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1

Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Welcome to an internet program that is all about life. Just what is life? This seems like a strange question. We all know what is meant by the word \\"life\\". But how do we define it? Are all living things alike? In this internet program, you will watch several short movies and some slides. After you see each movie and slide, you will write something about the movie and slide. Our learning goal is to make a list of the traits that all living things have in common. Get out a pencil and a piece of paper. We are off on a great adventure to learn about living things! This first movie is called, \\"Is It Alive?\\" It will help you begin thinking about living things and what they all have in common. Write on your paper: \\"Living Things\\". As you watch this movie, write the names of the things that you think are alive. Copy the ...

Melenson, Richard S.

2005-11-21

2

Discovering the Characteristics of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lab developed by Orange County Public School middle school science teachers. It is designed as an inquiry-based lab in which students explore how living and non living things are different. They are given many situations, including demo, lab, outdoor exploration, and follow-up, to learn the characteristics of living things.

Science, Orange C.

2011-10-14

3

Living and Non-living things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is intended to help students understand the difference between living and non-living things by teaching them the characteristics of living things. Introduction: We know what living things are, right? People are living things, aren't they? Can you think of any other living things? How do you know they are living? Task: If you were asked to explain what the difference between living and non-living things, how would you? This ...

Davies, Mrs.

2010-02-11

4

Living and non-living things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things often rely on non-living things to accomplish daily tasks. Living things have several characteristics that non-living things do not, such as the ability to move, eat, breathe, and reproduce. Living things and non-living things can interact even though they do not have the same characteristics.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-06-25

5

Living things and non-living things interact  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Living things and non-living things interact on a daily basis. The man is a human, a living thing. The corn crop and grass are also living things. The soil that the grass and corn crops are rooted in is a non-living thing.

Ken Hammond (USDA-ARS;)

2006-05-23

6

Fuel for Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners observe what happens when yeast cells are provided with a source of food (sugar). Red cabbage "juice" will serve as an indicator for the presence of carbon dioxide. Learners will observe how carbon dioxide gas is given off by yeast cells, as indicated by turning the mixture bright pink. This activity is broken up in three parts or sessions: making the indicator (can be done in advance), demonstration of cabbage juice indicator, and conducting the investigation.

Moreno, Nancy P.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Dresden, Judith

2011-01-01

7

Functions of Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about the functions carried out by plants and animals for maintaining life. The task specifically seeks to find out if students recognize that plants and animals share several common life functions, even though they are seemingly very different organisms.

Eberle, Francis; Farrin, Lynn; Keeley, Page

2005-01-01

8

Looking for Living and Nonliving Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is a field investigation where students begin to generate ideas about what is living and nonliving by observing and recording what they see in a defined area outdoors and later sharing things that they think are living and why.

9

Classification of Living Things: Introduction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Dennis O'Neal of Palomar College designed this site to introduce students to a tutorial on the Classification of Living Things. Topics addressed at this site include the Linnaen system of classification, amount of species in our world, the importance of biological diversity, the history of classification, and the relevancy of classification in the present day. There are links to the Main Menu, a Practice Quiz, and the other topics in the tutorial including Principals of Class, Kingdom to Subphylum, Class, and Subclass to Infraclass. Additionally, to link to a comprehensive glossary of relevant terms click on the Ecological Niches or Natural Selection links at the bottom of the site. For users with QuickTime there are several sound files that provide correct pronunciation of key terms.

O'Neal, Dennis

10

The Concept of Living and Non-Living Things in the World of Primary School Students in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to reveal how the concepts of living and non-living things are in the world of the primary school (4th and 5th classes) students, what they remember when they are told about living and non-living things and what the characteristics of living and non-living things are according to them. The research is a descriptive…

Topsakal, Unsal Umdu

2010-01-01

11

Consumers Get Energy from Other Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson where learners explore how animals obtain and store energy, and draw conclusions about the interconnectedness of living things in the flow of energy. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson four in the Astro-Venture Biology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

12

Demonstrating the Influence of UV Rays on Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experiment that introduces students to the different types of UV rays and their effects on living things by using appropriate teaching materials and equipment. Demonstrates the effects of exposure to UV-B (fluorescent) and UV-C (germicidal) lamps by using bananas, duckweed, and the fruit fly. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

Morimoto, Kouichi

2002-01-01

13

The Internet of Things for Ambient Assisted Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the logical further development of today's Internet. Technological advancements lead to smart objects being capable of identifying, locating, sensing and connecting and thus leading to new forms of communication between people and things and things themselves. Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) encompasses technical systems to support elderly people in their daily routine to allow an

A. Dohr; R. Modre-Opsrian; Mario Drobics; Dieter Hayn; Günter Schreier

2010-01-01

14

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they…

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-01-01

15

Mathematics and Living Things. Student Text. Revised Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed for grade eight to enrich and supplement the usual courses of instruction. Mathematics and Living Things (MALT) utilizes exercises in biological science to derive data through which mathematical concepts and principles may be introduced and expanded. Chapters included are: (1) Leaves and Natural Variation: Measurement of…

Faber, Norman J.; And Others

16

How Living Things Obtain Energy: A Simpler Explanation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines five basic reactions which describe the biochemical pathways for living things obtaining energy. Shows the reactions that occur in respiration after glycolysis, the dehydrogenation reaction, decarboxylation, and two kinds of make-ready reactions which prepare molecules for further dehydrogenation and decarboxylation. Diagrams are…

Igelsrud, Donald E.

1989-01-01

17

How to Care for Living Things in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) publication, the advantages of having living things in the classroom are discussed. Also given is a brief description of the facilities and environments required for various common mammals, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and plants. (CP)

Pratt, Grace K.

18

Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure about "Living Thing"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study aims to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structure on the concept of "living thing" through revealing their conceptual framework. Qualitative research method was applied in this study. The data were collected from 44 biology student teachers. A free word association test was used as a data collection…

Kurt, Hakan

2013-01-01

19

Investigating Biological Classification: Organization of All Living Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will investigate the organization of all living things through and learn how to classify through process of classifying their own shoes. Students will complete the classification of a Jaguar and write their own pneumonic device to remember the order of biological classification. (kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species)

Lindsey Oliver, Fridley Middle School, Fridley, MN

20

How Do Young Children Deal with Hybrids of Living and Non-Living Things: The Case of Humanoid Robots  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this experiment, we tested children's intuitions about entities that bridge the contrast between living and non-living things. Three- and four-year-olds were asked to attribute a range of properties associated with living things and machines to novel category-defying complex artifacts (humanoid robots), a familiar living thing (a girl), and a…

Saylor, Megan M.; Somanader, Mark; Levin, Daniel T.; Kawamura, Kazuhiko

2010-01-01

21

Persistence of the Intuitive Conception of Living Things in Adolescence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated whether intuitive, naive conceptions of "living things" based on objects' mobility (movement = alive) persist into adolescence and affect 10th graders' accuracy of responses and reaction times during object classification. Most of the 58 students classified the test objects correctly as living/nonliving, yet they demonstrated significantly longer reaction times for classifying plants compared to animals and for classifying dynamic objects compared to static inanimate objects. Findings indicated that, despite prior learning in biology, the intuitive conception of living things persists up to age 15-16 years, affecting related reasoning processes. Consideration of these findings may help educators in their decisions about the nature of examples they use in their classrooms.

Babai, Reuven; Sekal, Rachel; Stavy, Ruth

2010-02-01

22

Is it living or non living?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Once completed, students will have a deeper understanding of what is living and non living. Students will be able to identify the characteristics of non living and living things and will be able to classify them in an environment. Take this pretest to test your knowlege of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz Read this to learn more about living and non living things.Living vs Non Living Things Living things need 7 characteristics of life. Click on this link to learn more about what they are.7 Characteristics of Living Things Living and non living things have different characteristics. Look ...

Aitken, Miss

2009-04-17

23

When a Bilingual Child Describes Living Things: An Analysis of Conceptual Understandings from a Language Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With increasing numbers of students learning science through a second language in many school contexts, there is a need for research to focus on the impact language has on students’ understanding of science concepts. Like other countries, Brunei has adopted a bilingual system of education that incorporates two languages in imparting its curriculum. For the first three years of school, Brunei children are taught in Malay and then for the remainder of their education, instruction is in English. This research is concerned with the influence that this bilingual education system has on children’s learning of science. The purpose was to document the patterns of Brunei students’ developing understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things and examine the impact in the change in language as the medium of instruction. A cross-sectional case study design was used in one primary school. Data collection included an interview ( n = 75), which consisted of forced-response and semi-structured interview questions, a categorisation task and classroom observation. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that the transition from Malay to English as the language of instruction from Primary 4 onwards restricted the students’ ability to express their understandings about living things, to discuss related scientific concepts and to interpret and analyse scientific questions. From a social constructivist perspective these language factors will potentially impact on the students’ cognitive development by limiting the expected growth of the students’ understandings of the concepts of living and non-living things.

Salleh, Romaizah; Venville, Grady J.; Treagust, David F.

2007-07-01

24

Living Vs. Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First mouse over the objects to see some of the characteristics of living and non living things.Living Nonliving Characteristics 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Benson, Carrie

2012-10-08

25

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous Exploration and Evaluation  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 ­ Report Final hal-00940078,version1-31Jan2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.3 ­ Report on IOT

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Living Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First take this pretest to test your knowledge of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Benson, Mrs.

2010-02-23

27

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous Exploration and Evaluation  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4.3.1 ­ Report on IOT Living Labs Continuous,version1-7Mar2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

Genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B strains carried by adolescents living in Milan, Italy  

PubMed Central

Before a protein vaccine is introduced into a country, it is essential to evaluate its potential impact and estimate its benefits and costs. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis B (NmB) in the pharyngeal secretions of 1375 healthy adolescents aged 13–19 y living in Milan, Italy, in September 2012, and the possible protection offered by the two currently available NmB protein vaccines. Ninety-one subjects were Nm carriers (6.6%), 29 (31.9%) of whom carried the NmB capsular gene. The 29 identified strains belonged to eight clonal complexes (CCs), the majority of which were in the ST-41/44/Lin.3 CC (n = 11; 37.9%). All of the identified strains harboured ƒHbp alleles representing a total of 15 sub-variants: the gene for NHBA protein was found in all but three of the studied strains (10.3%) with 13 identified sub-variants. There were 15 porA sub-types, seven of which were identified in just one CC. The findings of this study seem to suggest that both of the protein vaccines proposed for the prevention of invasive disease due to NmB (the 4-protein and the 2-protein products) have a composition that can evoke a theoretically effective antibody response against the meningococcal strains currently carried by adolescents living in Northern Italy. The genetic characteristics of NmB strains can be easily evaluated by means of molecular methods, the results of which can provide an albeit approximate estimate of the degree of protection theoretically provided by the available vaccines, and the possible future need to change their composition. PMID:23880917

Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Terranova, Leonardo; Montinaro, Valentina; Scala, Alessia; Ansuini, Valentina; Principi, Nicola

2013-01-01

29

Young children learning about living things: A case study of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although research from a developmental/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative data-collection methods to investigate the process of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives when Year 1 (5- and 6-year-old) students were learning about living things. Most students were found to think about living things with either stable, nonscientific or stable, scientific framework theories. Transitional phases of understanding also were identified. Patterns of conceptual change observed over the 5-week period of instruction included theory change and belief revision as well as reversals in beliefs. The predominant pattern of learning, however, was the assimilation of facts and information into the students' preferred framework theory. The social milieu of the classroom context exposed students' scientific and nonscientific beliefs that influenced other individuals in a piecemeal fashion. Children with nonscientific theories of living things were identified as being least able to benefit from socially constructed, scientific knowledge; hence, recommendations are made for teaching that focuses on conceptual change strategies rather than knowledge enrichment.

Venville, Grady

2004-05-01

30

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API  

E-print Network

Architecture and Measured Characteristics of a Cloud Based Internet of Things API Geoffrey C. Fox Indiana University, Bloomington IN 47408 USA rdhartma@indiana.edu ABSTRACT The Internet of Things (Io systems [2,3]. This is the vision of the Internet of Things. We present a cloud-compatible open source

31

A Cloud-Based Internet of Things Platform for Ambient Assisted Living  

PubMed Central

A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrian; Pimentel, Ernesto

2014-01-01

32

Revisiting Preschoolers' Living Things Concept: A Microgenetic Analysis of Conceptual Change in Basic Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological…

Opfer, John E.; Siegler, Robert S.

2004-01-01

33

Different Living Things. Seychelles Integrated Science. [Teacher and Pupil Booklets.] Unit 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seychelles Integrated Science (SIS), a 3-year laboratory-based science program for students (ages 11-15) in upper primary grades 7, 8, and 9, was developed from an extensive evaluation and modification of previous P7-P9 materials. This P7 SIS unit is designed to: (1) help students develop an elementary understanding of how living things can be…

Brophy, M.; Fryars, M.

34

Revisiting preschoolers living things concept: A microgenetic analysis of conceptual change in basic biologyq  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judg- ments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological action, but that few pre- schoolers realize that

John E. Opfer; Robert S. Siegler

35

Revisiting preschoolers’ living things concept: A microgenetic analysis of conceptual change in basic biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many preschoolers know that plants and animals share basic biological properties, but this knowledge does not usually lead them to conclude that plants, like animals, are living things. To resolve this seeming paradox, we hypothesized that preschoolers largely base their judgments of life status on a biological property, capacity for teleological action, but that few preschoolers realize that plants possess

John E. Opfer; Robert S. Siegler

2004-01-01

36

Science K-12, Living Things Are Products of Their Heredity and Their Environment. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, health, general science, physical science) and grade level. Concepts regarding characteristics of living things are stressed in objectives for the primary grades (K-5), and reproductive biology is covered…

Utica City School District, NY.

37

Young children learning about living things: A case study of conceptual change from ontological and social perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research from a developmental\\/psychological perspective indicates that many children do not have a scientific understanding of living things, even by the age of 10 years, little research has been conducted about how students learn this science topic in the classroom. This exploratory research used a case-study design and qualitative data-collection methods to investigate the process of conceptual change from

Grady Venville

2004-01-01

38

Can We Make Definite Categorization of Student Attitudes? A Rough Set Approach to Investigate Students' Implicit Attitudinal Typologies Toward Living Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the possibility of analyzing educational data using the theory of rough sets which is mostly employed in the fields of data analysis and data mining. Data were collected using an open-ended conceptual understanding test of the living things administered to first-year high school students. The responses of randomly selected 60 students among the participants were analyzed using rough set approach on the basis of "nine attitudinal typologies toward wildlife" defined by Kellert (1996). Student responses were tabulated to be used in rough sets and upper and lower approximation analyses were carried out. Students were found to display the characteristics of four out of nine typologies. Analyses revealed that some students who possessed characteristics of a certain typology may partially display the characteristics of other typologies and these typologies could be determined using rough set theory.

Narli, Serkan; Yorek, Nurettin; Sahin, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

2010-10-01

39

Invitations to Heredity: Generation to Generation. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about heredity and genetics which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

40

Invitations to Interdependence: Caught in the Web. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about ecosystems which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures,…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

41

Invitations to Cells: Life's Building Blocks. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about cells which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures, extension…

Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

42

Unmasking "Alive:" Children's Appreciation of a Concept Linking All Living Things  

PubMed Central

Decades of research have documented in school-aged children a persistent difficulty apprehending an overarching biological concept that encompasses animate entities like humans and non-human animals, as well as plants. This has led many researchers to conclude that young children have yet to integrate plants and animate entities into a concept LIVING THING. However, virtually all investigations have used the word “alive” to probe children’s understanding, a term that technically describes all living things, but in practice is often aligned with animate entities only. We show that when “alive” is replaced with less ambiguous probes, children readily demonstrate knowledge of an overarching concept linking plants with humans and non-human animals. This work suggests that children have a burgeoning appreciation of this fundamental biological concept, and that the word “alive” paradoxically masks young children’s appreciation of the concept to which it is meant to refer. PMID:19319203

Leddon, Erin M.; Waxman, Sandra R.; Medin, Douglas L.

2009-01-01

43

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 -Project Presentation #4 (M32) Date 30/04/2013  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D6.3.4 - Project Final hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things................................................................................................4 hal-00943988,version1-10Feb2014 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

44

Early Understanding of the Concept of Living Things: An Examination of Young Children's Drawings of Plant Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper looks at the drawings of a sample of 118 children aged between 4 and 7 years old on the topic of plant life and relates the content to their knowledge of the concept of living things. The research project uses two types of tests: a task to analyse the level of understanding of the concept of living things and a free drawing activity.…

Villarroel, José Domingo; Infante, Guillermo

2014-01-01

45

ELLIOT Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 Serious Gaming approach Date 2011-02-29  

E-print Network

ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious Gaming2013 #12;ELLIOT ­ Experiential Living Lab for the Internet Of Things Project N. 258666 D3.3 ­ Serious

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Neighborhood Intimacy as Perceived by Women Living in Urban Areas and its Association with Personal and Social Network Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study is to determine association between personal, family, neighborhood, and social network characteristics and perceived intimacy in the neighborhood by the women. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we applied a two-stage sampling method to choose a representative sample of 150 married women and housewives, aged 15 to 49 years, who had education between six and twelve years and lived in the urban areas of the Khorasan-e-Razavi province of Iran. Association between personal, family, neighborhood, and social network variables, with the perceived neighborhood intimacy, was assessed through univariate and multiple linear regression. Results: Based on the multiple model, there were significant associations between neighborhood intimacy as perceived by the women and their education level (Standardized Beta=–0.190, P=0.019), length of residence (Standardized Beta=0.175, P=0.029), self-rated health status (Standardized Beta=0.177, P=0.029), and their individual social network size (Standardized Beta=0.211, P=0.030). Conclusion: The potential predictors including length of residence, self-rated health, and size of the respondents’ personal social networks had a direct association with the women's perceived neighborhood intimacy, while the education level of the respondents had an inverse association with the neighborhood intimacy, as another potential predictor. Neighborhood intimacy could express the social health condition of the community members. PMID:22708028

Alami, Ali; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Malekafzali, Hossein

2012-01-01

47

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers  

E-print Network

Query by Combination in the Internet of Things Sven Huysmans Peter Rigole Yolande Berbers.Huysmans@gmail.com {Peter.Rigole,Yolande.Berbers}@cs.kuleuven.be Abstract. In the Internet of Things, physical objects of the presented solution is illustrated by a concrete scenario. Keywords: RFID, Internet of Things, ontologies 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

'Things you can't learn from books': teaching recovery from a lived experience perspective.  

PubMed

Mental health policy in Australia is committed to the development of recovery-focused services and facilitating consumer participation in all aspects of mental health service delivery. Negative attitudes of mental health professionals have been identified as a major barrier to achieving these goals. Although the education of health professionals has been identified as a major strategy, there is limited evidence to suggest that consumers are actively involved in this education process. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate students' views and opinions at having been taught 'recovery in mental health nursing' by a person with a lived experience of significant mental health challenges. In-depth interviews were held with 12 students. Two main themes were identified: (i) 'looking through fresh eyes' - what it means to have a mental illness; and (ii) 'it's all about the teaching'. The experience was perceived positively; students referred to the impact made on their attitudes and self-awareness, and their ability to appreciate the impact of mental illness on the individual person. Being taught by a person with lived experience was considered integral to the process. This innovative approach could enhance consumer participation and recovery-focused care. PMID:23020070

Byrne, Louise; Happell, Brenda; Welch, Tony; Moxham, Lorna Jane

2013-06-01

49

Active Living by Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Members of the public health community and those from the world of urban planning have teamed up to create the Active Living By Design program, and by extension, this fine website. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and an academic home at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health, the program was created âÂÂto increase physical activity through community design, public policies and communications strategies.â On the siteâÂÂs homepage, visitors can browse through sections that include information on âÂÂActive Living EssentialsâÂÂ, âÂÂActive Living ProgramsâÂÂ, and âÂÂActive Living ResourcesâÂÂ. The âÂÂEssentialsâ section is a good place to start as visitors can learn about the organizationâÂÂs major fields, which include information on the links between physical activity, urban design, and health. Visitors who are looking to learn about the specific âÂÂon the groundâ programs will want to look over the âÂÂCommunity Partnershipsâ area, as it contains information on initiatives in Chicago, Nashville, Orlando, and Cleveland.

50

Feature Types and Object Categories: Is Sensorimotoric Knowledge Different for Living and Nonliving Things?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some models of semantic memory claim that items from living and nonliving domains have different feature-type profiles. Data from feature generation and perceptual modality rating tasks were compared to evaluate this claim. Results from two living (animals, fruits/vegetables) and two nonliving (tools, vehicles) categories showed that…

Ankerstein, Carrie A.; Varley, Rosemary A.; Cowell, Patricia E.

2012-01-01

51

Comparison of burning characteristics of live and dead chaparral fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wildfire spread in living vegetation, such as chaparral in southern California, often causes significant damage to infrastructure and ecosystems. The effects of physical characteristics of fuels and fuel beds on live fuel burning and whether live fuels differ fundamentally from dead woody fuels in their burning characteristics are not well understood. Toward this end, three common chaparral fuels prevalent in

Lulu Sun; Xiangyang Zhou; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

2006-01-01

52

Little Things  

E-print Network

We present LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey) that is aimed at determining what drives star formation in dwarf galaxies. This is a multi-wavelength survey of 37 Dwarf Irregular and 4 Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies that is centered around HI-line data obtained with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA). The HI-line data are characterized by high sensitivity (less than 1.1 mJy/beam per channel), high spectral resolution (less than or equal to 2.6 km/s), and high angular resolution (~6 arcseconds. The LITTLE THINGS sample contains dwarf galaxies that are relatively nearby (less than or equal to 10.3 Mpc; 6 arcseconds is less than or equal to 300 pc), that were known to contain atomic hydrogen, the fuel for star formation, and that cover a large range in dwarf galactic properties. We describe our VLA data acquisition, calibration, and mapping procedures, as well as HI map characteristics, and show channel maps, moment maps, ve...

Hunter, Deidre A; Ashley, Trisha; Brinks, Elias; Cigan, Phil; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Heesen, Volker; Herrmann, Kimberly A; Johnson, Megan; Se-Heon,; Rupen, Michael P; Schruba, Andreas; Simpson, Caroline E; Walter, Fabian; Westpfahl, David J; Young, Lisa M; Zhang, Hong-Xin

2012-01-01

53

Can We Make Definite Categorization of Student Attitudes? A Rough Set Approach to Investigate Students' Implicit Attitudinal Typologies toward Living Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the possibility of analyzing educational data using the theory of rough sets which is mostly employed in the fields of data analysis and data mining. Data were collected using an open-ended conceptual understanding test of the living things administered to first-year high school students. The responses of randomly selected…

Narli, Serkan; Yorek, Nurettin; Sahin, Mehmet; Usak, Muhammet

2010-01-01

54

Selective impairment of living things and musical instruments on a verbal 'Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire' in a case of apperceptive visual agnosia.  

PubMed

Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes separately into account four categories of living beings (animals, fruits, vegetables and body parts) and of artefacts (furniture, tools, vehicles and musical instruments), does not require a visual analysis and allows to distinguish errors concerning super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic knowledge. When the total number of errors obtained on all the categories of living and non-living beings was considered, a non-significant trend toward a higher number of errors in living stimuli was observed. This difference, however, became significant when body parts and musical instruments were excluded from the analysis. Furthermore, the number of errors obtained on the musical instruments was similar to that obtained on the living categories of animals, fruits and vegetables and significantly higher of that obtained in the other artefact categories. This difference was still significant when familiarity, frequency of use and prototypicality of each stimulus entered into a logistic regression analysis. On the other hand, a separate analysis of errors obtained on questions exploring super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic attributes showed that the differences between living and non-living stimuli and between musical instruments and other artefact categories were mainly due to errors obtained on questions exploring perceptual features. All these data are at variance with the 'domains of knowledge' hypothesis', which assumes that the breakdown of different categories of living and non-living things respects the distinction between biological entities and artefacts and support the models assuming that 'category-specific semantic disorders' are the by-product of the differential weighting that visual-perceptual and functional (or action-related) attributes have in the construction of different biological and artefacts categories. PMID:22771855

Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

2012-10-01

55

Why the Wild Things Are: Animals in the Lives of Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines children's many connections to animals and their developmental significance, exploring the growth of the human animal connection, and showing how children's innate interest in animals is shaped by their families and their social worlds, and may in turn shape the kind of people they will become. Chapter 1 documents how theory and…

Melson, Gail F.

56

Disaster's Aftermath: Rebuilding Schools Is One Thing--Rebuilding Children's Lives Is Quite Another.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children who experience disasters such as Hurricane Andrew in southern Florida, are prone to severe and debilitating stress. Districts can prepare by designating a disaster management commander, a search-and-rescue team, and a reuniting team. Planning should include drills, recovery, and restoration elements. (Contains 10 references.) (MLH)

Black, Susan

2001-01-01

57

Hearing Voices and Seeing Things  

MedlinePLUS

... a fixed, false and often bizarre belief). Hearing voices or seeing things that are not there can ... of stressors in their lives will sometimes hear voices or see things. Certain physical illnesses Examples may ...

58

Metabolic characteristics of long-lived mice  

PubMed Central

Genetic suppression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can extend longevity in worms, insects, and mammals. In laboratory mice, mutations with the greatest, most consistent, and best documented positive impact on lifespan are those that disrupt growth hormone (GH) release or actions. These mutations lead to major alterations in IIS but also have a variety of effects that are not directly related to the actions of insulin or insulin-like growth factor I. Long-lived GH-resistant GHR-KO mice with targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene, as well as Ames dwarf (Prop1df) and Snell dwarf (Pit1dw) mice lacking GH (along with prolactin and TSH), are diminutive in size and have major alterations in body composition and metabolic parameters including increased subcutaneous adiposity, increased relative brain weight, small liver, hypoinsulinemia, mild hypoglycemia, increased adiponectin levels and insulin sensitivity, and reduced serum lipids. Body temperature is reduced in Ames, Snell, and female GHR-KO mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that both Ames dwarf and GHR-KO mice utilize more oxygen per gram (g) of body weight than sex- and age-matched normal animals from the same strain. They also have reduced respiratory quotient, implying greater reliance on fats, as opposed to carbohydrates, as an energy source. Differences in oxygen consumption (VO2) were seen in animals fed or fasted during the measurements as well as in animals that had been exposed to 30% calorie restriction or every-other-day feeding. However, at the thermoneutral temperature of 30°C, VO2 did not differ between GHR-KO and normal mice. Thus, the increased metabolic rate of the GHR-KO mice, at a standard animal room temperature of 23°C, is apparently related to increased energy demands for thermoregulation in these diminutive animals. We suspect that increased oxidative metabolism combined with enhanced fatty acid oxidation contribute to the extended longevity of GHR-KO mice. PMID:23248643

Bartke, Andrzej; Westbrook, Reyhan

2012-01-01

59

48 Published by the IEEE Computer Society 1089-7801/09/$25.00 2009 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING InternetofThingsTrack  

E-print Network

of Things (IoT), a vision in which the Internet extends into our ev- eryday lives through a wireless network At the University of Washington, the RFID Ecosystem creates a microcosm for the Internet of Things. The authors University of Washington, Seattle Building the Internet of Things Using RFID The RFID Ecosystem Experience

Balazinska, Magdalena

60

Living by the Numbers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Quantitation of an article's worth by the impact of the journal in which it appears is a path to undermining scientific enterprise. Through a process analogous to rating medical care, rating journals can lead to loss of research effort in the most challenging questions. A paper should be evaluated on its own impact, not by some arbitrary score for the journal as a whole.

Michael B. Yaffe (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Chief Scientific Editor of Science Signaling REV)

2009-12-01

61

Living by the \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines empirically the effects of multimarket contact on pricing in the U.S. airline industry. The analysis of the time-series and cross-sectional variability of airline fares in the 1,000 largest domestic city-pair routes reveals the presence of statistically significant and quantitatively important multimarket effects--fares are higher in city-pair markets served by carriers with extensive interroute contacts. These findings are

William N. Evans; Ioannis N. Kessides

1994-01-01

62

Some day people will be judged by their individual aptitude to do a thing and (society)  

E-print Network

1 Some day people will be judged by their individual aptitude to do a thing and (society) will stop rates · 38% vs 50% · Longer time to promotion · Particularly in biology and psych/social sciences, healthcare · Alienating departmental culture · Male oriented norms and structures, condescension · Isolation

63

Compulsive Exercise: Too Much of a Good Thing? Contributed by Suzanne Girard Eberle, MS, RD  

E-print Network

Compulsive Exercise: Too Much of a Good Thing? Contributed by Suzanne Girard Eberle, MS, RD � 2004 National Eating Disorders Association. Permission is granted to copy and reprint materials for educational purposes only. National Eating Disorders Association must be cited and web address listed. www.NationalEatingDisorders

Walker, Matthew P.

64

Coordination by Avoidance: Bringing Things Together and Keeping Them Apart Across Hospital Departments  

E-print Network

Coordination by Avoidance: Bringing Things Together and Keeping Them Apart Across Hospital CA 92697-3440, USA jpd@ics.uci.edu ABSTRACT Coordination is central in CSCW systems design, where of a larger system. In this paper, we argue that existing conceptualizations of coordination in CSCW can

Dourish,Paul

65

The Childhood Living Arrangements of Children and the Characteristics of Their Marriages  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author uses data from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth to examine the impact of childhood living arrangements on the characteristics of marriages formed by women between 1970 and 1989.The focus is on sociodemographic characteristics of marriage that may be taken to indicate a heightened risk of marital stress or…

Teachman, Jay D.

2004-01-01

66

Smallest Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What's the world's smallest living creature? It depends on what you mean by "living." This science update explores the meaning of life and what is considered "living". The text in this Science Update explains the difference among the cell, virus, and prions and why the latter two are not considered living. This Science Update also contains in text format details of the research, which leads to these findings presented in the Science Update podcast. It also offers links to the other podcasts topics and resources for further inquiry.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (;)

2006-01-30

67

Research on Dynamical Security Risk Assessment for the Internet of Things inspired by immunology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) confronts a complicated and changeful attack environment. It is necessary to evaluate the security risk of IoT dynamically to judge the situation of IoT. To resolve the above problem, a dynamical risk assessment method for IoT inspired by Artificial Immune System is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is made up of Detection Agent

Caiming Liu; Yan Zhang; Jinquan Zeng; Lingxi Peng; Run Chen

2012-01-01

68

Live nephron imaging by MRI.  

PubMed

The local sensitivity of MRI can be improved with small MR detectors placed close to regions of interest. However, to maintain such sensitivity advantage, local detectors normally need to communicate with the external amplifier through cable connections, which prevent the use of local detectors as implantable devices. Recently, an integrated wireless amplifier was developed that can efficiently amplify and broadcast locally detected signals, so that the local sensitivity was enhanced without the need for cable connections. This integrated detector enabled the live imaging of individual glomeruli using negative contrast introduced by cationized ferritin, and the live imaging of renal tubules using positive contrast introduced by gadopentetate dimeglumine. Here, we utilized the high blood flow to image individual glomeruli as hyperintense regions without any contrast agent. These hyperintense regions were identified for pixels with signal intensities higher than the local average. Addition of Mn(2+) allowed the simultaneous detection of both glomeruli and renal tubules: Mn(2+) was primarily reabsorbed by renal tubules, which would be distinguished from glomeruli due to higher enhancement in T1-weighted MRI. Dynamic studies of Mn(2+) absorption confirmed the differential absorption affinity of glomeruli and renal tubules, potentially enabling the in vivo observation of nephron function. PMID:25186296

Qian, Chunqi; Yu, Xin; Pothayee, Nikorn; Dodd, Stephen; Bouraoud, Nadia; Star, Robert; Bennett, Kevin; Koretsky, Alan

2014-11-15

69

Science K-12, Living Things in Continuous Change. Utica City School District Articulated Curriculum: Project SEARCH, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two-column objectives are listed for an integrated science curriculum (grades K-12), often subheaded according to science area (biology, general science, physical science, earth science) and grade level. In grades K-6, objectives for topics of science study include conditions for plants and animals to live, adaptation, conservation,…

Utica City School District, NY.

70

Using the Real Thing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program to bring farm animals into the classroom. Topics discussed include using the senses, health and safety for both children and animals, and rewards of using animals in special situations. Talks given include "Similarities and Differences of Living Things"; "From a Sheep to a Ball of Wool"; and "Food from the Farm." (PVD)

Watson, Gwendy

1998-01-01

71

Words are not things  

PubMed Central

On a traditional view, words are the fundamental units of verbal behavior. They are independent, autonomous things that symbolically represent or refer to other independent, autonomous things, often in some other dimension. Ascertaining what those other things are constitutes determining the meaning of a word. On a behavior-analytic view, verbal behavior is ongoing, functional operant activity occasioned by antecedent factors and reinforced by its consequences, particularly consequences that are mediated by other members of the same verbal community. Functional relations rather than structure select the response unit. The behavior-analytic point of view clarifies such important contemporary issues in psychology as (a) the role of scientific theories and explanations, (b) educational practices, and (c) equivalence classes, so that there is no risk of strengthening the traditional view that words are things that symbolically represent other things. PMID:22477219

Moore, J.

2000-01-01

72

Lively Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintaining living things in a classroom requires knowledge and preparation. It also requires the proper equipment and space. There are two primary goals in the study of living things: first, we want our students to respect life, and second, we want them to appreciate its complexity in nature. Observing healthy living things in school accomplishes both goals. This chapter describes the appropriate precautions that should be taken into consideration when bringing living organisms into classrooms.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2002-01-01

73

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic investigation of mental phenomena, behaviour and the problems of adjustment to an environment. The  

E-print Network

Psychology is the study of the mind and behaviour of all living things. It is the systematic goal of Psychology is to understand the causes of human behaviour. Psychologists investigate how.They examine biological, cognitive and social determinants of behaviour. Psychology is a broad science

Seldin, Jonathan P.

74

Hydroxyflutamide alters the characteristics of live boar spermatozoa.  

PubMed

Our previous study revealed that in vitro incubation of boar ejaculates with hydroxyflutamide (OH-Flu) causes changes in sperm plasma membrane integrity and its stability and sperm mitochondrial oxidative capability. To broaden the knowledge of cellular physiology of spermatozoa, we investigated direct effects of OH-Flu administered for 2 and 24 hours at concentrations of 5, 50, and 100 ?g/mL, on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide anion production using JC-1 dye and MitoSOX Red fluorescent probe, respectively. We further measured phosphatidylserine membrane translocation (PST) from the inner to the outer layer of the sperm plasma membrane using an annexin-V binding assay. To provide new information of direct effects of OH-Flu on cell signaling pathway, we measured sperm intracellular calcium ion dynamics using Fluo-3. Finally, we assessed sperm motility using a computer-assisted spermatozoa analysis system. Motile sperm were highlighted using the "C-Ruch" computer program for detailed analysis of the straight line velocity distribution. For each functional test, boar spermatozoa were examined and analyzed by flow cytometry and/or confocal microscopy. The results revealed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in sperm mitochondrial membrane potential and a concomitant increase (P < 0.05) in mitochondrial superoxide anion production after a 2-hour incubation with 50 ?g OH-Flu compared with the respective controls and other doses used (P < 0.05). The adverse effects of OH-Flu become strengthened over time (P < 0.05). Notably, 50 and 100 ?g OH-Flu appeared to be effective in decreasing sperm motility. Hydroxyflutamide significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the fast sperm subpopulation percentage after 15 minutes and reduced the straight line velocity distribution (P < 0.05). An assessment of PST revealed an increase in the percentage of PST-positive spermatozoa (P < 0.05) only after exposure to OH-Flu for 24 hours. Moreover, OH-Flu at all concentrations induced a rapid increase in sperm intracellular calcium ion concentration. Altogether, the altered in vitro characteristics of live boar spermatozoa provide new insight into direct effects of OH-Flu on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential, superoxide anion production, translocation of membrane phosphatidylserine, free calcium ion dynamics, and sperm motility. PMID:25129871

Zarzycka, Marta; Kotwicka, Malgorzata; Jendraszak, Magdalena; Skibinska, Izabela; Kotula-Balak, Malgorzata; Bilinska, Barbara

2014-10-15

75

20 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT BROWSERS AND THE WEB Illustrated by Christoph Niemann. Written by the Google Chrome Team.  

E-print Network

20 THINGS I LEARNED ABOUT BROWSERS AND THE WEB Illustrated by Christoph Niemann. Written web that can be accessed by anyone through a web browser, on any Internet-connected device in the world. But how do our browsers and the web actually work? How has the World Wide Web evolved into what

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

76

String Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

String Thing is an interactive online game in which learners change a virtual string's tension, length, and gauge to create different musical pitches. Educators can use this game as an introduction to sound and before completing any activities on music or building instruments. Alternatively, educators can use this game to review or assess these concepts.

Wgbh

2010-01-01

77

pictorial cues (i.e., either living or nonliving things) that signaled whether subjects could earn money or not in  

E-print Network

that their findings introduce a striatum. novel mechanism by which positive arousal induced Immediately after the scan and focused on during reward anticipation might facilitate memory for-fear. The studies showed that punishment,tion elicited by punishment cues could modulate it may turn out that reward anticipation has an evenhippocampal

Knutson, Brian

78

BEYOND PHYLOGENIES: EVOLUTIONARY ANALYSIS OF PATHOGENS All living things are related. Understanding and describing the evolutionary relation-  

E-print Network

the evolution of genomes and organisms during the last few decades. The revolution has been driven by both data descriptions of the ancestral relationship structure. Rather than being a feature of sexual reproduction

Goldschmidt, Christina

79

The continuity of the spirit among all living things in the philosophy and literature of Henry Rider Haggard  

Microsoft Academic Search

Henry Rider Haggard is a man of many contradictions, not least concerning his representation of hunting in Africa. He is often considered as an adventure novelist whose interests lay in the supposed excitement of big game hunting. His early and most famous novels are replete with the wholesale slaughter of African animals by colonial hunters intent on profit from a

John Senior

2006-01-01

80

Things that Make us Stupid Peter Gutmann  

E-print Network

with the fashion industry) #12;Things That Make Us Stupid (ctd) How do you know it's a bad design? Effects of goodThings that Make us Stupid Peter Gutmann University of Auckland Things That Make Us Smart Influential industrial design book by Donald Norman #12;Things That Make Us Smart (ctd) Discusses the use

Gutmann, Peter

81

Demographic and Psychosocial Characteristics of Mobile Phone Ownership and Usage among Youth Living in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The use of mobile phones and other technology for improving health through research and practice is growing quickly, in particular in areas with difficult-to-reach population or where the research infrastructure is less developed. In Sub-Saharan Africa, there appears to be a dramatic increase in mobile phone ownership and new initiatives that capitalize on this technology to support health promotion campaigns to change behavior and to increase health literacy. However, the extent to which difficult-to-reach youth in the slums of Kampala may own and use mobile phones has not been reported despite the burden of injuries, substance use, and HIV that they face. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of mobile phone ownership and use in this high-risk population and to identify psychosocial characteristics that may differentiate those owning and using a phone from those who do not. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of the Kampala Youth Survey (N=457). Data collection took place in 2011, and the survey was designed to quantify high-risk behaviors in a convenience sample of urban youth living on the streets or in the slums, 14–24 years of age, who were participating in a Uganda Youth Development Link drop-in center for disadvantaged street youth. We computed chi-square analyses to determine any significant differences in psychosocial characteristics based on phone ownership and use. Results: Overall, 46.9% of youth reported owning a mobile phone and ownership did not vary by sex but was more common among youth older than 18 years of age. Mobile phone ownership was also more common among those who reported taking care of themselves at night, who reported current drug use and who reported trading sex for money, food or other things. Conclusion: Given that nearly half of the youth own and use phones daily, new research is needed to determine next steps for mobile health (mhealth), including the feasibility of using mobile phones for data collection and interventions with this hard-to-reach population. Moreover, this technology may also be suitable for injury-specific research given that there were few differences with respect to injury-related variables in mobile phone ownership and usage. PMID:25157308

Swahn, Monica H.; Braunstein, Sarah; Kasirye, Rogers

2014-01-01

82

Anthropometric Characteristics of Pakistani School Children Living in Bahrain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background This survey was designed to study the gender difference in physical growth of 1113 Pakistani children (646 male and 467 female)\\u000a living in Bahrain and to compare growth with their Bahraini and Pakistani counterparts. Methods Measurements of height, weight, mid-arm circumference, biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfold thickness were\\u000a carried out using the standard methods, and the median values

Abdulrahman O. Musaiger; Reshma D’Souza

2009-01-01

83

Living with diabetes: rationale, study design and baseline characteristics for an Australian prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Diabetes mellitus is a major global public health threat. In Australia, as elsewhere, it is responsible for a sizeable portion of the overall burden of disease, and significant costs. The psychological and social impact of diabetes on individuals with the disease can be severe, and if not adequately addressed, can lead to the worsening of the overall disease picture. The Living With Diabetes Study aims to contribute to a holistic understanding of the psychological and social aspects of diabetes mellitus. Methods/Design The Living With Diabetes Study is a 5-year prospective cohort study, based in Queensland, Australia. The first wave of data, which was collected via a mailed self-report survey, was gathered in 2008, with annual collections thereafter. Measurements include: demographic, lifestyle, health and disease characteristics; quality of life (EQ-5D, ADDQoL); emotional well-being (CES-D, LOT-R, ESSI); disease self-management (PAM); and health-care utilisation and patient-assessed quality of care (PACIC). 29% of the 14,439 adults who were invited to participate in the study agreed to do so, yielding a sample size of 3,951 people. Discussion The data collected by the Living With Diabetes Study provides a good representation of Australians with diabetes to follow over time in order to better understand the natural course of the illness. The study has potential to further illuminate, and give a comprehensive picture of the psychosocial implications of living with diabetes. Data collection is ongoing. PMID:22216947

2012-01-01

84

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes: Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Healthy Living Partnerships to Prevent Diabetes (HELP PD) is a randomized controlled trial designed to translate the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention into a community setting using community health workers engaged through an existing Diabetes Care Center (DCC). Overweight and obese (BMI 25-40 kg/m2) individuals with pre-diabetes (fasting blood glucose 95-125 mg/dl) with no medical contraindications to participate in a lifestyle intervention were recruited for participation in this study. Standard recruitment strategies were employed, including mass mailing, direct provider referral, and community events. Participant recruitment and randomization for this trial began in 2007 and was concluded in 2009. 1818 screenings were conducted; of these, 326 (17.9%) qualified and 301 (16.6%) participants were randomized over a 21 month period. 23.8% of potential participants were excluded during the initial telephone screening, primarily for BMI and recent history of CVD. The majority of participants (220, 73.1%) reported mass mailing as their primary source of information about the study. Mass mailing was more effective with participants who identified themselves as white when compared to African Americans. The cost of recruitment per randomized participant was $816, which includes direct costs and staff effort. 41% of the randomized participants were male and approximately 27% reported a race or ethnicity other than white. In comparison to the DPP study cohort, the HELP PD population is older, more educated and predominately white. These differences, reflecting in part the community in which HELP PD was conducted, may have implications for retention and adherence in the lifestyle intervention group. PMID:20974289

Blackwell, Caroline S.; Foster, Kara A.; Isom, Scott; Katula, Jeffrey A.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Rosenberger, Erica L.; Goff, David C.

2010-01-01

85

Revealing Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Revealing Things is the Smithsonian Institution's first specifically web based exhibit; both the content and design of the site are fascinating. This work in progress is a prototype of a future, more fully-developed exhibit. It concentrates on "common, everyday objects to tell stories about people, their cultures, and the meanings they associate with their possessions." Items discussed include a 1937 chemistry set, a Vietnam memorial offering, a duckpin bowling ball, an early TV, and a celery vase, among many others. Organized according to theme, era, and object, the exhibit is presented in a new pop-up browser window. Within that window, navigation takes place via "maplets," a connected series of moving colored labels representing the three ways that the exhibit is organized. Users can move slider bars to effect the placement of the labels, and search on terms to create their own thematic or object-based exhibit. When the cursor is placed over an object label, scrolling text introduces it. Alternatively, the site can be navigated via a series of icons that run down the middle of the exhibition page. When an icon is clicked, the series of icons may rearrange. Each exhibit contains a photo of the object, along with written commentary on it. In addition, sound is sometimes available to play period music, or render out loud the exhibition text. The most fully-developed object at this time is "Patched Bellbottoms." Users are advised to read the help files on both the main page and the exhibit page for navigation tips. The exhibit is a fascinating precursor of what could be a new way to interactively view museum exhibits, allowing the user to cast off the restraints of a linear orientation. Note that the exhibit is extremely browser and bandwidth intensive.

1998-01-01

86

The Active Living by Design National Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health advocates have increasingly highlighted the importance of implementing comprehensive physical activity interventions that use an ecologic framework. Such a framework can broadly address physical activity barriers, such as the lack of opportunities, social support, policies, built environments, and community awareness. The Active Living by Design (ALbD) was a community grant program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF),

Philip Bors MPH; Mark Dessauer MA; Rich Bell MCP; Risa Wilkerson MA; Sarah L. Strunk MHA

2009-01-01

87

Wondering About Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here you will find facts about and the opinions of an American astrophysicist who practiced in the second half of the twentieth century. The title explains why I did it. I invented some new ideas, I applied them to some astro objects, I computed things with pen and paper; I ended up thinking that I had succeeded in pushing the field ahead a bit. Attracted by Newtonian theory, I did some experiments too. I love hydrodynamics and magnetic fields in space. The math is beautiful, and the objects are stupendous in their brilliant displays. For some reason I meditated on gases between the stars, their pressures and motions. I left the stars to others, believing that their physics was under control. As I grew older, I had to decide whether to direct others rather than just myself and ended up at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics doing both. It was thrilling because I had never had management experience and was flying by the seat of my pants, as I guess other astrodirectors do. In the process, I advised the US government on future directions in astronomy, chairing a number of committees. It is astonishing that the government is interested in astronomy, and it is exciting to interact with the people in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Congress, and the Executive branch who have dedicated their lives to enable the expansion of our knowledge of astronomy. Along the way I studied more abstract concepts in physics, including magnetic helicity and its relation to the winding numbers of nonabelian particle physics. These are topological concepts that I should have learned in grad school but did not. This review has two parts. The first part is for scientists, and covers my life in chronological order. The second part is for laymen who are interested in science. It gives a flavor of my scientific work with no math and a minimum of jargon.

Field, George B.

2014-08-01

88

The internet of things for personalized health.  

PubMed

Advances in information and communications technologies (ICT) enable new personalized health care concepts which are often characterized by four "P" terms, i.e. personalized, predictive, preventive and participatory. However, real world implementations of the complete 4P spectrum hardly exist today. The Internet of Things (IoT) has been defined as an extension to the current Internet that enables pervasive communication between the physical and the virtual world. Smart devices and enabling elements like Near Field Communication (NFC) and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology already exist and increasingly will be a mainstream element of our lives. This future vision paper attempts to assess if and how the Internet of Things for personalized health (IoT4pH) can help to facilitate the 4P healthcare paradigm and discusses related challenges and opportunities. PMID:24851958

Schreier, Günter

2014-01-01

89

Screaming String Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this simple and fun activity, learners discover the relationship between vibration and sound by making a squeaky toy instrument out of simple household materials. Participants explore how increasing and decreasing friction on a string changes the sound of a pitch. They also experience how sound is amplified. Learners can expand the activity by linking their string things to create a "telephone" or making different instruments from other recycled materials.

Wgbh

2009-01-01

90

Physical Performance Characteristics of Assisted Living Residents and Risk for Adverse Health Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Researchers know little about the physical performance ability of residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) residents and its relationship to adverse outcomes such as fracture, nursing home placement, functional decline, and death. The purposes of this article are to (a) describe the functional characteristics of RC/AL residents, (b)…

Giuliani, Carol A.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Park, Nan S.; Schrodt, Lori A.; Rokoske, Franzi; Sloane, Philip D.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

2008-01-01

91

Demographic Characteristics of Pre-Mariel Cubans Living in the United States: 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes and analyzes the demographic characteristics of the Pre-Mariel Cuban American population living in the United States as presented in the 1980 U.S. Census of the Population. Information is not provided for the Mariel entrants, who began arriving from Cuba on April 21, 1980, because the data were derived from a one-in-a-thousand…

Boswell, Thomas D.; Rivero, Manuel

92

Socio-Economic Disequilibrium Catalyzed by Internet of Things (IoT)  

E-print Network

How will the tapestry of humanity and the ethos of civilization evolve when billions of devices and trillions of sensors with quadrillion end points can connect events in our daily lives to the world around us and monitor ...

Datta, Shoumen

2014-01-01

93

Long-lived polarization protected by symmetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we elucidate, theoretically and experimentally, molecular motifs which permit Long-Lived Polarization Protected by Symmetry (LOLIPOPS). The basic assembly principle starts from a pair of chemically equivalent nuclei supporting a long-lived singlet state and is completed by coupling to additional pairs of spins. LOLIPOPS can be created in various sizes; here we review four-spin systems, introduce a group theory analysis of six-spin systems, and explore eight-spin systems by simulation. The focus is on AA'XnX'n spin systems, where typically the A spins are 15N or 13C and X spins are protons. We describe the symmetry of the accessed states, we detail the pulse sequences used to access these states, we quantify the fraction of polarization that can be stored as LOLIPOPS, we elucidate how to access the protected states from A or from X polarization and we examine the behavior of these spin systems upon introduction of a small chemical shift difference.

Feng, Yesu; Theis, Thomas; Wu, Tung-Lin; Claytor, Kevin; Warren, Warren S.

2014-10-01

94

Doing Right Things Right  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attracting quality students in sufficient volume requires schools to do the right things right. Doing right things right is a combination of what they do and how well they do it. Successful enrollment marketing, like all good marketing, depends on consistency of effort and doing enough of the right things in the right way, repeatedly. Here, the…

Perna, Mark C.

2006-01-01

95

"MSN Was the next Big Thing after Beanie Babies": Children's Virtual Experiences as an Interface to Their Identities and Their Everyday Lives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article the author explores the seamlessness between children's online and offline worlds. For children, there is no dichotomy of online and offline, or virtual and real; the digital is so much intertwined into their lives and psyche that the one is entirely enmeshed with the other. Despite early research pointing to the differences that…

Thomas, Angela

2006-01-01

96

How Things Break Solids fail through the propagation of cracks, whose speed is controlled by instabilities at the  

E-print Network

objects together, and the conditions that cause them to fall apart, the dialogue taking placeHow Things Break Solids fail through the propagation of cracks, whose speed is controlled paid to how things break has been slight. In part, the subject seems too hard. Cracks form

Fineberg, Jay

97

Priming by DNA immunization augments T-cell responses induced by modified live bovine herpesvirus vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA vaccines have several advantages over conventional vaccines. One of the most important characteristics is the presentation of antigen via both MHC class I and class II receptors. Although this generally results in strong T-cell responses, antibody production and protection achieved by DNA immunization are unfortunately not always adequate. In contrast, modified live virus (MLV) vaccines usually induce adequate antibody

B. I. Loehr; R. Pontarollo; R. Rankin; L. Latimer; P. Willson; L. A. Babiuk; S. van Drunen; Littel-van den Hurk

98

The Little Things Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have assembled a multi-wavelength dataset on 41 relatively normal, nearby (<10 Mpc) gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies for the purpose of determining the drivers for star formation in these systems. This project is called LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our data include GALEX UV images, ground-based UBV and Halpha images, some ground-based JHK images, Spitzer archival mid-IR images, and HI-line maps. The HI maps, obtained with the VLA, go deep (12/6/2 hrs in B/C/D arrays) and are characterized by high spectral resolution (THINGS team is grateful to the National Science Foundation for funding through grants AST-0707563, AST-0707426, AST-0707468, and AST-0707835 to DAH, BGE, CES, and LMY.

Hunter, Deidre Ann; LITTLE THINGS Team

2012-01-01

99

Adaptive Live Video Streaming by Priority Drop  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we explore the use of Priority -progress streaming (PPS) for live video streaming applications with tight latency constraints. PPS is a technique for the delivery of continuous media over variable bit-rate channels. It is based on the simple idea of reordering media components within a time window into priority order before transmission. The main concern when using

Jie Huang; Charles Krasic; Jonathan Walpole; Wu-chi Feng

2003-01-01

100

User Empowerment in the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

This paper focuses on the characteristics of two big triggers that facilitated wide user adoption of the Internet: Web 2.0 and online social networks. We detect brakes for reproduction of these events in Internet of things. To support our hypothesis we first compare the difference between the ways of use of the Internet with the future scenarios of Internet of things. We detect barriers that could slow down apparition of this kind of social events during user adoption of Internet of Things and we propose a conceptual framework to solve these problems.

Munjin, Dejan

2011-01-01

101

The Educational Thing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, I argue that education should be conceived of as a thing in itself. To lift this view, I present aspects of Graham Harman's philosophy, a speculative realism that can be seen as a radical break with social constructivism and similar approaches. Next, I attempt to outline a rough sketch of an educational "thing", drawing on concepts…

Romer, Thomas Aastrup

2011-01-01

102

Things Come Together with "Things Fall Apart."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recommends using C. Achebe's English language novel, "Things Fall Apart," in a unit on tragedy. Provides plot summary and topics for discussion of cultural values and socialization. Notes that besides illustrating character traits, themes and plot structure of the tragic genre, the novel provides an opportunity for learning Nigerian colonial…

Puhr, Kathleen M.

1987-01-01

103

Monitoring living tissues by electrical impedance spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solving the experimental difficulties associated with measurement of the electrical impedance of living tissues gives access\\u000a to valuable tissue compartment parameters which are sensed within seconds using minimally invasive, simple metallic electrodes.\\u000a Extracellular conductivity and cell membrane capacitance can be followed over time under conditions of metabolic toxicity,\\u000a perfusion loss and thermal stress in liver, brain cortex, and muscle, respectively.

Paul Héroux; Michel Bourdages

1994-01-01

104

The Igbo People of Nigeria as Seen Through "Things Fall Apart" by Chinua Achebe. An Instructional Unit for Tenth Grade English.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teaching guide is intended to aid tenth grade English classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on the Igbo-speaking people of Nigeria. The source material for this unit is "Things Fall Apart," by Chinua Achebe. The guide is a product of an interdisciplinary summer workshop for teachers on development of…

Talley, Odessa B.

105

THINGS: THE H I NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We present 'The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)', a high spectral ({<=}5.2 km s{sup -1}) and spatial ({approx}6'') resolution survey of H I emission in 34 nearby galaxies obtained using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The overarching scientific goal of THINGS is to investigate fundamental characteristics of the interstellar medium (ISM) related to galaxy morphology, star formation, and mass distribution across the Hubble sequence. Unique characteristics of the THINGS database are the homogeneous sensitivity as well as spatial and velocity resolution of the H I data, which is at the limit of what can be achieved with the VLA for a significant number of galaxies. A sample of 34 objects at distances 2 {approx}< D {approx}< 15 Mpc (resulting in linear resolutions of {approx}100 to 500 pc) are targeted in THINGS, covering a wide range of star formation rates ({approx}10{sup -3} to 6 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), total H I masses M{sub HI} (0.01 to 14 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), absolute luminosities M{sub B} (-11.5 to -21.7 mag), and metallicities (7.5 to 9.2 in units of 12+log[O/H]). We describe the setup of the VLA observations, the data reduction procedures, and the creation of the final THINGS data products. We present an atlas of the integrated H I maps, the velocity fields, the second moment (velocity dispersion) maps and individual channel maps of each THINGS galaxy. The THINGS data products are made publicly available through a dedicated webpage. Accompanying THINGS papers (in this issue of the Astronomical Journal) address issues such as the small-scale structure of the ISM, the (dark) matter distribution in THINGS galaxies, and the processes leading to star formation.

Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Thornley, Michele D., E-mail: walter@mpia.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States)

2008-12-15

106

Probing mechanical properties of living cells by magnetopneumography.  

PubMed

Magnetopneumography (MPG) has been used to study long-term particle clearance from human lungs as well as cellular motility of pulmonary macrophages (PMs). This study describes an extension of the method enabling the measurement of mechanical properties of PM cells in vivo. Ferromagnetic microparticles are inhaled and then retained in the alveolar region of the lungs, where they are phagocytized within hours by PMs. The magnetic particles can be rotated in weak magnetic fields, and the response to this twisting shear (force) is detected as a macroscopic magnetic field producing a measure of cytoskeletal mechanics. Cytoplasmic viscosity is very high compared with that of water and is strongly non-Newtonian. Under rotational stresses from 0.4 to 6.4 Pa, it acts like a pseudoplastic fluid showing a characteristic shear rate dependence. The viscosity as well as the stiffness of the cytoskeleton increases with increasing shear stress as seems typical for living tissue and evidence for an intact cytoskeletal matrix. The particle recoil as measured by the amount of recoverable strain following a short twisting force describes a cytoplasmic elasticity that depends on both level and duration of stress. These investigations on the mechanical properties of living human cells are promising and should lead to better understanding of cellular dysfunction in disease as well as pathways for drug administration. PMID:10174196

Möller, W; Takenaka, S; Rust, M; Stahlhofen, W; Heyder, J

1997-01-01

107

All Things Green  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation by Bob Feldmaier of the Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT) was presented at the 2013 All Things Green conference and discusses the topics of green fleets, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), and PEV charging infrastructure. Provided in the presentation is a basic overview of PEVs and the types of PEVs, factors that affect PEV efficiency and range, the benefits of driving PEVs, the types and costs of installation of PEV charging infrastructure, and information on the federal Green Fleets program. This conference is annual and is hosted by the Macomb County Chamber. Other presenters at this conference came from Clean Light Green Light, Consumers Energy, General Motors, New Haven Schools, NextEnergy, Waste Management, and more.

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT)

108

The LITTLE THINGS Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have assembled a multi-wavelength dataset on 41 relatively normal, nearby (<10 Mpc) gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies for the purpose of determining the drivers for star formation in these systems. This project is called LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our data include GALEX UV images, ground-based UBV and Halpha images, some ground-based JHK images, Spitzer archival mid-IR images, and HI-line maps. The HI maps, obtained with the VLA, go deep (12/6/2 hrs in B/C/D arrays) and are characterized by high spectral resolution (by random turbulent compression in dwarf galaxies? What happens to the star formation process in the outer parts of disks? What happens to the star formation process at breaks in the exponential light profiles? And, what happens in Blue Compact Dwarf galaxies? The LITTLE THINGS team is grateful to the National Science Foundation for funding through grants AST-0707563, AST-0707426, AST-0707468, and AST-0707835 to DAH, BGE, CES, and LMY.

Hunter, Deidre Ann; LITTLE THINGS Team

2012-01-01

109

WHAT MAKES THINGS GO, TEACHER'S GUIDE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SIX FIFTH-GRADE SCIENCE UNITS ARE PRESENTED--SOUND AND LIGHT IN COMMUNICATION, LIVING THINGS, WEATHER, EARTH AND ITS RESOURCES, MOTION AND FOREIGN TRANSPORTATION, AND ELECTROMAGNETS. THE INTEREST LEVEL IS APPROPRIATE FOR FIFTH-GRADERS, BUT THREE READING ABILITY LEVELS, GRADES 1, 3, AND 5, ARE PROVIDED. THE TEACHER IS THUS ENABLED TO MOTIVATE…

BRODY, LARRY; AND OTHERS

110

Landfills a thing of the past in Germany where advanced waste management By Evridiki Bersi -Kathimerini  

E-print Network

had around 50,000 landfills. Now, in a country of 83 million inhabitants, there are less than 300: pollution of the soil and the water table, emission of toxic gases, protests by local communities. What we of PET, a plastic made from recycled bottles which costs 1,000 euros per metric ton, while new plastic

Columbia University

111

Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure of Amerindian women living alongside the Beni River (Amazonian Bolivia)  

E-print Network

Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure of Amerindian women living alongside.1016/j.ijheh.2010.08.010 #12;2 Title: Fishing activity, health characteristics and mercury exposure Amazonia are exposed to mercury contamination through fish ingestion. A group of 170 Amerindian women

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

How to build a living thing  

E-print Network

A number of research groups worldwide are working on various aspects of the problem of building life from scratch. Jack W. Szostak's lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts is one of the centers of the action. Open a recent news ...

Campbell, MacGregor (MacGregor Ballard)

2009-01-01

113

How to Make a Living Making Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cedar Lakes Craft Center in West Virginia is helping students learn new design, production, and marketing techniques. The year-round program at a state camp and conference center offers weekend and week-long workshops in arts and crafts for the professional artist and the hobbyist. (JOW)

Pyles, Ellen; Pyles, Tim

1980-01-01

114

The World of Tiny Living Things.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the culturing of microorganisms as a laboratory activity emphaszing the growth of microorganisms in food. Provides background and safety information, procedures, and additional ideas. The complete unit (teacher's guide, student worksheets, evaluation and assessment, and resources for students and teachers) is available from the author.…

Karstaedt, Debbrah A.

1984-01-01

115

Different Things Make Different People Happy: Examining Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being by Gender and Parental Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper addresses a number of key challenges in current subjective well-being (SWB) research: A new wave of studies should take into account that different things may make different people happy, thus going beyond a unitary "happiness formula". Furthermore, empirical results need to be connected to broader theoretical narratives. Using a…

Kroll, Christian

2011-01-01

116

Perceptions of Competencies Needed by Older Adults for Independent Living  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to determine the competencies needed to meet the individual needs of older adults when they choose independent living. The ob jectives were to determine the perceptions of 150 older adults, age 60 or over, and 251 home economists with regard to the levels of competencies needed by older adults for independent living in: (a) housing, (b)

Chloe D. Merrill; Carilyn K. Norris

1986-01-01

117

Elaphoidella grandidieri (Harpacticoida: Copepoda): demographic characteristics and possible use as live prey in aquaculture.  

PubMed

In freshwater ecosystems, rotifers and cladocerans are ideal prey for fish larvae whereas copepods, due to their purported low growth rate and predatory tendency, are not. We recently isolated the parthenogenetic Elaphoidella grandidieri (Gueme et Richard, 1893) a benthic freshwater harpacticoid, from a fish farm in the State of Morelos, central Mexico and tested its potential as a live prey organism for larval vertebrates. Population growth and life table demography experiments were conducted, in 100 ml recipients with 50 ml of test medium on a diet of Scenedesmus acutus at a density of 1.0 X 10(6) cell ml(-1); the former on live algae alone while the latter on live algae as well as detritus. We also conducted experiments to document the prey preference for this copepod by the larval Ameca splendens (Pisces: Goodeidae) and Ambystoma mexicanum (Amphibia: Ambystomatidae), fed the rotifer Plationus patulus, the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens, and the cladocerans Moina macrocopa and Daphnia pulex. Elaphoidella grandidieri is relatively easy to maintain under laboratory conditions, reaching densities (copepodites and adults) of more than 10,000 l(-1). The generation time ranged between 30-45 days, depending on the diet. The net reproductive rate was as high as 60 nauplii female(-1) day (1). Population growth rates ranged between 0.03 and 0.11 d(-1), live algae being the superior diet compared to detritus. Both predators showed no preference for E. grandidieri, but in the absence of alternate prey they consumed 80% of the harpacticoids offered. The data have been discussed in relation to the potential of E. grandidierias live food for aquaculture. PMID:22315830

Nandini, S; Nunez Ortiz, Alma Rosa; Sarma, S S S

2011-07-01

118

Characteristics of people living with HIV who use community-based services in Ontario, Canada: implications for service providers.  

PubMed

Community-based AIDS service organizations (CBAOs) direct services to multiple-needs people living with HIV/AIDS who are less likely to use mainstream health promotion services. As people live longer with HIV, the potential to enhance quality of life increases, yet little is known about who uses CBAOs or how this use affects other health and social services. This study of people living with AIDS in Ontario, Canada (n = 297) examined the demographic and health-related characteristics of people with AIDS who do and do not use CBAOs and their patterns of mainstream service utilization. It found that users of CBAOs were significantly less healthy, less able to sustain normal activities, and more often depressed. They reported physical disabilities significantly more often. Their quality of life was also lower along certain dimensions. They were significantly poorer and more reliant on government income supports. They consumed significantly more nonhospital health and social services and had significantly higher out-of-pocket costs. These results suggest CBAOs are being accessed appropriately by those most vulnerable. In an effort to strengthen CBAO capacity to recognize and address depression and physical health problems prevalent among their clients, links to other mainstream health promotion and social services is recommended. PMID:16435530

Williams, Peter; Narciso, Lea; Browne, Gina; Roberts, Jacqueline; Weir, Robin; Gafni, Amiram

2005-01-01

119

SALVIA SMSKRIFTER Changing Tastes: How Things Tasted in the  

E-print Network

or the lost arts of peasant or court cooking. I start by describing some features of a taste culture things are not chemical; they are cultural. And these cultural things have to do with what is in peoples' heads as they put things into their mouths. (Figure 1) The tasting act is, indeed, both cultural

Shapin, Steven

120

Different Things Make Different People Happy: Examining Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being by Gender and Parental Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses a number of key challenges in current subjective well-being (SWB) research: A new wave of studies should\\u000a take into account that different things may make different people happy, thus going beyond a unitary ‘happiness formula’.\\u000a Furthermore, empirical results need to be connected to broader theoretical narratives. Using a re-examination of the social\\u000a context of well-being as its

Christian Kroll

2011-01-01

121

Live Donor Champion: Finding Live Kidney Donors by Separating the Advocate from the Patient1  

PubMed Central

Background Lack of education and reluctance to initiate a conversation about live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is a common barrier to finding a donor. While transplant candidates are often hesitant to discuss their illness, friends or family members are often eager to spread awareness, and are empowered by advocating for the candidates. We hypothesized that separating the advocate from the patient is important in identifying live donors. Methods We developed an intervention to train a Live Donor Champion (LDC) (a friend, family member, or community member willing to advocate for the candidate) for this advocacy role. We compared outcomes of 15 adult KT candidates who had no prospective donors and underwent the LDC intervention with 15 matched controls from our waiting list. Results Comfort in initiating a conversation about transplantation increased over time for LDCs. Twenty-five potential donors contacted our center on behalf of LDC participants; four participants achieved LDKT and three additional participants have donors in evaluation, compared to zero among matched controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Transplant candidates are ill-equipped to seek live donors; by separating the advocate from the patient, understandable concerns about initiating conversations are reduced. PMID:22461037

Garonzik-Wang, Jacqueline M.; Berger, Jonathan C.; Ros, R. Lorie; Kucirka, Lauren M.; Deshpande, Neha A.; Boyarsky, Brian J.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Hall, Erin C.; James, Nathan T.; Segev, Dorry L.

2012-01-01

122

The LITTLE THINGS Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes that lead to star formation on galactic scales are poorly understood even in the simplest systems in the universe, dwarf galaxies. At best we have incomplete knowledge of certain processes in certain environments. Here we present preliminary HI images of a small subset of galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS Survey: a complete dataset on a sample of 41 dIm galaxies chosen to span a range of luminosities. We are tracing their stellar populations, gas content, dynamics, and star formation indicators. We were granted over 300 hours of time with the VLA in B, C, and D array configurations to obtain deep HI-line maps of the sample with high angular and velocity resolution to combine with our optical, UV, and IR data to answer the following questions: 1) What regulates cloud/star formation in tiny galaxies? 2) How is star formation occurring in the outer parts of dwarf galaxies, where the gas is gravitationally stable? 3) What happens to the star formation process at breaks in the exponential stellar light profiles? 4) And, what is going on with Blue Compact Dwarfs? More information can be found at http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation with grants to DAH (AST-0707563) and CES (AST-0707468). The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Rupen, Michael P.; LITTLE THINGS Team

2010-01-01

123

Influence of the long-lived quantum Hall potential on the characteristics of quantum devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hysteretic effects are reported in magneto-transport experiments on lateral quantum devices. The effects are characterized by two vastly different relaxation times (minutes and days). It is shown that the observed phenomena are related to long-lived eddy currents. This is confirmed by torsion-balance magnetometry measurements of the same two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) material. These observations show that the induced quantum Hall potential at the edges of the 2DEG reservoirs influences transport through the devices, and have important consequences for the transport properties of all lateral devices, subjected to quantizing magnetic fields.

Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Usher, A.; Sachrajda, A. S.; Lapointe, J.; Gupta, J.; Wasilewski, Z.; Studenikin, S.; Elliott, M.

2006-02-01

124

Alcohol and Associated Characteristics among Older Persons Living with HIV on Antiretroviral Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background Alcohol use, and particularly unhealthy alcohol use, is associated with poor HIV-related outcomes among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Despite a rapidly growing proportion of PLWH ?50 years, alcohol use and its associated characteristics are under-described in this population. We describe alcohol use, severity, and associated characteristics using data from a sample of PLWH ?50 years who participated in a trial of a telephone-based intervention to improve adherence to ART. Methods Participants were recruited from AIDS Service Organizations in 9 states and included PLWH ?50 years who were prescribed ART, reported suboptimal adherence at screening (missing >1.5 days of medication or taking medications 2 hours early or late on >3 days in the 30 days prior to screening), and consented to participate. The AUDIT-C alcohol screen, socio-demographic characteristics, substance use and mental health comorbidity were assessed at baseline. AUDIT-C scores were categorized into non-drinking, low-level drinking, and mild-moderate unhealthy, and severe unhealthy drinking (0, 1-3, 4-6, 7-12, respectively). Analyses described and compared characteristics across drinking status (any/none) and across AUDIT-C categories among drinkers. Results Among 447 participants, 57% reporting drinking alcohol in the past year, including 35%, 15% and 7% reporting low-level drinking, mild-moderate unhealthy drinking, and severe unhealthy drinking, respectively. Any drinking was most common among men and those who were LGBT, married/partnered, had received past-year alcohol treatment, and never used injection drugs (p-values all <0.05). Differences in race, employment status, past year alcohol treatment, and positive depression screening (p-values all <0.05) were observed across AUDIT-C categories. Conclusions In this sample of older PLWH with suboptimal ART adherence, a majority reported past-year alcohol use and 22% screened positive for unhealthy alcohol use. Any and unhealthy alcohol use were associated with demographics, depression, and substance use history. Further research is needed regarding alcohol use among older PLWH. PMID:24625188

Williams, Emily C.; Bradley, Katharine A.; Balderson, Benjamin H.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Grothaus, Lou; McCoy, Katryna; Rittmueller, Stacey E.; Catz, Sheryl L.

2014-01-01

125

Hermeneutics by the Living Anton Markos  

E-print Network

2010 # Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010 In being presented in play, what is emerges anything yet also revealing meaning. Its second pillar presents the image of singing humpback whales is punctuated by such topics as psychophysical dualism, body, linguistic metaphors of life, mimicry

Markos, Anton

126

How We like to Live when We Have the Chance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article has been written by a group of persons with intellectual disability, which is called the Consultative Committee of Persons with Intellectual Disability. This group works in Malta. The article is about how we would like to live. It looks at two things: "where we would like to live" and "going out in the community". This article shows…

Deguara, Marthese; Jelassi, Omar; Micallef, Brian; Callus, Anne-Marie

2012-01-01

127

Structure and Function in Living Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. In this particular publication, provided a wide variety of resources to enrich your content knowledge of the characteristics of living things, including their diversity, extinction, and evolution. Other topics include bacteria, plants, fungi, and protists.

Lefever, Mary

2007-08-01

128

Domain knowledge Interoperability to build the Semantic Web of Things W3C Workshop on the Web of Things, 2526 June 2014, Berlin, Germany  

E-print Network

of Things (SWoT) is a new field to combine Internet of Things (IoT) and semantic web technologies. We, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine-to- Machine (M2M), Linked Open Rules, Linked Open Data, Linked Open guidelines not known by the Internet of Things community 1. Guidelines summary We sum up some basic

Gesbert, David

129

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Complete Computer Solutions makes available the How Things Work Website. This is an excellent learning resource for anyone who has ever wondered about the workings of items such as oxygen tents or speedometers or materials such as porcelain. The site briefly summarizes a plethora of topics ranging from accordions to X-rays. This site is well worth a visit.

130

More about Charging Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the first chapter, you charged things up with excess electrons and saw what could happen as a result. Now we're going to get an idea of how to measure how much charge something has, figure out whether an object is positively or negatively charged, and make up a new concept called the electric field.

Robertson, William C.

2005-01-01

131

74 Published by the IEEE Computer Society 1089-7801/09/$26.00 2009 IEEE IEEE INTERNET COMPUTING InternetofThingsTrack  

E-print Network

to the real world is the Internet of Things,2 which connects such resources with everyday objects's based on the Internet of Things and its technologies. Their framework for integrating Web services-Essen Heinrich HuÃ?mann University of Munich Perci: Pervasive Service Interaction with the Internet of Things #12

132

Exploring "home" through residents' lenses: assisted living facility residents identify homelike characteristics using photovoice.  

PubMed

An increasing number of older adults are moving into assisted living facilities when living independently becomes difficult. These facilities afford older adults a home-like environment with opportunities for social activity and a minimal level of professional care, although relocation can negatively impact well-being. Because it is important to study home environments of aging adults, 10 residents of an assisted living facility were engaged in Photovoice to explore perceptions of the facility as home. Through photographic expression, residents identified environment enhancements for home at an assisted living facility. Findings of this study have implications for program planning at long-term care facilities. PMID:23078609

Lewinson, Terri; Robinson-Dooley, Vanessa; Grant, Kathryn W

2012-01-01

133

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

1997-01-01

134

How Things Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you've ever wondered how a neon light works, how food cooks, or why dust settles on the moving blades of a fan, this is an excellent place to find out. Professor Louis Bloomfield of the University of Virginia Physics Department urges users to "think of this site as a radio call-in program that's being held on the WWW instead of the radio." Users email questions about how things work and he answers them. A browsable and searchable list of answered questions is arranged (in nineteen major chapters, from The Laws of Motion to Resonance to Light) in accordance with a companion book HOW THINGS WORK: The Physics of Everyday Life. Note that at times the question box may be full.

2007-11-07

135

The right thing.  

PubMed

In my hospital experience working with families of seriously ill children, parents describe being stripped of confidence and having their functioning so compromised that they are unable to process facts or initiate action in a meaningful way. These narratives offer a glimpse into the minds of these parents and two things are clear: they love their children and they want to do the right thing. Treatment for pediatric brain tumors can last for long periods of time (months, even years) and cause significant damage even while seeking to save the child's life. Over the course of time, the family dynamic changes. Several important themes emerge from these stories and are explored in this commentary. An overarching theme is the agony that these parents go through as they struggle to make life and death decisions on behalf of their children. PMID:24748257

Barraza, Michael

2014-01-01

136

The Nature of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features interactive tools related to The Nature of Things television show. The tools include different videos and descriptions of a wide variety of subjects. Some examples include biomimicry, human illness, indoor pollution, and other issues affecting humans. The subject area covered is a very wide range, but users studying or interested in the human brain, biology of human beings, or relationships between animals will no doubt find this site intriguing.

2007-04-12

137

Developing network software and communications protocols towards the internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most profound changes today is the increase in mobility of portable yet powerful wireless devices capable of communicating via several different kinds of wireless radio networks of varying link-level characteristics. This paper addresses how the design and implementation of future applications and protocols can be facilitated by network programming frameworks. For the Internet of Things, upholding a

Bilhanan Silverajan; Jarmo Harju

2009-01-01

138

Provider Characteristics Desired by African American Women in Prenatal Care  

PubMed Central

Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe provider characteristics African American pregnant women identified as important when interacting with their prenatal care providers in an outpatient office setting. Study Design and Method A descriptive qualitative design was used to explore provider characteristics desired by African American women receiving prenatal care at two inner-city hospital–based obstetric clinics. A total of 22 African American women between the ages of 19 and 28 years participated in the study. Findings Four major provider characteristic themes emerged from the data: (a) demonstrating quality patient–provider communication, (b) providing continuity of care, (c) treating the women with respect, and (d) delivering compassionate care. Discussion and Conclusion An overarching theme revealed by the data analysis was the desire by African American women in this study to have their prenatal providers know and remember them. They wanted their providers to understand the context of their lives from their prenatal interactions. Incorporating findings from this study to improve patient–provider interactions during prenatal care could provide an increased understanding of the many complex variables affecting African American women’s lives. Implications for Practice and Research Prenatal care provides an opportunity for African American women to develop a trusting relationship with a provider. Developing models of prenatal care congruent with the realities of African American women’s lives has the potential to improve patient–provider interactions and potentially affect birth outcomes. PMID:21191039

Lori, Jody R.; Yi, Chin Hwa; Martyn, Kristy K.

2012-01-01

139

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by  

E-print Network

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination Peter Kner1 large fields of view. In structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), resolution is improved by moving high,2,7,8, Bryant B Chhun1,8, Eric R Griffis3,4, Lukman Winoto5 & Mats G L Gustafsson5,6 Structured-illumination

Griffis, Eric

140

Removal of tributyltin (TBT) by live and dead microalgal cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The removal of tributyltin (TBT) from artificial wastewater by dead and live cells of four microalgal species, Chlorella miniata, C. sorokiniana, Scenedesmus dimorphus and S. platydiscus was investigated. Dead cells were generally more efficient in removing TBT during three days exposure. More than 90% and 85% TBT were removed by dead cells of Scenedesmus and Chlorella, respectively. Although the removal

Nora F. Y Tam; A. M. Y Chong; Y. S Wong

2002-01-01

141

Differences in Adult Day Services Center Participant Characteristics by Center Ownership: United States, 2012  

MedlinePLUS

... Brief Number 164, September 2014 Differences in Adult Day Services Center Participant Characteristics by Center Ownership: United ... activities of daily living The majority of adult day services center participants were aged 65 and over. ...

142

Serostatus disclosure to sexual partners among people living with HIV: examining the roles of partner characteristics and stigma.  

PubMed

HIV serostatus disclosure among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is an important component of preventing HIV transmission to sexual partners. Due to barriers like stigma, however, many PLWHA do not disclose their serostatus to all sexual partners. This study explored differences in HIV serostatus disclosure based on sexual behavior subgroup (men who have sex with men [MSM]; heterosexual men; and women), characteristics of the sexual relationship (relationship type and HIV serostatus of partner), and perceived stigma. We examined disclosure in a sample of 341 PLWHA: 138 MSM, 87 heterosexual men, and 116 heterosexual women who were enrolled in SafeTalk, a randomized, controlled trial of a safer sex intervention. We found that, overall, 79% of participants disclosed their HIV status to all sexual partners in the past 3 months. However, we found important differences in disclosure by subgroup and relationship characteristics. Heterosexual men and women were more likely to disclose their HIV status than MSM (86%, 85%, and 69%, respectively). Additionally, disclosure was more likely among participants with only primary partners than those with only casual or both casual and primary partners (92%, 54%, and 62%, respectively). Participants with only HIV-positive partners were also more likely to disclose than those with only HIV-negative partners, unknown serostatus partners, or partners of mixed serostatus (96%, 85%, 40%, and 60%, respectively). Finally, people who perceived more HIV-related stigma were less likely to disclose their HIV serostatus to partners, regardless of subgroup or relationship characteristics. These findings suggest that interventions to help PLWHA disclose, particularly to serodiscordant casual partners, are needed and will likely benefit from inclusion of stigma reduction components. PMID:23020136

Przybyla, Sarahmona M; Golin, Carol E; Widman, Laura; Grodensky, Catherine A; Earp, Jo Anne; Suchindran, Chirayath

2013-01-01

143

Nucleic acid and protein mass mapping by live-cell  

E-print Network

structure. Finally, because of the shorter wavelength illumination, the theoretical spatial resolutionNucleic acid and protein mass mapping by live-cell deep-ultraviolet microscopy Benjamin J Zeskind1 the intensity of each pixel into an estimate of mass, deep-UV microscopy images generate maps of nucleic acid

Cai, Long

144

Enhancing Live Practical Demonstration by Using Engagement Devices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines some engagement or "showmanship" devices that can enhance the impact of live practical demonstrations. The fifteen engagement techniques described herein are used by the author in his spectacular chemistry demonstration shows in theaters, but they can also be useful in the classroom environment. Many of the…

Sosabowski, Michael Hal; Campbell, David

2013-01-01

145

Descriptive models for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a semantic analysis for Internet of things, a conclusion is drawn that the word thing here indicates actually the thing's information and the Internet here is actually the Internet application. Internet of Things is a new type of Internet application which makes the thing's information be shared on a global scale. Internet of Things has two attributes: being an

Yinghui Huang; Guanyu Li

2010-01-01

146

Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

2011-05-01

147

Live cell visualization of Golgi membrane dynamics by super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy.  

PubMed

Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy we developed provides cutting-edge high-speed live cell imaging at high space resolution. With this technology we are now able to observe details of membrane traffic events, including behaviors of small vesicles, cisternal maturation of the Golgi apparatus, and membrane segregation within a compartment. PMID:24295310

Kurokawa, Kazuo; Ishii, Midori; Suda, Yasuyuki; Ichihara, Akira; Nakano, Akihiko

2013-01-01

148

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS  

E-print Network

FROM MATHEMATICS FOR LIVING TO LIVING FOR MATHEMATICS George Malaty, University of Joensuu, Finland "Life is good for only two things, discovering mathematics and teaching mathematics". Siméon Poisson (1781-1840) Mathematics for living and living for mathematics are related to the goals of mathematics

Spagnolo, Filippo

149

Uptake of heavy metals by living and dead Cladonia thalli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uptake of Pb, Cu and Zn by thalli of Cladonia convoluta (Lam.) and Cladonia rangiformis (Hoffm.) from different concentrations of solutions of Pb(NO3)2, CuCl2 and ZnCl2 was studied. Zinc accumulation was higher in living than in dead thalli, but the opposite occurred for Pb and Cu. Further study with a solution containing all three metals revealed that at higher concentrations,

M. K. Chettri; T. Sawidis; G. A. Zachariadis; J. A. Stratis

1997-01-01

150

Active Living by Design as a Political Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

s the Active Living by Design (ALbD) program envisioned them, changes in the built environ- ment (physical projects) that encouraged physi- cal activity as part of routine daily life came about because of innovations in preparation, partnership, programming, promotions, and policy.1 The articles, which represent case studies in this supplement2-16 to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine depict in enlightening

M. Katherine Kraft; Lawrence D. Brown

2009-01-01

151

Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart  

PubMed Central

In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these arrangements, 18 of whom resided with their children's fathers occasionally while saying that they were not in a cohabiting relationship. We term such relationships living together apart (LTA). Data analysis revealed that distinct patterns of voluntary and involuntary separations and reunifications characterized intermittent cohabitation and LTA and that these relationships were shaped by the bonds that shared parenting created and the economic needs of both parents. We argue that these dimensions may explain some disparate accounts of cohabitation status in low-income populations. They also demonstrate previously unexplored diversity in cohabiting relationships and suggest further questioning contemporary definitions of families.

Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

2014-01-01

152

Characteristic Profiles of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Different Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The purposes of this study were to describe restrictions in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to assess different patterns of IADL in each MCI subtype. Methods: A total of 566 participants, those not cognitively impaired (NCI; n = 311) and MCI patients (n = 255), 60–94 years old (71.25 ± 6.00), were

Kyung Ran Kim; Kang Soo Lee; Hae-Kwan Cheong; Jin-Sup Eom; Byoung Hoon Oh; Chang Hyung Hong

2009-01-01

153

The relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics and physical inactivity among adolescents living in Boston, massachusetts.  

PubMed

Objectives. We sought to determine whether the socioeconomic environment was associated with no participation in physical activity among adolescents in Boston, Massachusetts. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from 1878 urban adolescents living in 38 neighborhoods who participated in the 2008 Boston Youth Survey, a biennial survey of high school students (aged 14-19 years). We used multilevel multiple regression models to determine the association between neighborhood-level exposures of economic deprivation, social fragmentation, social cohesion, danger and disorder, and students' reports of no participation in physical activity in the previous week. Results. High social fragmentation within the residential neighborhood was associated with an increased likelihood of being inactive (odds ratio?=?1.53; 95% confidence interval?=?1.14, 2.05). No other neighborhood exposures were associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions. Social fragmentation might be an important correlate of physical inactivity among youths living in urban settings. Interventions might be needed to assist youths living in unstable neighborhoods to be physically active. PMID:25211727

Pabayo, Roman; Molnar, Beth E; Cradock, Angie; Kawachi, Ichiro

2014-11-01

154

Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal  

PubMed Central

Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems1-3, logic circuits4-6 and robotics7-9. The molecule also naturally interfaces with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have previously been demonstrated10-13. Here we show that DNA origami14-16 can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other17-18 in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof-of-principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT, and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully employed the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets the cells of the animal. PMID:24705510

Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

2014-01-01

155

Privacy Preservation Technologies in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Since the beginning of the Internet thirty years ago, we have witnessed a number of changes in the application of communication technologies. Today, the Internet can be described to a large extent as a ubiquitous infrastructure that is always accessible. After the era of connecting places and connecting people, the Internet of the future will also connect things. The idea behind the resulting Internet of Things is to seamlessly gather and use information about objects of the real world during their entire lifecycle. In this paper, we consider different approaches to technological protection of user data privacy in the world of Internet of Things. In particular,we consider what kind of security problems are being faced and what level of protection can be provided by applying approaches based on secure multi-party computations.

Sen, Jaydip

2010-01-01

156

Summarize the technology of the things of Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article detailed introduction things of Internet technology in domestic and foreign research condition, trend of development as well as research goal and significance. Elaborated the things of Internet concept, the principle and the characteristic, then from home automation(HA), intelligent medical service(IM), intelligent transportation(ITS), intelligent electrical network (SPG), modern agriculture (MA) and intelligent Logistics (IL)from the intelligence aspects and so

Qiuxia Yang; Zhiguo Wang; Yinggao Yue

2012-01-01

157

Active Living Collaboratives in the United States: Understanding Characteristics, Activities, and Achievement of Environmental and Policy Change  

PubMed Central

Introduction Changing the built environment to promote active lifestyles requires collaboration among diverse sectors. Multisectoral collaborative groups in the United States promote active lifestyles through environmental and policy changes. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of these collaborative groups and the extent to which they have achieved change. Methods We identified, recruited, and interviewed the coordinators of active living collaborative groups in the United States. We used descriptive statistics to characterize groups by composition, stakeholder engagement, and the extent of environmental and policy change in 8 strategic areas. Results Fifty-nine groups from 22 states participated in the study. Most groups had a diverse set of partners and used a range of activities to advance their agendas. Most groups achieved some form of environmental or policy change. On average, groups reported working on 5 strategy areas; parks and recreation (86%) and Safe Routes to School (85%) were named most frequently. More than half of groups reported their environmental initiatives as either in progress or completed. Groups reported the most success in changing policy for public plazas, street improvements, streetscaping, and parks, open space, and recreation. Complete Streets policy and zoning ordinances were the most frequently cited policy types. Engaging in media activities and the policy-making process in addition to engaging stakeholders appear to influence success in achieving change. Conclusion Although many groups successfully worked on parks and recreation improvements, opportunities remain in other areas, including transit and infill and redevelopment. Additional time and resources may be critical to realizing these types of changes. PMID:23391295

Reed, Hannah L.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Zieff, Susan G.; Eyler, Amy A.; Lyn, Rodney; Goins, Karin Valentine; Gustat, Jeanette; Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara

2013-01-01

158

Chemical imaging of live fibroblasts by SERS effective nanofilm.  

PubMed

Reliable and strong surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signatures of intracellular compartments in live NIH3T3 fibroblasts are collected in real time by means of SERS active thin nanofilm (30 nm) on colloidal silica (1.5 ?m). Nanofilm is composed of preformed silver nanoparticles in the matrix of polyacrylic acid, protecting against heating (37 °C) in water, or culture medium or phosphate buffered saline aqueous solution. The SERS enhancement factors (EFs) of the order 10(8) allow single biomolecule detection in the native environment of a single live cell. Primary and secondary SERS hot spots of nanofilm are responsible for such high EFs. A slow SERS EF intensity decay occurs over a broader distance of micron silica with nanofilm, not achievable in a common core-shell model (silver nanoparticle coated with a thin silica layer). Extensive local field EFs and SERS EFs are mainly delivered by prolate silver nanoparticles ("rugby-like" shape). This is achieved if an incident field is polarized along the z-axis and the direction of incident polarization and main axis (z) are perpendicular to each other, not observable in water or on gold. PMID:25311048

Radziuk, D; Schuetz, R; Masic, A; Moehwald, H

2014-10-21

159

The Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT): methodological issues and participant characteristics  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health problems and risk behaviours among young people are of great public health concern. Consequently, within the VII Framework Programme, the European Commission funded the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) project. This Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) was conducted in eleven European countries, with Sweden as the coordinating centre, and was designed to identify an effective way to promote mental health and reduce suicidality and risk taking behaviours among adolescents. Objective To describe the methodological and field procedures in the SEYLE RCT among adolescents, as well as to present the main characteristics of the recruited sample. Methods Analyses were conducted to determine: 1) representativeness of study sites compared to respective national data; 2) response rate of schools and pupils, drop-out rates from baseline to 3 and 12 month follow-up, 3) comparability of samples among the four Intervention Arms; 4) properties of the standard scales employed: Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (Z-SAS), Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), World Health Organization Well-Being Scale (WHO-5). Results Participants at baseline comprised 12,395 adolescents (M/F: 5,529/6,799; mean age=14.9±0.9) from Austria, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Romania, Slovenia and Spain. At the 3 and 12 months follow up, participation rates were 87.3% and 79.4%, respectively. Demographic characteristics of participating sites were found to be reasonably representative of their respective national population. Overall response rate of schools was 67.8%. All scales utilised in the study had good to very good internal reliability, as measured by Cronbach’s alpha (BDI-II: 0.864; Z-SAS: 0.805; SDQ: 0.740; WHO-5: 0.799). Conclusions SEYLE achieved its objective of recruiting a large representative sample of adolescents within participating European countries. Analysis of SEYLE data will shed light on the effectiveness of important interventions aimed at improving adolescent mental health and well-being, reducing risk-taking and self-destructive behaviour and preventing suicidality. Trial registration US National Institute of Health (NIH) clinical trial registry (NCT00906620) and the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000214). PMID:23679917

2013-01-01

160

Why there is no such thing as “critical discourse analysis”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article argues that there is no such thing as Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in the sense of a method of political or ideological critique based on the application of conventional linguistic constructs. All of us, as language users and makers, are continuously engaged in the critical examination of and response to communication in our everyday lives. The article argues

Peter E. Jones

2007-01-01

161

Where the Wild Things Are: Informal Experience and Ecological Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Category-based induction requires selective use of different relations to guide inferences; this article examines the development of inferences based on ecological relations among living things. Three hundred and forty-six 6-, 8-, and 10-year-old children from rural, suburban, and urban communities projected novel "diseases" or "insides" from one…

Coley, John D.

2012-01-01

162

The Pleasure of Finding Things out  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The pleasure of finding things out" is a collection of short works by the Nobel Prize winning scientist Richard Feynman. The book provides insights into his infectious enthusiasm for science and his love of sharing ideas about the subject with anyone who wanted to listen. Feynman has been widely acknowledged as one of the greatest physicists of…

Loxley, Peter

2005-01-01

163

Internet of things and privacy preserving technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we consider different approaches to technological protection of users' privacy in the world of internet of things. Particularly, we consider what kind of problems and which level of protection can be achieved by applying approaches using secure multi-party computations.

Vladimir Oleshchuk

2009-01-01

164

Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

HISPANICS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute One of the leading causes of cancer?related deaths among ... a rare but often fatal disease known as pancreatic cancer. This cancer, which is often detected only after ...

165

Searching in a Web-based Infrastructure for Smart Things  

E-print Network

smart things in our everyday environments lies in the interconnection of the services they offer of everyday objects that are thereby transformed into smart things [1]. Such isolated smart devices already, decide, and act by themselves and thereby provide an invisible background assistance that could make life

166

How Things Work, an Enrichment Class for Middle School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Middle School students are curious about their surroundings. They are always asking questions about how things work. So this semester two middle school science teachers and a physicist combined their strengths and taught HOW THINGS WORK, THE PHYSICS OF EVERYDAY LIFE (a book by Louis A. Bloomfield). The students studied the physics behind everyday objects to see how they worked.

Tamara Goller; Nancy Watson; James Watson

1998-01-01

167

The clustering of Internet, Internet of Things and social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information, objects and people are three major macro elements in the human society. Their inner relations can be reflected by the Internet, the Internet of Things and social network, respectively. Normally, these three networks do not work together. This paper proposes a platform to cluster the Internet, the Internet of Things and social network together. The clustering will promote the

Lianhong Ding; Peng Shi; Bingwu Liu

2010-01-01

168

Near-term climate mitigation by short-lived forcers  

PubMed Central

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate-forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes, such as methane (CH4) and black carbon, have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and black carbon would likely have only a modest impact on near-term global climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 would be reduced by 0.16 °C, with a range of 0.04–0.35 °C because of uncertainties in carbonaceous aerosol emissions and aerosol forcing per unit of emissions. The high end of this range is only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is relatively small. More realistic emission reductions would likely provide an even smaller climate benefit. We find that the climate benefit from reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated. These near-term climate benefits of targeted reductions in short-lived forcers are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits from a comprehensive climate policy. PMID:23940357

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew

2013-01-01

169

Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-08-12

170

The Myths We Live By: Reframing History for the 21st Century  

E-print Network

The Myths We Live By: Reframing History for the 21st Century Professor Giselle Byrnes Pro Vice, Parliament House #12;Professorial Lecture Series The myths we live by: reframing history for the 21st Century #12;Charles Darwin University Professorial Lecture Series The myths we live by: reframing history

171

Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens.  

PubMed

Different vaccine strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum have been used on multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect birds against virulent field-strain infections. Use of the F-strain of M. gallisepticum (FMG), as an overlay vaccine during lay, may be necessary because of the lower level of protection afforded by M. gallisepticum vaccines of low virulence given before lay. Two replicate trials were conducted to investigate effects of live and killed M. gallisepticum vaccines administered individually and in combination before lay, in conjunction with an FMG vaccine overlay after peak egg production (EP), on the performance characteristics of commercial layers. The following treatments were utilized at 10 wk of age (woa): 1) control (no vaccinations); 2) ts11 strain M. gallisepticum (ts11MG) vaccine; 3) M. gallisepticum-Bacterin vaccine (MG-Bacterin); and 4) ts11MG and MG-Bacterin vaccines combination. At 45 woa, half of the birds were overlaid with an FMG vaccine. Hen mortality, BW, egg weight, percentage hen-day EP, egg blood spots, and egg meat spots were determined at various time periods between 18 and 52 woa. The data from each trial were pooled. Treatment did not affect performance in interval I (23 to 45 woa). However, during interval II (46 to 52 woa), the EP of control and MG-Bacterin-vaccinated birds that later received an FMG vaccine overlay was lower than that in the other treatment groups. Furthermore, treatment application reduced bird BW during interval II. Despite the effects on BW and EP, no differences were observed for egg blood or meat spots among the various treatments. It is suggested that the vaccination of commercial layers before lay with ts11MG, but not MG-Bacterin, may reduce the negative impacts of an FMG overlay vaccination given during lay. These results establish that the vaccination of pullets with ts11MG in combination with the vaccination of hens with an FMG overlay, for continual protection against field-strain M. gallisepticum infections, may be used without suppressing performance. PMID:24879690

Jacob, R; Branton, S L; Evans, J D; Leigh, S A; Peebles, E D

2014-06-01

172

Spatial and seasonal variations in the ecological characteristics of the free-living nematode assemblages in a large microtidal estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study has determined the ways in which the density, number of species, species composition and trophic structure of free-living nematode assemblages in the subtidal waters of a large southern hemisphere microtidal estuary change spatially and seasonally, and has explored whether those four biotic characteristics are related to certain environmental factors. Based on data derived from samples collected seasonally at 12 sites throughout the estuary, the densities and number of species of nematodes decreased progressively with distance from estuary mouth, to reach a minimum at sites where salinities were most variable, and then increased slightly in the uppermost part of the estuary where salinities were least. Densities were also generally greatest in spring, due largely to increases in the abundance of epistrate-grazing species at this time and thus when the amount of primary food (microphytobenthos) peaked. The spatial distribution of the composition of the nematode assemblages was closely correlated with salinity and, to a lesser extent, grain-size composition and amount of particulate organic material (%POM) in the sediment. Although species composition changed sequentially along the estuary, the change was particularly pronounced between sites above and below the area where salinities started to decline markedly and become more variable and %POM increased markedly. This reflected, in particular, far greater abundances of Spirinia parasitifera at the six downstream sites and of Theristus sp. 1 at the six sites further upstream. Species composition underwent pronounced seasonal cyclical changes at all sites, presumably reflecting interspecific differences in the timing of peak reproduction and thus of recruitment. The trophic structure of the nematode assemblages changed both spatially and temporally in relation to the relative abundance of different food sources. Thus, for example, non-selective deposit feeders, such as Theristus sp. 1, dominated samples in the upper estuary, where %POM was by far the greatest, and was rare or absent at downstream sites. Conversely, epistrate grazers, such as species of the Chromadoridae, were most abundant at downstream sites in spring, when the density of the microphytobenthos reached its maximum.

Hourston, M.; Potter, I. C.; Warwick, R. M.; Valesini, F. J.; Clarke, K. R.

2009-04-01

173

The effect of lipoic acid on macro and trace metal levels in living tissues exposed to oxidative stress.  

PubMed

Environmental pollution resulting from fast-paced industrialization, various chemicals used in agriculture, additives in food, smoking and use of alcohol, radiation, some viruses and poor dietary habits all have currently increased the incidence and types of cancer. Polycyclic hydrocarbons are an example of this type of carcinogens. Living things are exposed to this free radical-increasing substance due to various reasons. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species has an important place in the etiology of cancer, which develops in relation to many factors. Injury caused by cancer in the organism may affect other organs, as well as the tumors organs and tissues. In addition, it is known that some changes take place in the content of macro and trace elements due to cancer in the organism. Our study is intended to explore the protective role of alpha-lipoic acid, which has antioxidant characteristics in living tissues exposed to oxidative stress, in the macro and trace element levels. PMID:19519297

Ciftci, Harun; Bakal, Unal

2009-06-01

174

Philosophical behaviorism: a review of things that happen because they should: a teleological approach to action, by Rowland Stout  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mentalistic terms such as belief and desire have been rejected by behavior analysts because they are traditionally held to refer to unobservable events inside the organism. Behavior analysis has conse- quently been viewed by philosophers to be at best irrelevant to psychology, understood as a science of the mind. In this book, the philosopher Rowland Stout argues cogently that beliefs

HOWARD RACHLIN

1999-01-01

175

The Geoscience Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internet of Things is a term that refers to "uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure" (Wikipedia). We here use the term to describe new and innovative ways to integrate physical samples in the Earth Sciences into the emerging digital infrastructures that are developed to support research and education in the Geosciences. Many Earth Science data are acquired on solid earth samples through observations and experiments conducted in the field or in the lab. The application and long-term utility of sample-based data for science is critically dependent on (a) the availability of information (metadata) about the samples such as geographical location where the sample was collected, time of sampling, sampling method, etc. (b) links between the different data types available for individual samples that are dispersed in the literature and in digital data repositories, and (c) access to the samples themselves. Neither of these requirements could be achieved in the past due to incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names, and the lack of a central catalog that allows researchers to find a sample's archiving location. New internet-based capabilities have been developed over the past few years for the registration and unique identification of samples that make it possible to overcome these problems. Services for the registration and unique identification of samples are provided by the System for Earth Sample Registration SESAR (www.geosamples.org). SESAR developed the International Geo Sample Number, or IGSN, as a unique identifier for samples and specimens collected from our natural environment. Since December 2011, the IGSN is governed by an international organization, the IGSN eV (www.igsn.org), which endorses and promotes an internationally unified approach for registration and discovery of physical specimens in the Geoscience community and is establishing a new modular and scalable architecture for the IGSN to advance global implementation. Use of the IGSN will, for the first time, allow to establish links between samples (or the digital representation of them), data acquired on these samples, and the publications that report these data. Samples can be linked to a dataset by including IGSNs in the metadata record of a dataset's DOI® when the dataset is registered with the DOI® system for unique identification. Links between datasets and publications already have been implemented based on dataset DOIs® between some Geoscience journals and data centers that are Publication Agents in the DataCite consortium (www.datacite.org). Links between IGSNs, dataset DOIs, and publication DOIs will in the future allow researchers to find and access with a single query and without ambiguity all data acquired on a specific sample across the entire literature.

Lehnert, K.; Klump, J.

2012-04-01

176

Separation of Living and Dead Cells by Dielectrophoresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-frequency non-uniform electric fields were used to cause selective dielectrophoresis of yeast cells in an aqueous medium. Living cells separated from admixed dead ones remained viable after the separation process.

Herbert A. Pohi; Ira Hawk

1966-01-01

177

Historians use several types of evidence to learn about what it was like to live in a sod  

E-print Network

Historians use several types of evidence to learn about what it was like to live in a sod house in this activity was named Solomon Butcher. Much of what we know about living in sod houses is based on Mr. Butcher for Evidence Materials You Will Need These Things See what you can discover by investigating photographs of two

Mathis, Wayne N.

178

Comparison of the biosorption and desorption of hazardous organic pollutants by live and dead biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

and 2-chlorobiphenyl by living and dead cells of the fungus R. arrhizus and activated sludge was studied. A generalization concerning the relative magnitude of biosorptive uptake between live and dead biomass cannot be made using the experimental data. Uptakes by live and dead cells are similarly correlated to the octanol\\/water partition coefficient of the organic pollutants. The desorption of the

M. TSEZOS; J. P. BELL

1989-01-01

179

Learning by Living: Life-Altering Medical Education through Nursing Home-Based Experiential Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning by Living Project (referred to as Learning by Living) was piloted in 2006 as an experiential medical education learning model. Since its inception, medical and other health professions students have been "admitted" into nursing homes to live the life of an older adult nursing…

Gugliucci, Marilyn R.; Weiner, Audrey

2013-01-01

180

THINGS: The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey  

E-print Network

We present "The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)", a high spectral (atlas of the integrated HI maps, the velocity fields, the second moment (velocity dispersion) maps and individual channel maps of each THINGS galaxy. The THINGS data products are made publicly available through a dedicated webpage. Accompanying THINGS papers address issues such as the small-scale structure of the ISM, the (dark) matter distribution in THINGS galaxies, and the processes leading to star formation.

F. Walter; E. Brinks; W. J. G. de Blok; F. Bigiel; R. C. Kennicutt, Jr.; M. D. Thornley; A. K. Leroy

2008-10-12

181

Internet of Things Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT)  

E-print Network

Internet of Things Peng Du #12;Content Introduction to Internet ofThings (IoT) Challenges IPv6 / 6LoWPAN ROLL #12;What is Internet of Things (IoT) Internet TCP/IP Things Criteria #12;Elements A brief idea what Internet ofThings is and why it is interesting to us Appreciated IPv6 is one

Roussos, George

182

Philosophical behaviorism: a review of things that happen because they should: a teleological approach to action, by Rowland Stout.  

PubMed

Mentalistic terms such as belief and desire have been rejected by behavior analysts because they are traditionally held to refer to unobservable events inside the organism. Behavior analysis has consequently been viewed by philosophers to be at best irrelevant to psychology, understood as a science of the mind. In this book, the philosopher Rowland Stout argues cogently that beliefs and desires (like operants such as rats' lever presses) are best understood in terms of an interaction over time between overt behavior and its overt consequences (a viewpoint called teleological behaviorism). This book is important because it identifies the science of the mind with the science of overt behavior and implies that the psychologists best equipped to study mental life are not those who purport to do so but those who focus on the experimental analysis of behavior. PMID:10503301

Rachlin, H

1999-09-01

183

Incorporation of a Fluorescent Compound by Live Heterodera glycines  

PubMed Central

The incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by J2 of Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode, and the resulting effects on fitness were determined. Live soybean cyst nematode J2 incubated in FITC fluoresced, primarily in the intestinal region, beyond auto-fluorescence. Dissection of animals, as well as fluorescence-quenching techniques, indicated that FITC was not simply bound to the cuticle. FITC was also found to cross the egg shell. Fluorescence increased in relation to FITC concentration and incubation time. Nematodes incubated in FITC remained active and did not lose their fluorescence even after two weeks at room temperature. Fluorescence of nematodes was not stable through development. Males which developed from fluorescent juveniles did not retain the stain. Both FITC and the DMF solvent reduced the hatching rate. However, those individuals that successfully hatched remained viable and able to infect roots. Incorporation of FITC was found to occur in three other genera of nematodes. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate was also found to be incorporated by H. glycines. PMID:19259474

Schroeder, N. E.; MacGuidwin, A. E.

2007-01-01

184

Security Challenges for User-Oriented RFID Applications within the `Internet of Things'  

E-print Network

Security Challenges for User-Oriented RFID Applications within the `Internet of Things' G.P. HANCKE to be an important building block of the `Internet of Things' and examine how RFID, assisted by the deployment of NFC will need to address. Keywords: RFID, NFC, security, `Internet of Things', user-oriented architecture 1

Hancke, Gerhard

185

Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution  

E-print Network

1 Service-Oriented Middleware for the Mobile Internet of Things: A Scalable Solution Sara Hachem.issarny}@inria.fr Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is characterized by a wide penetration in the regular user's life and fulfill users' queries for Thing-based measurements/actions. I. INTRODUCTION The Internet of today

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

186

How Everyday Things Are Made  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is difficult for many individuals to fathom the exacting and complex processes used to manufacture an airplane, car, or even candy. Stepping in to help explain how many everyday things are made is this fine Web site developed by the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing at Stanford University and design 4x, a company that develops online courses on manufacturing topics. The site begins with a brief introductory video clip orienting new visitors to the materials available on the site, and on how best to navigate the site's features. Dozens of products are covered here, including airplanes, motorcycles, cars, jelly beans, chocolate, glass bottles, crayons, and golf clubs. Additionally, the site also contains information on various careers in manufacturing, along with a list of books on the field of manufacturing. Another helpful aspect of the site is the Think About It feature, where visitors are asked to offer their comments on how they think a certain process works, along with reading the previous comments of other visitors.

187

Environments For Healthy Living (EFHL) Griffith birth cohort study: characteristics of sample and profile of antenatal exposures  

PubMed Central

Background The Environments for Healthy Living (EFHL) study is a repeated sample, longitudinal birth cohort in South East Queensland, Australia. We describe the sample characteristics and profile of maternal, household, and antenatal exposures. Variation and data stability over recruitment years were examined. Methods Four months each year from 2006, pregnant women were recruited to EFHL at routine antenatal visits on or after 24 weeks gestation, from three public maternity hospitals. Participating mothers completed a baseline questionnaire on individual, familial, social and community exposure factors. Perinatal data were extracted from hospital birth records. Descriptive statistics and measures of association were calculated comparing the EFHL birth sample with regional and national reference populations. Data stability of antenatal exposure factors was assessed across five recruitment years (2006–2010 inclusive) using the Gamma statistic for ordinal data and chi-squared for nominal data. Results Across five recruitment years 2,879 pregnant women were recruited which resulted in 2904 live births with 29 sets of twins. EFHL has a lower representation of early gestational babies, fewer still births and a lower percentage of low birth weight babies, when compared to regional data. The majority of women (65%) took a multivitamin supplement during pregnancy, 47% consumed alcohol, and 26% reported having smoked cigarettes. There were no differences in rates of a range of antenatal exposures across five years of recruitment, with the exception of increasing maternal pre-pregnancy weight (p=0.0349), decreasing rates of high maternal distress (p=0.0191) and decreasing alcohol consumption (p<0.0001). Conclusions The study sample is broadly representative of births in the region and almost all factors showed data stability over time. This study, with repeated sampling of birth cohorts over multiple years, has the potential to make important contributions to population health through evaluating longitudinal follow-up and within cohort temporal effects. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000931077 PMID:23241307

2012-01-01

188

Embedded security for Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet of Things (IoT) consists of several tiny devices connected together to form a collaborative computing environment. IoT imposes peculiar constraints in terms of connectivity, computational power and energy budget, which make it significantly different from those contemplated by the canonical doctrine of security in distributed systems. In order to circumvent the problem of security in IoT domain, networks and

Arijit Ukil; Jaydip Sen; Sripad Koilakonda

2011-01-01

189

Object Recognition for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a system which allows to request information on physical objects by taking a picture of them. This way, using a\\u000a mobile phone with integrated camera, users can interact with objects or ”things” in a very simple manner. A further advantage\\u000a is that the objects themselves don’t have to be tagged with any kind of markers. At the core

Till Quack; Herbert Bay; Luc J. Van Gool

2008-01-01

190

Where We Live: Fun With Compiling Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners will find what is common and what is unique about where we live. Learners will count how many people, pets, windows, televisions and other things exist where they live. Everyone fills in information on a chart and then the group explores the data. Young learners focus on most, least, and simple comparisons; older ones look for typical responses and relationships among categories. For instance, does anyone have twice as many pets as people? Do those with more people mostly have more doors? This works well as a group activity or a display to which passers-by contribute. Available as a web page and downloadable pdf.

Terc

2010-01-01

191

Sustaining living rivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rivers cannot continue to meet society's needs, or the needs of living things, if humans continue to regard river management as a purely political or engineering challenge. The flow of rivers is part of a greater flow, the planet's water cycle, which sustains not only the flow of water but the entire web of life. Ultimately, the condition, or health,

James R. Karr; Ellen W. Chu

2000-01-01

192

Synthetic biology between technoscience and thing knowledge.  

PubMed

Synthetic biology presents a challenge to traditional accounts of biology: Whereas traditional biology emphasizes the evolvability, variability, and heterogeneity of living organisms, synthetic biology envisions a future of homogeneous, humanly engineered biological systems that may be combined in modular fashion. The present paper approaches this challenge from the perspective of the epistemology of technoscience. In particular, it is argued that synthetic-biological artifacts lend themselves to an analysis in terms of what has been called 'thing knowledge'. As such, they should neither be regarded as the simple outcome of applying theoretical knowledge and engineering principles to specific technological problems, nor should they be treated as mere sources of new evidence in the general pursuit of scientific understanding. Instead, synthetic-biological artifacts should be viewed as partly autonomous research objects which, qua their material-biological constitution, embody knowledge about the natural world-knowledge that, in turn, can be accessed via continuous experimental interrogation. PMID:23562606

Gelfert, Axel

2013-06-01

193

The Negotiation of Lived Spaces by Unauthorized College Aged Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Throughout the United States, undocumented students live in constant fear of their legal status being disclosed, and despite their educational success and professional objectives, face uncertainty and an unknown future. This study has put forward the question of what are the effects of the symbiotic relationship of a historical anti-Mexican…

Jacobo, Rodolfo

2010-01-01

194

Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

2007-01-01

195

Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

2011-01-01

196

Amperometric estimation of BOD by using living immobilized yeasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A microbial electrode consisting of immobilized living whole cells of yeasts, porous membrane and an oxygen electrode was prepared for continuous estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Immobilized Trichosporon cutaneum was employed for the microbial electrode sensor for BOD. When a sample solution containing the equivalent amount of glucose and glutamic acid was injected into the sensor system, the current

Motohiko Hikuma; Hiroshi Suzuki; Yakeo Yasuda; Isao Karube; Shuichi Suzuki

1979-01-01

197

Mechanics of Living Cells Measured by Laser Tracking Microrheology  

Microsoft Academic Search

To establish laser-tracking microrheology (LTM) as a new technique for quantifying cytoskeletal mechanics, we measure viscoelastic moduli with wide bandwidth (5 decades) within living cells. With the first subcellular measurements of viscoelastic phase angles, LTM provides estimates of solid versus liquid behavior at different frequencies. In LTM, the viscoelastic shear moduli are inferred from the Brownian motion of particles embedded

Soichiro Yamada; Denis Wirtz; Scot C. Kuo

2000-01-01

198

Characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of plasma generated by hypervelocity impact were studied through both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Based on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a thermal ionization model was proposed to explore the relationships of ionization degree and plasma conductivity to temperature with consideration of the velocity distribution law in the thermodynamic equilibrium state. In order to derive the temperature, internal energy, and density of the plasma generated by the impact for the above relationships, a 3-D model for the impact of an aluminum spherical projectile on an aluminum target was established and five cases with different impact angles were numerically simulated. Then, the temperature calculated from the internal energy and the Thomas Fermi (TF) model, the internal energy and the density of the plasma were put into the function of the ionization degree to study the characteristics of plasma. Finally, based on the experimental data, a good agreement was obtained between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results, and the feasibility of this theoretical model was verified.

Song, Weidong; Li, Jianqiao; Ning, Jianguo [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

2013-09-15

199

THINGS TO DO IN MADISON AND SURROUNDING AREA  

E-print Network

THINGS TO DO IN MADISON AND SURROUNDING AREA: SPORTS, ATHLETIC EVENTS, & RACING: MADISON MALLARDS://www.countyofdane.com/lwrd/parks/dog_parks.aspx) #12;EVENTS & ATTRACTIONS BY MONTH: FARMERS MARKET SATURDAY MORNINGS ON SQUARE SUMMER MARKET 04

Evans, Paul G.

200

Characteristics of the Colombian armed conflict and the mental health of civilians living in active conflict zones  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the fact that the Colombian armed conflict has continued for almost five decades there is still very little information on how it affects the mental health of civilians. Although it is well established in post-conflict populations that experience of organised violence has a negative impact on mental health, little research has been done on those living in active conflict zones. Médecins Sans Frontières provides mental health services in areas of active conflict in Colombia and using data from these services we aimed to establish which characteristics of the conflict are most associated with specific symptoms of mental ill health. Methods An analysis of clinical data from patients (N = 6,353), 16 years and over, from 2010–2011, who consulted in the Colombian departments (equivalent to states) of Nariño, Cauca, Putumayo and Caquetá. Risk factors were grouped using a hierarchical cluster analysis and the clusters were included with demographic information as predictors in logistic regressions to discern which risk factor clusters best predicted specific symptoms. Results Three clear risk factor clusters emerged which were interpreted as ‘direct conflict related violence’, ‘personal violence not directly conflict-related’ and ‘general hardship’. The regression analyses indicated that conflict related violence was more highly related to anxiety-related psychopathology than other risk factor groupings while non-conflict violence was more related to aggression and substance abuse, which was more common in males. Depression and suicide risk were represented equally across risk factor clusters. Conclusions As the largest study of its kind in Colombia it demonstrates a clear impact of the conflict on mental health. Among those who consulted with mental health professionals, specific conflict characteristics could predict symptom profiles. However, some of the highest risk outcomes, like depression, suicide risk and aggression, were more related to factors indirectly related to the conflict. This suggests a need to focus on the systemic affects of armed conflict and not solely on direct exposure to fighting. PMID:23171497

2012-01-01

201

Discussion on the Application of Internet of Things in Logistics Production Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the bar code's disadvantage, information flow cann't match the physical flow in the logistics production industry this causes the efficiency very slowly. Internet of Things overcomes the shortcomings of the bar code, it will revolutionize logistics production management. This paper describes basic principles and characteristics of Internet of Things, and discusses the application of it in logistics production

Mao Cuiyun; Han Yuanhang

2010-01-01

202

14 Conversations about Three Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this essay, the author tries to look forward into the 21st century to divine three things: (i) What skills will researchers in the future need to solve the most pressing problems? (ii) What are some of the most likely candidates to be those problems? and (iii) What are some current areas of research that seem mined out and should not distract…

Wainer, Howard

2010-01-01

203

Live Combined Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecium Ameliorate Murine Experimental Colitis by Immunosuppression  

PubMed Central

Live combined Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecium ameliorate murine experimental colitis by immunosuppression manifested by downregulation of TLRs, macrophages, Th1, and Th2 but upregulation of Tregs.

Chen, S.; Fu, Y.; Liu, L. L.; Gao, W.; Liu, Y. L.; Fei, S. H.; Tan, Y.; Zou, K. F.

2014-01-01

204

Study of Short-Lived Nuclear Decays by Digital Spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new generation of pulse processing electronics based on digital signal processing technology has been successfully tested on-line and applied for the first time in particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments. Systems based on commercially available Digital Gamma Finder (DGF) modules [1] were used to study the decays of short-lived states in exotic nuclei. Since the DGFs incorporate a RTPU, they

C. R. Bingham; E. Badura; J. C. Batchelder; C. J. Gross; R. Grzywacz; Z. Janas; M. Karny; W. Krolas; C. Mazzocchi; J. W. McConnell; M. Momayezi; M. Pfützner; K. Rykaczewski; K. Schmidt

2001-01-01

205

9 CFR 203.4 - Statement with respect to the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...provides, in part, that every packer, live poultry dealer, stockyard owner,...

2011-01-01

206

9 CFR 201.94 - Information as to business; furnishing of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...of by packers, swine contractors, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies... Each packer, swine contractor, live poultry dealer, stockyard owner,...

2010-01-01

207

9 CFR 203.4 - Statement with respect to the disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...disposition of records by packers, live poultry dealers, stockyard owners, market agencies...provides, in part, that every packer, live poultry dealer, stockyard owner,...

2010-01-01

208

Things to Know about Cosmetic Contacts  

MedlinePLUS

... they decided to reclassify cosmetic lenses as cosmetics. Contacts are not Cosmetics Classifying cosmetic contact lenses in ... and soaking solutions. Things to Know About Cosmetic Contacts Things to Know About Cosmetic Contacts— Continued Contact ...

209

Research: Putting Things Graphically  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs don't always show what the graphers say they do. The most notorious recent example of a misleading graph is the one produced by the U.S. Department of Education that plots National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading scores against total federal spending on education. This graph was taken apart by Howard Wainer and Daniel…

Bracey, Gerald W.

2004-01-01

210

Atomic-scale dynamics inside living cells explored by neutron scattering.  

PubMed

Single-particle neutron spectroscopy has contributed important experimental data on molecular dynamics in biological systems. The technique provides information on atomic and molecular motions in macromolecules on the picosecond to the nanosecond time scale, which are essential to biological function. Here, we report on recent neutron measurements performed directly in living cells by using isotope labelling to explore the dynamics of specific cellular components. The paper proposes an integrated view of results on atomic-scale cell water dynamics, internal and global macromolecular motions and solvent isotope effect on macromolecular dynamics. The work established the specific usefulness of the neutron scattering technique to get insight into biologically relevant dynamical features, in particular through comparative measurements. The method developed can now be applied to look for dynamical signatures related to cell characteristics in many different cell types and organelles. PMID:19586955

Jasnin, Marion

2009-10-01

211

In vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites of living organisms by mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:23811725

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-01-01

212

In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-07-01

213

In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:23811725

Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

2013-01-01

214

How Things Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the physics of liquid crystal displays (LCD) which is based on polarizing properties of crystals controlled by electric command. Production of alphanumerics, display control, and input are considered. (JM)

Crane, H. Richard, Ed.

1983-01-01

215

Things You Can Try  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Snip of the Scissors" describes the geometry involved in making stars by paper folding, and Checking the Calculated Average Through Subtraction" suggests practice in operations with negative numbers. (MM)

Junge, Charlotte W.

1971-01-01

216

Quality of Life of People Living with HIV/AIDS under the New Epidemic Characteristics in China and the Associated Factors  

PubMed Central

Background Improvement of quality of life has been one of goals in health care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). In China, the epidemic characteristics have changed and transmission is now most commonly sexual contact. However, the assessment of quality of life of PLWHA under new characteristics has limited reporting. This study was designed to assess the quality of life among PLWHA who contracted disease mainly via sexual contact and to clarify the associated factors. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Liaoning Province. Sample size (800) was calculated based on the fatality rate and enlarged with consideration on the loss of response. Participants were sampled by tables of random numbers among all registered PLWHA. Questionnaires pertaining to quality of life (SF-36) and related factors (demographic characteristics, social support and network, HIV/AIDS awareness, and behavior factors) were distributed during December 2010-April 2011. 783 effective responses were obtained. Results The average scores of physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and total score (TS) were 66.8±21.9 (Mean±SD), 62.2±20.9, and 64.5±20.2. General linear model analysis revealed that, in standardized estimate (?) sequence, PCS was significantly associated with monthly income, perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, transmission, and ethnicity; MCS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, condom use, monthly income, transmission, ethnicity, and alcohol consumption; whereas TS was associated with perceived social support, antiretroviral therapy, monthly income, transmission, condom use, and ethnicity. Conclusions Quality of life for PLWHA who contracted HIV mainly via sexual contact was worse and both physical conditions and social integration were impacted. Under current epidemic characteristics, efforts to increase social support and enhance the implementation of supporting policy are necessary to improve the quality of life of PLWHA. PMID:23741340

Sun, Wei; Wu, Ming; Qu, Peng; Lu, Chunming; Wang, Lie

2013-01-01

217

Creating the Internet of Your Things  

E-print Network

Creating the Internet of Your Things Barb Edson, General Manager Executive Summary Where is your perspective and challenging to drive business value from. The Internet of Things, also known as IoT, is one such trend. The Internet of Things provides vast opportunities, but it can also pose a challenge

Chaudhuri, Surajit

218

Internet of Things in college application prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things to China's development will bring about profound changes in university management and far-reaching impact. This paper analyzes the Internet of things and working principle of key technologies, combined with our college management problems; make things networking technology in the future development of Chinese universities and applications.

Jianhua Wang; Yongsheng Song; Yan Yu; Jun Zhang

2010-01-01

219

101 Things to Learn in Art School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is the first thing to learn in art school? "Art can be anything." The second thing? "Learn to draw." With "101 Things to Learn in Art School", artist and teacher Kit White delivers and develops such lessons, striking an instructive balance between technical advice and sage concepts. These 101 maxims, meditations, and demonstrations offer both…

White, Kit

2011-01-01

220

All Things Cretaceous  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This assortment of digital resources relevant to the Cretaceous Period (145.5-65.5 million years ago) covers a broad range of topics and includes an array of media types. A variety of images, maps, visualizations, virtual field trips, databases, technical papers and general information are among the resource types found here. Features include key topics, self-guide discovery pathways, guided activities for students that use internet resources, and a list of internet resources that is searchable by subject or by type of resource (map, activity, etc.).

Aschoff, Jen

2002-01-01

221

Things are Heating Up  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this demonstration, students learn that heat makes air expand and rise, and learn how pressure systems are formed by observing the creation of a convection current. A large rectangular pan, a salad dressing bottle, a small latex balloon and water are required materials. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA SCI Files: The Case of the Phenomenal Weather. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

222

Perceptions of the character of God as narrated by East African women living with HIV.  

PubMed

Two qualitative research studies conducted with women living with HIV in Malawi (N = 72) and Kenya (N = 54) separately revealed personal faith as a primary coping mechanism that mitigates the effects of stigma and promotes spiritual, physical, and mental health. Fourth characteristics of God emerged that sustain the women in daily life. PMID:22866377

Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah M; Kibicho, Jennifer W

2012-01-01

223

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn that it is incorrect to believe that heavier objects fall faster than lighter objects. By close observation of falling objects, they see that it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

224

It's the Little Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology (IT) departments are ruled by a kind of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: The big-tech stuff--the operating systems, the networks, the data centers--gets the priority, food-and-shelter attention, while upgrading the backup power supplies, evaluating new projector mounts, and taming that rat's nest of classroom cords fall…

Waters, John K.

2007-01-01

225

Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of food particle capture due to altered particle pathways and residence times, but also for the exchange of gases, solutes and spawn. The present results confirm previous studies on flow interaction effects of various biogenic structures, and they add a deeper level of detail for a better understanding of the fine-scale effects.

Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

2009-02-01

226

PINing for things past.  

PubMed

Long-term memories are thought to be maintained by persistent changes in the strength of synaptic connections among neurons, but how such changes can persist for days to years has been one of the fundamental enigmas of neuroscience. Recently, however, one mechanism that is dependent on the persistent increased activity of an enzyme has been shown to be necessary for the persistence of long-term memory. The transient inhibition of the brain-specific, constitutively active protein kinase C isoform PKMzeta erases memories that are even months old. This finding raises a number of issues; chief among them is the question, how can PKMzeta maintain memories for months when its half-life is probably much shorter? New data suggest how the high abundance of PKMzeta can be maintained over long periods of time. The synthesis of PKMzeta is inhibited by Pin1 (protein interacting with NIMA 1), a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that represses dendritic translation. Signals mediated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which induces long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation, inhibit Pin1, enabling PKMzeta synthesis. PKMzeta, once translated, in turn inhibits Pin1, permitting persistent PKMzeta synthesis. In this way, PKMzeta may be up-regulated to the appropriate amounts for maintaining LTP and perpetuating our mental representations of the past. PMID:20215644

Sacktor, Todd Charlton

2010-01-01

227

Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.  

PubMed

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

2006-10-01

228

The Way Things Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides an introduction to the motion of objects due to gravity. Topics covered include free fall and acceleration due to gravity, with or without an initial velocity, and the effects of air resistance. Simple equations are integrated along with a short experiments related to Galileo's classic ramp experiment. A lesson plan for teachers is provided. This item is part of an extensive collection, "From Stargazers to Starships" that uses space exploration and space science to introduce concepts in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

2009-04-29

229

The Size of Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this hands-on activity, learners begin by estimating the size of each planet in our Solar System and Pluto and making each out of playdough or a similar material. Then, learners follow specific instructions to divide a mass of playdough into the size of each planet and Pluto and compare the actual modeled sizes to the students' own predictions. This activity requires a large amount of playdough material per group of learners. Three pounds is the minimum amount required for each group.

230

Lecture and Lab Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page, created by David Howell of the University of Vermont, is a collection of examples, demonstrations, and exercises that can be used to motivate a lecture, demonstrate an important point, or create a laboratory exercise for students. Topics include the following: descriptives, normal distribution, sampling distributions, probability, Chi-square, t-tests, power, correlation/regression, one-way ANOVA, multiple comparisons, factorial ANOVA, repeated measures, multiple regression, general linear model, log linear models, and distribution-free tests. This is a large collection of materials pertaining to statistics.

Howell, David

2009-08-03

231

Ten Tips about 23 Things  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning 2.0--aka the "23 Things"--is a self-paced online learning program that the author designed in 2006 as a one-person crusade to move an entire organization of 500-plus staff onto the Web 2.0 bandwagon. Along with numerous requests to duplicate the program, many seek insight on how to do this successfully. In this article, the author shares…

Blowers, Helene

2008-01-01

232

Dispossession: The tenacity of things  

E-print Network

or collapsed into fewer. The two most generic motives appear to be (1) instrumentalcontrol or effectance of one's environment and (2) the symbolization of self and others (Belk, 1988;Csikszentmihalyi and Rochberg-Halton, 1981;Furby, 1978; Richins, 1994). Sartre... disbandment in later life." Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, 59B: S265-273. Dispossession: The Tenacity of Things 77 Fromm, E. (1976). To have or to be? New York: Harper & Row. Furby, L. (1978). "Possession: Toward a theory of their meaning...

Ekerdt, David

2009-01-01

233

Comparison of Pb2 accumulation characteristics between live and dead cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aureobasidium pullulans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pb2+ accumulation processes between live and dead cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aureobasidium pullulans are different. In the case of S. cerevisiae, the Pb2+ accumulation capacity of the live cells was higher than that of the dead cells but they showed reversed initial Pb2+ accumulation rates. On the contrary, A. pullulans used a different process due to the existence of

Jung Ho Suh; Jong Won Yun; Dong Seog Kim

1998-01-01

234

'INSPIRED' COPD Outreach ProgramTM: Doing the Right Things Right.  

PubMed

The well-documented gaps between needed and provided care for patients and families living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mandate changes to clinical practice. The multifaceted evidence-based INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM was first implemented in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada in 2010 (INSPIRED = Implementing a Novel and Supportive Program of Individualized care for patients and families living with REspiratory Disease) and undergoes ongoing evaluation. By enhancing patient confidence to manage their illness more effectively in their homes and communities, there has been a sustained and substantial reduction in facility-based care in comparison with patient care experience pre-INSPIRED. Sustaining and spreading a program recently designated a leading practice by Accreditation Canada, and especially modifying the program as new evidence emerges, requires integrating and modeling at the 'bedside' both evidence-based medicine ('doing the right things') and quality improvement ('doing them right'). In Canada, where COPD care gaps are common, a new pan-Canadian INSPIRED-based quality improvement program is supporting multidisciplinary healthcare teams to bridge the chasm between evidence and practice by working together to 'do the right things right' in COPD care. PMID:25282137

Rocker, Graeme M; Verma, Jennifer Y

2014-01-01

235

Adapted by Sharlene Denos from the Genetic Science Learning Center's "How to Extract DNA from Any Living Thing" (http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/units/activities/extraction/)  

E-print Network

the cells, break up the other cellular components like proteins and then precipitate the DNA using alcohol to proceed for at least 12 minutes. 4. Precipitating Your DNA: Now that most of your protein has been chewed the tube. You will need to allow at least 15 minutes for your DNA to precipitate. 5. Making your DNA

Ha, Taekjip

236

The direct and indirect economic costs incurred by living kidney donors—a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Despite the many benefits of living donor kidney transplantation, economic consequences can result for donors. We reviewed studies which quantified the direct and indirect costs incurred by living kidney donors, in order to understand the strengths and limitations of existing literature. Methods. We identified relevant studies in MEDLINE, EMBASE and ECONOLIT bibliographic databases, in the Science Citation Index and

Katherine S. Clarke; Scott Klarenbach; Sorina Vlaicu; Robert C. Yang; Amit X. Garg

2006-01-01

237

Dietary patterns and home food availability during emerging adulthood: do they differ by living situation?  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of the present work was to cross-sectionally examine and compare dietary behaviours and home food environments by young adults’ living situation. Design Using data from Project EAT (Eating Among Teens)-II, a large diverse youth cohort originally sampled in Minnesota, linear regression was used to examine self-reported meal frequency, dietary intake and home food availability outcomes by living situation (i.e. living with parents, renting an apartment/house or living on a college campus). Subjects Young adults (n 1687), mean age 20·5 years. Results Results suggested that young adults living with their parents or in rented apartments/houses had less frequent meals, poorer dietary intake and less healthy home food availability compared with those living on campus. These findings were evident even after controlling for sociodemographic factors (e.g. race/ethnicity, socio-economic status), particularly among females. Conclusions Although few emerging adults consume diets that are consistent with national recommendations, those living with parents and in rented apartments/houses may represent particularly at-risk groups. These differences in dietary factors across living situations appear to exist beyond the sociodemographic differences in these populations. Effective nutrition and healthy eating promotion strategies are needed for young adults. PMID:19691902

Laska, Melissa Nelson; Larson, Nicole I; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary

2010-01-01

238

Humans Really Are Still Evolving, Study Finds By Charles Choi, LiveScience Contributor | LiveScience.com Mon, Apr 30, 2012  

E-print Network

Humans Really Are Still Evolving, Study Finds By Charles Choi, LiveScience Contributor | LiveScience.com ­ Mon, Apr 30, 2012 Natural forces of evolution still continue to shape humanity despite the power we-fit individuals to survive and reproduce. However, since humans radically alter their environments, some

Lummaa, Virpi

239

Monitoring Dynamic Protein Expression in Single Living E. Coli. Bacterial Cells by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) is a novel, nondestructive, and label-free method that can be used to quantitatively measure changes in cellular activity in single living cells. Here, we demonstrate its use to monitor changes in a population of E. coli cells that occur during overexpression of a protein, the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(1-120)) Raman spectra were acquired of individual E. coli cells suspended in solution and trapped by a single tightly focused laser beam. Overexpression of MOG(1-120) in transformed E. coli Rosetta-Gami (DE3)pLysS cells was induced by addition of isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Changes in the peak intensities of the Raman spectra from a population of cells were monitored and analyzed over a total duration of three hours. Data was also collected for concentrated purified MOG(1-120) protein in solution, and the spectra compared with that obtained for the MOG(1-120) expressing cells. Raman spectra of individual, living E. coli cells exhibit signatures due to DNA and protein molecular vibrations. Characteristic Raman markers associated with protein vibrations, such as 1257 cm{sup -1}, 1340 cm{sup -1}, 1453 cm{sup -1} and 1660 cm{sup -1}, are shown to increase as a function of time following the addition of IPTG. Comparison of these spectra and the spectra of purified MOG protein indicates that the changes are predominantly due to the induction of MOG protein expression. Protein expression was found to occur mostly within the second hour, with a 470% increase relative to the protein expressed in the first hour. A 230% relative increase between the second and third hour indicates that protein expression begins to level off within the third hour. It is demonstrated that LTRS has sufficient sensitivity for real-time, nondestructive, and quantitative monitoring of biological processes, such as protein expression, in single living cells. Such capabilities, which are not currently available in flow cytometry, open up new possibilities for analyzing cellular processes occurring in single microbial and eukaryotic cells.

Chan, J W; Winhold, H; Corzett, M H; Ulloa, J M; Cosman, M; Balhorn, R; Huser, T

2007-01-09

240

The Effect of Household Characteristics on Living Standards in South Africa 1993 - 98: A Quantile Regression Analysis with Sample Attrition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines whether the dismantling of apartheid has resulted in the improvement in the standard of living for the vast majority of South Africans. The study is based on a panel data set from the Kwazulu-Natal province. Despite the best efforts of the interview team, the attrition rate in this panel is around 16%. We find that household income

Farshid Vahid; Pushkar Maitra

2005-01-01

241

A diffusion-consumption problem for oxygen in a living tissue perfused by capillaries  

E-print Network

A diffusion-consumption problem for oxygen in a living tissue perfused by capillaries Andro Mikeli Villeurbanne Cedex FRANCE e-mail: Andro.Mikelic@univ-lyon1.fr Mario Primicerio Dipartimento di Matematica

Primicerio, Mario

242

Direct analysis of large living organism by megavolt electrostatic ionization mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

A new ambient ionization method allowing the direct chemical analysis of living human body by mass spectrometry (MS) was developed. This MS method, namely Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry, is based on electrostatic charging of a living individual to megavolt (MV) potential, illicit drugs, and explosives on skin/glove, flammable solvent on cloth/tissue paper, and volatile food substances in breath were readily ionized and detected by a mass spectrometer. PMID:24924518

Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tang, Ho-Wai; Man, Sin-Heng; Mak, Pui-Yuk; Choi, Yi-Ching; Wong, Melody Yee-Man

2014-09-01

243

Direct Analysis of Large Living Organism by Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new ambient ionization method allowing the direct chemical analysis of living human body by mass spectrometry (MS) was developed. This MS method, namely Megavolt Electrostatic Ionization Mass Spectrometry, is based on electrostatic charging of a living individual to megavolt (MV) potential, illicit drugs, and explosives on skin/glove, flammable solvent on cloth/tissue paper, and volatile food substances in breath were readily ionized and detected by a mass spectrometer.

Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tang, Ho-Wai; Man, Sin-Heng; Mak, Pui-Yuk; Choi, Yi-Ching; Wong, Melody Yee-Man

2014-09-01

244

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-print Network

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01

245

Selection to postmenopausal therapy by women's characteristics.  

PubMed

Many surveys have shown that women using postmenopausal hormone therapy have a lower incidence of cardiovascular diseases and lower overall mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare past and non-users with current users of hormone therapy in regard to characteristics known to, or assumed to, predict poor subsequent health (indicators). The main data source was a survey in 1989 of a random sample (n = 2000, 86% response rate) of 45-64 year-old Finnish women. Among women with their uterus, after adjusting for age and urbanism, of the 21 indicators studied, 10 suggested a poorer and none a better health prognosis for the non-users than for current users. Many differences were greater among older women, suggesting a cohort effect or long-term users being an especially selected group. Among hysterectomized women, differences between users and non-users were similar or smaller than among women with uteri. The past users were more similar to non-users than current users. Our study suggests that women with a better health prognosis are selected or select themselves for hormone therapy, and that may impede interpretation of observational studies on hormone therapy and health. PMID:8455045

Hemminki, E; Malin, M; Topo, P

1993-03-01

246

10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whether writing a blog entry or a high-stakes test essay, fiction or nonfiction, short story or argumentation, students need to know certain things in order to write effectively. In 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know, Jeff Anderson focuses on developing the concepts and application of ten essential aspects of good writing--motion, models, focus,…

Anderson, Jeff

2011-01-01

247

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) can double the resolution of the wide-field fluorescence microscope, but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed SIM that is capable of 100 nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time frames. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in living Drosophila S2 cells in the total internal reflection (TIRF) mode.

Chhun, Bryant B.

248

Parkinson's Disease: To Live or Die by Autophagy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal survival continues to be the subject of intensive research efforts as the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases rises. Amid a complex mélange of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to disease manifestation, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the underlying signaling mechanisms that regulate neuronal survival. A recent study by Yang et al. sheds new light on an intracellular quality-control system that regulates the constitutive abundance of a neuronal survival factor through chaperone-mediated autophagy and links the deregulation of this pathway to Parkinson’s disease. Although the primary function of autophagy in most cell types has commonly been thought to be an adaptive response to starvation, it has been proposed that proper functioning of this system is essential for neuronal survival and that its deregulation leads to neurodegeneration.

Isabella Irrcher (University of Ottawa;Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine REV); David S. Park (University of Ottawa;Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine REV)

2009-04-07

249

From Cork to Budapest by Skype: living and dying.  

PubMed

Effective communication is a prerequisite to the delivery of good palliative care. The increasing use of web-based technologies and social media challenges us to reassess traditional communication styles and to define appropriate applications of evolving technologies. The use of Skype, blogging and webcams by patients in our hospitals and hospices is increasing. As illustrated in this case, the availability of such technology enables patients and families to communicate across wide geographical boundaries. This has particular advantages in situations where family members cannot routinely attend at the hospital because of other commitments or distance. The authors report on the varying use of Skype video-telephony over the course of a cancer patient's illness from the initial treatment phase through to the final days and hours of life. The benefits and challenges of using such technologies in a hospital setting and particularly in end-of-life circumstances are discussed. PMID:24654060

Battley, Jodie E; Balding, Lucy; Gilligan, Oonagh; O'Connell, Catherine; O'Brien, Tony

2012-06-01

250

A scheme of data management in the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things is a large network which integrates the current devices, such as RFID devices, sensors and other equipment and services. It extends the form of interaction between people to the interaction between people and things as well as things and things, and then, establishes a new ecological environment. In the Internet of Things, the heterogeneity of devices

Tongrang Fan; Yanzhao Chen

2010-01-01

251

Searching in a Web-based Infrastructure for Smart Things  

E-print Network

: Web technologies for application-layer interoperability of smart things Thing + Internet connection3. Hierarchy on the left) Conclusions Application of REST patterns in the design of an Internet of Things. From the Internet of Things to the Web of Things: Resource Oriented Architecture and Best Practices

252

Mapping Biological Behaviors by Application of Longer-Lived Positron Emitting Radionuclides  

PubMed Central

With the technological development of positron emission tomography (PET) and the advent of novel antibody-directed drug delivery systems, longer-lived positron-emitting radionuclides are moving to the forefront to take important roles in tracking the distribution of biotherapeutics such as antibodies, and for monitoring biological processes and responses. Longer half-life radionuclides possess advantages of convenient on-site preparation procedures for both clinical and non-clinical applications. The suitability of the long half-life radionuclides for imaging intact monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their respective fragments, which have inherently long biological half-lives, has attracted increased interest in recent years. In this review, we provide a survey of the recent literature as it applies to the development of nine-selected longer-lived positron emitters with half-lives of 9–140 hours (e.g., 124I, 64Cu, 86Y and 89Zr), and describe the biological behaviors of radionuclide-labeled mAbs with respect to distribution and targeting characteristics, potential toxicities, biological applications, and clinical translation potentials. PMID:23123291

Zhou, Yang; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

2012-01-01

253

A Highly Specific Probe for Sensing Hydrogen Sulfide in Live Cells Based on Copper-Initiated Fluorogen with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics  

PubMed Central

Here we reported the first fluorescent probe with aggregation-induced emission characteristics, namely AIE-S, for the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in live cells. The detection system is selective for complicated biological application and the response is fast enough to complete within seconds. Moreover, the probe exhibits the unique advantage of being immune to aggregation-caused quenching which is a detrimental phenomenon limiting the application of most current available H2S fluorescent probes. The detection mechanism was investigated and postulated to be S2- initiated de-coordination and thereafter aggregation of the AIE-S complex.

Li, Xin; Yang, Chengyu; Wu, Kai; Hu, Yongzhou; Han, Yifeng; Liang, Steven H.

2014-01-01

254

Power Scores Estimated by Item Characteristic Curves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method for estimating power scores is described. By way of illustration, it is applied to 21 students who were improperly timed on a standard test. Some empirical results are given in support of the estimation procedure. (Author)

Lord, Frederic M.

255

We live in a software jungle. Software helps run our cars, manage our money, plan our sched-  

E-print Network

insights haven't al- ways been an easy sell to computer scientists, who don't design systems to act like living things and typically don't have degrees in biolo- gy. It's easier for someone like me to make learned how to make connec- Biology Can Help Us Tame the Digital Beast by Stephanie Forrest | Santa Fe New

Forrest, Stephanie

256

Family Living and Personal Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for various projects for Family Living and Personal Living classes. FAMILY LIVING Wayne County Clerk - Marriage License The Knot Martha Stewart Weddings *Travel Planning Sites* Northwest Airlines Amtrak Travelocity Spirit Air Orbitz PERSONAL LIVING (and Parenting): *Alcohol Research* Alcohol and Public Health - CDC MedlinePlus: Alcoholism NIAAA National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism *Birth Control* Health and Wellness Resource Center - - start at this site by typing Birth Control in the search bar on the right of the screen and select "full text articles" and consumer heatlh. It will list a range of birth ...

Schultz, Ms.

2007-11-05

257

An Autonomic-oriented Architecture for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic tags, usually referred as RFIDs, sensors, wireless VoIP terminals are likely to create a technological and cultural revolution similar to the one initiated by the Internet technology in the early nineties. These very cheap components are manufactured by billions, and are going to be inserted in quite all our everyday objects. Internet of things is a paradigm dealing with

Guy Pujolle

2006-01-01

258

Some of the things that adults learn about language,  

E-print Network

Abstract Some of the things that adults learn about language, and about the world, are very), or that the letters st are sometimes followed by r but never by x, and so forth. Other aspects of what we know about- plications for language learning, Saffran, Aslin, and Newport (1996) found that 8-month-old infants

Marcus, Gary F.

259

Cross-protective Immunity Against Leptospirosis Elicited by a Live, Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide Mutant  

PubMed Central

Background. Leptospira species cause leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease found worldwide. Current vaccines against leptospirosis provide protection only against closely related serovars. Methods. We evaluated an attenuated transposon mutant of Leptospira interrogans serovar Manilae (M1352, defective in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis) as a live vaccine against leptospirosis. Hamsters received a single dose of vaccine and were challenged with the homologous serovar (Manilae) and a serologically unrelated heterologous serovar (Pomona). Comparisons were made with killed vaccines. Potential cross-protective antigens against leptospirosis were investigated. Results. Live M1352 vaccine induced superior protection in hamsters against homologous challenge. The live vaccine also stimulated cross-protection against heterologous challenge, with 100% survival (live M1352) versus 40% survival (killed vaccine). Hamsters receiving either vaccine responded to the dominant membrane proteins LipL32 and LipL41. Hamsters receiving the live vaccine additionally recognized LA3961/OmpL36 (unknown function), Loa22 (OmpA family protein, recognized virulence factor), LA2372 (general secretory protein G), and LA1939 (hypothetical protein). Manilae LigA was recognized by M1352 vaccinates, whereas LipL36 was detected in Pomona. Conclusion. This study demonstrated that a live, attenuated vaccine can stimulate cross-protective immunity to L. interrogans and has identified antigens that potentially confer cross-protection against leptospirosis. PMID:21220775

Srikram, Amporn; Zhang, Kunkun; Bartpho, Thanatchaporn; Lo, Miranda; Hoke, David E.; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Adler, Ben

2011-01-01

260

First and second things, and the operations of conscience in science.  

PubMed

Why is modern science less efficient than it used to be, why has revolutionary science declined, and why has science become so dishonest? One plausible explanation behind these observations comes from an essay First and second things published by CS Lewis. First Things are the goals that are given priority as the primary and ultimate aim in life. Second Things are subordinate goals or aims - which are justified in terms of the extent to which they assist in pursuing First Things. The classic First Thing in human society is some kind of religious or philosophical world view. Lewis regarded it as a 'universal law' that the pursuit of a Second Thing as if it was a First Thing led inevitably to the loss of that Second Thing: 'You can't get second things by putting them first; you can get second things only by putting first things first'. I would argue that the pursuit of science as a primary value will lead to the loss of science, because science is properly a Second Thing. Because when science is conceptualized as a First Thing the bottom-line or operational definition of 'correct behaviour' is approval and high status within the scientific community. However, this does nothing whatsoever to prevent science drifting-away from its proper function; and once science has drifted then the prevailing peer consensus will tend to maintain this state of corruption. I am saying that science is a Second Thing, and ought to be subordinate to the First Thing of transcendental truth. Truth impinges on scientific practice in the form of individual conscience (noting that, of course, the strength and validity of conscience varies between scientists). When the senior scientists, whose role is to uphold standards, fail to posses or respond-to informed conscience, science will inevitably go rotten from the head downwards. What, then, motivates a scientist to act upon conscience? I believe it requires a fundamental conviction of the reality and importance of truth as an essential part of the basic purpose and meaning of life. Without some such bedrock moral underpinning, there is little possibility that individual scientific conscience would ever have a chance of holding-out against an insidious drift toward corruption enforced by peer consensus. PMID:19733980

Charlton, Bruce G

2010-01-01

261

Injuries by chicken bills: characteristic wound morphology.  

PubMed

A 90-year-old woman, hampered in walking, was found dangerously wounded in a farm next to a chicken yard. On the occasion of forensic clinical investigation in hospital we found hematomas and many peculiar injuries of the epidermis and some defects even reaching the extremities of the subcutis and fascia. After experimental investigations we could show that these injuries were caused by the bills of chickens. PMID:1783335

Roll, P; Rous, F

1991-12-01

262

Precision ECM by Process Characteristic Modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrochemical machining (ECM), which is not normally considered as a precision process, is used to achieve accuracy better than 5 urn and surface finish 0.03 ?m Ra by using pulsed power of relatively short durations (1–10 ms) and narrow inter-electrode gaps (10–50 ?m). The narrow gaps, however, make the control and prediction of the process much more complex than normal

A. K. M. De Silva; H. S. J. Altena; J. A. McGeough

2000-01-01

263

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tuttle: The Presence of Simple Things, an interactive website from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), introduces visitors to the art of Richard Tuttle, using video of Tuttle at work and commentary by the artist and SFMOMA curators, as well as images and sound. For example, one of the movies shows Tuttle working on one of his Wire Pieces, which are assembled from scratch each time they are installed in a gallery; Tuttle draws on the gallery wall, and traces the lines with florists' wire. The Web exhibition feature is strong on process, but may leave some visitors wishing to see more of Tuttle's finished art. For them, there is the 388-page illustrated catalogue, and "The Art of Richard Tuttle," on view at SFMOMA through October 16, 2005, featuring 300 paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from the artist's 40-year career.

2005-01-01

264

The process of a group intervention for caregivers of demented persons living at home: Conceptual framework, components, and characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most earlier group interventions for caregivers of demented persons lacked a theoretical basis to guide the intervention process and focused on providing information and practical advice and encouraging the expression of feelings. This article presents the process of a group intervention with emphasis on its conceptual framework, components and characteristics. As caregivers are exposed to numerous daily stressful demands, the

L. Lévesque; C. Gendron; J. Vézina; R. Hébert; F. Ducharme; J.-P. Lavoie; M. Gendron; L. Voyer; M. Préville

2002-01-01

265

Characteristics of gravity waves resolved by ECMWF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global model data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are analyzed for resolved gravity waves (GWs). Based on fitted 3-D wave vectors of individual waves and using the ECMWF global scale background fields, backward ray tracing from 25 km altitude is performed. Different sources such as orography, convection and winter storms are identified. It is found that due to oblique propagation waves spread widely from narrow source regions. Gravity waves which originate from regions of strong convection are frequently excited around the tropopause and have in the ECMWF model low phase and group velocities as well as very long horizontal wavelengths compared to other models and to measurements. While the total amount of momentum flux for convective GWs changes little over season, GWs generated by storms and mountain waves show large day-to-day variability, which has a strong influence also on total hemispheric fluxes; from one day to the next the total hemispheric flux may increase by a factor of 3. Implications of these results for using the ECMWF model in predicting, analyzing and interpreting global GW distributions as well as implications for seamless climate prediction are discussed.

Preusse, P.; Ern, M.; Bechtold, P.; Eckermann, S. D.; Kalisch, S.; Trinh, Q. T.; Riese, M.

2014-10-01

266

Skin characteristics by laser generated surface waves.  

PubMed

This paper discusses a study into the suitability of using laser generated surface acoustic waves for the characterisation of skin properties without causing any damage to the skin thermally or by mechanical disruption. Using commercial Finite Element Code ANSYS, the effects of laser wavelength, laser beam radius and laser rise time on generation of laser generated ultrasonic waves in a 3-layered elastic isotropic model of human skin were studied. The FE model is an example of a sequential coupled field analysis where the thermal and mechanical analyses are treated separately. The heating of the skin model due to the short laser pulse is simulated by a dynamic thermal analysis with the laser pulse modeled as volumetric heat generation and the results from this analysis subsequently applied as a load in the mechanical analysis where the out-of-plane displacement histories are analyzed. The technique described in this paper also involves measuring the propagation velocity of SAWs, which are directly related to the material properties, and thickness of layers, this is done over a wide frequency range in order to obtain maximum information regarding the material under test. PMID:19963810

Huang, Zhihong; L'Etang, Adèle

2009-01-01

267

Impact of support services provided by a community-based AIDS service organization on persons living with HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

This study examined demographic, health-related, social support, and service utilization characteristics of clients with high and low use of a community-based AIDS service organization in Canada. The study confirmed that the organizations' services were reaching the most vulnerable persons living with HIV/AIDS. It found that a significantly greater number of high users compared with low users were single, lived alone, and reported poorer health. The similarity in functional health status and depression between user groups, despite high users' poorer health and greater social vulnerability, supports client reports that services have reduced client isolation and improved health-related quality of life. Finally, high users had lower expenditures for government-provided health and social services overall, particularly HIV specialists and AIDS medication, but significantly more expenditures for emergency room services and complementary therapies. The results suggest community-based services can enhance health-related quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS by increasing providers' capacity to identify and address client depression and its consequences. PMID:16435529

Crook, Joan; Browne, Gina; Roberts, Jacqueline; Gafni, Amiram

2005-01-01

268

Putting Thought in Accordance with Things: The Demise of Animal-Based Analogies for Plant Functions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advances six practical suggestions in transpiration whereby teachers can support students in their struggle to put their thoughts, especially everyday mental models, in accordance with classroom experimental evidence. Discusses the wider implications for how to teach about living things and how to view the status of analogies in science generally.…

Barker, Miles

2002-01-01

269

Teacher's Resource Book. Small Things. Grade 5. Revised. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document introduces fifth-grade children to the microscopic world, to the instruments needed to make it accessible, and to the appearance and structure of cells in nonliving as well as living things. Aims of the unit include providing children with an instrument which extends their senses in a radical manner, and leading them in using this…

Anchorage School District, AK.

270

How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life, 3rd Edition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This book is an unconventional introduction to physics and science that starts with whole objects and looks inside them to see what makes them work. It's written for students who seek a connection between science and the world in which they live. How Things Work brings science to the reader rather than the reverse. Like the course in which it

Louis A. Bloomfield

2005-01-01

271

Novel macromolecular architectures by living cationic polymerization: Synthetic approach toward heteroarm star-block copolymers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The living coupling reaction of living polyisobutylene (PIB), prepared by the 2-chloro-2,4,4-trimethylpentane/TiCl4/2,6-di-tert -butylpyridine/hexane:CH3Cl (60:40, v:v)/--80°C system, has been studied using 1,3-bis(1-phenylethenyl)benzene (MDDPE), 2,2-bis[4-(1-phenylethenyl)phenyl]propane (BDPEP), and 2,2-bis[4-(1-tolylethenyl)phenyl] propane (BDTEP) as coupling agents. The reaction of living PIB with MDDPE yielded the monoadduct due to the decreased reactivity of the second double bond upon monoaddition. Using BDPEP and BDTEP, which have two 1,1-diphenylethylene (DPE) units separated by an electron-donating spacer group, rapid and quantitative coupling was achieved. Kinetic studies by 1H NMR spectroscopy indicated the coupling reaction of living PIB by BDPEP is a consecutive reaction where the second addition is faster than the first one. By kinetic treatment of the experimental results, it was found that the second addition is about 5 times faster than the first one. On the basis of this living coupling reaction, amphiphilic A2B2 star-block copolymers (A = PIB and B = poly(methyl vinyl ether)) have been prepared. The living coupling reaction of living PIB was carried out using BDTEP as a living coupling agent, and this was followed by the chain-ramification polymerization of methyl vinyl ether (MeVE) at the junction of the living coupled PIB. By fractionation of the crude A2 B2 star-block copolymer, the purity of the crude A2 B2 star-block copolymer was calculated to be ˜94%. Two Tgs (-60 and -20°C) were observed for the star-block copolymer by DSC indicating the presence of the microphase separation. An A2B2 star-block copolymer with 80 wt% PMeVE composition ((IB45)2-s-(MeVE170) 2) exhibited a critical micelle concentration (cmc) of 4.25 x 10-4 M in water, which is an order of magnitude higher than cmcs obtained with linear-diblock copolymers with same total Mn and composition (IB90-b-MeVE 340) or with same segmental lengths (IB45-b-MeVE 170). This suggests that block copolymers with star architectures exhibit less tendency to micellization than their corresponding linear diblock copolymers. Average particle sizes in aqueous solution above the cmcs were measured to be from 41 to 177 nm, depending on the architecture and/or the molecular weight. Taking advantage of the monoaddition reaction of living PIB to double-DPEs, such as MDDPE or 1,4-bis(1-phenylethenyl)benzene (PDDPE), PIB macromonomers with terminal-DPE functionality have been prepared. The addition reaction of living PIB to 2 equiv of MDDPE resulted in the predominant formation of the monoadduct with negligible but detectable amounts (˜3%) of the diadduct. When 4 equiv of MDDPE was used, the diadduct was virtually absent and the product exhibited ˜100% DPE functionality. The addition reaction of living PIB to 2 equiv of PDDPE resulted in a rapid and quantitative formation of PIB-DPE macromonomer without the formation of the coupled product. Kinetic studies using fiber-optic visible spectroscopy indicated that PDDPE is ˜2.5 times more reactive than MDDPE towards living PIB.

Bae, Young Cheol

272

Getting Things Done Key to Utilization of People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are 16 practical rules based upon the experiences of successful managers that can help executives get more things accomplished by their subordinates. The rules include: delegate responsibility, acknowledge good work, schedule work breaks, encourage suggestions, and handle grievances promptly. (JMD)

Pollok, Ted

1979-01-01

273

Submitted to the Bernoulli Some things we've learned  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Bernoulli Some things we've learned (about Markov chain Monte Carlo) PERSI chains. 1. Introduction Simulation, especially Markov chain Monte Carlo, is close to putting elementary scheme where a deck of cards is slid around on the table by two hands. How long should the sliding go

Diaconis, Persi

274

Connected objects and the Internet of things — A paradigm shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging and future network requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) or Connected Objects (CO) cannot be met by the networks and solutions we envisage today. The vision of IoT includes millions of objects that interact with the network using a plethora of applications. Some of these objects will require little attention and will generate little traffic, while on the

E. Zouganeli; I. E. Svinnset

2009-01-01

275

Architectural Solutions for Mobile RFID Services for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile RFID services for Internet of Things can be created by using RFID as an enabling technology on mobile devices. Humans, devices and things are the content providers and users of these services. Mobile RFID services can be provided either on mobile devices as stand-alone services or combining with end- to-end systems. When different service solutions are considered, there are

Martin Peter Michael; Mohsen Darianian

2008-01-01

276

What sort of a thing is a religion? A view from object-relations theory.  

PubMed

This paper suggests that a religion is not, as Freud proposed, a science-like thing, refutable by evidence. It is a socially constructed and maintained system of internal objects, analogous to those spoken of in psychoanalysis. Like analytic internal objects, religious objects have a heuristic function but no material existence. Unlike analytic objects, they are derived from a definite cultural tradition and are elaborated over time to meet the experience of practitioners. They may be understood to have a function of 'containing' the feelings, thoughts and fantasies arising in individual practitioners, and of making these experiences comprehensible. These objects then enable the believer to speak more truthfully of, and relate more fully to, the larger matrix within which the human world is situated. Finally, the suggestion is made that, as with analytic internal objects, religious objects may best be judged by their long-term effects on the lives of believers. PMID:8344777

Black, D M

1993-06-01

277

Increased Surface Fatigue Lives of Spur Gears by Application of a Coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hard coatings have potential for increasing gear surface fatigue lives. Experiments were conducted using gears both with and without a metal-containing, carbonbased coating. The gears were case-carburized AISI 9310 steel spur gears. Some gears were provided with the coating by magnetron sputtering. Lives were evaluated by accelerated life tests. For uncoated gears, all of fifteen tests resulted in fatigue failure before completing 275 million revolutions. For coated gears, eleven of the fourteen tests were suspended with no fatigue failure after 275 million revolutions. The improved life owing to the coating, approximately a six-fold increase, was a statistically significant result.

Krantz, Timothy L.; Cooper, Clark V.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Hansen, Bruce D.

2003-01-01

278

Morgantown Cost of Living Exceeds National Average By Eric Bowen, Research Associate  

E-print Network

the national average in the expenditure categories of groceries, utilities, transportation, and health care and by Category Composite index Groceries Housing Utilities Transportation Health Care Misc. Morgantown, WV 105, transportation, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. #12;2 Cost of Living by Expenditure Category

Mohaghegh, Shahab

279

Remembering Camp Dreamcatcher: Art Therapy with Children Whose Lives Have Been Touched by HIV/AIDS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Society calls upon art therapists to meet the needs of troubled community members. This article describes one art therapist?s experience of "giving back" to the community by volunteering to provide art therapy at a therapeutic camp for children whose lives have been touched by HIV/AIDS. Some of the medical, social, and psychological issues…

Hrenko, Kathy D.

2005-01-01

280

A Sourcebook for Energy and the Way We Live. Courses by Newspaper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guide presents teaching suggestions and lists resources to be used with the twelfth Course by Newspaper, "Energy and the Way We Live." Courses by Newspaper is a program presenting college-level courses to the public through the cooperation of newspapers and participating colleges. Other components of this course are the Article Booklet (SO 012…

Elwood, Ann

281

Making Things Right: Tales of Redemption.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the theme of redemption and examines characters who try to make things right in literature and film. Reviews six books and two films and suggests creative activities for middle school students that tie in with the works cited. (LRW)

Zingher, Gary

2001-01-01

282

Identities in the Future Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are two problem areas of the current Internet to be solved in Future Internet scenarios—security and putting the user\\u000a back in control despite the move to the Internet of things. With this in mind, we address problems associated with the diversifying\\u000a of the Internet towards an Internet of things, and with increased ways to be reachable, whether the user

Amardeo C. Sarma; João Girão

2009-01-01

283

Future internet: The Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, the main communication form on the Internet is human-human. But it is foreseeable that in a near soon that any object will have a unique way of identification and can be addressed so that every object can be connected. The Internet will become to the Internet of Things. The communicate forms will expand from human-human to human-human, human-thing and

Lu Tan; Neng Wang

2010-01-01

284

Financial characteristics of hospitals purchased by investor-owned chains.  

PubMed

This article focuses on the preacquisition financial condition of not-for-profit hospitals acquired by investor-owned hospital chains. Financial ratios are used to determine if not-for-profit hospitals acquired by investor-owned hospital systems have common financial characteristics which make them a likely target for a takeover. The results indicate that during the time period studied, investor-owned hospital systems did tend to purchase hospitals with common financial characteristics and that these characteristics provide a reasonable description of a financially distressed hospital. This finding has important consequences for our health care delivery system. PMID:3771232

McCue, M J; Furst, R W

1986-10-01

285

‘All those things together made me retire’: qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees  

PubMed Central

Background Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. Methods A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60–64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). Results For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement (‘push factors’), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement (‘pull factors’) included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. Conclusion To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and the abilities and wishes of the employee on the other hand. Alongside improvements in the work environment that enable and motivate employees to prolong their careers, a continuous dialogue between the employer and employee on the (future) person-job fit and tailored interventions might be helpful. PMID:23714371

2013-01-01

286

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... of residences participating in the research have lower fees and half have higher fees. The rental rate includes the base rent and service fees charged by the assisted living community. While 86. ...

287

Compartmental genomics in living cells revealed by single-cell nanobiopsy.  

PubMed

The ability to study the molecular biology of living single cells in heterogeneous cell populations is essential for next generation analysis of cellular circuitry and function. Here, we developed a single-cell nanobiopsy platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) for continuous sampling of intracellular content from individual cells. The nanobiopsy platform uses electrowetting within a nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular milieu. We demonstrate the subcellular resolution of the nanobiopsy platform by isolating small subpopulations of mitochondria from single living cells, and quantify mutant mitochondrial genomes in those single cells with high throughput sequencing technology. These findings may provide the foundation for dynamic subcellular genomic analysis. PMID:24279711

Actis, Paolo; Maalouf, Michelle M; Kim, Hyunsung John; Lohith, Akshar; Vilozny, Boaz; Seger, R Adam; Pourmand, Nader

2014-01-28

288

Live-cell imaging of alkyne-tagged small biomolecules by stimulated Raman scattering  

PubMed Central

Functional small biomolecules play indispensable roles inside cells. However, sensitive and specific visualization of these molecules in living systems has proven to be highly challenging. Herein, we report stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne tags as a general strategy for studying a broad spectrum of small biomolecules in live cells and animals. We demonstrate this technique by tracking alkyne-bearing drugs in mouse tissues, and visualizing de novo synthesis of DNA, RNA, proteomes, phospholipids and triglycerides, respectively, through metabolic incorporation of alkyne-tagged small precursors. PMID:24584195

Wei, Lu; Hu, Fanghao; Shen, Yihui; Chen, Zhixing; Yu, Yong; Lin, Chih-Chun; Wang, Meng C.; Min, Wei

2014-01-01

289

Jonmal ofExperimentalPsychology:General Copyright 1998by theAmerican PsychologicalAssociation, Inc. 1998,Vol. 127,No. 2, 107-140 0096-3445/98/$3.00  

E-print Network

and categorization are described in terms of definitional rules. For example, if a living thing has a wide, fiat tail and constructs dams by cutting down trees with its teeth, then it is a beaver. Wittgenstein (1953) noted

Kruschke, John K.

290

Orca Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The brainchild of orca biologist Dr. Paul Spong, this Nature Network Web site aims to "relay live sound and images of the orcas in the natural environment of Hanson Island," near Vancouver Island, Canada. Live sound and image feeds are available at 56K and 300K connections, and, by completing a simple registration, visitors will be alerted via email whenever orcas are near the cameras and mikes. Click on Highlights 2000 to see and hear past Web casts of orcas activity. This Web site links to others that relay live images and sounds from animals located around the world.

291

The influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure on the overall health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background There remains limited evidence on how armed conflict affects overall physical and mental well-being rather than specific physical or mental health conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on general physical and mental health in Southern Sudan which is emerging from 20 years of armed conflict. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1228 adults was conducted in November 2007 in the town of Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to investigate the associations and relative influence of variables in three models of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and trauma exposure, on general physical and mental health status. These models were run separately and also as a combined model. Data quality and the internal consistency of the health status instrument (SF-8) were assessed. Results The variables in the multivariate analysis (combined model) with negative coefficients of association with general physical health and mental health (i.e. worse health), respectively, were being female (coef. -2.47; -2.63), higher age (coef.-0.16; -0.17), absence of soap in the household (physical health coef. -2.24), and experiencing within the past 12 months a lack of food and/or water (coef. -1.46; -2.27) and lack of medical care (coef.-3.51; -3.17). A number of trauma variables and cumulative exposure to trauma showed an association with physical and mental health (see main text for data). There was limited variance in results when each of the three models were run separately and when they were combined, suggesting the pervasive influence of these variables. The SF-8 showed good data quality and internal consistency. Conclusions This study provides evidence on the pervasive influence of demographic characteristics, living conditions, and violent and traumatic events on the general physical and mental health of a conflict-affected population in Southern Sudan, and highlights the importance of addressing all these influences on overall health. PMID:20799956

2010-01-01

292

Musical Meaning in the Lives of Those Affected by the Holocaust: Implications for Music Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study investigated the role of music in the lives of those affected by the Holocaust. Participants were identified through purposeful and snowball sampling techniques, and a total of five were selected based on their connection to the Holocaust. Participants included those incarcerated in camps and ghettos, those who escaped…

Cunningham, Deborah A.

2014-01-01

293

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech Laurent Canera,  

E-print Network

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter Laurent Canera, 35392 Giessen, Germany Abstract We investigated the nitrogen source for main taxa of soil fauna in two beech forests of contrasted humus type using 15 N-labelled beech litter and 15 N analysis of soil fauna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

294

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter  

E-print Network

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter Laurent CANER the nitrogen source for main taxa of soil fauna in two beech forests of contrasted humus type using 15 N. Variation of nitrogen stable isotope ratios (13 C, 15 N) in soil animals recently appeared as a new

295

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech Laurent Canera,a,  

E-print Network

Origin of the nitrogen assimilated by soil fauna living in decomposing beech litter Laurent Canera, 35392 Giessen, Germany Abstract We investigated the nitrogen source for main taxa of soil fauna in two beech forests of contrasted humus type using 15 N-labelled beech litter and 15 N analysis of soil fauna

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

296

25 CFR 243.9 - Who may inherit live Alaskan reindeer and by what means?  

...INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE REINDEER IN ALASKA § 243.9 Who may inherit live Alaskan...43 CFR 4.270 may be exercised by the Alaska Regional Director or his designee. ...ownership of the reindeer to one or more Alaska Native family members or other...

2014-04-01

297

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting 101 Prepared by the HLS Green Team and Green Living Program, updated February 2011.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 What is Compost? Compost is the product of a biological process

Wolfe, Patrick J.

298

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011  

E-print Network

Composting at HLS Brought to you by the Green Team and Green Living Program February 2011 Americans.5% was composted. The environmental effect of NOT trashing this mass would be equivalent to removing 5.8 million cars from the road. (www.epa.gov)1 Compost Basics Why Compost? 1 Emissions avoidance from compost

Wolfe, Patrick J.

299

CIGNA Living Benefits Helping employees cope with the financial burdens caused by an unexpected illness.  

E-print Network

with robust health coverage. Consider these facts: The average cost of care for a patient up to 90 days afterCIGNA Living Benefits Helping employees cope with the financial burdens caused by an unexpected advances. But the increase in medical costs can have a serious financial impact, even for individuals

Hutcheon, James M.

300

Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging and correlated  

E-print Network

Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging apparatus. This or- ganelle disassembles at the onset of mitosis and, after a sequence of poorly understood during mitosis remains unclear, partly due to limitations of molecular markers and the resolution

Tsien, Roger Y.

301

Teaching-Learning Process by Synchronic Communication Tools: The Elluminate Live Case  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When integrating a new online tool in university educational system, it is necessary to know its features, applications and functions in depth, advantages and disadvantages, and the results obtained when it has been used by other educational institutions. Synchronous communication tool, "Elluminate Live" can be integrated into a virtual platform…

Santovena-Casal, Sonia Ma

2012-01-01

302

pubs.acs.org/Langmuir Deposition of Coatings from Live Yeast Cells and Large Particles by  

E-print Network

of particle types have been deposited by this method, including colloidal latex,1-6 gold nanoparticles,7pubs.acs.org/Langmuir Deposition of Coatings from Live Yeast Cells and Large Particles for the rapid deposition of uniform, close-packed coatings of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells onto glass

Velev, Orlin D.

303

Measurement of Local Viscoelasticity and Forces in Living Cells by Magnetic Tweezers  

E-print Network

Measurement of Local Viscoelasticity and Forces in Living Cells by Magnetic Tweezers Andreas R measured the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm of J774 macrophages with a recently developed circuit, we measured the shear elastic modulus, the effective viscosities, and the strain relaxation time

Bausch, Andreas

304

PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION BY FREE-LIVING ORGANISMS: APPLICATIONS OF A SIGMOIDAL MODEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accumulation of contaminants by free-living organisms has traditionally been de- termined with permutations of the deterministic model: Ct = Ce(1 - e -kt). However, studies uti- lizing a variety of species and exposure scenarios now suggest that significant deviations may occur from this classic form. In many cases noted to date, these deviations have involved a sigmoidal pat- tern

I. Lehr Brisbin; Michael C. Newman; Susan G. McDowell; Eric L. Peters

1990-01-01

305

Dry amyloid fibril assembly in a yeast prion peptide is mediated by long-lived structures  

E-print Network

Dry amyloid fibril assembly in a yeast prion peptide is mediated by long-lived structures sequences using two amyloidogenic peptides, one a polar sequence from the N terminus of the yeast prion Sup interface formation characterizes protofilament assembly in the yeast prions. Indeed, as the two sheets

Thirumalai, Devarajan

306

Living Longer, Living Better  

E-print Network

Living Longer, Living Better ­ Functional Longevity Our mission is to promote long, healthy.azgec.arizona.edu - Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics: www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu - UA Studies on Aging Program with conference planning; provide technical support, including needs assessment and evaluation; and offer monthly

Arizona, University of

307

Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena.

Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

308

Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction.  

PubMed

Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

309

Imaging live cell in micro-liquid enclosure by X-ray laser diffraction  

PubMed Central

Emerging X-ray free-electron lasers with femtosecond pulse duration enable single-shot snapshot imaging almost free from sample damage by outrunning major radiation damage processes. In bioimaging, it is essential to keep the sample close to its natural state. Conventional high-resolution imaging, however, suffers from severe radiation damage that hinders live cell imaging. Here we present a method for capturing snapshots of live cells kept in a micro-liquid enclosure array by X-ray laser diffraction. We place living Microbacterium lacticum cells in an enclosure array and successively expose each enclosure to a single X-ray laser pulse from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser. The enclosure itself works as a guard slit and allows us to record a coherent diffraction pattern from a weakly-scattering submicrometre-sized cell with a clear fringe extending up to a 28-nm full-period resolution. The reconstructed image reveals living whole-cell structures without any staining, which helps advance understanding of intracellular phenomena. PMID:24394916

Kimura, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Shibuya, Akemi; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sangsoo; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Oshima, Tairo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Nishino, Yoshinori

2014-01-01

310

Group Living Enhances Individual Resources Discrimination: The Use of Public Information by Cockroaches to Assess Shelter Quality  

PubMed Central

In group-living organisms, consensual decision of site selection results from the interplay between individual responses to site characteristics and to group-members. Individuals independently gather personal information by exploring their environment. Through social interaction, the presence of others provides public information that could be used by individuals and modulates the individual probability of joining/leaving a site. The way that individual's information processing and the network of interactions influence the dynamics of public information (depending on population size) that in turn affect discrimination in site quality is a central question. Using binary choice between sheltering sites of different quality, we demonstrate that cockroaches in group dramatically outperform the problem-solving ability of single individual. Such use of public information allows animals to discriminate between alternatives whereas isolated individuals are ineffective (i.e. the personal discrimination efficiency is weak). Our theoretical results, obtained from a mathematical model based on behavioral rules derived from experiments, highlight that the collective discrimination emerges from competing amplification processes relying on the modulation of the individual sheltering time without shelters comparison and communication modulation. Finally, we well demonstrated here the adaptive value of such decision algorithm. Without any behavioral change, the system is able to shift to a more effective strategy when alternatives are present: the modification of the spatio-temporal distributions of individuals leading to the collective selection of the best resource. This collective discrimination implying such parsimonious and widespread mechanism must be shared by many group living-species. PMID:21701692

Canonge, Stephane; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Sempo, Gregory

2011-01-01

311

An examination of the adsorption characteristics of a basic dye (Maxilon Red BL-N) on to live activated sludge system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Removal of dyestuffs by adsorption on to live activated sludge was investigated. Two dyes, one acid dye (Acid Yellow 17) and one basic dye (Maxilon Red BL-N), were tested. Initial adsorption studies showed that binding of Acid Yellow 17 onto activated sludge was not promising while Maxilon Red BL-N was adsorbed well by activated sludge and the dye-sludge system conformed

M. Basibuyuk; C. F. Forster

2003-01-01

312

Comparative effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and ractopamine hydrochloride on live performance and carcass characteristics of calf-fed Holstein steers.  

PubMed

Holstein steers (n = 2,275) were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) a control diet containing no ?-agonists, 2) a diet that contained zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; 8.3 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 20 d with a 3-d withdrawal period before harvest, and 3) a diet that contained ractopamine hydrochloride (RH; 30.1 mg/kg [100% DM basis]) for 28 d before harvest. No differences (P ? 0.18) were detected between treatments for initial BW, BW at d 28, or DMI. Final BW, BW gain for the last 28 d, total BW gain, ADG for the last 28 d, and overall ADG were greater (P < 0.05) for steers fed ZH or RH than for steers fed the control diet. Additionally, G:F for the last 28 d and G:F for the entire trial was increased (P < 0.02) for steers fed ZH (0.147, 0.147) or RH (0.153, 0.151) compared to steers fed the control diet (0.134, 0.143), respectively. Steers fed ZH or RH had HCW that were 15.5 and 8.2 kg heavier (P ? 0.01) and LM areas that were 7.1 and 2.3 cm(2) larger (P < 0.01) than control cattle. Steers fed ZH also had dressed carcass yields that were 1.3% to 1.5% greater and USDA calculated yield grades that were decreased 0.16 to 0.23 units compared to RH and control steers. No differences (P ? 0.39) were found between treatments for marbling score, fat thickness, and percentage KPH. Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ? 0.04) percentage of yield grade 1 and 2 carcasses (15.1, 55.0) and a reduced (P ? 0.02) percentage of yield grade 3 carcasses (27.1) compared with those fed RH (10.5, 49.1, 36.1) or the control diet (9.0, 47.4, 36.4), respectively. Additionally, ZH-fed steers had a decreased (P ? 0.04) percentage of yield grade 4 and 5 carcasses (2.8) compared with steers fed the control diet (6.9). Steers fed ZH had an increased (P ? 0.01) percentage of USDA Select grading carcass (31.0%) and a decreased (P ? 0.01) percentage of USDA Choice grading carcasses (65.0%) compared with steers fed RH (25.8%, 70.2%) and no ?-agonist (24.8%, 72.0%), respectively. Feeding either ?-agonist to calf-fed Holstein steers increased live performance through increased BW, BW gain, and ADG. Furthermore, supplementing calf-fed Holstein steers with ZH provides greater improvements in HCW, LM area, and yield grade components, with a slight decrease in quality grade when compared to calf-fed Holstein steers supplemented with RH. PMID:25006068

Brown, T R; Sexten, A K; Lawrence, T E; Miller, M F; Thomas, C L; Yates, D A; Hutcheson, J P; Hodgen, J M; Brooks, J C

2014-09-01

313

Physics of Life: A Model for Non-Newtonian Properties of Living Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This innovation proposes the reconciliation of the evolution of life with the second law of thermodynamics via the introduction of the First Principle for modeling behavior of living systems. The structure of the model is quantum-inspired: it acquires the topology of the Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced with the information potential. As a result, the model captures the most fundamental property of life: the progressive evolution; i.e. the ability to evolve from disorder to order without any external interference. The mathematical structure of the model can be obtained from the Newtonian equations of motion (representing the motor dynamics) coupled with the corresponding Liouville equation (representing the mental dynamics) via information forces. All these specific non-Newtonian properties equip the model with the levels of complexity that matches the complexity of life, and that makes the model applicable for description of behaviors of ecological, social, and economical systems. Rather than addressing the six aspects of life (organization, metabolism, growth, adaptation, response to stimuli, and reproduction), this work focuses only on biosignature ; i.e. the mechanical invariants of life, and in particular, the geometry and kinematics of behavior of living things. Living things obey the First Principles of Newtonian mechanics. One main objective of this model is to extend the First Principles of classical physics to include phenomenological behavior on living systems; to develop a new mathematical formalism within the framework of classical dynamics that would allow one to capture the specific properties of natural or artificial living systems such as formation of the collective mind based upon abstract images of the selves and non-selves; exploitation of this collective mind for communications and predictions of future expected characteristics of evolution; and for making decisions and implementing the corresponding corrections if the expected scenario is different from the originally planned one. This approach postulates that even a primitive living species possesses additional, non-Newtonian properties that are not included in the laws of Newtonian or statistical mechanics. These properties follow from a privileged ability of living systems to possess a self-image (a concept introduced in psychology) and to interact with it. The proposed mathematical system is based on the coupling of the classical dynamical system representing the motor dynamics with the corresponding Liouville equation describing the evolution of initial uncertainties in terms of the probability density and representing the mental dynamics. The coupling is implemented by the information-based supervising forces that can be associated with self-awareness. These forces fundamentally change the pattern of the probability evolution, and therefore, lead to a major departure of the behavior of living systems from the patterns of both Newtonian and statistical mechanics. This innovation is meant to capture the signature of life based only on observable behavior, not on any biochemistry. This will not prevent the use of this model for developing artificial living systems, as well as for studying some general properties of behavior of natural, living systems.

Zak, Michail

2010-01-01

314

Observation of Live Ticks (Haemaphysalis flava) by Scanning Electron Microscopy under High Vacuum Pressure  

PubMed Central

Scanning electron microscopes (SEM), which image sample surfaces by scanning with an electron beam, are widely used for steric observations of resting samples in basic and applied biology. Various conventional methods exist for SEM sample preparation. However, conventional SEM is not a good tool to observe living organisms because of the associated exposure to high vacuum pressure and electron beam radiation. Here we attempted SEM observations of live ticks. During 1.5×10?3 Pa vacuum pressure and electron beam irradiation with accelerated voltages (2–5 kV), many ticks remained alive and moved their legs. After 30-min observation, we removed the ticks from the SEM stage; they could walk actively under atmospheric pressure. When we tested 20 ticks (8 female adults and 12 nymphs), they survived for two days after SEM observation. These results indicate the resistance of ticks against SEM observation. Our second survival test showed that the electron beam, not vacuum conditions, results in tick death. Moreover, we describe the reaction of their legs to electron beam exposure. These findings open the new possibility of SEM observation of living organisms and showed the resistance of living ticks to vacuum condition in SEM. These data also indicate, for the first time, the usefulness of tick as a model system for biology under extreme condition. PMID:22431980

Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nakamura, Yuka; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Yano, Yasuhiro; Kuwabata, Susumu; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Takegami, Tsutomu

2012-01-01

315

"How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things away  

E-print Network

1 "How about giving my things away over the Internet?" When Internet makes it easier to give things Away Over the Internet? When the Internet Makes It Easier to Give Things Away", in NA - Advances of Management, France [ to cite ]: Valérie Guillard and Céline Del Bucchia (2012) ,"How About Giving My Things

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

Differences in household characteristics by income distribution in Pakistan.  

PubMed

The authors examine household characteristics by income distribution in Pakistan using data from the 1979 Population, Labour Force and Migration (PLM) Survey. Tabular data, organized by measures of income and expenditure, are presented on average household size, dependency ratios, average number of children and average number of adults, proportion of female household members, labor force participation rates for various ages, and occupational status of heads of households. The authors conclude that "the findings for Pakistan generally are in consonance with those for other Third World countries and confirm that certain characteristics are associated with poverty." Comments by Karol J. Krotki are also included (pp. 668-9). PMID:12340761

Kazi, S; Sathar, Z A

1985-01-01

317

HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by people living with HIV from Buea, Cameroon.  

PubMed

The universal access to treatment and care for people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is a major problem especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV infected people live. However, equally important is the fact that HIV/AIDS-related stigma is recognized to be a major obstacle to successfully control the spread of this disease. In this study we measured the HIV/AIDS-related stigma felt by PLWHIV in Cameroon using "The people living with HIV stigma index" questionnaire developed by UNAIDS, International Planned Parenthood Federation and Global Network of PLWHIV/AIDS among others. A total of 200 questionnaires were anonymously administered to PLWHIV in the HIV/AIDS treatment center of the Regional Hospital Annex Buea in the South West Region of Cameroon by trained academics who were themselves PLWHIV. In this setting the major problems faced by the PLWHIV with regard to stigmatization and discrimination were gossiping and verbal insults, which was felt by about half of the interviewees. Equally important was internal stigma, half of the PLWHIV felt ashamed and guilty to be HIV infected. This is the first report of this kind in Cameroon. These results will help to better understand HIV/AIDS-related stigma in this setting and in turn will improve the quality of life of PLWHIV by promoting their acceptance by the community. PMID:22852551

Jacobi, Christoph A; Atanga, Pascal N J I; Bin, Leonard K; Mbome, Victor N; Akam, Wilfred; Bogner, Johannes R; Kropf, Siegfried; Malfertheiner, Peter

2013-01-01

318

Stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV by healthcare providers, Southwest Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Stigma and discrimination against people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are obstacles in the way of effective responses to HIV. Understanding the extent of stigma / discrimination and the underlying causes is necessary for developing strategies to reduce them. This study was conducted to explore stigma and discrimination against PLHIV amongst healthcare providers in Jimma zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study, employing quantitative and qualitative methods, was conducted in 18 healthcare institutions of Jimma zone, during March 14 to April 14, 2011. A total of 255 healthcare providers responded to questionnaires asking about sociodemographic characteristics, HIV knowledge, perceived institutional support and HIV-related stigma and discrimination. Factor analysis was employed to create measurement scales for stigma and factor scores were used in one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), T-tests, Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression analyses. Qualitative data collected using key-informant interviews and Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were employed to triangulate with the findings from the quantitative survey. Results Mean stigma scores (as the percentages of maximum scale scores) were: 66.4 for the extra precaution scale, 52.3 for the fear of work-related HIV transmission, 49.4 for the lack of feelings of safety, 39.0 for the value-driven stigma, 37.4 for unethical treatment of PLHIV, 34.4 for discomfort around PLHIV and 31.1 for unofficial disclosure. Testing and disclosing test results without consent, designating HIV clients and unnecessary referral to other healthcare institutions and refusal to treat clients were identified. Having in-depth HIV knowledge, the perception of institutional support, attending training on stigma and discrimination, educational level of degree or higher, high HIV case loads, the presence of ART service in the healthcare facility and claiming to be non-religious were negative predictors of stigma and discrimination as measured by the seven latent factors. Conclusions Higher levels of stigma and discrimination against PLHIV were associated with lack of in-depth knowledge on HIV and orientation about policies against stigma and discrimination. Hence, we recommend health managers to ensure institutional support through availing of clear policies and guidelines and the provision of appropriate training on the management of HIV/AIDS. PMID:22794201

2012-01-01

319

Efficient adsorption of waterborne short-lived radon decay products by glass fiber filters.  

PubMed

Glass fiber filters of a certain brand were found to be very efficient (retention > 95%) for adsorption of short-lived radon decay products during filtration of water. Carrier-free samples are obtained in a convenient geometry for efficient gross beta counting. Adsorption of "hot atoms" is not disturbed by the presence of "cold" lead ions. Approximate radioactive equilibrium between radon and its short-lived decay products may or may not exist in water at the source, but does exist after 3 h in PET bottles. These bottles are shown to be gas-tight for radon. Calibration of activity concentration in Bq L(-1) (radon gas concentration approximately equilibrium equivalent radon concentration) was performed by several standard procedures. Limit of detection is 2 Bq L(-1) within 10 min (total time) or 10 Bq L(-1) within 5 min for a net signal of 5 times standard deviation. PMID:9003713

von Philipsborn, H

1997-02-01

320

Proteomics. Tracking cancer drugs in living cells by thermal profiling of the proteome.  

PubMed

The thermal stability of proteins can be used to assess ligand binding in living cells. We have generalized this concept by determining the thermal profiles of more than 7000 proteins in human cells by means of mass spectrometry. Monitoring the effects of small-molecule ligands on the profiles delineated more than 50 targets for the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. We identified the heme biosynthesis enzyme ferrochelatase as a target of kinase inhibitors and suggest that its inhibition causes the phototoxicity observed with vemurafenib and alectinib. Thermal shifts were also observed for downstream effectors of drug treatment. In live cells, dasatinib induced shifts in BCR-ABL pathway proteins, including CRK/CRKL. Thermal proteome profiling provides an unbiased measure of drug-target engagement and facilitates identification of markers for drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:25278616

Savitski, Mikhail M; Reinhard, Friedrich B M; Franken, Holger; Werner, Thilo; Savitski, Maria Fälth; Eberhard, Dirk; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dovega, Rebecca Bakszt; Klaeger, Susan; Kuster, Bernhard; Nordlund, Pär; Bantscheff, Marcus; Drewes, Gerard

2014-10-01

321

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living Assisted Living Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table of Contents For ... t need round-the-clock nursing care. Assisted living facilities provide an alternative. Assisted living is for ...

322

Super-resolution video microscopy of live cells by structured illumination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) can double the resolution of the wide-field fluorescence microscope, but has previously been too slow for dynamic live imaging. Here we demonstrate a high-speed SIM that is capable of 100 nm resolution at frame rates up to 11 Hz for several hundred time frames. We demonstrate the microscope by video imaging of tubulin and kinesin dynamics in

Bryant B. Chhun; Eric R Griffis; Lukman Winoto; Mats G L Gustafsson

2009-01-01

323

Long-lived entanglement of neutral-atom chains by spin-exchange Rydberg interaction  

E-print Network

Conditions to achieve an unusually strong Rydberg spin-exchange interaction are investigated and proposed as a means to generate pairwise entanglement and realize a SWAP-like quantum gate for neutral atoms. Long-lived entanglement is created by mapping entangled Rydberg states to ground states using optical techniques. A protocol involving SWAP gate and pairwise entanglement operations is predicted to create global entanglement of a chain of N atoms in a time that is independent of N.

Shi, Xiao-Feng; Kennedy, T A B

2014-01-01

324

11?-Hydroxylation of progesterone by gel-entrapped living Rhizopus stolonifer mycelia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spores of Rhizopus stolonifer were immobilized aseptically by entrapment with photo-crosslinkable resin prepolymers, urethane prepolymers or several kinds of polysaccharides. The entrapped spores were allowed to germinate and develop in situ. The immobilized living mycelia so obtained were induced for the steroid 11a-hydroxylation system and examined for their activity to hydroxylate progesterone at 11a-position in a buffer system containing 2.5%

Kenji Sonomoto; Kazuhide Nomura; Atsuo Tanaka; Saburo Fukui

1982-01-01

325

Dynamic Fluorescent Imaging of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag in Live Cells by Biarsenical Labeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the primary structural protein of the virus and is sufficient for particle formation. We utilized the recently developed biarsenical-labeling method to dynamically observe HIV-1 Gag within live cells by adding a tetracysteine tag (C-C-P-G-C-C) to the C terminus of Gag in both Pr55Gag expression and full-length proviral constructs. Membrane-permeable biarsenical compounds FlAsH

Lynnie Rudner; Sascha Nydegger; Lori V. Coren; Kunio Nagashima; Markus Thali; David E. Ott

2005-01-01

326

Evolutionary costs of aggression revealed by testosterone manipulations in free-living male lizards  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the hypothesis that increased aggression results in decreased survivorship. We tested this hypothesis by increasing aggression of free-living male lizards Sceloporus jarrovi with testosterone implants and evaluating the effects on survivorship. A previous study showed that testosterone-implanted males were more aggressive than controls, suggesting a greater degree of success in male-male competition. Results of the present study show

C. A. Marler; M. C. Moore

1988-01-01

327

Long-lived entanglement of neutral-atom chains by spin-exchange Rydberg interaction  

E-print Network

Conditions to achieve an unusually strong Rydberg spin-exchange interaction are investigated and proposed as a means to generate pairwise entanglement and realize a SWAP-like quantum gate for neutral atoms. Long-lived entanglement is created by mapping entangled Rydberg states to ground states using optical techniques. A protocol involving SWAP gate and pairwise entanglement operations is predicted to create global entanglement of a chain of N atoms in a time that is independent of N.

Xiao-Feng Shi; F. Bariani; T. A. B. Kennedy

2014-10-13

328

Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET  

Microsoft Academic Search

D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to

Lars Farde; Hakan Hall; Erling Ehrin; Goran Sedvall

1986-01-01

329

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2011-10-01

330

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2012-10-01

331

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2010-10-01

332

42 CFR 130.21 - What documentation is required for petitions filed by living persons with HIV?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? 130.21 Section 130.21 Public...for petitions filed by living persons with HIV? The following rules apply to all petitions filed by persons with HIV: (a) All petitions filed under...

2013-10-01

333

Beef palatability as influenced by live animal characteristics, time-on-feed and carcass traits  

E-print Network

the preparation of this manuscript. Fur- ther appreciation is extended to Dr. T. R. Dutson, Mr. C. E. Murphey, Dr. G. T. King and Dr. J. D. Tatum for their advice and contributions during the course of this study. Sincere appreciation is extended... the accuracy of such predictions. In a recent study, Tatum (1978) examined the effects of USDA feeder grade, time-on-feed, subcutaneous fat thick- ness, breed-type and USDA quality grade on beef palatability within a relatively narrow range in time...

Dolezal, Howard Glen

2012-06-07

334

Detection of mRNA in living cells by double-stranded locked nucleic acid probes  

PubMed Central

Double-stranded probes are homogeneous biosensors for rapid detection of specific nucleotide sequences. These double-stranded probes have been applied in various molecular sensing applications, such as real-time polymerase chain reaction and detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this study, we present the design and optimization of double-stranded probes for single-cell gene expression analysis in living cells. With alternating DNA/LNA monomers for optimizing the stability and specificity, we show that the probe is stable in living cells for over 72 hours post-transfection and is capable of detecting changes in gene expression induced by external stimuli. The probes can be delivered to a large number of cells simultaneously by cationic liposomal transfection or to individual cells selectively by photothermal delivery. We also demonstrate that the probe quantifies intracellular mRNA in living cells through the use of an equilibrium analysis. With its effectiveness and performance, the double-stranded probe represents a broadly applicable approach for large-scale single-cell gene expression analysis toward numerous biomedical applications, such as systems biology, cancer, and drug screening. PMID:23772441

Riahi, Reza; Dean, Zachary; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

2013-01-01

335

Load Characteristics of Induction Motor Manufactured by Soft Magnetic Composite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The load characteristics of induction motor manufactured by soft magnetic composite (SMC) are presented. We manufactured three kinds of induction motors experimentally. One is a conventional laminated iron core motor. The others are SMC motors. One of the SMC motor uses SMC only for stator, while the other SMC motor uses SMC for stator and rotor. The experimental comparisons of load characteristics and loss analysis are shown. As a result, the difference between the efficiency of the SMC motor and the conventional laminated motor is 4.6%, in spite of the permeability of SMC being 20% lower than the conventional electromagnetic steel.

Fukuda, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Yutaka; Morimoto, Masayuki

336

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc.

Lu, Wei-yang (Pleasanton, CA); Min, Shermann (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01

337

Measurement of physical characteristics of materials by ultrasonic methods  

DOEpatents

A method is described for determining and evaluating physical characteristics of a material. In particular, the present invention provides for determining and evaluating the anisotropic characteristics of materials, especially those resulting from such manufacturing processes as rolling, forming, extruding, drawing, forging, etc. In operation, a complex ultrasonic wave is created in the material of interest by any method. The wave form may be any combination of wave types and modes and is not limited to fundamental plate modes. The velocity of propagation of selected components which make up the complex ultrasonic wave are measured and evaluated to determine the physical characteristics of the material including, texture, strain/stress, grain size, crystal structure, etc. 14 figs.

Lu, W.Y.; Min, S.

1998-09-08

338

Research on Key Technology and Applications for Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Internet of Things (IOT) has been paid more and more attention by the academe, industry, and government all over the world. The concept of IOT and the architecture of IOT are discussed. The key technologies of IOT, including Radio Frequency Identification technology, Electronic Product Code technology, and ZigBee technology are analyzed. The framework of digital agriculture application based on IOT is proposed.

Chen, Xian-Yi; Jin, Zhi-Gang

339

‘The best thing ever’: how children's popular culture matters  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reflects upon a popular cultural event which was, briefly, for a particular grouping of children in the UK, ‘the best thing ever’: namely the release of the CD-single Reach, by the British pop group S Club 7. I suggest that this event was illustrative of manifold cultural forms and practices which—being ostensibly banal, fun, faddish, lowbrow and ‘childish’—continue

John Horton

2010-01-01

340

Improvement of Surface Layer Characteristics by Shot Lining  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, lining of the metal with foils using shot peening was investigated to improve the surface layer characteristics. In the shot peening experiment, the foils set on the metal are pelted with hard particles traveling at a high velocity. The foils are bonded to the metal surface due to plastic deformation induced by the collision of the

Yasunori Harada

2005-01-01

341

Characteristics and Qualities Needed for Success by School Nutrition Directors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose/Objectives: The purpose was to identify the leadership characteristics and qualities perceived by school nutrition (SN) directors as necessary for success and determine whether training is needed to develop these attributes. Methods: A panel of seven SN professionals was assembled to ascertain their opinions regarding leadership…

Rushing, Keith; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

2009-01-01

342

Understanding the structural characteristics of compstatin by conformational space annealing  

E-print Network

12 are bridged by a disulfide bond and Gln5 -Asp6 -Trp7 -Gly8 forms a h-turn. The disulfide bridge in revised form 1 November 2004; accepted 10 December 2004 Available online 11 January 2005 Abstract The structural characteristics of the 13-residue compstatin molecule are investigated using the conformational

Lee, Jooyoung

343

Unbiased Identification of Nonlinear Sorption Characteristics by Soil Column Breakthrough  

E-print Network

Unbiased Identification of Nonlinear Sorption Characteristics by Soil Column Breakthrough, 35K65 \\Lambda submitted to Water Resources Research #12; 2 B. A. Igler, K. U. Totsche and P. Knabner column experiments are used to identify partitioning coefficients, ion­exchange or sorption isotherms

Gugat, Martin

344

Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass  

E-print Network

Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass Hak Sung Lee1, * and Bohumil3A 2B2, Canada Abstract: Biomass of nonliving brown seaweed Sargassum fluitans pretreated.5. There are indications that the biomass hydroxyl groups were involved in sequestering the aluminum in the form

Volesky, Bohumil

345

Signing stock market situations by means of characteristic sequential patterns  

E-print Network

. These events are obtained from market data (e.g. discretized financial time series) and from the financial newsSigning stock market situations by means of characteristic sequential patterns M.Leleu1,2 , J, France Abstract We are studying new techniques for computing similarities between stock market situations

Boulicaut, Jean-François

346

Exploring Dynamics of Molybdate in Living Animal Cells by a Genetically Encoded FRET Nanosensor  

PubMed Central

Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element for almost all living organisms including animals. Mo is used as a catalytic center of molybdo-enzymes for oxidation/reduction reactions of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. Whilst living cells are known to import inorganic molybdate oxyanion from the surrounding environment, the in vivo dynamics of cytosolic molybdate remain poorly understood as no appropriate indicator is available for this trace anion. We here describe a genetically encoded Förester-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET)-based nanosensor composed of CFP, YFP and the bacterial molybdate-sensor protein ModE. The nanosensor MolyProbe containing an optimized peptide-linker responded to nanomolar-range molybdate selectively, and increased YFP:CFP fluorescence intensity ratio by up to 109%. By introduction of the nanosensor, we have been able to successfully demonstrate the real-time dynamics of molybdate in living animal cells. Furthermore, time course analyses of the dynamics suggest that novel oxalate-sensitive- and sulfate-resistant- transporter(s) uptake molybdate in a model culture cell. PMID:23472155

Nakanishi, Yoichi; Iida, Syuntaro; Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Tomioka, Rie; Maeshima, Masayoshi

2013-01-01

347

Diabetes increases stiffness of live cardiomyocytes measured by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation.  

PubMed

Stiffness of live cardiomyocytes isolated from control and diabetic mice was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin administration. Histological images of myocardium from mice that were diabetic for 3 mo showed disorderly lineup of myocardial cells, irregularly sized cell nuclei, and fragmented and disordered myocardial fibers with interstitial collagen accumulation. Phalloidin-stained cardiomyocytes isolated from diabetic mice showed altered (i.e., more irregular and diffuse) actin filament organization compared with cardiomyocytes from control mice. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) pump expression was reduced in homogenates obtained from the left ventricle of diabetic animals compared with age-matched controls. The apparent elastic modulus (AEM) for live control or diabetic isolated cardiomyocytes was measured using the atomic force microscopy nanoindentation method in Tyrode buffer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (physiological condition), 100 nM Ca(2+) and 5.4 mM KCl (low extracellular Ca(2+) condition), or 1.8 mM Ca(2+) and 140 mM KCl (contraction condition). In the physiological condition, the mean AEM was 112% higher for live diabetic than control isolated cardiomyocytes (91 ± 14 vs. 43 ± 7 kPa). The AEM was also significantly higher in diabetic than control cardiomyocytes in the low extracellular Ca(2+) and contraction conditions. These findings suggest that the material properties of live cardiomyocytes were affected by diabetes, resulting in stiffer cells, which very likely contribute to high diastolic LV stiffness, which has been observed in vivo in some diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:25163520

Benech, Juan C; Benech, Nicolás; Zambrana, Ana I; Rauschert, Inés; Bervejillo, Verónica; Oddone, Natalia; Damián, Juan P

2014-11-15

348

Embedded Interaction: Interacting with the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things assumes that objects have digital functionality\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009and can be identified and tracked automatically. The main goal of\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009embedded interaction is to look at new opportunities that arise for\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interactive systems and the immediate value users gain. The authors\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009developed various prototypes to explore novel ways for human-computer\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009interaction (HCI), enabled by the Internet of Things and

Matthias Kranz; Albrecht Schmidt

2010-01-01

349

Home theater projectors: the next big thing?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The business presentation market has traditionally been the mainstay of the projection business, but as these users find the projectors work well at showing movies at home, interest in the home entertainment market is heating up. The idea of creating a theater environment in the home, complete with big screen projector and quality audio system, is not new. Wealthy patrons have been doing it for years. But can the concept be extended to ordinary living rooms? Many think so. Already pioneers like Sony, InFocus, Toshiba and Plus Vision are offering first generation products - and others will follow. But this market will require projectors that have different performance characteristics than those designed for data projection. In this paper, we will discuss how the requirements for a home theater projector differ from those of a data projector. We will provide updated information on who is doing what in this segment and give some insight into the growth potential.

Chinnock, Christopher B.

2002-04-01

350

In media res: commenting on the trajectory of lives.  

PubMed

The stories in this issue of Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics demonstrate two important things. First these stories explore the space between bodily impairment and the social structures that both enable and constrain the flourishing of those who are differently embodied. The authors of these narratives resist the dominant biomedical interpretation of their impairments, but also demonstrate their dependency upon others--social, medical, or familial others. Second, in writing these narratives, the authors are also engaged in an act of identity formation, which sometimes challenge and sometimes embrace the label of disability. By telling their stories in the middle of the action of their lives--in media res, taking up or resisting the label of disability-they also demonstrate the way in which lives can be lived open to new possibilities and interpretations. PMID:24407129

Bishop, Jeffery; Barina, Rachelle; Stahl, Devan

2013-01-01

351

RFID as a key enabler of the internet of things : localization and communication  

E-print Network

By having everything in our physical world digitally connected, the Internet of Things is expected to transform how we interact with our environments and unlock tremendous business values through advance analytics. Owing ...

Wang, Jue, 1986-

2014-01-01

352

Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about Relaxation Techniques for Stress  

MedlinePLUS

... 5 Things To Know About Relaxation Techniques for Stress When you’re under stress, your body reacts by releasing hormones that produce ... vessels narrow (restricting the flow of blood). Occasional stress is a normal coping mechanism. But over the ...

353

Positive Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Positive Lives project is "a unique international project that photographs and documents the social and emotional impact of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, illuminating positive human responses to this world crisis." Sponsored by the Levi Strauss Foundation and the Terrence Higgins Trust, the project has sponsored photographers from across the world to photograph various persons living with HIV/AIDS in a host of very different settings. While the project has sponsored a number of various photographic exhibits, this online collection represents a small portion of the work thus far. Using an interactive map of the world, users can click on different geographic areas to view photographic exhibits documenting the lived experience of this condition. In South Africa, visitors can learn about the work and the residents of Nazareth House, which is a children's home in Cape Town taking care of abandoned children with HIV or AIDS. In Edinburgh, visitors are taken through the lives of young drug abusers at the Muirhouse Estate who are also living with either HIV or AIDS. In the words of photographer John Sturrock, "In Muirhouse I witnessed the emotional struggle of people enduring a tragedy..." However, hope is present in these photographic essays as well, as they represent a broad range of emotions.

354

Split immunity: immune inhibition of rat gliomas by subcutaneous exposure to unmodified live tumor cells.  

PubMed

Gliomas that grow uninhibited in the brain almost never metastasize outside the CNS. The rare occurrences of extracranial metastasis are usually associated with a suppressed immune system. This observation raises the possibility that some gliomas might not grow outside the CNS due to an inherent immune response, We report in this study that the highly malignant F98 Fischer rat undifferentiated glioma, which grows aggressively in the brain, spontaneously regresses when injected live s.c. We found that this regression is immune-mediated and that it markedly enhances the survival or cures rats challenged with the same tumor intracranially either before or after the s.c. live-cell treatment. Adoptive transfer experiments showed the effect was immune-mediated and that the CD8 T cell fraction, which exhibited direct tumor cytotoxicity, was more effective than the CD4 T cell fraction in mediating resistance to intracranial challenge of naive rats. Brain tumors from treated rats exhibited enhanced CD3(+)CD8(+)CD4(-) and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(-) T cell infiltration and IFN-? secretion. The results in the F98 glioma were corroborated in the Lewis rat CNS-1 astrocytoma. In both tumor models, s.c. treatment with live cells was significantly better than immunization with irradiated cells. We propose in this study a location-based immunotherapeutic phenomenon we term "split immunity": a tumor that thrives in an immune-privileged site may be inhibited by injecting live, unmodified tumor cells into a site that is not privileged, generating protective immunity that spreads back to the privileged site. Split immunity could explain several long-standing paradoxes regarding the lack of overt extracranial metastasis in patients with primary brain tumors. PMID:21998458

Volovitz, Ilan; Marmor, Yotvat; Azulay, Meir; Machlenkin, Arthur; Goldberger, Ofir; Mor, Felix; Slavin, Shimon; Ram, Zvi; Cohen, Irun R; Eisenbach, Lea

2011-11-15

355

Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

Eibl, Robert H.

356

Science 101: What causes things to rust?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The simple answer is that things rust when you leave them out in the rain. But maybe you want a more thorough answer. Rust is a form of corrosion, which is broadly defined as the wearing away of materials due to chemical reactions. So corrosion applies to

2010-12-01

357

The Internet of nano-things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nanotechnology promises new solutions for many applications in the biomedical, industrial and military fields as well as in consumer and industrial goods. The interconnection of nanoscale devices with existing communication networks and ultimately the Internet defines a new networking paradigm that is further referred to as the Internet of Nano-Things. Within this context, this paper discusses the state of the

I. F. Akyildiz; J. M. Jornet

2010-01-01

358

Semantic middleware for the Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to extending the Internet to devices such as home appliances, consumer electronics, and sensor networks. As multiple heterogeneous devices attempt to create area networks, one of the major challenges is the interoperability and composability of their services. The traditional way to address interoperability is to define standards; however, there are many standards and specifications

Zhexuan Song; Alvaro A. Cárdenas; Ryusuke Masuoka

2010-01-01

359

The Internet of Things: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the Internet of Things. Main enabling factor of this promising paradigm is the integration of several technologies and communications solutions. Identification and tracking technologies, wired and wireless sensor and actuator networks, enhanced communication protocols (shared with the Next Generation Internet), and distributed intelligence for smart objects are just the most relevant. As one can easily imagine, any

Luigi Atzori; Antonio Iera; Giacomo Morabito

2010-01-01

360

OPPORTUNITIES WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO MARKETING  

E-print Network

Strategy/Brand Management Consultant · Legal Intelligence Marketing research creates intelligence betterMARKETING OPPORTUNITIES WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO MARKETING PEOPLE DO?? #12;OVERVIEW Marketing can value: marketing and innovation ­ everything else is a cost. Marketing activities create value directly

Selmic, Sandra

361

On how many things there might be  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exercise in classical (possibly even pre-historic) skepticism. Of ne- cessity this exercise has the character of tentative ideas rendered as sketchy notes. These notes document a retreat in which ideas on the scope for objective ontological knowledge are progressively narrowed. The last ditch in this process is the question of how many things it is logically possible that there

Roger Bishop Jones

362

Why there's no such thing as  

E-print Network

Why there's no such thing as cybersecurity Matt Might, Ph.D. School of Computing Might, Ph.D. School of Computing University of Utah matt.might.net @mattmight yet #12;Fear #12;Hope #12;#12;Discovery Patch release Patched Public disclosure Exploit creation #12;#12;Discovery Exploit creation Attack

Might, Matt

363

The Adult Learner: Some Things We Know  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses the "warrior" who rises to the challenge of teaching the adult learner. The discussion is designed as a catalyst for dialogue about the adult learner and to uncover the complexities of teaching this rare and riveting species. This book is organized around three interlocking themes: some things we know about the adult learner;…

Fogarty, Robin J.; Pete, Brian M.

2007-01-01

364

Addressing Health Disparities among Men: Demographic, Behavioral and Clinical Characteristics of Men who have Sex with Men Living in Puerto Rico  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to compare sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics associated with HIV among Men who have sex with Men (MSM) and men who have sex with women (MSW) in Puerto Rico. Data from a population-based cross-sectional study in PR (2005–2008) was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample and bivariate analyses were performed to identify differences of sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics between MSM and MSW. Exact logistic regression models adjusting for age were constructed for each risk behavior associated to MSM in bivariate analysis. Of the 674 men interviewed, 6.1% (n=41) reported ever having sex with men. Age-adjusted logistic regression models indicated that MSM were significantly more likely than MSW to have first sexual intercourse before the age of 15 (POR=2.6; 95%CI= 1.3, 5.3) and have at least 10 lifetime sex partners (POR=2.8; 95%CI= 1.4,5.9). Also, MSM were significantly more likely to report lifetime use of marihuana (POR=2.7; 95%CI= 1.3,5.8), cocaine (POR=2.5; 95%CI= 1.2,5.0), amphetamines (POR=3.8; 95%CI= 1.4,9.2) and sedatives or tranquilizers (POR=3.3; 95%CI= 1.4,7.2). Also, MSM were 13 times more likely to be HIV seropositive as compared to MSW (POR=13.3; 95%CI=1.7,102.0). In this population-based sample of men living in Puerto Rico, self-reported same-sex behavior is strongly associated with HIV, and other behavioral factors associated with HIV. Future targeted research is still necessary for the development of intervention programs among MSM in Puerto Rico. PMID:24288521

Colon-Lopez, Vivian; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Rodriguez-Diaz, Carlos; Suarez, Erick L.; Perez, Cynthia M.

2013-01-01

365

Mr. Neil Armstrong interviewed by Dr. P.J. Vorzimmar -MSC-April 6, 1967 ARMSTRONG: You remember which things change in the course of the  

E-print Network

orbit as well as distant cosmic destinations such as Mercury, Mars, Jupiter and Pluto. The Delta II representing the 4 LSP Goals: Goal 1: Maximize Mission Success Maximize mission success and achieve mission excellence for all missions. Goal 2: Assure Long-Term Launch Services Assure services by providing end

366

Challenges Experienced by Rural Women in India Living With AIDS and Implications for the Delivery of HIV\\/AIDS Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and they investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women's adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a primary health center (PHC) near Chennai, India, and with nurses,

Adeline M. Nyamathi; Sanjeev Sinha; Kalyan K. Ganguly; Ravi Raj William; Anisa Heravian; Padma Ramakrishnan; Barbara Greengold; Maria Ekstrand; Pantangi Venkata Rama Rao

2011-01-01

367

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose by the rumen anaerobic  

E-print Network

Saccharomyces cerevisiae live cells stimulate degradation and fermentation of cellulose France, 92300 Levallois-Perret, France Some live micro-organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The effects of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (SC) were investigated, in vitro, on degradation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

368

Transformation characteristics of functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, functionally graded steel has been produced via diffusion of the alloying elements during electroslag refining. As the alloying element diffuses, it creates alternating\\u000a regions with different transformation characteristics. Thus, it is possible to obtain steel composites with various combinations\\u000a of ferrite, bainite, martensite, and austenite phases. By choosing the appropriate thickness of the slices used to set

J. Aghazadeh Mohandesi; M. H. Shahosseinie

2005-01-01

369

Homeostasis: From Living Creatures to Living Machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Problem: While many robots in industry and research have proven capable of operating in com- plex environments, most robots still fall well short of living creatures in their ability to deal with extreme variations in their environment. Living creatures, by contrast, will typically cope in any environment to the extent that their physical bodies allow. Living creatures never give

Bryan Adams

2001-01-01

370

Living with depression: Coping strategies used by South Asian women, living in the UK, suffering from depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

This brief study employed a qualitative, grounded theory approach within a constructivist paradigm, to explore the coping strategies used by Asian women suffering from depression. Ten Asian women were interviewed about their choice of coping strategies, factors affecting this and how this relates to treatment. The patients were interviewed individually using a brief semi-structured interview. The data were gathered and

Feryad A. Hussain; Ray Cochrane

2003-01-01

371

Evolution of a gastric carcinoma cell-specific DNA aptamer by live cell-SELEX.  

PubMed

Aptamers have emerged as promising molecular probes for disease diagnosis and therapy. In the present study, the entire live cell-SELEX method was used to generate gastric cancer cell?specific aptamers. Human gastric carcinoma AGS cells were used as target cells for positive selections and human normal gastric epithelial GES-1 cells as the negative cells for counter selections. The selection procedure was monitored by gel electrophoresis and flow cytometric analysis. By successive in vitro evolutions and subsequent cloning and sequencing, a gastric carcinoma cell?specific DNA aptamer termed cy-apt 20 with minimal recognition to the controls was identified from the final enriched ssDNA pool. Flow cytometry binding assays revealed that cy-apt 20 had a >70% binding rate to AGS cells and <30% binding affinity to non-gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the targeting recognition of AGS cells was established by using minimal doses of FITC-cy-apt 20 that continued for a long period of time. As visualized by fluorescence imaging, the majority of AGS cells were stained by FITC-cy-apt 20. The fluorescence intensity of AGS cells was ~6-fold over that of non-AGS cells. The present study demonstrated that the entire live cell-SELEX was simple, but effective in generating gastric cancer cell?specific aptamers, and that the aptamer cy-apt 20 has great potential to be used for the study and diagnosis of gastric cancer. PMID:25175855

Cao, Hong-Yong; Yuan, Ai-Hua; Shi, Xue-Song; Chen, Wei; Miao, Yi

2014-11-01

372

Determination of the PSI/PSII ratio in living plant cells at room temperature by spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Leaf cells of living plants exhibit strong fluorescence from chloroplasts, the reaction centers of photosynthesis. Mutations in the photosystems change their structure and can, thus, be monitored by recording the fluorescence spectra of the emitted chlorophyll light. These measurements have, up to now, mostly been carried out at low temperatures (77 K), as these conditions enable the differentiation between the fluorescence of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII). In contrast, at room temperature, energy transfer processes between the various photosynthetic complexes result in very similar fluorescence emissions, which mainly consist of fluorescence photons emitted by PSII hindering a discrimination based on spectral ROIs (regions of interest). However, by statistical analysis of high resolution fluorescence spectra recorded at room temperature, it is possible to draw conclusions about the relative PSI/PSII ratio. Here, the possibility of determining the relative PSI/PSII ratio by fluorescence spectroscopy is demonstrated in living maize plants. Bundle-sheath chloroplasts of mature maize plants have a special morphologic characteristic; they are agranal, or exhibit only rudimentary grana, respectively. These chloroplasts are depleted in PSII activity and it could be shown that PSII is progressively reduced during leaf differentiation. A direct comparison of PSII activity in isolated chloroplasts is nearly impossible, since the activity of PSII in both mesophyll- and bundle-sheath chloroplasts decays with time after isolation and it takes significantly longer to isolate bundle-sheath chloroplasts. Considering this fact the measurement of PSI/PSII ratios with the 77K method, which includes taking fluorescence spectra from a diluted suspension of isolated chloroplasts at 77K, is questionable. These spectra are then used to analyze the distribution of energy between PSI and PSII. After rapid cooling to 77K secondary biochemical influences, which attenuate the fluorescence emanated from PSI, are frozen out. Due to their characteristic morphology, maize chloroplasts of mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells are an appropriate system for demonstrating the applicability of our in vivo method which, unlike the common 77K method, does not require the isolation of chloroplasts. In mesophyll chloroplasts of higher land plants, the thylakoids have a heterogenic morphology of appressed and non-appressed membrane domains, called the grana and the stroma lamellae. PSII is enriched in the grana, whereas PSI is enriched in the stroma lamellae. Changes in chloroplast membrane structure and composition, according to changes in the PSI/ PSII ratio, can be triggered by light quality and carbon source deficiency. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of statistical analysis of fluorescence spectra to detect changes in the PSI/PSII ratio resulting from structure changes in the thylakoid membrane.

Elgass, Kirstin; Zell, Martina; Maurino, Veronica G.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

2011-02-01

373

Long-lived quasi-periodic Bloch oscillations by spatially selective photoexcitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show, through accurate numerical simulations, that long-lived, large-amplitude quasi-periodic Bloch oscillations can be achieved through a spatially selective photoexcitation process in semiconductor superlattices. Specifically, by doping a single interior well of a GaAs/Al_xGa_1-xAs superlattice with a low level (typically less than 2%) of In, it becomes possible to photoexcite electrons to a small number of In-perturbed Wannier-Stark levels. This procedure circumvents the dephasing effects of interface roughness that is associated with conventional photoexcitation methods, where electrons are excited to Wannier-Stark levels essentially over the entire superlattice.

Reynolds, Joseph P.; Luban, Marshall; Luscombe, James H.

1997-03-01

374

Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for 118-137Cs. A resolving power of over 106 and an accuracy of 1.4×10-7 have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, St.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.-J.; Otto, Th.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Audi, G.; Moore, R. B.

1990-12-01

375

Self-Assembly of Epicuticular Waxes on Living Plant Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AFM studies of wax regeneration on living plant surfaces gave first insights into the crystal growth processes of plant waxes, while it was used to visualize the dynamic process of wax crystallization in real time, and for measuring the height of the wax layers. For the experiments presented in this paper, leaves of Thalictrum flavum were used to investigate their wax formation. Although AFM investigations on plant surfaces are limited by roughness and fragility of the epicuticular waxes, this method is preferred above SEM, because AFM measurements in tapping mode can be done without disturbing the biological processes on the leaf surface.

Koch, Kerstin; Dommisse, Aarnoud; Neinhuis, Christoph; Barthlott, Wilhelm

2003-12-01

376

Living Longer, Healthier Lives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contrary to popular images that portray a bleak future, important life tasks and accomplishments characterize the lives of\\u000a older women. Midlife women are more likely than not to work full-time, and some will earn the highest salaries of their careers.\\u000a A high percentage of women in public service or elected office are in their 50s and 60s. Bernadine Healy was

Susan D. Lonborg; Cheryl B. Travis

377

Intersecting the Architecture of the Internet of Things with the Future Retail Industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses the approach of SAP Research in Switzerland to investigate, develop and evaluate future Internet of Things architectures and prototypes with their unique combination of three scientific pillars: SAP Research combines an environment of co-located academic education at leading universities ("Campus-Based Engineering Centers") with the concept of living laboratories in which real-world prototypes and systems are rigorously tested. SAP Research Switzerland hosts the "Future Retail Center" (FRC) in order to validate innovations in the retail industry. As an orthogonal element, we also structure our research activities in technological dimensions as opposed to the industry-specific living labs. The "Smart Items Research Program" bundles and focuses all research topics that are related to Ambient Intelligence (AmI), Internet of Things, and Pervasive Computing. With the researchers from the engineering centers, the industry focus in the living labs, and the different research projects and research programs, a holistic research perspective is created that ensures a highly effective and focused execution of research, unifying technical Internet of Things architectures with the corresponding business needs and forming a unique landscape of innovation.

Magerkurth, Carsten; Haller, Stephan; Hagedorn, Pascal

378

The Gloss of Glossy Things  

E-print Network

This paper discusses the visual phenomenon of gloss. It is shown that the perception of this phenomenon derives from two effects (1) that the image reflected by a glossy surface lies in a different plane from the surface, ...

Lavin, Mark A.

379

HIP-tags architecture implementation for the Internet of things  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a possible implementation for the innovative and highly secure networking architecture dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT). We propose an infrastructure that works with a new type of tags, supporting the upcoming standard Host Identity Protocol (HIP). Our main concern is to ensure RFID tags privacy, while enabling things to things communications.

Pascal Urien; Simon Elrharbi; Dorice Nyamy; Hervé Chabanne; Thomas Icart; François Lecocq; Cyrille Pépin; Khalifa Toumi; Mathieu Bouet; Guy Pujolle; Patrice Krzanik; Jean-Ferdinand Susini

2009-01-01

380

From the Internet of Computers to the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

From the Internet of Computers to the Internet of Things Friedemann Mattern and Christian building blocks of the "Internet of Things". In particu- lar, we consider RFID and other important with a discussion of social and governance issues that are likely to arise as the vision of the Internet of Things

381

Mobile Interaction with the Internet of Things Sven Siorpaes1  

E-print Network

Mobile Interaction with the Internet of Things Sven Siorpaes1 , Gregor Broll1 , Massimo Paolucci2 hand the Internet of Things provides a set of standards and methods to tag objects in the real world and an early prototype currently under development for mobile interactions with the Internet of Things. Hereby

382

Layered Structure and Management in Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development for Internet of Things and RFID technology is described in this paper. A feasible scheme and layered structure is proposed for Internet of Things. Its management is presented according to the demand for Internet of Things in China. The general system contains two parts: computer information subsystem and RFID terminal subsystem, the latter of which is the main

Huansheng Ning; Na Ning; Shenfeng Qu; Yan Zhang; Huiping Yang

2007-01-01

383

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective  

E-print Network

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective (Invited Paper) Thiago. The Internet of Things plays a central role in the foreseen shift of the Internet to the Future Internet that the Internet of Things will cooperate with the Internet of Services to provide users with services

Teixeira, Thiago

384

How Things Work: The Physics of Everyday Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

How Things Work is different. Conventional physics textbooks introduce basic principles and laws, and, using mathematics appropriate to the intended readership, show how these principles and laws can be used to predict or explain how things behave. Occasionally, end-of-chapter examples may hint at everyday things that involve the physics discussed. Louis A Bloomfield, in this text for liberal arts students

John Ward

1998-01-01

385

Heirlooms, Nikes and Bribes: Towards a Sociology of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do things come to embody meaning? In much anthropological and sociological writings, things have mainly been considered in two ways: either as commodities or as gifts. Correspondingly, people's relationships to things and to other people seem to fall in two broad categories, often regarded as mutually exclusive: either as impersonal, economic or market relationships with strangers, or as personal

Aafke Komter

2001-01-01

386

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective  

E-print Network

Service Oriented Middleware for the Internet of Things: A Perspective Thiago Teixeira, Sara Hachem of Things plays a central role in the foreseen shift of the Internet to the Future Internet that the Internet of Things will cooperate with the Internet of Services to provide users with services

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

387

Monitoring and Security for the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Monitoring and Security for the Internet of Things A. Mayzaud, R. Badonnel and I. Chrisment of Internet of Things involves the deployment of Low power and Lossy Networks (LLN) allowing communications and Challenges The growing interest for the Internet of Things has resulted in the large-scale deployment of Low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Reliability for emergency applications in Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Reliability for emergency applications in Internet of Things Nourhene Maalel*, Enrico Natalizio.surname@cea.fr, name.surname@hds.utc.fr Abstract-- This paper addresses the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm, which and collaborate to accomplish a common task. This new paradigm is called Internet of Things (IoT) [1]. The major

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

A Survey on Facilities for Experimental Internet of Things Research  

E-print Network

1 A Survey on Facilities for Experimental Internet of Things Research Alexander Gluhak , Srdjan The initial vision of the Internet of Things (IoT) was of a world in which all physical objects are tagged Internet of Things, Experimental environment, Testbed 1 INTRODUCTION The IoT is a multidisciplinary domain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

EDITORIAL Open Access Editorial: Special issue on Internet of Things  

E-print Network

EDITORIAL Open Access Editorial: Special issue on Internet of Things: convergence of sensing, and computing devices, usually indicated as the Internet of Things (IoT). Several examples exist where wireless, in "Mashing Up the Internet of Things: A Framework for Smart Environ- ments" [1], a framework and an user

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Towards Unified Tag Data Translation for the Internet of Things  

E-print Network

Towards Unified Tag Data Translation for the Internet of Things Lo¨ic Schmidt, Nathalie Mitton. INTRODUCTION The "Internet of Things" aims at creating a large wireless network in which all objects would have defines, with partners, several standards for the Internet of things. These standards can be found under

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Advanced Internet of Things Lei Zhang, Nathalie Mitton  

E-print Network

Advanced Internet of Things Lei Zhang, Nathalie Mitton INRIA Lille - Nord Europe, Univ Lille Nord.mitton}@inria.fr Abstract--The Internet of Things (IoT) is a network of Internet-enabled objects, whose original purpose scheme for a new paradigm: Advanced Internet of Things (AIoT), which is based on our proposed Unified

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

Meaningful interpretation of subdiffusive measurements in living cells (crowded environment) by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy.  

PubMed

In living cell or its nucleus, the motions of molecules are complicated due to the large crowding and expected heterogeneity of the intracellular environment. Randomness in cellular systems can be either spatial (anomalous) or temporal (heterogeneous). In order to separate both processes, we introduce anomalous random walks on fractals that represented crowded environments. We report the use of numerical simulation and experimental data of single-molecule detection by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy for detecting resolution limits of different mobile fractions in crowded environment of living cells. We simulate the time scale behavior of diffusion times tau(D)(tau) for one component, e.g. the fast mobile fraction, and a second component, e.g. the slow mobile fraction. The less the anomalous exponent alpha the higher the geometric crowding of the underlying structure of motion that is quantified by the ratio of the Hausdorff dimension and the walk exponent d(f)/d(w) and specific for the type of crowding generator used. The simulated diffusion time decreases for smaller values of alpha # 1 but increases for a larger time scale tau at a given value of alpha # 1. The effect of translational anomalous motion is substantially greater if alpha differs much from 1. An alpha value close to 1 contributes little to the time dependence of subdiffusive motions. Thus, quantitative determination of molecular weights from measured diffusion times and apparent diffusion coefficients, respectively, in temporal auto- and crosscorrelation analyses and from time-dependent fluorescence imaging data are difficult to interpret and biased in crowded environments of living cells and their cellular compartments; anomalous dynamics on different time scales tau must be coupled with the quantitative analysis of how experimental parameters change with predictions from simulated subdiffusive dynamics of molecular motions and mechanistic models. We first demonstrate that the crowding exponent alpha also determines the resolution of differences in diffusion times between two components in addition to photophysical parameters well-known for normal motion in dilute solution. The resolution limit between two different kinds of single molecule species is also analyzed under translational anomalous motion with broken ergodicity. We apply our theoretical predictions of diffusion times and lower limits for the time resolution of two components to fluorescence images in human prostate cancer cells transfected with GFP-Ago2 and GFP-Ago1. In order to mimic heterogeneous behavior in crowded environments of living cells, we need to introduce so-called continuous time random walks (CTRW). CTRWs were originally performed on regular lattice. This purely stochastic molecule behavior leads to subdiffusive motion with broken ergodicity in our simulations. For the first time, we are able to quantitatively differentiate between anomalous motion without broken ergodicity and anomalous motion with broken ergodicity in time-dependent fluorescence microscopy data sets of living cells. Since the experimental conditions to measure a selfsame molecule over an extended period of time, at which biology is taken place, in living cells or even in dilute solution are very restrictive, we need to perform the time average over a subpopulation of different single molecules of the same kind. For time averages over subpopulations of single molecules, the temporal auto- and crosscorrelation functions are first found. Knowing the crowding parameter alpha for the cell type and cellular compartment type, respectively, the heterogeneous parameter gamma can be obtained from the measurements in the presence of the interacting reaction partner, e.g. ligand, with the same alpha value. The product alpha x gamma = gamma is not a simple fitting parameter in the temporal auto- and two-color crosscorrelation functions because it is related to the proper physical models of anomalous (spatial) and heterogeneous (temporal) randomness in cellular systems.We have already derived an analytical solution gam

Baumann, Gerd; Place, Robert F; Földes-Papp, Zeno

2010-08-01

394

Defining the Subcellular Interface of Nanoparticles by Live-Cell Imaging  

PubMed Central

Understanding of nanoparticle-bio-interactions within living cells requires knowledge about the dynamic behavior of nanomaterials during their cellular uptake, intracellular traffic and mutual reactions with cell organelles. Here, we introduce a protocol of combined kinetic imaging techniques that enables investigation of exemplary fluorochrome-labelled nanoparticles concerning their intracellular fate. By time-lapse confocal microscopy we observe fast, dynamin-dependent uptake of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles via the cell membrane within seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal fast and complete exchange of the investigated nanoparticles at mitochondria, cytoplasmic vesicles or the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation is observed within minutes by free diffusion and active transport. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) indicate diffusion coefficients of polystyrene and silica nanoparticles in the nucleus and the cytoplasm that are consistent with particle motion in living cells based on diffusion. Determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radii by FCS and RICS shows that nanoparticles exert their cytoplasmic and nuclear effects mainly as mobile, monodisperse entities. Thus, a complete toolkit of fluorescence fluctuation microscopy is presented for the investigation of nanomaterial biophysics in subcellular microenvironments that contributes to develop a framework of intracellular nanoparticle delivery routes. PMID:23637951

Hemmerich, Peter H.; von Mikecz, Anna H.

2013-01-01

395

New Generation Live Vaccines against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Designed by Reverse Genetics  

PubMed Central

Development of a live pediatric vaccine against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is complicated by the need to immunize young infants and the difficulty in balancing attenuation and immunogenicity. The ability to introduce desired mutations into infectious virus by reverse genetics provides a method for identifying and designing highly defined attenuating mutations. These can be introduced in combinations as desired to achieve gradations of attenuation. Attenuation is based on several strategies: multiple independent temperature-sensitive point mutations in the polymerase, a temperature-sensitive point mutation in a transcription signal, a set of non–temperature-sensitive mutations involving several genes, deletion of a viral RNA synthesis regulatory protein, and deletion of viral IFN ?/? antagonists. The genetic stability of the live vaccine can be increased by judicious choice of mutations. The virus also can be engineered to increase the level of expression of the protective antigens. Protective antigens from antigenically distinct RSV strains can be added or swapped to increase the breadth of coverage. Alternatively, the major RSV protective antigens can be expressed from transcription units added to an attenuated parainfluenza vaccine virus, making a bivalent vaccine. This would obviate the difficulties inherent in the fragility and inefficient in vitro growth of RSV, simplifying vaccine design and use. PMID:16113487

Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

2005-01-01

396

The thing about the quotes: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a paper about the educational landscape of Music Technology in Britain. Betweening is a project funded by Palatine (Higher Education Academy). Its aim is to investigate and collate information about existing models for running degree courses related to the interdisciplinary field of music technology in higher education institutions in Britain. The gathering of this information will result in

Carola Boehm

397

Where the Wild Things Are  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few people realize that coyotes prowl the country's major urban areas. By tracking them on their turf, one Boston-area high school teacher and his students are helping scientists to learn more about the oft-misunderstood animals. Here, the author features David Eatough, a science teacher at Revere High School just north of Boston, and his…

Capone, Lisa

2005-01-01

398

Is exercise a 'good thing'?  

PubMed

Exercise has emerged as a central concern in longevity and good health in the past 25 years, partly due to national pride, partly to business entrepreneurship and partly to scientific fact. There is still little hard evidence that exercise can prevent cardiovascular diseases. Any attempts at sound enquiry into the effects of exercise are hampered by the lack of specific regimens and reliable measuring devices. On the other hand, there is considerable morbidity associated with injudicious exercise activities. PMID:21274251

Godfrey, C M

1986-01-01

399

Living ring-opening homo- and copolymerisation of ?-caprolactone and L-lactide by cyclic ?-ketiminato aluminium complexes.  

PubMed

A series of novel aluminium complexes containing cyclic ?-ketiminato ligands of type Me2Al{O-[(ArN=CHC4H4(C6H4))]} (3a, Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3; 3b, Ar = C6H5; 3c, Ar = C6F5) have been prepared in high yields. These complexes were identified by (1)H, (13)C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. X-ray structural analyses for 3a-c revealed that these complexes have a distorted tetrahedral geometry around Al, and both bond distances and bond angles were considerably influenced by the ligand structure. These complexes were tested as catalyst precursors for ring-opening polymerisation of ?-caprolactone (?-CL) and L-lactide (L-LA) in the presence of 2-propanol as an initiator. Complex 3a could polymerize ?-CL in a controlled manner with high efficiency. Based on the living characteristics, the preparation of well-defined block copolymers PCL-b-PLLA via sequential addition of monomers was performed by 3a. Note that complex 3c exhibited rather high catalytic activity for the ROP of L-LA with narrow molecular weight distribution. The monomer conversion reached completion only in 4 h when the L-LA/Al molar ratio was 100 at 80 °C. PLLA-b-PCL copolymers were thus easily produced by 3c. PMID:24296527

Liu, Yan; Dong, Wei-Shi; Liu, Jing-Yu; Li, Yue-Sheng

2014-02-01

400

Feasibility of imaging living cells at subnanometer resolutions by ultrafast X-ray diffraction.  

PubMed

Detailed structural investigations on living cells are problematic because existing structural methods cannot reach high resolutions on non-reproducible objects. Illumination with an ultrashort and extremely bright X-ray pulse can outrun key damage processes over a very short period. This can be exploited to extend the diffraction signal to the highest possible resolution in flash diffraction experiments. Here we present an analysis of the interaction of a very intense and very short X-ray pulse with a living cell, using a non-equilibrium population kinetics plasma code with radiation transfer. Each element in the evolving plasma is modeled by numerous states to monitor changes in the atomic populations as a function of pulse length, wavelength, and fluence. The model treats photoionization, impact ionization, Auger decay, recombination, and inverse bremsstrahlung by solving rate equations in a self-consistent manner and describes hydrodynamic expansion through the ion sound speed. The results show that subnanometer resolutions could be reached on micron-sized cells in a diffraction-limited geometry at wavelengths between 0.75 and 1.5 nm and at fluences of 1011-1012 photons microm-2 in less than 10 fs. Subnanometer resolutions could also be achieved with harder X-rays at higher fluences. We discuss experimental and computational strategies to obtain depth information about the object in flash diffraction experiments. PMID:19079804

Bergh, Magnus; Huldt, Gösta; Tîmneanu, Nicusor; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hajdu, Janos

2008-01-01

401

Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [(13) N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.  

PubMed

Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the ?-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain. Synapse 69:26-32, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25196365

Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

2015-01-01

402

Fungicidal Mechanisms of Cathelicidins LL-37 and CATH-2 Revealed by Live-Cell Imaging  

PubMed Central

Antifungal mechanisms of action of two cathelicidins, chicken CATH-2 and human LL-37, were studied and compared with the mode of action of the salivary peptide histatin 5 (Hst5). Candida albicans was used as a model organism for fungal pathogens. Analysis by live-cell imaging showed that the peptides kill C. albicans rapidly. CATH-2 is the most active peptide and kills C. albicans within 5 min. Both cathelicidins induce cell membrane permeabilization and simultaneous vacuolar expansion. Minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) are in the same order of magnitude for all three peptides, but the mechanisms of antifungal activity are very different. The activity of cathelicidins is independent of the energy status of the fungal cell, unlike Hst5 activity. Live-cell imaging using fluorescently labeled peptides showed that both CATH-2 and LL-37 quickly localize to the C. albicans cell membrane, while Hst5 was mainly directed to the fungal vacuole. Small amounts of cathelicidins internalize at sub-MFCs, suggesting that intracellular activities of the peptide could contribute to the antifungal activity. Analysis by flow cytometry indicated that CATH-2 significantly decreases C. albicans cell size. Finally, electron microscopy showed that CATH-2 affects the integrity of the cell membrane and nuclear envelope. It is concluded that the general mechanisms of action of both cathelicidins are partially similar (but very different from that of Hst5). CATH-2 has unique features and possesses antifungal potential superior to that of LL-37. PMID:24492359

Ordonez, Soledad R.; Amarullah, Ilham H.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.

2014-01-01

403

Detection of live Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells by PMA-qPCR.  

PubMed

A unique open reading frame (ORF) Z3276 was identified as a specific genetic marker for E. coli O157:H7. A qPCR assay was developed for detection of E. coli O157:H7 by targeting ORF Z3276. With this assay, we can detect as low as a few copies of the genome of DNA of E. coli O157:H7. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were confirmed by intensive validation tests with a large number of E. coli O157:H7 strains (n = 369) and non-O157 strains (n = 112). Furthermore, we have combined propidium monoazide (PMA) procedure with the newly developed qPCR protocol for selective detection of live cells from dead cells. Amplification of DNA from PMA-treated dead cells was almost completely inhibited in contrast to virtually unaffected amplification of DNA from PMA-treated live cells. Additionally, the protocol has been modified and adapted to a 96-well plate format for an easy and consistent handling of a large number of samples. This method is expected to have an impact on accurate microbiological and epidemiological monitoring of food safety and environmental source. PMID:24513664

Li, Baoguang; Hu, Zonglin; Elkins, Christopher A

2014-01-01

404

Privacy Preservation Technologies in Internet of Things  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the beginning of the Internet thirty years ago, we have witnessed a\\u000anumber of changes in the application of communication technologies. Today, the\\u000aInternet can be described to a large extent as a ubiquitous infrastructure that\\u000ais always accessible. After the era of connecting places and connecting people,\\u000athe Internet of the future will also connect things. The idea

Jaydip Sen

2010-01-01

405

Incongruent Counterparts And Things In Themselves  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Those who cannot yet rid themselves of the notion that space and time are actual qualities inherent in things in themselves\\u000a may exercise their acumen on the following paradox. When they have in vain attempted its solution and are free from prejudices\\u000a at least for a few moments, they will suspect that the degradation of space and time to mere

James Cleve

406

How NAO Does Its Thing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This essay explains the mechanics of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO can be defined most simply as the relationship between the center of low atmospheric pressure over Iceland and the center of high pressure above the Azores. It is the interaction between these systems that directs the flow of air and causes persistent weather patterns. The writer states that a common goal of the recent work on the NAO is to analyze past events to determine if our current positive trend is being goaded by an outside influence namely, global warming. The site features an interactive graph that relates the oscillation to historical events. It also has links to other essays, a video, an interactive map, and outside sources for more information about NAO.

407

Breakthrough Towards the Internet of Things  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter we introduce the Internet of Things (IoT) from the perspective of companies. The Internet of Things mainly refers to the continuous tracking and observation of real-world objects over the Internet. The resulting information can be used to optimize many processes along the entire value chain. Important prerequisites for the IoT are that the objects of interest can be uniquely identified and that their environment can be monitored with sensors. Currently, technologies, such as different types of barcodes, active and passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and wireless sensor networks play the most important role. However, these technologies either do not provide monitoring of their environment or they are too expensive for widespread adoption. Organic Electronics is a new technology that allows printing electronic circuits using organic inks. It will produce ultra-low cost smart labels equipped with sensors, and thus it will become an enabler of the IoT. We discuss how organic smart labels can be used to implement the Internet of Things. We show how this technology is expected to develop. Finally, we indicate technical problems that arise when processing large volumes of data that will result from the usage of organic smart labels in business applications.

Chaves, Leonardo W. F.; Nochta, Zoltán

408

Women and the vision thing.  

PubMed

Are women rated lower than men in evaluations of their leadership capabilities because of lingering gender bias? No, according to an analysis of thousands of 360-degree assessments collected by Insead's executive education program. That analysis showed that women tend to outshine men in all areas but one: vision. Unfortunately, that exception is a big one. At the top tiers of management, the ability to see opportunities, craft strategy based on a broad view of the business, and inspire others is a must-have. To explore the nature of the deficit, and whether it is a perception or reality, Insead professor Ibarra and doctoral candidate Obodaru interviewed female executives and studied the evaluation data. They developed three possible explanations. First, women may do just as much as men to shape the future but go about it in a different way; a leader who is less directive, includes more people, and shares credit might not fit people's mental model of a visionary. Second, women may believe they have less license to go out on a limb. Those who have built careers on detail-focused, shoulder-to-the-wheel execution may hesitate to stray from facts into unprovable assertions about the future. Third, women may choose not to cultivate reputations as big visionaries. Having seen bluster passed off as vision, they may dismiss the importance of selling visions. The top two candidates for the Democratic nomination for U.S. president in 2008 offer an instructive parallel. The runner-up, Hillary Clinton, was viewed as a get-it-done type with an impressive, if uninspiring, grasp of policy detail. The winner, Barack Obama, was seen as a charismatic visionary offering a hopeful, if undetailed, future. The good news is that every dimension of leadership is learned, not inborn. As more women become skilled at, and known for, envisioning the future, nothing will hold them back. PMID:19227409

Ibarra, Herminia; Obodaru, Otilia

2009-01-01

409

Science Oxford Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first things visitors will see when visiting the Science Oxford Live website are a few shots from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibit that will soon be at the brick and mortar location of Science Oxford Live. It's hard to decide which is cuter: the hippo, the monkey, or the giraffe's tail. Visitors will certainly want to check out the video podcasts available through iTunes, and even may even subscribe to the podcasts to receive the latest episodes. These webcasts, found under the Watch Us tab, are recordings of live events that took place at Science Oxford Live. They cover topics such as Parkinson's disease, the sleep versus wake balance, the science and history of chocolate, the curse of consciousness, and how "doctors and other health professionals sometimes do more harm than good to patients, despite acting with the best of intentions." The Discovery Zone is a place for kids which is best experienced in person, but online it still has valuable lessons to teach, and it's worth a look.

2012-02-10

410

Hydrogen Evolution from Alfalfa and Clover Nodules and Hydrogen Uptake by Free-Living Rhizobium meliloti†  

PubMed Central

A series of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii strains were used as inocula for alfalfa and clover, respectively, grown under bacteriologically controlled conditions. Replicate samples of nodules formed by each strain were assayed for rates of H2 evolution in air, rates of H2 evolution under Ar and O2, and rates of C2H2 reduction. Nodules formed by all strains of R. meliloti and R. trifolii on their respective hosts lost at least 17% of the electron flow through nitrogenase as evolved H2. The mean loss from alfalfa nodules formed by 19 R. meliloti strains was 25%, and the mean loss from clover nodules formed by seven R. trifolii strains was 35%. R. meliloti and R. trifolii strains also were cultured under conditions that were previously established for derepression of hydrogenase synthesis. Only strains 102F65 and 102F51 of R. meliloti showed measurable activity under free-living conditions. Bacteroids from nodules formed by the two strains showing hydrogenase activity under free-living conditions also oxidized H2 at low rates. The specific activity of hydrogenase in bacteroids formed by either strain 102F65 or strain 102F51 of R. meliloti was less than 0.1% of the specific activity of the hydrogenase system in bacteroids formed by H2 uptake-positive Rhizobium japonicum USDA 110, which has been investigated previously. R. meliloti and R. trifolii strains tested possessed insufficient hydrogenase to recycle a substantial proportion of the H2 evolved from the nitrogenase reaction in nodules of their hosts. Additional research is needed, therefore, to develop strains of R. meliloti and R. trifolii that possess an adequate H2-recycling system. PMID:16345361

Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Maier, Robert J.; Evans, Harold J.

1979-01-01

411

Elastic Membrane Heterogeneity of Living Cells Revealed by Stiff Nanoscale Membrane Domains  

PubMed Central

Many approaches have been developed to characterize the heterogeneity of membranes in living cells. In this study, the elastic properties of specific membrane domains in living cells are characterized by atomic force microscopy. Our data reveal the existence of heterogeneous nanometric scale domains with specific biophysical properties. We focused on glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, which play an important role in membrane trafficking and cell signaling under both physiological and pathological conditions and which are known to partition preferentially into cholesterol-rich microdomains. We demonstrate that these GPI-anchored proteins reside within domains that are stiffer than the surrounding membrane. In contrast, membrane domains containing the transferrin receptor, which does not associate with cholesterol-rich regions, manifest no such feature. The heightened stiffness of GPI domains is consistent with existing data relating to the specific condensation of lipids and the slow diffusion rates of lipids and proteins therein. Our quantitative data may forge the way to unveiling the links that exist between membrane stiffness, molecular diffusion, and signaling activation. PMID:17981897

Roduit, Charles; van der Goot, F. Gisou; De Los Rios, Paolo; Yersin, Alexandre; Steiner, Pascal; Dietler, Giovanni; Catsicas, Stefan; Lafont, Frank; Kasas, Sandor

2008-01-01

412

Kidney Function in Living Donors Undergoing Nephrectomy by Sevoflurane or Desflurane Anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Although there is no clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity with the volatile anesthetics currently used in general anesthesia, a better agent should be needed in terms of preserving postoperative renal function in living kidney donors who have only single remaining kidney. The purpose of the current retrospective, single-center study was to evaluate and compare renal function of living kidney donors after nephrectomy under either sevoflurane or desflurane anesthesia. Materials and Methods From January 2006 through December 2011, a total of 228 donors undergoing video assisted minilaparotomy surgery nephrectomy for kidney donation were retrospectively enrolled in the current study. The donors were categorized into a sevoflurane group or desflurane group based on the type of volatile anesthetic used. We collected laboratory data from the patients preoperatively, immediately after the operation, on the first postoperative day and on the third postoperative day. We also compared renal function of the kidney donors after donor nephrectomy by comparing creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results The decrease in renal function after surgery in both groups was the most prominent on the first postoperative day. There were no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative changes of creatinine or eGFR. Conclusion Sevoflurane and desflurane can be used safely as volatile anesthetics in donors undergoing nephrectomy. PMID:23918580

Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Kim, Myoung-Soo; Ham, Sung-Yeon

2013-01-01

413

Late cataractogenesis caused by particulate radiations and photons in long-lived mammalian species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiation cataractogenesis induced by small acute doses of particulate radiations and photons in the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), the beagle dog (Canis familiaris) and the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is discussed in the context of the use of animal models to assess the radiation hazards faced by humans during lengthy sojourns in deep space. Attention is paid to: 1) the importance of lifespan studies with long-lived species - the above animals have median lifespans in captivity of 5-7, 13-14 and -25 years, respectively; 2) the magnitudes of possible dose thresholds for cataractogenesis from sparsely ionizing radiations and the modifications of those thresholds by the late degenerative phase of the phenomenon.

Lett, J. T.; Lee, A. C.; Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.

414

Drug screening boosted by hyperpolarized long-lived States in NMR.  

PubMed

Transverse and longitudinal relaxation times (T1? and T1 ) have been widely exploited in NMR to probe the binding of ligands and putative drugs to target proteins. We have shown recently that long-lived states (LLS) can be more sensitive to ligand binding. LLS can be excited if the ligand comprises at least two coupled spins. Herein we broaden the scope of ligand screening by LLS to arbitrary ligands by covalent attachment of a functional group, which comprises a pair of coupled protons that are isolated from neighboring magnetic nuclei. The resulting functionalized ligands have longitudinal relaxation times T1 ((1) H) that are sufficiently long to allow the powerful combination of LLS with dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Hyperpolarized weak "spy ligands" can be displaced by high-affinity competitors. Hyperpolarized LLS allow one to decrease both protein and ligand concentrations to micromolar levels and to significantly increase sample throughput. PMID:25196781

Buratto, Roberto; Bornet, Aurélien; Milani, Jonas; Mammoli, Daniele; Vuichoud, Basile; Salvi, Nicola; Singh, Maninder; Laguerre, Aurélien; Passemard, Solène; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

2014-11-01

415

A review of "Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature: Reading Women's Lives, 1600-1680" by Sharon Cadman Seelig  

E-print Network

REVIEWS 161 Sharon Cadman Seelig. Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature: Reading Women?s Lives, 1600-1680. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. 214pp. 75.00 cloth; Review by JULIE D. CAMPBELL, EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY...REVIEWS 161 Sharon Cadman Seelig. Autobiography and Gender in Early Modern Literature: Reading Women?s Lives, 1600-1680. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. 214pp. 75.00 cloth; Review by JULIE D. CAMPBELL, EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY...

Campbell, Julie D.

2007-01-01

416

Inhibition of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Replication by CD81 T Lymphocytes from Macaques Immunized with Live Attenuated SIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Characterization of immune responses induced by live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains may yield clues to the nature of protective immunity induced by this vaccine approach. We investigated the ability of CD81 T lymphocytes from rhesus macaques immunized with the live, attenuated SIV strain SIVmac239Dnef or SIVmac239D3 to inhibit SIV replication. CD81 T lymphocytes from immunized animals were able

MARIE-CLAIRE GAUDUIN; RHONA L. GLICKMAN; ROBERT MEANS

417

Characteristics of microwave plasma induced by lasers and sparks.  

PubMed

Characteristics of the plasma light source of microwave (MW) plus laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) or spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) were studied. The plasma was initially generated by laser- or spark-induced breakdown as a plasma seed. A plasma volume was then grown and sustained by MWs in air. This MW plasma had a long lifetime, large volume, strong emission intensity, and high stability with time. These characteristics are suitable for applications in the molecular analysis of gases such as OH or N(2). Because the plasma properties did not depend on laser or spark plasma seeds, the resulting plasma was easily controllable by the input power and duration of the MWs. Therefore, a significant improvement was achieved in the spectral intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. For example, the peak intensity of the Pb spectra of LIBS increased 15 times, and that of SIBS increased 880 times without increases in their background noise. A MW-enhanced plasma light source could be used to make the total system smaller and cheaper than a conventional LIBS system, which would be useful for real-time and in situ analysis of gas molecules in, for example, food processing, medical applications, chemical exposure, and gas turbine or automobile air-to-fuel ratio and exhaust gas measurement. PMID:22410918

Ikeda, Yuji; Tsuruoka, Ryoji

2012-03-01

418

Activities of Daily Living Indexing by Hierarchical HMM for Dementia Diagnostics  

E-print Network

This paper presents a method for indexing human ac- tivities in videos captured from a wearable camera being worn by patients, for studies of progression of the dementia diseases. Our method aims to produce indexes to facilitate the navigation throughout the individual video recordings, which could help doctors search for early signs of the dis- ease in the activities of daily living. The recorded videos have strong motion and sharp lighting changes, inducing noise for the analysis. The proposed approach is based on a two steps analysis. First, we propose a new approach to segment this type of video, based on apparent motion. Each segment is characterized by two original motion de- scriptors, as well as color, and audio descriptors. Second, a Hidden-Markov Model formulation is used to merge the multimodal audio and video features, and classify the test segments. Experiments show the good properties of the ap- proach on real data.

Karaman, Svebor; Dartigues, Jean-François; Gaëstel, Yann; Mégret, Rémi; Pinquier, Julien

2011-01-01

419

Live imaging reveals active infiltration of mitotic zone by its stem cell niche  

PubMed Central

Stem cells niches are increasingly recognized as dynamic environments that play a key role in transducing signals that allow an organism to exert control on its stem cells. Live imaging of stem cell niches in their in vivo setting is thus of high interest to dissect stem cell controls. Here we report a new microfluidic design that is highly amenable to dissemination in biology laboratories that have no microfluidics expertise. This design has allowed us to perform the first time lapse imaging of the C. elegans germline stem cell niche. Our results show that this niche is strikingly dynamic, and that morphological changes that take place during development are the result of a highly active process. These results lay the foundation for future studies to dissect molecular mechanisms by which stem cell niche morphology is modulated, and by which niche morphology controls stem cell behavior. PMID:23695198

Wong, Brandon G.; Paz, Adrian; Corrado, Michael A.; Ramos, Brian R.; Cinquin, Amanda

2013-01-01

420

Introduction of Foreign Genes into Tissues of Living Mice by DNA-Coated Microprojectiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Foreign genes were expressed in liver and skin cells of live mice by using a new apparatus to accelerate DNA-coated microprojectiles into tissues. After introduction of a plasmid in which the firefly luciferase gene was controlled by the human ?-actin promoter, luciferase activity was detectable for up to 14 days in mouse tissues (skin and liver). In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that microprojectiles penetrated through multiple cell layers without evidence of tissue injury and that 10-20% of the cells in the bombarded area expressed the foreign gene. An advantage of the new design is that internal organs, such as liver, can be transfected without subjecting the tissue to a vacuum. This procedure potentially is applicable to a wide variety of tissues and cell types for studies of transcriptional control elements and for expression of foreign proteins in intact animals.

Sanders Williams, R.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Riedy, Mark; Devit, Michael J.; McElligott, Sandra G.; Sanford, John C.

1991-04-01

421

Utilization of Soil C and N by Microbial Groups in the Presence of Living Roots  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of living plant roots and N on belowground C dynamics were examined in a CA annual grassland soil (Haploxeralf) during a 2-y greenhouse study. The fate of 13C-labeled plant roots ( Avena barbata L.) and soil were followed under planted and unplanted conditions; and with and without N addition (20 kg N ha-1 season-1). The treatments were applied during 2 growing seasons and each growing season was followed by a dry, fallow period (~ 150-d long). Living roots increased the turnover rate and loss of belowground 13 C during and after 2 seasons compared with unplanted soils. After 2 seasons, planted soils had 21% less belowground 13C present than in unplanted soils. However, total soil C increased in planted soils by 4.6% compared to unplanted after 2 seasons. N additions decreased belowground 13C turnover during the first treatment season in both planted and unplanted soils, however no effect of N on soil C was observed thereafter. Planted soils had larger microbial biomass and the community structure differed compared with unplanted soils. Planted soils had higher proportions of gram (-) bacteria, while unplanted soils had higher proportions of gram (+) bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi. New root and exudate C supplied from living roots increased the turnover of microbial assimilated 13C compared with unplanted for all microbial groups. This greater turnover of belowground 13C was especially significant for gram (-) bacteria, which were stimulated in the planted soil. In contrast, the activity among microbial groups in unplanted soils was similar to that prior to the initiation of the treatments and soil wet-up. Our findings suggest that A. barbata roots increased soil C levels over time because root and exudate C inputs are significant, however that C increase will be moderated by an overall faster C mineralization rate of belowground C. Increased N deposition may slow soil C losses, however, they appear minor and temporary at the rates applied and for the plant-soil system studied.

Bird, J.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M.

2007-12-01

422

Use and Evaluation of Disposable Absorbent Products for Managing Fecal Incontinence by Community-Living People  

PubMed Central

Purpose The use of disposable absorbent products by community-dwelling people with fecal incontinence was described. Differences in product use or evaluation based on sex, age, or severity of fecal incontinence were evaluated. Suggestions for modifying absorbent products to be more suitable for fecal incontinence were described. Methods A survey was administered to 189 community-living individuals with fecal incontinence at the start of a clinical trial about the effects of dietary fiber on fecal incontinence Results An absorbent product was used to manage fecal incontinence by 45% (86/189) of respondents. More women (88%, 76/86, p = .009) and older persons 65+ years (44%, 38/86, p = .001) wore an absorbent product. Participants who wore an absorbent product for fecal incontinence had a higher (worse) usual fecal incontinence severity score (median 4.75, range 1–27, p = .006). Sixty three users wore pantiliners and were the only ones who used more than three products per day. Feminine hygiene products were worn more than incontinence products. Half of users were satisfied with the product they used. Evaluations of product features differed by type of product; odor control had some of the lowest ratings. Conclusions Community-living individuals with FI, especially women and older individuals, tend to wear absorbent products. Perceptions of FI severity, preference, leakage of liquid stool, and presence of urinary incontinence influence the product type and pattern of wear. Participants report that modification of several features of absorbent products might make them more suitable for FI and increase satisfaction. PMID:21464770

Bliss, Donna Z.; Lewis, Jaclyn; Hasselman, Keegan; Savik, Kay; Lowry, Ann; Whitebird, Robin

2011-01-01

423

Removal of long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 ?m from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener’s energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Cushman, P.; Pepin, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

2013-08-08

424

Removal of long-lived $^{222}$Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

E-print Network

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the $^{222}$Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double-beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener's energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

R. W. Schnee; M. A. Bowles; R. Bunker; K. McCabe; J. White; P. Cushman; M. Pepin; V. E. Guiseppe

2014-04-23

425

Nuclear dynamics of influenza A virus ribonucleoproteins revealed by live-cell imaging studies  

SciTech Connect

The negative sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by the viral RNA polymerase. Only four viral polypeptides are required but multiple cellular components are potentially involved. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterise the dynamics of GFP-tagged viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components in living cells. The nucleoprotein (NP) displayed very slow mobility that significantly increased on formation of transcriptionally active RNPs. Conversely, single or dimeric polymerase subunits showed fast nuclear dynamics that decreased upon formation of heterotrimers, suggesting increased interaction of the full polymerase complex with a relatively immobile cellular component(s). Treatment with inhibitors of cellular transcription indicated that in part, this reflected an interaction with cellular RNA polymerase II. Analysis of mutated influenza virus polymerase complexes further suggested that this was through an interaction between PB2 and RNA Pol II separate from PB2 cap-binding activity.

Loucaides, Eva M. [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Kirchbach, Johann C. von [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Foeglein, Agnes [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom); Sharps, Jane; Fodor, Ervin [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Park Road, Oxford, OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Digard, Paul, E-mail: pd1@mole.bio.cam.ac.u [Division of Virology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP (United Kingdom)

2009-11-10

426

Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis infection in living raccoon dogs assessed by hematological examination.  

PubMed

The prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis in free-ranging raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus) was examined in the southeast region of Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, using a rapid immunomigration (RIM) test kit. Between April 2007 and March 2010, we examined 108 raccoon dogs rescued and housed by the Kanazawa Zoological Garden. D. immitis infection was found in 8 (7.4%) raccoon dogs. This is the first report to reveal the prevalence of D. immitis infection in living raccoon dogs. The prevalence of the infection was lower than previously reported values obtained on postmortem examination. One reason might be that the present study included young raccoon dogs infected with immature worms. Significant high-risk areas of D. immitis infection in the raccoon dogs were not observed. PMID:21293077

Kido, Nobuhide; Wada, Yuko; Takahashi, Maya; Kamegaya, Chihiro; Omiya, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

2011-06-01

427

Removal of long-lived 222Rn daughters by electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the 222Rn decay chain on detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay. Removal of tens of microns of material via electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing radon daughters implanted into material surfaces. Some applications, however, require the removal of uniform and significantly smaller thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate that electropolishing < 1 ?m from stainless-steel plates reduces the contamination efficiently, by a factor > 100. Examination of electropolished wires with a scanning electron microscope confirms that the thickness removed is reproducible and reasonably uniform. Together, these tests demonstrate the effectiveness of removal of radon daughters for a proposed low-radiation, multi-wire proportional chamber (the BetaCage), without compromising the screener's energy resolution. More generally, electropolishing thin layers of stainless steel may effectively remove radon daughters without compromising precision-machined parts.

Schnee, R. W.; Bowles, M. A.; Bunker, R.; McCabe, K.; White, J.; Cushman, P.; Pepin, M.; Guiseppe, V. E.

2013-08-01

428

Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to 17 picomoles per cubic centimeter and dissociation constants from 3.4 to 4.7 nanomolar. Maximum binding for human putamen at autopsy was 15 picomoles per cubic centimeter. Studies of [11C]raclopride binding indicate that clinically effective doses of chemically distinct neuroleptic drugs result in 85 to 90 percent occupancy of D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of schizophrenic patients.

Farde, Lars; Hall, Hakan; Ehrin, Erling; Sedvall, Goran

1986-01-01

429

Characterization of the adhesive mucilages secreted by live diatom cells using atomic force microscopy.  

PubMed

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) resolved the topography and mechanical properties of two distinct adhesive mucilages secreted by the marine, fouling diatom Craspedostauros australis. Tapping mode images of live cells revealed a soft and cohesive outer mucilage layer that encased most of the diatom's siliceous wall, and force curves revealed an adhesive force of 3.58 nN. High loading force, contact mode imaging resulted in cantilever 'cleaned' cell walls, which enabled the first direct observation of the active secretion of soft mucilage via pore openings. A second adhesive mucilage consisted of strands secreted at the raphe, a distinct slit in the silica wall involved in cell-substratum attachment and motility. Force measurements revealed a raphe adhesive strand(s) resistant to breaking forces up to 60 nN, and these strands could only be detached from the AFM cantilever probe using the manual stepper motor. PMID:12022272

Higgins, Michael J; Crawford, Simon A; Mulvaney, Paul; Wetherbee, Richard

2002-03-01

430

Long-Lived Quasistationary Coherences in a V-type System Driven by Incoherent Light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical study of noise-induced quantum coherences in a model three-level V-type system interacting with incoherent radiation, an important prototype for a wide range of physical systems ranging from trapped ions to biomolecules and quantum dots. By solving the quantum optical equations of motion, we obtain analytic expressions for the noise-induced coherences and show that they exhibit an oscillating behavior in the limit of large excited level spacing ? (? /??1, where ? is the radiative decay width). Most remarkably, we find that in the opposite limit of small level spacing ?/??1, appropriate for large molecules, (a) the coherences can survive for an extremely long time ? =(2/?)(?/?)-2 before eventually decaying to zero, and (b) coherences at short times can be substantial. We further show that the long-lived coherences can survive environmental relaxation and decoherence, suggesting implications to the design of quantum heat engines and to incoherent light excitation of biological systems.

Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

2014-09-01

431

Long-lived waveguides and sound-wave generation by laser filamentation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discover long-lived (microsecond-scale) optical waveguiding in the wake of atmospheric laser filaments. We also observe the formation and then outward propagation of the consequent sound wave. These effects may be used for remote induction of atmospheric long-lived optical structures from afar which could serve for a variety of applications.

Lahav, Oren; Levi, Liad; Orr, Itai; Nemirovsky, Ron A.; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Kaminer, Ido; Segev, Mordechai; Cohen, Oren

2014-08-01

432

Disease Risk Factors and Disease Progress in Coast Live Oak and Tanoak Affected by  

E-print Network

ramorum Canker (Sudden Oak Death)1 Tedmund J. Swiecki2 and Elizabeth Bernhardt2 Abstract This paper and from 12 percent to 23 percent in tanoak. About 58 percent of coast live oak and 47 percent of tanoak-GTR-196 384 canker in coast live oak. The presence of unweathered, brown bark in bark furrows was the only

Standiford, Richard B.

433

Starting characteristics of direct current motors powered by solar cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct current motors are used in photovoltaic systems. Important characteristics of electric motors are the starting to rated current and torque ratios. These ratios are dictated by the size of the solar cell array and are different for the various dc motor types. Discussed here is the calculation of the starting to rated current ratio and starting to rated torque ratio of the permanent magnet, and series and shunt excited motors when powered by solar cells for two cases: with and without a maximum-power-point-tracker (MPPT) included in the system. Comparing these two cases, one gets a torque magnification of about 3 for the permanent magnet motor and about 7 for other motor types. The calculation of the torques may assist the PV system designer to determine whether or not to include an MPPT in the system.

Singer, S.; Appelbaum, J.

1989-01-01

434

The characteristics of sprays produced by coaxial airblast atomisers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measurements of droplet size, velocity, liquid flux and concentration were made in sprays produced by a coaxial airblast atomizer using a phase Doppler anemometer. The atomizer comprised a liquid jet with exit diameter varied between 1.1 and 2.3 mm positioned in the center of a gaseous annular stream. The characteristics of the preburner sprays of the main engine of the space shuttle were simulated by using water and air respectively replacing liquid oxygen and hydrogen. Reduction of the diameter of the liquid tube was found to improve the atomization and reduce the rate of spread of sprays with similar gas-to-liquid velocity ratio. The presence of a converging nozzle at the exit of the gaseous jet improved the atomization and increased the rate of spread of sprays with gas-to-liquid velocity ratio up to around 45, but had no effect for higher velocity ratios.

Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

1993-01-01

435

The Next Big Thing - Eric Haseltine  

SciTech Connect

Eric Haseltine, Haseltine Partners president and former chief of Walt Disney Imagineering, presented "The Next Big Thing," on Sept. 11, at the ORNL. He described the four "early warning signs" that a scientific breakthrough is imminent, and then suggested practical ways to turn these insights into breakthrough innovations. Haseltine is former director of research at the National Security Agency and associate director for science and technology for the director of National Intelligence, former executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering and director of engineering for Hughes Aircraft. He has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web and Discover Magazine.

Eric Haseltine

2009-09-16

436

13 Things That Saved Apollo 13  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Perhaps, the most exciting rescue, terrestrial or extra-terrestrial, is the successful return of the Apollo 13 crew to Earth in April of 1970. The mission s warning system engineer, Jerry Woodfill, who remains a NASA employee after 47 years of government service has examined facets of the rescue for the past 42 years. He will present "13 Things That Saved Apollo 13" from the perspective of his real time experience as well as two score years of study. Many are recent discoveries never before published in mission reports, popular books or documentary and Hollywood movies depicting the rescue.

Woodfill, Jared

2012-01-01

437

The Next Big Thing - Eric Haseltine  

ScienceCinema

Eric Haseltine, Haseltine Partners president and former chief of Walt Disney Imagineering, presented "The Next Big Thing," on Sept. 11, at the ORNL. He described the four "early warning signs" that a scientific breakthrough is imminent, and then suggested practical ways to turn these insights into breakthrough innovations. Haseltine is former director of research at the National Security Agency and associate director for science and technology for the director of National Intelligence, former executive vice president of Walt Disney Imagineering and director of engineering for Hughes Aircraft. He has 15 patents in optics, special effects and electronic media, and more than 100 publications in science and technical journals, the web and Discover Magazine.

Eric Haseltine

2010-01-08

438

Cell observation method under near-living conditions by scanning electron microscopy.  

PubMed

Most cells of multicellular organisms have "primary cilia", which are single, non-motile, and sensory cilia. They have been reported to detect mechanical stimulation and transform it into internal cell, but the mechanisms are not still well known. Dermal papilla (DP) cells, which locate in the skin and regulate hair follicle development and hair cycle, were reported to have their primary cilia by immune-fluorescent method [1], but their detailed structure and function is unclear.For observation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), biological specimens are conventionally fixed with glutaraldehyde and dehydrated in 30%, 50%, 70%, 90% and 100% ethanol. Then specimens are dried by butyl alcohol and coated with gold. It takes several days to prepare these specimens. Using many chemical reagent and many steps in this way may lead to destroy biological specimens structure. Here we attempted a recently proposed method using ionic liquid to prepare cell samples in near- living conditions observed the structure of DP cells (2D and clumps) with primary cilia.This time, we used ionic liquid for preparing specimens. First, cultured cells were fixed in glutaraldehyde, and immersed in ionic liquid. Next, the specimens were coated with gold and observed by SEM. Thus, it takes shorter time due to fewer step than conventional method and the process has no drying step. In a conventional way, we got the micrographs of 2D cultured DP cells and observed the cilium of DP cells (200-nm in diameter and 1.5um in length) on nucleus (15-um). In addition we could observe the clumps of DP cells and the cilia-like structure (?12-um), but they do not attach to scaffoldings of the surface, probably due to drying. In observation using ionic liquid, we got the micrographs of 2D cultured DP cells and observed the cilium- like structure (200-nm in diameter and 2.1-um in length) on nucleus (30-um), as well. In this case, we could not find the cilia- like structure in the clumps of DP cells yet, but they well attached to the scaffoldings and kept the extending structure such as filopodia, too.We here observed DP cells and their cilia in near-living conditions. Unfortunately, we could not primary cilia in clumps of DP cells immersed in ionic liquid yet, but we could reduce damage receiving in the process of specimen's preparation, especially drying. In addition, we are challenging the observation using not only ionic liquid but also nano-suits by detergents [2] and the observation the cilia by SEM after identifying them by fluorescence microscopy, such as CLEM. PMID:25359834

Tanaka, Misaki; Matsushima, Kazuyuki; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi; Yasunaga, Takuo

2014-11-01

439

Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling  

SciTech Connect

We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

Charriere, Guillaume M. [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Cousin, Beatrice [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Arnaud, Emmanuelle [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Saillan-Barreau, Corinne [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Andre, Mireille [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massoudi, Ali [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Dani, Christian [UMR 6543 CNRS, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Penicaud, Luc [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Casteilla, Louis [UMR 5018 CNRS-UPS, IFR31, Bat L1, CHU Rangueil, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

2006-10-15

440

Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001). Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%), career planning (59.6%), and experiences abroad (57.6%). Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Stormann, Sylvere; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

2012-01-01

441

Probing Binding Pocket of Serotonin Transporter by Single Molecular Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells*  

PubMed Central

The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). The interaction energies involved in binding of such compounds to the transporter are unknown. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe single molecular interactions between the serotonin transporter and MFZ2-12 (a potent cocaine analog) in living CHOK1 cells. For the AFM measurements, MFZ2-12 was immobilized on AFM tips by using a heterobifunctional cross-linker. By varying the pulling velocity in force distance cycles drug-transporter complexes were ruptured at different force loadings allowing for mapping of the interaction energy landscape. We derived chemical rate constants from these recordings and compared them with those inferred from inhibition of transport and ligand binding: koff values were in good agreement with those derived from uptake experiments; in contrast, the kon values were scaled down when determined by AFM. Our observations generated new insights into the energy landscape of the interaction between SERT and inhibitors. They thus provide a useful framework for molecular dynamics simulations by exploring the range of forces and energies that operate during the binding reaction. PMID:22033932

Wildling, Linda; Rankl, Christian; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Gruber, Hermann J.; Holy, Marion; Newman, Amy Hauck; Zou, Mu-Fa; Zhu, Rong; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.; Hinterdorfer, Peter

2012-01-01

442

"We always live in fear": antidepressant prescriptions by unlicensed doctors in India.  

PubMed

In India, psychopharmaceuticals have seeped deep into both formal and informal pharmaceutical markets, and unlicensed "quack" doctors have become ready prescribers of psychotropics. These ethnographic insights trouble policies that aim at closing the treatment gap for psychiatric medications by "task shifting" to low-skilled health workers as if medications were exclusively available by prescription from public sector psychiatrists. This article describes what these doctors, known as rural medical practitioners (RMPs), know about psychotropics and how they use them in everyday practice. Unlicensed doctors learn about psychopharmaceuticals through exchanges with licensed doctors, through visits by drug companies' sales representatives, and through prescriptions brought by patients. Although the RMPs exist outside the margins of legitimacy, they are constrained by a web of relations with patients, licensed doctors, pharmacists, drug wholesalers, and government agents. The RMPs do not only prescribe but also dispense, which leads to conflicts with licensed medicine sellers. They "always live in fear" both because they are illegal prescribers and because they are illegal sellers of medications. The article shows that any form of strategic ignorance among policy makers about the local importance of informal practitioners in India can only lead to lopsided interventions. PMID:24705978

Ecks, Stefan; Basu, Soumita

2014-06-01

443

Noninvasive detection of neural progenitor cells in living brains by MRI  

PubMed Central

The presence of pericytes in brain regions undergoing repair is evident of the recruitment of bone marrow-derived multipotent regenerative cells to the neurovascular unit during angiogenesis. At present, post mortem sampling is the only way to identify them. Therefore, such cell typing is inadequate for preserving neural progenitor cells for any meaningful stem cell therapy. We aimed to target cerebral pericytes in vivo using dual gene transcript-targeted MRI (GT-tMRI) in male C57black6 mice after a 60-min bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). We attached superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) to phosphorothioate-modified micro-DNA that targets actin or nestin mRNA. Because BCAO compromises the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induces expression of ?-smooth muscle (?SM)-actin and nestin antigens by pericytes in new vessels, we delivered pericyte-specific magnetic resonance contrast agents (SPION-actin or SPION-nestin at 4 mg Fe/kg) by i.p. injection to C57black6 mice that had experienced BCAO. We demonstrated that the surge in cerebral iron content by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry matched the increase in the frequency of relaxivity. We also found that SPION-nestin was colocalized in ?SM- actin- and nestin-expressing pericytes in BCAO-treated C57black6 or transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg(CAG-mRFP1) 1F1Hadj/J, expressing red fluorescent protein by actin promoter]. We identified pericytes in the repair patch in living brains after BCAO with a voxel size of 0.03 mm3. The presence of electron-dense nanoparticles in vascular pericytes in the region of BBB injury led us to draw the conclusion that GT-tMRI can noninvasively reveal neural progenitor cells during vascularization.—Liu, C. H., Ren, J. Q., You, Z., Yang, J., Liu, C.-M., Uppal, R., Liu, P. K. Noninvasive detection of neural progenitor cells in living brains by MRI. PMID:22198388

Liu, Christina H.; Ren, Jia Q.; You, Zerong; Yang, Jinsheng; Liu, Charng-Ming; Uppal, Ritika; Liu, Philip K.

2012-01-01

444

Characteristics of analgesias induced by brief or prolonged stress.  

PubMed

Some characteristics of the effects of brief and prolonged stress on tail-flick latency are described. The pharmacological profiles of the latency responses to 30 sec and 30 min footshock are strikingly different. Thus, the increase of tail-flick latency after 30 sec shock is unaffected by naloxone and enhanced by drugs which decrease 5HT or DA-dependent transmission, while the increase after 30 min shock is blocked by naloxone and also by the above drugs. The increased tail-flick latency after 30 sec shock only occurs if tail-flick latency is also determined before shock. This finding, together with the attenuation or enhancement of the post-shock response by drugs that similarly affect conditioned avoidance behavior, suggests that the increased latency after brief shock occurs through a mechanism that is related to passive avoidance learning. Finally, a new approach to the investigation of stress-induced analgesia is described in which neurochemical changes during prolonged immobilization stress are repeatedly monitored using cisternal CSF samples taken in parallel with tail-flick latency measurements. PMID:3524390

Curzon, G; Hutson, P H; Kennett, G A; Marcou, M; Gower, A; Tricklebank, M D

1986-01-01

445

Pursuing Goals with Others: Group Identification and Motivation Resulting from Things Done versus Things Left Undone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses what factors best motivate individuals to work toward shared goals. We propose that when individuals do not identify highly with a group, their contributions will mimic others': An emphasis on things done will increase their contributions toward achieving a goal, because such emphasis suggests the goal is worth pursuing.…

Fishbach, Ayelet; Henderson, Marlone D.; Koo, Minjung

2011-01-01

446

Isolation of receptor-ligand pairs by capture of long-lived multivalent interaction complexes.  

PubMed

We have combined phage display and array screening for the rapid isolation of pairs of interacting polypeptides. Our strategy, named SAC (selection by avidity capture), is based on the avidity effect, the formation of highly stable complexes formed by multivalent interactions; in our case, between a receptor (multivalently displayed on phage) and a ligand (coexpressed as a multimeric fusion protein). Capture of the long-lived interaction complex allows the isolation of phage bearing cognate interaction pairs, as we demonstrate for a range of interactions, including Ab-antigen pairs and the rapamycin-dependent interaction of FKBP-12 and FRAP. Cognate phage are enriched by SAC up to 1000-fold and interacting pairs can be identified by array screening. Application of SAC to Ab-antigen interactions as a model system yielded over 140 specific Abs to a single antigen and 92 Abs to three different fetal human brain antigens in a single round of SAC each. Our results suggest that SAC should prove useful for the identification and study of receptor-ligand interactions in particular among extracellular proteins, as well as for the rapid generation of specific Abs to multiple antigens. PMID:12084913

de Wildt, Ruud M T; Tomlinson, Ian M; Ong, Jennifer L; Holliger, Philipp

2002-06-25

447

Teaching Consumer Selection of Market Quality Beef by Observable Characteristics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through a series of five tests, a slide-tape instructional presentation on the identification of beef quality was developed. It was determined that the slide-tape instruction can enable consumers to score more accurately characteristics of raw beef in relation to the characteristics of cooked beef. (Editor/TA)

Halvorson, Dorothy; Jacobson, Marion

1977-01-01

448

Water hammer simulation by implicit method of characteristic  

Microsoft Academic Search

An Implicit Method of Characteristics is proposed in this paper to alleviate the shortcomings and limitations of the mostly used conventional Method of Characteristics (MOC). An element-wise definition is used for all the devices that may be used in a pipeline system and the corresponding equations are derived in an element-wise manner. The proper equations defining the behavior of each

M. H. Afshar; M. Rohani

2008-01-01

449

A Framework Linking NonLiving and Living Systems: Classification of Persistence, Survival and Evolution Transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a framework for analyzing the development, operation and failure to survive of all things, living, non-living or\\u000a organized groupings. This framework is a sequence of developments that improve survival capability. Framework processes range\\u000a from origination of any entity\\/system, to the development of increased survival capability and development of life-forms and\\u000a organizations that use intelligence. This work deals with

L. Dennis; R. W. Gray; J. Brender McNair; N. J. Woolf

2009-01-01

450

Transcription Inhibition by Platinum DNA Cross-links in Live Mammalian Cells  

E-print Network

We have investigated the processing of site-specific Pt?DNA cross-links in live mammalian cells to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The activity of platinum drugs ...

Ang, Wee Han

451

[Absorption characteristics of molybdenum by reed and cattail].  

PubMed

The adsorption characteristics of reed and cattail to molybdenum were studied. The toxicity, removal rate, adsorption process and accumulation of Mo were investigated in the short-term indoor-culture experiment. The effects of Mo adsorbed by two plants in nutrition solution with different concentrations were also studied. Due to the Mo toxicity, the color of stems and leaves of two plants had become scorch and the transpiration was declined. The cattail illustrated higher tolerance to Mo than reed when Mo concentration was in the range of 2-20 mg x L(-1). The removal rate of Mo by cattail was 87%, which was higher than reed (62%) with Mo concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The absorption process of Mo by two plants was homeostasis, and the passivity absorption was the main absorption mechanism. Mo enrichment amount in cattail was higher than that in reed, and Mo concentration in shoot were higher than that in roots. The results displayed that cattail was Mo hyper accumulator. The absorption of Mo was not enhanced with the increase of nutrition solution concentration, due to the competition of other ions. The study suggested that the absorption capacity of Mo was significant by the two plants, and cattail was better for Mo removal than reed. PMID:22295632

Lian, Jian-Jun; Xu, Shi-Guo; Han, Cheng-Wei

2011-11-01

452

HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma felt by people living with HIV from Buea, Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The universal access to treatment and care for people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is a major problem especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of HIV infected people live. However, equally important is the fact that HIV\\/AIDS-related stigma is recognized to be a major obstacle to successfully control the spread of this disease. In this study we measured the HIV\\/AIDS-related

Christoph A. Jacobi; Pascal N. J. I. Atanga; Leonard K. Bin; Victor Njie Mbome; Wilfred Akam; Johannes R. Bogner; Siegfried Kropf; Peter Malfertheiner

2012-01-01

453

Free-living amoebae: Biological by-passes in water treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Free-living amoebae constitute reservoirs for many bacteria including not only well-known pathogens but also emerging pathogens responsible for respiratory diseases, and contribute to the protection, survival and dissemination of these bacteria in water systems, despite the application of disinfection or thermal treatments. In this article we review the available information on the presence of free-living amoebae and amoebae-resisting bacteria in

Jean-François Loret; Gilbert Greub

2010-01-01

454

Living related liver transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liver transplantation from a brain death donor has not yet been accepted in Japan. The only alternative method at present is transplantation from a living donor. After the first successful living related liver transplantation was performed by Strong in Brisbane, Australia, Japanese hepatic and transplant surgeons also began to perform such operations. As of February 1991, 16 living related liver

Masatoshi Makuuchi; Hideo Kawarazaki; Tadashi Iwanaka; Naoshi Kamada; Tadatoshi Takayama; Masamitsu Kumon

1992-01-01

455

High resolution tumor targeting in living mice by means of multispectral optoacoustic tomography  

PubMed Central

Background Tumor targeting is of high clinical and biological relevance, and major efforts have been made to develop molecular imaging technologies for visualization of the disease markers in tissue. Of particular interest is apoptosis which has a profound role within tumor development and has significant effect on cancer malignancy. Methods Herein, we report on targeting of phosphatidylserine-exposing cells within live tumor allograft models using a synthetic near infrared zinc(II)-dipicolylamine probe. Visualization of the probe biodistribution is performed with whole body multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) system and subsequently compared to results attained by planar and tomographic fluorescence imaging systems. Results Compared to whole body optical visualization methods, MSOT attains remarkably better imaging capacity by delivering high-resolution scans of both disease morphology and molecular function in real time. Enhanced resolution of MSOT clearly showed that the probe mainly localizes in the vessels surrounding the tumor, suggesting that its tumor selectivity is gained by targeting the phosphatidylserine exposed on the surface of tumor vessels. Conclusions The current study demonstrates the high potential of MSOT to broadly impact the fields of tumor diagnostics and preclinical drug development. PMID:22464315

2012-01-01

456

Evaluation of YadC protein delivered by live attenuated Salmonella as a vaccine against plague.  

PubMed

Yersinia pestis YadB and YadC are two new outer membrane proteins related to its pathogenicity. Here, codon-optimized yadC, yadC810 (aa 32-551), or yadBC antigen genes delivered by live attenuated Salmonella strains are evaluated in mice for induction of protective immune responses against Y. pestis CO92 through subcutaneous or intranasal challenge. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC, YadC810, or YadBC develop significant serum IgG responses to purified recombinant YadC protein. For subcutaneous challenge (approximately 230 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92), mice immunized with Salmonella synthesizing YadC or YadC810 are afforded 50% protection, but no protection by immunization with the Salmonella strain synthesizing YadBC. None of these antigens provided protection against intranasal challenge (approximately 31 LD50 of Y. pestis CO92). In addition, subcutaneous immunization with purified YadC810 protein emulsified with alum adjuvant does not elicit a protective response against Y. pestis administered by either challenge route. PMID:23913628

Sun, Wei; Olinzock, Joseph; Wang, Shifeng; Sanapala, Shilpa; Curtiss, Roy

2014-03-01

457

Characteristics of pulsed power generator by versatile inductive voltage adder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pulsed power generator by inductive voltage adder, versatile inductive voltage adder (VIVA-I), which features a high average potential gradient (2.5 MV/m), was designed and is currently in operation,. It was designed to produce an output pulse of 4 MV/60 ns by adding 2 MV pulses in two-stages of induction cells, where amorphous cores are installed. As a pulse forming line, we used a Blumlein line with the switching reversed, where cores are automatically biased due to the presence of prepulse. Good reproducibility was obtained even in the absence of the reset pulse. Within [similar]40% of full charge voltage, pulsed power characteristics of Marx generator, pulse forming line (PFL), transmission line (TL), and induction cells were tested for three types of loads; open-circuit, dummy load of liquid (CuSO4) resistor, and electron beam diode. In the open-circuit test, [similar]2.0 MV of output voltage was obtained with good reproducibility. Dependences of output voltage on diode impedances were evaluated by using various dummy loads, and the results were found as expected. An electron-beam diode was operated successfully, and [similar]18 kA of beam current was obtained at the diode voltage of [similar]1 MV.

Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Shimiya, Kouichi; Masugata, Katsumi; Shigeta, Masao; Shibata, Kazuhiko

2005-10-01

458

Shock characteristics obtained by nanosecond analyses for aerospace materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For numerical designs of safety cabin and seats to maintain a survivable environment for passengers and crew in a crash occurrence, very high-strain-rate characteristics of many kinds aerospace materials are indispensable. So, stress-time histories are obtained in two glassy polymers (polymethyl methacrylate: PMMA and polycarbonate: PC) and two kinds of light metals (commercially pure aluminum: A1100-H14[JIS] and super duralumin: A2024-T3[JIS]) at impact velocity 600 to 700 m/s using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) gauges in a plate impact testing by a powder gun. Nanosecond analyses are used to extract strain-time histories from experimental stress data. Then, stress-strain curves at very high-strain-rates (106 to 107 [1/s]) in shock wave region under conditions of uniaxial strain. A drop-hammer compression test is also used to determine stress-strain curves at medium strain rates (102 [1/s]) under conditions of uniaxial stress by using an extrapolation method. For low strain rates (ca. 10-4 [1/s]), stress-strain curves are determined under conditions of uniaxial stress by a universal testing machine combined with the extrapolation method. Power law relations between stress and strain-rate are observed with the glassy polymers under uniaxial strain conditions in a very wide strain-rate range.

Sato, Yasuhisa; Ueno, Taku

2005-04-01

459

Video Surveillance System for Elderly Person Living Alone by Person Tracking and Fall Detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection of accidents on elderly person living alone and the communication between the elderly person and his/her family are very important. This paper describes a new method for tracking and fall detection of elderly person using omni-directional image sensor, and the Itawari-kan communication system that supports their communications and gives alarms for detected accidents on the elderly person. This system tracks the person's head position in real-time by image processing on images captured by some omni-directional image sensor. Then, the system transmits the information of the detected head position to another site. The computer of recipient site generates the computer graphics animation of the tracked person and displays the animation on a monitor. When the system detects an accident from the head position, the system gives an alarm. This method reduces traffic on network and keeps the privacy for the tracked person. We made a prototype system of the Itawari-kan communication system. Experiments on the system showed good feasibility of the proposed system.

Doi, Motonori; Inoue, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yutaro; Oshiro, Osamu

460

Hysteretic effects in lateral nanostructures caused by long-lived quantum-Hall eddy currents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coulomb blockade studies of lateral quantum dots and measurements of the quantised conductance of quantum point contacts, in high magnetic fields, reveal novel features which are hysteretic in magnetic-field sweep direction. These features are associated with long-lived eddy currents, induced in the 2D electron gas leads in these devices as the magnetic field sweeps and the 2DEG enters the quantum Hall effect state. Torsion-balance magnetometry measurements confirm the presence of these induced currents, and their influence on the nanostructures. The decay of the eddy currents, after the magnetic field sweep is stopped, exhibits two distinct regimes: a fast initial exponential decay followed by a much longer power-law decay in which the size of the eddy current falls typically to 60% of its original value in one day. The interpretation of these observations is that the Coulomb blockade and quantum point contact devices are influenced by the local Hall potential at the edges of the 2DEG leads. The Hall potential changes the local chemical potential of the leads, and hence the properties of the devices, in a manner which reverses when the field sweep direction is reversed.

Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Usher, A.; Sachrajda, A. S.; Elliott, M.; Lapointe, J.; Gupta, J.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Studenikin, S.

2006-08-01

461

Imaging of protein kinase C activation by FRET during proliferation induced by low-energy laser irradiation in living cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) play an important role in cellular proliferation, and low-energy laser irradiation (LELI) can enhance cellular proliferation. The present work contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of action by studying effects of LELI at the dose of 0.8 J/cm2 on PKCs activities in the single lung adenocarcinoma cell (ASTC-a-1) and in real time by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. C-kinase activity reporter (CKAR), consisting of a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), the FHA2 phosphothreonine-binding domain, a PKC substrate sequence, and a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), was utilized. The living cell imaging showed a decrease in FRET in the cytosol and nucleus after the cells were treated with LELI. These results suggest that PKCs could be activated by LELI throughout the cell, and the proliferation of ASTC-a-1 cells could be modulated by the activated PKCs.

Gao, Xuejuan; Chen, Tongsheng; Xing, Da; Wang, Fang

2005-01-01

462

Public by Day, Private by Night: Examining the Private Lives of Kenya's Public Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the emergence of the public university in Kenya as a key provider of private higher education, characterised mainly by the phenomenon of the "private public university student." It probes the broader socio-economic reforms circumscribing the privatisation of Kenya's public universities and the local and global forces…

Wangenge-Ouma, Gerald

2012-01-01

463

Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.  

PubMed

The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed. PMID:20155290

Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

2010-05-01

464

Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models  

SciTech Connect

A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

2008-04-01

465

Meteor trail characteristics observed by high time resolution lidar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report and analyse the characteristics of 1382 meteor trails based on a sodium data set of ~ 680 h. The observations were made at Yanqing (115.97° E, 40.47° N), China by a ground-based Na fluorescence lidar. The temporal resolution of the raw profiles is 1.5 s and the altitude resolution is 96 m. We discover some characteristics of meteor trails different from those presented in previous reports. The occurrence heights of the trails follow a double-peak distribution with the peaks at ~ 83.5 km and at ~ 95.5 km, away from the peak height of the regular Na layer. 4.7% of the trails occur below 80 km, and 3.25% above 100 km. 75% of the trails are observed in only one 1.5 s profile, suggesting that the dwell time in the laser beam is not greater than 1.5 s. The peak density of the trails as a function of height is similar to that of the background sodium layer. The raw occurrence height distribution is corrected taking account of three factors which affect the relative lifetime of a trail as a function of height: the meteoroid velocity (which controls the ratio of Na/Na+ ablated); diffusional spreading of the trail; and chemical removal of Na. As a result, the bi-modal distribution is more pronounced. Modelling results show that the higher peak corresponds to a meteoroid population with speeds between 20 and 30 km s-1, whereas the lower peak should arise from much slower particles in a near-prograde orbit. It is inferred that most meteoroids in this data set have masses of ~ 1 mg, in order for ablation to produce sufficient Na atoms to be detected by lidar. Finally, the evolution of longer-duration meteor trails is investigated. Signals at each altitude channel consist of density enhancement bursts with the growth process usually faster than the decay process, and there exists a progressive phase shift among these altitude channels.

Liu, Y. J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Clemesha, B. R.; Wang, J. H.; Cheng, X. W.

2014-10-01

466

Detection of Glycoprotein Receptors on Blotting Membranes by Binding of Live Bacteria and Amplification by Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conditions have been adapted for detecting bacteria bound to glycoprotein receptors on blotting membranes using a self-enhancing detection method based on bacterial growth. Neutrophil plasma membrane proteins, mediating adherence of mannose-binding type-1-fimbriated Escherichia coli and concanavalin A (Con A) to intact human neutrophils, were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred onto a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. The PVDF membrane was immersed

A. Karlsson; M. Markfjall; H. Lundqvist; N. Stromberg; C. Dahlgren

1995-01-01

467

Improving Service Management in the Internet of Things  

PubMed Central

In the Internet of Things (IoT) research arena, many efforts are devoted to adapt the existing IP standards to emerging IoT nodes. This is the direction followed by three Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Working Groups, which paved the way for research on IP-based constrained networks. Through a simplification of the whole TCP/IP stack, resource constrained nodes become direct interlocutors of application level entities in every point of the network. In this paper we analyze some side effects of this solution, when in the presence of large amounts of data to transmit. In particular, we conduct a performance analysis of the Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP), a widely accepted web transfer protocol for the Internet of Things, and propose a service management enhancement that improves the exploitation of the network and node resources. This is specifically thought for constrained nodes in the abovementioned conditions and proves to be able to significantly improve the node energetic performance when in the presence of large resource representations (hence, large data transmissions).

Sammarco, Chiara; Iera, Antonio

2012-01-01

468

Impact-absorbing characteristics by applying ultrasonic vibration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An impact-absorbing device that facilitates the application of ultrasonic vibrations was devised. Vibration distributions, springback characteristics, and impact-absorption characteristics were measured. We confirm that the springback amount decreases and the impact is absorbed upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations. When an aluminum alloy plate is crumpled, the maximum output voltage of the attached shock sensor decreases to 65% upon the application of ultrasonic vibrations as compared to when the ultrasonic vibrations are not applied.

Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Ueki, Eiichiro; Tsujino, Jiromaru

2012-05-01

469

Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy.  

PubMed

Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments. PMID:9018691

Teal, T H; Chapman, M; Guillemette, T; Margulis, L

1996-12-01

470

Opto-injection into single living cells by femtosecond near-infrared laser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation presents a novel technique to deliver membrane impermeable molecules into single living cells with the assistance of femtosecond (fs) near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. This approach merges ultrafast laser technology with key biological, biomedical, and medical applications, such as gene transfection, gene therapy and drug delivery. This technique promises several major advantages, namely, very high transfection efficiency, high cell survival rate (?100%) and fully preserved cell viabilities. It is also a promising method to deliver molecules into cells that are difficult or even completely resistant to established physical methods, such as microinjection by glass pipettes, electroporation, and biolistics. In this work, the system for fs NIR opto-injection was designed and built. Successful fs NIR opto-injection has been performed on several cell systems including single mammalian cells (bovine aortic endothelial cells), marine animal eggs (Spisula solidissima oocytes), and human cancer cells (fibrosarcoma HT1080) cultured in a tissue-like environment. The connections between laser parameters and cell responses were explored through further experiments and in-depth analyses, especially the relationship between dye uptake rate and incident laser intensity, and the relationship between pore size created on cell membranes and incident laser intensity. Dye uptake rate of the target cells was observed to depend on incident laser intensity. Pore size was found dependent on incident laser intensity. The conclusion was made that laser-induced breakdown and plasma-induced ablation in cell membrane are the physical principles that govern the process of fs NIR opto-injection.

Peng, Cheng

471

Long-lived quasi-stationary coherences in V-type system driven by incoherent light  

E-print Network

We present a theoretical study of noise-induced quantum coherences in a model three-level V-type system interacting with incoherent radiation, an important prototype for a wide range of physical systems ranging from trapped ions to biomolecules and quantum dots. By solving the quantum optical equations of motion for the V-type system, we obtain analytical expressions for the noise-induced coherences and show that they exhibit an oscillating behavior in the limit of large excited level spacing $\\Delta$ ($\\Delta /\\gamma \\gg 1$, where $\\gamma$ is the radiative decay rate). Most remarkably, we find that in the opposite limit of small level spacing $\\Delta/\\gamma \\ll 1$, appropriate for large molecules, (a) the coherences can survive for an arbitrarily long time $\\tau=(2/\\gamma) (\\Delta/\\gamma)^{-2}$ before eventually decaying to zero, and (b) coherences at short times can be substantial. We further show that the long-lived coherences can be robust against environmental relaxation and decoherence, and discuss implications to the design of quantum heat engines and incoherent light excitation of biological systems.

Timur V. Tscherbul; Paul Brumer

2014-03-26

472

GRANMA manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Living Quicksand  

E-print Network

Abstract The image of quicksand merciless swallowing a victim has inspired the fantasy of kids and helped writers and moviemakers to get rid of evil figures. Is this really possible? This is still disputed since till today it is not even clear what quicksand exactly is. In soil mechanics, the “quick-condition ” is usually described as a liquefaction due to high water pressure essentially possible with any soil. However, previous studies have detected anomalous rheological properties from natural quicksand. Pushed by these contradicting points of view we set off to Lençois Maranhenses in North-East Brazil, where quicksands are common, to investigate rheology and strength in situ. We found that along very quiet drying lakes cyanobacteria cement an impermeable crust above a suspension of grains. Beyond a critical pressure, the crust fails releasing water from the collapsing colloidal structure and radically changing the depth dependence of the shear strength from a constant to a linear function. The sedimenting solid fraction and the rapid increase of shear strength can indeed trap an intruder endangering his life if the basin is sufficiently deep. As opposed to some previous studies, we find that this quicksand condition cannot be restored once it has collapsed. Finally, we also show some preliminary results from a contact dynamics model specially designed to mimic the living quicksand behavior.

Dirk Kadau; Hans J. Herrmann; José S. Andrade; Ascânio Dias Araújo; Luiz José C; Luis P. Maia; Dirk Kadau; Hans J. Herrmann; José S. Andrade; Dias Araújo; Luiz José; C. Bezerra; Luis P. Maia

2008-01-01

473

Free-living spirochetes from Cape Cod microbial mats detected by electron microscopy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spirochetes from microbial mats and anaerobic mud samples collected in salt marshes were studied by light microscopy, whole mount and thin section transmission electron microscopy. Enriched in cellobiose-rifampin medium, selective for Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, seven distinguishable spirochete morphotypes were observed. Their diameters ranged from 0.17 micron to > 0.45 micron. Six of these morphotypes came from southwest Cape Cod, Massachusetts: five from Microcoleus-dominated mat samples collected at Sippewissett salt marsh and one from anoxic mud collected at School Street salt marsh (on the east side of Eel Pond). The seventh morphotype was enriched from anoxic mud sampled from the north central Cape Cod, at the Sandy Neck salt marsh. Five of these morphotypes are similar or identical to previously described spirochetes (Leptospira, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi and Treponema), whereas the other two have unique features that suggest they have not been previously described. One of the morphotypes resembles Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi (the largest free-living spirochete described), in its large variable diameter (0.4-3.0 microns), cytoplasmic granules, and spherical (round) bodies with composite structure. This resemblance permits its tentative identification as a Sippewissett strain of Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Microbial mats samples collected in sterile Petri dishes and stored dry for more than four years yielded many organisms upon rewetting, including small unidentified spirochetes in at least 4 out of 100 enrichments.

Teal, T. H.; Chapman, M.; Guillemette, T.; Margulis, L.

1996-01-01