Science.gov

Sample records for ljudmila ljapnikova linda

  1. Linda and friends

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Curriero, N.; Gelernter, D.

    1986-08-01

    Linda consists of a few simple operators designed to support and simplify the construction of explicitly-parallel programs. Linda has been implemented on ATandT Bell Labs' S/Net multicomputer and, in a preliminary way, on an Ethernet-based MicroVAX network and an Intel iPSC hypercube. Parallel programming is often described as being fundamentally harder than conventional, sequential programming, but in our experience (limited so far, but growing) it isn't. Parallel programming in Linda is conceptually the same order of task as conventional programming in a sequential language. Parallelism does, though, encompass a potentially difficult problem. A conventional program consists of one executing process, of a single point in computational time-space, but a parallel program consists of many, and to the extent that we have to worry about the relationship among these points in time and space, the mood turns nasty. Linda's mission, however, is to make it largely unnecessary to think about the coupling between parallel processes. Linda's uncoupled processes, in fact, never deal with each other directly. A parallel program in Linda is a spatially and temporally unordered bag of processes, not a process graph.

  2. Linda S. Gottfredson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Howard; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Linda Gottfredson (nee Howarth), who obtained her BA (psychology, Phi Beta Kappa) from UC Berkeley in 1969, served in the Peace Corps in the Malaysian Health Service from 1969 to 1972, and received her PhD (sociology) from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in 1976. She was Research Scientist at JHU's Center for…

  3. p4-Linda: A portable implementation of Linda

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R.M.; Leveton, A.L.; Lusk, E.L.

    1993-07-01

    Facilities such as interprocess communication and protection of shared resources have been added to operating systems to support multiprogramming and have since been adapted to exploit explicit multiprocessing within the scope of two models: the shared-memory model and the distributed (message-passing) model. When multiprocessors (or networks of heterogeneous processors) are used for explicit parallelism, the difference between these models is exposed to the programmer. The p4 tool set was originally developed to buffer the programmer from synchronization issues while offering an added advantage in portability, however two models are often still needed to develop parallel algorithms. We provide two implementations of Linda in an attempt to support a single high-level programming model on top of the existing paradigms in order to provide a consistent semantics regardless of the underlying model. Linda`s fundamental properties associated with generative communication eliminate the distinction between shared and distributed memory.

  4. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTUR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    At 90 years of age, the APTA may be facing some of the greatest national and global challenges of its history. Membership has grown from 238 in 1921 to over 70,000 in 2011, but the expansion of the APTA may be restrictive to individual participation. A leadership gap appears imminent in practice and education. Fostering every member to understand the APTA and its great work is essential to ensuring a profession that lives its core values and meets societal needs. The Linda Crane Memorial Lecture in 2011 celebrated a vision of the APTA's 100th birthday with every member serving as a “professional centenarian” who stewards the organization to continued greatness. PMID:21637394

  5. Linda Sue Park: A Writer Found

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierpont, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    This article profiles Newbery Award-winning author Linda Sue Park, a special breed of author who writes so convincingly about the past it is as if she herself has actually lived these stories from a time long gone. She has provided such spectacular glimpses into Korea's storied past with books such as "A Single Shard" (Clarion, 2001), "The Kite…

  6. Ruptures of vulnerability: Linda Stein's Knight Series.

    PubMed

    Bible, Ann Vollmann

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Monique Wittig, this article understands Linda Stein's Knight Series as a lacunary writing communicating both her challenges to come to representation and her creative registration of subjectivity. The argument is grounded in an exploration of the rich interplay of power and vulnerability across the series as against the discourse of escapist fashion. Specifically, Stein's critical contradictions of inside and outside, conflated temporality, disjunctions between decoration and abstraction, and fluidity of sex and gender are examined. The discussion is elaborated through consideration of the work of Julia Kristeva, Elizabeth Grosz, and Hayao Miyazaki. PMID:20408009

  7. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Linda Godwin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda Godwin is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. She gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), her role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how she will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Godwin ends with her thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  8. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  9. Astronaut Linda Godwin uses Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, Astronaut Linda M. Godwin uses the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX). The payload commander, as well as several other STS-59 crew members, spent some off-duty time using the amateur radio experiment to communicate with 'Hams' and students on Earth.

  10. A Conversation with Linda Christensen on Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, John

    2008-01-01

    High school teacher John Golden interviews social justice educator Linda Christensen. Golden and Christensen begin by expanding on an understanding of social justice and a teacher's role in the social justice classroom. They continue by addressing complicated issues of student empowerment, meeting state standards, and choosing appropriate texts…

  11. Restructuring the Community College at the Yorba Linda Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lyndon E.; Head, Fred L.

    An innovative educational program is being planned at the Yorba Linda Campus of the Northern Orange County (California) Community College District in an effort to increase enrollment and improve the financial status of the district. The proposed program involves the following components: (1) the adoption of a trimester-based educational system;…

  12. Narrating Socialization: Linda Scott DeRosier's Memoirs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locklear, Erica Abrams

    2007-01-01

    Linda Scott DeRosier's autobiographical accounts of literacy attainment in "Creeker: A Woman's Journey" and "Songs of Life and Grace" reveal that entrance into a secondary discourse community via literacy can bring both pleasure and pain. Analyzing the identity negotiations DeRosier encounters reveals that although she experiences a sense of loss…

  13. Astronaut Linda Godwin during contingency EVA training in WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Linda M. Godwin, payload commander, prepares to be submerged in a 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). STS-59 crewmembers are using the WETF to train for contingency space walks for the shuttle Endeavour mission. Godwin is standing on the platform in the full extravehicular mobility unit (EMU).

  14. Astronaut Linda Godwin during contingency EVA training in WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Linda M. Godwin, payload commander, prepares to donn her helmet before being submerged in a 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). STS-59 crewmembers are using the WETF to train for contingency space walks for the shuttle Endeavour mission. Godwin is wearing the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), communication carrier assembly (CCA) but no helmet.

  15. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ.

  16. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTURE: Striving for Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sherrill H

    2010-01-01

    Historically, invited lecturers have often challenged us to define excel lence in physical therapy practice, or in our academic programs. While some have addressed different char acteristics of excellence, our profession has not really come together to address 2 very important questions: what does “quality” mean in physical therapist education? And how do we measure it? Using 3 elements of Friendship, Leadership, and Mentoring, and Defining Excellence and juxtaposing these with Linda Crane and her life, a vision of excellence in physical therapy educational programs was explored in this invited lecture. The text of that lecture ensues. PMID:20520760

  17. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Johanning, J.; Maudsley, G.; Slaton, T.; Morton, P. )

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3[times]10[sup 10] protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90--100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron.

  18. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Hubbard, J; Johanning, J; Maudsley, G; Slaton, T; Morton, P

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3 x 10(10) protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90-100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron. PMID:7891629

  19. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-10

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  20. Requirements for the Loma Linda proton therapy accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, George; Ghebremedhin, Abiel

    1999-06-01

    More than eight years have passed since Loma Linda University Medical Center treated its first cancer patient with the world's first hospital based proton therapy accelerator. Using a synchrotron with extracted energies in the range of 70 to 250 MeV, nearly one hundred patients per day have been treated at the facility. Over the past five years, more than 97% of the patients received treatments on the day they were scheduled for irradiation. The activity schedules of accelerator maintenance and operations to maintain this patient load and accelerator reliability are presented in this paper. A typical 24-hour schedule of daily beam activities is presented. The specifications of what was needed in 1990 and what is needed now will also be discussed, as will an accelerator control system upgrade for achieving better intensity and energy control for more advanced dose localization. These new requirements include rapid energy and intensity changes within a patient treatment, fast beam abort systems, uniform beam spill, and energy control to better than 0.1%.

  1. 75 FR 63533 - Gulf & Ohio Railways Holding Co., Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen-Continuance in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Gulf & Ohio Railways Holding Co., Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C... Co., Inc. (G&O), H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen (the Claussens), noncarriers, have filed...

  2. Linda Finch speaks to children during World Flight in New Orleans, La.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Linda Finch, who re-created the flight of Amelia Earhardt's flight around the world 60 years ago, landed at New Orleans Lakefront Airport to speak to groups of inner-city school children during World Flight 1997. Stennis Space Center's Educator Resource Center played a role in the event by providing SSC-developed Geomap software to aid students in tracking Finch's flight.

  3. An Interview with Linda Tuhiwai Te Rina Smith, March 27, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Te Rina; Battiste, Marie; Bell, Lynne; Findlay, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Linda Tuhiwai Te Rina Smith--Maori researcher, educator, and activist--discusses key moments in the journey toward decolonization of Maori education, the impact of her book about decolonizing research methodologies, the concept of postcolonialism, challenges to the sustainability of social and educational change, disrupting the power relation…

  4. "Everything the World Turns on": Inclusion and Exclusion in Linda Hogan's "Power"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    In her novel "Power," Linda Hogan provides readers with a close look at how separatism and syncretism, or exclusion and inclusion, are complex ideologies that lead to complex decisions. A close look at the novel reveals that the tensions and sharp dichotomies between the traditional world of the Taiga elders and the European American world,…

  5. The Challenges of Supporting New Teachers: A Conversation with Linda Darling-Hammond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2012-01-01

    In this wide-ranging interview with Educational Leadership, Stanford University Professor of Education Linda Darling-Hammond discusses the kind of preparation and support new teachers need to survive their critical first years in the classroom. Among her central recommendations are more intensive mentoring that lasts through the first year of…

  6. Automated segmentation of chronic stroke lesions using LINDA: Lesion identification with neighborhood data analysis.

    PubMed

    Pustina, Dorian; Coslett, H Branch; Turkeltaub, Peter E; Tustison, Nicholas; Schwartz, Myrna F; Avants, Brian

    2016-04-01

    The gold standard for identifying stroke lesions is manual tracing, a method that is known to be observer dependent and time consuming, thus impractical for big data studies. We propose LINDA (Lesion Identification with Neighborhood Data Analysis), an automated segmentation algorithm capable of learning the relationship between existing manual segmentations and a single T1-weighted MRI. A dataset of 60 left hemispheric chronic stroke patients is used to build the method and test it with k-fold and leave-one-out procedures. With respect to manual tracings, predicted lesion maps showed a mean dice overlap of 0.696 ± 0.16, Hausdorff distance of 17.9 ± 9.8 mm, and average displacement of 2.54 ± 1.38 mm. The manual and predicted lesion volumes correlated at r = 0.961. An additional dataset of 45 patients was utilized to test LINDA with independent data, achieving high accuracy rates and confirming its cross-institutional applicability. To investigate the cost of moving from manual tracings to automated segmentation, we performed comparative lesion-to-symptom mapping (LSM) on five behavioral scores. Predicted and manual lesions produced similar neuro-cognitive maps, albeit with some discussed discrepancies. Of note, region-wise LSM was more robust to the prediction error than voxel-wise LSM. Our results show that, while several limitations exist, our current results compete with or exceed the state-of-the-art, producing consistent predictions, very low failure rates, and transferable knowledge between labs. This work also establishes a new viewpoint on evaluating automated methods not only with segmentation accuracy but also with brain-behavior relationships. LINDA is made available online with trained models from over 100 patients. PMID:26756101

  7. The Socially Just Face of Public Health Leadership Linda Rae Murray

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Linda Rae Murray, MD, MPH, a champion of social justice and outspoken advocate for the medically underserved for more than 40 years, is not easy to describe. Part E. F. Hutton (when she talks, people listen), part streetwise negotiator (she's not shy about dropping a four-letter word into conversation), she might come across as brash and intimidating to some. But those who know her well will attest to her softhearted interior, and her unwavering commitment to speaking out in the name of better health for all. PMID:21228283

  8. From fetal physiology to gene therapy: it all started in Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Lorijn, Ronald H W

    2014-01-01

    Just having finished medical school in the Netherlands, without basically any serious research experience, Lawrence Longo, Gordon Power and Ray Gilbert received this 25 year young man with open arms at the end of July 1977. The Center for Perinatal Biology of Loma Linda University (CPB) would become for the next 3 years not the just the center of my postdoctoral activities, it would also lay the foundation for the following decades. The next paragraphs will describe three key success factors that can be traced back to these formative years that have contributed so much to my professional career. PMID:25015804

  9. The socially just face of public health leadership Linda Rae Murray. Interview by Donya Lynn Currie.

    PubMed

    Murray, Linda Rae

    2011-02-01

    Linda Rae Murray, MD, MPH, a champion of social justice and outspoken advocate for the medically underserved for more than 40 years, is not easy to describe. Part E. F. Hutton (when she talks, people listen), part streetwise negotiator (she's not shy about dropping a four-letter word into conversation), she might come across as brash and intimidating to some. But those who know her well will attest to her softhearted interior, and her unwavering commitment to speaking out in the name of better health for all. PMID:21228283

  10. Water-induced fabrics of olivine in peridotites from the Lindas Nappe, Bergen arc, western Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sejin; Jung, Haemyeong; Austrheim, Hâkon

    2010-05-01

    The Bergen Arc, western Norway is composed of several units distributed in an arc shape. Lindas Nappe is one of these units. Two peridotite outcrops in Lindas Nappe anorthosite complex were studied to understand deformation conditions of olivine. A mylonite zone was found in the peridoties and deformation fabrics of small olivine in the area were also studied. Lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine was determined using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in SEM. Water content of olivine in the samples was measured using the Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We observed three different types of LPOs (E-, B-, and A-type) of olivine in a large grain area. Sample (372) showed that [100] axes of olivine are aligned subparallel to the lineation and [001] axes aligned normal to the foliation, which is known as E-type LPO of olivine (Jung et al., 2006). Three samples (375, 380, and 381) showed that [001] axes of olivine are aligned subparallel to the lineation and [010] axes aligned normal to the foliation, which is known as B-type LPO of olivine. Another sample (379) in the large grain area showed that [100] axes of olivine are aligned subparallel to the lineation and [010] axes aligned normal to the foliation, which is known as A-type LPO of olivine. On the other hand, we observed two types of LPOs of olivine in a mylonite zone with a small grain-size: B- and C-type. C-type LPO is characterized as [001] axes of olivine aligned subparallel to the lineation and [100] axes of olivine aligned nearly normal to the foliation. Previous experimental study showed that B-, C-, and E-type LPO patterns were observed in a wet condition and A-type LPO was observed in a dry condition (Jung et al., 2006). FTIR analysis of olivine revealed that a sample showing the A-type LPO showed only small IR absorption peaks in the range of wave numbers 3000 - 3750 cm-1. In contrast, samples showing B-, C-, and E-type LPO showed large IR absorption peaks in the

  11. 76 FR 13271 - Gulf & Ohio Railways, Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C. Claussen-Continuance in Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... and published in the Federal Register (75 FR 63,533). The exemption became effective on October 31... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Gulf & Ohio Railways, Inc., H. Peter Claussen and Linda C....

  12. Microdosimetry spectra of the Loma Linda proton beam and relative biological effectiveness comparisons.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Cortese, J; Ghebremedhin, A; Hubbard, J; Johanning, J; Koss, P; Maudsley, G; Slater, C R; Zuccarelli, C

    1997-09-01

    Protons have long been recognized as low LET radiation in radiotherapy. However, a detailed account of LET (linear energy transfer) and RBE (relative biological effectiveness) changes with incident beam energy and depth in tissue is still unresolved. This issue is particularly important for treatment planning, where the physical dose prescription is calculated from a RBE using cobalt as the reference radiation. Any significant RBE changes with energy or depth will be important to incorporate in treatment planning. In this paper we present microdosimetry spectra for the proton beam at various energies and depths and compare the results to cell survival studies performed at Loma Linda. An empirically determined biological weighting function that depends on lineal energy is used to correlate the microdosimetry spectra with cell survival data. We conclude that the variations in measured RBE with beam energy and depth are small until the distal edge of the beam is reached. On the distal edge, protons achieve stopping powers as high as 100 keV/micron, which is reflected in the lineal energy spectra taken there. Lineal energy spectra 5 cm beyond the distal edge of the Bragg peak also show a high LET component but at a dose rate 600 times smaller than observed inside the proton field. PMID:9304579

  13. Research activities at the Loma Linda University and Proton Treatment Facility--an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Green, L. M.; Gridley, D. S.; Archambeau, J. O.; Slater, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Loma Linda University (LLU) Radiobiology Program coordinates basic research and proton beam service activities for the university and extramural communities. The current focus of the program is on the biological and physical properties of protons and the operation of radiobiology facilities for NASA-sponsored projects. The current accelerator, supporting facilities and operations are described along with a brief review of extramural research projects supported by the program. These include space craft electronic parts and shielding testing as well as tumorigenesis and animal behavior experiments. An overview of research projects currently underway at LLU is also described. These include: 1) acute responses of the C57Bl/6 mouse immune system, 2) modulation of gene expression in the nematode C. elegans and rat thyroid cells, 3) quantitation of dose tolerance in rat CNS microvasculature, 4) behavioral screening of whole body proton and iron ion-irradiated C57Bl/6 mice, and 5) investigation of the role of cell integration into epithelial structures on responses to radiation.

  14. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Bauman, M.; Lesyna, D.; Miller, D.; Nusbaum, J.; Slater, J.; Johanning, J.; Miranda, J. ); DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Siebers, J. ); Ludewigt, B. )

    1991-11-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented (R. R. Wilson, Radiology {bold 47}, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. {bold 9}, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. {bold 10}, 831 (1983)). One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less then {plus minus}5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7{times}10{sup 9} protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5{times}10{sup 10} protons/spills for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation. The distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak was observed at 27.5-cm depth with an incident proton energy of 235 MeV. The dose at the distal edge falls from 90% to 10% of peak value in 7 mm.

  15. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Miller, D. ); Kross, B.J.; Anderson, D.F. ); DeLuca, P. Jr.; Siebers, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10{sup 10} and 10{sup 11} protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-{mu}m-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm{sup 2} and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10{sup 10} photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10{sup 7} photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10{sup 4} Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10{sup 3} protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10{sup 5} is available.

  16. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Bauman, M; Lesyna, D; Miller, D; Nusbaum, J; Slater, J; Johanning, J; Miranda, J; DeLuca, P M; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented [R. R. Wilson, Radiology 47, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983)]. One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less than +/- 5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7 x 10(9) protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5 x 10(10) protons/spill for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1661367

  17. A beam intensity monitor for the Loma Linda cancer therapy proton accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Miller, D; Kross, B J; Anderson, D F; DeLuca, P; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A beam intensity monitor was tested in a 230-MeV proton beam at the Loma Linda Proton Therapy Accelerator during its commissioning at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The intensity monitor was designed to regulate the beam intensity extracted from the proton synchrotron. The proton beam is tunable between 70 and 250 MeV with an adjustable intensity between 10(10) and 10(11) protons per spill. A beam spill is typically 1 s long with a 2-s repetition period. The intensity monitor must be radiation hard, expose minimum mass to the beam, and measure intensity to 1% in 1-ms time intervals. To this end, a 5-cm-thick xenon gas scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) was tested to measure its response to the proton beam. The gas cell was operated at 1.2 atm of pressure and has 12.7-microns-thick titanium entrance and exit foils. The total mass exposed to the beam is 0.14 g/cm2 and is dominated by the titanium windows. This mass corresponds to a range attenuation equal to 1.4 mm of water. The energy lost to the xenon gas is about 70 keV per proton. Each passing proton will produce approximately 2000 photons. With a detection efficiency on the order of 0.05% for this UV light, one would anticipate over 10(10) photoelectrons per second. In a 1-ms time bin there will be approximately 10(7) photoelectrons. This yields a resolution limited by systematics. For unregulated 0.4-s proton spills, we observe a response bandwidth in excess of 10(4) Hz. While signal-to-noise and linearity were not easily measured, we estimate as few as 10(3) protons can be observed suggesting a dynamic range in excess of 10(5) is available. PMID:1656180

  18. Ljudmila Petrushevskaja: A New Voice of Glasnost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Helen

    During the period of glasnost, between 1985 and 1990, all of Russian literature changed. After 60 years of division between official and unofficial, dissident and emigre, the publishing of Russian literature became unified. Censorship and government control practically disintegrated. Among the "new voices" in Russian literature is Ljudmila…

  19. The "Puerto Rican Exception": Persistent Poverty and the Conservative Social Policy of Linda Chavez. IPR Policy Forums Proceedings (New York, New York, November 6, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcon, Angelo, Ed.; Santiago, John, Ed.

    A policy forum featured a presentation by Linda Chavez on the public policy needs of the Puerto Rican community. The forum also included a panel of experts from the Puerto Rican community to provide critical feedback on Chavez's presentation. Chavez argued that Hispanic Americans can move into the mainstream of United States society, and that…

  20. Launching and Undergraduate Earth System Science Curriculum with a Focus on Global Sustainability: the Loma Linda University Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. E.; Dunbar, S. G.; Soret, S.; Wiafe, S.; Gonzalez, D.; Rossi, T.

    2004-12-01

    The vision of the School of Science and Technology (SST) at Loma Linda University (LLU) is to develop an interdisciplinary approach to doing science that bridges the social, biological, earth, and health sciences. It will provide opportunities for undergraduate, graduate, and professional students to apply new tools and concepts to the promotion of global service and citizenship while addressing issues of global poverty, health and disease, environmental degradation, poverty, and social inequality. A primary teaching strategy will be to involve students with faculty in applied field social and science policy research on "global sustainability" issues and problems in real places such as Fiji, Jamaica, Honduras, Bahamas, East Africa, and the US southwest (Great Basin, Salton Sea, coastal California, southern Utah). Recently we became a partner in the NASA/USRA ESSE21 Project (Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century). We bring to that consortium strengths and experience in areas such as social policy, sustainable development, medicine, environmental health, disaster mitigation, humanitarian relief, geoinformatics and bioinformatics. This can benefit ESSE21, the NASA Earth Enterprise Mission, and the wider geosciences education community by demonstrating the relevance of such tools, and methods outside the geosciences. Many of the graduate and undergraduate students who will participate in the new program come from around the world while many others represent underserved populations in the United States. The PI and Co-PIs have strong global as well as domestic experience serving underrepresented communities, e.g. Seth Wiafe from Ghana, Sam Soret from Spain, Stephen Dunbar from the South Pacific, and Robert Ford from Latin America and Africa. Our partnership in implementation will include other institutions such as: La Sierra University, the California State University, Pomona, Center for Geographic Information Science Research, ESRI, Inc., the University of

  1. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    PubMed

    Salto, Lorena M; Riggs, Matt L; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  2. Underrepresented Minority High School and College Students Report STEM-Pipeline Sustaining Gains After Participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Salto, Lorena M.; Riggs, Matt L.; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A.; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  3. Sailors' scurvy before and after James Lind--a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jeremy Hugh

    2009-06-01

    Scurvy is a thousand-year-old stereotypical disease characterized by apathy, weakness, easy bruising with tiny or large skin hemorrhages, friable bleeding gums, and swollen legs. Untreated patients may die. In the last five centuries sailors and some ships' doctors used oranges and lemons to cure and prevent scurvy, yet university-trained European physicians with no experience of either the disease or its cure by citrus fruits persisted in reviews of the extensive but conflicting literature. In the 20(th) century scurvy was shown to be due to a deficiency of the essential food factor ascorbic acid. This vitamin C was synthesized, and in adequate quantities it completely prevents and completely cures the disease, which is now rare. The protagonist of this medical history was James Lind. His report of a prospective controlled therapeutic trial in 1747 preceded by a half-century the British Navy's prevention and cure of scurvy by citrus fruits. After lime-juice was unwittingly substituted for lemon juice in about 1860, the disease returned, especially among sailors on polar explorations. In recent decades revisionist historians have challenged normative accounts, including that of scurvy, and the historicity of Lind's trial. It is therefore timely to reassess systematically the strengths and weaknesses of the canonical saga. PMID:19519673

  4. Hester Prynne and Linda Lovelace: Pure or Prurient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Gertrude

    A June 21, 1973, Supreme Court ruling yielded jurisdiction in matters of obscenity to individual communities and the decision as to what is prurient to"contemporary community standards." This ruling leaves the courts in the powerful position of surgeon, judge, film critic, and arbiter of community taste. An analysis of past court cases involving…

  5. On Blue Tongues, Undergraduates, and Science: An Interview With Linda M. Bartoshuk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Camille Tessitore

    2004-01-01

    Camille Tessitore King is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, where she teaches Introduction to Psychology, Great Experiments in Psychology, Biological Psychology, as well as other advanced topic courses such as Drugs and Behavior. She received her BA, MA, and PhD from the University of…

  6. Beam Optics for a Scanned Proton Beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, George; Hubbard, Jeff; Koss, Peter; Sanders, Ed; Panchal, Mona

    2003-08-26

    Beam scanning in proton therapy is a medical technique to lower the dose to healthy tissue while irradiating a tumor volume. Scanned proton beams for proton radiation therapy require small beam sizes at the tumor location. In beam scanning, a small beam usually less than 1 cm diameter is swept across the tumor volume with two magnets located several meters upstream of the patient. In general, all proton beams in a therapy facility must be transported from the accelerator to the treatment rooms where the scanning systems are located. This paper addresses the problem of transporting the beam without losses to the patient and achieving a small beam at the tumor location in the patient. The strengths of the beam line quadrupoles were allowed to vary to produce the desired beam sizes along the beam lines. Quadrupole strengths were obtained using the beam simulation program TRANSPORT originally from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Palo Alto, CA. An enhanced version of the original program by Accel Soft Inc. in San Diego, CA has been used for these studies. Beam size measurements were used for comparison with TRANSPORT to verify the predictions of TRANSPORT calculations.

  7. Beam Optics for a Scanned Proton Beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, George; Hubbard, Jeff; Koss, Peter; Sanders, Ed; Panchal, Mona

    2003-08-01

    Beam scanning in proton therapy is a medical technique to lower the dose to healthy tissue while irradiating a tumor volume. Scanned proton beams for proton radiation therapy require small beam sizes at the tumor location. In beam scanning, a small beam usually less than 1 cm diameter is swept across the tumor volume with two magnets located several meters upstream of the patient. In general, all proton beams in a therapy facility must be transported from the accelerator to the treatment rooms where the scanning systems are located. This paper addresses the problem of transporting the beam without losses to the patient and achieving a small beam at the tumor location in the patient. The strengths of the beam line quadrupoles were allowed to vary to produce the desired beam sizes along the beam lines. Quadrupole strengths were obtained using the beam simulation program TRANSPORT originally from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in Palo Alto, CA. An enhanced version of the original program by Accel Soft Inc. in San Diego, CA has been used for these studies. Beam size measurements were used for comparison with TRANSPORT to verify the predictions of TRANSPORT calculations.

  8. Linda Is Not a Bearded Lady: Configural Weighting and Adding as the Cause of Extension Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Hakan; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Hansson, Goran

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the configural weighted average (CWA) hypothesis suggesting that extension biases, like conjunction and disjunction errors, occur because people estimate compound probabilities by taking a CWA of the constituent probabilities. The hypothesis suggests a process consistent with well-known cognitive constraints, which…

  9. 76 FR 66972 - Linda Sue Cheek, M.D., Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ..., D.D.S., 74 FR 36751 (2009). In Owens, I explicitly declined to extend the holding of Pettigrew Rexall Drugs, 64 FR 8855, 8859-60 (1999), which cited evidence that a pharmacy was ``one of two..., to the case of a prescribing practitioner. 74 FR at 36757. As Owens explained, ``consideration of...

  10. Response to Anthony Petrosky, Review of Linda Flower, "Problem-Solving Strategies for Writing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flower, Linda

    1984-01-01

    Flower defends her book "Problem-Solving Strategies for Writing," stating that contrary to Petrosky's interpretation, it does not take an out-moded, logical positivist view of communication theory that treats thought as an object to be transferred while ignoring the constructivist nature of both reading and writing. (HTH)

  11. Les McCann, Elvis Presley, Linda Ronstadt, and Buddy Holly: Focusing on the Lives of Contemporary Singers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, B. Lee

    1980-01-01

    Recommends that high school social studies teachers exploit student interest in contemporary musicians to teach techniques of biographical construction. Maintains that innovative classroom practices involving non-traditional subject matter can foster intellectual growth and historical understanding. (Author/DB)

  12. The Plight of the Education Systems--Post Hurricane Katrina: An Interview with Dr. Brenda Mitchell and Dr. Linda Stelly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    The changes in the New Orleans public school system are proceeding at break neck speed. There is currently a bill in the Louisiana State Senate which would allow the state to sell, lease, or give New Orleans school buildings to any institution that has operated schools for 25 years. This would be done with a no-bid process. The money would not go…

  13. The Educational and Political Significance of the New Social Media: A Dialogue with Linda Herrera and Michael A. Peters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Linda; Peters, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2010 was named the Year of Social Media, a technology of communication and for creating and exchanging "User Generated Content". The year 2010 also marked the start of the Arab revolts where, in Tunisia and Egypt, social media served as a critical platform for expressing dissent, organizing, and providing citizen media accounts of events.…

  14. What Is FRBR? It's Not a Small Rodent, Explains Linda Gonzalez, but a Striking Way to Improve Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Catalogers, catalog managers, and others in library technical services have become increasingly interested in, worried over, and excited about FRBR (the acronym for Functional Requirements of Bibliographic Records). Staff outside of the management of the library's bibliographic database may wonder what the fuss is about (FERBER? FURBUR?), assuming…

  15. Lessons Learned From Political Violence and Genocide in Teaching a Psychology of Peace: An Interview With Linda Woolf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Tasha R.

    2004-01-01

    Tasha R. Howe got her BA in psychology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. She received her MA and PhD in developmental psychology from the University of California, Riverside. After doing an NIMH-sponsored postdoctoral fellowship in developmental psychopathology at Vanderbilt University, she served as assistant professor of…

  16. Water Conservation: A Tool to Build Understanding, Service and Awareness about Natural Resources Linda Ruiz McCall, Katherine K. Ellins, and Bridget Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, L. R.; Ellins, K. K.; Cameron, B.

    2010-12-01

    Water is arguably our most important natural resource, essential for sustaining life on Earth; necessary to support agriculture and industry; and important for fisheries, power, navigation, and recreation. As world population increases and climate change brings about a redistribution of water and people across our planet, water resource management and conservation are increasingly important. Based on current population projections for Texas, about 85 percent of the state’s projected population will not have enough water by 2060 in drought conditions. Water conservation is critical for meeting the state’s long-term water needs. To that end, the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) is engaged in a number of education and outreach programs. In this paper, we report on three TWDB educational campaigns. Water Exploration, a Web-based water resources education program for Texas high school students, Put Some Blue in Your Green School, a service learning project designed to promote interaction between schools and their local communities, and Water IQ: Know Your Water, a public awareness campaign for water conservation. Water Exploration uses a pedagogical approach called the Legacy Cycle to involve students in experiential, project-based learning to help them achieve a deeper understanding about water resources. It addresses the need for rigorous curriculum in a vitally important area for the new Texas high school Earth and Space Science Capstone course, as well as Environmental Systems, and Aquatic Science. The interdisciplinary nature of the curriculum encourages students to explore the connections between water resources and economics (water planning, water as a commodity), history (water affects human settlement and migration), and biology (water is essential for life; contaminated water affects living organisms). The ability to integrate information from different disciplines and weigh the perspectives of multiple experts is particularly important for solving the complex problems in the geosciences (e.g. contaminant remediation, flood control, or climate change). Put Some Blue in Your Green School is a service learning program designed to engage students in real-world problem solving. Students form teams to collect and analyze indoor and outdoor water use data, and prepare recommendations for actions to help schools become efficient water users. By forming partnerships with water supply entities and other community members, students learn about the need for good stewardship practices for water resources and engage the community in understanding the need for conservation. Water IQ: Know your water, is a statewide public awareness campaign that educates Texans about water conservation. Through Water IQ, the Texas Water Development Board provides information on water-efficient practices raises the awareness about the importance of water conservation and helps Texans use less water. The program is designed to complement and support existing local and regional conservation efforts. Communities are encouraged to use Water IQ and provide a link from their community web site to the Water IQ web site.

  17. The Uniqueness of Home Economics and Its Conversation with Itself. A Response to Papers by Patricia J. Thompson, Francine H. Hultgren, Maureen E. Kelly, and Linda B. Peterat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrin, Donald A.

    Recent discussions have questioned the ongoing contributions of home economics to conversations about women's education. These conversations are complicated by factors suggesting home economics is a discipline that talks primarily to itself but sees itself having a unique view of the world that takes women's world of experience as its starting…

  18. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A.; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.

  19. Dislocated Workers. Trade Adjustment Assistance Program Flawed. Statement of Linda G. Morra, Director of Education and Employment Issues, Human Resources Division. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Employment, Housing and Aviation, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program is designed to help the more than 1 million workers per year who lose their jobs because of permanent layoffs or plant closures, due in part because of imports. Studies show, however, that the TAA program fails to meet the seven goals of a successful reemployment assistance program: (1) TAA benefits…

  20. Troubled Kids' Psychiatric Care Often Delayed by Insurance Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... for any type of emergency service, said Linda Johnson. She's the operations director for the Office of ... assistant professor of medicine, Tufts University, Boston; Linda Johnson, operations director, Office of the Health Insurance Commissioner, ...

  1. ELISA

    MedlinePlus

    ... is broken) Alternative Names Enzyme-linked immunoassay; EIA ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  2. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  3. 78 FR 45535 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    .... Hughes, Jr., Jacksonville, Florida; J. Malcolm Jones, Jr., Jacksonville, Florida; James T. Katsur, Longwood, Florida; W. Andrew Krusen, Jr., Tampa, Florida; Allan S. Martin, Tampa, Florida; Linda C....

  4. Title: The Impact of 2006-2012 CReSIS Summer Research Programs that Influence Student's Choice of a STEM Related Major in College Authors: Dr. Darnell Johnson Djohnson@mail.ecsu.edu Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina 27909 Dr. Linda Hayden Haydenl@mindspring.com Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 27909

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Researchers, policymakers, business, and industry have indicated that the United States will experience a future shortage of professionals in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Several strategies have been suggested to address this impending shortage, one of which includes increasing the representation of females and minorities in the STEM fields. In order to increase the representation of underrepresented students in the STEM fields, it is important to understand the motivational factors that impact underrepresented students' interest in STEM academics and extracurricular programs. Research indicates that greater confidence leads to greater interest and vice versa (Denissen et al., 2007). In this paper, the mathematics research team examined the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority secondary students studying in STEM fields. An undergraduate research mathematics team focused on the link between summer research and the choice of an undergraduate discipline. A Chi Square Statistical Test was used to examine Likert Scale results on the attitude of students participating in the 2006-2012 Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Summer Research Programs for secondary students. This research was performed at Elizabeth City State University located in northeastern North Carolina about the factors that impact underrepresented students' choices of STEM related majors in college. Results can be used to inform and guide educators, administrators, and policy makers in developing programs and policy that support and encourage the STEM development of underrepresented students. Index Terms: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), Underrepresented students

  5. 75 FR 51486 - Comment Request for Information Collection for OMB 1205-0030, Job Corps Enrollee Allotment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... Request for Information Collection for OMB 1205-0030, Job Corps Enrollee Allotment Determination... on or before October 19, 2010. ADDRESSES: Submit written comments to Linda Estep, Office of Job Corps....linda@dol.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Job Corps is an intensive, residential...

  6. 76 FR 7907 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... AIMEE GOBLET DARWIN ANGELA MARY BRUCE DAVID CARY RICHARD DAVID-PELLERIN STEPHANIE DE CANDIA FABRIZIO DE... GRANT S FRAZER LINDA C FRENKEL SHARON FREY ELIZABETH U FUNG PASCALE N GIBSON MATTHEW CHARLES GIBSON... GUERLAIN MARIE HA PATRICIA HABOLDT BOB P HAJEK LINDA ANETTE HANSEN PAUL ROBERT HARDWICK III CHARLES...

  7. 76 FR 70978 - Environmental Impact Statement for Disposition of Hangars 2 and 3, Fort Wainwright, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ...: carrie.mcenteer@us.army.mil . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Please contact Ms. Linda Douglass, Public...; telephone (907) 353- 6701, email: linda.douglass@us.army.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The decision to be... Department of the Army Environmental Impact Statement for Disposition of Hangars 2 and 3, Fort Wainwright,...

  8. QA Activities on Two Large RARE Projects at the US EPA, RTP, NC ─ from Fish to Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two RARE (Regional Applied Research Effort) projects are being managed by Janet Diliberto, Linda Birnbaum, and Thomas Hughes. Janet is the Project Officer, Linda is the science advisor and Thomas is the QA and Records Manager for these two RARE projects. These are high visibili...

  9. 75 FR 61998 - Programs for Specific Positions and Examinations (Miscellaneous)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Linda Watson by telephone at (202) 606-0830; by fax at (202) 606-2329; by TTY at (202) 418-3134; or by e- mail at linda.watson@opm.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 20, 2007, OPM published a final rule at 72 FR 12947, to revise the Administrative Law Judge Program. These...

  10. Groupware for case management and inter-organizational collaboration: the virtual rehabilitation team.

    PubMed

    Bång, M; Hagdahl, A; Eriksson, H; Timpka, T

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents LINDA, a prototype system designed to support virtual rehabilitation teams. LINDA enables professionals from different welfare-state agencies to collaborate in case management. Our approach to supporting teamwork involves the sharing of minimal case sets across organizational borders needed to provide a shared situation assessment among team members. The system provides a shared workspace for the team; a lightweight client-database, visualization of case histories and plans, and means to communicate effectively in the team using yellow sticker-notes. We present LINDA and discuss how we approached the problem to design groupware to support work under changing and uncertain conditions. PMID:11604695

  11. 75 FR 52554 - Office of the Secretary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Register on January 22, 2010, (75 FR 3759). Dated: August 20, 2010. Linda Watts Thomas, Acting Departmental... vehicle meeting the required safety standards, the form is completed. Form WH-515 is a...

  12. 75 FR 54916 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... (Vol. 75, FR 20005). Dated: August 31, 2010. Linda Watts Thomas, Acting Departmental Clearance Officer... disclosing inspection records for cranes and ropes, as well as disclosing written reports of rated load...

  13. Belching

    MedlinePlus

    ... or be more forceful. Symptoms such as nausea, dyspepsia , and heartburn may be relieved by belching. Causes ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 132. Read More Heartburn Indigestion Update Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: Linda ...

  14. 4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, SHOWING HOIST IN POSITION NEXT TO WINDOW FOR VIEWING TAILINGS PILE, SLOT IN FRONT WALL FOR VIEWING HEADFRAME. - A. D. Wilcox Drift Mine, Boiler Cabin, Linda Creek near Dalton Highway, Bettles, Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, AK

  15. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  16. Entropion

    MedlinePlus

    ... trachoma (such as North Africa or South Asia). Images Eye ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  17. IT Summit 2010 - Award Winners

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA CIO Linda Cureton announces this year’s IT Summit award winners. These awards recognize achievement in six key areas for contributions that have aided in NASA achieving mission goals and objec...

  18. Osteoarthritis: No Pills Yet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis "No Pills Yet..." Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table ... Robert Boston "There are no pills yet for osteoarthritis, but we're working on it," says Linda ...

  19. IT Summit 2010 - Promo 2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA CIO Linda Cureton offers a preview of the NASA IT Summit, which will feature IT experts from the public and private sectors speaking about IT collaboration, innovation, waves of the future, in...

  20. 75 FR 55326 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ..., Comment Period Ends: 11/15/2010, Contact: Linda Devine 757-964-9434. Revision to FR Notice Published 08/20... Pony Project, Proposes to Reduce Fire Hazard to Permanent Research Plots and to Areas Within...

  1. 76 FR 44051 - Submission for Review: Verification of Who Is Getting Payments, RI 38-107 and RI 38-147

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ....S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Retirement Services, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal.... Office of Personnel Management, Linda Bradford (Acting) Deputy Associate Director, Retirement...

  2. 75 FR 54387 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... 4, 2009, (Vol. 74 FR 57199). ] Dated: August 31, 2010. Linda Watts Thomas, Acting Departmental...: Standard on Ethylene Oxide (29 CFR 1910.1047). OMB Control Number: 1218-0108. Affected Public: Business...

  3. Women Often Overestimate Odds That Early Breast Cancer Will Return, Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... of medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor; Linda Bosserman, M.D., clinical assistant professor, City of Hope Medical Group, Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.; presentation, American Society of ...

  4. Can Read, Can Write

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melia, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Linda Worden always loved books. She liked the way they felt in her hands and the way they smelled. The only problem was she could not read them--until she took part in Channel 4's "Can't Read, Can't Write". This article tells the story of Linda Worden and how learning to read changed her life. Her attempts to learn as an adult are a shocking…

  5. An Extensible Space-Based Coordination Approach for Modeling Complex Patterns in Large Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Eva; Mordinyi, Richard; Schreiber, Christian

    Coordination is frequently associated with shared data spaces employing Linda coordination. But in practice, communication between parallel and distributed processes is carried out with message exchange patterns. What, actually, do shared data spaces contribute beyond these? In this paper we present a formal representation for a definition of shared spaces by introducing an "extensible tuple model", based on existing research on Linda coordination, some Linda extensions, and virtual shared memory. The main enhancements of the extensible tuple model comprise: means for structuring of spaces, Internet- compatible addressing of resources, more powerful coordination capabilities, a clear separation of user data and coordination information, support of symmetric peer application architectures, and extensibility through programmable aspects. The advantages of the extensible tuple model (XTM) are that it allows for a specification of complex coordination patterns.

  6. H sup minus beam characterization using laser-induced neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Garcia, R.; Johnson, K.F.; Saadatmand, K.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.; Shinas, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Laser-induced neutralization techniques, LINDA, is important as a noninterceptive diagnostic for quantitatively measuring beam emittance values. It is also valuable for its capability to characterize, both quantitatively and qualitatively, the performance and match of linac components. In this paper we present LINDA experimental results that show how the output beam of a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and drift-tube linac (DTL) combination changes with the variation of RFQ-DTL relative phase and of DTL cavity power. We also present results showing the effect of a longitudinal buncher on beam emissions. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Health Coaching Education: A Conversation With Pioneers in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  8. Off White: Readings on Race, Power, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle, Ed.; Weis, Lois, Ed.; Powell, Linda C., Ed.; Wong, L. Mun, Ed.

    The contributions in this volume analyze the white racialization process in the context of multiculturalism and examine how racism is established in institutional structures. The chapters are: (1) "The Achievement (K)not: Whiteness and 'Black Underachievement'" (Linda C. Powell); (2) "White Experimenters, White Blood, and Other White Conditions:…

  9. STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Cameron juggle cassettes on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 crewmembers watch Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron juggle cassette tapes on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Laughing at Cameron's stunt are Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin (foreground), Commander Steven R. Nagel (behind Cameron), and MS Jerry L. Ross (at floor level). Ross snacks on chocolate candy during the performance.

  10. Celebrating Excellence: Learning and Teaching in Adult Higher Education. National Conference on Alternative and External Degree Programs for Adults (15th, Columbus, Ohio, October 5-7, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance, an Association for Alternative Degree Programs.

    These 23 presentations are organized in five categories: diversity, assessment, distance education, learning, and teaching. Five papers on diversity include the following: "From Rosie the Riveter to Comparable Worth: The Infusion of Gender and Women's Issues into an Interdisciplinary Curriculum for Working Adults" (Linda L. Hulbert, Theodore A.…

  11. Technology for Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on technology for education to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program Students Meet Peers Via Video Conference" (Linda Cantu, Leticia Lopez-De La Garza) describes how at-risk student…

  12. Nominees Set High Standards, Support Student Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Carla

    2003-01-01

    Describes the winner and other nominees for the "Administrator of the Year" award presented nationally by the Journalism Education Association. Explains that W. Charles Dill, Don Senti, Juan Gonzales, Christy Slagle, Linda Quinn, Gary Davis, and Lucinda Lee Katz all set high standards, valued student press rights, and supported students. (PM)

  13. Thoughts on "Reconsidering the Washington-Du Bois Debate: Two Black Colleges in 1910-1911" and Thoughts on "Liberalism at the Crossroads: Jimmy Carter, Joseph Califano, and Public College Desegregation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anthony

    These two papers offer critiques of two essays that appeared in "Essays in Twentieth-Century Southern Education: Exceptionalism and its Limits," edited by Wayne J. Urban. The first paper examines Linda Buchanan and Philo Hutcheson's interpretation of the debate which underscored the well-known conflict between Booker T. Washington-W.E.B. DuBois…

  14. 78 FR 5516 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ...: Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. ACTION: Annual notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given under 5 U.S.C... Safety and Health Review Commission. DATES: Membership is effective on January 25, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Linda M. Beard, Human Resources Specialist, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health...

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Mass Communication and Society Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Mass Communication and Society Division of the proceedings contains the following 12 papers: "Free Congress Research and Education Foundation: An Extremist Organization in Think Tank Clothing?" (Sharron M. Hope); "Presence in Informative Virtual Environments: The Effects of Self-Efficacy, Spatial Ability and Mood" (Lynette Lim, Linda A.…

  16. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part VIII: Spanish for Business and the Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part VIII of the proceedings includes 16 presentations. They are: "Strengthening Internationalism through the Establishment of a Center for Spanish Language Training for Engineering Students" (David C. Kraft, Pamela J. Madl, Robert C. Spires, and Rusty McClanahan); "Training Court Interpreters: A Practitioner's Perspective" (Linda E. Haughton);…

  17. Proximal Variables in Families of Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine and Enrolled in a Center- or Home-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinehart, L. H. B.; Dice, J. L.; Dobbins, D. R.; Claussen, A. H.; Bono, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined proximal variables in families of children prenatally exposed to cocaine and enrolled in a large-scale intervention program. Fifty-six high-risk families of children enrolled in the center-based (n = 30) or home-based (n = 26) intervention of the Linda Ray Intervention Program were interviewed. Four proximal variables…

  18. Gifted Education Quarterly, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maurice, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These four issues of "Gifted Education Quarterly" include the following articles: (1) "Using Test Results To Support Clinical Judgment" (Linda Kreger Silverman), which discusses some of the difficulties in obtaining accurate indications of a child's level of giftedness and the importance of using professional judgment in determining whether tests…

  19. What I Learned in Grad School, or Literary Training and the Theorizing of Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzaro, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Examines the impact of training in literature on the development of theories of composition. Examines connections between the strategies employed in seven influential composition theorists' dissertations (Linda Flower, Art Young, David Bartholomae, Erika Lindemann, Toby Fulwiler, Lisa Ede, and Peter Elbow) and those strategies used in their…

  20. Waging Peace in Our Schools: Beginning with the Children. Peace Education Miniprints No. 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantieri, Linda

    The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) began in New York City by Linda Lantieri who is now the national director. This program is for teachers, students, administrators, and parents who seek to make schools and society more peaceful through creative means. RCCP was developed because of the increasing statistics of violent acts that take…

  1. 78 FR 49548 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Job Corps Application Data (Job Corps Enrollee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for Job Corps Application Data (Job Corps Enrollee Allotment Determination, Extension Without Revisions) AGENCY: Employment and.... ADDRESSES: Submit written comments to Linda Estep, Office of Job Corps Room N4507 Employment and...

  2. The Future Is Now. Dimension '95. Selected Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching and the South Carolina Foreign Language Teachers' Association (Charleston, South Carolina, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Robert M., Ed.

    Papers on aspects of second language teaching include: "Cognitive Approaches to Listening Comprehension" (James S. Noblitt); "Popular Music in a Whole Language Approach to Foreign Language Teaching" (Sue Barry, Sidney Pellissier); "Language Maintenance: Bridging the Gaps in Foreign Language Education" (Jean W. LeLoup, Linda Shinnock); "Meeting the…

  3. Energy Conservation: Three Projects That Worked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Compact design and insulation cut energy use at a junior high school in Rexon (New Brunswick). Loma Linda University in California has reduced consumption of natural gas by installing cogeneration equipment. Morningside College in Sioux City (Iowa) has replaced deteriorating windows. (Author/MLF)

  4. 76 FR 26968 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376... regarding the proposed regulatory flood elevations for the reach described by the downstream and upstream... Road. Linda Creek Approximately 0.7 mile +172 +173 Unincorporated Areas of downstream of...

  5. STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Godwin during simulation in JSC's FB-SMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin rehearses some phases of her scheduled duties on the middeck of the fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Godwin is inspecting supplies stowed in the middeck lockers during this unsuited simulation.

  6. Promoting Evidence-Based Practices: New Teaching Module for Early Childhood Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Linda Halgunseth, head of NAEYC's Office of Applied Research (OAR), tells readers about Child Care and Early Education Research Connections, a Web site (www.researchconnections.org/teaching_modules) to help teacher educators integrate knowledge about evidence-based practices into teacher education programs. In addition, the article touts the…

  7. Listen Up! Podcasting for Schools and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Linda W.

    2007-01-01

    Here is a timely--and time-saving--guide for teachers, librarians, and school media specialists who need to get quickly up-to-speed on podcasting. Educational technology specialist Linda Braun explains what podcasting is and why it is such a useful tool for schools and libraries. She covers both content and technical issues, sharing tips for…

  8. Gender-Based Violence Prevention. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on gender-based violence prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Preventing Gender-Based Violence: An Overview (Linda Langford); (2) Q&A With Amelia Cobb; (3) Denim Day at HBCUs; (4) Dear Colleague Letter; (5) ED Grants for Violence Prevention; and (6) Higher Education Center…

  9. RACE AND UNEQUAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED COMPOUNDS - THE ROLE OF DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Max Weintraub, MS, Toxics Office, US Environmental Protection Agency, 75 Hawthorne Street, Mail Code CMD-4, San Francisco, CA 94105 and Linda S. Birnbaum, PhD, Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, 66 USEPA Mailroom, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
    The Centers for...

  10. EMPLOYEE SPIRITUAL CARE: Supporting Those Who Care for Others.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide whole-person care for patients and families, Loma Linda University Health recognizes the importance of supporting employee wholeness. The Employee Spiritual Care department helps create and support an environment that nurtures the spiritual health and wholeness of employees, and provides employees tools and knowledge about providing whole-person care to patients and colleagues. PMID:27119805

  11. SPSS Beginner's Handbook for the Interactive Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Richard B.

    This handbook lists step-by-step the procedures for making Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) runs on the interactive computer. The programs follow the Loma Linda University Revision 2.1 as adapted for the Data General Eclipse Systems. The four-step process includes instructions for developing the codebook, building the data and…

  12. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of the 2000 edition of the "Education Policy Analysis Archives." The papers include: (1) "Teacher Quality and Student Achievement: A Review of State Policy Evidence" (Linda Darling-Hammond); (2) "America Y2K: The Obsolescence of Educational Reforms" (Sherman Dorn); (3) "Forces for Change in Mathematics Education: The Case of…

  13. Research Issues in HRD. Symposium 34. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on research issues in human resource development (HRD) consists of three presentations. "The Influence of Theories of Action on Action Research Initiatives: One Dying Division's Case" (Linda Neavel Dickens) reports an interpretive case study to illuminate how individual, team, and organizational practices and theories of action…

  14. AOP Knowledge Base/Wiki Tool Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin Is...

  15. Effects on Science Summarization of a Reading Comprehension Intervention for Adolescents with Behavior and Attention Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogevich, Mary E.; Perin, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-three adolescent boys with behavioral disorders (BD), 31 of whom had comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), participated in a self-regulated strategy development intervention called Think Before Reading, Think While Reading, Think After Reading, With Written Summarization (TWA-WS). TWA-WS adapted Linda Mason's TWA…

  16. CHEMICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CHLORINATED AND OZONATED-CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER: A COLLABORATION OF THE FOUR NATIONAL LABS OF THE U. S. EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHEMICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CHLORINATED AND OZONATED-CHLORINATED DRINKING WATER: A COLLABORATION OF THE FOUR NATIONAL LABS OF THE U.S. EPA
    Susan D. Richardson1, Linda K. Teuschler2, Alfred D. Thruston, Jr.,1 Thomas Speth3, Richard J. Miltner3, Glenn Rice2, Kathle...

  17. Effects of the Administration's Fiscal Year 1984 Budget on Children and Youth. Hearing before the Task Force on Entitlements, Uncontrollables, and Indexing of the Committee on the Budget. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (March 9, 1983). Serial No. TF8-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on the Budget.

    In this report of a hearing on the effects on children and youth of President Reagan's proposed budget cuts of means-tested entitlement programs, Linda S. McMahon, Associate Commissioner of the Office of Family Assistance, and Robert E. Leard, Acting Administrator of the Food and Nutrition Service at the Department of Agriculture, present the…

  18. Haywood case shows NMC is out of touch.

    PubMed

    Higginson, Ray

    Margaret Haywood has recently been removed from the NMC's register after claims that she violated patient dignity and confidentiality by secretly filming for the BBC's Panorama. Head of the NMC's advisory panel, Linda Read, said Haywood's actions constituted a 'major breach' of the nursing Code of Conduct. PMID:19448576

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Communication Technology & Policy Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Communication Technology & Policy Division of the proceedings contains the following 7 papers: "Current Status of the Direct Broadcast Satellite Industry: Is DBS a True Alternative to Cable?" (Ju-Yong Ha); "An Analysis of the Characteristics of Early Internet Adopters" (Tien-tsung Lee, Linda Li-Shuan Wang and Paul Bolls); "Digital 'En…

  20. The Ethics of Clarity and/or Obscuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreuter, Nate

    2013-01-01

    The essay examines the ethical tensions surrounding the common cultural and disciplinary demand that writers write "clearly." The essay seeks to advance the discipline's engagement with Linda Kintz's and Sharon Crowley's separate critiques of the "ideology of clarity," arguing that clarity potentially manipulates audiences primarily through either…

  1. OATYC Journal, 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullen, Jim, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The OATYC Journal provides the two-year colleges of Ohio with a medium for discussing problems and sharing concepts, methods, and findings relevant to the two-year college classroom. The fall 1992 and spring 1993 issues contain: "What We Are Doing Right: Can We Do It All?," by Linda Houston; "Campus Profile: A Walk through Shawnee State…

  2. Why Henry Giroux's Democratic Pedagogy Is Crucial for Confronting Failed Corporate School Reform and How Liberals Like Ravitch and Darling-Hammond Are Making Things Worse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Progressive media and the academic community outside of education has largely embraced liberal criticisms of corporate school reform or neoliberal educational restructuring, typified by the highly publicized writing and speaking of Diane Ravitch and Linda Darling-Hammond. Despite offering valuable policy information, the liberal view is grounded…

  3. We May Well Become Accomplices: To Rear a Generation of Spectators Is Not to Educate at All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Joyce E.

    2016-01-01

    Research on education and society is the focus in discussing four essays of AERA past presidents, Newton Edwards, Maxine Greene, Linda Darling-Hammond, and William F. Tate, IV. The title, "We May Well Become Accomplices... ," is taken from Greene's speech to foreground inherent moral obligations of scholars when racial and social justice…

  4. 75 FR 54654 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposals, Submissions, and Approvals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... service employees performing work on the contract. This information collection pertains to records needed... terms in a collective bargaining agreement. For additional information, see related notice published in the Federal Register on March 10, 2010, (75 FR 11198). ] Dated: August 31, 2010. Linda Watts...

  5. International Reports on Literacy Research: Canada, France, Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a compilation of reports on international literacy research. The report includes 3 separate reports on Canada, France and Russia. In the first report, research correspondent Linda M. Phillips, in collaboration with Christian Beaulieu, reports on the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network (CLLRNet). The vision of CLLRNet is…

  6. 77 FR 64967 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ..., KAREN C HALE, ANDREW M HALE, JOHN H HALLMAN, TIMOTHY J HANDWERKER, ALAN I HANLON, PETER H HANNIGAN... HARRIS, ROBERT J HARROD, WILLIAM J HARVEY, STEPHEN J HELD, EDWARD B HENDERSON III, CLYDE H HENNEBERGER..., LINDA S KIRCHHOFF, STEPHEN A KLARA, SCOTT M KLAUSING, KATHLEEN A KLING, JON NMN KNOELL, THOMAS C...

  7. Proper Maternal Folate Level May Reduce Child Obesity Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throughout the world on fetal, infant and child development; maternal, child and family health; reproductive biology and ... Institute/Center Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Contact Linda Huynh Robert Bock 301-496- ...

  8. Social Studies: Selected Teaching Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John I., Ed.

    Nine essays serving as springboards to the study of historical events and cultures focus on the use of memorabilia and primary resources for teaching social studies. Following a short preface by John I. Thomas, Linda Carrillo examines ways in which folk songs can be used to arouse a child's interest in the study of other cultures. In "Using Older…

  9. CYP1A2 DOES NOT PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN 2, 3 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN-INDUCED IMMUNOSUPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    CYP1A2 IS NOT REQUIRED FOR 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN-INDUCED IMMUNOSUPPRESSION Smialowicz, Ralph J1; Burgin, Deborah E2; Williams, Wanda C1; Diliberto, Janet J1; Birnbaum, Linda S1
    1 Experimental Toxicology Division, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2Curriculum in Toxicology, U...

  10. Assessment Update: Progress, Trends, and Practices in Higher Education. Volume 25, Issue 2, March-April 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This issue of "Assessment Update" presents the following articles: (1) "Just Right" Outcomes Assessment: A Fable for Higher Education (Catherine M. Wehlburg); (2) Editor's Notes: Helping Faculty Members Learn (Linda Suskie); (3) Focus on the Bottom-Line: Assessing Business Writing (Michael Cherry and George Klemic); (4)…

  11. Time, Effort, and Care: The Challenge of Retaining Students until They Meet Their Academic Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Corey

    2010-01-01

    As states slash funding for education and other services in the face of shrinking budgets, the question is not how to find students, but how to help them once enrolled. Linda Hagedorn, director of the Research Institute for Studies in Higher Education at Iowa State University, states that instead of being concerned about where community colleges…

  12. Brown Plus Thirty: Perspectives on Desegregation. Proceedings of a Conference Commemorating the Thirtieth Anniversary of the 1954 Supreme Court Decision in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (New York, New York, September 11-14, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lamar P., Ed.

    This report comprises papers delivered at a conference assessing the impact of the Supreme Court decision in the case of Brown v. Board of Education 30 years after it was passed in 1954. The following papers (and authors) are included: (1) "Reflections on Brown after Thirty Years" (Linda Brown Smith); (2) "School Integration and the National…

  13. Making Strides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Since 1980, Dr. Linda Hayden has been able to bring innovation to Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) by seeking out and partnering with entities like the U.S. Navy and NASA. For years, these partnerships allowed faculty, students, and administrators in the computer science department and other departments to gain early exposure to cutting-edge…

  14. The Two-Sided Mind: Teaching and Suggestopedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    This paper explores how Georgi Lozanov's Suggestopedia incorporates elements of modern right-brain research. For example, issues in Linda VerLee Williams's "Teaching for the Two-Sided Mind" that are applicable to Suggestopedia include visual thinking, fantasy, multisensory learning, music, and direct experience. In Robert Ornstein's "The…

  15. The Harbour School, A Very Special School. IssueTrak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenzler, Yale

    2005-01-01

    The Harbour School in Baltimore County, Maryland and provides a unique and outstanding setting that was designed to enhance and support the programs and services required for 125 special-needs students between the ages of 6 and 21. The director of the school, Dr. Linda Jacobs, had previous experience with establishing a school in a commercial…

  16. Adventures in Assessment: Learner-Centered Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation in Adult Literacy, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This journal presents the following articles: "Introduction: Volume 14--Examining Performance" (Marie Cora) "Fair Assessment Practices: Giving Students Equitable Opportunities to Demonstrate Learning" (Linda Suskie); "Assessing Oral Communication at the Community Learning Center Development of the OPT (Oral Proficiency Test)" (JoAnne Hartel and…

  17. Buyer Beware: Lessons Learned from EdTPA Implementation in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah; O'Hara, Kate E.

    2015-01-01

    As states across the country continue their implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment Portfolio (edTPA), a complex and high-stakes certification requirement for teacher certification, there are important lessons for educators and education advocates to learn from New York State's implementation. As Linda Darling-Hammond, developer and…

  18. The Activist WPA in Action: A Profile of the Firstyear Writing Program at Eastern Michigan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, L. Lennie

    2009-01-01

    This writing program profile examines the work of Dr. Linda Adler-Kassner and the ways in which she has redefined writing and the place of first-year writing at her university. The profile highlights Adler-Kassner's development of an "open systems" curriculum and her use of assessment for program visibility and continuous program…

  19. Networking the Light Fantastic--CD-ROMs on LANs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul W.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the development of a local area network (LAN) at Loma Linda University that allows remote access for both IBM and Macintosh microcomputers to CD-ROMs. Topics discussed include types of networks; fiber optic technology; networking CD-ROM drives; remote access; modems; CD-ROM databases; memory management; interface software; and future…

  20. Worlds Remade: Inclusion through Engagement with Disability Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the 2007 Disability Studies in Education Conference plenary session, "Using Disability Art in Teaching About Disability: Riva Lehrer, David Mitchell, Sharon Snyder and Linda Ware". The plenary coincided with a group show at The Arts Club of Chicago that featured multimedia works by artists who figure disability experiences into…

  1. Putting the Medical Library Online: Electronic Bulletin Boards. . . and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul W.

    1985-01-01

    Describes use of microcomputers with system called "TBBS" ("The Bread Board System") at Loma Linda University Medical Center to allow users enhanced services from home, whether library facilities are open or not. Flexibility and security, dialing into medical library, and suggestions for setting up similar computerized information centers are…

  2. "We Were Those Who Walked out of Bullets and Hunger": Representation of Trauma and Healing in "Solar Storms"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Irene S.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars Kali Tal and Cathy Caruth express the importance of trauma literature as "the need to tell and retell the story of the traumatic experience, to make it "real" both to the victim and to the community," and to tell "a reality or truth that is not otherwise available." In "Solar Storms" Linda Hogan vividly recounts the consequences of…

  3. 78 FR 63275 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards Membership

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...; Gehrke, Linda M.; Hynes-Cherin, Brigid; Krochalis, Richard F.; McMillan, Therese Watkins; Mello, Mary E.; Nifosi, Dana C.; Patrick, Robert C.; Rogers, Leslie T.; Shazor, Marilyn G.; Simon, Marisol R.; Taylor... Federal Highway Administration Alicandri, Elizabeth; Arnold, Robert E.; Bezio, Brian R.; Brown, Janice...

  4. Engaging 21st-Century Adolescents: Video Games in the Reading Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Megan Glover

    2009-01-01

    Cross-age tutoring, in which older and younger students work together to improve their ELA skills, is not a new concept; Linda D. Labbo and William H. Teale explored it as a tool for poor readers as early as 1990. The author has found that using tutoring with video games also works well. Students have the opportunity to read aloud collaboratively…

  5. A Study of Medical Graduates of the WICHE Student Exchange Programs Showing the Relation of That Group to the Medical Manpower of the Sending States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    The medical graduates from the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Student Exchange Programs (SEP) are studied in their relation to the medical manpower of the sending states. Participating schools were: University of California (Los Angeles, Irvine, and San Francisco branches); Loma Linda University; Stanford University;…

  6. Bringing critical thinking into introductory astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    Critical thinking is often a desired outcome in an introductory astronomy course, but it is often poorly defined. The model developed by Linda Elder and Richard Paul provides an internally consistent framework for both defining and implementing critical thinking. This article provides suggestions for using it in a typical introductory astronomy course.

  7. The Effects of Using a Critical Thinking Scoring Rubric to Assess Undergraduate Students' Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leist, Cathy W.; Woolwine, Mark A.; Bays, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a critical thinking rubric as an assessment of reading achievement for students enrolled in a reading intervention course. A reading prompt and scoring rubric, based on Richard Paul and Linda Elder's critical thinking framework, were created to assess critical reading in an intervention…

  8. Tales from the Electronic Frontier: First-Hand Experiences of Teachers and Students Using the Internet in K-12 Math and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinohara, Mayumi, Ed.; And Others

    This document presents first-hand experiences of teachers and students using the Internet in K-12 math and science, as well as articles on getting the right hardware, choosing an Internet service provider, designing an online project, and fostering acceptable use. Chapters include: (1) "Something in the Air" (Linda Maston): a computer-assisted…

  9. Problematizing Assumptions, Examining Dilemmas, and Exploring Promising Possibilities in Culturally Relevant Pedagogy. A Response to "'I Didn't See It as a Cultural Thing': Supervisors of Student Teachers Define and Describe Culturally Responsive Supervision"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantas-Whitney, Maria; Ulveland, R. Dana

    2016-01-01

    In response to the study and recommendations presented in the article "I Didn't See it as a Cultural Thing," written by Linda Griffin, Dyan Watson and Tonda Liggett, we explore three interrelated topics. First, we seek to problematize some of the assumptions in the study. We review some of the authors' approaches and assertions that seem…

  10. 77 FR 35021 - Kwan Bo Jin, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ..., at 14-16; \\1\\ which is contrary to agency precedent.\\2\\ See Linda Sue Cheek, 76 FR 66972, 66973 (2011); Mark De La Lama, 76 FR 20011, 20020 n.20 (2011); Bienvenido Tan, 76 FR 17673, 17694 n.58 (2011); Gregory D. Owens, 74 FR 36571, 36757 & n.22 (2009). Nonetheless, my rejection of the ALJ's discussion...

  11. 77 FR 45656 - Decision and Order; Perry T. Dobyns, M.D.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... David M. Headley, 61 FR 39469, 39471 (1996)). However, the Agency has since held in multiple cases that... explanation as to why. See Linda Sue Cheek, 76 FR 66972, 66973 (2011); Mark De La Lama, 76 FR 20011, 20020 n.20 (2011); Bienvenido Tan, 76 FR 17673, 17694 n.58 (2011); Gregory D. Owens, 74 FR 36571, 36757 &...

  12. The Doubly Exceptional Child: A Principal's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesner, Rebecca J., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains two articles concerned with doubly exceptional children and gifted education. In "The Doubly Exceptional Child: A Principal's Dilemma," (Carol J. Mills and Linda E. Brody), such children do not fit into the usual categories for sorting children because their gifts and disabilities often mask each other. Suggestions are…

  13. ee-Learning: The Best Road to Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Linda Chisholm discusses the potential of ee-learning to address some of the endemic problems of college campuses. In an era of large campuses and large classes, students are removed from the positive examples once provided by faculty who lived in the campus community. The result is as evident in the woeful skills of some college…

  14. Profiles in Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Wright, Benjamin Drake; Linacre, John Michael; Webster, Linda; Andrich, David

    1998-01-01

    Four of the articles in this section profile major figures in measurement: (1) Sir Francis Galton (Larry Ludlow); (2) Georg Rasch (Benjamin Wright); (3) Benjamin Wright (John Michael Linacre); and (4) David Andrich (Linda Webster). The fifth article, by David Andrich, presents insights gained into the Rasch model. (SLD)

  15. 75 FR 45671 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    .... Asbestos exposure results in asbestosis, an emphysema-like condition; lung cancer; mesothelioma; and gastrointestinal cancer. Several provisions of the Standard specify paperwork requirements, including: Implementing... the Federal Register on April 5, 2010, (75 FR 17164). Dated: July 28, 2010. Linda Watts Thomas,...

  16. Economic Education Experiences of Enterprising Teachers. Volume 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nappi, Andrew T., Ed.

    This book describes award-winning teacher-developed projects and courses in economics. The reports are condensed versions of the original projects and are divided into grade levels. Primary Level includes: "Peanut Economics" (Janet Lancaster; Dena L. Meade); "Consumer Education Circus" (Pearl Eloshway; Linda McGeehan); "Critter Cards" (Joyce G.…

  17. Travel in Time: Tradition to Technology. Proceedings of the 1985 ABC International Convention (Chicago, Illinois, October 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Sam J., Ed.; Pettit, John D., Jr., Ed.

    These conference proceedings contain the following 23 presentations: "Development of a Communication Skill Model Using Interpretive Structural Modeling" (Karen S. Nantz and Linda Gammill); "The Coincidence of Needs: An Inventional Model for Audience Analysis" (Gina Burchard); "A Computer Algorithm for Measuring Readability" (Terry D. Lundgren);…

  18. It Would Be Fun to Do Again: Multigenre Responses to Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    Middle school students are often asked to reflect on what they read by writing in journals or writing analytic essays. Another approach is to compile multigenre papers. Seventh-grade students each created a booklet containing 10 items in different genres, based on "A Single Shard" by Linda Sue Park. Students also wrote reflections explaining how…

  19. Life Affirming Work and Social Justice. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on life-affirming work and social justice that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Doing Good or Doing Well? A Counter-story of Continuing Professional Education (CPE)" (Laurel Jeris, Linda Armacost) reports on an exploratory study in which a critical…

  20. Questions of Intimacy: Rethinking Population Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Linda, Ed.

    This document contains 14 papers that examine recent changes in the definition, principles, and delivery of population education throughout the world. The paper titles are as follows: "Introduction" (Linda King); "Reaching Men for Health and Development" (Benno de Keijzer); "Boys, Men and Questions of Masculinity in South Africa" (Robert Morrell);…

  1. Who, What and How? Commentary on Cheney, F. N. (1963) the Teaching of Reference in American Library Schools. (Journal of Education for Librarianship, 3(3), 188-198)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Cheney's paper was the first major article on the subject of teaching reference in American library schools. In the article, she addressed three questions: (1) Who is teaching reference?; (2) What is being taught?; and (3) How is it being taught? In this article, Linda Smith discusses how the teaching of reference has changed in the more than 50…

  2. By Chance or by Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.; LaCost, Barbara Y.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes three women who hold prominent places in the history of the United States. They are: (1) Linda Brown, the symbol of "bringing down segregation" in U.S. schools; (2) Rosa Parks, the mother of the Civil Rights Movement; and (3) Coretta Scott King, an accomplished musician and singer. These women hold their places in history…

  3. Forging Connections in Adult Higher Education. National Conference on Alternative and External Degree Programs for Adults (14th, San Francisco, California, October 6-8, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the following 25 papers from a conference on adult higher educational practices: "Learning and Workplace Linkages via Applied Research Projects" (Elaine Cahalan Hollensbe, Linda Hauber); "Practical Action Research in Non-Traditional Students' Senior Projects" (Elliott Lauderdale); "Obtaining the Elusive: An Innovative Degree…

  4. Systematic Instruction in Reading for Spanish-Speaking Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Elva; Shefelbine, John; Carnine, Linda; Maldonado-Colon, Elba; Gunn, Barbara

    This book addresses the area of reading and literacy instruction for Spanish-speaking students. Ten chapters focus on the following: (1) "Direct Instruction" (Elva Duran and Douglas Carnine); (2) "Developing the Foundations of Literacy: Oracy" (Elba Maldonado-Colon); (3) "Language Development and Instruction" (Linda Carnine); (4) "Academic…

  5. Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Bridgie Alexis, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This publication presents seven articles concerned with the education of students with disabilities or special talents who also have cultural or linguistic differences. Section 1 contains the following four articles: (1) "Code Switching: A Bridge or Barrier between Two Languages?" (Alejandro Brice and Linda I. Rosa-Lugo); (2) "Resistance Theories:…

  6. Gifted and Talented Students. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on issues surrounding gifted and talented students, especially as they relate to poor, minority, or limited-English-proficient children. "Traditional Methods of Identifying Gifted Students Overlooks Many" (Linda Cantu) presents findings from the National Educational Longitudinal Study that…

  7. Leadership Development. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles on the theme of leadership development, particularly in relation to high-risk students or Mexican American communities. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program: 'Because All Children Are Valuable'" (Linda Cantu) shares some success stories from the program, which recruits high-risk students to be tutors of younger…

  8. 76 FR 15350 - Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey, RI 38-115

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Representative Payee Survey, RI 38-115 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to comment... information collection to U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Linda Bradford (Acting), Deputy...

  9. Promoting Active-Student Learning Using the World Wide Web in Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Scott P.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates how Web-based technologies can be used to encourage and motivate students to become active participants in the introductory economics classroom and describes two Web-based active learning exercises that place students in the center of the learning process. Includes reactions by Kim Sosin and Linda M. Manning. (CMK)

  10. STUDIES ON THE METABOLISM OF 6-NITROCHRYSENE AND THE FORMATION OF DNA ADDUCTS IN THE LIVER, LUNG AND BLADDER OF A/J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    /
    Studies On The Metabolism of 6-Nitrochrysene and The Formation of DNA Adducts in the Liver, Lung and Bladder ofAJJ Mice
    Moses McDaniel*, Linda Adamst, Joycelyn Allisont, Michael George"l", Dhimant Desai+, 5hantu Amin+, Guy Lambertt, William Padgettt, Stephen Nesnowt and...

  11. 75 FR 66054 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services, Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Line at (800) 514-0301 (Voice) or (800) 514-0383 (TTY), 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday... Information Line at (800) 514-0301 (Voice) or (800) 514-0383 (TTY) at least five business days in advance of... other accommodations, auxiliary aids, or foreign language translation should contact Linda Garrett...

  12. The Inside-Out Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Delores B.; MacDonell, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Linda MacDonell is the assistant superintendent of the Instructional Services Division of the Orange County (California) Department of Education and over the years, Delores Lindsey served as MacDonell's leadership coach. In this article, they talk about their experiences as external/internal partners building internal capacity for culturally…

  13. Views on Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAG Communicator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this issue consider key issues in the selection of populations for gifted education program services. Titles and authors of articles include: "The Identification Blues and How to Cure Them" (Ernesto Bernal); "Recognizing Giftedness in Your Child" (Linda Kreger Silverman); "Instructional Grouping, GATE and Honors Classes" (Bill…

  14. Making the Year 2000 a Sure Winner. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference (16th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 19-20, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Patricia, Ed.

    This document contains 21 presentations from a conference on business and marketing education. The following papers are included: "Business and Marketing Education: In Tune with the Times" (Clarice P. Brantley); "Portfolio Assessment--A Sure Winner" (Ann Bullock); "The Effect of the Year 2000 on Web Page Maintenance" (Linda Carr);…

  15. They're a Hard Act to Follow: Four Professors Who Make Them Laugh in Liberal Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, Thomas R.; And Others

    Four teachers at Fort Lewis College, Colorado, use humor to send messages which "leap frog" resistance to the new and different, and go directly to the preconscious. The power in these humorous conceptual leaps is that the entering information sticks to the anger and passions of the human psyche, thus fostering retention. Linda Mack, a music…

  16. Race Equity in Education: The History of School Desegregation 1849-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquila, Frank D., Ed.

    This book is a compilation of articles by Linda Zook, Steven Bower, Thomas Black, Frank Aquila, Patrick Tydings, Robert Powers, and Bruce Graham on the legal and educational history of school segregation. An initial article reviews the Federal court process. Also presented is a general historical review of Supreme Court doctrine on the issue of…

  17. Use of "Ad Hominem" Argument in Political Discourse: The Battalino Case from the Impeachment Trial of President Clinton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Examines argument from the televised impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton concerning the similarity of the Clinton case to the Linda Battalino case and asks if the argument does or does not represents an "ad hominem" argument. Provides an introduction to the viewpoint of informal logic and a summary of the various forms of argument at…

  18. 75 FR 55831 - Appointment of Members of Senior Executive Services Performance Review Board.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... CONTROL POLICY Appointment of Members of Senior Executive Services Performance Review Board. AGENCY: Office of National Drug Control Policy . ACTION: Notice of Appointments. Heading: Appointment of Members... questions to Linda V. Priebe, Deputy General Counsel (202) 395-6622, Office of National Drug Control...

  19. Florida Journal of Communication Disorders, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa-Lugo, Linda I., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of the Florida Journal of Communication Disorders contains the following featured articles: (1) Using Descriptive Language Assessment Procedure with African-American English Preschool Child Speakers: Advantages and Limitations (Kenyatta O. Rivers and Linda J. Lombardino), which discusses best practices for using descriptive language…

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (74th, Boston, Massachusetts, August 7-10, 1991). Part VII: Journalism and Media History, Section A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    Section A of the Journalism and Media History section of the proceedings contains the following 16 papers: "Covering the 'World's Most Famous' Trial: An Examination of the Choices Made by Georgia Reporters" (Gregory C. Lisby and Linda L. Harris); "Market Segmentation and Political Capital as Supports for Newspaper Partisanship: The Partisan Press…

  1. Leadership. Research in Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neider, Linda L. Ed.; Schriesheim, Chester A., Ed.

    This volume in the Research in Management series is devoted to the field of leadership--a look at where it has been and where it seems to be going. A "Foreword" (Linda L. Neider, Chester A. Schriesheim) is followed by seven chapters highlighting creative, new looks at leadership and adept analyses of leadership theories that have already made…

  2. A Collection of Papers on Self-Study and Institutional Improvement, 2003. Volume 1: Establishing and Sustaining Effective Connections. 2003 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Kollenburg, Susan E., Ed.

    Papers in this collection were prepared for the annual meeting of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. This volume contains papers discussing establishing and sustaining effective connections. Chapter 1, "Building New Partnerships for Learning," contains: (1) "Developing the ABCs of Successful Partnerships" (Linda L. Baer and Ann…

  3. 2,3,7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)-MEDIATED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FEMALE CYP1A-2 KNOCKOUT (CYP1A2-/-) MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Female CYP1A2 Knockout (CYP1A2-/-) Mice

    Deborah Burgin1, Janet Diliberto2, Linda Birnbaum2
    1UNC Toxicology; 2USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Most of the effects due to TCDD exposure are mediated via...

  4. Building Bridges to Tomorrow in Business and Marketing Education. Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference Proceedings (15th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 20-21, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swope, John A., Ed.

    This proceedings includes the following papers: "Using Multimedia in Computer Applications" (Delores Barnhill); "Becoming an International Educator: Why, How, and What" (Ray D. Bernardi); "Online Courses--A Bridge for Education" (Phyllis J. Broughton); "Web Page Maintenance" (Linda Carr, Mary Cauley); "Teaching Suggestions to Help Students Prevent…

  5. Community College Journal for Research and Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edith H., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Designed as a forum for the exchange of information among research and planning professionals, this journal presents articles on institutional research studies and practices. In "The President's Forum," Mantha Mehallis focuses on the changing role of research evaluation and planning in community colleges. Next, Linda Greer, in her article,…

  6. The Peep Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Three years ago, the author and Linda Arbuckle (University of Florida ceramic professor and internationally known majolica clay artist) were on the phone discussing how electric kilns just don't have any artistic design flair to them. The round kiln has basic properties that allow it to function properly, but its looks are far from exciting. They…

  7. Best Leadership Practices for High-Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Linda L.; Villani, Christine J.

    2004-01-01

    This book presents both the practice and theory of best leadership practices in high-poverty schools. Authors Linda Lyman and Christine Villani take a unique approach by inviting readers into two high-poverty elementary schools where they will experience, through in-depth case studies, how two extraordinary principals model and practice their…

  8. Supporting Moral Development: The Virtues Project[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moor, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    The Virtues Project[TM] was founded in Canada in 1991 by Linda Kavelin Popov, Dan Popov, and John Kavelin who were concerned about the level of violence among families and youth. In studying sacred traditions and cultures around the world, they identified a set of common virtues. These were used to develop a pedagogical model that has applications…

  9. Authors in the Fast Lane!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follos, Alison M. G.; Rubin, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces various writers, including Laurie Halse Anderson, Linda Sue Park, Richard Peck, James Patterson, and Charles R. Smith, Jr., who will give their presentations at the 2009 American Association of School Librarians (AASL) National Conference & Exhibition in Charlotte. This November the AASL National Conference and Exhibition…

  10. Monograph: Young Adulthood and Middle Age, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monograph: Young Adulthood and Middle Age, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The inaugural volume of this serial contains 12 articles that represent a diverse population of counselors: (1) "Issues in Counseling Immigrants" (Linda Sheppard); (2) "Family Support and Starting a Small Business" (Michael Cusack and Peter Emerson); (3) "Professional Disillusionment: Crisis or Catalyst" (Kay Miller, Susan Cooper-Shoup and…

  11. "A Lifelong Aversion to Writing": What if Writing Courses Emphasized Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    There has been a great deal of groundbreaking research done on motivation during the last twenty-five years, and all of it points to the importance of intrinsic motivation. This research has very significant ramifications for teachers of English. In this essay, the author engages the issue of "aversion" that Linda Brodkey raises in her essay…

  12. STS-37 Pilot Cameron and MS Godwin work on OV-104's aft flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Pilot Kenneth D. Cameron and Mission Specialist (MS) Linda M. Godwin pause from their work on aft flight deck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, to pose for a picture. Cameron holds onto an onorbit station control panel while Godwin steadies herself by using the overhead window (W8) sill.

  13. The Case of Columbus, New Mexico: Educational Life on the Border. Multicultural Videocase Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Joanne M., Ed.; McNergney, Robert F., Ed.

    This guide accompanies one of a pair of videocases depicting educational life in Columbus, New Mexico. The videocase includes 23 minutes of unstaged but edited videotape footage of teaching and learning in and around an elementary school. The first section of the guide, "Teaching Note" (Linda Warner), contains a transcript of the videotape and…

  14. A Brighter Future: Solutions to Policy Issues Affecting America's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Lawrence J., Ed.

    This collection of papers explains why deep reforms are necessary if today's children are to reach their full potential as productive, independent, and responsible adults. The papers are: (1) "Orphanages as Villages" (Richard B. McKenzie); (2) "Medicating Children" (Linda Gorman); (3) "Government Drug Pushers and the Ritalin Controversy" (Shelley…

  15. In Africa, Berklee Summons the Music of Dreams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Homegrown musicians from all over Africa gather at auditions for scholarships to the Berklee College of Music. The Africa Scholars Program, as the scholarship is called, offers a four-year, full scholarship, to begin in 2009. It was established by Berklee's president, Roger H. Brown, and his wife, Linda Mason, both of whom have worked extensively…

  16. Racism. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on racism in colleges and public schools and on strategies to build ethnic and racial tolerance. "Affirmative Action: Not a Thing of the Past" (Linda Cantu) reviews the history of affirmative action and its positive effects on Hispanic and Black enrollment in higher education, discusses current efforts to…

  17. A Fresh Start for New Orleans' Children: Improving Education after Katrina. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate. One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session on Examining the Education System of New Orleans (July 14, 2006, New Orleans, LA). Senate Hearing 109-626

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the education system of New Orleans. Statements were presented by: Honorable Lamar Alexander, Chairman, Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development; Honorable Mary L. Landrieu, U.S. Senator from Louisiana; Honorable Richard Burr, U.S. Senator from North Carolina; Linda Johnson, President,…

  18. Technical Assistance for Writers in the Workplace: Some Heuristic Uses of Professional Writing Techniques in a Multiauthor Writing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Describes aspects of Linda Flower's work used by the author in devising writing technical assistance for teams writing technical reports in the United States General Accounting Office. Discusses three brief case studies describing the relationship between the work program structure (a major barrier to audience-based writing) and the writing…

  19. National Standards: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus in Change, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Issues in the debate over national education standards for content and performance are examined in this journal issue. Interviews with three individuals in different areas of education were held, and each is described in narrative style by Anne Turnbaugh Lockwood. The first is with Linda Darling-Hammond, director of the National Center for…

  20. Accountability Is More than a Test Score

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnipseed, Stephan; Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The number one quality business leaders look for in employees is creativity and yet the U.S. education system undermines the development of the higher-order skills that promote creativity by its dogged focus on multiple-choice tests. Stephan Turnipseed and Linda DarlingHammond discuss the kind of rich accountability system that will help students…

  1. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  2. Writing Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richgels, Donald J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses four recent writing books: "Teaching to Write: Theory Into Practice" (Jane B. Hughey and Charlotte Slack); "The Writing Teacher's Handbook" (Jo Phenix); "Scaffolding Young Writers: A Writers' Workshop Approach" (Linda J. Dorn and Carla Soffos); and "Directing the Writing Workshop: An Elementary Teacher's Handbook" (Jean Wallace Gillet…

  3. 75 FR 45694 - ITS Joint Program Office; IntelliDriveSM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; IntelliDrive\\SM\\ Task Force Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research and... Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office will hold a meeting with the Institute of... July 2010. Linda Dodge, Chief of Staff, ITS Joint Program Office. BILLING CODE 4910-HY-P...

  4. From School-Culture-to-Family-Culture: Reflections on Four Generations of a Deweyan Education in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makaiau, Amber Strong

    2015-01-01

    In 1918, the author's great great aunt, Sophie Judd Cooke founded a small progressive school in Honolulu. Her brother Henry named it Hanahau'oli School, which means joyful work school. In this essay the author's mother, Linda Summers Strong and the author reflect on the impact of Hanahau'oli School's Deweyan approach to education on the…

  5. Ethical Living Through Children's Literature--Caring, Compassion, and Community: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamford, Rosemary Salesi; Kristo, Janice V.

    1996-01-01

    Introduces five articles that advocate using children's literature to explore ethical issues and behaviors with students. Constance Perry summarizes research on moral/ethical development. Linda Lamme recommends fiction and biographies with subtle messages. Yvonne Siu-Runyan emphasizes multicultural literature. Bonnie Blake-Kline stresses zigzag…

  6. Dragon Dancers and Eastern Westerns: Serving the Asian American Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    Describes how the Linda Vista branch of the San Diego Public Library (California) developed services for three Asian American constituencies--Vietnamese, Lao, and Hmong. Topics addressed include bilingual library assistants; getting to know the community; coalitions with business and religious leaders; special programming; and collection…

  7. 78 FR 76598 - Membership of the Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... GONIPROW, ALEXANDER GRAHAM, DARRELL W. GREWAL, SATYAMDEEP S. HALL, LINDA W. HAMMOND, PEIRCE A. III HARRIS..., DENNIS LABRECK, JANET L. LAKIN, KENNETH CHARLES LHAMON, CATHERINE E. LIM, JEANETTE J. LUCZAK, RONALD J...: Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454,...

  8. A Simplified Indicator of Social Well-Being in the United States: Examining the Ecological Impact of Family Formation within a County Level Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jeremy R.

    2012-01-01

    In 1995, a study entitled "Does Marriage Matter?" was published by Linda Waite in the journal of "Demography," which was concerned with the direction of such causal relationships. While Waite's examination of the causal relationships associated with marriage, and most other analyses of this type, is primarily concerned with the individual level…

  9. Math and Science Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on efforts to make math and science more attractive, relevant, and accessible to students, especially limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, female, and at-risk students. "TAAS Math Performance" (Linda Cantu) outlines recent statewide results for the controversial Texas Assessment of Academic…

  10. 75 FR 74132 - Notice of Intent To Grant Buy America Waiver to Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477), or visit http://www.regulations... Martin, Attorney-Advisor, FRA Office of Chief Counsel, (202) 493-6062 or via e-mail at Linda.Martin@dot... Trainmen (BLET) and James A. Stern, Jr., National Legislative Director of the United Transportation...

  11. Research, Issues, and Practices. Proceedings of the Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium (3rd, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 28, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion.

    This monograph provides the following 11 papers presented at a 1995 symposium on curriculum and instruction: (1) "Early Children Education in Belarus: Kindergarten No. 490" (Linda A. Good) a case study of one school for 260 children, ages 2-7; (2) "How Parents Spend Their Time" (Timothy Lillie) an investigation of how parents of children with…

  12. 78 FR 40738 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site AGENCY... incurred for the Double H Pesticide Burial Site in Grandview, Yakima County, Washington. Under this proposed settlement, the settling parties are Double H, L.P.; James T. Hansen; Linda L. Hansen; George...

  13. 76 FR 3145 - Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program (P50)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... announcing the availability of grant funds for the support of the Office of Orphan Products Development (OOPD... single device projects. Although administered by the Office of Orphan Products Development, this grant... Information and Additional Requirements Contact: Linda C. Ulrich or Debra Y. Lewis, Office of Orphan...

  14. 75 FR 78992 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ..., Contact: Linda Devine 757-964-9434. Revision to FR Notice Published 08/20/2010: Extending Comment Period...: Contact: Matthew McMillen 202-586-7248. Revision to FR Notice Published 08/27/2010: The US Department of...: Mike Ackerman 210-295-2273. Revision to FR Notice Published 11/05/2010; Extending Comment Period...

  15. Career Choice and Development. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Duane; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers examining established and newly emerging theories of career choice and development. Following prefaces to the third, second, and first editions by Duane Brown and Linda Brooks, the following papers are included: "Introduction to Theories of Career Development and Choice: Origins, Evolution, and Current Efforts" (Duane…

  16. Expanding the Vision of Self: Why the Arts Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Linda F.

    2013-01-01

    In this reflective essay, Linda F. Nathan, the founding headmaster of the Boston Arts Academy and currently the executive director of Center for Arts in Education at Boston Arts Academy, shares a story about how one student, Ronald, expands his vision of self through his engagement with the arts. In presenting this reflection on Ronald's…

  17. Impact: Advising for the '80s. Proceedings of the National Conference on Academic Advising (3rd, Omaha, Nebraska, October 14-17, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chando, Carl M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 National Conference on Academic Advising are presented. Contents include the keynote address, papers, and panel discussions. The 61 papers and authors include the following: "Some Recent Discoveries in Vocational Assistance" (John Holland); "Specific Responses to High Risk Students at a State College" (Linda Syrell, David…

  18. Professional Development: International and National Perspectives. Four Presentations from AAHE's National Conference on School/College Collaboration, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Sato, Nancy; Paine, Lynn; Snowball, Diane

    The four papers presented here address teacher development from an international viewpoint. In "Professional Development and Standards" (Linda Darling-Hammond) it is suggested that U.S. educators engage in new kinds of collaborations with universities, and it proposes a shift from information transmittal to "co-construction" of knowledge state…

  19. Reflecting Visions. New Perspectives on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains 14 papers: "Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education: A Growing Challenge" (Rodolfo Stavenhagen); "Indigenous Peoples: Progress in the International Recognition of Human Rights and the Role of Education" (Julian Burger); "Adult Learning in the Context of Indigenous Societies" (Linda King); "Linguistic Rights and the Role of…

  20. Research, Issues, and Practices. Conference Proceedings of the Annual Curriculum and Instruction Research Symposium (2nd, Vermillion, South Dakota, April 15, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.

    The purpose of the conference reported in this document was to promote the professional sharing of current educational issues, provide a forum for dialogue concerning relevant educational topics, and share faculty research interests. The presentations are: (1) "Videotape Production: A Technological Form of Educational Research" (Linda Good); (2)…

  1. Oscar F. Smith Middle School: One Extra Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article features Oscar F. Smith Middle School, a challenging school in Chesapeake, Virginia. When Principal Linda Scott exclaims, "Oscar F. Smith Middle School is "hot"!" to visitors, she is not referring to the inside temperature of the bustling school of grades 6-8 located in the historic South Norfolk borough of Chesapeake. She is…

  2. Ke Ha'a La Puna i Ka Makani: Pele and Hi'iaka Mo'olelo and the Possibilities for Hawaiian Literary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ho'omanawanui, ku'ualoha

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the University of Hawai'i sponsored a symposium titled "Indigenizing the University." This symposium featured indigenous scholars such as Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Graham Smith, and Taiaiake Alfred, who addressed how indigenous political theory and methods of research were necessary to support indigenous research and how changes…

  3. Shared medical appointments: An innovative approach to patient care.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Cora A

    2015-09-13

    This article provides an overview of shared medical appointments, an innovative approach to managing patients with chronic conditions. The Diabetes Shared Medical Appointment of the Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare System, conducted by an interprofessional team and led by a nurse practitioner, is described. PMID:26274879

  4. Come to the River: Using Spirituality to Cope, Resist, and Develop Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses spiritual lives of African American female college students, including elements of coping, resisting, and developing identity. The theoretical frameworks of James Fowler, Sharon Parks, and Linda James Myers are viewed through the lens of experiences of African American women in college. Qualitative research…

  5. A Disability Studies Response to JTE's Themed Issue on Diversity and Disability in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent themed issue of "Journal of Teacher Education" ("JTE" 63.4) about issues of disability, diversity, and teacher education, guest editors Marleen Pugach, Linda Blanton, and Lani Florian (2012) invite readers to participate in "honest, difficult, and much needed dialogue across the many diversity constituencies in teacher education" (p.…

  6. 75 FR 45672 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Register on April 5, 2010, (75 FR 17163). Dated: July 28, 2010. Linda Watts Thomas, Acting Departmental...: Formaldehyde (29 CFR 1910.1048). OMB Control Number: 1218-0145. Affected Public: Business or other for-profits... requirements contained in the Formaldehyde Standard. The Formaldehyde Standard requires employers to...

  7. Making Connections, Building Communities. Proceedings of the Annual Rural & Small Schools Conference (19th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 26-27, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan. Center for Rural Education and Small Schools.

    This proceedings contains 26 summaries of conference presentations and discussions. Titles and authors are: "Is a Sexual Harassment Policy Enough To Protect Against Liability?" (Camille Barnett); "Recreating the Communities of Our Youth" (Marlyn Benson); "Creating a Language of Ethics in Rural Schooling" (Terry R. Berkeley, Linda P. Thurston);…

  8. "Response to Comments": Straw Makeovers, Dogmatic Holism, and Interesting Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the author's response to commentaries by Eric Bredo, R. Burke Johnson, and Linda Tillman on his article "Positivist Dogmas, Rhetoric, and the Education Science Question." Each of the commentaries goes beyond merely characterizing and assessing the author's analysis to also suggest an alternative emphasis, if not an alternative…

  9. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in ideal…

  10. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  11. Invited Reaction: Black and White Women Managers--Access to Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    In a survey of Black and White women managers, Linda M. Hite identifies differences in the managers' perceptions of opportunities available to different race and gender groups. Her findings reveal divergent beliefs about the opportunities for people of color; there is more similarity in Black and White women's views when comparing opportunities…

  12. Laser Disk Systems in Libraries. Summary of Proceedings of FLICC/FEDLINK Institute (Washington, D.C., May 11, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Library and Information Center Committee, Washington, DC. Federal Library and Information Network.

    This document summarizes the nine presentations made at an institute on laser disk systems in libraries held at the Library of Congress in May 1987. The first speaker, Linda Helgerson, discussed advances in CD-ROM technology as well as its advantages and disadvantages. Judy McQueen focused primarily on the disadvantages of CD-ROM and urged caution…

  13. Risky Business: Taking and Managing Risks in Library Services for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Linda W.; Martin, Hillias J.; Urquhart, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Do we add that edgy urban novel to our teen collection? Should we initiate social networking? What about abandoning Dewey for a bookstore arrangement? Change is risky business, but librarians must be prepared to initiate change to best serve teens. YA (young adult) service innovators Linda W. Braun, Hillias J. Martin, and Connie Urquhart explain…

  14. On "In a Different Voice": An Interdisciplinary Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Linda K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This group of papers on Carol Gilligan's study of psychological theory, "In a Different Voice," includes: "Some Cautionary Words for Historians" (Linda K. Kerber); "How Different Is the 'Different Voice?'" (Catherine G. Greeno and Eleanor F. Maccoby); "A Methodological Critique" (Zella Luria); "The Culture of Gender: Women and Men of Color" (Carol…

  15. School Nursing Certification Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Wolfe, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 update to the resource you have been waiting for to help you prepare to take the National School Nurse Certification Exam. Dr. Janice Selekman DNSc, RN, NCSN, a recognized expert in pediatric nursing, and NASN Past President Linda C. Wolfe MEd, BSN, RN, NCSN, FNASN are the authors. This text was created in response to many years of…

  16. Consumer Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gindele, John; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Consumer education activities for secondary, adult, and special needs students are described in "What Does It Cost to Run a Home?" by John and Joseph Gindele; "Taking the Show on the Road" by Linda Lewis; "Special Home Ec Program" by Marty Nelson; and "Understanding Civil Law" by Michael Weis. (SK)

  17. Immigrant Education. Federal Funding Has Not Kept Pace with Student Increases. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and the Humanities, Committee on Labor and Human Resources, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morra, Linda G.

    The statement by Linda G. Morra, Director of Education and Employment Issues in the Health, Education, and Human Services Division, discusses the agency's work on immigrant education and the Emergency Immigrant Education Act (EIEA) Program. The nation's ability to meet its educational goals increasingly depends on its ability to educate immigrant…

  18. Research on Professional Development Schools. Teacher Education Yearbook VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, David M., Ed.; McIntyre, D. John, Ed.

    This book examines the current standard practice of confining teacher preparation to 4 years of coursework, examining the growing interest in career-spanning teacher education. There are 12 chapters. Section 1, "Collaboration: Building Bridges to Transform Institutional Cultures," includes: "Overview and Framework" (Linda Valli) and three…

  19. Adult Learning: A Key for the 21st Century. CONFINTEA V Background Papers (Hamburg, Germany, July 14-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education and Development, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Jakob Horn, Paul Belanger); "Internationalization and Globalization" (Ove Korsgaard); "Adult Learning and the Challenges of the 21st Century" (Marc-Laurent Hazoume); "Diversity in Adult Education: Some Key Concepts in Minority and Indigenous Issues" (Linda King de Jardon); "The Culture of Peace: The…

  20. Options in Education. Technology in College, Parts One and Two, Program Nos. 244-245.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    Scripts of public radio programs on the subject of technology in college are presented. The scripts are as follows: "Dental Videotape;""A Geography Student Talks About Learning by Computers;""Linda Harris Talks About Fear of Computers;""Charles Van Loan, Who Teaches Computer Science at Cornell University;""Students Who Learn Through…

  1. Let's Treat the Cause, Not the Symptoms: Equity and Accountability in Texas Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Richard R.; Valenzuela, Angela; Sloan, Kris; Foley, Douglas E.

    2001-01-01

    Response to article in December 2000 "Phi Delta Kappan" by James Scheurich, Linda Skrla, and Joseph Johnson in support of the Texas Accountability System. Discusses flaws in the article's historical possibilities thesis and the inaccurate characterization of accountability as a dichotomy. Advocates Coalition for Authentic Reform Education…

  2. In-Forming Practice through Action Research. Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Education. Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterat, Linda, Ed.; Smith, M. Gale

    This book contains 16 papers about informing family and consumer sciences educational practice through action research. The following papers are included: "Informing Practice through Classroom Inquiry" (Linda Peterat, M. Gale Smith); "Focusing Praxis Research on Sexism in a Primary Classroom" (Emily Sutherland); "Understanding the Meaning of…

  3. Beyond Part C: Reducing Middle School Special Education for Early Intervention Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullery, Mary Anne; Katz, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the rates of special education placement during middle school grades (sixth through eighth) among children who participated in the Linda Ray Intervention Program (LRIP) center-based and home-based learning modalities. The study sample included 113 children in Miami Dade County Public Schools who had gestational cocaine exposure…

  4. Science Learning: Processes and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Carol Minnick, Ed.; Alvermann, Donna E., Ed.

    Reflecting a collaboration in terms of content areas, levels, and audience, this volume represents the efforts of science teachers and reading teachers to understand and help one another fine tune their craft. Chapters in the volume include: (1) "Metacognition, Reading and Science Education" (Linda Baker); (2) "Science and Reading: Many Process…

  5. Redefining Professional Development. Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The research on effective professional development is consistent across many studies. Researchers Willis Hawley and Linda Valli (Westchester Institute for Human Services Research, n.d.), in their synthesis of the professional development literature, find that high-quality teacher development is as follows: (1) Informed by research on teaching and…

  6. Role of HRD in Women's Career Development. Symposium 17. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This symposium on the role of human resource development (HRD) in women's career development consists of three presentations. "Career Goals of Non-Managerial Women: An Adaptive Approach" (Linda M. Hite, Kimberly S. McDonald) reports an exploratory study that produced data from which these four themes emerged--adaptive goals, family influence,…

  7. Weaving Wisdom with Hard Work: Accomplished Student Learns, Grows, and Gives Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhl, Eleanor

    2010-01-01

    Linda Taylor (Dine) raises sheep and horses, creates sculpture, paints, teaches traditional weaving classes, hunts solo for elk and deer, and volunteers at the Methodist Thrift Shop. In the past, she has also cared for Native children in need, and she is currently applying to foster a Navajo girl. On weekends, she sells bales of hay at the…

  8. Addressing Barriers to Learning. Volume 9, Number 1. Winter 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter of the Center for Mental Health in Schools is devoted entirely to presenting the first draft of a brief prepared by the staff of two national centers: the Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA (co-directed by Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor) and the Center for School Mental Health Assistance at the…

  9. A Vision for the Future: Collective Effort for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Megan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of the teacher in the classroom is the most important factor in raising student achievement, as Linda Darling-Hammond noted, and educators should offer their students nothing less than well-trained and well-supported teachers. Providing high-quality teachers is of particular importance in low-income communities of color, where the most…

  10. Documenting the Diaspora: Historian Couple Investigate Central Africa's Place in World History, Rooting Black Studies in an International Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    At a time when Black studies programs at American colleges and universities are placing increasing emphasis on the impact of Black migrations and movements throughout the world, scholars such as Drs. John Thornton and Linda Heywood, husband and wife historians, are gaining prominence in the discipline due to the shilling focus. Scholars like this…

  11. STS-108 Flight Day 10 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this tenth day of the STS-108 mission, STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda Godwin is seen during unloading operations in the Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The exterior of Endeavour and the International Space Station are shown as the Canadarm grapples the MPLM and transfers it to the payload bay of the orbiter.

  12. Second Language Acquisition Theory and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Fred R., Ed.; And Others

    Selected papers on second language acquisition and instruction from the University of Wisconsin at Madison symposium include the following: "Learning and Teaching: The Necessary Intersection" (Susan M. Gass); "Reenvisioning the Second Language Classroom: A Vygotskian Approach" (Linda Schinke-Llano); "The FOCAL SKILLS Approach: An Assessment"…

  13. Vienna in the Early Twentieth Century: The Cultural Response to Modernization. Curriculum Units, NEH Institute, Summer 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene.

    These curriculum units were developed by participants in the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar at the University of Oregon in 1993. The lessons include: (1) "Schule, Freunde, Liebe: Wien um die Jahrhundertwende (School, Friends, Love: Vienna at the Turn of the Century)" (Linda Hansen; Glenn Tetterton-Opheim); (2) "Kultur in Wien um die…

  14. Teaching for Joy and Justice: Re-Imagining the Language Arts Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Linda

    2009-01-01

    "Teaching for Joy and Justice" is the much-anticipated sequel to Linda Christensen's bestselling, "Reading, Writing, and Rising Up." Christensen is recognized as one of the country's finest teachers. Her latest book shows why. Through story upon story, Christensen demonstrates how she draws on students' lives and the world to teach poetry, essay,…

  15. Writing Is Not Just a Basic Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    At many colleges, professors trained in the discipline of rhetoric and composition are finding that the specialized knowledge they bring to teaching writing is held in thrall to older notions of how students learn to write--what Linda Brodkey, an author and director of the Warren College Writing Program at the University of California at San…

  16. Narrative Clock Sculptures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Art teacher Linda Popp and artist H. Ed Smith team up to teach about creating sculptural clocks. This lesson shows how a portrait can be created using various media. Students based projects on someone in their lives they have known for a long time. This sculptural problem was part of a series of portrait and self-portrait lessons with a high…

  17. 76 FR 34108 - Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election (RI 20-80)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Alternative Annuity Election (RI 20-80) AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel... Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other federal agencies the opportunity to comment... information collection to U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Linda Bradford (Acting) Deputy...

  18. Collaborative Learning in Higher Education. Proceedings of the Teaching Conference (Bloomington, Indiana, October 11-12, 1990). Panel Discussions and Selected Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Edmund, Ed.; And Others

    This conference report contains selected presentations and panel discussions concerning the experiences of faculty and students with learner-oriented approaches to college teaching. Following a welcome address by Kenneth R. R. Gross-Louis and keynote addresses by Faith Gabelnick and Linda Harasim, papers are organized in two categories:…

  19. Education Reformer: Robert J. Marzano. Models for Education Reform, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Frederick M. Hess, director of education policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute, a public policy think tank in Washington, D.C., and Linda Darling-Hammond, a professor of education at Stanford University, wrote in "How to Rescue Education Reform" in The New York Times on December 5 that the federal government can and should play a…

  20. Translation of Evidence-Based Practices in a Behaviour Support Implementation Model for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Linda Miller describes a model for the practical implementation of behaviour supports. This model, the "5P approach", attempts to delineate a comprehensive and sequentially-stepped model of the assessment and treatment of challenging behaviour with consistent colour-coded themes. The 5Ps include profiling the child, prioritising the challenging…

  1. Young Unwed Fathers and Welfare Reform. Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report. Report of a Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., November 18, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Theodora; Herendeen, Lisa

    This report contains highlights of a seminar which focused on young unwed fathers and welfare reform. Comments by these panelists are summarized: Rikki Baum, legislative assistant to Senator Patrick Moynihan; Linda Mellgren, from the Office of Income Security; and Margaret Boeckmann, Director of the Office of Employment Policy, Maryland Department…

  2. Adult Learning and Literacy in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shohet, Linda

    2001-01-01

    In Chapter Six, Linda Shohet offers a description of the adult literacy and learning system in Canada. In providing a historical overview of the development of the field, Shohet notes key political events that have influenced the funding and development of services for adults. Through her description, the author reveals the complexity and…

  3. Gaming: Eat Breakfast, Drink Milk, Play Xbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    Plagued by one of the most overweight populaces in the country, the state of West Virginia was looking for a solution to its obesity problem that would appeal to the school-age crowd. It turned to Linda Carson, a professor at West Virginia University's School of Physical Education. Carson recalled witnessing kids lining up in an arcade to play a…

  4. Our Visions of Possibility for Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Tim; Reinier, Rise; Gallagher, Kevin; Morgan, Bruce; Lopez-Robertson, Julia; Santman, Donna; Wong-Kam, JoAnn; Hill, Sharon; Christensen, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Tim O'Keefe, Rise Reinier and Kevin Gallagher, Bruce Morgan, Julia Lopez-Robertson, Donna Santman, JoAnn Wong-Kam, Sharon Hill, and Linda Christensen provide short essays describing their personal visions of possibility about literacy and how they maintain that passion and vision. Across a range of contexts, they reflect on the ways in which their…

  5. Where Focus on the Family Falls Short on Character Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Sheldon H.

    1995-01-01

    Linda Page's article ("A Conservative Christian View on Values," this issue) mistakenly argues that the source of this country's moral crisis lies in a 30-year history of moral relativism in schools promoted by the values-clarification movement. Page unfairly blames educators for the growth in crime and violence and the decline of moral courage…

  6. ICORE '98: Proceedings from the International Conference on Outdoor Recreation and Education (12th, Fort Walton Beach, Florida, October 20-24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rob, Comp.

    This proceedings of a conference on outdoor recreation and education contains conference papers and summaries of presentations and panel sessions. Following a summary of conference activities, the 14 entries are: "Working Together in Outdoor Programming: How Can It Work for You?" (W. T. Taylor, Jim Gilbert, Patsy Kott, Linda Potter-Rosenkrantz,…

  7. Making People Mad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arias, Anna Maria

    1992-01-01

    Presents the story of Linda Chavez, a controversial conservative Hispanic, widely disliked because of her opposition to affirmative action assimilation advocacy, criticism to Puerto Ricans, affiliation to the Conservative Republican, and support of English as the official language of the United States. Mentions her book, "Out of the Barrio," which…

  8. Construction Sites: Excavating Race, Class, and Gender among Urban Youth. The Teaching for Social Justice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Lois, Ed.; Fine, Michelle, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers on the lives of urban youths in and out of school. There are 17 chapters in 4 parts. Part 1, "Spaces for Identity Work," includes: (1) "Writing on the Bias" (Linda Brodkey); (2) "Learning to Speak Out in an Abstinence-Based Sex Education Group: Gender and Race Work in an Urban Magnet School" (Lois Weis and…

  9. Reading, Language Arts & Literacy. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Kathy, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on reading, language arts, and literacy from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Improving the Teaching of Reading, Language Arts and Literacy through WebCT: A Work in Progress" (Linda Akanbi); (2) "A Survey of Computer Software Available in the Current…

  10. Proton-beam irradiation for the cancer patient: An approach to optimal therapy and normal-tissue sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, J.O.; Slater, J.M.; Coutrakon, G.B.

    1994-12-31

    The development of a hospital-based proton-beam therapy system at Loma Linda University Medical Center is one step of a historical trend toward more precise radiation therapy. It exploits available technology and, in doing so, may point the way toward other, similar facilities; it is hoped that it may also point the way to true selective cell irradiation. In its present form it offers patients an opportunity for effective cancer control with reduced side effects. As an instrument of precision, it allows for physical, radiobiological, and clinical investigations not previously attainable and is, therefore, intended as a worldwide resource as well as a treatment center. As research accumulates and results are published, a better-defined role for proton-beam radiation therapy is expected to become apparent and further exploitation of protons most likely will be undertaken. The Loma Linda facility, then, represents not so much a culmination as a beginning. 43 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Vicarious Collecting: A Review of Some Notable Books about Books - and where to acquire them!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Jack

    Reviews on Milestones of Science, Ruth A. Sparrow, Buffalo Museum of Science, 1972, The Face of the Moon, from the Linda Hall Library, Out of this World - The Golden Age of the Celestial Atlas, Linda Hall Library, including Bayer's Uranometria, Schiller's Coelum Christianum, Hevelius' Firmamentum, Flamsteed's Atlas Coelestis, and Bode's Uranographia, as well as Argelander, Bode, Cellarius, Coronelli, Doppelmaier, Kepler, La Caille, Messier, Piccolomini, and Wollaston, Heavenly Library, Angus MacDonald and A.D. Morrison-Low from Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Library, 1994, Catalogue of the Rare Astronomical Books in the San Diego State University Library, Louis A. Kenney, 1988, and Vanity Fair, from 1869 to 1914, including caricatures of famous astronomers and scientists, such as Airy, Ball, Huggins, and Proctor.

  12. Validation of Rules to Predict Emergent Surgical Intervention in Pediatric Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boatright, Dowin H; Byyny, Richard L; Hopkins, Emily; Bakes, Katherine; Hissett, Jennifer; Tunson, Java; Easter, Joshua S; Vogel, Jody A; Bensard, Denis; Haukoos, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Background Trauma centers use guidelines to determine when a trauma surgeon is needed in the emergency department (ED) on patient arrival. A decision rule from Loma Linda University identified patients with penetrating injury and tachycardia as requiring emergent surgical intervention. Our goal was to validate this rule and to compare it to the American College of Surgeons’ Major Resuscitation Criteria (MRC). Study Design We used data from 1993 through 2010 from two Level 1 trauma centers in Denver, Colorado. Patient demographics, injury severity, times of ED arrival and surgical intervention, and all variables of the Loma Linda Rule and the MRC were obtained. The outcome, emergent intervention (defined as requiring operative intervention by a trauma surgeon within one hour of arrival to the ED or performance of cricothyroidotomy or thoracotomy in the ED) was confirmed using standardized abstraction. Sensitivities, specificities, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results 8,078 patients were included and 47 (0.6%) required emergent intervention. Of the 47 patients, the median age was 11 years (IQR: 7–14), 70% were male, 30% had penetrating mechanisms, and the median ISS was 25 (IQR: 9–41). At the two institutions, the Loma Linda Rule had a sensitivity and specificity of 69% (95% CI: 45%–94%) and 76% (95% CI: 69%–83%), respectively, and the MRC had a sensitivity and specificity of 80% (95% CI: 70%–92%) and 81% (95% CI: 77%–85%), respectively. Conclusions Emergent surgical intervention is rare in the pediatric trauma population. Although precision of predictive accuracies of the Loma Linda Rule and MRC were limited by small numbers of outcomes, neither set of criteria appears to be sufficiently accurate to recommend their routine use. PMID:23623222

  13. 75 FR 44017 - Office of the Secretary; Submission for OMB review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... obtained from the RegInfo.gov Web site at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain or by contacting Linda....342, 75.351, 75.360, 75.361, 75.362, 75.363, 75.364, 75.370, 75.371, and 75.382. For additional... public information collection request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review...

  14. Spill uniformity measurements for a raster scanned proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Koss, P.; Evans, K.; Taylor, D.; Jenkins, G.

    2000-11-01

    The method of scanning a proton beam across a target region for radiation therapy requires a uniform beam intensity throughout the beam spill time. Achieving uniform intensity using feedback to an air core quadrapole in the Loma Linda synchrotron accelerator is described in this paper. Frequency domain transfer functions and time domain intensity ripple measurements are presented followed with results and discussion of issues requiring additional work.

  15. Spill uniformity measurements for a raster scanned proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Johanning, J.; Koss, P.

    1997-02-01

    The method of scanning a proton beam across a target region for radiation therapy requires a uniform beam intensity throughout the beam spill time. Achieving uniform intensity using feedback to an air core quadrupole in the Loma Linda synchrotron accelerator is described in this paper. Frequency domain transfer functions and time domain intensity ripple measurements are presented followed with results and discussion of issues requiring additional work.

  16. STS-59 red shift crew on Endeavour's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On Endeavour's middeck, the three sts-59 red shift crew members begin to organize what was believed to be among the longest mail messages in recent Shuttle history. With the picture held vertically, Astronaut Sidney M. Gutierrez, mission commander, is in upper right. Also seen are Astronauts Linda M. Godwin, payload commander, and Kevin P. Chilton, pilot. Though early Shuttle flights could brag of longer teleprinted messages, this Thermal Printing System's (TIPS) message from the ground competes with those of recent Shuttle flights.

  17. 75 FR 1372 - Records Governing Off-the-Record Communications; Public Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... exempt off-the-record communications. Order No. 607 (64 FR 51222, September 22, 1999) requires Commission..., CP09-7-000 12-17-09 John Hempton. 4. CP09-6-000, CP09-7-000 12-17-09 Linda Martin. 5. CP09-6-000, CP09-7-000 12-17-09 Paul Sansone. Exempt 1. CP09-6-000, CP09-7-000 12-23-09 Marron Dooney and Jim...

  18. Technicians examine largest lunar rock sample collected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Three Brown and Root/Northrop technicians in the Nonsterile Nitrogen Laboratory in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) peer through glass at the much-discussed basketball size rock which Apollo 14 crewmen brought back from the Fra Mauro area of the Moon. They are, left to right, Linda Tyler, Nancy L. Trent and Sandra Richards (21244); Dr. Daniel Anderson, an aerospace technologist and test director in the LRL, looks at basketball size rock through a microscope (21245).

  19. STS-108 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-108 mission, the STS-108 crew (Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani), Expedition 3 crew (Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov), and Expedition 4 crew (Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Daniel Bursch) work to reload the Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module. Commander Culbertson is seen on the International Space Station's treadmill.

  20. STS-108 Flight Day 12 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this twelfth day of the STS-108 mission, the deployment of the Starship-3 satellite is shown. Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson, STS-108 Commander Dominic Gorie, Expedition 3 Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov, and STS-108 Pilot Mark Kelly are seen in an on-orbit interview, where they answer questions about their missions. Gorie, Kelly, and STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda Godwin are seen as they stow equipment on the middeck of Endeavour.

  1. Stennis Space Center observes 2009 Energy Awareness Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees Maria Etheridge (l to r), Linda Sauland Maurice Prevost visit a Coast Electric Power Association display featuring energy-efficient light bulbs during 2009 Energy Awareness Day activities on Oct. 20. The exhibit was one of several energy-efficiency and energy-awareness displays on-site for employees to visit. Vendors included Mississippi Power Company, Coast Electric Power Association, Mississippi Development Authority - Energy Division,Jacobs FOSC Environmental, Southern Energy Technologies, and Siemens Building Technologies.

  2. Earthquake and ambient vibration monitoring of the steel-frame UCLA factor building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.D.; Davis, P.M.; Safak, E.

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic property measurements of the moment-resisting steel-frame University of California, Los Angeles, Factor building are being made to assess how forces are distributed over the building. Fourier amplitude spectra have been calculated from several intervals of ambient vibrations, a 24-hour period of strong winds, and from the 28 March 2003 Encino, California (ML = 2.9), the 3 September 2002 Yorba Linda, California (ML = 4.7), and the 3 November 2002 Central Alaska (Mw = 7.9) earthquakes. Measurements made from the ambient vibration records show that the first-mode frequency of horizontal vibration is between 0.55 and 0.6 Hz. The second horizontal mode has a frequency between 1.6 and 1.9 Hz. In contrast, the first-mode frequencies measured from earthquake data are about 0.05 to 0.1 Hz lower than those corresponding to ambient vibration recordings indicating softening of the soil-structure system as amplitudes become larger. The frequencies revert to pre-earthquake levels within five minutes of the Yorba Linda earthquake. Shaking due to strong winds that occurred during the Encino earthquake dominates the frequency decrease, which correlates in time with the duration of the strong winds. The first shear wave recorded from the Encino and Yorba Linda earthquakes takes about 0.4 sec to travel up the 17-story building. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  3. Measurement of longitudinal emittance growth using a laser-induced neutralization method

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Garcia, R.; Johnson, K.F.; Saadatmand, K.; Sander, O.R.; Sandoval, D.; Shinas, M.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced neutralization technique, LINDA, has been used to study the longitudinal emittance of the 5-MeV H{sup {minus}} beam exiting the drift-tube Linac (DTL) of the Los Alamos Accelerator Test Stand (ATS). By using multiple laser intersection points, longitudinal emittance growths over drift distances of 23.6 and 30.6 cm were measured. Subsequently, a beam transport line, which consisted of one arm of a beam funnel, was substituted for the drift space. Measurements show that the elements of the funnel constrain emittance growth while the H{sup {minus}} beam is contained within these transport elements.

  4. MARS PATHFINDER LANDER REMOVED FROM SHIPPING CONTAINER IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the SAEF-2 spacecraft checkout facility at Kennedy Space Center, engineers and technicians from Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove the Mars Pathfinder lander from its shipping container, still covered in protective wrapping. Pictured from L-R, Linda Robeck, Jerry Gutierrez, Lorraine Garcia, Chuck Foehlinger of JPL. The arrival of the spacecraft at KSC from Pasadena, CA occurred on Aug. 13, 1996. Launch of Mars Pathfinder aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket will occur from Pad B at Complex 17 on Dec. 2.

  5. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Eaddy, J. M.; Archambeau, J. O.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Miller, D. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Siebers, J. V.; Slater, J. M.; Dicello, J. F.

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness and microdosimetry of a mixed energy field of protons up to 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J B; Eaddy, J M; Archambeau, J O; Coutrakon, G B; Miller, D W; Moyers, M F; Siebers, J V; Slater, J M; Dicello, J F

    1994-10-01

    We have studied radiation effects utilizing the new 250 MeV Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. In this paper we present the data collected for the survival of Chinese hamster lung (V79) cells, that were irradiated with a beam of mixed energy protons up to 200 MeV. The RBE for protons, when compared to 60Co gamma rays, ranged from a low of 1.2 at the high energy portion of the field to 1.3+ at the low energy portion of the field. These results are consistent with the measured lineal energy (microdosimetric) spectra. PMID:11539961

  7. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    PubMed

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck. PMID:16802565

  8. Officers and Council, 1998-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    The 1998-1999 Council of the British Astronomical Association photographed on the steps of Burlington House, London, on 1999 May 26. Front row, left to right: Bob Marriott, Hazel McGee, Martin Mobberley, Nick James, Jonathan Shanklin, Ron Johnson; centre: Richard Miles, Gordon Taylor, Jacqueline Mitton, David Tucker, John Mason, Pat Barber, David Reid, Peter Hudson; back: Laurence Anslow, Guy Hurst, Lionel Mayling, Nick Hewitt, Owen Brazell, Tony Kinder, Mark Armstrong, Maurice Gavin. Photo by Hazel McGee and Linda Newton.

  9. The technical editing internship: What makes it work

    SciTech Connect

    Caruthers, C.M.; Caruthers, L.E.; Schmidt, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The following paper presents the experiences and perceptions of the three main participants of a technical editing internship at Argonne National Laboratory during the summer of 1986. Linda Caruthers, Clifford Caruthers, and Bryan Schmidt/emdash/teacher, supervisor, and intern, respectively/emdash/share what they received as their roles and responsibilities in guiding, managing, and becoming an entry-level technical editor. The following discussions demonstrate how the efforts of three people pursuing different objectives achieve the primary goal of all technical writers and editors: high-quality publications.

  10. STS-76 Mission Specialist Richard Clifford suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-76 Mission Specialist Michael Richard 'Rich' Clifford is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. Clifford has flown in space twice before, on Missions STS-53 and STS-59, the latter including fellow STS-76 crew members Kevin Chilton and Linda Godwin. Once suitup activities are completed the six-member STS-76 flight crew will depart for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately seven-minute launch window opening around 3:13 a.m. EST, March 22.

  11. CLMA position on laboratory direction. Clinical Laboratory Management Association.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In July 1991, CLMA's National Affairs Committee (NAC) developed a proposed position statement on the laboratory director standard. The proposed statement was submitted to the 24-member National Affairs Reactor Panel and, based on their input, appropriate revisions were made. In August 1991, CLMA surveyed the full membership, and, as a result, the following position was adopted. NAC members include Royal A. Crystal, Chair; Linda D. Bielitzki, J.D., Vice Chair; Michael G. Bissell, M.D., Ph.D.; Earl C. Buck; Michael A. Maffetone, D.A.; Timothy Murray; Laurence J. Peterson; Marianne C. Watters; and Martha A. Feichter, National Affairs Analyst. PMID:10119431

  12. STS-108 MS Godwin in an M-113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. --STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda A. Godwin is ready to take her turn driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier. She and other crew members are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit from the launch pad and a simulated launch countdown. The 11-day mission will carry the replacement Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station, as well as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, filled with supplies and equipment. STS-108 is scheduled to launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  13. STS-108 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-108 mission, NASA Ground Control, STS-108 crew (Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani), Expedition 3 crew (Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov), and Expedition 4 crew (Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Daniel Bursch) are seen during a ceremony of remembrance on the three-month anniversary of the September 11th tragedy. The three crews also answer questions from the press on their missions. They are seen as they transfer supplies and equipment from the Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module.

  14. STS-108 Flight Day 9 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this ninth day of the STS-108 mission, the Expedition 3 crew (Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov), Expedition 4 crew (Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Daniel Bursch), and STS-108 crew (Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani) are seen during a ceremony where the E3 crew officially hands over the control of the International Space Station of the E4 crew. Kelly, Godwin, and Tani are seen on the middeck of Endeavour stowing equipment.

  15. STS-108 Flight Day 11 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On this eleventh day of the STS-108 mission, the Expedition 3 crew (Commander Frank Culbertson, Jr. and Flight Engineers Mikhail Turin and Vladimir Dezhurov), Expedition 4 crew (Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Carl Walz and Daniel Bursch), and STS-108 crew (Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda Godwin and Daniel Tani) are seen as the E3 crew bids farewell to the International Space Station (ISS) that has been their home for the previous several months. Endeavour undocks from ISS and performs the customary flyaround. The STS-108 crew and Commander Culbertson answer questions from the press in an on-orbit interview.

  16. Proton therapy construction projects in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    Proton and heavy-ion radiation therapy has been taking place now for 40 years, at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these centers built originally for physics research. The high degree of promise shown for using these particles for treating and curing cancer has stimulated the medical community to look seriously at building dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research, and development of effective treatments with these beams. In the United States, the first such facility, at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, has been in operation now for two years, and is currently treating a total of 35 to 40 patients per day. Two new projects are being designed at present, one at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, the second a joint project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the University of California at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to the proton-therapy application, and will present performance and operations characteristics for the Loma Linda facility, as well as details of the plans, process and progress towards construction of the new facilities in Boston and Sacramento.

  17. A school-wide assessment of social media usage by students in a US dental school.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M R; Christensen, H L; Nelson, B A

    2014-11-01

    Social media sites have become an established means of communication due to the exponential growth in number of users across the world and the encouragement of interaction between users through site features. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which Loma Linda University School of Dentistry students use social media accounts, the types of accounts they prefer, their interest in incorporating social media into courses and their perceptions of the usefulness of social media in private practice. In addition, we wanted to determine the degree of student interest in the integration of these social tools into their instruction. One thousand one hundred and sixty-two students from Loma Linda University School of Dentistry were invited by e-mail to complete a confidential 18 item multiple choice survey through Surveymonkey.com. The overall response rate was 30% (n = 351) from the pooled response periods; the first in 2011 and the second in 2013. Similar to other studies, Facebook was used by 91% of the School of Dentistry students, and less than half used Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn. Of the respondents, 68% of students reported communicating on social media daily and 80% saw value for practising dentists to operate accounts. Time and privacy concerns were the largest barriers to usage at 16% and 12% respectively. One third of respondents were in favour of the incorporation of social media in their courses. PMID:25377826

  18. Down syndrome: national conference on patient registries, research databases, and biobanks.

    PubMed

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Reeves, Roger H; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R B; Maddox, Yvonne T

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, "Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks," was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  19. Conference Proceedings: “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks”

    PubMed Central

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S.; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L.; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reeves, Roger H.; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F.; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Maddox, Yvonne T.

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks,” was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  20. Peregrine monte carlo dose calculations for radiotherapy using clinically realistic neutron and proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J., LLNL

    1997-06-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed an all-particle Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation code--PEREGRINE--for use in clinical radiation oncology. For PEREGRINE, we have assembled high-energy evaluated nuclear databases; created radiation source characterization and sampling algorithms; and simulated and characterized clinical beams for treatment with photons, neutrons and protons. Spectra are available for the Harper Hospital (Detroit, U.S.A.) Be(d,n) neutron therapy beam, the National Accelerator Centre (NAC, Faure, S.A.) Be(p,n) neutron therapy beam and many of the operating modes of the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC, Loma Linda, USA) proton treatment center. These beam descriptions are being used in PEREGRINE for Monte Carlo dose calculations on clinical configurations for comparisons to measurements. The methods of defining and sampling the beam phase space characterizations are discussed. We show calculations using these clinical beams compared to measurements in homogeneous water phantoms. The state of PEREGRINE's high energy neutron and proton transport database, PCSL, is reviewed and the remaining issues involving nuclear data needs for PEREGRINE are addressed.

  1. A bold adventure in innovation: an international off-campus master's degree program.

    PubMed

    Jones, Patricia S; Van Cleve, Lois; King, Helen E; Bossert, Elizabeth; Herrmann, Marilyn M

    2010-10-01

    In response to the global shortage of nursing faculty, Loma Linda University School of Nursing offered an off-campus master's degree program to prepare nurse educators who would commit to remain in their home countries following graduation. The program was approved by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges to be offered in both English and Spanish. Students and faculty met for 1 month each year for 4 years at one of two international sites: Thailand or Argentina. Forty-five of 49 students completed the program. The cultural diversity in both cohorts enriched classroom discussions, social interaction, and student-faculty conversations. The program was a life-changing experience for all involved and helped to meet the global need for nursing faculty. The faculty reported that it broadened their world view and opened their minds to the potential for innovation to transform nursing education. PMID:20672774

  2. STS-76 crew after arrival at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-76 Mission Commander Kevin P. Chilton (left); Mission Specialists Linda M. Godwin and Shannon W. Lucid; Pilot Richard A. Searfoss and Mission Specialist Michael 'Rich' Clifford chat shortly after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Not shown is Payload Commander Ronald M. Sega. The astronauts' late-night arrival allows them to maintain the shift in their waking and sleeping hours, altered in preparation for their upcoming spaceflight. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to lift off on STS-76 around 3:35 a.m. EST, March 21, with one of the primary mission objectives being the third docking between the U.S. Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir.

  3. Geochemical exploration techniques applied to well waters of the South San Bernardino Geothermal Area and the Upper Santa Ana River Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, C.D.; Elders, W.A.

    1984-11-01

    Chemical geothermometry surveys of well waters in the Arrowhead Hot Springs, Bunker Hill Basin, and other basins located near San Bernardino, CA suggest temperatures up to 140C for waters ascending along fault zones. Calculated temperatures from geothermometry are nearly always higher than the measured temperatures of 87C at Arrowhead Hot Springs and 63C in a well sited on the Loma Linda Fault. Mixing of the geothermal waters with shallow, dilute groundwaters is indicated by ternary molality plots of C1, B, and HCO3 and C1, F, and HCO3. The source of the geothermal component appears to be deep circulation in fractured crystalline basement complex. Circulation at depth is enhanced and directed along the major strikeslip fault zones of the region.

  4. Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease: Common pathways, common goals.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Dean; Blumenthal, Thomas; Carrillo, Maria; DiPaolo, Gilbert; Esralew, Lucille; Gardiner, Katheleen; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Iqbal, Khalid; Krams, Michael; Lemere, Cynthia; Lott, Ira; Mobley, William; Ness, Seth; Nixon, Ralph; Potter, Huntington; Reeves, Roger; Sabbagh, Marwan; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Whitten, Michelle; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, estimates indicate there are between 250,000 and 400,000 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and nearly all will develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology starting in their 30s. With the current lifespan being 55 to 60 years, approximately 70% will develop dementia, and if their life expectancy continues to increase, the number of individuals developing AD will concomitantly increase. Pathogenic and mechanistic links between DS and Alzheimer's prompted the Alzheimer's Association to partner with the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation at a workshop of AD and DS experts to discuss similarities and differences, challenges, and future directions for this field. The workshop articulated a set of research priorities: (1) target identification and drug development, (2) clinical and pathological staging, (3) cognitive assessment and clinical trials, and (4) partnerships and collaborations with the ultimate goal to deliver effective disease-modifying treatments. PMID:25510383

  5. Microdosimetric comparison of scanned and conventional proton beams used in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Dicello, John F; Gersey, Bradford B; Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Lesyna, David; Pisacane, Vincent L; Robertson, James B; Schulte, Reinhard W; Slater, Jerry D; Wroe, Andrew J; Slater, James M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple groups have hypothesised that the use of scanning beams in proton therapy will reduce the neutron component of secondary radiation in comparison with conventional methods with a corresponding reduction in risks of radiation-induced cancers. Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) has had FDA marketing clearance for scanning beams since 1988 and an experimental scanning beam has been available at the LLUMC proton facility since 2001. The facility has a dedicated research room with a scanning beam and fast switching that allows its use during patient treatments. Dosimetric measurements and microdosimetric distributions for a scanned beam are presented and compared with beams produced with the conventional methods presently used in proton therapy. PMID:21362697

  6. The STS-108 crew are at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, members of the STS-108 mission crew look over equipment during Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities. From left are Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; at right is a technician. The CEIT provides familiarization with the launch vehicle and payload. Mission STS-108 is a Utilization Flight (UF-1), carrying the Expedition Four crew plus Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello to the International Space Station. Other crew members are Commander Dominic L. Gorie and Pilot Mark E. Kelly. The Expedition Four crew comprises Yuri Onufriyenko, commander, Russian Aviation and Space Agency, and astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Walz. Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 29 on mission STS-108.

  7. STS-108 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-108 crew members take a break from their training to pose for their preflight portrait. Astronauts Dominic L. Gorie right) and Mark E. Kelly, commander and pilot, respectively, are seated in front. In the rear are astronauts Linda M. Godwin and Daniel L. Tani, both mission specialists. The 12th flight to the International Space Station (ISS) and final flight of 2001, the STS-108 mission launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on December 5, 2001. They were accompanied to the ISS by the Expedition Four crew, which remained on board the orbital outpost for several months. The Expedition Three crew members returned home with the STS-108 astronauts. In addition to the Expedition crew exchange, STS-108 crew deployed the student project STARSHINE, and delivered 2.7 metric tons (3 tons) of equipment and supplies to the ISS.

  8. Earth Sciences Electronic Theater ''999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Manyin, Mike

    1999-01-01

    The Etheater presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 ....... to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS.

  9. Earth Science Observations, Analysis and Visualization: Roots in the 60's - Vision for the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz; Allen, Jesse

    1999-01-01

    The Etheater presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966....... to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape in standard and HDTV that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS.

  10. Global Observation Information Networking: Using the Distributed Image Spreadsheet (DISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz

    1999-01-01

    The DISS and many other tools will be used to present visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 ....... to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI Onyx Graphics-Supercomputers are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science and used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS.

  11. Earth Science Observations, Analysis and Visualization: Roots in the 60's: Vision for the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Etheater presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 ... to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS.

  12. NASA/NOAA Earth Science Electronic Theater 1999. Earth Science Observations, Analysis and Visualization: Roots in the 60s: Vision for the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz

    1999-01-01

    The Etheater presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 ....... to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape in standard and HDTV that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS.

  13. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  14. Magnetic Properties and Archeointensity Determination of Selected Mesoamerican Potteries (300 A.C to 1500 D.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ceja, M.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Morales Contreras, J. J.; Manzanilla Naim, L.; Chauvin, A.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-05-01

    In spite of abundant archeological material available in Mexico, archeomagnetic studies are extremely scarce. In this work, we conducted systematic archeointensity measurements on some well-known archeological sites in central and eastern Mexico (e.g., Teotihuacan, Templo Mayor among others) to contribute to the relative and absolute chronology of Mesoamerica. Our sampling strategy was guided largely by Linda Manzanilla's detailed study of two of the most important archeological sites in Central Mexico, Teotihuacan, and Templo Mayor, since we sampled only materials that are already studied and provide more or less coherent archeological ages. Moreover, we incorporated data from some Mexican lava flows that erupted during historic times in order to extend the archeointensity master curve for Mexico and Mesoamerica to the present.

  15. Hearing loss: terminology and classification. Joint Committee of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council on Education of the Deaf.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The following position statement and technical report were developed by the Joint Committee of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the Council on Education of the Deaf (CED) and approved as Association policy by the ASHA Legislative Council in November 1997 (LC 6-97). CED member organizations are reviewing the document for approval in 1998. Joint Committee members responsible for the development of this document include (from ASHA) Joan Marttila, chair 1996-97; Linda Seestedt-Stanford, chair 1994-95; Evelyn Cherow, ex official; Donald Goldberg; Dawna Lewis; Leslie Ann McMillian; Jane Seaton; Alicia Stewart; and Larry Higdon, vice president for professional practices in audiology and monitoring vice president; and (from CED) Kathee Christensen; Steve Nover; Marilyn Sass-Lehrer; and Patrick Stone. This document supersedes ASHA policy: Definitions of Communication Disorders and Variations: Hearing Disorders section. PMID:9567446

  16. STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC KSC-01PD-1706 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly arrives at KSC in a T-38 jet trainer. He and the rest of the crew will be preparing for launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour. Liftoff is scheduled for 7:41 p.m. EST. Top priorities for the STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition Three and Expedition Four crews, bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and completion of spacewalk and robotics tasks. Mission Specialists Linda A. Godwin and Daniel M. Tani will take part in the spacewalk to install thermal blankets over two pieces of equipment at the bases of the Space Station's solar wings. Dominic L. Gorie is the commander on the mission.

  17. Applications of the Strategic Defense Initiative's compact accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarelli, Nick; Lynch, Ted

    1991-12-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative's (SDI) investment in particle accelerator technology for its directed energy weapons program has produced breakthroughs in the size and power of new accelerators. These accelerators, in turn, have produced spinoffs in several areas: the radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator (RFQ linac) was recently incorporated into the design of a cancer therapy unit at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, an SDI-sponsored compact induction linear accelerator may replace Cobalt-60 radiation and hazardous ethylene-oxide as a method for sterilizing medical products, and other SDIO-funded accelerators may be used to produce the radioactive isotopes oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET). Other applications of these accelerators include bomb detection, non-destructive inspection, decomposing toxic substances in contaminated ground water, and eliminating nuclear waste.

  18. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  19. Is experiential-intuitive cognitive style more inclined to err on conjunction fallacy than analytical-rational cognitive style?

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In terms of prediction by Epstein's integrative theory of personality, cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST), those people with experiential-intuitive cognitive style are more inclined to induce errors than the other people with analytical-rational cognitive style in the conjunction fallacy (two events that can occur together are seen as more likely than at least one of the two events). We tested this prediction in a revised Linda problem. The results revealed that rational and experiential cognitive styles do not statistically influence the propensity for committing the conjunction fallacy, which is contrary to the CEST's predictions. Based on the assumption that the rational vs. experiential processing is a personality trait with comparatively stabile specialities, these findings preliminarily indicate that those people who are characterized by "rational thinking" are not more inclined to use Bayes' deduction than the other people who are labeled by "intuitive thinking" or by "poor thinking." PMID:25705198

  20. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  1. Geographic names information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1987-01-01

    of the data in each of the data elements of the four data bases of GNIS. The GNIS program, which includes the automated names system and the National Gazetteer program, is a coordinated effort under the direction of Donald J. Orth, Chief of the Branch of Geographic Names. The automated system was initially developed by Sam Stulberg and Roger L. Payne. System enhancement and software development is coordinated by Judy J. Stella, head programmer for GNIS, and special projects coordinator is Louis A. Yost IV. Coordination of the research and compilation of certain gazetteers is directed by Robin D. Worcester with research assistance and support from Jon Campbell, Linda S. Davis, and Nancy Engel.

  2. Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease: Common pathways, common goals

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Dean; Blumenthal, Thomas; Carrillo, Maria; DiPaolo, Gilbert; Esralew, Lucille; Gardiner, Katheleen; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Iqbal, Khalid; Krams, Michael; Lemere, Cynthia; Lott, Ira; Mobley, William; Ness, Seth; Nixon, Ralph; Potter, Huntington; Reeves, Roger; Sabbagh, Marwan; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Whitten, Michelle; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, estimates indicate there are between 250,000 and 400,000 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and nearly all will develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology starting in their 30s. With the current lifespan being 55 to 60 years, approximately 70% will develop dementia, and if their life expectancy continues to increase, the number of individuals developing AD will concomitantly increase. Pathogenic and mechanistic links between DS and Alzheimer's prompted the Alzheimer's Association to partner with the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation at a workshop of AD and DS experts to discuss similarities and differences, challenges, and future directions for this field. The workshop articulated a set of research priorities: (1) target identification and drug development, (2) clinical and pathological staging, (3) cognitive assessment and clinical trials, and (4) partnerships and collaborations with the ultimate goal to deliver effective disease-modifying treatments. PMID:25510383

  3. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  4. Flash Updates of GSC projects (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Glockner, Frank Oliver; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cole, James

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. In quick succession Frank Oliver Glockner (MPI-Bremen), Victor Markowitz (LBNL), Nikos Kyripides (JGI), Folker Meyer (ANL), Linda Amaral-Zettler (Marine Biology Lab), and James Cole (Michigan State University) provide updates on a number of topics related to GSC projects at the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  5. Three new species of western California springsnails previously confused with Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana (Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hershler, Robert; Liu, Hsiu-Ping; Babbitt, Caitlin; Kellogg, Michael G.; Howard, Jeanette K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We describe three new, allopatric species of springsnails (genus Pyrgulopsis) from western California (Pyrgulopsis lindae, Pyrgulopsis ojaiensis, Pyrgulopsis torrida) that were previously identified as Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana. The new species are differentiated from Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana and each other both by mtCOI sequences (3.9-9.9%) and details of penial morphology. We also provide a phylogeny with increased sampling which confirms a previous finding that Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana sensu stricto is paraphyletic relative to two other California species (Pyrgulopsis diablensis, Pyrgulopsis giulianii). Our molecular and morphological evidence suggests that Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana paraphyly is an artifact of conservative taxonomy, however additional studies utilizing rapidly evolving genetic markers will be needed to confidently tease apart the cryptic diversity in this widely ranging springsnail. The new species described herein are narrowly distributed and vulnerable to anthropogenic stressors. The single known population of Pyrgulopsis torrida may have become extirpated between 2000 and 2015. PMID:27551184

  6. Hurricane tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    New hurricane forecasting that provides more accurate pictures of storms and their movement through the atmosphere could increase warning time and cut down on false alarms that cost millions of dollars in unnecessary evacuations, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).NOAA's new Gulfstream-IV jet produced “the most complete and detailed portrait of a hurricane ever seen” when it flew near Hurricane Guillermo in a test-run last August, according to the agency. Since then, the plane — that can fly to the upper troposphere at an altitude of 13,716 m (45,000 ft) — has helped to dramatically improve the forecasts for Hurricanes Erika and Linda.

  7. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  8. A knowledge base architecture for distributed knowledge agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Joel; Walls, Bryan

    1990-01-01

    A tuple space based object oriented model for knowledge base representation and interpretation is presented. An architecture for managing distributed knowledge agents is then implemented within the model. The general model is based upon a database implementation of a tuple space. Objects are then defined as an additional layer upon the database. The tuple space may or may not be distributed depending upon the database implementation. A language for representing knowledge and inference strategy is defined whose implementation takes advantage of the tuple space. The general model may then be instantiated in many different forms, each of which may be a distinct knowledge agent. Knowledge agents may communicate using tuple space mechanisms as in the LINDA model as well as using more well known message passing mechanisms. An implementation of the model is presented describing strategies used to keep inference tractable without giving up expressivity. An example applied to a power management and distribution network for Space Station Freedom is given.

  9. Three new species of western California springsnails previously confused with Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana (Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae).

    PubMed

    Hershler, Robert; Liu, Hsiu-Ping; Babbitt, Caitlin; Kellogg, Michael G; Howard, Jeanette K

    2016-01-01

    We describe three new, allopatric species of springsnails (genus Pyrgulopsis) from western California (Pyrgulopsis lindae, Pyrgulopsis ojaiensis, Pyrgulopsis torrida) that were previously identified as Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana. The new species are differentiated from Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana and each other both by mtCOI sequences (3.9-9.9%) and details of penial morphology. We also provide a phylogeny with increased sampling which confirms a previous finding that Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana sensu stricto is paraphyletic relative to two other California species (Pyrgulopsis diablensis, Pyrgulopsis giulianii). Our molecular and morphological evidence suggests that Pyrgulopsis stearnsiana paraphyly is an artifact of conservative taxonomy, however additional studies utilizing rapidly evolving genetic markers will be needed to confidently tease apart the cryptic diversity in this widely ranging springsnail. The new species described herein are narrowly distributed and vulnerable to anthropogenic stressors. The single known population of Pyrgulopsis torrida may have become extirpated between 2000 and 2015. PMID:27551184

  10. Applications of the Strategic Defense Initiative's compact accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanarelli, Nick; Lynch, Ted

    1991-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative's (SDI) investment in particle accelerator technology for its directed energy weapons program has produced breakthroughs in the size and power of new accelerators. These accelerators, in turn, have produced spinoffs in several areas: the radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator (RFQ linac) was recently incorporated into the design of a cancer therapy unit at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, an SDI-sponsored compact induction linear accelerator may replace Cobalt-60 radiation and hazardous ethylene-oxide as a method for sterilizing medical products, and other SDIO-funded accelerators may be used to produce the radioactive isotopes oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 for positron emission tomography (PET). Other applications of these accelerators include bomb detection, non-destructive inspection, decomposing toxic substances in contaminated ground water, and eliminating nuclear waste.

  11. CLMA position on HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. Clinical Laboratory Management Association.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In February 1991, CLMA's National Affairs Committee (NAC) developed a proposed position statement on mandatory HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. The proposed statement was submitted to the 24-member National Affairs Reactor Panel and, based on their input, appropriate revisions were made. In May 1991, CLMA surveyed the full membership, and, as a result, the following position was adopted. Ninety-six percent of the members responding agreed with principles 1, 2, and 3; 88% agreed with 4, 5, and 6. NAC members include Royal A. Crystal, Chair; Linda D. Bielitzki, J.D., Vice Chair; Michael G. Bissell, M.D., Ph.D.; Earl C. Buck; Michael A. Maffetone, D. A.; Timothy Murray; Laurence J. Peterson; Marianne C. Watters; and Martha A. Feichter, National Affairs Analyst. PMID:10128723

  12. Radiation tests of the EMU spacesuit for the International SpaceStation using energetic protons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2001-06-04

    Measurements using silicon detectors to characterize theradiation transmitted through the EMU spacesuit and a human phantom havebeen performed using 155 and 250 MeV proton beams at the Loma LindaUniversity Medical Center (LLUMC). The beams simulate radiationencountered in space, where trapped protons having kinetic energies onthe order of 100 MeV are copious. Protons with 100 MeV kinetic energy andabove can penetrate many centimeters of water of other light materials,so that astronauts exposed to such energetic particles will receive dosesto their internal organs. This dose can be enhanced or reduced byshielding - either from the spacesuit or the self-shielding of the body -but minimization of the risk depends on details of the incident particleflux (in particular the energy spectrum) and on the dose responses of thevarious critical organs.

  13. Flash Updates of GSC projects (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Glockner, Frank Oliver; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cole, James

    2009-09-09

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. In quick succession Frank Oliver Glockner (MPI-Bremen), Victor Markowitz (LBNL), Nikos Kyripides (JGI), Folker Meyer (ANL), Linda Amaral-Zettler (Marine Biology Lab), and James Cole (Michigan State University) provide updates on a number of topics related to GSC projects at the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  14. The STS-108 crew look over MPLM during Crew Equipment Interface Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 crew practices moving packages stored inside the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. Holding a package is Commander Dominic L. Gorie. Kneeling below him (center) is Mission Specialist Linda A. Godwin. The crew is taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities at KSC. Not seen are Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Mission Specialist Daniel M. Tani. The CEIT provides familiarization with the launch vehicle and payload. Mission STS-108 is a Utilization Flight (UF-1), carrying the Expedition Four crew plus Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello to the International Space Station. The Expedition Four crew comprises Yuri Onufriyenko, commander, Russian Aviation and Space Agency, and astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Walz. Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 29 on mission STS-108.

  15. STS-108 MS Godwin has her boot fitted during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 MS Godwin has her boot fitted during TCDT KSC-01PP-1679 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda A. Godwin is helped with her boot during suit and pre-pack fit check. Godwin and other crew members are preparing to take part in a simulated launch countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT also includes emergency exit training from the orbiter and launch pad. STS-108 is a Utilization Flight that will carry the replacement Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station, as well as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, filled with supplies and equipment. The 11-day mission is scheduled for launch Nov. 29 on Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  16. An examination of antibacterial and antifungal properties of constituents described in traditional Ulster cures and remedies

    PubMed Central

    Woods-Panzaru, Simon; Nelson, David; McCollum, Graham; Ballard, Linda M; Millar, B Cherie; Maeda, Yasunori; Goldsmith, Colin E; Rooney, Paul J; Loughrey, Anne; Rao, Juluri R; Moore, John E

    2009-01-01

    Traditional herbal cures and remedies have played an important historical role in the treatment of a variety of illnesses and diseases in Northern Ireland for the last three hundred years. Recently, these have been reviewed in the publication by Linda Ballard from the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum at Cultra, Co. Down, which details the variety of local plants used and for what purpose. From this publication and another related publication, we note the description of several plant species that consistently appear in traditional cures and remedies, particularly used to treat infections and infectious diseases. Unfortunately, although these plants have strong associations with the local historical evidence base, there are very limited and mainly no formal publications in the medical/scientific evidence base, examining their scientific background and clinical efficacy. PMID:19252724

  17. Expedition 4 crew member Daniel W. Bursch arrives at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 crew member Daniel W. Bursch arrives at KSC KSC-01PD-1705 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Expedition 4 crew member Daniel W. Bursch arrives at KSC in a T-38 jet trainer. He and other crew members Commander Yuri Onufrienko and astronaut Carl E. Walz will be traveling on Space Shuttle Endeavour - mission STS-108 - to replace the Expedition 3 crew. Top priorities for the STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition Three and Expedition Four crews, bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, and completion of spacewalk and robotics tasks. The mission crew comprises Commander Dominic L. Gorie, Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Mission Specialists Linda A. Godwin and Daniel M. Tani. Liftoff is scheduled for 7:41 p.m. EST..

  18. The STS-108 crew look over MPLM during Crew Equipment Interface Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 crew look into the hatch of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello. From left are Commander Dominic L. Gorie, Pilot Mark E. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Linda A. Godwin and Daniel M. Tani. The four astronauts are taking part in Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities at KSC. The CEIT provides familiarization with the launch vehicle and payload. Mission STS-108 is a Utilization Flight (UF-1), carrying the Expedition Four crew plus Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello to the International Space Station. The Expedition Four crew comprises Yuri Onufriyenko, commander, Russian Aviation and Space Agency, and astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Walz. Endeavour is scheduled to launch Nov. 29 on mission STS-108.

  19. STS-37 Breakfast / Ingress / Launch & ISO Camera Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-37 mission was to deploy the Gamma Ray Observatory. The mission was launched at 9:22:44 am on April 5, 1991, onboard the space shuttle Atlantis. The mission was led by Commander Steven Nagel. The crew was Pilot Kenneth Cameron and Mission Specialists Jerry Ross, Jay Apt, and Linda Godwing. This videotape shows the crew having breakfast on the launch day, with the narrator introducing them. It then shows the crew's final preparations and the entry into the shuttle, while the narrator gives information about each of the crew members. The countdown and launch is shown including the shuttle separation from the solid rocket boosters. The launch is reshown from 17 different camera views. Some of the other camera views were in black and white.

  20. Correction to Brittian et al. (2015).

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Reports an error in "Do dimensions of ethnic identity mediate the association between perceived ethnic group discrimination and depressive symptoms" by Aerika S. Brittian, Su Yeong Kim, Brian E. Armenta, Richard M. Lee, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Seth J. Schwartz, Ian K. Villalta, Byron L. Zamboanga, Robert S. Weisskirch, Linda P. Juang, Linda G. Castillo and Monika L. Hudson (Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 2015[Jan], Vol 21[1], 41-53). The seventh column labeled "6" in Table 2 should have been omitted. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-31330-001.) Ethnic group discrimination represents a notable risk factor that may contribute to mental health problems among ethnic minority college students. However, cultural resources (e.g., ethnic identity) may promote psychological adjustment in the context of group-based discriminatory experiences. In the current study, we examined the associations between perceptions of ethnic group discrimination and depressive symptoms, and explored dimensions of ethnic identity (i.e., exploration, resolution, and affirmation) as mediators of this process among 2,315 ethnic minority college students (age 18 to 30 years; 37% Black, 63% Latino). Results indicated that perceived ethnic group discrimination was associated positively with depressive symptoms among students from both ethnic groups. The relationship between perceived ethnic group discrimination and depressive symptoms was mediated by ethnic identity affirmation for Latino students, but not for Black students. Ethnic identity resolution was negatively and indirectly associated with depressive symptoms through ethnic identity affirmation for both Black and Latino students. Implications for promoting ethnic minority college students' mental health and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26168165

  1. The Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care: Assessing Resident Perceptions of Internal Medicine Continuity Clinics and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, John M.; Chang, Barbara K.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Keitz, Sheri A.; Kaminetzky, Catherine P.; Aron, David C.; Baz, Sam; Cannon, Grant W.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Holland, Gloria J.; Kashner, T. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2010, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a national patient-centered care initiative that organized primary care into interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to provide patient-centered, continuous, and coordinated care. Objective We assessed the discriminate validity of the Learners' Perceptions Survey—Primary Care (LPS-PC), a tool designed to measure residents' perceptions about their primary and patient-centered care experiences. Methods Between October 2010 and June 2011, the LPS-PC was administered to Loma Linda University Medical Center internal medicine residents assigned to continuity clinics at the VA Loma Linda Healthcare System (VALLHCS), a university setting, or the county hospital. Adjusted differences in satisfaction ratings across settings and over domains (patient- and family-centered care, faculty and preceptors, learning, clinical, work and physical environments, and personal experience) were computed using a generalized linear model. Results Our response rate was 86% (77 of 90). Residents were more satisfied with patient- and family-centered care at the VALLHCS than at either the university or county (P < .001). However, faculty and preceptors (odds ratio [OR]  =  1.53), physical (OR  =  1.29), and learning (OR  =  1.28) environments had more impact on overall resident satisfaction than patient- and family-centered care (OR  =  1.08). Conclusions The LPS-PC demonstrated discriminate validity to assess residents' perceptions of their patient-centered clinical training experience across outpatient primary care settings at an internal medicine residency program. The largest difference in scores was the patient- and family-centered care domain, in which residents rated the VALLHCS much higher than the university or county sites. PMID:24455006

  2. How robust is the language architecture? The case of mood

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkum, Jos J. A.; De Goede, Dieuwke; Van Alphen, Petra M.; Mulder, Emma R.; Kerstholt, José H.

    2013-01-01

    In neurocognitive research on language, the processing principles of the system at hand are usually assumed to be relatively invariant. However, research on attention, memory, decision-making, and social judgment has shown that mood can substantially modulate how the brain processes information. For example, in a bad mood, people typically have a narrower focus of attention and rely less on heuristics. In the face of such pervasive mood effects elsewhere in the brain, it seems unlikely that language processing would remain untouched. In an EEG experiment, we manipulated the mood of participants just before they read texts that confirmed or disconfirmed verb-based expectations about who would be talked about next (e.g., that “David praised Linda because … ” would continue about Linda, not David), or that respected or violated a syntactic agreement rule (e.g., “The boys turns”). ERPs showed that mood had little effect on syntactic parsing, but did substantially affect referential anticipation: whereas readers anticipated information about a specific person when they were in a good mood, a bad mood completely abolished such anticipation. A behavioral follow-up experiment suggested that a bad mood did not interfere with verb-based expectations per se, but prevented readers from using that information rapidly enough to predict upcoming reference on the fly, as the sentence unfolds. In all, our results reveal that background mood, a rather unobtrusive affective state, selectively changes a crucial aspect of real-time language processing. This observation fits well with other observed interactions between language processing and affect (emotions, preferences, attitudes, mood), and more generally testifies to the importance of studying “cold” cognitive functions in relation to “hot” aspects of the brain. PMID:23986725

  3. Obituary: Jason G. Porter, 1954-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2005-12-01

    Jason Porter, a solar astronomer at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), died on 23 July 2005 from complications associated with his 18-year battle with a form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was born on 28 June 1954. Jason was Texas born and bred. He received his Bachelor's degree from Texas A&M in 1976 and then went to the University of Colorado for his graduate work. He received his PhD from the Department of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences in 1984. His thesis, "Ultraviolet Spectral Diagnostics of Solar Flares and Heating Events," was written under the guidance of Katharine Gebbie and Juri Toomre. The ideas behind his thesis and much of his later work were formulated while he was a Graduate Research Assistant at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) working on analysis of data from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter, a major instrument on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). While at Goddard, he met his wife-to-be, Linda Zimmerman, who was working as a computer system administrator at the SMM Operations Center. They married and moved to Huntsville, Alabama in 1984 where Jason had an appointment as an NAS/NRC Resident Research Associate in the Solar Physics Branch of MSFC and Linda was a system administrator for the Space Science Laboratory. After a short stint at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Jason joined NASA as a Senior Scientist in the Space Science Laboratory in 1987, a position he still held at the time of his death. Jason's early work brought forth the idea that "microflares" make a significant contribution to the heating of the solar corona, an idea which he continued to champion throughout his career. He also searched for coronal emission from white dwarf stars using the ROSAT and Chandra Space Observatories, and served as the NASA Project Scientist for a lunar based ultraviolet telescope. More recently he was leading a team of engineers and scientists, from MSFC, GSFC, and the National Solar Observatory on the

  4. Dietary Risk Factors for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A Confirmatory Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Sobel, Eugene; Ziogas, Argyrios; Smoak, Carey; Bohr, Thomas; Doram, Keith; Liwnicz, Boleslaw

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study’s primary purpose was to determine whether earlier findings suggesting an association between sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of humans and specific dietary components could be replicated. The a priori hypotheses were that consumption of (i) foods likely to contain organ tissue and (ii) raw/rare meat are associated with increased sCJD risk. Study Design Population-based case-control study. Place and Duration of Study Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 4 years. Methodology An 11-state case-control study of pathologically confirmed, definite sCJD cases, matched controls, and a sample of control-surrogates was conducted. Ninety-six percent (106/110) of the case data was obtained in 1991-1993, prior to variant CJD publicity. Results Using control self-responses, consumption of hot dogs, sausage, pepperoni, kielbasa, “other” canned meat, poultry liver, any stomach/intestine, beef stomach/intestine, any organ tissue, and beef organ tissue was individually associated with increased sCJD risk; odds ratios (OR) ranged from 2.4 to 7.2 (0.003

  5. Status and perspectives of the studies on anomalous phosphene perceptions in the frame of the ALTEA program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio; Carozzo, Simone; Casolino, Marco; de Martino, Angelo; di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Paci, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Adele; Sannita, Walter G.; Zaconte, Veronica; Schardt, Dieter; Khan, Elias; Marechal, Francoise; Nelson, Gregory; Obenaus, Andre; Titova, Elena

    One of the major aims of the ALTEA program is to study the anomalous phosphenes per-ceptions reported by astronauts since Apollo 11 lunar flight. This is pursued via space and ground-based experiments. The ALTEA detection systems in the ISS allow concurrent mea-surement of the particles travelling through the brain/eyes of the astronauts (discriminating Z and trajectory of the ions), as well as the electrophysiological brain activity, including the retinogram, and the instances of phosphene perceptions. These measurements permitted to document the electrophysiological responses to particle passages concomitant with phosphene perception with links between the electrophysiological signals and ions traveling through the eye. We have also measured the average number of ions impinging in the eye / brain of the astronaut per minute. On ground-based experiments we have measured the mouse electrophys-iological responses to very short (¡ 5 ms) 12C bursts in the eyes, and the summation effect of the 12C/light stimuli concomitance. We also studied hadron therapy patients reporting phosphenes when irradiated. At the carbon-ion treatment unit at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) we also em-ployed electrophysiological recording, while at the proton therapy center in Orsay, France and at Loma Linda (CA, USA) we are collecting subjective data from treated patients. In the GSI case we have been able to measure electrophysiological responses to ion bursts and to link the perceptions to specific irradiated regions. At Loma Linda the perceived phosphenes correlate temporally with individual accelerator spills, so that the patients can count them. They appear bright white or intense cobalt blue (essentially no other colors) depending on the portion of the eye/optic nerve receiving dose. Foul or burning smells and taste illusions that may last from days to more than a week were also reported during irradiation. In Orsay patients routinely perceive flashes, mostly light blue, but also white

  6. Quantum Poetics: Science and Spirit in Twentieth Century American Poetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, (Mary) Patricia

    Concepts from quantum physics illuminate ways in which five 20th century American poets struggle with the expression of nonlinear, nontemporal experiences in linear, temporal language. An "experience of spirit"- -an experience of cosmic unity which occurs in a timeless moment and involves a paradoxical sensuality--is expressed by poets Wallace Stevens, Albert Goldbarth, Nancy Willard, Linda Gregg and Marilyn Waniek. Contemporary science similarly seeks ways to express nonlinear realities in linear language. The English language is found to guide users to linear, time-bounded expression through the noun (leading to nominalization), the verb (demanding experience be limited to past, present or future), adverb and adjective (which separate senses from each other and divide attributes from essence). English presents structural difficulties to those who wish to express experiences of spirit--difficulties also articulated by quantum theorists struggling to express unvisualizable concepts. Wallace Stevens devoted the first half of his poetic career to questions of order, which find reflections within the works of quantum physicists who theorize an "implicate order" within the subatomic universe. During his later years, Stevens turned to the question of chaos, an interest paralleled by recent developments in dynamical systems theory. Albert Goldbarth and Nancy Willard alter narrative form in three ways to convey nonlinear possibilities. The "parabolic" narrative uses story to exemplify a moral or philosophical message. The "midrashic" illuminates the meaning of one story by the telling of another. Finally, the "coyotic" begins with one, apparently ordinary, story which is then altered to introduce fantastical realities. These narratives form a "relative time," similar to that which Einstein defined in his special theory of relativity. The works of Marilyn Waniek and Linda Gregg are examined in terms of the language of paradoxical sensuality, which calls into question the

  7. Predicting academic performance and clinical competency for international dental students: seeking the most efficient and effective measures.

    PubMed

    Stacey, D Graham; Whittaker, John M

    2005-02-01

    Measures used in the selection of international dental students to a U.S. D.D.S. program were examined to identify the grouping that most effectively and efficiently predicted academic performance and clinical competency. Archival records from the International Dental Program (IDP) at Loma Linda University provided data on 171 students who had trained in countries outside the United States. The students sought admission to the D.D.S. degree program, successful completion of which qualified them to sit for U.S. licensure. As with most dental schools, competition is high for admission to the D.D.S. program. The study's goal was to identify what measures contributed to a fair and accurate selection process for dental school applicants from other nations. Multiple regression analyses identified National Board Part II and dexterity measures as significant predictors of academic performance and clinical competency. National Board Part I, TOEFL, and faculty interviews added no significant additional help in predicting eventual academic performance and clinical competency. PMID:15689612

  8. STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2 of 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video is a continuation of 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 1 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049331). Flight day four footage continues with a video tour of the International Space Station (ISS). During flight day five, an exterior view of the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is seen, followed by the crew unloading the supplies and equipment from the MPLM. Commander Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialist Linda Godwin are seen making preparations for the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) scheduled for the following day. Footage of an exterior view of the ISS is also shown. Flight day six footage includes Godwin and Mission Specialist Daniel Tani suiting up for their EVA and the installation of thermal blankets around the solar array wings of the ISS. Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson is seen working in the ISS laboratory during flight day seven. Views are shown of Saudi Arabia and the Red Sea, the western coast of Australia, Cuba and Florida, and Switzerland and Northern Italy. During flight day eight, the crew is seen stowing objects in the MPLM for return to earth. The video concludes with footage of the treadmill used by the astronauts for physical exercise. Flight days nine through twelve are included in 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 3 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049329).

  9. Distribution of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts across the Bragg Curve of Light and Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Lacy, S.; Gridley, D. S.; Rusek, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment consists of energetic particles of varying mass and energy, and understanding the :biological Bragg curve" is essential in optimizing shielding effectiveness against space radiation induced biological impacts. The "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Previously, we studied the induction of micronuclei (MN) across the Bragg curve of energetic Fe and Si ions, and observed no increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, was found higher at the Bragg peak location in comparison to the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Here, we report the induction of MN in normal human fibroblast cells across the Bragg curve of incident protons generated at Loma Linda University. Similar to Si and Fe ions, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells showed a clear spike as the protons reached the Bragg peak. Unlike the two heavy ions, however, the MN yield also increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak of heavy, but not light ions are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  10. Iron Accumulation Is Not Homogenous among Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Liu, Manju; Kani, Camellia; Dalaie, Pejman; Obenaus, Andre; Simmons, Daniel; Gatto, Nicole M.; Zarifi, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Background. Iron is considered to lead to neurodegeneration and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a powerful tool to measure phase related iron content of brain. Methods. Twelve de novo patients with PD were recruited from the Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Loma Linda University. Twelve age- and sex-matched non-PD subjects were recruited from neurology clinic as controls. Using SWI, the phase related iron content was estimated from different brain regions of interest (ROIs). Results. There was a trend between increasing age and iron accumulation in the globus pallidus and putamen in all subjects. Iron accumulation was not significant in different ROIs in PD patients compared to controls after adjustment for age. Our data revealed heterogeneity of phase values in different brain ROIs among all subjects with an exaggerated trend at SN in PD patients. Conclusions. Our data suggest a nonhomogeneous pattern of iron accumulation in different brain regions among PD patients. Further studies are needed to explore whether this may correlate to the progression of PD. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD. PMID:25945281

  11. STS-108 Crew Walkout of O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Crew Walkout of O&C Building KSC-01PD-1783 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Eagerly stepping out from the Operations and Checkout Building are the STS-108 crew, leading the way, and the Expedition 4 crew as they head for Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are, left to right, Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; Expedition 4 members Daniel W. Bursch, Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Carl E. Walz. This is the second launch attempt after the first attempt Dec. 4 was scrubbed due to poor weather conditions at KSC. The main goals of the mission are to carry the Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station as replacement for Expedition 3; carry the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello filled with water, equipment and supplies; and install thermal blankets over equipment at the base of the ISS solar wings. STS-108 is the final Shuttle mission of 2001 and the 107th Shuttle flight overall. Launch is scheduled for 5:19 p.m. EST Dec. 5, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B.

  12. STS-108 Crew Walkout of O&C Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Crew Walkout of O&C Building KSC-01PD-1784 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 and Expedition 4 crews head for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the way are Pilot Mark E. Kelly (left) and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; behind them are Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; next is Expedition 4 Commander Yuri Onufrienko, followed by astronauts Daniel W. Bursch (left) and Carl E. Walz. This is the second launch attempt after the first attempt Dec. 4 was scrubbed due to poor weather conditions at KSC. The main goals of the mission are to carry the Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station as replacement for Expedition 3; carry the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello filled with water, equipment and supplies; and install thermal blankets over equipment at the base of the ISS solar wings. STS-108 is the final Shuttle mission of 2001 and the 107th Shuttle flight overall. Launch is scheduled for 5:19 p.m. EST Dec. 5, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B.

  13. Midway-Sunset keeps producing oil with a little help from steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1995-10-01

    The largest field in the lower 48 states runs on steam injection and well-honed maintenance. The glory days of the Midway-Sunset field had been gone for more than four decades by the beginning of the 1960s. Production had peaked in 1914 with an average of 94,140 bo/d. The field, except for an occasional spike, had been in decline until steam-injection began. The advent of steam injection to increase recovery of the field`s heavy crude began on a pilot basis in 1963. If anyone had predicted the dramatic effect steam would have on Midway-Sunset as well as other California heavy crude fields, the prediction would have been met with total disbelief. The first steam project in California had been initiated by Shell Oil Co. in the Yorba Linda field in the Los Angeles Basin in 1960. Other pilot projects followed in the Coalinga and Kern River fields. Today, Berry Petroleum Co. continues as one of the field`s most successful steamers. The company`s ongoing steam efforts have played a major role in making Berry the top California-based independent producer in the field. Steam contributed to the posting by Berry of a 32% increase in this year`s second quarter earnings.

  14. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber.

    PubMed

    Cirio, R; Garelli, E; Schulte, R; Amerio, S; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Coutrakon, G; Donetti, M; Giordanengo, S; Koss, P; Madon, E; Marchetto, F; Nastasi, U; Peroni, C; Santuari, D; Sardo, A; Scielzo, G; Stasi, M; Trevisiol, E

    2004-08-21

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 x 24 cm2, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 x 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 x 24 cm2 area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm3. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers. PMID:15446800

  15. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirio, R.; Garelli, E.; Schulte, R.; Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Coutrakon, G.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Koss, P.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Santuari, D.; Sardo, A.; Scielzo, G.; Stasi, M.; Trevisiol, E.

    2004-08-01

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 × 24 cm2, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm3. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers.

  16. Particle beam radiation therapy in prostate cancer: is there an advantage?

    PubMed

    Rossi, C J; Slater, J D; Reyes-Molyneux, N; Yonemoto, L T; Archambeau, J O; Coutrakon, G; Slater, J M

    1998-04-01

    Hadron therapy uses heavy particles to deliver therapeutic ionizing energy. Each particle's inherent attributes determine the pattern of energy deposited by its beam, expressed in macro (conformability to a three-dimensional target volume) and micro (radiobiologic properties) distributions. Mass and charge regulate the inherent properties; beam energy provides a controllable, variable characteristic. Generally, heavy charged particles provide superior macrodosimetric properties; heavy particles (charged or not) have microdosimetric characteristics that produce high linear energy transfer (LET). Neutron macrodosimetry is similar to that of photons. Protons and helium ions possess superior macrodosimetric properties, plus microdosimetric characteristics resulting in low LET, yielding beam characteristics that approach the ideal for clinical radiotherapy. Hadron therapy for prostate cancer has been limited by the availability of appropriate treatment facilities. Nonetheless, encouraging results have been obtained. Neutron therapy demonstrated improved overall survival in a multi-institutional randomized trial, and improved local disease control in a subsequent trial. Proton radiation forms the boost component of several conformal dose-escalation studies. A Loma Linda University study demonstrated low treatment-related morbidity despite a prostate dose of 75 CGE; late-morbidity data were superior to published reports from multi-field, conformal photon therapy. A Phase III dose-escalation study of protons for early prostate cancer is proceeding. PMID:9516592

  17. WWWinda Orchestrator: a mechanism for coordinating distributed flocks of Java Applets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfreund, Yechezkal-Shimon; Nicol, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The WWWinda Orchestrator is a simple but powerful tool for coordinating distributed Java applets. Loosely derived from the Linda programming language developed by David Gelernter and Nicholas Carriero of Yale, WWWinda implements a distributed shared object space called TupleSpace where applets can post, read, or permanently store arbitrary Java objects. In this manner, applets can easily share information without being aware of the underlying communication mechanisms. WWWinda is a very useful for orchestrating flocks of distributed Java applets. Coordination event scan be posted to WWWinda TupleSpace and used to orchestrate the actions of remote applets. Applets can easily share information via the TupleSpace. The technology combines several functions in one simple metaphor: distributed web objects, remote messaging between applets, distributed synchronization mechanisms, object- oriented database, and a distributed event signaling mechanisms. WWWinda can be used a s platform for implementing shared VRML environments, shared groupware environments, controlling remote devices such as cameras, distributed Karaoke, distributed gaming, and shared audio and video experiences.

  18. Ion-counting nanodosemeter with particle tracking capabilities.

    PubMed

    Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Breskin, A; Chechik, R; Schemelinin, S; Garty, G; Wroe, A; Sadrozinski, H; Grosswendt, B

    2006-01-01

    An ion-counting nanodosemeter (ND) yielding the distribution of radiation-induced ions in a low-pressure gas within a millimetric, wall-less sensitive volume (SV) was equipped with a silicon microstrip telescope that tracks the primary particles, allowing correlation of nanodosimetric data with particle position relative to the SV. The performance of this tracking ND was tested with a broad 250 MeV proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center. The high-resolution tracking capability made it possible to map the ion registration efficiency distribution within the SV, for which only calculated data were available before. It was shown that tracking information combined with nanodosimetric data can map the ionisation pattern of track segments within 150 nm-equivalent long SVs with a longitudinal resolution of approximately 5 tissue-equivalent nanometers. Data acquired in this work were compared with results of Monte Carlo track structure simulations. The good agreement between 'tracking nanodosimetry' data acquired with the new system and simulated data supports the application of ion-counting nanodosimetry in experimental track-structure studies. PMID:17283009

  19. Nanodosimetry: Principle and Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2011-05-01

    Due to the success of theoretical track structure Monte Carlo simulations, showing that features of ionization patterns on the nanometer level are important for the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation, several new methods for experimental track structure investigations have been developed in recent years. These methods all use the principle of density scaling in low-pressure gas to probe track structure in macroscopic dimensions, ideally with single-ionization resolution. The new field of experimental track structure investigation, which has been called nanodosimetry, can be approached in two ways: (1) the number of ionizations in a defined, ideally wall-less, sensitive volume is registered per single primary particle and cluster size distributions are obtained, or (2) the full track structure of an ion track segment is "imaged". Existing nanodosimetric methods are based on the first approach, but a track structure imaging detector is currently under development at Loma Linda University. This contribution will review the principle and existing technical approaches to nanodosimetry and will give an outlook on future developments and applications.

  20. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  1. MOTIVES FOR RESIDENTIAL MOBILITY IN LATER LIFE

    PubMed Central

    SERGEANT, JULIE F.; EKERDT, DAVID J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes. Well, she moved because my sister and I decided she was going to move. But she wanted to move. It wouldn’t have happened if we hadn’t decided that she was gonna move. It was a little complicated . . . - Linda Brierton’s daughter, Karen PMID:18453180

  2. Ageing conference -- towards a cooperative future.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    The Regional Conference on Ageing was conducted in Tokyo, Japan from July 6-9, 1999 to promote intergenerational relationships and community support systems for the elderly and families. It was attended by a total of 30 representatives from 8 countries, namely, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Nepal, the Philippines, and Singapore. Participants took part in keynote and country presentations, a World Population Day special symposium, and a field trip to Edogawa City to observe the city programs related to the elderly. Among the speakers of the conference were Hirofumi Ando of the UN Population Fund, Linda Martin of the Population Council, and Jerrold Heuget of Economic and Social Commission of Asia and the Pacific. Heuget stated that productive employment during one's working years is the best preparation for old age. Moreover, expansion of pension and provident fund systems to cover all people of working age would be the most valuable policy that many Asian countries could implement to assist persons prepare for retirement. After being reviewed and discussed by a working group, the recommendations during the conference were approved in a plenary session as the conference recommendations. PMID:12349388

  3. A modular approach to modeling an isolated power system on a finite voltage bus using a differential algebraic equation solving routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipps, Mark R.

    1994-03-01

    The modeling of power systems has been primarily driven by the commercial power utility industry. These models usually involve the assumption that system bus voltage and frequency are constant. However, in applications such as shipboard power systems this infinite bus assumption is not valid. This thesis investigates the modeling of a synchronous generator and various loads in a modular fashion on a finite bus. The simulation presented allows the interconnection of multiple state-space models via a bus voltage model. The major difficulty encountered in building a model which computes bus voltage at each time step is that bus voltage is a function of current and current derivative terms. Bus voltage is also an input to the state equations which produce the current and current derivatives. This creates an algebraic loop which is a form of implicit differential equation. A routine has been developed by Linda Petzold of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for solving these types of equations. The routine, called Differential Algebraic System Solver (DASSL), has been implemented in a pre-release version of the software Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) and has been made available to the Naval Postgraduate School on a trial basis. An isolated power system is modeled using this software and the DASSL routine. The system response to several dynamic situations is studied and the results are presented.

  4. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, B; Szprengiel, A; Pluhar, J; Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints. PMID:15803624

  5. Effect of laser parameters and mode on pulp surgery outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Peavy, George M.; Kurosaki, Tom

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of localized laser pulp surgery in the canine model. Effects of laser parameters on treatment outcome were also investigated. Pulpal exposure 3 mm in diameter were prepared in healthy teeth and left open to infection from the oral cavity for 72 hours. Pulpal tissue was then removed using high speed handpiece with sterile irrigation, or a CO2 laser. Teeth were monitored clinically, radiographically for 3 months. Results for each criterion were evaluated on a scale of 0-(-2). After sacrifice, histological assessment was made soft and hard tissue response. Results for each category were evaluated on a standard scale of 0-(-2). All evaluations were performed by 1 blinded, pre-standardized clinician. Statistical assessment using the chi-square test and Fisher's Exact Test associated laser treatment with a significantly better clinical, radiographic and histological treatment outcome. NIH RRO1192, seed grant funding form Loma Linda University, the Edna P. Jacobsen Charitable Trust for Animals, Inc.

  6. Why are there no great women chefs?

    PubMed

    Druckman, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the rhetorical and deliberately provocative approach of the watershed essay art historian Linda Nochlin wrote in 1971—“Why Have there Been No Great Women Artists?”—to today's culinary industry. Nochlin used the question her title posed as a theoretical trap that would draw attention not only to the inherent sexism or prejudice that pervades the way the public perceives art, but also to those same issues' existence within and impact on academia and the other cultural institutions responsible for posing these sorts of questions. Nochlin bypassed the obvious and irrelevant debate over women's being less or differently talented and, in so doing, exposed that debate for being a distraction from the heart of the matter: how, sociologically (media) or institutionally (museums, foundations, etc.), people define a “great artist.” Although it's 40 years later, the polemic is as effective when used to understand the gender divide in the food world. PMID:21495288

  7. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  8. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  9. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  10. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  11. The interface between cultural understandings: negotiating new spaces for Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Mila-Schaaf, Karlo; Hudson, Maui

    2009-02-01

    This theoretical paper introduces the concept of the "negotiated space", a model developed by Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Maui Hudson and colleagues describing the interface between different worldviews and knowledge systems. This is primarily a conceptual space of intersection in-between different ways of knowing and meaning making, such as, the i Pacific indigenous reference and the dominant Western mental health paradigm of the bio-psycho-social. When developing Pacific models of care, the "negotiated space" provides room to explore the relationship between different (and often conflicting) cultural understandings of mental health and illness. The "negotiated space" is a place ofp urposive re-encounter reconstructing and re-balancing of ideas and values in complementary realignments that have resonance for Pacific peoples living in Western oriented societies. This requires making explicit the competing epistemologies of the Pacific indigenous worldviews and references alongside the bio-psycho-social and identifying the assumptions implicit in the operating logic ofe ach. This is a precursor to being empowered to negotiate, resolve and better comprehend the cultural conflict between the different understandings. This article theorises multiple patterns of possibility of resolutions and relationships within the negotiated space relevant to research, evaluation, model, service development and quality assurance within Pacific mental health. PMID:19585741

  12. New developments in treatment planning and verification of particle beam therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Reinhard W.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Charged particle beam therapy has been used for almost 60 years. During the initial 40 years, the medical use of protons and heavy ions was explored at accelerator laboratories in a limited number of patients and for a limited number of cancerous and non-cancerous disease conditions. After the development of computed tomography and 3D treatment planning, it was time to move charged particle therapy into the clinical realm. This happened in October 1991 when an ocular melanoma patient became the first patient to be treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center in California. Due to the increased awareness of the advantages of charged particle therapy and promising results of single-institution experiences, one currently observes a phase of rapid expansion of proton treatment centers throughout the world. A few of these centers are combined proton/carbon ion facilities. It is very important that the technological evolution of charged particle therapy will continue during this phase of clinical expansion to ensure that the increasing number of patients exposed to therapeutic charged particles will benefit most from the advantageous dose distributions that these particles afford. This report will give an overview of translational research activities related to planning and verification of proton therapy in which the authors have been involved for a number of years. While our activities focus on protons, these developments are to a large degree also applicable to carbon ion therapy. PMID:25520941

  13. Stress Exposure, Food Intake, and Emotional State

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Fulton, Stephanie; Wilson, Mark; Petrovich, Gorica; Rinaman, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the proceedings of the symposium entitled, “Stress, Palatable Food and Reward”, that was chaired by Drs. Linda Rinaman and Yvonne Ulrich-Lai at the 2014 Neurobiology of Stress Workshop held in Cincinnati, OH. This symposium comprised research presentations by four neuroscientists whose work focuses on the biological bases for complex interactions among stress, food intake and emotion. First, Dr. Ulrich-Lai describes her rodent research exploring mechanisms by which the rewarding properties of sweet palatable foods confer stress relief. Second, Dr. Stephanie Fulton discusses her work in which excessive, long-term intake of dietary lipids, as well as their subsequent withdrawal, promotes stress-related outcomes in mice. Third, Dr. Mark Wilson describes his group’s research examining the effects of social hierarchy-related stress on food intake and diet choice in group-housed female rhesus macaques, and compared the data from monkeys to results obtained in analogous work using rodents. Lastly, Dr. Gorica Petrovich discusses her research program that is aimed at defining cortical–amygdalar–hypothalamic circuitry responsible for curbing food intake during emotional threat (i.e., fear anticipation) in rats. Their collective results reveal the complexity of physiological and behavioral interactions that link stress, food intake and emotional state, and suggest new avenues of research to probe the impact of genetic, metabolic, social, experiential, and environmental factors. PMID:26303312

  14. Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs associated with Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Kristen; Belliard, Juan Carlos; Hardin, Steven; Knecht, Kathryn; Chen, C.S.; Montgomery, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The high prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients (40 – 83%) receiving conventional treatment and the complex relationship between the psychosocial factors that may contribute to or result from CAM use requires further understanding. We conducted a descriptive mixed-methods pilot study to understand CAM practices, attitudes and beliefs among cancer patients at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Methods This was the qualitative phase of the study and no hypotheses were set. Twenty-three face-to-face interviews were conducted and thematic coding was used to analyze 22 interview transcriptions. There were fourteen CAM users (64%) and eight non-users (36%). Findings The themes present among those who used CAM were: physicians viewed as one aspect of health care options, a holistic view on wellbeing, satisfaction with CAM use, and three key coping methods (confrontive, supportive, and optimistic) to confront cancer. Themes were not independent of each other. Two themes were present among nonusers; nonusers trusted their physician and were more likely to express evasive coping methods. Discussion Perceptions and behavioral patterns are complex predictors of CAM use. A better understanding of CAM, medical pluralism, and the perceptions of patients would help health care providers deliver a better quality of care. The promotion of integrative care may help health care providers better identify medical pluralism and would shift focus to patient-centered care. PMID:22313741

  15. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J. Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing “historic” (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  16. Assessment of electromagnetic field levels from surrounding high-tension overhead power lines for proposed land use.

    PubMed

    Al-Bassam, E; Elumalai, A; Khan, A; Al-Awadi, L

    2016-05-01

    The surrounding outdoor environment for new development has a big effect on the indoor quality of life. The main aim of this work was to determine the suitability of the area for building new schools with reference to electromagnetic field (EMF) effects. The specific objective of this study was to detect the safe distance from the EMF posed by the high-tension overhead power lines in the vicinity of the specified area. The measurements were taken for both the electric and magnetic fields in different months in order to detect the highest EMF levels during the peak power load season. EMDEX II with E-probe and EMDEX II with Linda were used for the measurements. These instruments were all calibrated by ENERTECH Company in USA. The EMF associated with high tension transmission lines that surrounded the proposed site has to be below 0.2 μT (Italian EMF regulations are the most suitable regulations for the establishment of schools in Kuwait). The safety clearance distance from the existing 300-kV high-tension power line has been assigned as 200 m and from other existing 132-kV high-tension power line was 50 m. The proposed site with its predefined boundaries has a magnetic field below the Italian EMF regulations for the establishment of new schools. PMID:27129598

  17. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The food and drug administration agrees to classify mercury fillings.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In the United States Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit, the Appellants Mom's Against Mercury, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, Oregonians for Life, California Citizens for Health Freedom, Kevin J. Biggers, Karen Johnson, Linda Brocato, R. Andrew Landerman, and Antia Vazquez Tibaul filed a petition for review of Regulatory Inaction by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On Monday June 2, 2008, the lawsuit was settled with the FDA after it agreed to classify mercury fillings. During its negotiation session with the Appellants, the FDA indicated that it would change its website on mercury fillings. The FDA no longer claims that no science exists about the safety of mercury amalgam or that other countries have acted for environmental reasons only. On its website, the FDA now states the following: "Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetus." The FDA also states that "Pregnant women and persons who may have a health condition that makes them more sensitive to mercury exposure, including individuals with existing high levels of mercury bioburden, should not avoid seeking dental care, but should discuss options with their health practitioner." The FDA decision to classify mercury fillings is a reflection of the legislations enacted in Europe and Canada that highlight the neurotoxic effects of mercury fillings. PMID:19105536

  19. 2015 Distinguished career award: Reflections on a career in science.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Edward M

    2016-08-01

    I was very pleased to receive the 2015 Distinguished Career Award from SSIB. This brief manuscript contains reminisces that might stir up pleasant memories in the older members of SSIB and also some general thoughts that I hope will be of value to the younger investigators who are closer to the beginning of their scientific careers. Although the organization has chosen to honor me with this special award, my own career was shaped by a great many people who have influenced my scientific career and I want to acknowledge them. They include Neal Miller, my doctoral mentor at Yale; Joe Holmes and Alan Epstein, my postdoctoral mentors; George Wolf and Reed Hainsworth, graduate student colleagues; John Brobeck, Paul Rozin, and Phil Teitelbaum, Michael Zigmond, Joe Verbalis, Jim Smith, and Alan Sved, faculty colleagues; Derek Denton, Paul McHugh, and James Fitzsimons, scientific role models; John Bruno, Steve Fluharty, and Linda Rinaman, post-doctoral trainees at Pitt; and Lori Flanagan, Kath Curtis, Michael Bushey, Mike Bykowski, Reza Manesh, Carrie Smith, Jennifer Vaughan, and Myriam Stricker, student trainees at Pitt. I thank them all and also my colleagues in SSIB not only for the honor of this award but for providing an abundant supply of insights and discoveries that have stimulated me throughout my adult life, in addition to being an attentive community in supporting my own work. PMID:26434784

  20. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing "historic" (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  1. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding.

    PubMed

    George, K; Willingham, V; Wu, H; Gridley, D; Nelson, G; Cucinotta, F A

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. PMID:12539753

  2. Neural relativity principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Alexei

    Olfaction is the final frontier of our senses - the one that is still almost completely mysterious to us. Despite extensive genetic and perceptual data, and a strong push to solve the neural coding problem, fundamental questions about the sense of smell remain unresolved. Unlike vision and hearing, where relatively straightforward relationships between stimulus features and neural responses have been foundational to our understanding sensory processing, it has been difficult to quantify the properties of odorant molecules that lead to olfactory percepts. In a sense, we do not have olfactory analogs of ``red'', ``green'' and ``blue''. The seminal work of Linda Buck and Richard Axel identified a diverse family of about 1000 receptor molecules that serve as odorant sensors in the nose. However, the properties of smells that these receptors detect remain a mystery. I will review our current understanding of the molecular properties important to the olfactory system. I will also describe a theory that explains how odorant identity can be preserved despite substantial changes in the odorant concentration.

  3. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Wang, N.; Miller, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  4. Method of etching zirconium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, L.S.; Kwiatkowski, B.

    1988-03-31

    The invention described herein may be manufactured, used, and licensed by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to us of any royalty thereon. This invention relates in general to a method of etching, zirconium diboride(ZrB/sub 2/) and, in particular, to a method of dry etching a thin film of ZrB/sub 2/ that has been deposited onto a substrate and patterned using photolithography. U.S. patent application S.N. 156, 124, filed 16 February, 1988, of Linda S. Heath for Method of Etching Titanium Diboride and assigned to a common assignee and with which this application is copending describes and claims a method of etching titanium diboride with a dry etch. Zirconium diboride, like titanium diboride, TiB/sub 2/, has become of interest in laboratory research because of its resistance to change or degradation at high temperatures. By adjusting the process parameters, one is able to attain etch rates of 67 to 140 A/min for ZrB/sub 2/. This is useful for patterning ZrB/sub 2/ as a diffusion barrier or a Schottky contact to semiconductors. The ZrB/sub 2/ film may be on a GaAs substrate.

  5. Stress exposure, food intake and emotional state.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Fulton, Stephanie; Wilson, Mark; Petrovich, Gorica; Rinaman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes the proceedings of the symposium entitled, "Stress, Palatable Food and Reward", that was chaired by Drs. Linda Rinaman and Yvonne Ulrich-Lai at the 2014 Neurobiology of Stress Workshop held in Cincinnati, OH. This symposium comprised research presentations by four neuroscientists whose work focuses on the biological bases for complex interactions among stress, food intake and emotion. First, Dr Ulrich-Lai describes her rodent research exploring mechanisms by which the rewarding properties of sweet palatable foods confer stress relief. Second, Dr Stephanie Fulton discusses her work in which excessive, long-term intake of dietary lipids, as well as their subsequent withdrawal, promotes stress-related outcomes in mice. Third, Dr Mark Wilson describes his group's research examining the effects of social hierarchy-related stress on food intake and diet choice in group-housed female rhesus macaques, and compared the data from monkeys to results obtained in analogous work using rodents. Finally, Dr Gorica Petrovich discusses her research program that is aimed at defining cortical-amygdalar-hypothalamic circuitry responsible for curbing food intake during emotional threat (i.e. fear anticipation) in rats. Their collective results reveal the complexity of physiological and behavioral interactions that link stress, food intake and emotional state, and suggest new avenues of research to probe the impact of genetic, metabolic, social, experiential and environmental factors on these interactions. PMID:26303312

  6. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm 2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples.

  7. Proton Lateral Broadening Distribution Comparisons Between GRNTRN, MCNPX, and Laboratory Beam Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Moyers, Michael F.; Walker, Steven A.; Tweed, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in NASA s deterministic High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code have included lateral broadening of primary ion beams due to small-angle multiple Coulomb scattering, and coupling of the ion-nuclear scattering interactions with energy loss and straggling. This new version of HZETRN is based on Green function methods, called GRNTRN, and is suitable for modeling transport with both space environment and laboratory boundary conditions. Multiple scattering processes are a necessary extension to GRNTRN in order to accurately model ion beam experiments, to simulate the physical and biological-effective radiation dose, and to develop new methods and strategies for light ion radiation therapy. In this paper we compare GRNTRN simulations of proton lateral broadening distributions with beam measurements taken at Loma Linda University Proton Therapy Facility. The simulated and measured lateral broadening distributions are compared for a 250 MeV proton beam on aluminum, polyethylene, polystyrene, bone substitute, iron, and lead target materials. The GRNTRN results are also compared to simulations from the Monte Carlo MCNPX code for the same projectile-target combinations described above.

  8. A Conversation with the Richmonds on Their 30 Years of Service with the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David A.; Mongero, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: David A. PalmerLinda B. MongeroBeth A. Richmond, PhD, and Mark G. Richmond, EdD, Co-Executive Directors serving for the ABCP, have assumed this role for the past 30 years. Their experience working with a variety of perfusionists in the field influenced the profession and some of the professionals we view as perfusion leaders. Anyone with time working as a clinical perfusionist acknowledges the role they have had establishing the certification process and influencing perfusion education. The goal of this article is simply to highlight the Board’s history through the words of both Co-Directors. Our profession, young in years, has a unique history. The names have not been changed and many of the stories have yet to be told. During the winter of 2009, we sat down with Beth and Mark Richmond to talk about their experience working with different Boards over the past 30 years. The following article is their story in their words. PMID:19806795

  9. Proton lateral broadening distribution comparisons between GRNTRN, MCNPX, and laboratory beam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Moyers, Michael F.; Walker, Steven A.; Tweed, John

    2010-04-01

    Recent developments in NASA’s deterministic High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code have included lateral broadening of primary ion beams due to small-angle multiple Coulomb scattering, and coupling of the ion-nuclear scattering interactions with energy loss and straggling. This new version of HZETRN is based on Green function methods, called GRNTRN, and is suitable for modeling transport with both space environment and laboratory boundary conditions. Multiple scattering processes are a necessary extension to GRNTRN in order to accurately model ion beam experiments, to simulate the physical and biological-effective radiation dose, and to develop new methods and strategies for light-ion radiation therapy. In this paper we compare GRNTRN simulations of proton lateral broadening distributions with beam measurements taken at Loma Linda University Proton Therapy Facility. The simulated and measured lateral broadening distributions are compared for a 250 MeV proton beam on aluminum, polyethylene, polystyrene, bone substitute, iron, and lead target materials. The GRNTRN results are also compared to simulations from the Monte Carlo MCNPX code for the same projectile-target combinations described above.

  10. a New Architecture for Intelligent Systems with Logic Based Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, K. K.; Saini, Sanju

    2008-10-01

    People communicate with each other in sentences that incorporate two kinds of information: propositions about some subject, and metalevel speech acts that specify how the propositional information is used—as an assertion, a command, a question, or a promise. By means of speech acts, a group of people who have different areas of expertise can cooperate and dynamically reconfigure their social interactions to perform tasks and solve problems that would be difficult or impossible for any single individual. This paper proposes a framework for intelligent systems that consist of a variety of specialized components together with logic-based languages that can express propositions and speech acts about those propositions. The result is a system with a dynamically changing architecture that can be reconfigured in various ways: by a human knowledge engineer who specifies a script of speech acts that determine how the components interact; by a planning component that generates the speech acts to redirect the other components; or by a committee of components, which might include human assistants, whose speech acts serve to redirect one another. The components communicate by sending messages to a Linda-like blackboard, in which components accept messages that are either directed to them or that they consider themselves competent to handle.

  11. Capacity building and collaborative research on cross-national studies in the Asian region

    PubMed Central

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Chang, Linda; Wang, Gene-Jack; Li, Ming D.; Rawson, Richard; Shoptaw, Steve; Normand, Jacques; Tai, Betty

    2013-01-01

    To build capacity and collaborative research for future cross-national studies in the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) region, priority research topics were identified and discussed at the April 2013 Conference to Promote Global Health in Taipei. These topics included (1) Neuroscience on HIV/HCV and amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), led by Drs. Linda Chang, Gene-Jack Wang, and Betty Tai; (2) ATS and mental health disorders, led by Drs. Richard Rawson and Wilson Compton; and (3) HIV/HCV transmission and social networks, led by Drs. Steven Shoptaw and Jacques Normand. Potential genetic studies spanning these topical areas as well as the importance of smoking cessation were further discussed, led by Dr. Ming Li. Additional priority research topics were also identified: (4) Drug use prevention, and (5) Family involvement to improve treatment adherence and recovery. Workgroups on these topics will be formed to prioritize research questions within the respective topical area and to determine the next steps. The ultimate goal of these workgroups is to stimulate collaboration that will eventually lead to research studies addressing critical issues related to the rising substance abuse and HIV infection rates in many Asian countries and, at the same time, to advance the scientific knowledge of substance abuse and HIV infection. PMID:24567700

  12. Medical Imaging for Understanding Sleep Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Sleep is essential for the health of the nervous system. Lack of sleep has a profound negative effect on cognitive ability and task performance. During sustained military operations, soldiers often suffer from decreased quality and quantity of sleep, increasing their susceptibility to neurological problems and limiting their ability to perform the challenging mental tasks that their missions require. In the civilian sector, inadequate sleep and overt sleep pathology are becoming more common, with many detrimental impacts. There is a strong need for new, in vivo studies of human brains during sleep, particularly the initial descent from wakefulness. Our research team is investigating sleep using a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and electroencephalography (EEG). High resolution MRI combined with PET enables localization of biochemical processes (e.g., metabolism) to anatomical structures. MRI methods can also be used to examine functional connectivity among brain regions. Neural networks are dynamically reordered during different sleep stages, reflecting the disconnect with the waking world and the essential yet unconscious brain activity that occurs during sleep.[4pt] In collaboration with Linda Larson-Prior, Washington University; Alpay Ozcan, Virginia Tech; Seong Mun, Virginia Tech; and Zang-Hee Cho, Gachon University.

  13. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  14. STS-108 Crew Breakfast for second launch attempt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Crew Breakfast for second launch attempt KSC-01PD-1775 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Gathered for a second day after a scrub due to weather conditions, the STS-108 crew again enjoy a pre-launch snack featuring a cake with the mission patch. Seated left to right are Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin, Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; the Expedition 4 crew Commander Yuri Onufrienko and astronauts Carl E. Walz and Daniel W. Bursch. Top priorities for the STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition 3 and Expedition 4 crews; bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello; and the crew's completion of robotics tasks and a spacewalk to install thermal blankets over two pieces of equipment at the bases of the Space Station's solar wings. Launch is scheduled for 5:19 p.m. EST Dec .5, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B.

  15. ResPlan Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellers, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    The main project I was involved in was new application development for the existing CIS0 Database (ResPlan). This database application was developed in Microsoft Access. Initial meetings with Greg Follen, Linda McMillen, Griselle LaFontaine and others identified a few key weaknesses with the existing database. The weaknesses centered around that while the database correctly modeled the structure of Programs, Projects and Tasks, once the data was entered, the database did not capture any dynamic status information, and as such was of limited usefulness. After the initial meetings my goals were identified as follows: Enhance the ResPlan Database to include qualitative and quantitative status information about the Programs, Projects and Tasks Train staff members about the ResPlan database from both the user perspective and the developer perspective Give consideration to a Web Interface for reporting. Initially, the thought was that there would not be adequate time to actually develop the Web Interface, Greg wanted it understood that this was an eventual goal and as such should be a consideration throughout the development process.

  16. Nanodosimetry: Principle and Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2011-05-05

    Due to the success of theoretical track structure Monte Carlo simulations, showing that features of ionization patterns on the nanometer level are important for the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation, several new methods for experimental track structure investigations have been developed in recent years. These methods all use the principle of density scaling in low-pressure gas to probe track structure in macroscopic dimensions, ideally with single-ionization resolution. The new field of experimental track structure investigation, which has been called nanodosimetry, can be approached in two ways: (1) the number of ionizations in a defined, ideally wall-less, sensitive volume is registered per single primary particle and cluster size distributions are obtained, or (2) the full track structure of an ion track segment is 'imaged'. Existing nanodosimetric methods are based on the first approach, but a track structure imaging detector is currently under development at Loma Linda University. This contribution will review the principle and existing technical approaches to nanodosimetry and will give an outlook on future developments and applications.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: my research passion. Interview by Hannah Branch.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Linda

    2013-07-01

    Linda Hazlett is a department chair and distinguished professor at Wayne State University (MI, USA). Her research is focused on the host immune response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its role in ocular infections. Dr Hazlett has been funded continuously by the NIH by R01 support for 34 years. She is currently principal investigator of two R01 grants from the National Eye Institute that study pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa in the eye. Dr Hazlett oversees four Course Directors who lead Year 1 medical student teaching, in addition to two graduate course directors. Furthermore, although not involved in medical teaching, she educates graduate students and mentors a Research Scientist and a Research Assistant Professor. Throughout her career, Dr Hazlett has achieved several honors and awards including Distinguished Professor at Wayne State University (2008), National Eye Institute Core Center (P30) grant for 1987-2013, Chair of Physiology Search 2008-2009, Member of the Academy of Scholars at Wayne State University, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology fellow at the Gold Medal level (2009) and was an invited speaker at the Gordon Conference 2010. PMID:23841630

  18. A proton imaging device: Design and status of realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipala, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Candiano, G.; Capineri, L.; P. Cirrone, G. A.; Civinini, C.; Cuttone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Marrazzo, L.; Mazzaglia, E.; Menichelli, D.; Randazzo, N.; Talamonti, C.; Valentini, S.

    2010-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is a precise form of cancer therapy, which requires verification of the patient position and the accurate knowledge of the dose delivered to the patient. At present in the proton treatment centre, patients are positioned with X-ray radiography and dose calculations rely on the patient's morphology and electron densities obtained by X-ray computed tomography [U. Schneider, E. Pedroni, Med. Phys. 22 (1995) 353]. A proton imaging device can improve the accuracy of proton radiation therapy treatment planning and the alignment of the patient with the proton beam. Our collaboration has developed a pCR prototype consisting of a silicon microstrip tracker and a calorimeter to detect the residual energy [R. Shulte, et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 51 (2004) 866-872]. In this contribution we will show some results obtained testing the front-end board of the tracker and measurements performed at LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud) and in LLUMC (Loma Linda University Medical Centre) using 60 and 200 MeV proton beams to test the calorimeter.

  19. An imaging informatics-based system utilizing DICOM objects for treating pain in spinal cord injury patients utilizing proton beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Chun, Sophia; Gridley, Daila S.

    2014-03-01

    Many US combat personnel have sustained nervous tissue trauma during service, which often causes Neuropathic pain as a side effect and is difficult to manage. However in select patients, synapse lesioning can provide significant pain control. Our goal is to determine the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The project is a joint collaboration of USC, Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach, and Loma Linda University. This is first system of its kind that supports integration and standardization of imaging informatics data in DICOM format; clinical evaluation forms outcomes data and treatment planning data from the Treatment planning station (TPS) utilized to administer the proton therapy in DICOM-RT format. It also supports evaluation of SCI subjects for recruitment into the clinical study, which includes the development, and integration of digital forms and tools for automatic evaluation and classification of SCI pain. Last year, we presented the concept for the patient recruitment module based on the principle of Bayesian decision theory. This year we are presenting the fully developed patient recruitment module and its integration to other modules. In addition, the DICOM module for integrating DICOM and DICOM-RT-ION data is also developed and integrated. This allows researchers to upload animal/patient study data into the system. The patient recruitment module has been tested using 25 retrospective patient data and DICOM data module is tested using 5 sets of animal data.

  20. An imaging informatics-based system to support animal studies for treating pain in spinal cord injury utilizing proton-beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mao, Xiao W.; Kotha, Nikhil

    2015-03-01

    In previous years we demonstrated an imaging informatics system designed to support multi-institutional research focused on the utilization of proton radiation for treating spinal cord injury (SCI)-related pain. This year we will demonstrate an update on the system with new modules added to perform image processing on evaluation data using immunhistochemistry methods to observe effects of proton therapy. The overarching goal of the research is to determine the effectiveness of using the proton beam for treating SCI-related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The research is a joint collaboration between three major institutes, University of Southern California (data collection/integration and image analysis), Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach (patient subject recruitment), and Loma Linda University and Medical Center (human and preclinical animal studies). The system that we are presenting is one of its kind which is capable of integrating a large range of data types, including text data, imaging data, DICOM objects from proton therapy treatment and pathological data. For multi-institutional studies, keeping data secure and integrated is very crucial. Different kinds of data within the study workflow are generated at different stages and different groups of people who process and analyze them in order to see hidden patterns within healthcare data from a broader perspective. The uniqueness of our system relies on the fact that it is platform independent and web-based which makes it very useful in such a large-scale study.

  1. A synopsis of the genus Ethmia Hübner in Costa Rica: biology, distribution, and description of 22 new species (Lepidoptera, Gelechioidea, Depressariidae, Ethmiinae), with emphasis on the 42 species known from Área de Conservación Guanacaste

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Rodríguez, Eugenie; Powell, Jerry A.; Hallwachs, Winnie; Janzen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss 45 Costa Rican species of Ethmia Hübner, 1819, including 23 previously described: Ethmia delliella (Fernald), Ethmia bittenella (Busck), Ethmia festiva Busck, Ethmia scythropa Walsingham, Ethmia perpulchra Walsingham, Ethmia terpnota Walsingham, Ethmia elutella Busck, Ethmia janzeni Powell, Ethmia ungulatella Busck, Ethmia exornata (Zeller), Ethmia phylacis Walsingham, Ethmia mnesicosma Meyrick, Ethmia chemsaki Powell, Ethmia baliostola Walsingham, Ethmia duckworthi Powell, Ethmia sandra Powell, Ethmia nigritaenia Powell, Ethmia catapeltica Meyrick, Ethmia lichyi Powell, Ethmia transversella Busck, Ethmia similatella Busck, Ethmia hammella Busck, Ethmia linda Busck, and 22 new species: Ethmia blaineorum, Ethmia millerorum, Ethmia dianemillerae, Ethmia adrianforsythi, Ethmia stephenrumseyi, Ethmia berndkerni, Ethmia dimauraorum, Ethmia billalleni, Ethmia ehakernae, Ethmia helenmillerae, Ethmia johnpringlei, Ethmia laphamorum, Ethmia petersterlingi, Ethmia lesliesaulae, Ethmia turnerorum, Ethmia normgershenzi, Ethmia nicholsonorum, Ethmia hendersonorum, Ethmia randyjonesi, Ethmia randycurtisi, Ethmia miriamschulmanae and Ethmia tilneyorum. We illustrate all species and their male and female genitalia, along with distribution maps of Costa Rican localities. Immature stages are illustrated for 11 species, and food plants are listed when known. Gesneriaceae is added as a new food plant family record for Ethmia. CO1 nucleotide sequences (“DNA barcodes”) were obtained for 41 of the species. PMID:25561859

  2. Obituary: John Louis Africano III, 1951-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Edwin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Technical Conference whose attendance expanded dramatically during his tenure. John moved to the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, in 1998 to work full time on orbital debris projects including the 3.0 meter Liquid Mirror Telescope and the CCD Debris Telescope in Cloudcroft, New Mexico. In 2000 he moved back to Colorado Springs, Colorado, to be closer to his family. From there he continued to support both the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) and AMOS. John was very instrumental in establishing cooperative programs between the ODPO and AMOS, which will benefit both organizations for many years to come. John left an indelible mark on his programs and all those who knew and loved him. The impact of his untimely departure will reverberate for many years. As John's wife Linda put it, "John is now visiting the stars and galaxies he adored from afar." John is survived by his wife, Linda Ann Africano; two sons, James Keith and Brian Michael; a daughter, Monica Lynn Africano; a sister, Diana Smith; and four grandchildren. The author acknowledges valuable input from Brian Africano (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), Eugene Stansbery (NASA), Mark Mulrooney (NASA contractor), Tom Kelecy (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Paul Sydney (Boeing LTS, Inc.), Kira Abercromby (NASA contractor), and Patrick Seitzer (University of Michigan).

  3. APS Science 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J. M; Mills, D. M.; Gerig, R.

    2010-05-01

    of sustainable energy provides an opportunity for expanded involvement with industrial research. We were privileged to recruit several outstanding new leaders at the APS. Linda Young, from Argonne's Chemical Sciences Division, became the new Director of the X-ray Science Division (XSD). Chris Jacobsen (from Stony Brook University) has been added to Linda's team as an XSD Associate Division Director, joining George Srajer. Alexander (Sasha) Zholents (formerly of Berkeley Lab) became Director of the Accelerator Systems Division. Sasha is the inventor of the short-pulse x-ray scheme that we plan to implement in the APS-U to obtain very high average brightness, broadband, 1-ps x-ray pulses. Walter Lowe (formerly of Howard University) has taken a new position as senior advisor for outreach and development of the user community. Walter's role is to increase the diversity of the user community (with diversity read broadly to include users, institutions, and technical disciplines that are underrepresented at APS). Walter is also leading an effort to increase access for industrial users. I am confident that we have in place a great team to help our users and the APS take fullest advantage of the APS-U opportunity. In planning with users for the proposed APS-U, we focused on the need to study 'real materials under real conditions in real time' on spatial and temporal scales unavailable today. Only by studying materials as they are made-or as they perform-in difficult environments can we solve the grand challenge of higher-performance, sustainable materials for energy and health. The proposed APS-U will improve the brightness of penetrating x-rays produced by the APS over 100 times, and support our efforts in developing state-of-the-art instruments to address these challenges.

  4. Data prep: the bottleneck of future applications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramss, Juergen; Eichhorn, Hans; Lempke, Melchior; Jaritz, Renate; Neick, Volker; Beyer, Dirk; Buerger, Bertram; Baetz, Ulrich; Kunze, Klaus; Belic, Nikola

    2006-06-01

    There is no doubt that shaped beam systems have been well established in the mask write community since the introduction of the 130nm technology node. Moreover, they are successfully advancing to conquer also the wafer direct write market. To be able to handle today and in the near future the tremendous data volumes with their characteristic complexity as well as to make use of such indispensable methods like PEC and Fogging corrections, new, sophisticated solutions are necessary to master the challenging 45nm technology node. However, we are aware that the 45nm node presents only an intermediate step, because, according to the international roadmap, we soon will be confronted with the hardware and software requirements of the next, the 32nm technology node. In this context it becomes more and more important to consider potential showstoppers, in our case the data preparation process To investigate this complex subject a Linux cluster computer featuring 3.6GHz clock rate CPUs, and a software package supporting distributed computing with a 64Bit version and address units down to 0.1nm were used. The work was focused on the performance of pattern samples down to the 45nm node. Both mask and wafer data as well as NIL template manufacturing were considered, data prep times and CPU loads were analysed. Furthermore, the user-friendly Leica Interface for Data Preparations (LINDA) was applied. In addition, an outlook to future hardware/software configurations for mastering the challenges of the 32nm node will be given. The results presented in this paper prove that data preparation is not the bottleneck of current and future applications.

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicated Soaps Commonly Used By Dar es Salaam Residents in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mwambete, K. D.; Lyombe, F.

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro evaluation of the anti-microbial activity of medicated soaps was conducted using ditch-plate and hand washing techniques. Strains of reference microbes namely Candida albicans (ATCC90028), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Pseudomonas aureginosa (ATCC27853) and Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) were tested at three different soaps’ concentrations (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/ml). A total of 16 medicated soaps were assayed for their antimicrobial efficacy. Of these, 13 were medicated and 3 non-medicated soaps, which served as control. Ciprofloxacin and ketaconazole were employed as positive controls. Label disclosure for the soaps’ ingredients and other relevant information were absorbed. The most common antimicrobial active ingredients were triclosan, trichloroxylenol and trichlorocarbanilide. ANOVA for means of zones of inhibition revealed variability of antimicrobial activity among the medicated soaps. Positive correlation (r=0.318; P<0.01) between zones of inhibition and soaps’ concentrations was evidenced. Hand washing frequencies positively correlated with microbial counts. Roberts® soap exhibited the largest zone of inhibition (34 mm) on S. aureus. Candida albicans was the least susceptible microbe. Regency® and Dalan® exhibited the least zone of inhibition on the tested bacteria. Protex®, Roberts®, Family® and Protector® were equally effective (P<0.01) against S. aureus. In conclusion, majority of the assayed medicated soaps have satisfactory antibacterial activity; though lack antifungal effect with exception of Linda® liquid soap. The hand washing technique has proved to be inappropriate for evaluation of soaps’ antimicrobial efficacy due to presence of the skin microflora. PMID:22131630

  6. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm(3) target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy. PMID:21076200

  7. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET).

  8. Evidence For Decadal and Century Scale Climate and Oceanic Variability in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Over the Last Millenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Aiello, I. W.; Stewart, Z.; Sauthoff, W.

    2015-12-01

    Linda Pineda1Ana Christina Ravelo2Ivano Aiello3Zach Stewart2Wilson Sauthoff2 Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, UCSC Ocean Sciences Department, UCSC Moss Landing Marine Lab Natural climate change affects coastal water resources, human land use, and marine biological productivity. In particular, the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is influenced by changes in global-scale temperature and pressure gradients and is responsible for spatial changes in summertime rainfall in Mesoamerica impacting regional water resources and the strength of upwelling. In October 2014, aboard the Research Vessel El Puma, a 3.9 meter long core (G14-P12) was recovered from the Northeast flank of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California within the oxygen minimum zone (27˚52.11'N, 111˚41.51'W, water depth of 677m) to investigate changes in seasonal upwelling and Central Mexico rainfall over the last ~1000 years. The age model was developed using Pb210, C14 and lamination counting. The time interval includes the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period. Biological productivity and precipitation proxy records were produced using an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) core-scanner and a color line scanner to generate a record of bulk chemistry and color reflectance. The records indicate marked decadal and centennial scale variability in the lithologic composition of the sediment superimposed on millimeter-scale variability that reflects the presence of seasonally laminated sediments. Nitrogen isotopic and nitrogen weight % measurements were used, in combination with the scanned data, to interpret changes in nitrate utilization and biological productivity. These new records will have broad implications on the link between regional coastal environmental conditions in the Gulf of California and global climate change.

  9. Psychosocial Implications During Adolescence for Infant Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Vidhya; Freier Randall, Catherin; Chinnock, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background & Objectives: As more heart transplant recipients survive into late adolescence, research addressing long-term psychosocial and neurodevelopmental outcomes is imperative. The limited literature available suggests risk for psychosocial difficulties and lower cognitive, academic, and neuropsychological functioning. This paper reviews topic-related literature and provides preliminary data examining psychosocial and neuropsychological functioning of adolescents who received their heart transplant during infancy. Method: This paper offers a literature review AND presents preliminary data from studies conducted through Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital (LLUCH). Study one examined psychosocial functioning and quality of life of adolescent infant heart transplant recipients. In study two, cognitive, academic, and neuropsychological data were analyzed. Results: Study 1: Overall psychosocial functioning fell in the Average range, however, a significant percentage of participants presented with difficulties on one or more of the psychosocial domains. Quality of life was also within normal limits, though concerns with general health and bodily discomfort were noted. Study 2: Cognitive functioning was assessed to be Below Average, with 43-62% of the participants demonstrating significant impairments. Neuropsychological functioning yielded significant weakness on language functioning, and mild weakness on visual-motor integration and executive functioning. Conclusion: While the majority of the participants demonstrate psychosocial resiliency, a subgroup present with difficulties suggesting the need for intervention. Cognitive/neuropsychological functioning suggests poorer functioning with patterns similar to other high-risk pediatric populations. These results are preliminary and further research on long-term psychosocial and neuropsychological development of pediatric heart transplant recipients is needed to better understand and ameliorate developmental

  10. Minnesota court overturns ban on Medicaid coverage for abortion.

    PubMed

    1994-06-24

    Hennipin County District Court Judge William Posten issued a decision on June 16 striking down Minnesota's near ban on abortion coverage for low-income women. Ruling in Women of the State of Minnesota vs. Haas-Steffen, Judge Posten found that the state Constitution's rights of privacy and equality are more protective of women's reproductive choices than the corresponding federal rights. Holding that "the state's selective funding of childbirth over abortion impinges on an indigent woman's fundamental right to decide for herself whether to continue or terminate her pregnancy," the state district court permanently enjoined enforcement of the measure. Minnesota must now cover all medically necessary abortions for women receiving Medicaid. For more than 15 years, the statutes and regulations invalidated by Judge Posten have limited abortion coverage to cases of life endangerment or reported rape or incest. State officials have indicated that they will seek a stay and expedited review of Judge Posten's decision from the Minnesota Supreme Court. Filed on March 8, 1993, the Minnesota case is one of 5 such lawsuits brought by CRLP. Last December, in a similar case, the West Virginia Supreme Court struck down that state's ban on Medicaid coverage for abortions. Similar CRLP cases are still pending in Florida, Texas, and Montana. Plaintiffs--a class of Minnesota Medicaid-eligible women seeking abortions, Dr. Jane Hodgson, Pro-Choice Resources, Women's Health Center, Midwest Health Center for Women, and Meadowbrook Women's Clinic, on behalf of themselves and the women they serve--are represented by CRLP's Simon Heller, Janet Benshoof, and Lenora Lapidus, along with Minnesota attorney Linda Ojala. PMID:12345511

  11. Glacial Lake Outburst Flood on Lemon Creek, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, S. L.; Schwarz, T. C.; Walter, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    A system of small glacial lakes on Lemon Glacier near Juneau, AK was studied to better understand its annual jokulhlaup cycle. Although jokulhlaup behaviors of many supraglacial and glacially-dammed lakes around the world have been studied, some observed relationships among the governing parameters remain mysterious. An associated two-lake system, Lakes Linda and Lynn, which are uniquely small among similar research, provide an opportunity to investigate the applicability of previously developed relationships between discharge magnitude and lake volume to a different spatial scale. The system proved to be interesting in that its behavior does not fit well with established jokulhlaup taxonomy. Additionally, this glacier discharges into Lemon Creek, an important development corridor for Juneau, AK and a productive salmon stream. Understanding how the yearly Lemon Glacier jokulhlaup event impacts this stream is essential to monitoring and meaningfully interpreting water quality data. Historical USGS Lemon Creek streamflow data and icefield observations from the Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) were used to characterize the Lemon Glacier Jokulhlaup and identify changes in system since its discovery in 1962. A detailed field study was carried out from 6/15/01 to 8/2/01 to improve our understanding of the mechanics and thermodynamics of this system. Monitored during this period were lake-levels, lake-temperature profiles, air temperature, surface temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed/direction, solar radiation, and Lemon Creek streamflow and water-quality. This system has undergone substantial historical changes including the relatively recent development of Lake Lynn, which is now the larger of the two lakes. Continued enlargement of this system is increasing its contribution to peak streamflows in Lemon Creek and thus its impact on stream water quality, especially with respect to sediment loading.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Medicated Soaps Commonly Used By Dar es Salaam Residents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwambete, K D; Lyombe, F

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro evaluation of the anti-microbial activity of medicated soaps was conducted using ditch-plate and hand washing techniques. Strains of reference microbes namely Candida albicans (ATCC90028), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), Pseudomonas aureginosa (ATCC27853) and Escherichia coli (ATCC25922) were tested at three different soaps' concentrations (1.0, 4.0 and 8.0 mg/ml). A total of 16 medicated soaps were assayed for their antimicrobial efficacy. Of these, 13 were medicated and 3 non-medicated soaps, which served as control. Ciprofloxacin and ketaconazole were employed as positive controls. Label disclosure for the soaps' ingredients and other relevant information were absorbed. The most common antimicrobial active ingredients were triclosan, trichloroxylenol and trichlorocarbanilide. ANOVA for means of zones of inhibition revealed variability of antimicrobial activity among the medicated soaps. Positive correlation (r=0.318; P<0.01) between zones of inhibition and soaps' concentrations was evidenced. Hand washing frequencies positively correlated with microbial counts. Roberts(®) soap exhibited the largest zone of inhibition (34 mm) on S. aureus. Candida albicans was the least susceptible microbe. Regency(®) and Dalan(®) exhibited the least zone of inhibition on the tested bacteria. Protex(®), Roberts(®), Family(®) and Protector(®) were equally effective (P<0.01) against S. aureus. In conclusion, majority of the assayed medicated soaps have satisfactory antibacterial activity; though lack antifungal effect with exception of Linda(®) liquid soap. The hand washing technique has proved to be inappropriate for evaluation of soaps' antimicrobial efficacy due to presence of the skin microflora. PMID:22131630

  13. When steve becomes Stephanie.

    PubMed

    Gary, Loren; Elliot, Brian

    2008-12-01

    Henrietta Mercer, the senior vice president for human resources at LaSalle Chemical, is facing a challenge unprecedented in her career: Steve Ambler, recently appointed the company's group sales director, has decided to change his gender identity. Before Henrietta can finish crafting a corporate response, someone slips a copy of her confidential memo to the executive committee to one of Steve's colleagues, whose outraged reaction suggests the difficulties that may lie ahead. How can she help him transition in a workplace where not everyone is on board with the plan? Linda E. Taylor, the director of work life, equity, and inclusion at Raytheon Missile Systems, advises Henrietta to offer lots of gender identity training. When Raytheon employees question the morality of condoning transgender choices, she replies that the company doesn't pass judgment on its employees' private lives and that working for Raytheon means adhering to its policy of inclusion. Ronald K. Andrews, a vice president and head of human resources at Prudential, says it is crucial to work very closely with the person transitioning and points out that the individual's courage may be what most strikes colleagues. Prudential held a meeting to educate account executives and provide them with talking points before they spoke directly to key clients - not one of whom was lost. Stasha Goliaszewski, a scientist and engineer at Boeing, started her gender transition after four years with the company. HR support helped with other employees, and her professional expertise helped when she called on customers. She advises large companies to prepare their gender-identity policies and not be caught off guard, as Henrietta was. Statistics show that, sooner or later, they are bound to encounter the issue. PMID:19058459

  14. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  15. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Szprengiel, A.; Pluhar, J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  16. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments’ Response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs. PMID:26823922

  17. Visions of Our Planet's Atmosphere, Land & Oceans - ETheater Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of ma'gazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using 1 m resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUS, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  18. NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theatre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Pierce, Hal; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using 1 m resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite, Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  19. Visions of Our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: Electronic-Theater 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to the Delaware Bay and Philadelphia area. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer tropical cyclones & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA, NOAA & UMETSAT remote sensing missions like GOES, Meteosat, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. see visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including Landsat tours of the US, and Africa with drill downs of major global cities using 1 m resolution commercialized spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. see ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across a super sized panoramic screen.

  20. A Presentation of Spectacular Visualizations. Visions of Our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: ETheater Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Pierce, Hal; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using 1 m resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortices and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  1. A Presentation of Spectacular Visualizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes and tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) remote sensing missions like the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), NOAA, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), SeaWiFS, Landsat7, and new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran, and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science, and on National and International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam and zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using one meter resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  2. A Presentation of Spectracular Visualizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Pierce, Hal; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using I m resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  3. A Primordial and Complicated Ocean of Magma on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2006-03-01

    It seems almost certain that the Moon was surrounded by an ocean of magma when it formed. This important idea has been applied to the other terrestrial planets and even to asteroids. Linda (Lindy) Elkins-Tanton and colleagues Mark Parmentier, Paul Hess, and Sarah Zaranek at Brown University, and Lars Borg and David Draper (University of New Mexico) have examined the chemical and physical consequences of magma ocean crystallization on Mars. Elkins-Tanton has focused on the fate of the pile of crystals created during solidification of a magma ocean over a thousand kilometers thick. Crystallization causes the minerals that form first to lie beneath those formed later. The deepest minerals are also less dense than the overlying minerals. This is an unstable situation: the low-density rocks would have a tendency to rise while the high-density rocks would have a tendency to sink. Although we think of rocks as solid and hard, when hot and under pressure, they flow like liquids. They do not flow fast, but they do flow like ultra-gooey liquids (about a factor of 100 million billion times gooier than ketchup at room temperature). Thus, the heavy layers sink and the light layers rise, producing a complicated Martian mantle with chemical characteristics like those cosmochemists infer from studies of Martian meteorites. The sinking of relatively cool rocks from the top of the crystallized pile cools the boundary between the metallic core and the mantle, causing motions inside the core to produce the early, strong magnetic field of Mars.

  4. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  5. Simulation of a 36 h solar particle event at LLUMC using a proton beam scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G. B.; Benton, E. R.; Gridley, D. S.; Hickey, T.; Hubbard, J.; Koss, P.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Pecaut, M. J.; Sanders, E.; Shahnazi, K.

    2007-08-01

    A radiation biology experiment was performed in the research room of the proton therapy facility at Loma Linda University Medical Center to simulate the proton exposure produced by a solar particle event. The experiment used two scanning magnets for X and Y deflection of the proton beam and covered a usable target area of nearly 1 m2. The magnet scanning control system consisted of Lab View 6.0 software running on a PC. The goal of this experiment was to study the immune system response of 48 mice simultaneously exposed to 2 Gy of protons that simulated the dose rate and energy spectrum of the September 1989 solar particle event. The 2 Gy dose was delivered to the entrance of the mice cages over 36 h. Both ion chamber and TLD measurements indicated that the dose delivered was within 9% of the intended value. A spot scanning technique using one spot per accelerator cycle (2.2 s) was used to deliver doses as low as 1 μGy per beam spot. Rapid beam termination (less than 5 ms) on each spot was obtained by energizing a quadrupole in the proton synchrotron once the dose limit was reached for each spot. A parallel plate ion chamber placed adjacent to the mice cages provided fluence (or dose) measurements for each beam energy during each hour of the experiment. An intensity modulated spot scanning technique can be used in a variety of ways for radiation biology and a second experiment is being designed with this proton beam scanning system to simultaneously irradiate four groups of mice with different dose rates within the 1 m2 area. Also, large electronic devices being tested for radiation damage have been exposed in this beam without the use of patch fields. The same scanning system has potential application for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) as well. This paper discusses the beam delivery system and dosimetry of the irradiation.

  6. Proceedings of the Second All-USGS Modeling Conference, February 11-14, 2008: Painting the Big Picture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2009-01-01

    The Second USGS Modeling Conference was held February 11-14, 2008, in Orange Beach, Ala. Participants at the conference came from all U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) regions and represented all four science discipline - Biology, Geography, Geology, and Water. Representatives from other Department of the Interior (DOI) agencies and partners from the academic community also participated. The conference, which was focused on 'painting the big picture', emphasized the following themes: Integrated Landscape Monitoring, Global Climate Change, Ecosystem Modeling, and Hazards and Risks. The conference centered on providing a forum for modelers to meet, exchange information on current approaches, identify specific opportunities to share existing models and develop more linked and integrated models to address complex science questions, and increase collaboration across disciplines and with other organizations. Abstracts for the 31 oral presentations and more than 60 posters presented at the conference are included here. The conference also featured a field trip to review scientific modeling issues along the Gulf of Mexico. The field trip included visits to Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge, Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, the 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center, and Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge. On behalf of all the participants of the Second All-USGS Modeling Conference, the conference organizing committee expresses our sincere appreciation for the support of field trip oganizers and leaders, including the managers from the various Reserves and Refuges. The organizing committee for the conference included Jenifer Bracewell, Sally Brady, Jacoby Carter, Thomas Casadevall, Linda Gundersen, Tom Gunther, Heather Henkel, Lauren Hay, Pat Jellison, K. Bruce Jones, Kenneth Odom, and Mark Wildhaber.

  7. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. The Universe Now and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist opened this, the third session in the NASA Administrator's Seminar Series, by asking the following question: 'What would be a bold and aspiring agenda for America's next era in space?' It aimed at answering the following questions: What do we know about the universe? How do we know it? (Dr. Cordova also mentioned that the first seminar was about the definition of cellular life and how to recognize it, and featured as speakers, Dr. Lynn Margoles and Dr. Leslie Orgle.) Administrator Daniel S. Goldin was introduced; he welcomed the attendees, and remarked that NASA personnel have a critical need to explain to Congress and the public why a space program is important. Congress and the public pay for the space programs. Therefore the programs' importance cannot remain in the sole domain of scientists. The first speaker, Dr. Vera Ruben of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institute of Washington, was introduced as an art historian expert in cosmology and an observational astronomer. Dr. Ruben brought up a number of questions regarding the substance, location, and origin of dark matter, radiation, galaxies, and the lumpy structure of galaxies in space, as well as the age and density of our universe. The next speaker was Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, a theoretical astrophysicist from Princeton University's Department of Astrophysical Sciences. The final speaker, Dr. Linda Schale is a cosmologist from the University of Texas at Austin. She was said to be a 'paleontologist of the human mind' who tries 'to understand mechanisms people use to understand the world'. The concluding discussion centered on why NASA scientists don t communicate better with people who are not highly educated. This is a big concern because to continue its work, NASA needs to communicate the importance of its goals to the average person. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs. PMID:26823922

  9. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  10. [The prevention of voice disorders in the actor: protocol and follow-up nine months of professional theater].

    PubMed

    Ormezzano, Y; Delale, A; Lamy-Simonian, A

    2011-01-01

    In July 2009, at the beginning of this work, 26 theses addressing professional principles of voice were listed in the database of SUDOC (Système Universitaire de Documentation): 9 related to voices of teachers (about 900,000* professionals in France), 14 theses relating to singers (7500** professionals), and only 3 about the voice of actors (20 000*** professional actors in France in 2006). The latter pertaining to concerning rookie actors (sensibilisation vocale auprès du comédien débutant Bichet, Linda, Bordeaux II, 2006), the mechanical larynx (étude des mécanismes laryngés dans la voix projetée: cas particulier des comédiennes Guerin, Mélanie, Paris VI, 2009), vocal fatigue (Fatigue vocale après une tâche d'utilisation prolongée de la voix chez le comédien Canaan Baggioni, Brigitte, Aix-Marseille II, 2009). Professional actors are plentiful; their training in vocal technique is very heterogeneous, or non-existent: it is not a prerequisite to have a degree to work as an actor! This lack of vocal technique is associated with risk factors specific to the acting profession: numerous travels in air-conditioned vehicles, unsuitable workplaces; dusty or poorly heated, irregular working patterns, excessive demands from directors... All this makes the actors highly susceptible to voice disorders. The protocol for the prevention of voice disorders presented here is holistic and ecological. This work also examines the effectiveness of such a preventive protocol aimed at theatre comedians. PMID:21977701

  11. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  12. Characterization of the Radiation Shielding Properties of US andRussian EVA Suits

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.R.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    2001-10-26

    Reported herein are results from the Eril Research, Inc.(ERI) participationin the NASA Johnson Space Center sponsored studycharacterizing the radiation shielding properties of the two types ofspace suit that astronauts are wearing during the EVA on-orbit assemblyof the International Space Station (ISS). Measurements using passivedetectors were carried out to assess the shielding properties of the USEMU Suit and the Russian Orlan-M suit during irradiations of the suitsand a tissue equivalent phantom to monoenergetic proton and electronbeams at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Duringirradiations of 6 MeV electrons and 60 MeV protons, absorbed dose as afunction of depth was measured using TLDs exposed behind swatches of thetwo suit materials and inside the two EVA helmets. Considerable reductionin electron dosewas measured behind all suit materials in exposures to 6MeV electrons. Slowing of the proton beam in the suit materials led to anincrease in dose measured in exposures to 60 MeV protons. During 232 MeVproton irradiations, measurements were made with TLDs and CR-39 PNTDs atfive organ locations inside a tissue equivalent phantom, exposed bothwith and without the two EVA suits. The EVA helmets produce a 13 to 27percent reduction in total dose and a 0 to 25 percent reduction in doseequivalent when compared to measurements made in the phantom head alone.Differences in dose and dose equivalent between the suit and non-suitirradiations forthe lower portions of the two EVA suits tended to besmaller. Proton-induced target fragmentation was found to be asignificant source of increased dose equivalent, especially within thetwo EVA helmets, and average quality factor inside the EMU and Orlan-Mhelmets was 2 to 14 percent greater than that measured in the barephantom head.

  13. Comparison of High-Dose Proton Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Rossi, Carl J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Yan, Yan; Shipley, William U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case-matched analysis comparing high-dose external-beam radiation (EBRT) for prostate cancer delivered on Proton Radiation Oncology Group (PROG) 95-09, a randomized trial, with permanent prostate brachytherapy over the same era. Methods: From 1996 to 1999, 196 patients were accrued to the high-dose arm (79.2 Gray equivalent (GyE) using photons and protons) of PROG 95-09 at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Loma Linda University Medical Center. Entry criteria specified T1-2 and prostate-specific antigen {<=}15 ng/mL. When Gleason score >7 was excluded, 177 men were left for case matching. At Massachusetts General Hospital, 203 similar patients were treated by a single brachytherapist from 1997 to 2002. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Case matching, based on T stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, and age resulted in 141 matches (282 patients). Median follow-up was 8.6 and 7.4 years for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (BF). Results: Using the Phoenix definition, the 8-year BF rates were 7.7% and 16.1% for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively (p = 0.42). A stratified analysis was performed by risk group. In the EBRT group, 113 and 28 patients were low and intermediate risk, respectively. In the brachytherapy group, 118 and 23 were. When stratified by risk group, the BF rates were similar by either technique. Conclusions: High-dose EBRT and brachytherapy result in similar BF rates for men with localized prostate cancer. Comparative quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies are warranted.

  14. Luminol/H2O2 chemiluminescence detector for the analysis of nitric oxide in exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J K; Bollinger, M J; Birks, J W

    1999-11-15

    A new instrument for the detection of nitric oxide has been developed and applied to the analysis of exhaled breath. The instrument is based on conversion of NO to NO2, using the oxidant chromium trioxide, followed by detection of chemiluminescence in the reaction of NO2 with an alkaline luminol/H2O2 solution. The presence of H2O2 is found to enhance the sensitivity of NO2 detection by a factor of approximately 20. A bundle of porous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes is used to bring the gaseous sample into contact with the luminol solution. Chemiluminescence occurring within the translucent hollow fibers is detected using a miniature photomultiplier tube. The limit of detection for NO is 0.3 ppbv for S/N = 3, and the 1/e response time is 2 s. A large interference resulting from the 4-6% CO2 concentration in exhaled breath is removed by use of an ascarite scrubber in the air stream. Breath measurements of NO were made using a sampling technique developed by Sensor Medics (Yorba Linda, CA) with simultaneous detection using the luminol/H2O2 and NO + O3 chemiluminescence techniques. The two instruments were found to be in excellent agreement. Nitric oxide levels were in the range 6.0-22.0 ppbv for healthy individuals and 40.0-80.0 ppbv for individuals with asthma or a respiratory infection. This new detector offers the advantages of compact size, low cost, and a simple configuration compared to NO detectors based on NO + O3 chemiluminescence. PMID:10575964

  15. Preparation and Current Situation of Proton-ICCHIBAN-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihori, Yukio; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kitamura, H.; Kodaira, S.; Benton, Eric; Hajek, Michael; Berger, Thomas; Jadrnickova, Iva; Ploc, Ondrej

    The ICCHIBAN (Inter Comparison for Cosmicrays with Heavy Ion Beams at NIRS) working group has organized and performed various ICCHIBAN runs for active and passive radiation detectors at HIMAC, NIRS, Japan, Loma Linda and Brookhaven, USA and CERN, Switzer-land since the start of the ICCHIBAN project in the year 2002. One of the main focus points of this project is to understand the response of the applied detector systems (either active or passive) for personal and area dosimetry in space environment to a simulated sub-set of the space radiation environment, focusing on the heavy ion response. This is of special importance for the further intercomparison of space radiation data gathered by various international in-stitutes and universities for space radiation experiments as MATROSHKA, DOSIS, DOBIES, BRADOS, MATROSHKA-R etc. The ICCHIBAN experiments have created a big database of response data, especially for all the different passive radiation detectors and detector materials (Thermoluminescence (TLD) and Optical Luminescence (OSL)) over the last 7 years, resulting in a better understanding of how and why we still have differences in the measurement results from common space experiments -as the Space ICCHIBAN 2 experiment. One of the reasons why for the differences in the TLD/OSL results is the lack of intercomparison and response data for low LET particles up to around 10 keV/m, especially protons. Due to the fact, that the main contribution to absorbed dose in low earth orbit is due to protons, the ICCHIBAN working group has started the set-up of a Proton ICCHIBAN intercomparison experiment at NIRS. The Proton ICCHIBAN run has been performed at the cyclotron at NIRS, Chiba in February 2010. 15 institutes from 12 countries sent or brought their dosimeters and exposed them to 40 and 70 MeV proton beams with the same doses and exposure conditions. In this paper, the experiment procedures and current situation of the intercomparision experiments will be shown.

  16. Control Algorithms Charge Batteries Faster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    On March 29, 2011, NASA s Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft beamed a milestone image to Earth: the first photo of Mercury taken from orbit around the solar system s innermost planet. (MESSENGER is also the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury.) Like most of NASA s deep space probes, MESSENGER is enabled by a complex power system that allows its science instruments and communications to function continuously as it travels millions of miles from Earth. "Typically, there isn't one particular power source that can support the entire mission," says Linda Taylor, electrical engineer in Glenn Research Center s Power Systems Analysis Branch. "If you have solar arrays and you are in orbit, at some point you re going to be in eclipse." Because of this, Taylor explains, spacecraft like MESSENGER feature hybrid power systems. MESSENGER is powered by a two-panel solar array coupled with a nickel hydrogen battery. The solar arrays provide energy to the probe and charge the battery; when the spacecraft s orbit carries it behind Mercury and out of the Sun s light, the spacecraft switches to battery power to continue operations. Typically, hybrid systems with multiple power inputs and a battery acting alternately as storage and a power source require multiple converters to handle the power flow between the devices, Taylor says. (Power converters change the qualities of electrical energy, such as from alternating current to direct current, or between different levels of voltage or frequency.) This contributes to a pair of major concerns for spacecraft design. "Weight and size are big drivers for any space application," Taylor says, noting that every pound added to a space vehicle incurs significant costs. For an innovative solution to managing power flows in a lightweight, cost-effective manner, NASA turned to a private industry partner.

  17. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarik, D.; Byron, J.; Germer, M.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  18. Tharsis: Consequence of Mars' Dichotomy and Layered Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, M. J.; Manga, M.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    The two largest and most striking features on Mars are the crustal dichotomy, the nearly hemispheric division in topography, gravity, crustal thickness, and age, and Tharsis, a volcanic center active from the Noachian to the present. Tharsis' long-term persistence of localized volcanism is, to the best of our knowledge, unique in the solar system. Explaining the timing of Tharsis volcanism, from initiation early in martian history to recent activity, has been an enduring challenge. Here we present an model of the martian mantle that can explain early and persistent volcanism at Tharsis by incorporating the effects of the crustal dichotomy and a compositionally layered mantle. As the crust is expected to be enriched in heat-producing elements, this dichotomy in thickness leads to a dichotomous heat flux boundary condition on the mantle, which affects the internal dynamics. The evidence for layering includes the ability of a layered mantle to simultaneously meet a chondritic bulk composition and the moment-of-inertia factor (Elkins-Tanton et al., in revision), which can not be done with a one-layered mantle. In addition, studies of the martian meteorites suggest that the martian mantle is heterogeneous, a constraint that can be met with layering. We perform analog laboratory experiments with corn syrup to simulate Mars' thermal evolution. We vary the presence of a partial insulating lid, to simulate the effect of the dichotomy, and layering in the convecting fluid. We show that in the case of a layered mantle and an insulating lid, a large swell, which acts to localize upwelling plumes under the lid, forms early and endures for the scaled equivalent of billions of years. Linda T. Elkins-Tanton, E. M. Parmentier, and P. C. Hess, "Magma ocean fractional crystallization and cumulate overturn in terrestrial planets: implications for Mars," in revision for Meteoritics and Planetary Science.

  19. Sociodemographic and lifestyle statistics of oldest old people (>80 years) living in ikaria island: the ikaria study.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Chrysohoou, Christina; Siasos, Gerasimos; Zisimos, Konstantinos; Skoumas, John; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    Background. There are places around the world where people live longer and they are active past the age of 100 years, sharing common behavioral characteristics; these places (i.e., Sardinia in Italy, Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda in California and Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica) have been named the "Blue Zones". Recently it was reported that people in Ikaria Island, Greece, have also one of the highest life expectancies in the world, and joined the "Blue Zones". The aim of this work work was to evaluate various demographic, lifestyle and psychological characteristics of very old (>80 years) people participated in Ikaria Study. Methods. During 2009, 1420 people (aged 30+) men and women from Ikaria Island, Greece, were voluntarily enrolled in the study. For this work, 89 males and 98 females over the age of 80 yrs were studied (13% of the sample). Socio-demographic, clinical, psychological and lifestyle characteristics were assessed using standard questionnaires and procedures. Results. A large proportion of the Ikaria Study's sample was over the age of 80; moreover, the percent of people over 90 were much higher than the European population average. The majority of the oldest old participants reported daily physical activities, healthy eating habits, avoidance of smoking, frequent socializing, mid-day naps and extremely low rates of depression. Conclusion. Modifiable risk factors, such as physical activity, diet, smoking cessation and mid-day naps, might depict the "secrets" of the long-livers; these findings suggest that the interaction of environmental, behavioral together with clinical characteristics may determine longevity. This concept must be further explored in order to understand how these factors relate and which are the most important in shaping prolonged life. PMID:21403883

  20. Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Statistics of Oldest Old People (>80 Years) Living in Ikaria Island: The Ikaria Study

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Chrysohoou, Christina; Siasos, Gerasimos; Zisimos, Konstantinos; Skoumas, John; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    Background. There are places around the world where people live longer and they are active past the age of 100 years, sharing common behavioral characteristics; these places (i.e., Sardinia in Italy, Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda in California and Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica) have been named the “Blue Zones”. Recently it was reported that people in Ikaria Island, Greece, have also one of the highest life expectancies in the world, and joined the “Blue Zones”. The aim of this work work was to evaluate various demographic, lifestyle and psychological characteristics of very old (>80 years) people participated in Ikaria Study. Methods. During 2009, 1420 people (aged 30+) men and women from Ikaria Island, Greece, were voluntarily enrolled in the study. For this work, 89 males and 98 females over the age of 80 yrs were studied (13% of the sample). Socio-demographic, clinical, psychological and lifestyle characteristics were assessed using standard questionnaires and procedures. Results. A large proportion of the Ikaria Study's sample was over the age of 80; moreover, the percent of people over 90 were much higher than the European population average. The majority of the oldest old participants reported daily physical activities, healthy eating habits, avoidance of smoking, frequent socializing, mid-day naps and extremely low rates of depression. Conclusion. Modifiable risk factors, such as physical activity, diet, smoking cessation and mid-day naps, might depict the “secrets” of the long-livers; these findings suggest that the interaction of environmental, behavioral together with clinical characteristics may determine longevity. This concept must be further explored in order to understand how these factors relate and which are the most important in shaping prolonged life. PMID:21403883

  1. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-10

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)

  2. The impact of second-hand tobacco smoke exposure on pregnancy outcomes, infant health, and the threat of third-hand smoke exposure to our environment and to our children.

    PubMed

    Merritt, T Allen; Mazela, Jan; Adamczak, Aleksandra; Merritt, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with various adverse effects on pregnancy and fetal development, carries a lot of serious complications such as spontaneous abortion, placental abruption, and reduced birth weight of the newborn. Children of smoking mothers have an increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome and respiratory diseases during infancy. Smoking also causes long-term risk of maternal health problems such as: heart disease, cancer, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and higher mortality rate. Because women are more likely to quit smoking during pregnancy than at any other time, there are attempts to increase motivation and help them to stop smoking at the procreative phase of their life. The article describes interventions that are carried out in Loma Linda, where the educational program "When You Smoke Your Baby Smokes" reminds parents about the health effects of smoking during pregnancy and harmful impact on child's health caused by second-hand smoke. Another threat to health and environment of our children, is the nicotine coming from indirect exposure to tobacco smoke. Residual nicotine that persists in high concentrations on the interior surfaces, including clothing, is forming in the reaction of nitric acid carcinogenic compounds of specific nitrosamines. In addition, ozone and related atmospheric oxidants react with nicotine smoke or smoke coming from the second-hand smoke, giving the smallest particles with high risk of asthma. Efforts towards reducing exposure to tobacco smoke coming from the passive and indirect smoking should be placed at a high priority throughout the European Union. PMID:23421018

  3. HUBBLE MEASURES VELOCITY OF GAS ORBITING BLACK HOLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A schematic diagram of velocity measurements of a rotating disk of hot gas in the core of active galaxy M87. The measurement was made by studying how the light from the disk is redshifted and blueshifted -- as part of the swirling disk spins in earth's direction and the other side spins away from earth. The gas on one side of the disk is speeding away from Earth, at a speed of about 1.2 million miles per hour (550 kilometers per second). The gas on the other side of the disk is orbiting around at the same speed, but in the opposite direction, as it approaches viewers on Earth. This high velocity is the signature of the tremendous gravitational field at the center of M87. This is clear evidence that the region harbors a massive black hole, since it contains only a fraction of the number of stars that would be necessary to create such a powerful attraction. A black hole is an object that is so massive yet compact nothing can escape its gravitational pull, not even light. The object at the center of M87 fits that description. It weights as much as three billion suns, but is concentrated into a space no larger than our solar system. The observations were made with HST's Faint Object Spectrograph. Credit: Holland Ford, Space Telescope Science Institute/Johns Hopkins University; Richard Harms, Applied Research Corp.; Zlatan Tsvetanov, Arthur Davidsen, and Gerard Kriss at Johns Hopkins; Ralph Bohlin and George Hartig at Space Telescope Science Institute; Linda Dressel and Ajay K. Kochhar at Applied Research Corp. in Landover, Md.; and Bruce Margon from the University of Washington in Seattle. NASA PHOTO CAPTION STScI-PR94-23b

  4. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  5. Astronauts Visit LaRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Linda M. Godwin, trains with the Mir Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP) in a NASA Langley Research Center clean room. During a space walk in late March 1996, STS-76 astronauts Godwin and Michael R. Clifford will attach the four MEEP experiments to handrails on the shuttle docking module of the Russian space station Mir. Once they have attached the four MEEP experiment containers to Mir, Godwin and Clifford will open the containers to expose the experiment materials to space and orbital debris. MEEP will remain attached to Mir until late 1997, when the four experiment containers will be retrieved by another space shuttle crew (STS-86) and returned to Earth for study. The four experiment containers that make up MEEP will be attached to the outside of the Russian space station to study how often space debris strike the station and the effects of those collisions. MEEP will study both human-made and natural debris. MEEP will also expose selected and proposed International Space Station materials to the effects of space and orbital debris. These materials include paint samples, glass coatings, multi-layer insulation and a variety of metallic samples. Flying MEEP aboard Mir is the best way to test materials for the International Space Station because the new space station will be placed in approximately the same Earth orbit as Mir. The four MEEP experiments are contained in four separate Passive Experiment Carriers (PEC). Each PEC consists of a sidewall carrier for attachment to the payload bay of Atlantis (STS-76), a handrail clamp for attachment to the Mir shuttle docking module, and the experiment container to house the individual experiment. The four PEC handrail clamps will be stored in a Spacehab locker aboard Atlantis and will be used to orient the MEEP experiments during the spacewalk. The PECs were designed and built at NASA Langley Research Center. NASA Langley, which manages the MEEP project, was also responsible for ensuring that the MEEP

  6. Leakage and scatter radiation from a double scattering based proton beamline.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Benton, E R; Ghebremedhin, A; Coutrakon, G

    2008-01-01

    Proton beams offer several advantages over conventional radiation techniques for treating cancer and other diseases. These advantages might be negated if the leakage and scatter radiation from the beamline and patient are too large. Although the leakage and scatter radiation for the double scattering proton beamlines at the Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Facility were measured during the acceptance testing that occurred in the early 1990s, recent discussions in the radiotherapy community have prompted a reinvestigation of this contribution to the dose equivalent a patient receives. The dose and dose equivalent delivered to a large phantom patient outside a primary proton field were determined using five methods: simulations using Monte Carlo calculations, measurements with silver halide film, measurements with ionization chambers, measurements with rem meters, and measurements with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. The Monte Carlo dose distribution was calculated in a coronal plane through the simulated patient that coincided with the central axis of the beam. Measurements with the ionization chambers, rem meters, and plastic nuclear track detectors were made at multiple locations within the same coronal plane. Measurements with the film were done in a plane perpendicular to the central axis of the beam and coincident with the surface of the phantom patient. In general, agreement between the five methods was good, but there were some differences. Measurements and simulations also tended to be in agreement with the original acceptance testing measurements and results from similar facilities published in the literature. Simulations illustrated that most of the neutrons entering the patient are produced in the final patient-specific aperture and precollimator just upstream of the aperture, not in the scattering system. These new results confirm that the dose equivalents received by patients outside the primary proton field from primary particles that leak

  7. Leakage and scatter radiation from a double scattering based proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Benton, E. R.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Coutrakon, G.

    2008-01-15

    Proton beams offer several advantages over conventional radiation techniques for treating cancer and other diseases. These advantages might be negated if the leakage and scatter radiation from the beamline and patient are too large. Although the leakage and scatter radiation for the double scattering proton beamlines at the Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Facility were measured during the acceptance testing that occurred in the early 1990s, recent discussions in the radiotherapy community have prompted a reinvestigation of this contribution to the dose equivalent a patient receives. The dose and dose equivalent delivered to a large phantom patient outside a primary proton field were determined using five methods: simulations using Monte Carlo calculations, measurements with silver halide film, measurements with ionization chambers, measurements with rem meters, and measurements with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. The Monte Carlo dose distribution was calculated in a coronal plane through the simulated patient that coincided with the central axis of the beam. Measurements with the ionization chambers, rem meters, and plastic nuclear track detectors were made at multiple locations within the same coronal plane. Measurements with the film were done in a plane perpendicular to the central axis of the beam and coincident with the surface of the phantom patient. In general, agreement between the five methods was good, but there were some differences. Measurements and simulations also tended to be in agreement with the original acceptance testing measurements and results from similar facilities published in the literature. Simulations illustrated that most of the neutrons entering the patient are produced in the final patient-specific aperture and precollimator just upstream of the aperture, not in the scattering system. These new results confirm that the dose equivalents received by patients outside the primary proton field from primary particles that leak

  8. Experimental study of the hydrogeochemical properties of the Hontomin cap rock under CO2 supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep M.; Davila, Gabriela; Luquot, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Gabriela Dávila, Linda Luquot, Jordi Cama and Josep M. Soler Departament de Geociències, Institut de Diagnosi Ambiental i Estudis de l'Aigua (IDAEA), CSIC, Barcelona 08034. The main cap rock for CO2 injection at the PDT Hontomin site (Spain) is a marly shale made up of calcite (56 %), quartz (21%), illite (17%) clinochlore (3%) and others (albite, gypsum, anhydrite, pyrite) (~3%). Contact with CO2-rich acid brines may induce the dissolution of these minerals. Since the brine contains sulfate, gypsum (or anhydrite at depth) may precipitate, which may coat the surface of the dissolving calcite grains and cause their passivation. These mineral reactions will also induce changes in porosity and permeability. Percolation laboratory experiments with Hontomin shale rock cores under controlled pCO2 (8 MPa) are being performed to quantify these processes. In mechanically fractured cores (7.5 mm in diameter and 18 mm in length), two synthetic brines (a sulfate-free solution and a version of the Hontomin formation brine (sulfate solution)) were injected into the rock at constant flow rates (0.2, 1 and 60 mL/h) under CO2 supercritical conditions (pCO2 = 8 MPa and T = 60 °C). As the pH of the injecting brines in equilibrium with a pCO2 of 8 MPa is acidic (~3), it was observed that in the case of the sulfate-free brine experiments, the main processes that yield variation in the hydrodynamic behavior of the fractured rock was the dissolution of calcite, Si-bearing minerals, clinochlore and pyrite. In the sulfate-rich brine experiments, the dissolution of calcite and Si-bearing minerals also occurred, together with gypsum precipitation in the experiments run at low flow rates. As a result, initial fracture permeability tends (i) to stabilize or increase when the cap rock interacts with the sulfate-free brine and (ii) to decrease as the rock interacts with the sulfate-rich brine. The interpretation (reactive transport modeling) of the changes in mineralogy and solution

  9. Introduction to the Proceedings of the 9th ISDH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, V. Michael, Jr.; Riskin, Seth

    2013-02-01

    The Proceedings As co-chairs of the 9th International Symposium on Display Holography, we welcome readers of this collection of papers and posters presented at the event. We hope that both attendees of the event and others pursuing the art, science, and business of holography and 3D imaging will find the authors' contributions of lasting interest and importance. The Event Since its creation at Lake Forest College in 1982 by Professor Tung H Jeong, ISDH has followed a model that differentiates it from other scientific conferences. The 9th ISDH continued this history, fully occupying a floor of the MIT Media Lab for five days. The single-track conference opened with reports on the state of holography in the various nations represented by the attendees, followed by a series of presentations on Education and Holography. One and one-half days of papers on Art and Holography followed, then sessions on Techniques and Materials, Digital Techniques, and Commercial and Applied Holography. A poster session permitted more in-depth discussion between authors and the audience. Two exhibitions of holographic works opened at ISDH: an informal display area at the symposium, and a 15-month-long MIT Museum exhibition, The Jeweled Net: Views of Contemporary Holography. The success of an event of this sort requires the help of many people and organizations. We wish especially to recognize our Honorary Conference Chairs: Tung H Jeong and Joseph W Goodman; our Technical Program Committee: Hans I Bjelkhagen, Frank Fan, Nasser Peyghambarian, and Hiroshi Yoshikawa; and our Arts and Exhibition Committee: Betsy Connors-Chen, Melissa Crenshaw, John Durant, Dieter Jung, Linda Law, Martin Richardson, Jonathan Ross, and Sally Weber. Betsy also coordinated the on-site exhibition. Kristin Hall at the MIT Media Lab made local arrangements, while registration was handled by MIT Conference Services. We also gratefully acknowledge support from Lake Forest College, holographer.org, and authentibrand

  10. The brain on itself: Nobel laureates and the history of fundamental nervous system function.

    PubMed

    Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2007-11-01

    terminated by reuptake. This review does not include 21st century laureates, although the prize has already been given to neuroscientists twice this century; Arvid Carlsson, Paul Greengard, and Eric Kandel received the award in 2000 for their discoveries related to signal transduction, and Richard Axel and Linda Buck received the award in 2004 for their work in the field of odorant receptors and the organization of the olfactory system. PMID:18091266

  11. Development of a responsive and constructivist portfolio-based assessment of a writing-to-learn curriculum in introductory astronomy: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Mary

    As the primary evaluator of a National Science Foundation grant-supported project to develop an introductory, writing-to-learn-based astronomy curriculum, my goal was to help design and test materials that would meet the learning needs of non-science majors, especially women and minorities, and promote their science literacy. My immediate problem was to create a context-sensitive assessment that engages teachers' goals and objectives while reconciling these with the diverse needs, interests, and abilities of students. To that end, I developed a responsive or stakeholder-focused constructivist assessment based upon Guba and Lincoln's fourth generation evaluation. Both responsive and constructivist, my-approach reflects recent developments in sociocognitive theories of writing and learning, especially those by Linda Flower. Flower focuses on the literate act or learning task, such as writing a summary, as the basic unit of analysis. Not the act itself but the "site" at which it occurs is of main interest. This is where the tension between the private "self" and the public "other" provides an opportunity for meaning to evolve as students explore alternate writing and learning strategies through inner acts of negotiation. Because the new astronomy curriculum centered around students keeping a learning log or process portfolio, portfolios afforded the ideal documentary evidence of the site at which students negotiate meanings and strategies. The portfolio-based assessment, therefore, centers upon having evaluators or teacher-researchers identify and interpret how students represent learning tasks to themselves and develop strategies to complete these tasks. Researchers next compare and judge their own interpretations of these behaviors according to the pre-ordinate objectives of the curriculum. Then the key stakeholders (i.e., evaluators, students, and teachers), through hermeneutic and dialectic interchanges, reconstruct or recondition these pre-ordmate evaluation

  12. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  13. Prescription drug abuse: what is being done to address this new drug epidemic? Testimony before the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2006-10-01

    This comprehensive health policy review of the prescription drug abuse epidemic is based on the written and oral testimony of witnesses at a July 26, 2006 Congressional Hearing, including that of Laxmaiah Manchikanti, MD, the chief executive officer of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians and additions from review of the literature. Honorable Mark E. Souder, chairman of the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy, and Human Resources, introduced the issue as follows: "Prescription drug abuse today is second only to marijuana abuse. In the most recent household survey, initiates to drug abuse started with prescription drugs (especially pain medications) more often than with marijuana. The abuse of prescription drugs is facilitated by easy access (via physicians, the Internet, and the medicine cabinet) and a perception of safety (since the drugs are FDA approved). In addition to the personal toll of drug abuse using prescription drugs, indirect costs associated with prescription drug abuse and diversion include product theft, commission of other crimes to support addiction, law enforcement costs, and encouraging the practice of defensive medicine." The Administration witnesses, Bertha Madras, Nora D. Volkow, MD, Sandra Kweder, MD, and Joe Rannazzisi reviewed the problem of drug abuse and discussed what is being done at the present time as well as future strategies to combat drug abuse, including prescription drug monitoring programs, reducing malprescriptions, public education, eliminating Internet drug pharmacies, and the development of future drugs which are not only tamper-resistant but also non-addictive. The second panel, consisting of consumers and advocates, included Misty Fetco, Linda Surks, and Barbara van Rooyan, all of whom lost their children to drugs, presented their stories and strategies to prevent drug abuse, focusing on education at all levels, development of resistant drugs, and non-opioid treatment of chronic pain. Mathea

  14. Space radiation shielding studies for astronaut and electronic component risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jordan; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment is comprised of a complex and variable mix of high energy charged particles, gamma rays and other exotic species. Elements of this radiation field may also interact with intervening matter (such as a spaceship wall) and create secondary radiation particles such as neutrons. Some of the components of the space radiation environment are highly penetrating and can cause adverse effects in humans and electronic components aboard spacecraft. Developing and testing materials capable of providing effective shielding against the space radiation environment presents special challenges to researchers. Researchers at the Cen-ter for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View AM University (PVAMU) perform accelerator based experiments testing the effectiveness of various materials for use as space radiation shields. These experiments take place at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory where charged particles and neutrons are produced at energies similar to those found in the space radiation environment. The work presented in this paper constitutes the beginning phase of an undergraduate research project created to contribute to this ongoing space radiation shielding project. Specifically, this student project entails devel-oping and maintaining a database of information concerning the historical data from shielding experiments along with a systematic categorization and storage system for the actual shielding materials. The shielding materials referred to here range in composition from standard materi-als such as high density polyethylene and aluminum to exotic multifunctional materials such as spectra-fiber infused composites. The categorization process for each material includes deter-mination of the density thickness of individual

  15. Ortho stops marketing Lippes Loop; cites economic factors.

    PubMed

    1985-11-01

    Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation has stopped marketing the Lippes Loop IUD, the only inert IUD currently available in the US. The firm cited "economic considerations" as its reason. Linda Organ, company spokeswoman, told Contraceptive Technology Update (CTU) that the number of women using IUDs has declined in the past few years and, as a result, Ortho's Lippes Loop sales dropped. Most physicians, according to Organ, currently prescribe copper-bearing IUDs. Few devices have been studied as thoroughly before marketing as the Lippes Loop, according to its developer, Dr. Jack Lippes. Lippes told CTU that the Population Council analyzed 40,000 women from 1962 to 1968 and "found no trouble with the Loop." Lippes attributes Ortho's recent decision to 2 factors: the IUD has been only "marginally profitable" and the problems of A.H. Robins with the Dalkon Shield has most likely had an effect; and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a proposed rule in August 1985 that would require any company wanting to manufacture and market IUDs like the Lippes Loop to submit a premarketing approval application to that agency. In effect, the FDA's rule would only apply to the Lippes Loop. Under the proposed rule, any company wanting to market Lippes Loops, or any nondrug IUD, would have to submit an application to the FDA with a detailed discussion and supporting clinical studies addressing the following concerns: pelvic actinomycosis; tubal infertility; duration that the IUD should remain in situ; and safety of leaving the IUD in situ when contraception is no longer indicated. According to Lillian Yin, FDA device evaluation, the clinical effectiveness and most of the safety issues regarding inert IUDs have been thoroughly covered in published data. She told CTU that "most of the information needed is straightforward, but the part that's new involves the long term use infection rate." Yin indicated that the FDA received a letter from Ortho advising the agency of the

  16. Cases of Coastal Zone Change and Land Use/Land Cover Change: a learning module that goes beyond the "how" of doing image processing and change detection to asking the "why" about what are the "driving forces" of global change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    In 2006 the Loma Linda University ESSE21 Mesoamerican Project (Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century) along with partners such as the University of Redlands and California State University, Pomona, produced an online learning module that is designed to help students learn critical remote sensing skills-- specifically: ecosystem characterization, i.e. doing a supervised or unsupervised classification of satellite imagery in a tropical coastal environment. And, it would teach how to measure land use / land cover change (LULC) over time and then encourage students to use that data to assess the Human Dimensions of Global Change (HDGC). Specific objectives include: 1. Learn where to find remote sensing data and practice downloading, pre-processing, and "cleaning" the data for image analysis. 2. Use Leica-Geosystems ERDAS Imagine or IDRISI Kilimanjaro to analyze and display the data. 3. Do an unsupervised classification of a LANDSAT image of a protected area in Honduras, i.e. Cuero y Salado, Pico Bonito, or Isla del Tigre. 4. Virtually participate in a ground-validation exercise that would allow one to re-classify the image into a supervised classification using the FAO Global Land Cover Network (GLCN) classification system. 5. Learn more about each protected area's landscape, history, livelihood patterns and "sustainability" issues via virtual online tours that provide ground and space photos of different sites. This will help students in identifying potential "training sites" for doing a supervised classification. 6. Study other global, US, Canadian, and European land use/land cover classification systems and compare their advantages and disadvantages over the FAO/GLCN system. 7. Learn to appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of existing LULC classification schemes and adapt them to local-level user needs. 8. Carry out a change detection exercise that shows how land use and/or land cover has changed over time for the protected area of your choice

  17. The Venus "Shell-over-Star" hieroglyph and Maya warfare: An examination of the interpretation of a Mayan symbol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Claudia Ann

    For decades, Maya scholars have associated the Mayan "Shell-Star" (also referred to as "Star-War") hieroglyph with Maya warfare. Put forward by scholars such as Floyd Lounsbury and David Kelley, and later advanced by Linda Schele, David Freidel, Ian Graham, Peter Matthews, Anthony Aveni and others, there are now dozens of published articles and chapters relating the hieroglyph to Venus and warfare. Venus is one of the most notable celestial objects outside of the Sun and Moon and was highly visible to the inhabitants of the Maya world. The Dresden Codex (an astronomical almanac) contains important information about the planet Venus, and the calendar section was deciphered by the librarian and mathematician, Ernst Förstemann in the late 1800s. In his decipherment, he deduced that the numbers contained in the tables must be connected to the orbital period of the planet. There is no other planet with the same orbital period 3 as Venus. Förstemann suggested that the decoded astronomy tables were used by the Maya to determine when to wage war. This interpretation, along with others, like Floyd Lounsbury`s study of Venus and the Long Count date at Bonampak were the seeds that have led to methodological errors that first began to take root in Maya research. The idea of the Venus association with warfare took hold and continues to propagate. Many scholars continue to assert that the "shell-star" glyph is related to warfare events. Others, like Gerardo Aldana, and Stanley Guenter, have recently come forward to reexamine and question the hieroglyph and its relationship, if any, to Maya warfare. I suggest, further, that methodological errors may have occurred along the way. I propose that these errors include data lost in translation, and inaccurate translations. In addition, the statistical analysis of Venus cycles has weak points. If this identification of the errors is correct, we need to re-evaluate the weakened foundation on which we are building our assertions about

  18. Radiation Shielding of Lunar Regolith/Polyethylene Composites and Lunar Regolith/Water Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Quincy F.; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Zhou, Jianren

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is a complex mixed field of ionizing radiation that can pose hazardous risks to sophisticated electronics and humans. Mission planning for lunar exploration and long duration habitat construction will face tremendous challenges of shielding against various types of space radiation in an attempt to minimize the detrimental effects it may have on materials, electronics, and humans. In late 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) discovered that water content in lunar regolith found in certain areas on the moon can be up to 5.6 +/-2.8 weight percent (wt%) [A. Colaprete, et. al., Science, Vol. 330, 463 (2010). ]. In this work, shielding studies were performed utilizing ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and aluminum, both being standard space shielding materials, simulated lunar regolith/ polyethylene composites, and simulated lunar regolith mixed with UHMWPE particles and water. Based on the LCROSS findings, radiation shielding experiments were conducted to test for shielding efficiency of regolith/UHMWPE/water mixtures with various percentages of water to compare relative shielding characteristics of these materials. One set of radiation studies were performed using the proton synchrotron at the Loma Linda Medical University where high energy protons similar to those found on the surface of the moon can be generated. A similar experimental protocol was also used at a high energy spalation neutron source at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). These experiments studied the shielding efficiency against secondary neutrons, another major component of space radiation field. In both the proton and neutron studies, shielding efficiency was determined by utilizing a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) behind various thicknesses of shielding composite panels or mixture materials. Preliminary results from these studies indicated that adding 2 wt% water to regolith particles could increase shielding of

  19. Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. D.; Mittleman, A.; Taghavy, A.; Fortner, J.; Lantagne, D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media Anjuliee M. Mittelman, Amir Taghavy, Yonggang Wang, John D. Fortner, Daniele S. Lantagne, Linda M. Abriola and Kurt D. Pennell* Detailed knowledge of the processes governing nanoparticle transport and reactivity in porous media is essential for accurate predictions of environmental fate, water and wastewater treatment system performance, and assessment of potential risks to ecosystems and water supplies. To address these issues, an interdisciplinary research team combined experimental and mathematical modeling studies to investigate the mobility, dissolution, and aging of silver nanoparticles (nAg) in representative aquifer materials and ceramic filters. Results of one-dimensional column studies, conducted with water-saturated sands maintained at pH 4 or 7 and three levels of dissolved oxygen (DO), revealed that fraction of silver mass eluted as Ag+ increased with increasing DO level, and that the dissolution of attached nAg decreased over time as a result of surface oxidation. A hybrid Eulerain-Lagragian nanoparticle transport model, which incorporates DO-dependent dissolution kinetics and particle aging, was able to accurately simulate nAg mobility and Ag+ release measured in the column experiments. Model sensitivity analysis indicated that as the flow velocity and particle size decrease, nAg dissolution and Ag+ transport processes increasingly govern silver mobility. Consistent results were obtained in studies of ceramic water filters treated with nAg, where silver elution was shown to be governed by nAg dissolution to form Ag+ and subsequent cation exchange reactions. Recent studies explored the effects of surface coating aging on nAg aggregation, mobility and dissolution. Following ultraviolet light, nAg retention in water saturated sand increased by 25-50%, while up to 50% of the applied mass eluted as Ag+ compared to less than 1% for un-aged n

  20. Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. D.; Mittleman, A.; Taghavy, A.; Fortner, J.; Lantagne, D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media Anjuliee M. Mittelman, Amir Taghavy, Yonggang Wang, John D. Fortner, Daniele S. Lantagne, Linda M. Abriola and Kurt D. Pennell* Detailed knowledge of the processes governing nanoparticle transport and reactivity in porous media is essential for accurate predictions of environmental fate, water and wastewater treatment system performance, and assessment of potential risks to ecosystems and water supplies. To address these issues, an interdisciplinary research team combined experimental and mathematical modeling studies to investigate the mobility, dissolution, and aging of silver nanoparticles (nAg) in representative aquifer materials and ceramic filters. Results of one-dimensional column studies, conducted with water-saturated sands maintained at pH 4 or 7 and three levels of dissolved oxygen (DO), revealed that fraction of silver mass eluted as Ag+ increased with increasing DO level, and that the dissolution of attached nAg decreased over time as a result of surface oxidation. A hybrid Eulerain-Lagragian nanoparticle transport model, which incorporates DO-dependent dissolution kinetics and particle aging, was able to accurately simulate nAg mobility and Ag+ release measured in the column experiments. Model sensitivity analysis indicated that as the flow velocity and particle size decrease, nAg dissolution and Ag+ transport processes increasingly govern silver mobility. Consistent results were obtained in studies of ceramic water filters treated with nAg, where silver elution was shown to be governed by nAg dissolution to form Ag+ and subsequent cation exchange reactions. Recent studies explored the effects of surface coating aging on nAg aggregation, mobility and dissolution. Following ultraviolet light, nAg retention in water saturated sand increased by 25-50%, while up to 50% of the applied mass eluted as Ag+ compared to less than 1% for un-aged n

  1. Lesson's-learned from a 2003-2006 USA-Honduras NGO and University Geosciences Education Partnership in Land use Land / Land Cover Change Analysis using Remote Sensing and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2006 the Loma Linda University ESSE21 Mesoamerican Project (Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century) collaborated with a series of academic, NGO (nongovernmental) and government agencies, including a USAID (United States Agency for International Development) integrated environmental resource management project to: a) build the human and technical capacity of local partners in the use of geospatial technologies, e.g. GIS, GPS, Remote Sensing, b) improve their capacity to apply these tools to biodiversity, health, sustainability, protected-area management, and other NRM (Natural Resource Management) decision-making needs and problems, and c) establish long term institutional relationships for teacher/student exchange, including development of joint curricula and research projects focused on health geoinformatics as well as sustainable development. Much of this has contributed toward a new "geotourism" effort adopted by Honduras called the SAVE Honduras strategy (Scientific, Academic, Volunteer, Educational). A central element of this initiative is to increase joint collaborative research and learning together by students and faculty at US universities working with Honduran institutions (private and public). See SAVE Strategy page = http://www.fundacionsave.com/home_eng.html In the presentation we describe our experience over the last three years collaborating with key partners such as the Central American Observatory of Suyapa based at the UNAH (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras) which has opened a new GIS/Remote Sensing Laboratory. We also collaborated closely with CURLA (Centro Universitario Regional del Litoral Atlántico) located near La Ceiba--a land grant-type institution- -to support outreach and extension activities by students and staff to local-level NGOs and community groups dealing with conservation, hazards mitigation, biodiversity, fisheries and related problems. We have also participated in joint "informal

  2. Tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetry measurements utililzed aboard aircraft and in accelerator based space radiation shielding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment presents a potential hazard to the humans, electronics and materials that are exposed to it. Particle accelerator facilities such as the NASA Space Ra-diation Laboratory (NSRL) and Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) provide particle radiation of specie and energy within the range of that found in the space radiation environment. Experiments performed at these facilities determine various endpoints for bio-logical, electronic and materials exposures. A critical factor in the performance of rigorous scientific studies of this type is accurate dosimetric measurements of the exposures. A Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a microdosimeter that may be used to measure absorbed dose, average quality factor (Q) and dose equivalent of the particle beam utilized in these experiments. In this work, results from a variety of space radiation shielding studies where a TEPC was used to perform dosimetry in the particle beam will be presented. These results compare the absorbed dose and dose equivalent measured downstream of equal density thicknesses of stan-dard and multifunctional shielding materials. The standard materials chosen for these shielding studies included High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and aluminum alloy, while the multifunc-tional materials included carbon composite infused with single walled carbon nanotubes. High energy particles including proton, silicon and iron nuclei were chosen as the incident radia-tion for these studies. Further, TEPC results from measurements taken during flights aboard ER-2 and KC-135 aircraft will also be discussed. Results from these flight studies include TEPC measurements for shielded and unshielded conditions as well as the effect of vibration and electromagnetic exposures on the TEPC operation. The data selected for presentation will highlight the utility of the TEPC in space radiation studies, and in shielding studies in particular. The lineal energy response function of the

  3. A Fault Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment

    SciTech Connect

    McKie, Jim

    2014-11-20

    The FOX project, funded under the ASCR X-stack I program, developed systems software and runtime libraries for a new approach to the data and work distribution for massively parallel, fault oblivious application execution. Our work was motivated by the premise that exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today’s machines. To deliver the capability of exascale hardware, the systems software must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. Our OS research has prototyped new methods to provide efficient resource sharing, synchronization, and protection in a many-core compute node. We have experimented with alternative task/dataflow programming models and shown scalability in some cases to hundreds of thousands of cores. Much of our software is in active development through open source projects. Concepts from FOX are being pursued in next generation exascale operating systems. Our OS work focused on adaptive, application tailored OS services optimized for multi → many core processors. We developed a new operating system NIX that supports role-based allocation of cores to processes which was released to open source. We contributed to the IBM FusedOS project, which promoted the concept of latency-optimized and throughput-optimized cores. We built a task queue library based on distributed, fault tolerant key-value store and identified scaling issues. A second fault tolerant task parallel library was developed, based on the Linda tuple space model, that used low level interconnect primitives for optimized communication. We designed fault tolerance mechanisms for task parallel computations

  4. The Impact of Discovering Life beyond Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    risks, impacts and plans Margaret Race; 18. Searching for extraterrestrial intelligence: preparing for an expected paradigm break Michael A. G. Michaud; 19. SETI in non-western perspective John Traphagan and Julian W. Traphagan; 20. The allure of alien life: public and media framings of extraterrestrial life Linda Billings; 21. Internalizing null extraterrestrial 'signals': an astrobiological app for a technological society Eric Chaisson; Index.

  5. Efficiency of clinorotation usage on virus-infected seed potatoes for its improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Ivan; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Dunich, Alina; Mishchenko, Anatoliy; Boiko, Anatolii

    organization, and physiological balances. Using microgravity simulated in the clinostats, it is possible to investigate the effects of this factor on the relationships in the system “virus - host plant”. This problem remains important as its solution allows to discover a wider set of techniques allowing to obtain plants free from viral infections. The possibility of the WSMV (wheat steak mosaic virus) elimination in wheat plants under the influence of simulated microgravity has been demonstrated in our works. The study of this phenomenon allowed to admit that the freeing of plants from viral infection under the impact of simulated microgravity occurs in the process of induced resistance formation. In our further research activities, we used potato plants for which the elimination of viral infections is of exceptional importance. Viruses transmitted mechanically have to use a vascular system to move all over the plant and, finally, into the tubers. The factors limiting this movability will at certain moments of plant growth favor the elimination of virus in certain parts of the plant. Introduction of tissues from such parts into in vitro cultures allows to regenerate virus-free plants. Еру efficiency of tissue culture in combination with clonal micro multiplication in vitro allows to obtain up to 1 mln plants from a single one in half a year. Such a productivity of a new technology allowed to prognosticate the potato production in vitro in the world on the level of 212 mln plantlets per year. But today, according to some estimates the in vitro potato production may be achieved with lower expenditures on plant remediation and freeing of the cultivars from viral infection. Therefore the purpose of work was to probe possibilities of receiving virus free seminal material of potato at the terms of clinorotation and set of its economic efficiency. Researches of simulated microgravity influence conducted on the potato varieties Sineglazka, Crimean, Agave, Linda, Bellaroza

  6. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, Daila S.

    2008-10-31

    photons. Over the course of this research, tissues other than spleens were archived and with funding obtained from other sources, including the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, some additional assays were performed. Furthermore, groups of additional mice were included that were pre-exposed to low-dose photons before irradiating with acute photons, protons, and simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons. Hence, the original support together with the additional funding for our research led to generation of much valuable information that was originally not anticipated. Some of the data has already resulted in published articles, manuscripts in review, and a number of presentations at scientific conferences and workshops. Difficulties in reliable and reproducible quantification of secreted cytokines using multi-plex technology delayed completion of this study for a period of time. However, final analyses of the remaining data are currently being performed and should result in additional publications and presentations in the near future. Some of the most notable conclusions, thus far, are briefly summarized below: - Distribution of leukocytes were dependent upon cell type, radiation quality, body compartment analyzed, and time after exposure. Low-dose protons tended to have less effect on numbers of major leukocyte populations and T cell subsets compared to low-dose photons. - The patterns of gene and cytokine expression in CD4+ T cells after protracted low-dose irradiation were significantly modified and highly dependent upon the total dose and time after exposure. - Patterns of gene and cytokine expression differed substantially among groups exposed to low-dose photons versus low-dose protons; differences were also noted among groups exposed to much higher doses of photons, protons, and simulated SPE protons. - Some measurements indicated that exposure to low-dose photon radiation, especially 0.01 Gy, significantly

  7. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes, Applied Surface Science, 2013, 268, 261-268.) Chapter two shows how exposure to CNTs changes the biomechanical properties of fixed human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells). Specifically, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technology, we demonstrated that cellular exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 24h induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics leading to increased cellular stiffness. The MWCNTs incubation also seemed to alter the surface area of the cells. Consequently, measures of the mechanical properties of the exposed cell could be used as indicators of its biological state and could offer valuable insights into the mechanisms associated with CNTs-induced genetic instability. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Linda Sargent, Michael L Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul and Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Expose to carbon nanotubes leads to change in cellular biomechanics, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2013, 7, 945-951.) Chapter three links together the MWCNTs exposure duration, internalization and induced biomechanical changes in fixed cells. Our findings indicated that changes in biomechanical properties of the fixed cells are a function of the uptake and internalization of the MWCNTs as well as their uptake time. Specifically, short exposure time did not seem to lead to considerable changes in the elastic properties in the cellular system. However, longer cellular exposure to CNTs leads to a higher uptake and internalization of the nanotubes and a larger effect on the cell mechanics. Such changes could be related to CNTs interactions with cellular elements and could bring information on the CNT intrinsic toxicity. Chapter four talks about the potential of purified forms of CNTs with increased hydrophilicity to affect live human lung epithelial cells when used at occupational

  8. HBCUs inform students and the community about cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Green, Julian S; Williams, Deloris G; Scott, Dolores B; Madison, Shirley B; Comer, Kimberly D; Haynes, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    , some HBCUs have already begun to promote and provide the vaccination, "South Carolina State University is one of the HBCUs which provides the HPV vaccination and promotes HPV prevention. There has been a great initiative by their health center to focus prevention efforts on incoming freshman". HBCU administrations must bear in mind that beyond the campus, students will undoubtedly carry the information learned during college into the communities in which they live after graduation and moreover, utilize this information as a basis for educating their children and families. Community activist and Columbia resident Linda "T'Zima" Brown, whose 16 year-old son is considering application to Delaware State University, believes that HBCUs bear a great responsibility to the well-being of the community, "We as residents should be able to take part in the events that our black colleges have. Black colleges used to operate from a more inclusive, family approach, and we need to get back to that; plus, many HBCUs are supported with our state dollars, so the community should be able to look to them for information aside from what our children relay to us". PMID:20108714

  9. Radiation Beamline Testbeds for the Simulation of Planetary and Spacecraft Environments for Human and Robotic Mission Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the international space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  10. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    display the large num- ber of flights in which EVA played a role. This approach also makes apparent significant EVA gaps, for example, the U.S. gap between 1985 and 1991 following the Challenger accident. This NASA History Monograph is an edited extract from an extensive EVA Chronology and Reference Book being produced by the EVA Project Office, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The larger work will be published as part of the NASA Formal Series in 1998. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by Max Ary, Ashot Bakunts, Gert-Jan Bartelds, Frank Cepollina, Andrew Chaikin, Phillip Clark, Richard Fullerton, Steven Glenn, Linda Godwin, Jennifer Green, Greg Harris, Clifford Hess, Jeffrey Hoffman, David Homan, Steven Hopkins, Nicholas Johnson, Eric Jones, Neville Kidger, Joseph Kosmo, Alexei Lebedev, Mark Lee, James LeBlanc, Dmitri Leshchenskii, Jerry Linenger, Igor Lissov, James McBarron, Clay McCullough, Joseph McMann, Story Musgrave, Dennis Newkirk, James Oberg, Joel Powell, Lee Saegesser, Andy Salmon, Glen Swanson, Joseph Tatarewicz, Kathy Thornton, Chris Vandenberg, Charles Vick, Bert Vis, David Woods, Mike Wright, John Young, and Keith Zimmerman. Special thanks to Laurie Buchanan, John Charles, Janet Kovacevich, Joseph Loftus, Sue McDonald, Martha Munies, Colleen Rapp, and Jerry Ross. Any errors remain the responsibility of the authors.

  11. Radiation beamline testbeds for the simulation of planetary and spacecraft environments for human and robotic mission risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Richard

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the inter-national space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Med-ical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  12. Astronomical tuning of black cherts in the Cenomanian Scaglia Bianca as precursors of the Bonarelli level (OAE2) at Furlo, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, S. J.; Montanari, A.; Sprovieri, M.; Hilgen, F. J.; Coccioni, R.; Gale, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    chert deposition, as well as the onset of the oceanic anoxic event itself, is related to eccentricity maxima. The stable 405-kyr periodicity of eccentricity is readily discernible in the data records and can be used for tuning to the astronomical solution (Laskar et al. 2011). A total of five and a half 405-kyr cycles can be identified below the Bonarelli level, which itself comprises a 405-kyr cycle. This cyclostratigraphy can potentially be anchored to the absolute time scale by using the newly determined Cenomanian-Turonian boundary age of 93.9 ± 0.15 Ma, which is based on intercalibration of astrochronological and radioisotopic data for the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval near the GSSP in Colorado, USA (Meyers et al., 2012). Correlation to the orbitally tuned Turonian interval of the nearby Gubbio and Contessa sections in Italy (De Vleeschouwer et al., this session) allows the construction of an anchored astronomical time scale for the Cenomanian-Turonian interval of > 5 Ma. Herbert, T. D., and A. G. Fischer. 1986. "Milankovitch climatic origin of mid-Cretaceous black shale rhythms in central Italy." Nature 321 (19): 739-743. Lanci, L., G. Muttoni, and E. Erba. 2010. "Astronomical tuning of the Cenomanian Scaglia Bianca Formation at Furlo, Italy." Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Laskar, J., A. Fienga, M. Gastineau, and H. Manche. 2011. "La2010: A new orbital solution for the long term motion of the Earth." Astronomy and Astrophysics arXiv:1103.1084v1. Mitchell, Ross N., David M. Bice, Alessandro Montanari, Laura C. Cleaveland, Keith T. Christianson, Rodolfo Coccioni, and Linda A. Hinnov. 2008. "Oceanic anoxic cycles? Orbital prelude to the Bonarelli Level (OAE 2)." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 267: 1-16. Trabucho Alexandre, J., E. Tuenter, G. A Henstra, K. J van der Zwan, R. S.W van de Wal, H. A Dijkstra, and P. L de Boer. 2010. "The mid-Cretaceous North Atlantic nutrient trap: Black shales and OAEs." Paleoceanography 25 (4).

  13. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  14. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  15. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network: Monitoring building response to earthquakes through community instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Kohler, M. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Clayton, R. W.; Chandy, M.; Cochran, E.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    are used to identify the first two pairs of horizontal vibrational frequencies, which are then used to compute the response on every floor of the building, constrained by the observed data. The approach has been applied to a CSN-instrumented 12-story reinforced concrete building near downtown Los Angeles. The frequencies were identified directly from spectra of the 8 August 2012 M4.5 Yorba Linda, California earthquake acceleration time series. When the basic dimensions and the first two frequencies are input into a prismatic Timoshenko beam model of the building, the model yields mode shapes that have been shown to match well with densely recorded data. For the instrumented 12-story building, comparisons of the predictions of responses on other floors using only the record from the 9th floor with actual data from the other floors shows this method to approximate the true response remarkably well.

  16. Rings Research in the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    -based observations. Members of the Rings White Paper Team include: Matthew S. Tiscareno (Cornell U), Nicole Albers (U of Colorado), Todd Bradley (U of Central Florida), André Brahic (U of Paris, France), Shawn Brooks (JPL), Joseph Burns (Cornell U), Carlos Chavez (UNAM, Mexico), Joshua Colwell (U of Central Florida), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames), Imke de Pater (U of California), Luke Dones (SwRI), Richard Durisen (Indiana U), Michael Evans (Cornell U), Cecile Ferrari (CEA Saclay, France), Gianrico Filacchione (INAF-IASF, Italy), Silvia Giuliatti Winter (UNESP, Brazil), Mitch Gordon (SETI), Amara Graps (SwRI), Eberhard Gruen (MPI, Germany), Douglas Hamilton (U of Maryland), Matthew Hedman (Cornell U), Mihaly Horanyi (U of Colorado), Sascha Kempf (MPI, Germany), Harald Krueger (MPI, Germany), Steve Larson (U of Arizona), Mark Lewis (Trinity U), Jack Lissauer (NASA Ames), Colin Mitchell (CICLOPS/SSI), Carl Murray (QMUL, England), Philip Nicholson (Cornell U), Cathy Olkin (SwRI), Robert Pappalardo (JPL), Frank Postberg (MPI, Germany), Heikki Salo (U of Oulu, Finland), Juergen Schmidt (U of Potsdam, Germany), David Seal (JPL), Mark Showalter (SETI), Frank Spahn (U of Potsdam, Germany), Linda Spilker (JPL), Joseph Spitale (CICLOPS/SSI), Ralf Srama (MPI, Germany), Miodrag Sremcevic (U of Colorado), Glen Stewart (U of Colorado), John Weiss (Carleton College), Padma Yanamandra-Fisher (JPL)

  17. NASA/NOAA: Earth Science Electronic Theater 1999. Earth Science Observations, Analysis and Visualization: Roots in the 60s - Vision for the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz

    1999-01-01

    The Etheater presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966, to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA''s visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the NASA Goddard Visualization & Analysis Laboratory, and Scientific Visualization Studio, as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the Earth Science ETheater 1999 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Sydney, Melbourne, Honolulu, Washington, New York, and Dallas. The presentation Jan 11-14 at the AMS meeting in Dallas used a 4-CPU SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation with 8 GB RAM and a Terabyte Disk at 3840 X 1024 resolution with triple synchronized BarcoReality 9200 projectors on a 60ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense HyperImage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many new Earth sensing satellites, Hyper

  18. NASA/NOAA: Earth Science Electronic Theater 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz

    1999-01-01

    The Electronic Theater (E-theater) presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the NASA Goddard Visualization and Analysis Laboratory (VAL/912), and Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS/930), as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the Earth Science E-Theater 1999 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Sydney, Melbourne, Honolulu, Washington, New York, and Dallas. The presentation Jan 11-14 at the AMS meeting in Dallas used a 4-CPU SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation with 8 GB RAM and a Terabyte Disk at 3840 X 1024 resolution with triple synchronized BarcoReality 9200 projectors on a 60ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense HyperImage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many

  19. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    or interest. Just let us know your views! Highlights and recommendations can be found on https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ *Moon Village Workshops Organisers Team: Bernard Foing (ESA/ESTEC & ILEWG), Aidan Cowley, Guillermo Ortega, Linda van Hilten (ESA), Vid Beldavs, David Dunlop, Jim Crisafulli (International Lunar Decade), ESTEC Moon Village workshop 2015 WGs co-conveners: Peter Batenburg, Andrea Jaime, Abigail Calzada, Angeliki Kapoglou, Chris Welch, Susanne Pieterse, Daniel Esser, Audrey Berquand, Daniel Winter, Dmitri Ivanov, Simone Paternostro, Matias Hazadi, Oscar Kamps, Marloes Offringa

  20. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Effects of acid treatment on structure, properties and biocompatibility of carbon nanotubes, Applied Surface Science, 2013, 268, 261-268.) Chapter two shows how exposure to CNTs changes the biomechanical properties of fixed human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells). Specifically, by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation technology, we demonstrated that cellular exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 24h induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics leading to increased cellular stiffness. The MWCNTs incubation also seemed to alter the surface area of the cells. Consequently, measures of the mechanical properties of the exposed cell could be used as indicators of its biological state and could offer valuable insights into the mechanisms associated with CNTs-induced genetic instability. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Linda Sargent, Michael L Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul and Cerasela Zoica Dinu, Expose to carbon nanotubes leads to change in cellular biomechanics, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2013, 7, 945-951.) Chapter three links together the MWCNTs exposure duration, internalization and induced biomechanical changes in fixed cells. Our findings indicated that changes in biomechanical properties of the fixed cells are a function of the uptake and internalization of the MWCNTs as well as their uptake time. Specifically, short exposure time did not seem to lead to considerable changes in the elastic properties in the cellular system. However, longer cellular exposure to CNTs leads to a higher uptake and internalization of the nanotubes and a larger effect on the cell mechanics. Such changes could be related to CNTs interactions with cellular elements and could bring information on the CNT intrinsic toxicity. Chapter four talks about the potential of purified forms of CNTs with increased hydrophilicity to affect live human lung epithelial cells when used at occupational

  1. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis prepares to touch down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. Lucid was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 March and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards on the latter date. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was the payload commander and mission specialist-1. Other mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin, and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are

  2. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  3. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  4. The Science Behind the NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    shots of lower Manhattan and the Pentagon after the September 11 disaster as well as shots of Afghanistan from the Space Imaging IKONOS as well as debris plume images from Terra MODIS and SPOT Image. Shown by the SGI-Octane Graphics-Supercomputer are visualizations of hurricanes Michelle 2001, Floyd, Mitch, Fran and Linda. Our visualizations of these storms have been featured on the covers of the National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA's large collection of High Definition TV (HDTV) visualizations clips New visualizations of a Los Alamos global ocean model, and high-resolution results of a NASA/JPL Atlantic ocean basin model showing currents, and salinity features will be shown. El Nino/La Nina effects on sea surface temperature and sea surface height of the Pacific Ocean will also be shown. The SST simulations will be compared with GOES Gulf Stream animations and ocean productivity observations. Tours will be given of the entire Earth's land surface at 500 m resolution from recently composited Terra MODIS data, Visualizations will be shown from the Earth Science Etheater 2001 recently presented over the last years in New Zealand, Johannesburg, Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Sydney, Melbourne, Honolulu, Washington, New York City, Pasadena, UCAR/Boulder, and Penn State University. The presentation will use a 2-CPU SGI/CRAY Octane Super Graphics workstation with 4 GB RAM and terabyte disk array at 2048 x 768 resolution plus multimedia laptop with three high resolution projectors. Visualizations will also be featured from museum exhibits and presentations including: the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, IMAX theater at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, the James Lovell Discovery World Science museum in Milwaukee, the American Museum of Natural History (NYC) Hayden Planetarium IMAX theater, etc. The Etheater is sponsored by NASA, NOAA and the American Meteorological Society. This presentation is brought to

  5. The Science Behind the NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    shots of lower Manhattan and the Pentagon after the September 11 disaster as well as shots of Afghanistan from the Space Imaging IKONOS as well as debris plume images from Terra MODIS and SPOT Image. Shown by the SGI-Octane Graphics-Supercomputer are visualizations of hurricanes Michelle 2001, Floyd, Mitch, Fran and Linda. Our visualizations of these storms have been featured on the covers of the National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA's large collection of High Definition TV (HDTV) visualizations clips New visualizations of a Los Alamos global ocean model, and high-resolution results of a NASA/JPL Atlantic ocean basin model showing currents, and salinity features will be shown. El Nino/La Nina effects on sea surface temperature and sea surface height of the Pacific Ocean will also be shown. The SST simulations will be compared with GOES Gulf Stream animations and ocean productivity observations. Tours will be given of the entire Earth's land surface at 500 m resolution from recently composited Terra MODIS data, Visualizations will be shown from the Earth Science Etheater 2001 recently presented over the last years in New Zealand, Johannesburg, Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Sydney, Melbourne, Honolulu, Washington, New York City, Pasadena, UCAR/Boulder, and Penn State University. The presentation will use a 2-CPU SGI/CRAY Octane Super Graphics workstation with 4 GB RAM and terabyte disk array at 2048 x 768 resolution plus multimedia laptop with three high resolution projectors. Visualizations will also be featured from museum exhibits and presentations including: the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, IMAX theater at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, the James Lovell Discovery World Science museum in Milwaukee, the American Museum of Natural History (NYC) Hayden Planetarium IMAX theater, etc. The Etheater is sponsored by NASA, NOAA and the American Meteorological Society. This presentation is brought to

  6. Teaching mental health skills to general practitioners and medical officers.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David; Gask, Linda

    2002-01-01

    postgraduates to practice each skill they wish to learn, and other support materials. There is also a paper written by ourselves in association with Norman Sartorius, who has encouraged us to prepare the teaching package under the auspices of the WPA. Linda Gask described the process of teaching specific 'microskills', by working through how the skills necessary for the management of people who present in primary and general medical settings have been described and taught in the UK (see box 1). A model of the strategies and skills to be [figure: see text] taught was first developed utilizing the experience professionals and teachers from both primary care and mental health. A videotape was produced in which the skills to be acquired were demonstrated by real primary care doctors in role-played interviews with the addition of subtitles to label particular skills. The videotape is then utilised in a group teaching session to model the specific component skills of the model or 'microskills' to the participants in order to demonstrate exactly how the strategies of the model are applied in a real consultation. Watching the videotape will not however change behaviour. To do this, it is necessary to role-play brief scenarios so that the professional is able to practice the actual words he or she would use. This role-play work may be carried out in pairs, with one doctor playing the professional and the other playing the patient, or in threes, with the addition of an observer who ensures that the participants keep to the task. At the end of the role-play all participants provide feedback. These methods are described in much more detail in Gask (1999). Finally, there is also the possibility of videotaping one of these role-played interviews and teaching on this tape with the group as a whole. The specific skills and methods required to do this are described in much more detail along with the research evidence for these methods in Gask (1998). Our approach to facilitating the group in

  7. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  8. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis prepares to touch down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. Lucid was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 March and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards on the latter date. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was the payload commander and mission specialist-1. Other mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin, and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are

  9. STS-37 Shuttle Crew after Edwards landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The crew of the Space Shuttle Atlantis gives the 'all's well' thumb's-up sign after leaving the 100-ton orbiter following their landing at 6:55 a.m. (PDT), 11 April 1991, at NASA's Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, to conclude mission STS-37. They are, from left, Kenneth D. Cameron, pilot; Steven R. Nagel, mission commander; and mission specialists Linda M. Godwin, Jerry L. Ross, and Jay Apt. During the mission,which began with launch April 5 at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, the crew deployed the Gamma Ray Observatory. Ross and Jay also carried out two spacewalks, one to deploy an antenna on the Gamma Ray Observatory and the other to test equipment and mobility techniques for the construction of the future Space Station. The planned five-day mission was extended one day because of high winds at Edwards. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space

  10. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  11. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at

  12. Obituary: Ronald N. Bracewell, 1921-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2009-01-01

    , a life-long researcher at Stanford, to establish the annual Bunyan lecture series. His repeated recounting of his encounters with Mr. Bunyan remained interesting and amusing. Up to his last day you could find Ron in his office or in the corridors of the David Packard Electrical Engineering Building interacting with students and faculty. He continued to be an active member of the astronomy community at Stanford up to the end. Professor Bracewell is survived by his wife of 54 years, Helen; by a son, Mark, of San Jose California; a daughter, Wendy, of London, England; a brother, Mark, of Melbourne, Australia; and two grandchildren. I would like to thank emeritus professors Peter Sturrock, Anthony Fraser-Smith, and Von Eshleman for valuable advice and suggestions. The photograph is courtesy of Linda Cicero.

  13. FOREWORD: Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications Tackling inverse problems in a Banach space environment: from theory to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Thomas; Hofmann, Bernd; Kaltenbacher, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    iterative method. A powerful tool for proving convergence rates of Tikhonov type but also other regularization methods in Banach spaces are assumptions of the type of variational inequalities that combine conditions on solution smoothness (i.e., source conditions in the Hilbert space case) and nonlinearity of the forward operator. In Parameter choice in Banach space regularization under variational inequalities, Bernd Hofmann and Peter Mathé provide results with general error measures and especially study the question of regularization parameter choice. Daijun Jiang, Hui Feng, and Jun Zou consider an application of Banach space ideas in the context of an application problem in their paper Convergence rates of Tikhonov regularizations for parameter identifiation in a parabolic-elliptic system, namely the identification of a distributed diffusion coefficient in a coupled elliptic-parabolic system. In particular, they show convergence rates of Lp-H1 (variational) regularization for the application under consideration via the use and verification of certain source and nonlinearity conditions. In computational practice, the Lp norm with p close to one is often used as a substitute for the actually sparsity promoting L1 norm. In Norm sensitivity of sparsity regularization with respect to p, Kamil S Kazimierski, Peter Maass and Robin Strehlow consider the question of how sensitive the Tikhonov regularized solution is with respect to p. They do so by computing the derivative via the implicit function theorem, particularly at the crucial value, p=1. Another iterative regularization method in Banach space is considered by Qinian Jin and Linda Stals in Nonstationary iterated Tikhonov regularization for ill-posed problems in Banach spaces. Using a variational formulation and under some smoothness and convexity assumption on the preimage space, they extend the convergence analysis of the well-known iterative Tikhonov method for linear problems in Hilbert space to a more general Banach

  14. Efficiency of clinorotation usage on virus-infected seed potatoes for its improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Ivan; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Dunich, Alina; Mishchenko, Anatoliy; Boiko, Anatolii

    organization, and physiological balances. Using microgravity simulated in the clinostats, it is possible to investigate the effects of this factor on the relationships in the system “virus - host plant”. This problem remains important as its solution allows to discover a wider set of techniques allowing to obtain plants free from viral infections. The possibility of the WSMV (wheat steak mosaic virus) elimination in wheat plants under the influence of simulated microgravity has been demonstrated in our works. The study of this phenomenon allowed to admit that the freeing of plants from viral infection under the impact of simulated microgravity occurs in the process of induced resistance formation. In our further research activities, we used potato plants for which the elimination of viral infections is of exceptional importance. Viruses transmitted mechanically have to use a vascular system to move all over the plant and, finally, into the tubers. The factors limiting this movability will at certain moments of plant growth favor the elimination of virus in certain parts of the plant. Introduction of tissues from such parts into in vitro cultures allows to regenerate virus-free plants. Еру efficiency of tissue culture in combination with clonal micro multiplication in vitro allows to obtain up to 1 mln plants from a single one in half a year. Such a productivity of a new technology allowed to prognosticate the potato production in vitro in the world on the level of 212 mln plantlets per year. But today, according to some estimates the in vitro potato production may be achieved with lower expenditures on plant remediation and freeing of the cultivars from viral infection. Therefore the purpose of work was to probe possibilities of receiving virus free seminal material of potato at the terms of clinorotation and set of its economic efficiency. Researches of simulated microgravity influence conducted on the potato varieties Sineglazka, Crimean, Agave, Linda, Bellaroza

  15. SINFONI Opens with Upbeat Chords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    the development of SINFONI for nearly 7 years. Some of the members of the Commissioning Teams are depicted in PR Photos 24g/04 and 24h/04; in addition to the SPIFFI team members present on the second photo, Walter Bornemann, Reinhard Genzel, Hans Gemperlein, Stefan Huber have also been working on the reintegration/commissioning in Paranal. Notes [1] This press release is issued in coordination between ESO, the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching, Germany, and the Nederlandse Onderzoekschool Voor Astronomie in Leiden, The Netherlands. A German version is available at http://www.mpg.de/bilderBerichteDokumente/dokumentation/pressemitteilungen/2004/pressemitteilung20040824/index.html and a Dutch version at http://www.astronomy.nl/inhoud/pers/persberichten/30_08_04.html. [2] The SINFONI team consists of Roberto Abuter, Andrew Baker, Walter Bornemann, Ric Davies, Frank Eisenhauer (SPIFFI Principal Investigator), Hans Gemperlein, Reinhard Genzel (MPE Director), Andrea Gilbert, Armin Goldbrunner, Matthew Horrobin, Stefan Huber, Christof Iserlohe, Matthew Lehnert, Werner Lieb, Dieter Lutz, Nicole Nesvadba, Claudia Röhrle, Jürgen Schreiber, Linda Tacconi, Matthias Tecza, Niranjan Thatte, Harald Weisz (Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany), Anthony Brown, Paul van der Werf (NOVA, Leiden, The Netherlands), Eddy Elswijk, Johan Pragt, Jan Kragt, Gabby Kroes, Ton Schoenmaker, Rik ter Horst (ASTRON, Dwingeloo, The Netherlands), Henri Bonnet (SINFONI Project Manager), Roberto Castillo, Ralf Conzelmann, Romuald Damster, Bernard Delabre, Christophe Dupuy, Robert Donaldson, Christophe Dumas, Enrico Fedrigo, Gert Finger, Gordon Gillet, Norbert Hubin (Head of Adaptive Optics Dept.), Andreas Kaufer, Franz Koch, Johann Kolb, Andrea Modigliani, Guy Monnet (Head of Telescope Systems Division), Chris Lidman, Jochen Liske, Jean Louis Lizon, Markus Kissler-Patig (SINFONI Instrument Scientist), Jerome Paufique, Juha Reunanen