcutaneous or intranasal challenge. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC, YadC810, or YadBC develop significant serum IgG responses to purified recombinant YadC protein. For subcutaneous challenge (approximately 230 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92), mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC or YadC810 are afforded 50% protection, but no protection by immunization with the Salmonella strain synthesizing YadBC. None of these antigens provided protection against intranasal challenge (approximately 31 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92). In addition, subcutaneous immunization with purified YadC810 protein emulsified with alum adjuvant does not elicit a protective response against Y. pestis administered by either challenge route. PMID:23913628

Sun, Wei; Olinzock, Joseph; Wang, Shifeng; Sanapala, Shilpa; Curtiss, Roy

2014-03-01

435

Phytosynthesis of intracellular and extracellular gold nanoparticles by living peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea L.).  

PubMed

Inorganic nanomaterials of different chemical compositions are conventionally synthesized under harsh environments such as extremes of temperature, pressure, and pH. Moreover, these methods are eco-unfriendly and cumbersome, yield bigger particles, and agglomerate because of not being capped by capping agents. In contrast, biological synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials occurs under ambient conditions, namely room temperature, atmospheric pressure, and physiological pH. These methods are reliable, eco-friendly, and cheap. In this paper, we report for the first time the extracellular and intracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using living peanut seedlings. The formed GNPs were highly stable in solution and inside the plant tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that extracellular GNPs distributions were in the form of monodispersed nanoparticles. The nanoparticles ranged from 4 to 6 nm in size. The intercellular nanoparticles were of oval shape and size ranged from 5 to 50 nm. Both extracellular and intracellular nanoparticles were further characterized by standard techniques. The formed GNPs inside the plant tissue were estimated by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. This opens up an exciting possibility of a plant-based nanoparticle synthesis strategy, wherein the nanoparticles may be entrapped in the biomass in the form of a film or produced in the solution, both of which have interesting applications. PMID:23586957

Raju, Dugyala; Mehta, Urmil J; Ahmad, Absar

2012-01-01

436

Performance improvement of an ESD suppressor by studying its characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was used to study the characteristics of an ESD suppressor. The obtained capacitance of the ESD suppressor filled with air was validated by measurement data and another numerical result obtained by time-domain moment method (TDMM). Under the same conditions, no large differences are found among the obtained capacitances for the ESD suppressor filled with air, neon, argon, and helium. But the ESD suppressor filled with air has a much higher trigger and clamping voltages than the ESD suppressor filled with neon, argon, or helium. Capacitance is found to decrease with the increase of the spark gap distance or the operating frequency. But the capacitance increases with increasing relative dielectric constant of the substrate or the overcoat. t is observed that ESD currents with a transient waveform reach a maximum value and decays sharply as the time increases under the condition of the spark gap distance of 5 ?m. Outside the spark gap, the maximum electric field is below the breakdown strength, but the magnitude of the electric field radiated from ESD events is still very large when the distance from the ESD suppressor is less than 2 mm.

Chen, H.-Y.; Li, P.-K.

2013-03-01

437

Characteristics of liquid sheets formed by splash plate nozzles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental study was conducted to identify the effect of viscosity on the characteristics of liquid sheets formed by a splash plate nozzle. Various mixtures of corn syrup and water are used to obtain viscosities in the range 1-170 mPa.s. Four different splash plates with nozzle diameters of 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mm, with a constant plate angle of 55° were tested. Liquid sheets formed under various operating conditions were directly visualized. The sheet atomization process for the range of parameters studied here is governed by two different mechanisms: Rayleigh-Plateau (R-P) and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. R-P occurs at the rim and R-T occurs on the thin sheet. The rim instability can be laminar or turbulent, depending on the jet Reynolds number. The R-T instability of the sheet is observed at the outer edges of the radially spreading sheet, where the sheet is the thinnest. It can also occur inside the sheet, due to formation of holes and ruptures.

Ahmed, M.; Amighi, A.; Ashgriz, N.; Tran, H. N.

2008-01-01

438

Some characteristics of Ca2+ uptake by yeast cells.  

PubMed

Experiments were performed to obtain information on: (i) the specific properties of Ca2+ binding and transport in yeast; (ii) the relationship between both parameters; (iii) similarities to or differences from other biological systems as measured by the effects of inhibitors; and (iv) the effects of mono and divalent cations, in order to get some insight on the specificity and some characteristics of the mechanism of the transport system for divalent cations in yeast. The results obtained gave some kinetic parameters for a high affinity system involved in the transport of Ca2+ in yeast. These were obtained mainly by considering actual concentrations of Ca2+ in the medium after substracting the amounts bound to the cell. A km of 1.9 microM and a Vmax of 1.2 nmol (100 mg.3 min)-1 were calculated. The effects of some inhibitors and other cations on Ca2+ uptake allow one to postulate some independence between binding and transport for this divalent cation. Of the inhibitors tested, only lanthanum seems to be a potent inhibitor of Ca2+ uptake in yeast. The effects of Mg2+ on the uptake of Ca2+ agree with the existence of a single transport system for both divalent cations. The actions of Na+ and K+ on the transport of Ca2+ offer interesting possibilities to study further some of the mechanistic properties of this transport system for divalent cations. PMID:6157027

Borbolla, M; Peńa, A

1980-05-23

439

The hottest thing in remediation.  

PubMed Central

Scientists and engineers are exploring a new way to decontaminate toxic waste sites by literally turning up the heat on pollutants. The method heats the ground using electricity or steam, which mobilizes the contaminants so they can either be extracted from the ground and destroyed or actually destroyed in place. Among the targets for this method are pollutants such as creosote, solvents, and gasoline. These in situ thermal technologies also offer the benefit of reaching contaminants not previously amenable to cleanup, such as those found beneath structures and below the water table. PMID:11882491

Black, Harvey

2002-01-01

440

PERSONALIZED HEALTHCARE COMMUNICATION IN INTERNET OF THINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personalized healthcare is a challenge because supports the sustainability of care. Internet of Things is a paradigm promising to manage the digital identity, so the personalization of care services. Different equipment is used in extra-wall healthcare and assistive services, requiring different sorts of objects to communicate and to make the ubiquitous system-of-system. Extended entities and mixed roles are becoming inter-operable.

Mikhail Simonov; Riccardo Zich; Flavia Mazzitelli

441

Privacy Preservation Technologies in Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the beginning of the Internet thirty years ago, we have witnessed a\\u000anumber of changes in the application of communication technologies. Today, the\\u000aInternet can be described to a large extent as a ubiquitous infrastructure that\\u000ais always accessible. After the era of connecting places and connecting people,\\u000athe Internet of the future will also connect things. The idea

Jaydip Sen

2010-01-01

442

Uncommon Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Uncommon Lives series on the National Archives of Australia website takes an approach to Australian history that not only encompasses the well-known history-makers, but also lesser known people's role in shaping Australian history. One of the stated goals of the Uncommon Lives series is to show how amateur historians and researchers alike can use the archives to find biographical resources. There are five stories the visitor can discover by simply clicking on the image of the person or people next to the brief description of their story including, "Muslim Journeys", "Charles and Ruth Lane Poole", "Jessie Street", "Wolf Klaphake", and "Dhakiyarr Wirrpanda". By clicking on any choice, visitors will find each story divided into subsections. Explanatory text accompanies the thumbnails of each image and these can be expanded into a high quality image by clicking on them. Each of these stories provides a unique and compelling look into Australian history. For instance in Wolf Klaphake's story you can listen to or read the transcript of segments of the ABC radio play "A Doubtful Character" which is about Klaphake's life and in Dhakiyarr Wirrpanda's story, you can view the actual court records of his case, which was the first for an Aboriginal Australian in the High Court.

2007-01-01

443

Does surgery improve live birth rates in patients with recurrent miscarriage caused by uterine anomalies?  

PubMed

Abstract We found that congenital uterine anomalies have a negative impact on reproductive outcome in recurrent-miscarriage couples, being associated with further miscarriage with a normal embryonic karyotype. There has been no study comparing live birth rates between patients with and without surgery. We conducted a prospective study to prove that surgery for a bicornuate or septate uterus might improve the live birth rate. A total of 170 patients with congenital uterine anomalies suffering two or more miscarriages were examined. The live birth rate after ascertainment of anomalies, cumulative live birth rate and infertility rate, were compared between patients with and without surgery. In patients with a septate uterus, the live birth rate (81.3%) at the first pregnancy after ascertainment of anomalies with surgery tended to be higher than that (61.5%) in those without surgery. The infertility rates were similar in both groups, while the cumulative live birth rate (76.1%) tended to be higher than without surgery (60.0%). Surgery showed no benefit in patients with a bicornuate uterus for having a baby, but tended to decrease the preterm birth rate and the low birth weight. The possibility that surgery has benefits for having a baby in patients with a septate uterus suffering recurrent miscarriage could not be excluded. PMID:25058627

Sugiura-Ogasawara, M; Lin, B L; Aoki, K; Maruyama, T; Nakatsuka, M; Ozawa, N; Sugi, T; Takeshita, T; Nishida, M

2015-02-01

444

Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids  

PubMed Central

Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

2013-01-01

445

Corticobasal syndrome: Five new things.  

PubMed

Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by asymmetric involuntary movements including rigidity, tremor, dystonia, and myoclonus, and often associated with apraxia, cortical sensory deficits, and alien limb phenomena. Additionally, there are various nonmotor (cognitive and language) deficits. CBS is associated with several distinct histopathologies, including corticobasal degeneration, other forms of tau-related frontotemporal lobar degeneration such as progressive supranuclear palsy, and Alzheimer disease. Accurate antemortem diagnosis of underlying pathology in CBS is challenging, though certain clinical and imaging findings may be helpful. Five recent advances in the understanding of CBS are reviewed, including clinical and pathologic features, imaging and CSF biomarkers, the role of specific genes, and the concept of a spectrum of tauopathies. PMID:25279254

Chahine, Lama M; Rebeiz, Tanya; Rebeiz, Jean J; Grossman, Murray; Gross, Rachel G

2014-08-01

446

How NAO Does Its Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This essay explains the mechanics of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO can be defined most simply as the relationship between the center of low atmospheric pressure over Iceland and the center of high pressure above the Azores. It is the interaction between these systems that directs the flow of air and causes persistent weather patterns. The writer states that a common goal of the recent work on the NAO is to analyze past events to determine if our current positive trend is being goaded by an outside influence namely, global warming. The site features an interactive graph that relates the oscillation to historical events. It also has links to other essays, a video, an interactive map, and outside sources for more information about NAO.

447

Breakthrough Towards the Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter we introduce the Internet of Things (IoT) from the perspective of companies. The Internet of Things mainly refers to the continuous tracking and observation of real-world objects over the Internet. The resulting information can be used to optimize many processes along the entire value chain. Important prerequisites for the IoT are that the objects of interest can be uniquely identified and that their environment can be monitored with sensors. Currently, technologies, such as different types of barcodes, active and passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and wireless sensor networks play the most important role. However, these technologies either do not provide monitoring of their environment or they are too expensive for widespread adoption. Organic Electronics is a new technology that allows printing electronic circuits using organic inks. It will produce ultra-low cost smart labels equipped with sensors, and thus it will become an enabler of the IoT. We discuss how organic smart labels can be used to implement the Internet of Things. We show how this technology is expected to develop. Finally, we indicate technical problems that arise when processing large volumes of data that will result from the usage of organic smart labels in business applications.

Chaves, Leonardo W. F.; Nochta, Zoltán

448

Impact-absorbing characteristics by applying ultrasonic vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An impact-absorbing device that facilitates the application of ultrasonic vibrations was devised. Vibration distributions, springback characteristics, and impact-absorption characteristics were measured. We confirm that the springback amount decreases and the impact is absorbed upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations. When an aluminum alloy plate is crumpled, the maximum output voltage of the attached shock sensor decreases to 65% upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations as compared to when the ultrasonic vibrations are not applied.

Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ueki, Eiichiro; Tsujino, Jiromaru

2012-05-01

449

Characteristics of Populations (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The concept that populations are dynamic with identifiable characteristics and measurable growth patterns is addressed in this lesson plan. Population characteristics are explained, including biotic potential, density, natality, mortality, and age distribution. The lesson plan provides objectives, skills, time needed, a content outline, materials, significant terms, and questions for the class. The main goal of the lesson plan is for students to develop an understanding of the interdependence of all organisms and the need for conserving natural resources.

450

Stigmatization and discrimination towards people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS by the general public in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Globally, HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discriminatory attitudes deter the effectiveness of HIV prevention and care programs. This study investigated the general public's perceptions about HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination towards people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS in order to understand the root of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discriminatory attitudes. Study was carried out using qualitative focus group discussions (FGD). An interview guide with semi-structured questions was used. Participants were members of the public in Malaysia. Purposive sampling was adopted for recruitment of participants. A total 14 focus group discussions (n = 74) was carried out between March and July 2008. HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) was profound. Key factors affecting discriminatory attitudes included high-risk taking behavior, individuals related to stigmatized identities, sources of HIV infection, stage of the disease, and relationship with an infected person. Other factors that influence attitudes toward PLWHA include ethnicity and urban-rural locality. Malay participants were less likely than other ethnic groups to perceive no stigmatization if their spouses were HIV positive. HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination were stronger among participants in rural settings. The differences indicate attitudes toward PLWHA are influenced by cultural differences. PMID:22299438

Wong, L P; Syuhada, A R Nur

2011-09-01

451

Synthesis of arborescent model polymer structures by living carbocationic polymerization for structure-property studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polyisobutylene is fully saturated, therefore exhibits outstanding chemical, oxidative and thermal stability,1 which makes it ideally suitable as a model to study mechanical and viscoelastic properties of elastomers, and to correlate properties with structure. The main objective of this dissertation was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of the synthesis of arborescent (hyperbranched) polyisobutylene (arbPIB) by inimer-type (initiator-monomer) living carbocationic polymerization. The strategy for the effective synthesis of arbPIBs consists of copolymerizing the 4-(2-methoxyisopropyl)styrene (IUPAC name: p-vinylcumyl methyl ether) (IB) via controlled/living carbocationic polymerization using TiCl4 coinitiator. In situ FTIR monitoring showed that the self-condensing vinyl polymerization (SCVP) of MeOIM is possible, and that when copolymerizing MeOIM and IB, a nearly alternating structure and multiple end groups are obtained. arbPIB was synthesized and the repeatability of the polymerization was demonstrated. It was found that higher branching was obtained with increasing [MeOIM] and that branching did not further increase if additional IB was added after the MeOIM had reacted completely. No evident changes were observed when switching solvents from Hx/MeCl to a MeCHx/MeCl mixture. Branching parameters showed that arbPIBs have a behavior between polydisperse stars and polycondensates with the number of branches increasing linearly with molecular weight. Novel arbPIB-based block copolymers (TPEs) were synthesized and it was found that copolymers with low Tg short end blocks and less than 5 mol% of a second monomer exhibit thermoplastic elastomeric properties. The materials were strongly reinforced when compounded with carbon black. arbPIB-b-PS are prospective biomaterials and the establishment of reliable methods for evaluating their short and long term properties is a subject of great importance. A dynamic fatigue testing methodology was developed for small, soft rubbery specimens that can be implanted into small animals and re-tested after explantation. Higher ultimate tensile strength and lower elongation at break were measured on microdumbbells than on standard dumbbells. Fatigue testing microdumbbells induced higher stresses at the same strain rate, thus presenting the worst case scenario and being appropriate for fatigue tests. The fatigue limit of linear polystyrene-b-polyisobutylene- b-polystyrene (SIBS) and analogous arbPIB- b-PS samples were determined by using stepwise increasing strain tests developed for fatigue analysis. The presence of branching and a broader molecular weight distribution arbPIB-b-PS led to better mechanical stability and higher fatigue limit than in analogous linear SIBS samples.

Dos Santos Freire, Lucas

452

Relationships between Free-Living Protozoa, Cultivable Legionella spp., and Water Quality Characteristics in Three Drinking Water Supplies in the Caribbean?†  

PubMed Central

The study whose results are presented here aimed at identifying free-living protozoa (FLP) and conditions favoring the growth of these organisms and cultivable Legionella spp. in drinking water supplies in a tropical region. Treated and distributed water (±30°C) of the water supplies of three Caribbean islands were sampled and investigated with molecular techniques, based on the 18S rRNA gene. The protozoan host Hartmannella vermiformis and cultivable Legionella pneumophila were observed in all three supplies. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with the highest similarity to the potential or candidate hosts Acanthamoeba spp., Echinamoeba exundans, E. thermarum, and an Neoparamoeba sp. were detected as well. In total, 59 OTUs of FLP were identified. The estimated protozoan richness did not differ significantly between the three supplies. In supply CA-1, the concentration of H. vermiformis correlated with the concentration of Legionella spp. and clones related to Amoebozoa predominated (82%) in the protozoan community. These observations, the low turbidity (<0.2 nephelometric turbidity units [NTU]), and the varying ATP concentrations (1 to 12 ng liter?1) suggest that biofilms promoted protozoan growth in this supply. Ciliophora represented 25% of the protozoan OTUs in supply CA-2 with elevated ATP concentrations (maximum, 55 ng liter?1) correlating with turbidity (maximum, 62 NTU) caused by corroding iron pipes. Cercozoan types represented 70% of the protozoan clones in supply CA-3 with ATP concentrations of <1 ng liter?1 and turbidity of <0.5 NTU in most samples of distributed water. The absence of H. vermiformis in most samples from supply CA-3 suggests that growth of this protozoan is limited at ATP concentrations of <1 ng liter?1. PMID:21873489

Valster, Rinske M.; Wullings, Bart A.; van den Berg, Riemsdijk; van der Kooij, Dick

2011-01-01

453

The four dimensions of clathrin coats in living cells measured by advanced fluorescence microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After microinjection into cultured Vero cells, rhodamine-labeled clathrin triskelions gave rise to a punctuate fluorescence pattern typical for clathrin, with two major localizations: the plasma membrane and the perinuclear region of the cells. We analyzed clathrin motion by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching and its 3 dimensional distribution by Confocal Microscopy. Altogether, 55% of total clathrin is polymerized into coats which are turning over with a half time of 11 seconds and 45% of total diffuses freely in the cytoplasm. Various conditions known to affect membrane traffic were investigated. Cytosolic acidification or ATP depletion stabilized the polymerized clathrin coats without modifying the ratio of free versus polymerized clathrin. Low temperature (6 °C) or hypertonic media dramatically increased both the stability and the amount of the polymerized clathrin. We conclude that ATP and pH homeostasis are needed to support a very high turnover of the clathrin coats in living cells whereas low temperature and high osmotic strength promote an extensive polymerization of clathrin.

Davoust, Jean; Cosson, Pierre

1991-05-01

454

Estimation of Lipid Reserves in Unstained Living and Dead Nematodes by Image Analysis  

PubMed Central

During storage, non-feeding stages of entomopathogenic nematodes become visibly more transparent due to depletion of energy reserves. Optical density per unit area (OD per area) of infective juveniles of Steinernerna carpocapsae (All) and two Heterorhabditis isolates (UK211 and HF85) was measured with an image analysis system and compared with neutral lipid levels obtained by Oil Red O staining. Optical density (OD) measurements were compared with triglyceride levels of UK211 and HF85. Good correlations between OD per area and neutral lipids (0.90) and between OD and triglycerides (0.87) were found. Thus, OD reflects lipid levels and can be used as an indicator of lipid reserves in these nematodes. Heat-killing of nematodes had no significant effect on OD measurements, but length increased significantly. Storage in a triethanolamine in formaldehyde solution decreased the OD and OD/area by about 5% to 8%. An additional advantage of the image analysis method described is that repeated measurements can be performed on live nematodes. Key words: entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis, image analysis, neutral lipid, Oil Red O, optical density, Steinernema, triglyceride. PMID:19274145

Fitters, P. F. L.; Meijer, E. M. J.; Wright, D. J.; Griffin, C. T.

1997-01-01

455

Characteristics of Cheetahs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What are some characteristics of cheetahs? First, go to Graphic Organizer and use this graphic organizer to organize your answers to the following questions. Second, go to Cheetah Pictures and look at these pictures of cheetahs. Write five things that describe what cheetahs look like and record your answers in your graphic organizer under "What They Look Like" Third, ...

Ms.weathers

2012-04-05

456

Characteristics of the Swirling Flow Generated by an Axial Swirler  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation was conducted to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the confined, non-reacting, swirling flow field. The flow was generated by a helicoidal axial-vaned swirler with a short internal convergent-divergent venturi, which was confined within 2-inch square test section. A series of helicoidal axial-vaned swirlers have been designed with tip vane angles of 40 deg., 45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg. and 65 deg.. The swirler with the tip vane angle of 60 deg. was combined with several simulated fuel nozzle insertions of varying lengths. A two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was employed to measure the three-component mean velocities and Reynolds stresses. Detailed data are provided to enhance understanding swirling flow with different swirl degrees and geometries and to support the development of more accurate physicaVnumerica1 models. The data indicated that the degree of swirl had a clear impact on the mean and turbulent flow fields. The swirling flow fields changed significantly with the addition of a variety of simulated fuel nozzle insertion lengths

Fu, Yongqiang; Jeng, San-Mou; Tacina, Robert

2005-01-01

457

Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models  

SciTech Connect

A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

2008-04-01

458

[Morphological characteristics of resting eggs produced by different Brachionus calyciflorus].  

PubMed

In this paper, the Qingdao and Wuhu strains of Brachionus calyciflorus were cultured at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C, and fed with 1.0 x 10(6) and 5.0 x 10(6) cells x ml(-1) of Scenedesmus obliquus. The morphological study of their produced resting eggs showed that at the two food concentrations, the resting eggs produced at 20 degrees C were the largest in length, width and volume, while those produced at 25 degrees C and 30 degrees C were the smallest. The effects of strain on the morphological characteristics of resting eggs also depended on food concentration. When the food concentration was 1.0 x 10(6) cells x ml(-1), the length, width and volume of the resting eggs produced by Wuhu strain and Qingdao strain were 156.00 microm, 99.95 microm and 12 269.11 microm3, and 145. 13 microm, 91.97 microm and 10 498. 19 microm3, respectively, while when the food concentration was 5.0 x 10(6) cells x ml(-1), the corresponding values were 155. 68 microm, 100.85 microm and 12 348.59 microm, and 156.63 microm, 98.04 microm and 12 054. 20 microm3, respectively. For test strains, only Wuhu strain showed a marked curvilinear correlation in the length, width and volume of its resting eggs with temperature. At the same temperature, the volumes of the resting eggs produced by both Qingdao and Wuhu strains were increased with increasing food concentration, with the exception that the resting eggs produced by Wuhu strain at 30 degrees C decreased with increasing food concentration. PMID:17044519

Liu, Guiyun; Xi, Yilong

2006-07-01

459

Characteristics of sprays produced by coaxial airblast atomizers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of droplet size, velocity, and liquid flux were made in sprays produced by a coaxial airblast atomizer using a phase Doppler anemometer. The atomizer comprised a liquid jet with an exit diameter varied between 1.1-2.3 mm, positioned in the center of a gaseous annular stream. The characteristics of the preburner sprays of the main engine of the Space Shuttle were simulated by using water and air, replacing liquid oxygen and hydrogen, respectively. The sprays covered a range of Weber numbers at the exit of the nozzle from 200 to 3500, of gas-to-liquid momentum ratio from 2 to 110, velocity ratio from 10 to 85, mass flow rate ratio from 0.2 to 1.3, liquid jet Reynolds numbers from 1 x 10(sup 4) to 5.5 x 10(sup 4), and gaseous jet Reynolds numbers from 9 x 10(sup 4) to 1.9 x 10(sup 5). Reduction of the diameter of the liquid tube was found to improve the atomization and reduce the width of sprays with similar gas-to-liquid velocity ratios. The presence of a converging nozzle at the exit of the gaseous jet improved the atomization and increased the rate of spread of sprays with a gas-to-liquid velocity ratio up to around 50, but had no effect for higher velocity ratios. Recess of the liquid tube by two and three liquid tube diameters increased the rate of spread of the sprays and reduced the atomization for the straight and converging gaseous jet exit nozzle.

Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

1994-07-01

460

Uranus' southern circulation revealed by Voyager 2: Unique characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Revised calibration and processing of 1600 images of Uranus by Voyager 2 revealed dozens of discrete features south of -45° latitude, where only a single feature was known from Voyager images and none has been seen since. Tracking of these features over five weeks defined the southern rotational profile of Uranus with high accuracy and no significant gap. The profile has kinks unlike previous profiles and is strongly asymmetric with respect to the northern profile by Sromovsky et al. (Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.M., Hammel, H.B., de Pater, I., Rages, K.A. [2012]. Icarus 220, 694-712). The asymmetry is larger than that of all previous data on jovian planets. A spot that included the South Pole off-center rotated with a period of 12.24 h, 2 h outside the range of all previous observations of Uranus. The region between -68° and -59° latitude rotated almost like a solid body, with a shear that was about 30 times smaller than typical shears on Uranus. At lower latitudes, features were sheared into tightly wound spirals as Voyager watched. The zone at -84° latitude was exceptionally bland; reflectivity variations were only 18 ppm, consistent with a signal-to-noise ratio estimated at 55,000. The low noise was achieved by smoothing over dozens of pixels per image and averaging 1600 images. The presented data set in eight filters contains rich information about temporal evolution and spectral characteristics of features on Uranus that will be the basis for further analysis.

Karkoschka, Erich

2015-04-01

461

Simplified setup for imaging with digital holographic microscopy and enhanced quantitative phase contrast by osmotic stimulation of living cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require the generation of a coherent reference wave, which results in a phase stability decrease and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. Thus, investigations on a simplified digital holographic microscopy approach that avoids a separate reference wave were performed. Results from live cell investigations demonstrate the capability of the method for quantitative phase contrast imaging. In further experiments the modification of the intracellular refractive index distribution by osmotic stimulation was analyzed. Data from human pancreas tumor cells show that by choice of suitable buffer solutions live cell imaging with enhanced quantitative phase contrast is achieved.

Kemper, Björn; Przibilla, Sabine; Rommel, Christina E.; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; von Bally, Gert

2011-03-01

462

Psychoactive substances use experience and addiction or risk of addiction among by Polish adolescents living in rural and urban areas.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to determine the similarities and differences between adolescents with psychoactive substances use experience living in urban and rural areas as regards the intensity of Internet addiction symptoms as well as the evaluation of prevalence of psychoactive substances use among adolescents depending on the place of residence. The examined group consisted of 1 860 people (1 320 girls and 540 boys) their average age being 17 years. In the study the following research methods were used: the Sociodemographic Questionnaire designed by the authors, the Internet Addiction Questionnaire by Potembska, the Internet Addiction test by Young, the Internet Addiction Questionnaire (KBUI) designed by Paw?owska and Potembska. Statistically significant differences were found as regards the prevalence of psychoactive substances use by the adolescents living in urban and rural areas and as regards the intensity of Internet addiction symptoms in adolescents, both from the urban and rural areas, who use and do not use illegal drugs. Significantly more adolescents living in urban areas as compared to their peers living in rural areas use psychoactive substances, mainly marihuana. The adolescents who use psychoactive substances, as compared to the adolescents with no experience using illegal drugs, living both in urban and rural areas significantly more often play online violent games and use web pornography. The adolescents living in rural areas who use psychoactive substances significantly more often as compared to the adolescents who do not use these substances claim that it is only thanks to the interactions established on the Internet that they can get acceptance, understanding and appreciation. PMID:25528919

Paw?owska, Beata; Zygo, Maciej; Potembska, Emilia; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Dreher, Piotr; K?dzierski, Zbigniew

2014-11-26

463

Induction of T lymphocyte responses to dengue virus by a candidate tetravalent live attenuated dengue virus vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of a safe and immunogenic tetravalent dengue virus (DV) vaccine has been designated as a priority by the World Health Organization. We characterized the T cell response to DV induced by a candidate live attenuated tetravalent DV vaccine as part of a phase I study. Proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to multiple DV serotypes were detected in

Alan L Rothman; Niranjan Kanesa-thasan; Kim West; Jurand Janus; Jean-Francois Saluzzo; Francis A Ennis

2001-01-01

464

Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

1996-01-01

465

Biosorption of As(V) from aqueous solutions by living cells of Bacillus cereus.  

PubMed

In this work, the biosorption of As(V) from aqueous solutions by living cells of Bacillus cereus has been reported. The batch biosorption experiments were conducted with respect to biosorbent dosage 0.5 to 15 g/L, pH 2 to 9, contact time 5 to 90 min, initial concentration 1 to 10 mg/L and temperature 10 to 40 °C. The maximum biosorption capacity of B. cereus for As(V) was found to be 30.04 at pH 7.0, at optimum conditions of contact time of 30 min, biomass dosage of 6 g/L, and temperature of 30 ± 2 °C. Biosorption data were fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherms with R(2) (correlation coefficient) >0.99. Bacillus cereus cell surface was characterized using AFM and FTIR. The metal ions were desorbed from B. cereus using both 1 M HCl and 1 M HNO(3). The pseudo-second-order model was successfully applied to predict the rate constant of biosorption. PMID:22907454

Giri, A K; Patel, R K; Mishra, P C

2012-01-01

466

Tissue engineering by self-assembly and bio-printing of living cells  

PubMed Central

Biofabrication of living structures with desired topology and functionality requires the interdisciplinary effort of practitioners of the physical, life, medical and engineering sciences. Such efforts are being undertaken in many laboratories around the world. Numerous approaches are being pursued, such as those based on the use of natural or artificial scaffolds, decellularized cadaveric extracellular matrices and lately bioprinting. To be successful in this endeavor it is crucial to provide in vitro micro-environmental clues for the cells resembling those in the organism. Therefore scaffolds populated with differentiated cells or stem cells of increasing complexity and sophistication are being fabricated. However, scaffolds, no matter how sophisticated they are, can cause problems stemming from their degradation, eliciting immunogenic reactions and other a priori unforeseen complications. It is also being realized that ultimately the best approach is to rely on the self-assembly and self-organizing properties of cells and tissues and the innate regenerative capability of the organism itself, not just simply prepare tissue and organ structures in vitro followed by their implantation. Here we briefly review the different strategies for the fabrication of three-dimensional biological structures, in particular bioprinting. We detail a fully biological, scaffoldless, print-based engineering approach that uses self-assembling multicellular units as bioink particles and employs early developmental morphogenetic principles, such as cell sorting and tissue fusion. PMID:20811127

Jakab, Karoly; Marga, Francoise; Norotte, Cyrille; Murphy, Keith; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

2013-01-01

467

Differential regulation of protrusion and polarity by PI(3)K during neutrophil motility in live zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Summary Cell polarity is crucial for directed migration. Here we show that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI(3)K) mediates neutrophil migration in vivo by differentially regulating cell protrusion and polarity. The dynamics of PI(3)K products PI(3,4,5)P3-PI(3,4)P2 during neutrophil migration were visualized in living zebrafish, revealing that PI(3)K activation at the leading edge is critical for neutrophil motility in intact tissues. A genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac was used to demonstrate that localized activation of Rac is sufficient to direct migration with precise temporal and spatial control in vivo. Similar stimulation of PI(3)K-inhibited cells did not direct migration. Localized Rac activation rescued membrane protrusion but not anteroposterior polarization of F-actin dynamics of PI(3)K-inhibited cells. Uncoupling Rac-mediated protrusion and polarization suggests a paradigm of two-tiered PI(3)K-mediated regulation of cell motility. This work provides new insight into how cell signaling at the front and back of the cell is coordinated during polarized cell migration in intact tissues within a multicellular organism. PMID:20159593

Yoo, Sa Kan; Deng, Qing; Cavnar, Peter J.; Wu, Yi I.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Huttenlocher, Anna

2010-01-01

468

Human behavior understanding for assisted living by means of hierarchical context free grammars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human behavior understanding has attracted the attention of researchers in various fields over the last years. Recognizing behaviors with sufficient accuracy from sensors analysis is still an unsolved problem, because of many reasons, including the low accuracy of the data, differences in the human behaviors as well as the gap between low-level sensors data and high-level scene semantics. In this context, an application that is attracting the interest of both public and industrial entities is the possibility to allow elderly or physically impaired people conducting a normal life at home. Ambient intelligence (AmI) technologies, intended as the possibility of automatically detecting and reacting to the status of the environment and of the persons, is probably the major enabling factor for the achievement of such an ambitious objective. AmI technologies require suitable networks of sensors and actuators, as well as adequate processing and communication technologies. In this paper we propose a solution based on context free grammars for human behavior understanding with an application to assisted living. First, the grammars of the different actions performed by a person in his/her daily life are discovered. Then, a longterm analysis of the behavior is used to generate a control grammar, taking care of the context when an action is performed, and adding semantics. The proposed framework is tested on a dataset acquired in a real environment and compared with state of the art methods already available for the problem considered.

Rosani, A.; Conci, N.; De Natale, F. G. B.

2014-03-01

469

From the Cover: Visualization of maltose uptake in living yeast cells by fluorescent nanosensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compartmentation of metabolic reactions and thus transport within and between cells can be understood only if we know subcellular distribution based on nondestructive dynamic monitoring. Currently, methods are not available for in vivo metabolite imaging at cellular or subcellular levels. Limited information derives from methods requiring fixation or fractionation of tissue (1, 2). We thus developed a flexible strategy for designing protein-based nanosensors for a wide spectrum of solutes, allowing analysis of changes in solute concentration in living cells. We made use of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs), where we show that, on binding of the substrate, PBPs transform their hinge-bend movement into increased fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two coupled green fluorescent proteins. By using the maltose-binding protein as a prototype, nanosensors were constructed allowing in vitro determination of FRET changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. For physiological applications, mutants with different binding affinities were generated, allowing dynamic in vivo imaging of the increase in cytosolic maltose concentration in single yeast cells. Control sensors allow the exclusion of the effect from other cellular or environmental parameters on ratio imaging. Thus the myriad of PBPs recognizing a wide spectrum of different substrates is suitable for FRET-based in vivo detection, providing numerous scientific, medical, and environmental applications.

Fehr, Marcus; Frommer, Wolf B.; Lalonde, Sylvie

2002-07-01

470

Chlorination by a long-lived intermediate in the mechanism of flavin-dependent halogenases.  

PubMed

The flavin-dependent halogenase RebH catalyzes the formation of 7-chlorotryptophan as the initial step in the biosynthesis of antitumor agent rebeccamycin. The reaction of FADH2, Cl-, and O2 in the active site generates the powerful oxidant HOCl, which was presumed to carry out the chlorination reaction. Herein, we demonstrate the formation of a long-lived chlorinating intermediate (t1/2 = 63 h at 4 degrees C) when RebH, FADH2, Cl-, and O2 react in the absence of substrate tryptophan. This intermediate remained on the enzyme after removal of FAD and transferred chlorine to tryptophan with kinetically competent rates. The identity of this intermediate is suggested by the X-ray crystal structure of RebH, which revealed an active site Lys79 located in a central position between flavin and tryptophan binding sites and just 4.1 A above C7 of tryptophan. The chlorinating species is proposed to be a Lys-epsilonNH-Cl (lysine chloramine) from reaction of enzyme-generated HOCl with the active site Lys79. This covalent enzyme chloramine likely plays a key role in directing regiospecific chlorination of substrate in this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:17260957

Yeh, Ellen; Blasiak, Leah C; Koglin, Alexander; Drennan, Catherine L; Walsh, Christopher T

2007-02-01

471

UNM Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you can't make it to the University of New Mexico campus in Albuquerque, why not tune in to their events online? This is now possible, courtesy of the UNM Live website. The function of this site is to bring "educational resources to a wider audience", and their focus is quite catholic, with talks on student aid, podcasts on anthropology, and so on. Visitors can learn about the initiative via the "About UNM Live" section of the site, and for more general information, they can look over the "What is a podcast? How do I subscribe?" area. First-time visitors should start by listening to Professor Jerry Shea talk about the Swahili terms "Sasa" and "Zamani" for a good introduction to the site. The social networking media options are quite easy to use, and visitors can recommend various media clips and programs to friends and others. Also, visitors can use the "Categories" area to look for materials related to campus life, arts, business, education, and current affairs.

472

Bovine myofiber characteristics are influenced by postweaning nutrition.  

PubMed

This study determined the extent to which bovine longissimus lumborum muscle (LLM) myofibers are influenced by nutrition for 120 d from weaning and the time-course of recovery after severe postweaning nutritional restriction. After weaning, 3 groups of Belmont Red cattle, a tropically adapted breed, were fed to achieve rapid growth (RG, > or =0.6 kg of BW gain/d; n = 16), slow growth (SG, 0.2 kg of BW gain/d; n = 17), or BW loss (WL, 10% loss of weaning weight; n = 17) over 120 d. They were then grazed as 1 group at pasture with forage supplementation for 600 d until slaughter at approximately 500 kg of BW. Samples of LLM were taken from 8 to 12 animals per treatment 6 d before (baseline) and 115, 204, 324, and 476 d after commencement of the study and from all cattle at slaughter (d 721). Myofiber characteristics were determined by immunocytochemical staining of myosin heavy chains. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the major myofiber types 1, 2A, and 2X in WL were reduced at d 115 compared with baseline and with the growth groups (all P < 0.001); however, there was little difference in the percentage of the different myofiber types (all P > 0.10). Differences in CSA of the major myofiber types between WL and the growth groups at 115 d were smallest for type 1 (slow oxidative) and greatest for type 2X (fast glycolytic). Consequently, the relative area (percentage of total myofiber area) of type 1 myofibers in WL was significantly greater at 115 d than in the growth groups (P < 0.001). During recovery from postweaning nutritional restriction, significant differences in major myofiber type percentages were not evident (all P > 0.10), and by 721 d CSA of myofiber types differed little between the treatment groups, although SG had greater CSA of type 1 (P < 0.05) and type 2A (P < 0.01) myofibers than WL and RG. At 721 d, the relative area of type 2A myofibers was less in WL compared with SG (P < 0.01) and RG (P < 0.05) and of type 2X myofibers greater (P < 0.05) in WL compared with SG. It is concluded that in the LLM of cattle undergoing severe nutritional restriction immediately postweaning, the size of the more glycolytic fiber types is more adversely affected than the more oxidative types, resulting in an increased relative area of type 1, slow oxidative myofibers. However, given adequate time and nutriment at pasture, LLM myofiber characteristics of cattle recovered to near normal after severe, chronic nutritional restriction immediately postweaning, consistent with earlier findings for beef quality. PMID:19542515

Greenwood, P L; Tomkins, N W; Hunter, R A; Allingham, P G; Harden, S; Harper, G S

2009-10-01

473

Differential Osmotic Behavior of Water Components in Living Skeletal Muscle Resolved by 1H-NMR  

PubMed Central

Using frog sartorius muscle, we observed transverse relaxation processes of 1H-NMR signals from myowater. The process could be well described by four characteristic exponentials: the extremely slow exponential of relaxation time constant T2 > 0.4 s, the slow one of T2 ? 0.15 s, the intermediate one of 0.03 s < T2 < 0.06 s, and the rapid one of T2 < 0.03 s. Addition of isotonic extracellular solution affected only the extremely slow exponential, linearly increasing its amplitude and gradually increasing its T2 toward that of the bulk solution (1.7 s). Therefore, this exponential should represent extracellular surplus solution independently of the other exponentials. At two thirds to three times the isotonicity, the amplitude of the intermediate exponential showed normal osmotic behavior in parallel with the volume change of the myofilament lattice measured with x-ray diffraction. In the same tonicity range, the amplitude of the rapid exponential showed converse osmotic behavior. Lower tonicities increased the amplitude of only the slow exponential. Studied tonicities did not affect the T2 values. The distinct osmotic behavior indicated that each characteristic exponential could be viewed as a distinct water group. In addition, the converse osmotic behavior suggested that the rapid exponential would not be a static water layer on the macromolecule surface. PMID:15894647

Kimura, Masako; Takemori, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Maki; Umazume, Yoshiki

2005-01-01

474

Family and parenting characteristics associated with marijuana use by Chilean adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objective Family involvement and several characteristics of parenting have been suggested to be protective factors for adolescent substance use. Some parenting behaviors may have stronger relationships with adolescent behavior while others may have associations with undesirable behavior among youth. Although it is generally acknowledged that families play an important role in the lives of Chilean adolescents, scant research exists on how different family and parenting factors may be associated with marijuana use and related problems in this population which has one of the highest rates of drug use in Latin America. Methods Using logistic regression and negative binomial regression, we examined whether a large number of family and parenting variables were associated with the possibility of Chilean adolescents ever using marijuana, and with marijuana-related problems. Analyses controlled for a number of demographic and peer-related variables. Results Controlling for other parenting and family variables, adolescent reports of parental marijuana use showed a significant and positive association with adolescent marijuana use. The multivariate models also revealed that harsh parenting by fathers was the only family variable associated with the number of marijuana-related problems youth experienced. Conclusion Of all the family and parenting variables studied, perceptions of parental use of marijuana and harsh parenting by fathers were predictors for marijuana use, and the experience of marijuana-related problems. Prevention interventions need to continue emphasizing the critical socializing role that parental behavior plays in their children’s development and potential use of marijuana. PMID:21660209

Bares, Cristina B; Delva, Jorge; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Andrade, Fernando

2011-01-01

475

Biosensing by luminogens with aggregation-induced emission characteristics.  

PubMed

Fluorescent biosensors are powerful analytical tools for studying biological events in living systems. Luminescent materials with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) attributes have attracted much research interest and have been identified as a novel class of luminogens to develop fluorescent turn-on biosensors with superior sensitivity. In this Tutorial Review, we present an overview of the AIE phenomenon and its mechanism. We summarize the structural design and working principle of AIE biosensors developed recently. Typical examples of AIE biosensors are presented. PMID:25374162

Kwok, Ryan T K; Leung, Chris W T; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

2014-11-01

476

Public by Day, Private by Night: Examining the Private Lives of Kenya's Public Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the emergence of the public university in Kenya as a key provider of private higher education, characterised mainly by the phenomenon of the "private public university student." It probes the broader socio-economic reforms circumscribing the privatisation of Kenya's public universities and the local and global forces…

Wangenge-Ouma, Gerald

2012-01-01

477

Bile duct reconstruction by a young surgeon in living donor liver transplantation using right liver graft.  

PubMed

Biliary strictures and bile leaks account for the majority of biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). The aim of this study was to examine differences in biliary complications after adult LDLTs were performed by an experienced senior surgeon and an inexperienced junior surgeon. Surgeries included bile duct reconstruction after adult LDLT using a right liver graft, and risk factors for biliary stricture were identified. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 136 patients who underwent LDLT in order to identify patients who developed biliary complications. The senior surgeon performed 102 surgeries and the junior surgeon performed 34 surgeries. The proportion of patients with biliary stricture was similar between the senior and the junior surgeons (27.5% vs 26.5%; P?=?0.911). However, the incidence of biliary leakage was higher in patients of the junior surgeon than in those of the senior surgeon (23.5% vs 2.9%; P?=?0.001). The frequency of percutaneous drainage was also higher for the junior surgeon than the senior surgeon because of the junior surgeon's high leakage rate of the drainage. When the junior surgeon performed bile duct anastomosis, biliary leakage occurred in 7 patients between the 11th and 20th cases. However, biliary leakage occurred in only 1 case thereafter. Bile duct reconstruction performed by beginner surgeons in LDLT using right lobe grafts should be cautiously monitored and observed by a senior surgeon until an inexperienced junior surgeon has performed at least 20 cases, because of the high incidence of biliary leakage related to surgeon's inexperience in bile duct reconstructions in LDLT. PMID:25255023

Kim, Jong Man; Cho, Wontae; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Park, Jae Berm; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Gwak, Mi Sook; Kim, Gaab Soo; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Suk-Koo

2014-09-01

478

Development of live attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae as potential vaccines by selecting for resistance to sparfloxacin.  

PubMed

To develop attenuated bacteria as potential live vaccines, sparfloxacin was used in this study to modify 40 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae. Majority of S. agalactiae used in this study were able to develop at least 80-fold resistance to sparfloxacin. When the virulence of the sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates were tested in 10-12g Nile tilapia by intraperitoneal injection at dose of 2×10(7)CFU/fish, 31 were found to be avirulent to fish. Of the 31 avirulent sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates, 30 provided 75-100% protection to 10-12g Nile tilapia against challenges with a virulent S. agalactiae isolate Sag 50. When the virulence of the 30 sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates was tested in 3-5g Nile tilapia by intraperitoneal injection at dose of 2×10(7)CFU/fish, six were found to be avirulent to 3-5g Nile tilapia. Of the six avirulent sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates, four provided 3-5g Nile tilapia 100% protection against challenges with homologous isolates, including Sag 97-spar isolate that was non-hemolytic. However, Sag 97-spar failed to provide broad cross-protection against challenges with heterologous isolates. When Nile tilapia was vaccinated with a polyvalent vaccine consisting of 30 sparfloxacin-resistant S. agalactiae isolates at dose of 2×10(6)CFU/fish, the polyvalent vaccine provided significant (P<0.001) protection to both 3-5g and 15-20g Nile tilapia against challenges with 30 parent isolates of S. agalactiae. Taken together, our results suggest that a polyvalent vaccine consisting of various strains of S. agalactiae might be essential to provide broader protection to Nile tilapia against infections caused by S. agalactiae. PMID:23583891

Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H

2013-05-31

479

Quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer by monitoring sensitized emission in living plant cells  

PubMed Central

Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) describes excitation energy exchange between two adjacent molecules typically in distances ranging from 2 to 10 nm. The process depends on dipole-dipole coupling of the molecules and its probability of occurrence cannot be proven directly. Mostly, fluorescence is employed for quantification as it represents a concurring process of relaxation of the excited singlet state S1 so that the probability of fluorescence decreases as the probability of FRET increases. This reflects closer proximity of the molecules or an orientation of donor and acceptor transition dipoles that facilitates FRET. Monitoring sensitized emission by 3-Filter-FRET allows for fast image acquisition and is suitable for quantifying FRET in dynamic systems such as living cells. In recent years, several calibration protocols were established to overcome to previous difficulties in measuring FRET-efficiencies. Thus, we can now obtain by 3-filter FRET FRET-efficiencies that are comparable to results from sophisticated fluorescence lifetime measurements. With the discovery of fluorescent proteins and their improvement toward spectral variants and usability in plant cells, the tool box for in vivo FRET-analyses in plant cells was provided and FRET became applicable for the in vivo detection of protein-protein interactions and for monitoring conformational dynamics. The latter opened the door toward a multitude of FRET-sensors such as the widely applied Ca2+-sensor Cameleon. Recently, FRET-couples of two fluorescent proteins were supplemented by additional fluorescent proteins toward FRET-cascades in order to monitor more complex arrangements. Novel FRET-couples involving switchable fluorescent proteins promise to increase the utility of FRET through combination with photoactivation-based super-resolution microscopy. PMID:24194740

Müller, Sara M.; Galliardt, Helena; Schneider, Jessica; Barisas, B. George; Seidel, Thorsten

2013-01-01

480

Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Invasion into Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells by Contact with Live Lactobacillus casei  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that is responsible for mastitis in dairy herds. S. aureus mastitis is difficult to treat and prone to recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. The ability of S. aureus to invade bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) is evoked to explain this chronicity. One sustainable alternative to treat or prevent mastitis is the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as mammary probiotics. In this study, we tested the ability of Lactobacillus casei strains to prevent invasion of bMEC by two S. aureus bovine strains, RF122 and Newbould305, which reproducibly induce acute and moderate mastitis, respectively. L. casei strains affected adhesion and/or internalization of S. aureus in a strain-dependent manner. Interestingly, L. casei CIRM-BIA 667 reduced S. aureus Newbould305 and RF122 internalization by 60 to 80%, and this inhibition was confirmed for two other L. casei strains, including one isolated from bovine teat canal. The protective effect occurred without affecting bMEC morphology and viability. Once internalized, the fate of S. aureus was not affected by L. casei. It should be noted that L. casei was internalized at a low rate but survived in bMEC cells with a better efficiency than that of S. aureus RF122. Inhibition of S. aureus adhesion was maintained with heat-killed L. casei, whereas contact between live L. casei and S. aureus or bMEC was required to prevent S. aureus internalization. This first study of the antagonism of LAB toward S. aureus in a mammary context opens avenues for the devel