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Sample records for lkb1 regulates pancreatic

  1. LKB1 Regulates Pancreatic β Cell Size, Polarity, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Zvi; Swisa, Avital; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Fujimoto, Wakako; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Miki, Takashi; Lennerz, Jochen K.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Meyuhas, Oded; Seino, Susumu; Permutt, M. Alan; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Dor, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic β cells, organized in the islets of Langerhans, sense glucose and secrete appropriate amounts of insulin. We have studied the roles of LKB1, a conserved kinase implicated in the control of cell polarity and energy metabolism, in adult β cells. LKB1-deficient β cells show a dramatic increase in insulin secretion in vivo. Histologically, LKB1-deficient β cells have striking alterations in the localization of the nucleus and cilia relative to blood vessels, suggesting a shift from hepatocyte-like to columnar polarity. Additionally, LKB1 deficiency causes a 65% increase in β cell volume. We show that distinct targets of LKB1 mediate these effects. LKB1 controls β cell size, but not polarity, via the mTOR pathway. Conversely, the precise position of the β cell nucleus, but not cell size, is controlled by the LKB1 target Par1b. Insulin secretion and content are restricted by LKB1, at least in part, via AMPK. These results expose a molecular mechanism, orchestrated by LKB1, for the coordinated maintenance of β cell size, form, and function. PMID:19808022

  2. The tumour suppressor LKB1 regulates myelination through mitochondrial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pooya, Shabnam; Liu, Xiaona; Kumar, V.B. Sameer; Anderson, Jane; Imai, Fumiyasu; Zhang, Wujuan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Ratner, Nancy; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Yoshida, Yutaka; Jankowski, Michael P.; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite to myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells (SCs) is SC differentiation, and recent evidence indicates that reprogramming from a glycolytic to oxidative metabolism occurs during cellular differentiation. Whether this reprogramming is essential for SC differentiation, and the genes that regulate this critical metabolic transition are unknown. Here we show that the tumour suppressor Lkb1 is essential for this metabolic transition and myelination of peripheral axons. Hypomyelination in the Lkb1-mutant nerves and muscle atrophy lead to hindlimb dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Lkb1-null SCs failed to optimally activate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during differentiation. This deficit was caused by Lkb1-regulated diminished production of the mitochondrial Krebs cycle substrate citrate, a precursor to cellular lipids. Consequently, myelin lipids were reduced in Lkb1-mutant mice. Restoring citrate partially rescued Lkb1-mutant SC defects. Thus, Lkb1-mediated metabolic shift during SC differentiation increases mitochondrial metabolism and lipogenesis, necessary for normal myelination. PMID:25256100

  3. Lkb1 regulates organogenesis and early oncogenesis along AMPK-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Bryan; Strasser, Geraldine; Sagolla, Meredith; Austin, Cary D.; Junttila, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Lkb1/STK11/Par-4 is a key regulator of cellular energy, proliferation, and polarity, yet its mechanisms of action remain poorly defined. We generated mice harboring a mutant Lkb1 knockin allele that allows for rapid inhibition of Lkb1 kinase. Culturing embryonic tissues, we show that acute loss of kinase activity perturbs epithelial morphogenesis without affecting cell polarity. In pancreas, cystic structures developed rapidly after Lkb1 inhibition. In lung, inhibition resulted in cell-autonomous branching defects. Although the lung phenotype was rescued by an activator of the Lkb1 target adenosine monophosphate–activated kinase (AMPK), pancreatic cyst development was independent of AMPK signaling. Remarkably, the pancreatic phenotype evolved to resemble precancerous lesions, demonstrating that loss of Lkb1 was sufficient to drive the initial steps of carcinogenesis ex vivo. A similar phenotype was induced by expression of mutant K-Ras with p16/p19 deletion. Combining culture of embryonic tissues with genetic manipulation and chemical genetics thus provides a powerful approach to unraveling developmental programs and understanding cancer initiation. PMID:23266956

  4. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  5. Heat-shock protein 90 and Cdc37 interact with LKB1 and regulate its stability.

    PubMed Central

    Boudeau, Jérôme; Deak, Maria; Lawlor, Margaret A; Morrice, Nick A; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    LKB1 is a widely expressed serine/threonine protein kinase that is mutated in the inherited Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome. Recent findings indicate that LKB1 functions as a tumour suppressor, but little is known regarding the detailed mechanism by which LKB1 regulates cell growth. In this study we have purified LKB1 from cells and establish that it is associated with the heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) chaperone and the Cdc37 kinase-specific targetting subunit for Hsp90. We demonstrate that Cdc37 and Hsp90 bind specifically to the kinase domain of LKB1. We also perform experiments using Hsp90 inhibitors, which indicate that the association of Hsp90 and Cdc37 with LKB1 regulates LKB1 stability and prevents its degradation by the proteasome. Hsp90 inhibitors are being considered as potential anti-cancer agents. However, our observations indicate that prolonged usage of these drugs could possibly lead to tumour development by decreasing cellular levels of LKB1. PMID:12489981

  6. Oncogenic B-RAF Negatively Regulates the Tumor Suppressor LKB1 to Promote Melanoma Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Jeong, Joseph H.; Asara, John M.; Yuan, Yuan-Ying; Granter, Scott R.; Chin, Lynda; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The LKB1 – AMPK signaling pathway serves as a critical cellular sensor coupling energy homeostasis to cell growth, proliferation and survival. However, how tumor cells suppress this signaling pathway to gain growth advantage under conditions of energy stress is largely unknown. Here, we show that AMPK activation is suppressed in melanoma cells with the B-RAF V600E mutation and that down-regulation of B-RAF signaling activates AMPK. We find that in these cells LKB1 is phosphorylated by ERK and Rsk, two kinases downstream of B-RAF, and that this phosphorylation compromises the ability of LKB1 to bind and activate AMPK. Furthermore, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of LKB1 allows activation of AMPK and inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth. Our findings provide a molecular linkage between the LKB1-AMPK and the RAF-MEK-ERK pathways and suggest that suppression of LKB1 function by B-RAF V600E plays an important role in B-RAF V600E-driven tumorigenesis. PMID:19187764

  7. Protein kinase LKB1 regulates polarized dendrite formation of adult hippocampal newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; She, Liang; Chang, Xing-ya; Yang, Rong-rong; Wang, Liang; Ji, Hong-bin; Jiao, Jian-wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the rodent hippocampus are important for memory formation and mood regulation, but the cellular mechanism underlying their polarized development, a process critical for their incorporation into functional circuits, remains unknown. We found that deletion of the serine-threonine protein kinase LKB1 or overexpression of dominant-negative LKB1 reduced the polarized initiation of the primary dendrite from the soma and disrupted its oriented growth toward the molecular layer. This abnormality correlated with the dispersion of Golgi apparatus that normally accumulated at the base and within the initial segment of the primary dendrite, and was mimicked by disrupting Golgi organization via altering the expression of Golgi structural proteins GM130 or GRASP65. Thus, besides its known function in axon formation in embryonic pyramidal neurons, LKB1 plays an additional role in regulating polarized dendrite morphogenesis in adult-born granule cells in the hippocampus. PMID:24367100

  8. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zirong; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T.; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A.; Carper, Miranda B.; Haura, Eric B.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  9. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zirong; Li, Jian-Liang; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A; Carper, Miranda B; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Lu, Jianrong; Amelio, Antonio L; Cress, W Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J; Wu, Lizi

    2016-06-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  10. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-05-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:25996931

  11. Negative regulation of mTOR activity by LKB1-AMPK signaling in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-xia; Sun, Lin-lin; Zhang, Xia; Pan, Li; Lian, Lin-juan; Chen, Zhe; Zhong, Dian-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of LKB1 in regulation of mTOR signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods: LKB1 protein expression and phosphorylation of AMPK, 4E-BP1 and S6K in the cells were assessed using Western blotting in various NSCLC cell lines (A549, H460, H1792, Calu-1 and H1299). Energy stress was mimicked by treating the cells with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Compound C was used to inhibit AMPK activity. Cell growth was measured using the MTS assay. Results: LKB1 protein was expressed in LKB1 wild-type Calu-1, H1299 and H1792 cells, but it was undetected in LKB1 mutant A549 and H460 cells. Treatment of the LKB1 wild-type cells with 2-DG (5, 10 and 25 mmol/L) augmented the phosphorylation of AMPK in dose- and time-dependent manners. In the LKB1 wild-type cells, 2-DG dramatically suppressed the phosphorylation of two mTOR targets, 4E-BP1 and S6K, whereas the LKB1 mutant A549 and H460 cells were highly resistant to 2-DG-induced inhibition on mTOR activity. In addition, stable knockdown of LKB1 in H1299 cells impaired 2-DG-induced inhibition on mTOR activity. Pretreatment of H1299 and H1792 cells with the AMPK inhibitor compound C (10 μmol/L) blocked 2-DG-induced inhibition on mTOR activity. 2-DG inhibited the growth of H1299 cells more effectively than that of H460 cells; stable knockdown of LKB1 in H1299 cells attenuated the growth inhibition caused by 2-DG. Conclusion: In non-small cell lung cancer cells, LKB1/AMPK signaling negatively regulates mTOR activity and contributes to cell growth inhibition in response to energy stress. PMID:23178462

  12. LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases negatively regulate human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Treatment options are limited and prophylactic agents are not available. We have previously demonstrated an essential role for CREB-regulating transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) in HTLV-1 transcription. Results In this study we report on the negative regulatory role of LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) in the activation of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) by the oncoprotein Tax. Activation of LKB1 and SIKs effectively blunted Tax activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas compromising these kinases, but not AMP-dependent protein kinases, augmented Tax function. Activated LKB1 and SIKs associated with Tax and suppressed Tax-induced LTR activation by counteracting CRTCs and CREB. Enforced expression of LKB1 or SIK1 in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clone pX1MT repressed proviral transcription. On the contrary, depletion of LKB1 in pX1MT-transfected cells and in HTLV-1-transformed T cells boosted the expression of Tax. Treatment of HTLV-1 transformed cells with metformin led to LKB1/SIK1 activation, reduction in Tax expression, and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings revealed a new function of LKB1 and SIKs as negative regulators of HTLV-1 transcription. Pharmaceutical activation of LKB1 and SIKs might be considered as a new strategy in anti-HTLV-1 and anti-ATL therapy. PMID:23577667

  13. Primary cilia regulate mTORC1 activity and cell size through Lkb1.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Patel, Vishal; Braeg, Simone; Voelker, Henriette; Bredt, Saskia; Beyer, Theresa; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Gödel, Markus; Müller, Klaus; Herbst, Martin; Hornung, Miriam; Doerken, Mara; Köttgen, Michael; Nitschke, Roland; Igarashi, Peter; Walz, Gerd; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    The mTOR pathway is the central regulator of cell size. External signals from growth factors and nutrients converge on the mTORC1 multi-protein complex to modulate downstream targets, but how the different inputs are integrated and translated into specific cellular responses is incompletely understood. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway occurs in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), where cilia (filiform sensory organelles) fail to sense urine flow because of inherited mutations in ciliary proteins. We therefore investigated if cilia have a role in mTOR regulation. Here, we show that ablation of cilia in transgenic mice results in enlarged cells when compared with control animals. In vitro analysis demonstrated that bending of the cilia by flow is required for mTOR downregulation and cell-size control. Surprisingly, regulation of cell size by cilia is independent of flow-induced calcium transients, or Akt. However, the tumour-suppressor protein Lkb1 localises in the cilium, and flow results in increased AMPK phosphorylation at the basal body. Conversely, knockdown of Lkb1 prevents normal cell-size regulation under flow conditions. Our results demonstrate that the cilium regulates mTOR signalling and cell size, and identify the cilium-basal body compartment as a spatially restricted activation site for Lkb1 signalling. PMID:20972424

  14. Stabilization of LKB1 and Akt by neddylation regulates energy metabolism in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Delgado, Teresa C.; García-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Zubiete-Franco, Imanol; Fernández-Ramos, David; Buqué, Xabier; Cano, Ainara; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Fernández-Domínguez, Itziar; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Fernández-Tussy, Pablo; Boix, Loreto; Bruix, Jordi; Villa, Erica; Castro, Azucena; Lu, Shelly C.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Xirodimas, Dimitris; Varela-Rey, Marta; Mato, José M.; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, María L.

    2015-01-01

    The current view of cancer progression highlights that cancer cells must undergo through a post-translational regulation and metabolic reprogramming to progress in an unfriendly environment. In here, the importance of neddylation modification in liver cancer was investigated. We found that hepatic neddylation was specifically enriched in liver cancer patients with bad prognosis. In addition, the treatment with the neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 in Phb1-KO mice, an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma showing elevated neddylation, reverted the malignant phenotype. Tumor cell death in vivo translating into liver tumor regression was associated with augmented phosphatidylcholine synthesis by the PEMT pathway, known as a liver-specific tumor suppressor, and restored mitochondrial function and TCA cycle flux. Otherwise, in protumoral hepatocytes, neddylation inhibition resulted in metabolic reprogramming rendering a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation and concomitant tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, Akt and LKB1, hallmarks of proliferative metabolism, were altered in liver cancer being new targets of neddylation. Importantly, we show that neddylation-induced metabolic reprogramming and apoptosis were dependent on LKB1 and Akt stabilization. Overall, our results implicate neddylation/signaling/metabolism, partly mediated by LKB1 and Akt, in the development of liver cancer, paving the way for novel therapeutic approaches targeting neddylation in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25650664

  15. LKB1 is a central regulator of tumor initiation and pro-growth metabolism in ErbB2-mediated breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Germline and somatic mutations in STK11, the gene encoding the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, are strongly associated with tumorigenesis. While loss of LKB1 expression has been linked to breast cancer, the mechanistic role of LKB1 in regulating breast cancer development, metastasis, and tumor metabolism has remained unclear. Methods We have generated and analyzed transgenic mice expressing ErbB2 in the mammary epithelium of LKB1 wild-type or LKB1-deficient mice. We have also utilized ErbB2-expressing breast cancer cells in which LKB1 levels have been reduced using shRNA approaches. These transgenic and xenograft models were characterized for the effects of LKB1 loss on tumor initiation, growth, metastasis and tumor cell metabolism. Results We demonstrate that loss of LKB1 promotes tumor initiation and induces a characteristic shift to aerobic glycolysis (‘Warburg effect’) in a model of ErbB2-mediated breast cancer. LKB1-deficient breast cancer cells display enhanced early tumor growth coupled with increased cell migratory and invasive properties in vitro. We show that ErbB2-positive tumors deficient for LKB1 display a pro-growth molecular and phenotypic signature characterized by elevated Akt/mTOR signaling, increased glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased bioenergetic markers both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that mTOR contributes to the metabolic reprogramming of LKB1-deficient breast cancer, and is required to drive glycolytic metabolism in these tumors; however, LKB1-deficient breast cancer cells display reduced metabolic flexibility and increased apoptosis in response to metabolic perturbations. Conclusions Together, our data suggest that LKB1 functions as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Loss of LKB1 collaborates with activated ErbB2 signaling to drive breast tumorigenesis and pro-growth metabolism in the resulting tumors. PMID:24280377

  16. Investigation of LKB1 Ser431 phosphorylation and Cys433 farnesylation using mouse knockin analysis reveals an unexpected role of prenylation in regulating AMPK activity

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Vanessa P.; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Gourlay, Robert; Varghese, Joby; Davies, Paul; Shpiro, Natalia; Sakamoto, Kei; Alessi, Dario R.

    2013-01-01

    The LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase functions to activate two isoforms of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and 12 members of the AMPK-related family of protein kinases. The highly conserved C-terminal residues of LKB1 are phosphorylated (Ser431) by PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) and RSK (ribosomal S6 kinase) and farnesylated (Cys433) within a CAAX motif. To better define the role that these post-translational modifications play, we created homozygous LKB1S431A/S431A and LKB1C433S/C433S knockin mice. These animals were viable, fertile and displayed no overt phenotypes. Employing a farnesylation-specific monoclonal antibody that we generated, we established by immunoprecipitation that the vast majority, if not all, of the endogenous LKB1 is prenylated. Levels of LKB1 localized at the membrane of the liver of LKB1C433S/C433S mice and their fibroblasts were reduced substantially compared with the wild-type mice, confirming that farnesylation plays a role in mediating membrane association. Although AMPK was activated normally in the LKB1S431A/S431A animals, we unexpectedly observed in all of the examined tissues and cells taken from LKB1C433S/C433S mice that the basal, as well as that induced by the AMP-mimetic AICAR (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside), AMPK activation, phenformin and muscle contraction were significantly blunted. This resulted in a reduced ability of AICAR to inhibit lipid synthesis in primary hepatocytes isolated from LKB1C433S/C433S mice. The activity of several of the AMPK-related kinases analysed [BRSK1 (BR serine/threonine kinase 1), BRSK2, NUAK1 (NUAK family, SNF1-like kinase 1), SIK3 (salt-inducible kinase 3) and MARK4 (MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4)] was not affected in tissues derived from LKB1S431A/S431A or LKB1C433S/C433S mice. Our observations reveal for the first time that farnesylation of LKB1 is required for the activation of AMPK. Previous reports have indicated that a pool of AMPK is localized at the

  17. The ubiquitin-associated domain of AMPK-related kinases regulates conformation and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Villa, Fabrizio; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Prescott, Alan R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Alessi, Dario R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase, which is mutated in Peutz–Jeghers cancer syndrome, phosphorylates and activates a group of protein kinases that are related to AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Ten of the 14 AMPK-related protein kinases activated by LKB1, including SIK (salt-induced kinase), MARK (microtubule-affinity-regulating kinase) and BRSK (brain-specific kinase) isoforms, possess a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain immediately C-terminal to the kinase catalytic domain. These are the only protein kinases in the human genome known to possess a UBA domain, but their roles in regulating AMPK-related kinases are unknown. We have investigated the roles that the UBA domain may play in regulating these enzymes. Limited proteolysis of MARK2 revealed that the kinase and UBA domains were contained within a fragment that was resistant to trypsin proteolysis. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) analysis of inactive and active LKB1-phosphorylated MARK2 revealed that activation of MARK2 is accompanied by a significant conformational change that alters the orientation of the UBA domain with respect to the catalytic domain. Our results indicate that none of the UBA domains found in AMPK-related kinases interact with polyubiquitin or other ubiquitin-like molecules. Instead, the UBA domains appear to play an essential conformational role and are required for the LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AMPK-related kinases. This is based on the findings that mutation or removal of the UBA domains of several AMPK-related kinases, including isoforms of MARK, SIK and BRSK, markedly impaired the catalytic activity and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of these enzymes. We also provide evidence that the UBA domains do not function as LKB1–STRAD (STE20-related adaptor)–MO25 (mouse protein 25) docking/interacting sites and that mutations in the UBA domain of SIK suppressed the ability of SIK to localize within punctate regions of the

  18. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  19. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  20. LKB1 preserves genome integrity by stimulating BRCA1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Liu, Alex. Y.; Glazer, Peter M.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11, also known as LKB1) functions as a tumor suppressor in many human cancers. However, paradoxically loss of LKB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblast results in resistance to oncogene-induced transformation. Therefore, it is unclear why loss of LKB1 leads to increased predisposition to develop a wide variety of cancers. Here, we show that LKB1 protects cells from genotoxic stress. Cells lacking LKB1 display increased sensitivity to irradiation, accumulates more DNA double-strand breaks, display defective homology-directed DNA repair (HDR) and exhibit increased mutation rate, compared with that of LKB1-expressing cells. Conversely, the ectopic expression of LKB1 in cells lacking LKB1 protects them against genotoxic stress-induced DNA damage and prevents the accumulation of mutations. We find that LKB1 post-transcriptionally stimulates HDR gene BRCA1 expression by inhibiting the cytoplasmic localization of the RNA-binding protein, HU antigen R, in an AMP kinase-dependent manner and stabilizes BRCA1 mRNA. Cells lacking BRCA1 similar to the cell lacking LKB1 display increased genomic instability and ectopic expression of BRCA1 rescues LKB1 loss-induced sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Collectively, our results demonstrate that LKB1 is a crucial regulator of genome integrity and reveal a novel mechanism for LKB1-mediated tumor suppression with direct therapeutic implications for cancer prevention. PMID:25488815

  1. LKB1 and Notch Pathways Interact and Control Biliary Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Poncy, Alexis; Charawi, Sara; Dahmani, Rajae; Traore, Massiré; Dumontet, Typhanie; Drouet, Valérie; Dumont, Florent; Gilgenkrantz, Hélène; Colnot, Sabine; Terris, Benoit; Coulouarn, Cédric; Lemaigre, Frédéric; Perret, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background LKB1 is an evolutionary conserved kinase implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including inhibition of cell proliferation, regulation of cell polarity and metabolism. When Lkb1 is inactivated in the liver, glucose homeostasis is perturbed, cellular polarity is affected and cholestasis develops. Cholestasis occurs as a result from deficient bile duct development, yet how LKB1 impacts on biliary morphogenesis is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the phenotype of mice in which deletion of the Lkb1 gene has been specifically targeted to the hepatoblasts. Our results confirmed that lack of LKB1 in the liver results in bile duct paucity leading to cholestasis. Immunostaining analysis at a prenatal stage showed that LKB1 is not required for differentiation of hepatoblasts to cholangiocyte precursors but promotes maturation of the primitive ductal structures to mature bile ducts. This phenotype is similar to that obtained upon inactivation of Notch signaling in the liver. We tested the hypothesis of a functional overlap between the LKB1 and Notch pathways by gene expression profiling of livers deficient in Lkb1 or in the Notch mediator RbpJκ and identified a mutual cross-talk between LKB1 and Notch signaling. In vitro experiments confirmed that Notch activity was deficient upon LKB1 loss. Conclusion LKB1 and Notch share a common genetic program in the liver, and regulate bile duct morphogenesis. PMID:26689699

  2. LKB1 Tumor Suppressor: Therapeutic Opportunities Knock when LKB1 Is Inactivated

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Marcus, Adam I.

    2014-01-01

    LKB1 is commonly thought of as a tumor suppressor gene because its hereditary mutation is responsible for a cancer syndrome, and somatic inactivation of LKB1 is found in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and cervical cancers. However, unlike other tumor suppressors whose main function is to either suppress cell proliferation or promote cell death, one of the functions of LKB1-regulated AMPK signaling is to suppress cell proliferation in order to promote cell survival under energetic stress conditions. This unique, pro-survival function of LKB1 has led to the discovery of reagents, such as phenformin, that specifically exploit the vulnerability of LKB1-null cells in their defect in sensing energetic stress. Such targeted agents represent a novel treatment strategy because they induce cell killing when LKB1 is absent. This review article summarizes various vulnerabilities of LKB1-mutant cells that have been reported in the literature and discusses the potential of using existing or developing novel reagents to target cancer cells with defective LKB1. PMID:25679014

  3. Lkb1 controls brown adipose tissue growth and thermogenesis by regulating the intracellular localization of CRTC3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tizhong; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Pengpeng; Li, Zhiguo; Jiang, Qingyang; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Gongshe; Wang, Yizhen; Liu, Xiaoqi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through Ucp1-mediated uncoupled respiration and its activation may represent a therapeutic strategy to combat obesity. Here we show that Lkb1 controls BAT expansion and UCP1 expression in mice. We generate adipocyte-specific Lkb1 knockout mice and show that, compared with wild-type littermates, these mice exhibit elevated UCP1 expression in BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, have increased BAT mass and higher energy expenditure. Consequently, KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and are more resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Deletion of Lkb1 results in a cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of CRTC3 in brown adipocytes, where it recruits C/EBPβ to enhance Ucp1 transcription. In parallel, the absence of Lkb1 also suppresses AMPK activity, leading to activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and subsequent BAT expansion. These data suggest that inhibition of Lkb1 or its downstream signalling in adipocytes could be a novel strategy to increase energy expenditure in the context of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27461402

  4. Lkb1 controls brown adipose tissue growth and thermogenesis by regulating the intracellular localization of CRTC3.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Pengpeng; Li, Zhiguo; Jiang, Qingyang; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Gongshe; Wang, Yizhen; Liu, Xiaoqi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through Ucp1-mediated uncoupled respiration and its activation may represent a therapeutic strategy to combat obesity. Here we show that Lkb1 controls BAT expansion and UCP1 expression in mice. We generate adipocyte-specific Lkb1 knockout mice and show that, compared with wild-type littermates, these mice exhibit elevated UCP1 expression in BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, have increased BAT mass and higher energy expenditure. Consequently, KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and are more resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Deletion of Lkb1 results in a cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of CRTC3 in brown adipocytes, where it recruits C/EBPβ to enhance Ucp1 transcription. In parallel, the absence of Lkb1 also suppresses AMPK activity, leading to activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and subsequent BAT expansion. These data suggest that inhibition of Lkb1 or its downstream signalling in adipocytes could be a novel strategy to increase energy expenditure in the context of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27461402

  5. Targeting LKB1 in cancer – exposing and exploiting vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Momcilovic, M; Shackelford, D B

    2015-01-01

    The LKB1 tumour suppressor is a serine/threonine kinase that functions as master regulator of cell growth, metabolism, survival and polarity. LKB1 is frequently mutated in human cancers and research spanning the last two decades have begun decoding the cellular pathways deregulated following LKB1 inactivation. This work has led to the identification of vulnerabilities present in LKB1-deficient tumour cells. Pre-clinical studies have now identified therapeutic strategies targeting this subset of tumours that promise to benefit this large patient population harbouring LKB1 mutations. Here, we review the current efforts that are underway to translate pre-clinical discovery of therapeutic strategies targeting LKB1 mutant cancers into clinical practice. PMID:26196184

  6. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Lister, Richard J; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Hurley, Timothy R; Bradshaw, Cheryl D; Spahr, Mark A; Newton, Roger S

    2013-08-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  7. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Lister, Richard J.; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Hurley, Timothy R.; Bradshaw, Cheryl D.; Spahr, Mark A.; Newton, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  8. Loss of Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) in Beta Cells Enhances Glucose-stimulated Insulin Secretion Despite Profound Mitochondrial Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Swisa, Avital; Granot, Zvi; Tamarina, Natalia; Sayers, Sophie; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Philipson, Louis; Hodson, David J.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Rutter, Guy A.; Leibowitz, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is an important regulator of pancreatic β cell biology. LKB1-dependent phosphorylation of distinct AMPK (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) family members determines proper β cell polarity and restricts β cell size, total β cell mass, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the full spectrum of LKB1 effects and the mechanisms involved in the secretory phenotype remain incompletely understood. We report here that in the absence of LKB1 in β cells, GSIS is dramatically and persistently improved. The enhancement is seen both in vivo and in vitro and cannot be explained by altered cell polarity, increased β cell number, or increased insulin content. Increased secretion does require membrane depolarization and calcium influx but appears to rely mostly on a distal step in the secretion pathway. Surprisingly, enhanced GSIS is seen despite profound defects in mitochondrial structure and function in LKB1-deficient β cells, expected to greatly diminish insulin secretion via the classic triggering pathway. Thus LKB1 is essential for mitochondrial homeostasis in β cells and in parallel is a powerful negative regulator of insulin secretion. This study shows that β cells can be manipulated to enhance GSIS to supra-normal levels even in the face of defective mitochondria and without deterioration over months. PMID:26139601

  9. Activation of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 by the STE20-like pseudokinase STRAD

    PubMed Central

    Baas, A.F.; Boudeau, J.; Sapkota, G.P.; Smit, L.; Medema, R.; Morrice, N.A.; Alessi, D.R.; Clevers, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    The LKB1 gene encodes a serine/threonine kinase mutated in Peutz–Jeghers cancer syndrome. Despite several proposed models for LKB1 function in development and in tumour suppression, the detailed molecular action of LKB1 remains undefined. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an LKB1-specific adaptor protein and substrate, STRAD (STe20 Related ADaptor). STRAD consists of a STE20- like kinase domain, but lacks several residues that are indispensable for intrinsic catalytic activity. Endo genous LKB1 and STRAD form a complex in which STRAD activates LKB1, resulting in phosphorylation of both partners. STRAD determines the subcellular localization of wild-type, but not mutant LKB1, translocating it from nucleus to cytoplasm. One LKB1 mutation previously identified in a Peutz–Jeghers family that does not compromise its kinase activity is shown here to interfere with LKB1 binding to STRAD, and hence with STRAD-dependent regulation. Removal of endogenous STRAD by siRNA abrogates the LKB1-induced G1 arrest. Our results imply that STRAD plays a key role in regulating the tumour suppressor activities of LKB1. PMID:12805220

  10. LKB1 acts as a critical gatekeeper of ovarian primordial follicle pool

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Shan; Schatten, Heide; Fan, Heng-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Liver Kinase b1 (LKB1/STK11)is a tumor suppressor responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, an autosomal-dominant, cancer-prone disorder in which patients develop neoplasms in several organs, including the oviduct, ovary, and cervix. Besides, the C allele of a SNP in the Lkb1 gene impedes the likelihood of ovulation in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women treated with metformin, a known LKB1-AMPK activator. It is very likely that LKB1 plays roles in female fertility. To identify the physiological functions of LKB1 in the mouse ovary, we selectively disrupted LKB1 in oocytes by the Cre-LoxP conditional knockout system and found that Lkb1fl/fl; Gdf9-Cre mice were severely subfertile with significantly enlarged ovaries compared to Lkb1fl/fl mice. Interestingly, without Lkb1 expression in oocytes from the primordial follicle stage, the entire primordial follicle pool was activated but failed to mature and ovulate, subsequently causing premature ovarian failure (POF). Further investigation demonstrated that elevated mTOR signaling regulated by an AKT-independent LKB1-AMPK pathway was responsible for the excessive follicle activation and growth. Our findings reveal the role of LKB1 as an indispensable gatekeeper for the primordial follicle pool, offer new functional understanding for the tumor suppressor genes in reproductive organs, and might also provide valuable information for understanding POF and infertility. PMID:26745759

  11. Lkb1 is indispensable for skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and satellite cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-11-01

    Serine/threonine kinase 11, commonly known as liver kinase b1 (Lkb1), is a tumor suppressor that regulates cellular energy metabolism and stem cell function. Satellite cells are skeletal muscle resident stem cells that maintain postnatal muscle growth and repair. Here, we used MyoD(Cre)/Lkb1(flox/flox) mice (called MyoD-Lkb1) to delete Lkb1 in embryonic myogenic progenitors and their descendant satellite cells and myofibers. The MyoD-Lkb1 mice exhibit a severe myopathy characterized by central nucleated myofibers, reduced mobility, growth retardation, and premature death. Although tamoxifen-induced postnatal deletion of Lkb1 in satellite cells using Pax7(CreER) mice bypasses the developmental defects and early death, Lkb1 null satellite cells lose their regenerative capacity cell-autonomously. Strikingly, Lkb1 null satellite cells fail to maintain quiescence in noninjured resting muscles and exhibit accelerated proliferation but reduced differentiation kinetics. At the molecular level, Lkb1 limits satellite cell proliferation through the canonical AMP-activated protein kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, but facilitates differentiation through phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a key component of the WNT signaling pathway. Together, these results establish a central role of Lkb1 in muscle stem cell homeostasis, muscle development, and regeneration. PMID:25069613

  12. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Colby B.; Madsen, Steven R.; Hallowell, David M.; Goring, Darren M. J.; Moore, Timothy M.; Hardman, Shalene E.; Heninger, Megan R.; Atwood, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training. PMID:23982155

  13. Breaking the epithelial polarity barrier in cancer: the strange case of LKB1/PAR-4

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Johanna I.; Tervonen, Topi A.; Klefström, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The PAR clan of polarity regulating genes was initially discovered in a genetic screen searching for genes involved in asymmetric cell divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Today, investigations in worms, flies and mammals have established PAR proteins as conserved and fundamental regulators of animal cell polarization in a broad range of biological phenomena requiring cellular asymmetries. The human homologue of invertebrate PAR-4, a serine–threonine kinase LKB1/STK11, has caught attention as a gene behind Peutz–Jeghers polyposis syndrome and as a bona fide tumour suppressor gene commonly mutated in sporadic cancer. LKB1 functions as a master regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and 12 other kinases referred to as the AMPK-related kinases, including four human homologues of PAR-1. The role of LKB1 as part of the energy sensing LKB1-AMPK module has been intensively studied, whereas the polarity function of LKB1, in the context of homoeostasis or cancer, has gained less attention. Here, we focus on the PAR-4 identity of LKB1, discussing the weight of evidence indicating a role for LKB1 in regulation of cell polarity and epithelial integrity across species and highlight recent investigations providing new insight into the old question: does the PAR-4 identity of LKB1 matter in cancer? PMID:24062587

  14. Deletion of Lkb1 in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Leads to CKD by Altering Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Hyeok; Malaga-Dieguez, Laura; Chinga, Frank; Kang, Hyun Mi; Tao, Jianling; Reidy, Kimberly; Susztak, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Renal tubule epithelial cells are high-energy demanding polarized epithelial cells. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is a key regulator of polarity, proliferation, and cell metabolism in epithelial cells, but the function of LKB1 in the kidney is unclear. Our unbiased gene expression studies of human control and CKD kidney samples identified lower expression of LKB1 and regulatory proteins in CKD. Mice with distal tubule epithelial-specific Lkb1 deletion (Ksp-Cre/Lkb1(flox/flox)) exhibited progressive kidney disease characterized by flattened dedifferentiated tubule epithelial cells, interstitial matrix accumulation, and dilated cystic-appearing tubules. Expression of epithelial polarity markers β-catenin and E-cadherin was not altered even at later stages. However, expression levels of key regulators of metabolism, AMP-activated protein kinase (Ampk), peroxisome proliferative activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1a), and Ppara, were significantly lower than those in controls and correlated with fibrosis development. Loss of Lkb1 in cultured epithelial cells resulted in energy depletion, apoptosis, less fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis, and a profibrotic phenotype. Treatment of Lkb1-deficient cells with an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist (A769662) or a peroxisome proliferative activated receptor alpha agonist (fenofibrate) restored the fatty oxidation defect and reduced apoptosis. In conclusion, we show that loss of LKB1 in renal tubular epithelial cells has an important role in kidney disease development by influencing intracellular metabolism. PMID:26054542

  15. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. PMID:15623475

  16. Lkb1 Deletion Promotes Ectopic Lipid Accumulation in Muscle Progenitor Cells and Mature Muscles

    PubMed Central

    SHAN, TIZHONG; ZHANG, PENGPENG; BI, PENGPENG; KUANG, SHIHUAN

    2015-01-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used MyodCre and Lkb1flox/flox mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs. PMID:25251157

  17. LKB1 loss in melanoma disrupts directional migration toward extracellular matrix cues

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keefe T.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; King, Samantha J.; Bo, Tao; Dubose, Evan S.; Liu, Wenjin; Berginski, Matthew E.; Simon, Jeremy M.; Davis, Ian J.; Gomez, Shawn M.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic inactivation of the serine/threonine kinase gene STK11/LKB1/PAR-4 occurs in a variety of cancers, including ∼10% of melanoma. However, how the loss of LKB1 activity facilitates melanoma invasion and metastasis remains poorly understood. In LKB1-null cells derived from an autochthonous murine model of melanoma with activated Kras and Lkb1 loss and matched reconstituted controls, we have investigated the mechanism by which LKB1 loss increases melanoma invasive motility. Using a microfluidic gradient chamber system and time-lapse microscopy, in this paper, we uncover a new function for LKB1 as a directional migration sensor of gradients of extracellular matrix (haptotaxis) but not soluble growth factor cues (chemotaxis). Systematic perturbation of known LKB1 effectors demonstrated that this response does not require canonical adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity but instead requires the activity of the AMPK-related microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (MARK)/PAR-1 family kinases. Inhibition of the LKB1–MARK pathway facilitated invasive motility, suggesting that loss of the ability to sense inhibitory matrix cues may promote melanoma invasion. PMID:25349262

  18. Ionizing radiation induces ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM)-mediated phosphorylation of LKB1/STK11 at Thr-366.

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Gopal P; Deak, Maria; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Morrice, Nick; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Smythe, Carl; Shiloh, Yosef; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Alessi, Dario R

    2002-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase LKB1 functions as a tumour suppressor, and mutations in this enzyme lead to the inherited Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome. We previously found that LKB1 was phosphorylated at Thr-366 in vivo, a residue conserved in mammalian, Xenopus and Drosophila LKB1, located on a C-terminal non-catalytic moiety of the enzyme. Mutation of Thr-366 to Ala or Asp partially inhibited the ability of LKB1 to suppress growth of G361 melanoma cells, but did not affect LKB1 activity in vitro or LKB1 localization in vivo. As a first step in exploring the role of this phosphorylation further, we have generated a phosphospecific antibody specifically recognizing LKB1 phosphorylated at Thr-366 and demonstrate that exposure of cells to ionizing radiation (IR) induced a marked phosphorylation of LKB1 at Thr-366 in the nucleus. Thr-366 lies in an optimal phosphorylation motif for the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-like kinases DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related kinase (ATR), which function as sensors for DNA damage in cells and mediate cellular responses to DNA damage. We demonstrate that both DNA-PK and ATM efficiently phosphorylate LKB1 at Thr-366 in vitro and provide evidence that ATM mediates this phosphorylation in vivo. This is based on the finding that LKB1 is not phosphorylated in a cell line lacking ATM in response to IR, and that agents which induce cellular responses via ATR in preference to ATM poorly induce phosphorylation of LKB1 at Thr-366. These observations provide the first link between ATM and LKB1 and suggest that ATM could regulate LKB1. PMID:12234250

  19. LKB1/AMPK and PKA Control ABCB11 Trafficking and Polarization in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Homolya, László; Fu, Dong; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Jarnik, Michal; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Arias, Irwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Polarization of hepatocytes is manifested by bile canalicular network formation and activation of LKB1 and AMPK, which control cellular energy metabolism. The bile acid, taurocholate, also regulates development of the canalicular network through activation of AMPK. In the present study, we used collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures from control and liver-specific LKB1 knockout mice to examine the role of LKB1 in trafficking of ABCB11, the canalicular bile acid transporter. In polarized hepatocytes, ABCB11 traffics from Golgi to the apical plasma membrane and endogenously cycles through the rab 11a-myosin Vb recycling endosomal system. LKB1 knockout mice were jaundiced, lost weight and manifested impaired bile canalicular formation and intracellular trafficking of ABCB11, and died within three weeks. Using live cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), particle tracking, and biochemistry, we found that LKB1 activity is required for microtubule-dependent trafficking of ABCB11 to the canalicular membrane. In control hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking was accelerated by taurocholate and cAMP; however, in LKB1 knockout hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking to the apical membrane was greatly reduced and restored only by cAMP, but not taurocholate. cAMP acted through a PKA-mediated pathway which did not activate AMPK. Our studies establish a regulatory role for LKB1 in ABCB11 trafficking to the canalicular membrane, hepatocyte polarization, and canalicular network formation. PMID:24643070

  20. LKB1/AMPK and PKA control ABCB11 trafficking and polarization in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Homolya, László; Fu, Dong; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Jarnik, Michal; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Gutkind, J Silvio; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Arias, Irwin M

    2014-01-01

    Polarization of hepatocytes is manifested by bile canalicular network formation and activation of LKB1 and AMPK, which control cellular energy metabolism. The bile acid, taurocholate, also regulates development of the canalicular network through activation of AMPK. In the present study, we used collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures from control and liver-specific LKB1 knockout mice to examine the role of LKB1 in trafficking of ABCB11, the canalicular bile acid transporter. In polarized hepatocytes, ABCB11 traffics from Golgi to the apical plasma membrane and endogenously cycles through the rab 11a-myosin Vb recycling endosomal system. LKB1 knockout mice were jaundiced, lost weight and manifested impaired bile canalicular formation and intracellular trafficking of ABCB11, and died within three weeks. Using live cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), particle tracking, and biochemistry, we found that LKB1 activity is required for microtubule-dependent trafficking of ABCB11 to the canalicular membrane. In control hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking was accelerated by taurocholate and cAMP; however, in LKB1 knockout hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking to the apical membrane was greatly reduced and restored only by cAMP, but not taurocholate. cAMP acted through a PKA-mediated pathway which did not activate AMPK. Our studies establish a regulatory role for LKB1 in ABCB11 trafficking to the canalicular membrane, hepatocyte polarization, and canalicular network formation. PMID:24643070

  1. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  2. Lkb1 deletion upregulates Pax7 expression through activating Notch signaling pathway in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yizhen; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-07-01

    Satellite cells play crucial roles in mediating the growth, maintenance, and repair of postnatal skeletal muscle. Activated satellite cells (myoblasts) can divide symmetrically or asymmetrically to generate progenies that self-renewal, proliferate or differentiate. Pax7 is a defining marker of quiescent and activated satellite cells, but not differentiated myoblast. We demonstrate here that deletion of Lkb1 upregulates Pax7 expression in myoblasts and inhibits asymmetric divisions that generate differentiating progenies. Furthermore, we find that Lkb1 activates the Notch signaling pathway, which subsequently increases Pax7 expression and promotes self-renewal and proliferation while inhibiting differentiation. Mechanistic studies reveal that Lkb1 regulates Notch activation through AMPK-mTOR pathway in myoblasts. Together, these results establish a key role of Lkb1 in regulating myoblast division and cell fates choices. PMID:27131604

  3. LKB1 inhibits the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by suppressing the nuclear translocation of Yap and β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lian-Gang; Bian, Shi-Bo; Cui, Jian-Xin; Xi, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Ke-Cheng; Qin, Hong-Zhen; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is known to suppress the proliferation, energy metabolism and mesenchymal transition of various cancer cells, and is involved in the regulation of Hippo-Yes-associated protein (Yap) and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. However, the role of LKB1 in gastric cancer (GC) was not fully understood. Thus, in the present study, we studied LKB1 and found that protein expression (0.37±0.061 vs. 0.59±0.108, P=0.006) and the protein ratio of p-Yap/Yap (0.179±0.085 vs. 0.8±0.126, P=0.001) were reduced in 54 gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) tissues compared with the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues, using western blotting and RT-qPCR assays. LKB1 expression was also observed decreased in 109 GAC tissues compared with 54 adjacent non-cancerous tissues (χ2=4.678, P=0.0306), and negatively correlated with the nuclear expression of Yap (r=-0.6997) and β-catenin (r=-0.3510), using immunohistochemical analysis. In GC patients, LKB1 expression was negatively associated with tumor size, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. LKB1 expression was determined to be positively correlated with longer overall survival of GC patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis (P=0.001). Subsequently, LKB1 expression in human GAC AGS cells was enhanced with a full‑length LKB1 transfection. In vitro and in vivo proliferation was inhibited in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. Yap and β-catenin expression were assessed by western blotting and RT-qPCR, and were found to be increased in the cytoplasm but decreased in the nucleus in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. The increase in cytoplasmic β-catenin was reversed by the silencing of LKB1 or Yap with shRNAs in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells. Moreover, Yap and β-catenin mRNA were barely altered by LKB1 overexpression. Thus, we concluded that LKB1 expression was reduced in GAC tissues but that it correlated positively with better

  4. mTOR remains unchanged in diet-resistant (DR) rats despite impaired LKB1/AMPK cascade in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Liang, Huimin; Tian, Derun; Du, Jianying; Wang, Qiming; Xi, Pengjiao; Wang, Haomin; Li, Yongmei

    2016-08-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) plays an important role in adipogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we explored the functional relationship between LKB1 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating adipogenesis in rats and preadipocytes. We found that LKB1 and the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade are impaired in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rats when compared with chow-fed (CF) rats. While DIO activated the mTOR pathway in WAT and led to a more fat mass gain, DR maintained the normal activity of the mTOR pathway and normal weight and percentage of fat mass. We further constructed overexpressed LKB1 (OE) and silenced LKB1 (Si) 3T3-L1 preadipocytes monoclonal cell lines. In the OE cell line, the mTOR pathway was inactivated, and intracellular lipid content was reduced during differentiation. This effect could be reversed by AMPK inhibition. Conversely, in the Si cell line, the mTOR pathway was activated and intracellular lipid content increased. This effect could be reversed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR. Our results suggest that mTOR mediates the effect of LKB1 on adipogenesis, and normal activity of mTOR in DR rats interferes with the effect of LKB1 in WAT. PMID:27235551

  5. LKB1 Is Required for the Development and Maintenance of Stereocilia in Inner Ear Hair Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Zhang, Tingting; Jin, Yecheng; Li, Huashun

    2015-01-01

    The LKB1 gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase, was discovered to play crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, and the establishment of cell polarity. In our study, LKB1 conditional knockout mice (Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice) were generated to investigate LKB1 function in the inner ear. Tests of auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions revealed significant decreases in the hearing sensitivities of the Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice. In Atoh1-LKB1-/- mice, malformations of hair cell stereocilliary bundles were present as early as postnatal day 1 (P1), a time long before the maturation of the hair cell bundles. In addition, we also observed outer hair cell (OHC) loss starting at P14. The impaired stereocilliary bundles occurred long before the presence of hair cell loss. Stereociliary cytoskeletal structure depends on the core actin-based cytoskeleton and several actin-binding proteins. By Western blot, we examined actin-binding proteins, specifically ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton of hair cell stereocilia. Our results revealed that the phosphorylation of ERM proteins (pERM) was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Thus, we propose that the decreased pERM may be a key factor for the impaired stereocillia function, and the damaged stereocillia may induce hair cell loss and hearing impairments. Taken together, our data indicates that LKB1 is required for the development and maintenance of stereocilia in the inner ear. PMID:26274331

  6. The Prognostic Value of Decreased LKB1 in Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xi; Gao, Ying; Xie, Mingxuan; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Wei; He, Bixiu; He, Shuya; You, Shaojin; Chen, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is a protein kinase that regulates the growth, integrity and polarity of mammalian cells. Recent studies have reported the prognostic value of decreased LKB1 expression in different tumors. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed to more accurately estimate the role of decreased LKB1 in the prognostication of human solid tumors. Methods A systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI (updated to October 15, 2015) was performed to identify eligible studies. The overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and clinicopathological features data were collected from these studies. The hazard ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled with a random-effects models using Stata12.0 software. Results A total of 14 studies covering 1915 patients with solid tumors were included in this meta-analysis. Decreased LKB1 was associated with poorer OS in both the univariate (HR: 1.86, 95%CI: 1.42–2.42, P<0.001) and multivariate (HR: 1.55, 95%CI: 1.09–2.21, P = 0.015) analyses. A subgroup analysis revealed that the associations between decreased LKB1 and poor OS were significant within the Asian region (HR 2.18, 95%CI: 1.66–2.86, P<0.001) and obvious for lung cancer (HR: 2.16, 95%CI: 1.47–3.18, P<0.001). However, the articles that involved analyses of both RFS and DFS numbered only 3, and no statistically significant correlations of decreased LKB1 with RFS or DFS were observed in this study. Additionally, the pooled odds ratios (ORs) indicated that decreased LKB1 was associated with larger tumor size (OR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.09–2.36, P = 0.017), lymph node metastasis (OR: 2.41, 95%CI: 1.53–3.78, P<0.001) and a higher TNM stage (OR: 3.35, 95%CI: 2.20–5.09, P<0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that decreased LKB1 expression in patients with

  7. MLK3 phophorylates AMPK independently of LKB1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lingyu; Jiang, Shanshan; Huang, Deqiang; Lu, Nonghua; Luo, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that cellular energy metabolism is regulated by the AMPK and MLK3-JNK signaling pathways, but the functional link between them remains to be determined. The present study aimed to explore the crosstalk between MLK3 and AMPK. We found that both JNK and AMPK were phosphorylated at their activation sites by TNF-α, Anisomycin, H2O2 and sorbitol. Interestingly, sorbitol stimulated phosphorylation of AMPK at T172 in LKB1-deficient cells. Following the screening of more than 100 kinases, we identified that MLK3 induced phosphorylation of AMPK at T172. Our in vitro analysis further revealed that MLK3-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK at T172 was independent of AMP, but addition of AMP caused a mobility shift of AMPK, an indication of autophosphorylation, suggesting that AMP binding and phosphorylation of T172 leads to maximal activation of AMPK. GST-pull down assays showed a direct interaction between AMPKα1 subunit and MLK3. Altogether, our results indicate that MLK3 serves as a common upstream kinase of AMPK and JNK and functions as a direct upstream kinase for AMPK independent of LKB1. PMID:25874865

  8. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumor suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signaling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues such as liver, muscle, and adipose, a function that has made it a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumor suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway with established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer. PMID:19629071

  9. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose cooperates with arsenic trioxide to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells: involvement of IGF-1R-regulated Akt/mTOR, MEK/ERK and LKB-1/AMPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; de Blas, Elena; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; Mena, Maria Luz; Gómez-Gómez, Milagros; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2012-12-15

    While the anti-tumor efficacy of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) is normally low in monotherapy, it may represent a valuable radio- and chemo-sensitizing agent. We here demonstrate that 2-10 mM 2-DG cooperates with arsenic trioxide (ATO) and other antitumor drugs to induce apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cell lines. Using ATO and HL60 as drug and cell models, respectively, we observed that 2-DG/ATO combination activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as indicated by Bid-, and Bax-regulated cytochrome c and Omi/HtrA2 release, XIAP down-regulation, and caspase-9/-3 pathway activation. 2-DG neither causes oxidative stress nor increases ATO uptake, but causes inner mitochondria membrane permeabilization as well as moderate ATP depletion, which nevertheless do not satisfactorily explain the pro-apoptotic response. Surprisingly 2-DG causes cell line-specific decrease in LKB-1/AMPK phosphorylation/activation, and also causes Akt/mTOR/p70S6K and MEK/ERK activation, which is prevented by co-treatment with ATO. The use of kinase-specific pharmacologic inhibitors and/or siRNAs reveals that apoptosis is facilitated by AMPK inactivation and restrained by Akt and ERK activation, and that Akt and ERK activation mediates AMPK inhibition. Finally, 2-DG stimulates IGF-1R phosphorylation/activation, and co-treatment with IGF-1R inhibitor prevents 2-DG effects on Akt, ERK and AMPK, and facilitates 2-DG-provoked apoptosis. In summary 2-DG elicits IGF-1R-mediated AMPK inactivation and Akt and ERK activation, which facilitates or restrain apoptosis, respectively. 2-DG-provoked AMPK inactivation increases the apoptotic efficacy of ATO, while in turn ATO-provoked Akt and ERK inactivation may increase the efficacy of 2-DG as anti-tumor drug. PMID:23041229

  10. A mouse model uncovers LKB1 as an UVB-induced DNA damage sensor mediating CDKN1A (p21WAF1/CIP1) degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Gil, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Elena; Bech-Serra, Joan Josep; Grueso, Judit; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Moliné, Teresa; Canals, Francesc; Ferrer, Berta; Cortés, Javier; Bastian, Boris; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana Maria; Vivancos, Ana; García-Patos, Vicenç; Recio, Juan Ángel

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight accounts for 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging and skin cancer. The tumor suppressor serine-threonine kinase LKB1 is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in a spectrum of epithelial cancers whose etiology suggests a cooperation with environmental insults. Here we analyzed the role of LKB1 in a UV-dependent mouse skin cancer model and show that LKB1 haploinsufficiency is enough to impede UVB-induced DNA damage repair, contributing to tumor development driven by aberrant growth factor signaling. We demonstrate that LKB1 and its downstream kinase NUAK1 bind to CDKN1A. In response to UVB irradiation, LKB1 together with NUAK1 phosphorylates CDKN1A regulating the DNA damage response. Upon UVB treatment, LKB1 or NUAK1 deficiency results in CDKN1A accumulation, impaired DNA repair and resistance to apoptosis. Importantly, analysis of human tumor samples suggests that LKB1 mutational status could be a prognostic risk factor for UV-induced skin cancer. Altogether, our results identify LKB1 as a DNA damage sensor protein regulating skin UV-induced DNA damage response. PMID:25329316

  11. The role of LKB1 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2011-09-01

    In humans, the LKB1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 19, which is frequently deleted in lung tumors. Unlike most cancers of sporadic origin, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nearly half of the tumors harbor somatic and homozygous inactivating mutations in LKB1. In NSCLC, LKB1 inactivation strongly predominates in adenocarcinomas from smokers and coexists with mutations at other important cancer genes, including KRAS and TP53. Remarkably, LKB1 alterations frequently occur simultaneously with inactivation at another important tumor suppressor gene, BRG1 (also called SMARCA4), which is also located on chromosome 19p. The present review considers the frequency and pattern of LKB1 mutations in lung cancer and the distinct biological pathways in which the LKB1 protein is involved in the development of this type of cancer. Finally, the possible clinical applications in cancer management, especially in lung cancer treatment, associated with the presence of absence of LKB1 are discussed. PMID:21516316

  12. Uncoupling of the LKB1-AMPKα Energy Sensor Pathway by Growth Factors and Oncogenic BRAFV600E

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Canals, Francesc; Colomé, Núria; Merlino, Glenn; Recio, Juan Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the biochemical mechanisms contributing to melanoma development and progression is critical for therapeutical intervention. LKB1 is a multi-task Ser/Thr kinase that phosphorylates AMPK controlling cell growth and apoptosis under metabolic stress conditions. Additionally, LKB1Ser428 becomes phosphorylated in a RAS-Erk1/2-p90RSK pathway dependent manner. However, the connection between the RAS pathway and LKB1 is mostly unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the UV induced HGF transgenic mouse melanoma model to investigate the interplay among HGF signaling, RAS pathway and PI3K pathway in melanoma, we identified LKB1 as a protein directly modified by HGF induced signaling. A variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture revealed that LKB1Ser428 (Ser431 in the mouse) is constitutively phosphorylated in BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines and spontaneous mouse tumors with high RAS pathway activity. Interestingly, BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cells showed a very limited response to metabolic stress mediated by the LKB1-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Here we show for the first time that RAS pathway activation including BRAFV600E mutation promotes the uncoupling of AMPK from LKB1 by a mechanism that appears to be independent of LKB1Ser428 phosphorylation. Notably, the inhibition of the RAS pathway in BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cells recovered the complex formation and rescued the LKB1-AMPKα metabolic stress-induced response, increasing apoptosis in cooperation with the pro-apoptotic proteins Bad and Bim, and the down-regulation of Mcl-1. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that growth factor treatment and in particular oncogenic BRAFV600E induces the uncoupling of LKB1-AMPKα complexes providing at the same time a possible mechanism in cell proliferation that engages cell growth and cell division in response to mitogenic stimuli and resistance to low energy conditions in tumor cells. Importantly, this mechanism reveals a new level for

  13. BRG1 and LKB1: tales of two tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 19p and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nieto, Salvador; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2009-04-01

    Losses of heterozygosity (LOH) of the short arm of chromosome 19 are frequent in lung cancer, suggesting that one or more tumor suppressor genes are present in this region. The LKB1 gene, also called STK11, is somatically inactivated through point mutations and large deletions in lung tumors, demonstrating that LKB1 is a target of the LOH of this chromosomal arm. Data from several independent groups have provided information about the profiles of lung tumors with LKB1 inactivation and it is generally agreed that this alteration strongly predominates in non-small cell lung cancer, in particular adenocarcinomas, in smokers. The LKB1 protein has serine-threonine kinase activity and is involved in the regulation of the cell energetic checkpoint through the phosphorylation and activation of adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK). LKB1 is also involved in other processes such as cell polarization, probably through substrates other than AMPK. Interestingly, another gene on chromosome 19p, BRG1, encoding a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, has emerged as a tumor suppressor gene that is altered in lung tumors. Similar to LKB1, BRG1 is somatically inactivated by point mutations or large deletions in lung tumors featuring LOH of chromosome 19p. These observations suggest an important role for BRG1 in lung cancer and highlight the need to further our understanding of the function of Brahma/SWI2-related gene 1 (BRG1) in cancer. Finally, simultaneous mutations at LKB1 and BRG1 are common in lung cancer cells, which exemplifies how a single event, LOH of chromosome 19p in this instance, targets two different tumor suppressors. PMID:19176640

  14. The LKB1-salt-inducible kinase pathway functions as a key gluconeogenic suppressor in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Foretz, Marc; Marion, Allison; Campbell, David G.; Gourlay, Robert; Boudaba, Nadia; Tournier, Emilie; Titchenell, Paul; Peggie, Mark; Deak, Maria; Wan, Min; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Göransson, Olga; Viollet, Benoit; Gray, Nathanael S.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Sutherland, Calum; Sakamoto, Kei

    2014-01-01

    LKB1 is a master kinase that regulates metabolism and growth through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and 12 other closely related kinases. Liver-specific ablation of LKB1 causes increased glucose production in hepatocytes in vitro and hyperglycaemia in fasting mice in vivo. Here we report that the salt-inducible kinases (SIK1, 2 and 3), members of the AMPK-related kinase family, play a key role as gluconeogenic suppressors downstream of LKB1 in the liver. The selective SIK inhibitor HG-9-91-01 promotes dephosphorylation of transcriptional co-activators CRTC2/3 resulting in enhanced gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production in hepatocytes, an effect that is abolished when an HG-9-91-01-insensitive mutant SIK is introduced or LKB1 is ablated. Although SIK2 was proposed as a key regulator of insulin-mediated suppression of gluconeogenesis, we provide genetic evidence that liver-specific ablation of SIK2 alone has no effect on gluconeogenesis and insulin does not modulate SIK2 phosphorylation or activity. Collectively, we demonstrate that the LKB1–SIK pathway functions as a key gluconeogenic gatekeeper in the liver. PMID:25088745

  15. Somatic LKB1 Mutations Promote Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Shana N.; Gallardo, Teresa D.; Akbay, Esra A.; Liang, Mei-Chi; Contreras, Cristina M.; Boren, Todd; Shimamura, Takeshi; Miller, David S.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Schorge, John O.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2009-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77). LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence. PMID:19340305

  16. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Koji; Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie; Asaka, Masahiro; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  17. A genetic mouse model of invasive endometrial cancer driven by concurrent loss of Pten and Lkb1 is highly responsive to mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hailing; Liu, Pixu; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Erbo; Symonds, Lynn; Ohlson, Carolynn E.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Maira, Sauveur-Michel; Tomaso, Emmanuelle Di; Li, Jane; Myers, Andrea P.; C.Cantley, Lewis; Mills, Gordon B.; Zhao, Jean J.

    2014-01-01

    Signals from the tumor suppressors PTEN and LKB1 converge on mTOR to negatively regulate its function in cancer cells. Notably, both of these suppressors are attenuated in a significant fraction of human endometrial tumors. In this study, we generated a genetic mouse model of endometrial cancer driven by concomitant loss of these suppressors to gain pathophysiological insight into this disease. Dual loss of Pten and Lkb1 in the endometrial epithelium led to rapid development of advanced endometrioid endometrial tumors with 100% penetrance and short host survival. The tumors displayed dysregulated PI3K/Akt and Lkb1/Ampk signaling with hyperactivation of mTOR signaling. Treatment with a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, BEZ235, extended the time before tumor onset and prolonged overall survival. The PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 used as a single agent reduced the growth rate of primary tumor implants in Pten/Lkb1-deficient mice, and the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 was unexpectedly as effective as BEZ235 in triggering tumor regression. In parallel, we also found that ectopic expression of LKB1 in PTEN/LKB1-deficient human endometrial cancer cells increased their sensitivity to PI3K inhibition. Together, our results demonstrated that Pten/Lkb1-deficient endometrial tumors rely strongly on deregulated mTOR signaling, and they provided evidence that LKB1 status may modulate the response of PTEN-deficient tumors to PI3K or mTOR inhibitors. PMID:24322983

  18. The transcriptional responsiveness of LKB1 to STAT-mediated signaling is differentially modulated by prolactin in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver kinase 1 (LKB1) is an important multi-tasking protein linked with metabolic signaling, also controlling polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangements in diverse cell types including cancer cells. Prolactin (PRL) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have been associated with breast cancer progression. The current investigation examines the effect of PRL and STAT-mediated signaling on the transcriptional regulation of LKB1 expression in human breast cancer cells. Methods MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47D human breast cancer cells, and CHO-K1 cells transiently expressing the PRL receptor (long form), were treated with 100 ng/ml of PRL for 24 hours. A LKB1 promoter-luciferase construct and its truncations were used to assess transcriptional changes in response to specific siRNAs or inhibitors targeting Janus activated kinase 2 (JAK2), STAT3, and STAT5A. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were applied to quantify changes in mRNA and protein levels. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to examine STAT3 and STAT5A binding to the LKB1 promoter. Results Consistent with increases in mRNA, the LKB1 promoter was up-regulated by PRL in MDA-MB-231 cells, a response that was lost upon distal promoter truncation. A putative GAS element that could provide a STAT binding site mapped to this region, and its mutation decreased PRL-responsiveness. PRL-mediated increases in promoter activity required signaling through STAT3 and STAT5A, also involving JAK2. Both STATs imparted basally repressive effects in MDA-MB-231 cells. PRL increased in vivo binding of STAT3, and more definitively, STAT5A, to the LKB1 promoter region containing the GAS site. In T47D cells, PRL down-regulated LKB1 transcriptional activity, an effect that was reversed upon culture in phenol red-free media. Interleukin 6, a cytokine activating STAT signaling in diverse cell types, also increased LKB1 mRNA levels and

  19. The Peutz-Jeghers kinase LKB1 suppresses polyp growth from intestinal cells of a proglucagon-expressing lineage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Trapp, Stefan; Richards, Paul; Sayers, Sophie; Sun, Gao; Bloom, Stephen R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Rutter, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1; also known as STK11) is a serine/threonine kinase and tumour suppressor that is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a premalignant syndrome associated with the development of gastrointestinal polyps. Proglucagon-expressing enteroendocrine cells are involved in the control of glucose homeostasis and the regulation of appetite through the secretion of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY). To determine the role of LKB1 in these cells, we bred mice bearing floxed alleles of Lkb1 against animals carrying Cre recombinase under proglucagon promoter control. These mice (GluLKB1KO) were viable and displayed near-normal growth rates and glucose homeostasis. However, they developed large polyps at the gastro-duodenal junction, and displayed premature mortality (death from 120 days of age). Histological analysis of the polyps demonstrated that they had a PJS-like appearance with an arborising smooth-muscle core. Circulating GLP-1 levels were normal in GluLKB1KO mice and the polyps expressed low levels of the peptide, similar to levels in the neighbouring duodenum. Lineage tracing using a Rosa26tdRFP transgene revealed, unexpectedly, that enterocytes within the polyps were derived from non-proglucagon-expressing precursors, whereas connective tissue was largely derived from proglucagon-expressing precursors. Developmental studies in wild-type mice suggested that a subpopulation of proglucagon-expressing cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to become smooth-muscle-like cells. Thus, it is likely that polyps in the GluLKB1KO mice developed from a unique population of smooth-muscle-like cells derived from a proglucagon-expressing precursor. The loss of LKB1 within this subpopulation seems to be sufficient to drive tumorigenesis. PMID:25190708

  20. Sestrin2 promotes LKB1-mediated AMPK activation in the ischemic heart

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Alex; Chen, Li; Wang, Jinli; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Hui; Ma, Yina; Budanov, Andrei; Lee, Jun Hee; Karin, Michael; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of AMPK in the ischemic heart remains incompletely understood. Recent evidence implicates the role of Sestrin2 in the AMPK signaling pathway, and it is hypothesized that Sestrin2 plays an influential role during myocardial ischemia to promote AMPK activation. Sestrin2 protein was found to be expressed in adult cardiomyocytes and accumulated in the heart during ischemic conditions. Sestrin2 knockout (KO) mice were used to determine the importance of Sestrin2 during ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. When wild-type (WT) and Sestrin2 KO mice were subjected to in vivo I/R, myocardial infarct size was significantly greater in Sestrin2 KO compared with WT hearts. Similarly, Langendorff perfused hearts indicated exacerbated postischemic contractile function in Sestrin2 KO hearts compared with WT. Ischemic AMPK activation was found to be impaired in the Sestrin2 KO hearts. Immunoprecipitation of Sestrin2 demonstrated an association with AMPK. Moreover, liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a major AMPK upstream kinase, was associated with the Sestrin2-AMPK complex in a time-dependent manner during ischemia, whereas this interaction was nearly abolished in Sestrin2 KO hearts. Thus, Sestrin2 plays an important role in cardioprotection against I/R injury, serving as an LKB1-AMPK scaffold to initiate AMPK activation during ischemic insults.—Morrison, A., Chen, L. Wang, J., Zhang, M., Yang, H., Ma, Y., Budanov, A., Lee, J. H., Karin, M., Li, J. Sestrin2 promotes LKB1-mediated AMPK activation in the ischemic heart. PMID:25366347

  1. The LKB1 Tumor Suppressor as a Biomarker in Mouse and Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Zhang, Song; Zhao, Ni; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Sharpless, Norman E.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hayes, D. Neil; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the LKB1 gene (also known as STK11) cause the Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and somatic loss of LKB1 has emerged as causal event in a wide range of human malignancies, including melanoma, lung cancer, and cervical cancer. The LKB1 protein is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other downstream targets. Conditional knockout studies in mouse models have consistently shown that LKB1 loss promotes a highly-metastatic phenotype in diverse tissues, and human studies have demonstrated a strong association between LKB1 inactivation and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, LKB1 deficiency confers sensitivity to distinct classes of anticancer drugs. The ability to reliably identify LKB1-deficient tumors is thus likely to have important prognostic and predictive implications. Previous research studies have employed polyclonal antibodies with limited success, and there is no widely-employed immunohistochemical assay for LKB1. Here we report an assay based on a rabbit monoclonal antibody that can reliably detect endogenous LKB1 protein (and its absence) in mouse and human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. LKB1 protein levels determined through this assay correlated strongly with AMPK phosphorylation both in mouse and human tumors, and with mRNA levels in human tumors. Our studies fully validate this immunohistochemical assay for LKB1 in paraffin-embedded formalin tissue sections. This assay should be broadly useful for research studies employing mouse models and also for the development of human tissue-based assays for LKB1 in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24086281

  2. LKB1 reduces ROS-mediated cell damage via activation of p38

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua-Guo; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Chen, Jianfeng; Lu, Yibing; Wang, Jian-Wei; Quan, Cheng-Shi; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Xiao, Xuxian; He, Qiongqiong; Werle, Kaitlin D.; Kim, Hyung-Gyoon; Lopez, Richard; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Li, Yu-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1, also known as serine/threonine kinase 11, STK11) is a tumor suppressor mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in a variety of sporadic cancers. Herein, we demonstrate that LKB1 controls the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protects the genome from oxidative damage. Cells lacking LKB1 exhibit markedly increased intracellular ROS levels, excessive oxidation of DNA, increased mutation rates, and accumulation of DNA damage, which are effectively prevented by ectopic expression of LKB1 and by incubation with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The role of LKB1 in suppressing ROS is independent of AMPK, a canonical substrate of LKB1. Instead, under the elevated ROS, LKB1 binds to and maintains the activity of cdc42-PAK1 (p21 activated kinase 1) complex, which triggers the activation of p38 and its downstream signaling targets, such as ATF-2, thereby enhancing the activity of SOD-2 and catalase, two antioxidant enzymes that protect the cells from ROS accumulation, DNA damage, and loss of viability. Our results provide a new paradigm for a non-canonical tumor suppressor function of LKB1 and highlight the importance of targeting ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer cells lacking LKB1. PMID:25263448

  3. Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2011-09-15

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

  4. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes through LKB1/AMPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonghan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Tiantian; Wang, Yanwen; Sun, Changhao

    2013-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA) is a triterpenoid compound with multiple biological functions. This compound has recently been reported to possess an anti-obesity effect; however, the mechanisms are less understood. Objective As adipogenesis plays a critical role in obesity, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of UA on adipogenesis and mechanisms of action in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods and Results The 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced to differentiate in the presence or absence of UA for 6 days. The cells were determined for proliferation, differentiation, fat accumulation as well as the protein expressions of molecular targets that regulate or are involved in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. The results demonstrated that ursolic acid at concentrations ranging from 2.5 µM to 10 µM dose-dependently attenuated adipogenesis, accompanied by reduced protein expression of CCAAT element binding protein β (C/EBPβ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBPα) and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), respectively. Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and protein expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), but decreased protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein expression of (silent mating type information regulation 2, homolog) 1 (Sirt1). Further studies demonstrated that the anti-adipogenic effect of UA was reversed by the AMPK siRNA, but not by the Sirt1 inhibitor nicotinamide. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), the upstream kinase of AMPK, was upregulated by UA. When LKB1 was silenced with siRNA or the inhibitor radicicol, the effect of UA on AMPK activation was diminished. Conclusions Ursolic acid inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis through the LKB1/AMPK pathway

  5. LKB1/STK11 Inactivation Leads to Expansion of a Prometastatic Tumor Subpopulation in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjin; Monahan, Kimberly B.; Pfefferle, Adam D.; Shimamura, Takeshi; Sorrentino, Jessica; Chan, Keefe T.; Roadcap, David W.; Ollila, David W.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Miller, C. Ryan; Perou, Charles M.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Bear, James E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Germline mutations in LKB1 (STK11) are associated with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), which includes aberrant mucocutaneous pigmentation, and somatic LKB1 mutations occur in 10% of cutaneous melanoma. By somatically inactivating Lkb1 with K-Ras activation (±p53 loss) in murine melanocytes, we observed variably pigmented and highly metastatic melanoma with 100% penetrance. LKB1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of the SRC family kinase (SFK) YES, increased expression of WNT target genes, and expansion of a CD24+ cell population, which showed increased metastatic behavior in vitro and in vivo relative to isogenic CD24− cells. These results suggest that LKB1 inactivation in the context of RAS activation facilitates metastasis by inducing an SFK-dependent expansion of a prometastatic, CD24+ tumor subpopulation. PMID:22698401

  6. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Peña, Christopher G; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D; Aloisio, Gina M; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S; Lea, Jayanthi S; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Amelio, Antonio L; Brekken, Rolf A; Castrillon, Diego H

    2015-11-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  7. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D.; Aloisio, Gina M.; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S.; Lea, Jayanthi S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  8. Energy sensing and cancer: LKB1 function and lessons learnt from Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shorning, Boris Y; Clarke, Alan R

    2016-04-01

    We describe in this review increasing evidence that loss of LKB1 kinase in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) derails the existing natural balance between cell survival and tumour growth suppression. LKB1 deletion can plunge cells into an energy/oxidative stress-induced crisis which leads to the activation of alternative and often carcinogenic pathways to maintain cellular energy levels. It therefore appears that although LKB1 deficiency can suppress oncogenic transformation in the short term, it can ultimately lead to more progressed and malignant phenotypes by driving abnormal cell differentiation, genomic instability and increased tumour heterogeneity. PMID:26877140

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans PIG-1/MELK acts in a conserved PAR-4/LKB1 polarity pathway to promote asymmetric neuroblast divisions.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shih-Chieh; Brinkmann, Eva-Maria; Teuliere, Jerome; Garriga, Gian

    2013-03-01

    Asymmetric cell divisions produce daughter cells with distinct sizes and fates, a process important for generating cell diversity during development. Many Caenorhabditis elegans neuroblasts, including the posterior daughter of the Q cell (Q.p), divide to produce a larger neuron or neuronal precursor and a smaller cell that dies. These size and fate asymmetries require the gene pig-1, which encodes a protein orthologous to vertebrate MELK and belongs to the AMPK-related family of kinases. Members of this family can be phosphorylated and activated by the tumor suppressor kinase LKB1, a conserved polarity regulator of epithelial cells and neurons. In this study, we present evidence that the C. elegans orthologs of LKB1 (PAR-4) and its partners STRAD (STRD-1) and MO25 (MOP-25.2) regulate the asymmetry of the Q.p neuroblast division. We show that PAR-4 and STRD-1 act in the Q lineage and function genetically in the same pathway as PIG-1. A conserved threonine residue (T169) in the PIG-1 activation loop is essential for PIG-1 activity, consistent with the model that PAR-4 (or another PAR-4-regulated kinase) phosphorylates and activates PIG-1. We also demonstrate that PIG-1 localizes to centrosomes during cell divisions of the Q lineage, but this localization does not depend on T169 or PAR-4. We propose that a PAR-4-STRD-1 complex stimulates PIG-1 kinase activity to promote asymmetric neuroblast divisions and the generation of daughter cells with distinct fates. Changes in cell fate may underlie many of the abnormal behaviors exhibited by cells after loss of PAR-4 or LKB1. PMID:23267054

  10. Methylisoindigo preferentially kills cancer stem cells by interfering cell metabolism via inhibition of LKB1 and activation of AMPK in PDACs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Kim, Jee Young; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Duvaci, Tijen; Rafiee, Roya; Theobald, Jannick; Alborzinia, Hamed; Holenya, Pavlo; Fredebohm, Johannes; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Hafezi, Mohammadreza; Saffari, Arash; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) clinically has a very poor prognosis. No small molecule is available to reliably achieve cures. Meisoindigo is chemically related to the natural product indirubin and showed substantial efficiency in clinical chemotherapy for CML in China. However, its effect on PDAC is still unknown. Our results showed strong anti-proliferation effect of meisoindigo on gemcitabine-resistant PDACs. Using a recently established primary PDAC cell line, called Jopaca-1 with a larger CSCs population as model, we observed a reduction of CD133+ and ESA+/CD44+/CD24+ populations upon treatment and concomitantly a decreased expression of CSC-associated genes, and reduced cellular mobility and sphere formation. Investigating basic cellular metabolic responses, we detected lower oxygen consumption and glucose uptake, while intracellular ROS levels increased. This was effectively neutralized by the addition of antioxidants, indicating an essential role of the cellular redox balance. Further analysis on energy metabolism related signaling revealed that meisoindigo inhibited LKB1, but activated AMPK. Both of them were involved in cellular apoptosis. Additional in situ hybridization in tissue sections of PDAC patients reproducibly demonstrated co-expression and -localization of LKB1 and CD133 in malignant areas. Finally, we detected that CD133+/CD44+ were more vulnerable to meisoindigo, which could be mimicked by LKB1 siRNAs. Our results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that LKB1 sustains the CSC population in PDACs and demonstrate a clear benefit of meisoindigo in treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells. This novel mechanism may provide a promising new treatment option for PDAC. PMID:26887594

  11. Underexpression of LKB1 tumor suppressor is associated with enhanced Wnt signaling and malignant characteristics of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Keqiang; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Liu, Xiyong; Li, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yong; Cheng, Qingbao; Hu, Zhenli; Guo, Chao; Hu, Shuya; Mu, Bing; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Li, Jie; Smith, Lynne; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qi; Chu, Peiguo; Chang, Vincent; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. In this study, we identified the presence of gene deletion and missense mutation leading to inactivation or underexpression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor and excluded the involvement of LKB1 gene hypermethylation in ICC tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LKB1 was underexpressed in a portion of 326 ICC tissues compared to their adjacent normal tissues. By statistical analysis underexpression of LKB1 in ICC tissues significantly correlated with poor survival and malignant disease characteristics in ICC patients. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of LKB1 significantly enhanced growth, migration, and invasion of three LKB1-competent ICC cell lines. Global transcriptional profiling analysis identified multiple malignancy-promoting genes, such as HIF-1α, CD24, Talin1, Vinculin, Wnt5, and signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, and cell adhesion as novel targets of LKB1 underexpression in ICC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 gene expression dramatically enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ICC cells, while an inverse correlation between LKB1 and nuclear β-catenin was observed in ICC tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for ICC carcinogenesis in which LKB1 underexpression enhances multiple signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin to promote disease progression. PMID:26056085

  12. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  13. Heightening Energetic Stress Selectively Targets LKB1-Deficient Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milica; McMickle, Robert; Abt, Evan; Seki, Atsuko; Simko, Sarah A; Magyar, Clara; Stout, David B; Fishbein, Michael C; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Shackelford, David B

    2015-11-15

    Inactivation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor is a frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) leading to the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and sensitivity to the metabolic stress inducer phenformin. In this study, we explored the combinatorial use of phenformin with the mTOR catalytic kinase inhibitor MLN0128 as a treatment strategy for NSCLC bearing comutations in the LKB1 and KRAS genes. NSCLC is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disease, giving rise to lung tumors of varying histologies that include adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that phenformin in combination with MLN0128 induced a significant therapeutic response in KRAS/LKB1-mutant human cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC that develop both adenocarcinomas and SCCs. Specifically, we found that KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung adenocarcinomas responded strongly to phenformin + MLN0128 treatment, but the response of SCCs to single or combined treatment with MLN0128 was more attenuated due to acquired resistance to mTOR inhibition through modulation of the AKT-GSK signaling axis. Combinatorial use of the mTOR inhibitor and AKT inhibitor MK2206 robustly inhibited the growth and viability of squamous lung tumors, thus providing an effective strategy to overcome resistance. Taken together, our findings define new personalized therapeutic strategies that may be rapidly translated into clinical use for the treatment of KRAS/LKB1-mutant adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors. PMID:26574479

  14. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  15. Radiation-induced autophagy promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell survival via the LKB1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chi; Xie, Conghua

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment modality for esophageal cancer; however, the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy is limited by tumor radioresistance. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that radiation induces tumor cell autophagy as a cytoprotective adaptive response, which depends on liver kinase B1 (LKB1) also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11). Radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy was found to be dependent on signaling through the LKB1 pathway, and autophagy inhibitors that disrupted radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy increased cell cycle arrest and cell death in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy also reduced the clonogenic survival of the Eca-109 cells. When treated with radiation alone, human esophageal carcinoma xenografts showed increased LC3B and p-LKB1 expression, which was decreased by the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. In vivo inhibition of autophagy disrupted tumor growth and increased tumor apoptosis when combined with 6 Gy of ionizing radiation. In summary, our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of resistance to radiotherapy in which radiation-induced autophagy, via the LKB1 pathway, promotes tumor cell survival. This indicates that inhibition of autophagy can serve as an adjuvant treatment to improve the curative effect of radiotherapy. PMID:27109915

  16. Diet and tumor LKB1 expression interact to determine sensitivity to anti-neoplastic effects of metformin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Algire, C; Amrein, L; Bazile, M; David, S; Zakikhani, M; Pollak, M

    2011-03-10

    Hypothesis-generating epidemiological research has suggested that cancer burden is reduced in diabetics treated with metformin and experimental work has raised questions regarding the role of direct adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated anti-neoplastic effects of metformin as compared with indirect effects attributable to reductions in circulating insulin levels in the host. We treated both tumor LKB1 expression and host diet as variables, and observed that metformin inhibited tumor growth and reduced insulin receptor activation in tumors of mice with diet-induced hyperinsulinemia, independent of tumor LKB1 expression. In the absence of hyperinsulinemia, metformin inhibited only the growth of tumors transfected with short hairpin RNA against LKB1, a finding attributable neither to an effect on host insulin level nor to activation of AMPK within the tumor. Further investigation in vitro showed that cells with reduced LKB1 expression are more sensitive to metformin-induced adenosine triphosphate depletion owing to impaired ability to activate LKB1-AMPK-dependent energy-conservation mechanisms. Thus, loss of function of LKB1 can accelerate proliferation in contexts where it functions as a tumor suppressor, but can also sensitize cells to metformin. These findings predict that any clinical utility of metformin or similar compounds in oncology will be restricted to subpopulations defined by host insulin levels and/or loss of function of LKB1. PMID:21102522

  17. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C.; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells. PMID:26506235

  18. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  19. Differential control of Yorkie activity by LKB1/AMPK and the Hippo/Warts cascade in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gailite, Ieva; Aerne, Birgit L.; Tapon, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a highly conserved tumor suppressor network that restricts developmental tissue growth and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. At the heart of the Hpo pathway is the progrowth transcriptional coactivator Yorkie [Yki–Yes-activated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) in mammals]. Yki activity is restricted through phosphorylation by the Hpo/Warts core kinase cascade, but increasing evidence indicates that core kinase-independent modes of regulation also play an important role. Here, we examine Yki regulation in the Drosophila larval central nervous system and uncover a Hpo/Warts-independent function for the tumor suppressor kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and its downstream effector, the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), in repressing Yki activity in the central brain/ventral nerve cord. Although the Hpo/Warts core cascade restrains Yki in the optic lobe, it is dispensable for Yki target gene repression in the late larval central brain/ventral nerve cord. Thus, we demonstrate a dramatically different wiring of Hpo signaling in neighboring cell populations of distinct developmental origins in the central nervous system. PMID:26324895

  20. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avtanski, Dimiter B; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Saxena, Neeraj K; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-10-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  1. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  2. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  3. Modulation of the LKB1-AMPK Signalling Pathway Underpins Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Evans, A Mark; Lewis, Sophronia A; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A; Moral-Sanz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the defining characteristic of pulmonary arteries is the process of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which, under physiological conditions, supports ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung by diverting blood flow away from oxygen deprived areas of the lung to oxygen rich regions. However, when alveolar hypoxia is more widespread, either at altitude or with disease (e.g., cystic fibrosis), HPV may lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. HPV is driven by the intrinsic response to hypoxia of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, which are acutely sensitive to relatively small changes in pO2 and have evolved to monitor oxygen supply and thus address ventilation-perfusion mismatch. There is now a consensus that the inhibition by hypoxia of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation represents a key step towards the induction of HPV, but the precise nature of the signalling pathway(s) engaged thereafter remains open to debate. We will consider the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase through which AMPK is intimately coupled to changes in oxygen supply via mitochondrial metabolism. A growing body of evidence, from our laboratory and others, suggests that modulation of the LKB1-AMPK signalling pathway underpins both hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26303471

  4. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, Luc; Rooman, Ilse

    2005-10-01

    Beta-cell mass regulation represents a critical issue for understanding diabetes, a disease characterized by a near-absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency in the number of pancreatic beta cells. The number of islet beta cells present at birth is mainly generated by the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells, a process called neogenesis. Shortly after birth, beta-cell neogenesis stops and a small proportion of cycling beta cells can still expand the cell number to compensate for increased insulin demands, albeit at a slow rate. The low capacity for self-replication in the adult is too limited to result in a significant regeneration following extensive tissue injury. Likewise, chronically increased metabolic demands can lead to beta-cell failure to compensate. Neogenesis from progenitor cells inside or outside islets represents a more potent mechanism leading to robust expansion of the beta-cell mass, but it may require external stimuli. For therapeutic purposes, advantage could be taken from the surprising differentiation plasticity of adult pancreatic cells and possibly also from stem cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that it is feasible to regenerate and expand the beta-cell mass by the application of hormones and growth factors like glucagon-like peptide-1, gastrin, epidermal growth factor, and others. Treatment with these external stimuli can restore a functional beta-cell mass in diabetic animals, but further studies are required before it can be applied to humans. PMID:16183912

  5. Pulsed Azidohomoalanine Labeling in Mammals (PALM) Detects Changes in Liver-Specific LKB1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of proteomes by mass spectrometry has proven to be useful to study human pathology recapitulated in cellular or animal models of disease. Enriching and quantifying newly synthesized proteins (NSPs) at set time points by mass spectrometry has the potential to identify important early regulatory or expression changes associated with disease states or perturbations. NSP can be enriched from proteomes by employing pulsed introduction of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA). We demonstrate that pulsed introduction of AHA in the feed of mice can label and identify NSP from multiple tissues. Furthermore, we quantitate differences in new protein expression resulting from CRE-LOX initiated knockout of LKB1 in mouse livers. Overall, the PALM strategy allows for the first time in vivo labeling of mouse tissues to differentiate protein synthesis rates at discrete time points. PMID:26445171

  6. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1. PMID:27015742

  7. Additive effects of eukaryotic co‑expression plasmid carrying GRIM‑19 and LKB1 genes on breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shao, Ying; Du, Ye; Geng, Wei; Jiang, Tong; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Duo

    2015-11-01

    Gene associated with retinoid‑interferon‑induced mortality 19 (GRIM‑19) and the liver kinase B1 (LKB1) gene, two types of tumor suppressor gene, have been demonstrated to have important roles in breast carcinogenesis. The present study developed a dual expression plasmid that co‑expressed GRIM‑19 and LKB1, and evaluated the combined effects of the two genes against breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with a plasmid for the simultaneous expression of GRIM‑19 and LKB1 (pGRIM19‑LKB1) into MCF‑7 breast cancer cells significantly inhibited the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion compared with the effects of transfection with either pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. Furthermore, transfection with pGRIM19‑LKB1 induced enhanced levels of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 stage in MCF7 cells compared to the effects of pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. An in vivo experiment using an MCF‑7 xenograft tumor model demonstrated that intravenous injection of pGRIM19‑LKB1 had an enhanced effect on tumor growth inhibition compared to that of pGRIM‑19 or pLKB1 alone. In conclusion the findings of the present study suggested that transfection with eukaryotic plasmid for the simultaneous expression of GRIM‑19 and LKB1 more effectively suppressed the growth of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, and may therefore have therapeutic potential for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:26458553

  8. Honokiol activates the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway and attenuates the lipid accumulation in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min Suk; Kim, Jung Hwan; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl; Park, Sang Won

    2015-04-15

    Honokiol is a bioactive neolignan compound isolated from the species of Magnolia. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which honokiol alleviates the development of non-alcoholic steatosis. HepG2 cells were treated with honokiol for 1 h, and then exposed to 1 mM free fatty acid (FFA) for 24 h to simulate non-alcoholic steatosis in vitro. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 28 days, and honokiol (10 mg/kg/day) was daily treated. Honokiol concentration-dependently attenuated intracellular fat overloading and triglyceride (TG) accumulation in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. Honokiol significantly inhibited sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) maturation and the induction of lipogenic proteins, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells, but these effects were blocked by pretreatment of an AMPK inhibitor. Honokiol induced AMPK phosphorylation and subsequent acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation, which were inhibited by genetic deletion of liver kinase B1 (LKB1). Honokiol stimulated LKB1 phosphorylation, and genetic deletion of LKB1 blocked the effect of honokiol on SREBP-1c maturation and the induction of SCD-1 and FAS proteins in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. Honokiol attenuated the increases in hepatic TG and lipogenic protein levels and fat accumulation in the mice fed with high-fat diet, while significantly induced LKB1 and AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that honokiol has an anti-lipogenic effect in hepatocytes, and this effect may be mediated by the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway, which induces ACC phosphorylation and inhibits SREBP-1c maturation in hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Honokiol attenuates lipid accumulation induced by free fatty acid in hepatocyte. • Honokiol inhibits the increase in lipogenic enzyme levels induced by free fatty

  9. Peutz-Jeghers families unlinked to STK11/LKB1 gene mutations are highly predisposed to primitive biliary adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Olschwang, S.; Boisson, C.; Thomas, G.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—Germline mutations of the STK11/LKB1 tumour suppressor gene (19p13.3) are responsible for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a rare genetic disorder, which is dominantly inherited. In addition to the typical hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and perioral pigmented lesions, PJS is also associated with the development of tumours in various sites. No specific follow up has yet been evaluated for gene carriers. Furthermore, genetic heterogeneity has been reported, which makes genetic counselling difficult.
METHODS—We report here the analysis of the STK11/LKB1 locus in a series of 34 PJS families, combining the search for mutations and rearrangements in the coding sequence, allele specific expression tests, and linkage studies.
RESULTS—Germline deleterious mutation of the STK11/LKB1 gene were identified in 70% of cases. The hypothesis of a second PJS locus was reinforced and PJS families could be divided into two groups on the basis of the presence or absence of an identified STK11/LKB1 alteration. Analysis of clinical data indicates that the cancer associated risk is markedly different in the two groups. PJS patients with no identified STK11/LKB1 mutation are at major risk for proximal biliary adenocarcinoma, an infrequent tumour in the general population.
CONCLUSION—Up to 30% of PJS patients are caused by mutation in an unidentified gene that confers high susceptibility to cancer development.


Keywords: Peutz-Jeghers disease; genetic heterogeneity; cancer predisposition; risk estimation PMID:11389158

  10. Pancreatic regeneration: basic research and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Shigenori, Ota; Ishii, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ueki, Tomomi; Meguro, Makoto; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kojima, Takashi; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Noriyuki; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic regeneration (PR) is an interesting phenomenon that could provide clues as to how the control of diabetes mellitus might be achieved. Due to the different regenerative abilities of the pancreas and liver, the molecular mechanism responsible for PR is largely unknown. In this review, we describe five representative murine models of PR and thirteen humoral mitogens that stimulate β-cell proliferation. We also describe pancreatic ontogenesis, including the molecular transcriptional differences between α-cells and β-cells. Furthermore, we review 14 murine models which carry defects in genes related to key transcription factors for pancreatic ontogenesis to gain further insight into pancreatic development. PMID:26148809

  11. LKB1/KRAS mutant lung cancers constitute a genetic subset of NSCLC with increased sensitivity to MAPK and mTOR signalling inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, C L; Choudhury, B; Davies, H; Edkins, S; Greenman, C; Haaften, G van; Mironenko, T; Santarius, T; Stevens, C; Stratton, M R; Futreal, P A

    2009-01-01

    LKB1/STK11 is a multitasking tumour suppressor kinase. Germline inactivating mutations of the gene are responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers hereditary cancer syndrome. It is also somatically inactivated in approximately 30% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we report that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLC cell lines are sensitive to the MEK inhibitor CI-1040 shown by a dose-dependent reduction in proliferation rate, whereas LKB1 and KRAS mutations alone do not confer similar sensitivity. We show that this subset of NSCLC is also sensitised to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, the data suggest that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLCs are a genetically and functionally distinct subset and further suggest that this subset of lung cancers might afford an opportunity for exploitation of anti-MAPK/mTOR-targeted therapies. PMID:19165201

  12. Pancreatic Insulin Content Regulation by the Estrogen Receptor ERα

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Ropero, Ana B.; Carrera, M. Pilar; Cederroth, Christopher R.; Baquié, Mathurin; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Nef, Serge; Stefani, Enrico; Nadal, Angel

    2008-01-01

    The function of pancreatic β-cells is the synthesis and release of insulin, the main hormone involved in blood glucose homeostasis. Estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, are important molecules involved in glucose metabolism, yet their role in pancreatic β-cell physiology is still greatly unknown. In this report we show that both ERα and ERβ are present in pancreatic β-cells. Long term exposure to physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol (E2) increased β-cell insulin content, insulin gene expression and insulin release, yet pancreatic β-cell mass was unaltered. The up-regulation of pancreatic β-cell insulin content was imitated by environmentally relevant doses of the widespread endocrine disruptor Bisphenol-A (BPA). The use of ERα and ERβ agonists as well as ERαKO and ERβKO mice suggests that the estrogen receptor involved is ERα. The up-regulation of pancreatic insulin content by ERα activation involves ERK1/2. These data may be important to explain the actions of E2 and environmental estrogens in endocrine pancreatic function and blood glucose homeostasis. PMID:18446233

  13. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10–30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  14. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Hye Rin; Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10-30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1-42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  15. Neural Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Target for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aeson; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P.; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is known to play a pivotal role in driving cancer progression and governing response to therapy. This is of significance in pancreatic cancer where the unique pancreatic tumor microenvironment, characterized by its pronounced desmoplasia and fibrosis, drives early stages of tumor progression and dissemination, and contributes to its associated low survival rates. Several molecular factors that regulate interactions between pancreatic tumors and their surrounding stroma are beginning to be identified. Yet broader physiological factors that influence these interactions remain unclear. Here, we discuss a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies that highlight the important role chronic stress plays as a physiological regulator of neural-tumor interactions in driving the progression of pancreatic cancer. These studies propose several approaches to target stress signaling via the β-adrenergic signaling pathway in order to slow pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. They also provide evidence to support the use of β-blockers as a novel therapeutic intervention to complement current clinical strategies to improve cancer outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26193320

  16. Metformin increases antitumor activity of MEK inhibitors through GLI1 downregulation in LKB1 positive human NSCLC cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Mauro, Concetta Di; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Papaccio, Federica; Fasano, Morena; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; De Vita, Ferdinando; Orditura, Michele; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metformin, widely used as antidiabetic drug, showed antitumoral effects expecially in combination with chemotherapy. Our group recently has demonstrated that metformin and gefitinib are synergistic in LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cells. In these models, metformin as single agent induced an activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) through an increased C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization. Experimental design Since single agent metformin enhances proliferating signals through the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway, and several MEK inhibitors (MEK-I) demonstrated clinical efficacy in combination with other agents in NSCLC, we tested the effects of metformin plus MEK-I (selumetinib or pimasertib) on proliferation, invasiveness, migration abilities in vitro and in vivo in LKB1 positive NSCLC models harboring KRAS wild type and mutated gene. Results The combination of metformin with MEK-I showed a strong anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effect in Calu-3, H1299, H358 and H1975 human NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status. The combination reduced the metastatic behaviour of NSCLC cells, via a downregulation of GLI1 trascritional activity, thus affecting the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. Metformin and MEK-Is combinations also decreased the production and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by reducing the NF-jB (p65) binding to MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoters. Conclusions Metformin potentiates the antitumor activity of MEK-Is in human LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status, through GLI1 downregulation and by reducing the NF-jB (p65)-mediated transcription of MMP-2 and MMP-9. PMID:26673006

  17. Allelic imbalance at the LKB1 (STK11) locus in tumours from patients with Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome provides evidence for a hamartoma-(adenoma)-carcinoma sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; Ellis, I; Zauber, P; Iwama, T; Marchese, C; Talbot, I; Xue, W H; Yan, Z Y; Tomlinson, I

    1999-05-01

    Patients with Peutz-Jeghers' syndrome (PJS) develop hamartomatous gastrointestinal polyps and characteristic pigmentation, as a result of germline mutations in the LKB1 gene. The hamartomas in PJS were long considered to be without malignant potential. There is, however, accumulating epidemiological evidence to suggest that PJS predisposes to cancers at several different sites (colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, testis, and cervix), although large enough patient samples are rarely available to prove this. Allelic imbalance [allele loss, loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] has previously been reported in a small number of PJS polyps, suggesting that LKB1 acts as a tumour suppressor in these tumours. This study confirms allelic loss at LKB1 in PJS polyps and shows that LOH also occurs in cancers of the colon, breast, and cervix in PJS patients. Allele loss was additionally found in a colonic adenoma from a PJS patient, strongly suggesting the existence of a hamartoma-(adenoma)-carcinoma sequence in tumourigenesis. These results provide molecular evidence that PJS patients are predisposed to cancers at several sites, as a direct result of selection for loss of the 'wild-type' LKB1 allele in tumours. Given the rare involvement of LKB1 in sporadic cancers, these data also suggest that the indirect effect on cancer risk (or 'bystander effect') proposed for hamartomas in juvenile polyposis does not apply to carcinomas in PJS. PMID:10398133

  18. LKB1 is required for adiponectin-mediated modulation of AMPK–S6K axis and inhibition of migration and invasion of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Taliaferro-Smith, L; Nagalingam, A; Zhong, D; Zhou, W; Saxena, NK; Sharma, D

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is widely known as an adipocytokine with therapeutic potential for its markedly protective function in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disorders, metabolic syndrome, systemic insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and more recently carcinogenesis. In the present study, we show that adiponectin inhibits adhesion, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Further analysis of the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed that adiponectin treatment increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and activity as evident by increased phosphorylation of downstream target of AMPK, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and inhibition of p70S6 kinase (S6K). Intriguingly, we discovered that adiponectin treatment increases the expression of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 in breast cancer cells. Overexpression of LKB1 in breast cancer cells further increased adiponectin-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK. Using isogenic LKB1 knockdown cell line pair, we found that LKB1 is required for adiponectin-mediated modulation of AMPK–S6K axis and more importantly, inhibition of adhesion, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Taken together these data present a novel mechanism involving specific upregulation of tumor suppressor gene LKB1 by which adiponectin inhibits adhesion, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate the possibility of using adiponectin analogues to inhibit invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. PMID:19483724

  19. LKB1/AMPK inhibits TGF-β1 production and the TGF-β signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nian-Shuang; Zou, Jun-Rong; Lin, Hui; Ke, Rong; He, Xiao-Ling; Xiao, Lu; Huang, Deqiang; Luo, Lingyu; Lv, Nonghua; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a fuel gauge that maintains energy homeostasis in both normal and cancerous cells, and has emerged as a tumor suppressor. The present study aims to delineate the functional relationship between AMPK and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Our results showed that expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase of AMPK, impeded TGF-β-induced Smad phosphorylation and their transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells, whereas knockdown of LKB1 or AMPKα1 subunit by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) enhanced the effect of TGF-β. Furthermore, AMPK activation reduced the promoter activity of TGF-β1. In accordance, type 2 diabetic patients taking metformin displayed a trend of reduction of serum TGF-β1, as compared with those without metformin. A significant reduction of serum TGF-β1 was found in mice after treatment with metformin. These results suggest that AMPK inhibits the transcription of TGF-β1, leading to reduction of its concentration in serum. Finally, metformin suppressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates that AMPK exerts multiple actions on TGF-β signaling and supports that AMPK can serve as a therapeutic drug target for breast cancer. PMID:26718214

  20. Nodal and Lefty signaling regulates the growth of pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Qing; Sterling, Lori; Stotland, Aleksandr; Hua, Hong; Kritzik, Marcie; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Nodal and its antagonist, Lefty, are important mediators specifying the laterality of the organs during embryogenesis. Nodal signals through activin receptors in the presence of its co-receptor, Cripto. In the present study, we investigated the possible roles of Nodal and Lefty signaling during islet development and regeneration. We found that both Nodal and Lefty are expressed in the pancreas during embryogenesis and islet regeneration. In vitro studies demonstrated that Nodal inhibits, whereas Lefty enhances, the proliferation of a pancreatic cell line. In addition, we showed that Lefty-1 activates MAPK and Akt phosphorylation in these cells. In vivo blockade of endogenous Lefty using neutralizing Lefty-1 monoclonal antibody results in a significantly decreased proliferation of duct epithelial cells during islet regeneration. This is the first study to decipher the expression and function of Nodal and Lefty in pancreatic growth. Importantly, our results highlight a novel function of Nodal-Lefty signaling in the regulation of expansion of pancreatic cells. PMID:18393305

  1. MicroRNA-7a regulates pancreatic β cell function

    PubMed Central

    Latreille, Mathieu; Hausser, Jean; Stützer, Ina; Zhang, Quan; Hastoy, Benoit; Gargani, Sofia; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois; Zavolan, Mihaela; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.; Eliasson, Lena; Rülicke, Thomas; Rorsman, Patrik; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA) networks contribute to inappropriate responses following pathological stress and are the underlying cause of several disease conditions. In pancreatic β cells, miRNAs have been largely unstudied and little is known about how specific miRNAs regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) or impact the adaptation of β cell function to metabolic stress. In this study, we determined that miR-7 is a negative regulator of GSIS in β cells. Using Mir7a2 deficient mice, we revealed that miR-7a2 regulates β cell function by directly regulating genes that control late stages of insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane and ternary SNARE complex activity. Transgenic mice overexpressing miR-7a in β cells developed diabetes due to impaired insulin secretion and β cell dedifferentiation. Interestingly, perturbation of miR-7a expression in β cells did not affect proliferation and apoptosis, indicating that miR-7 is dispensable for the maintenance of endocrine β cell mass. Furthermore, we found that miR-7a levels are decreased in obese/diabetic mouse models and human islets from obese and moderately diabetic individuals with compensated β cell function. Our results reveal an interconnecting miR-7 genomic circuit that regulates insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic β cells and support a role for miR-7 in the adaptation of pancreatic β cell function in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24789908

  2. Argonaute2 Regulates the Pancreatic β-Cell Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Tattikota, Sudhir G.; Sury, Matthias D.; Rathjen, Thomas; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Pandey, Amit K.; You, Xintian; Becker, Clinton; Chen, Wei; Selbach, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N.

    2013-01-01

    Argonaute2 (Ago2) is an established component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Similar to miR-375 loss-of-function studies, inhibition of Ago2 in the pancreatic β-cell resulted in enhanced insulin release underlining the relationship between these two genes. Moreover, as the most abundant microRNA in pancreatic endocrine cells, miR-375 was also observed to be enriched in Ago2-associated complexes. Both Ago2 and miR-375 regulate the pancreatic β-cell secretome, and by using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified the enhanced release of a set of proteins or secretion “signatures ” in response to a glucose stimulus using the murine β-cell line MIN6. In addition, the loss of Ago2 resulted in the increased expression of miR-375 target genes, including gephyrin and ywhaz. These targets positively contribute to exocytosis indicating they may mediate the functional role of both miR-375 and Ago proteins in the pancreatic β-cell by influencing the secretory pathway. This study specifically addresses the role of Ago2 in the systemic release of proteins from β-cells and highlights the contribution of the microRNA pathway to the function of this cell type. PMID:23358505

  3. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. MUC1 Regulates PDGFA Expression During Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sahraei, Mahnaz; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Curry, Jennifer M; Teresa, Tinder L; Nath, Sritama; Besmer, Dahlia; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Dalia, Ritu; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) has one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. Mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is a key modulator of several signaling pathways that affect oncogenesis, motility, and metastasis. Its expression is known to be associated with poor prognosis in patients. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We report a novel association of MUC1 with Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-A (PDGFA). PDGFA is one of the many drivers of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis in PDA. Using mouse PDA models as well as human samples, we show clear evidence that MUC1 regulates the expression and secretion of PDGFA. This, in turn, influences proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells leading to higher tumor burden in vivo. In addition, we reveal that MUC1 over expressing cells are heavily dependent on PDGFA both for proliferation and invasion while MUC1-null cells are not. Moreover, PDGFA and MUC1 are critical for translocation of βcatenin to the nucleus for oncogenesis to ensue. Finally, we elucidate the underlying mechanism by which MUC1 regulates PDGFA expression and secretion in pancreatic cancer cells. We show that MUC1 associates with Hif1-α, a known transcription factor involved in controlling PDGFA expression. Furthermore, MUC1 facilitates Hif1-α translocation to the nucleus. In summary, we have demonstrated that MUC1-induced invasion and proliferation occurs via increased exogenous production of PDGFA. Thus, impeding MUC1 regulation of PDGFA signaling may be therapeutically beneficial for patients with PDA. PMID:22266848

  5. Integrin β3 and LKB1 are independently involved in the inhibition of proliferation by lovastatin in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Huei; Lin, Hung-Yun; Changou, Chun A; Chen, Chun-Han; Liu, Yun-Ru; Wang, Jinghan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Luh, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat. In our study, Lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, demonstrated anticancer properties by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Lovastatin inhibited the expressions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Furthermore, lovastatin inhibited the expressions of integrin β1 and integrin β3 but not integrin αv or integrin β5. While Lovastatin's inhibitory effects on TGFβ1, COX2, and ICAM-1 expression were independently controlled by the tumor suppressor LKB1, integrin β3 expression was not affected. Lovastatin's inhibitory effect on cell adhesion was associated with the decreased expression of integrin β3 and cell surface heterodimer integrin αvβ3. Quantitative real time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, and cell migration assays all confirmed that Lovastatin inhibits integrin αvβ3 downstream signaling including FAK activation, and β-catenin, vimentin, ZO-1, and β-actin. Overall, Lovastatin reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration by modifying the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion and other critical cellular processes. Our study highlights novel anti-cancer properties of Lovastatin and supports further exploration of statins in the context of cholangiocarcinoma therapy. PMID:26517522

  6. Integrin β3 and LKB1 are independently involved in the inhibition of proliferation by lovastatin in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Huei; Lin, Hung-Yun; Changou, Chun A; Chen, Chun-Han; Liu, Yun-Ru; Wang, Jinghan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Luh, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat. In our study, Lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, demonstrated anticancer properties by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Lovastatin inhibited the expressions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Furthermore, lovastatin inhibited the expressions of integrin β1 and integrin β3 but not integrin αv or integrin β5. While Lovastatin's inhibitory effects on TGFβ1, COX2, and ICAM-1 expression were independently controlled by the tumor suppressor LKB1, integrin β3 expression was not affected. Lovastatin's inhibitory effect on cell adhesion was associated with the decreased expression of integrin β3 and cell surface heterodimer integrin αvβ3. Quantitative real time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, and cell migration assays all confirmed that Lovastatin inhibits integrin αvβ3 downstream signaling including FAK activation, and β-catenin, vimentin, ZO-1, and β-actin. Overall, Lovastatin reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration by modifying the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion and other critical cellular processes. Our study highlights novel anti-cancer properties of Lovastatin and supports further exploration of statins in the context of cholangiocarcinoma therapy. PMID:26517522

  7. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer. PMID:26470595

  8. AID-Induced Genotoxic Stress Promotes B Cell Differentiation in the Germinal Center via ATM and LKB1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Kuraishy, Ali I.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hong, Jason S.; Cacalano, Nicholas A.; Gatti, Richard A.; Manis, John P.; Damore, Michael A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Teitell, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During an immune response, B cells undergo rapid proliferation and AID-dependent remodeling of immunoglobulin (IG) genes within germinal centers (GCs) to generate memory B and plasma cells. Unfortunately, the genotoxic stress associated with the GC reaction also promotes most B cell malignancies. Here we report that exogenous- and intrinsic AID-induced DNA strand breaks activate ATM, which signals through an LKB1 intermediate to inactivate CRTC2, a transcriptional coactivator of CREB. Using genome-wide location analysis, we determined that CRTC2 inactivation unexpectedly represses a genetic program that controls GC B cell proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation while opposing lymphomagenesis. Inhibition of this pathway results in increased GC B cell proliferation, reduced antibody secretion, and impaired terminal differentiation. Multiple distinct pathway disruptions were also identified in human GC B cell lymphoma patient samples. Combined, our data show that CRTC2 inactivation, via physiologic DNA damage response signaling, promotes B cell differentiation in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:20864035

  9. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activatio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer. PMID:26470595

  10. Par3 regulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via interaction with Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingjun; Wang, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xin; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Shi, Chengjian; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Hang; Feng, Yechen; Xie, Yu; Xu, Xiaodong; Jia, Wei; He, Ruizhi; Jiang, Jianxin; Hu, Jun; Tian, Rui; Qin, Renyi

    2016-08-01

    The conserved polarity complex, which comprises partitioning-defective proteins Par3, Par6, and the atypical protein kinase C, affects various cell-polarization events, including assembly of tight junctions. Control of tight junction assembly is closely related to invasion and migration potential. However, as the importance of conserved polarity complexes in regulating pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis is unclear, we investigated their role and mechanism in pancreatic cancers. We first detect that the key protein of the conserved polarity complex finds that only Par3 is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues while Par6 and aPKC show no difference. What is more, Par3 tissues level was significantly and positively associated with patient overall survival. Knocking-down Par3 promotes pancreatic cancer cells invasion and migration. And Par3 requires interaction with Tiam1 to affect tight junction assembly, and then affect invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Then, we find that tight junction marker protein ZO-1 and claudin-1 are down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues. And the relationship of the expression of Par3 and ZO-1 in pancreatic cancer tissue is linear correlation. We establish liver metastasis model of human pancreatic cancer cells in Balb/c nude mice and find that knocking down Par3 promotes invasion and metastasis and disturbs tight junction assembly in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the Par3 regulates invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancers by controlling tight junction assembly. PMID:26084985

  11. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E.; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A.; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The genomic regulatory programs that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer, and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signaling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signaling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role of TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas. PMID:25915126

  12. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Cho, Candy H-H; Bessa, José; Rovira, Meritxell; Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The genomic regulatory programmes that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signalling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signalling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role for TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas. PMID:25915126

  13. Microphthalmia transcription factor regulates pancreatic β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Magdalena A; Winkler, Marcus; Ganic, Elvira; Colberg, Jesper K; Johansson, Jenny K; Bennet, Hedvig; Fex, Malin; Nuber, Ulrike A; Artner, Isabella

    2013-08-01

    Precise regulation of β-cell function is crucial for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Pax6 is an essential regulator of β-cell-specific factors like insulin and Glut2. Studies in the developing eye suggest that Pax6 interacts with Mitf to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Here, we show that Mitf, like Pax6, is expressed in all pancreatic endocrine cells during mouse postnatal development and in the adult islet. A Mitf loss-of-function mutation results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion but no increase in β-cell mass in adult mice. Mutant β-cells secrete more insulin in response to glucose than wild-type cells, suggesting that Mitf is involved in regulating β-cell function. In fact, the transcription of genes critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis (insulin and Glut2) and β-cell formation and function (Pax4 and Pax6) is significantly upregulated in Mitf mutant islets. The increased Pax6 expression may cause the improved β-cell function observed in Mitf mutant animals, as it activates insulin and Glut2 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that Mitf binds to Pax4 and Pax6 regulatory regions, suggesting that Mitf represses their transcription in wild-type β-cells. We demonstrate that Mitf directly regulates Pax6 transcription and controls β-cell function. PMID:23610061

  14. Microphthalmia Transcription Factor Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Magdalena A.; Winkler, Marcus; Ganić, Elvira; Colberg, Jesper K.; Johansson, Jenny K.; Bennet, Hedvig; Fex, Malin; Nuber, Ulrike A.; Artner, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    Precise regulation of β-cell function is crucial for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Pax6 is an essential regulator of β-cell–specific factors like insulin and Glut2. Studies in the developing eye suggest that Pax6 interacts with Mitf to regulate pigment cell differentiation. Here, we show that Mitf, like Pax6, is expressed in all pancreatic endocrine cells during mouse postnatal development and in the adult islet. A Mitf loss-of-function mutation results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin secretion but no increase in β-cell mass in adult mice. Mutant β-cells secrete more insulin in response to glucose than wild-type cells, suggesting that Mitf is involved in regulating β-cell function. In fact, the transcription of genes critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis (insulin and Glut2) and β-cell formation and function (Pax4 and Pax6) is significantly upregulated in Mitf mutant islets. The increased Pax6 expression may cause the improved β-cell function observed in Mitf mutant animals, as it activates insulin and Glut2 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that Mitf binds to Pax4 and Pax6 regulatory regions, suggesting that Mitf represses their transcription in wild-type β-cells. We demonstrate that Mitf directly regulates Pax6 transcription and controls β-cell function. PMID:23610061

  15. Histamine regulation of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Taylor; Graf, Allyson; Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Price, Mattie; Kearney, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a dynamic organ that performs a multitude of functions within the body. Diseases that target the pancreas, like pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, are devastating and often fatal to the suffering patient. Histamine and histamine receptors (H1-H4HRs) have been found to play a critical role in biliary diseases. Accordingly, the biliary tract and the pancreas share similarities with regards to morphological, phenotypical and functional features and disease progression, studies related the role of H1-H4HRs in pancreatic diseases are important. In this review, we have highlighted the role that histamine, histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamine receptors and mast cells (the main source of histamine in the body) play during both pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The objective of the review is to demonstrate that histamine and histamine signaling may be a potential therapeutic avenue towards treatment strategies for pancreatic diseases. PMID:24570946

  16. Regulation of triple-negative breast cancer cell metastasis by the tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, L V; Tate, C R; Hoang, V T; Burks, H E; Gilliam, D; Martin, E C; Elliott, S; Miller, D B; Buechlein, A; Rusch, D; Tang, H; Nephew, K P; Burow, M E; Collins-Burow, B M

    2015-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11), has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers including breast. Low LKB1 expression has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients, and we report here a significant association between loss of LKB1 expression and reduced patient survival specifically in the basal subtype of breast cancer. Owing to the aggressive nature of the basal subtype as evidenced by high incidences of metastasis, the purpose of this study was to determine if LKB1 expression could regulate the invasive and metastatic properties of this specific breast cancer subtype. Induction of LKB1 expression in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC)/triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and BT-549, inhibited invasiveness in vitro and lung metastatic burden in an orthotopic xenograft model. Further analysis of BLBC cells overexpressing LKB1 by unbiased whole transcriptomics (RNA-sequencing) revealed striking regulation of metastasis-associated pathways, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, LKB1 overexpression inhibited EMT-associated genes (CDH2, Vimentin, Twist) and induced the epithelial cell marker CDH1, indicating reversal of the EMT phenotype in the MDA-MB-231 cells. We further demonstrated marked inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression and activity via regulation of c-Jun through inhibition of p38 signaling in LKB1-expressing cells. Taken together, these data support future development of LKB1 inducing therapeutics for the suppression of invasion and metastasis of BLBC. PMID:26436950

  17. The Role of miRNAs in the Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Leongito, Maddalena; Palma, Giuseppe; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Palaia, Raffaele; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Amore, Alfonso; Petrillo, Antonella; Granata, Vincenza; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with low overall survival rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Several studies have shown that pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) play different roles in the regulation of drug resistance and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. MicroRNA (miRNA), a class of newly emerging small noncoding RNAs, is involved in the modulation of several biological activities ranging from invasion to metastases development, as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. In this review, we synthesize the latest findings on the role of miRNAs in regulating different biological properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:27006664

  18. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  19. Mucin 1 Regulates Cox-2 Gene in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sritama; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Grover, Priyanka; Rao, Shanti; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eighty percent of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAs) overexpress mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein. MUC1high PDA patients also express high levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and show poor prognosis. The cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) partakes in oncogenic signaling, resulting in accelerated cancer progression. Our aim was to understand the regulation of Cox-2 expression by MUC1. Methods Levels of COX-2 and MUC1 were determined in MUC1−/−, MUC1low, and MUC1high PDA cells and tumors using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Proliferative and invasive potential was assessed using MTT and Boyden chamber assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to evaluate binding of MUC1-CT to the promoter of COX-2 gene. Results Significantly higher levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein were detected in MUC1high versus MUC1low/null cells, which were recapitulated in vivo. In addition, deletion of MUC1 gene and transient knockdown of MUC1 led to decreased COX-2 level. Also, MUC1-CT associated with the COX-2 promoter at ∼1000 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site, the same gene locus where nuclear factor κB p65 associates with the COX-2 promoter. Conclusions Data supports a novel regulation of COX-2 gene by MUC1 in PDA, the intervention of which may lead to a better therapeutic targeting in PDA patients. PMID:26035123

  20. CIP2A down regulation enhances the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin; Zhao, Long; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Zhennan; Qian, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is an oncoprotein which participates in inhibiting tumor apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Using immunohistochemical staining, we investigated the expression of CIP2A protein in 72 cases of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissue and 27 cases of adjacent normal pancreatic tissue. The positive rate of CIP2A protein expression in pancreatic cancer tissue was70.83 %, which was significantly higher than that in adjacent non- cancerous pancreatic tissue (11.11%). The expression of CIP2A was found to be correlated with TNM stage, but not correlated with age, gender, tumor location, smoking status, alcohol consumption, diabetes, high blood pressure, BMI, tumor size, lymph node metastasis or distant metastases. Kaplan- Meier survival analysis showed that patients with positive CIP2A protein expression had a lower overall survival rate than patients without CIP2A expression. COX regression analysis indicated that expression of CIP2A was an independent prognostic factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In addition, down-regulation of CIP2A inhibited cell proliferation and increased sensitivity to gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells by decreasing AKT signaling pathway. Our results indicated that down-regulation of CIP2A could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26894380

  1. Association of Mitotic Regulation Pathway Polymorphisms with Pancreatic Cancer Risk and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Bamlet, William R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitosis is a highly regulated process that serves to ensure the fidelity of cell division. Disruption of mitotic regulators leading to aneuploidy and polyploidy is commonly observed in cancer cells. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regulators of mitosis may promote chromosome mis-segregation and influence pancreatic cancer and/or survival. Methods Thirty four SNPs, previously associated with breast cancer risk, from 33 genes involved in regulation of mitosis, were investigated for associations with pancreatic cancer risk in 1,143 Caucasian patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 1,097 unaffected controls from the Mayo Clinic. Associations with survival from pancreatic cancer were also assessed using 1,030 pancreatic cancer cases with known outcome. Results Two SNPs in the APC (rs2431238) and NIN (rs10145182) loci, out of 34 examined, were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p=0.035 and p=0.038, respectively). Further analyses of individuals categorized by smoking and BMI identified several SNPs displaying significant associations (p<0.05) with pancreatic cancer risk, including APC rs2431238 in individuals with high body mass index (BMI≥30) (p=0.031) and NIN rs10145182 in ever smokers (p=0.01). In addition, survival analyses detected significant associations between SNPs in EIF3S10 and overall survival (p=0.009), SNPs from five genes and survival in resected cancer cases (p<0.05), and SNPs from two other genes (p<0.05) and survival of locally advanced cancer cases. Conclusion Common variation in genes encoding regulators of mitosis may independently influence pancreatic cancer susceptibility and survival. PMID:20056645

  2. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  3. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  4. Sox9: A Master Regulator of the Pancreatic Program

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, it has been discovered that the transcription factor Sox9 plays several critical roles in governing the development of the embryonic pancreas and the homeostasis of the mature organ. While analysis of pancreata from patients affected by the Sox9 haploinsufficiency syndrome campomelic dysplasia initially alluded to a functional role of Sox9 in pancreatic morphogenesis, transgenic mouse models have been instrumental in mechanistically dissecting such roles. Although initially defined as a marker and maintenance factor for pancreatic progenitors, Sox9 is now considered to fulfill additional indispensable functions during pancreogenesis and in the postnatal organ through its interactions with other transcription factors and signaling pathways such as Fgf and Notch. In addition to maintaining both multipotent and bipotent pancreatic progenitors, Sox9 is also required for initiating endocrine differentiation and maintaining pancreatic ductal identity, and it has recently been unveiled as a key player in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. These functions of Sox9 are discussed in this article, with special emphasis on the knowledge gained from various loss-of-function and lineage tracing mouse models. Also, current controversies regarding Sox9 function in healthy and injured adult pancreas and unanswered questions and avenues of future study are discussed. PMID:25148367

  5. GATA4 and GATA6 regulate pancreatic endoderm identity through inhibition of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Sussel, Lori

    2016-03-01

    GATA4 and GATA6 are zinc finger transcription factors that have important functions in several mesodermal and endodermal organs, including heart, liver and pancreas. In humans, heterozygous mutations of either factor are associated with pancreatic agenesis; however, homozygous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 is necessary to disrupt pancreas development in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that arrested pancreatic development in Gata4(fl/fl); Gata6(fl/fl); Pdx1:Cre (pDKO) embryos is accompanied by the transition of ventral and dorsal pancreatic fates into intestinal or stomach lineages, respectively. These results indicate that GATA4 and GATA6 play essential roles in maintaining pancreas identity by regulating foregut endodermal fates. Remarkably, pancreatic anlagen derived from pDKO embryos also display a dramatic upregulation of hedgehog pathway components, which are normally absent from the presumptive pancreatic endoderm. Consistent with the erroneous activation of hedgehog signaling, we demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are able to repress transcription through the sonic hedgehog (Shh) endoderm-specific enhancer MACS1 and that GATA-binding sites within this enhancer are necessary for this repressive activity. These studies establish the importance of GATA4/6-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling as a major mechanism regulating pancreatic endoderm specification during patterning of the gut tube. PMID:26932670

  6. Green Tea Extract Rich in Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Prevents Fatty Liver by AMPK Activation via LKB1 in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Santamarina, Aline B.; Oliveira, Juliana L.; Silva, Fernanda P.; Carnier, June; Mennitti, Laís V.; Santana, Aline A.; de Souza, Gabriel H. I.; Ribeiro, Eliane B.; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M.; Lira, Fábio S.; Oyama, Lila M.

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with epigallocatechin-3-gallate has been determined to aid in the prevention of obesity. Decaffeinated green tea extract appears to restore a normal hepatic metabolic profile and attenuate high-fat diet (HFD)-induced effects, thereby preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice. Mice were maintained on either a control diet (CD) or HFD for 16 weeks and supplemented with either water or green tea extract (50 mg/kg/day). The body mass increase, serum adiponectin level, and lipid profile were measured over the course of the treatment. Furthermore, the AMPK pathway protein expression in the liver was measured. From the fourth week, the weight gain in the CD + green tea extract (CE) group was lower than that in the CD + water (CW) group. From the eighth week, the weight gain in the HFD + water (HFW) group was found to be higher than that in the CW group. Moreover, the weight gain in the HFD + green tea extract (HFE) group was found to be lower than that in the HFW group. Carcass lipid content was found to be higher in the HFW group than that in the CW and HFE groups. Serum analysis showed reduced non-esterified fatty acid level in the CE and HFE groups as compared with their corresponding placebo groups. Increased adiponectin level was observed in the same groups. Increased VLDL-TG secretion was observed in the HFW group as compared with the CW and HFE groups. Increased protein expression of AdipoR2, SIRT1, pLKB1, and pAMPK was observed in the HFE group, which explained the reduced expression of ACC, FAS, SREBP-1, and ChREBP in this group. These results indicate that the effects of decaffeinated green tea extract may be related to the activation of AMPK via LKB1 in the liver of HFD-fed mice. PMID:26536464

  7. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2016-09-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin's clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome's proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/ toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin's turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  8. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  9. Efficient targeting and tumor retardation effect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF)-specific RNA replacement in pancreatic cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Heo, Kyun; Lee, Yusun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Daehong; Song, Min Sun; Lee, Seoung-Wook; Lee, Yangsoon; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, In-Hoo

    2014-03-28

    The soluble protein pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) plays an important role in pancreatic tumor progression and has begun to attract attention as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. We herein present PAUF RNA-targeting gene therapy strategies with both targeting and therapeutic function using trans-splicing ribozyme (TSR) in pancreatic cancer. We developed adenoviral PAUF-targeting TSR (Rz) containing a PAUF-specific internal guide sequence (IGS) determined by library screening. This Rz harbors suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) or firefly luciferase (Luc) as a transgene for 3' exon replacement of PAUF RNAs. Ad-Rz-TK, Rz harboring the HSV-tk, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in vivo as well as PAUF-dependent cell death in vitro via a successful trans-splicing reaction. Selective induction of Rz-controlled transgene in PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer was confirmed through noninvasive in vivo imaging; a luminescence signal from Rz harboring Luc (Ad-Rz-Luc) was detectable only in pancreatic tumor sites, not in normal mice. In addition, a [(125)I] FIAU signal reflecting thymidine kinase expression through SPECT and ex vivo biodistribution was co-localized with the tumor sites when we treated with Ad-Rz-TK in orthotopic xenograft model. Taken together, these results imply that PAUF-targeting TSR can contribute to successful targeted gene therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24189457

  10. Minireview: Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein: Regulation and Function in the Pancreatic β-Cell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are responsible for insulin production, and loss of functional β-cell mass is now recognized as a critical step in the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, the factors controlling the life and death of the pancreatic β-cell have only started to be elucidated. Discovered as the top glucose-induced gene in a human islet microarray study 12 years ago, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) has now emerged as such a key player in pancreatic β-cell biology. Since then, β-cell expression of TXNIP has been found to be tightly regulated by multiple factors and to be dramatically increased in diabetic islets. Elevated TXNIP levels induce β-cell apoptosis, whereas TXNIP deficiency protects against type 1 and type 2 diabetes by promoting β-cell survival. TXNIP interacts with and inhibits thioredoxin and thereby controls the cellular redox state, but it also belongs to the α-arrestin family of proteins and regulates a variety of metabolic processes. Most recently, TXNIP has been discovered to control β-cell microRNA expression, β-cell function, and insulin production. In this review, the current state of knowledge regarding regulation and function of TXNIP in the pancreatic β-cell and the implications for drug development are discussed. PMID:24911120

  11. Association between glucose-regulated protein and neutrophil apoptosis in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lan-Tao; Xu, He-Ling; Fu, Ming-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the role of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP-78) in the apoptosis of neutrophils in rats with severe acute pancreatitis. Methods: A total of 54 SD male rats were randomly assigned into 2 groups: sham group (n=24) and pancreatitis group (n=30). Severe acute pancreatitis was induced by retrograde cholangiopancreatography injection of sodium taurocholate. Rats were sacrified at 3 h, 6 h and 12 h after injection. In control group, rats received laparotomy, but the pancreates remained intact. The serum amylase was detected at different time points, and flow cytometry was done to detect the apoptosis of neutrophils. Proteins were extracted from neutrophils and subjected to detection of GRP78 and Mcl-1 expression by Western blot assay. HE staining was performed for pathological scoring of the pancreas. Results: The serum amylase in pancreatitis group increased markedly when compared with control group (P<0.01). In SAP group, the serum amylase increased gradually over time (P<0.01). HE staining showed a lot of inflammatory cells and infiltration of red blood cells and the apoptosis rate of neutrophils reduced gradually (P<0.01). Western blot assay showed the protein expression of GRP-78 and Mcl-1 increased in neutrophils over time. Conclusion: In rats with SAP, the apoptosis rate of neutrophils reduced over time, which may be associated to the stress induced expression of GRP78 and subsequent activation of Mcl-1 resulting in suppression of neutrphil apoptosis over time. PMID:26464680

  12. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B H; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL's osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  13. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  14. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  15. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes Kras(G12D)-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation.

    PubMed

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  16. UHRF1 regulation of the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway in pancreatic cancer contributes to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Alainin, Wafa; Gana, Thompson; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Olayanju, Adedamola; Barrera, Lawrence N; Ferguson, Robert; Campbell, Fiona; Andrews, Timothy; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Park, Brian K; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Schmid, Michael C; Slupsky, Joseph R; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John P; Costello, Eithne

    2016-02-01

    The cellular defence protein Nrf2 is a mediator of oncogenesis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and other cancers. However, the control of Nrf2 expression and activity in cancer is not fully understood. We previously reported the absence of Keap1, a pivotal regulator of Nrf2, in ∼70% of PDAC cases. Here we describe a novel mechanism whereby the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 suppresses Keap1 protein levels. UHRF1 expression was observed in 20% (5 of 25) of benign pancreatic ducts compared to 86% (114 of 132) of pancreatic tumours, and an inverse relationship between UHRF1 and Keap1 levels in PDAC tumours (n = 124) was apparent (p = 0.002). We also provide evidence that UHRF1-mediated regulation of the Nrf2 pathway contributes to the aggressive behaviour of PDAC. Depletion of UHRF1 from PDAC cells decreased growth and enhanced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. UHRF1 depletion also led to reduced levels of Nrf2-regulated downstream proteins and was accompanied by heightened oxidative stress, in the form of lower glutathione levels and increased reactive oxygen species. Concomitant depletion of Keap1 and UHRF1 restored Nrf2 levels and reversed cell cycle arrest and the increase in reactive oxygen species. Mechanistically, depletion of UHRF1 reduced global and tumour suppressor promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer cell lines, and KEAP1 gene promoter methylation was reduced in one of three cell lines examined. Thus, methylation of the KEAP1 gene promoter may contribute to the suppression of Keap1 protein levels by UHRF1, although our data suggest that additional mechanisms need to be explored. Finally, we demonstrate that K-Ras drives UHRF1 expression, establishing a novel link between this oncogene and Nrf2-mediated cellular protection. Since UHRF1 over-expression occurs in other cancers, its ability to regulate the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway may be critically important to the malignant behaviour of these cancers. PMID:26497117

  17. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Moura, Conceição Souto; Baltazar, Fátima; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2015-03-30

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function.To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via 'Zinc-Finger Nucleases'. The three homozygous BSG-/- cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG-/- cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin. PMID:25894929

  18. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  19. Two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, stimulate GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Fujinami, Aya; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Amano, Akiko; Ishigami, Akihito; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Ito, Fumitake; Mori, Taisuke; Sawada, Morio; Iwasa, Koichi; Kitawaki, Jo; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    4-Hydroxyderricin (4HD) and xanthoangelol (XAG) are major components of n-hexane/ethyl acetate (5:1) extract of the yellow-colored stem juice of Angelica keiskei. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG have been reported to increase glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4)-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, but the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism by which 4HD and XAG increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Both 4HD and XAG increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG also stimulated the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In addition, phosphorylation of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), which acts upstream of AMPK, was also increased by 4HD and XAG treatment. Small interfering RNA knockdown of LKB1 attenuated 4HD- and XAG-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and suppressed glucose uptake. These findings demonstrate that 4HD and XAG can increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. PMID:26077869

  20. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Seok; Rho, Jun Gi; Shin, Jung Jae; Song, Woo Keun; Lee, Eun Kyung; Egan, Josephine M.; Kim, Wook

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212–2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes. PMID:26967640

  1. β2-Adrenogenic signaling regulates NNK-induced pancreatic cancer progression via upregulation of HIF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiguang; Chen, Xin; Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Xu, Qinhong; Duan, Wanxing; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Huo, Xiongwei

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a tobacco-specific nitrosamine, mediates the carcinogenic action of cigarette smoking by promoting cancer growth. In the present study, we show that smoking, HIF-1α expression and β2-adrenogenic receptor (β2-AR) expression are negatively correlated with the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Moreover, HIF-1α expression and β2-AR expression are positively correlated with smoking status, different histological differentiation and among the tumor node metastasis (TNM) stages in pancreatic cancer patients. NNK increases HIF-1α expression in pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, knockdown of HIF-1α and ICI118, 551 (a β2-AR selective antagonist) abrogates NNK-induced pancreatic cancer proliferation and invasion in vitro and inhibits NNK-induced pancreatic cancer growth in vivo. However, using CoCl2 (a HIF-1α stabilizing agent which decreases HIF-1α degradation under normoxia conditions) reverses ICI118, 551 induced effects under NNK exposure. Thus, our data indicate that β2-AR signaling regulates NNK-induced pancreatic cancer progression via upregulation of HIF-1α. Taken together, β2-AR signaling and HIF-1α may represent promising therapeutic targets for preventing smoking induced pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26497365

  2. Profile of MMP and TIMP Expression in Human Pancreatic Stellate Cells: Regulation by IL-1α and TGFβ and Implications for Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tjomsland, Vegard; Pomianowska, Eva; Aasrum, Monica; Sandnes, Dagny; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a prominent fibroinflammatory stroma with both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressive functions. The pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) is the major cellular stromal component and the main producer of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagens, which are degraded by metalloproteinases (MMPs). PSCs interact with cancer cells through various factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)β and interleukin (IL)-1α. The role of TGFβ in the dual nature of tumor stroma, i.e., protumorigenic or tumor suppressive, is not clear. We aimed to investigate the roles of TGFβ and IL-1α in the regulation of MMP profiles in PSCs and the subsequent effects on cancer cell migration. Human PSCs isolated from surgically resected specimens were cultured in the presence of pancreatic cancer cell lines, as well as IL-1α or TGFβ. MMP production and activities in PSCs were quantified by gene array transcripts, mRNA measurements, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based activity assay, and zymography. PSC-conditioned media and pancreatic cancer cells were included in a collagen matrix cell migration model. We found that production of IL-1α by pancreatic cancer cells induced alterations in MMP and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) profiles and activities in PSCs, upregulated expression and activation of MMP1 and MMP3, and enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells in the collagen matrix model. TGFβ counteracted the effects of IL-1α on PSCs, reestablished PSC MMP and TIMP profiles and activities, and inhibited migration of cancer cells. This suggests that tumor TGFβ has a role as a suppressor of stromal promotion of tumor progression through alterations in PSC MMP profiles with subsequent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell migration. PMID:27435927

  3. Alcohol Disrupts Levels and Function of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Promote Development of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Kui, Balázs; Katona, Máté; Judák, Linda; Németh, István; Kemény, Lajos V.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Venglovecz, Viktória; Földesi, Imre; Pető, Zoltán; Somorácz, Áron; Borka, Katalin; Perdomo, Doranda; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Gray, Mike A.; Monterisi, Stefania; Zaccolo, Manuela; Sendler, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Excessive consumption of ethanol is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Alterations to the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) also cause pancreatitis. However, little is known about the role of CFTR in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatitis. METHODS We measured CFTR activity based on chloride concentrations in sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis, patients admitted to the emergency department because of excessive alcohol consumption, and healthy volunteers. We measured CFTR levels and localization in pancreatic tissues and in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis induced by alcohol. We studied the effects of ethanol, fatty acids, and fatty acid ethyl esters on secretion of pancreatic fluid and HCO3− , levels and function of CFTR, and exchange of Cl− for HCO3− in pancreatic cell lines as well as in tissues from guinea pigs and CFTR knockout mice after administration of alcohol. RESULTS Chloride concentrations increased in sweat samples from patients who acutely abused alcohol but not in samples from healthy volunteers, indicating that alcohol affects CFTR function. Pancreatic tissues from patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis had lower levels of CFTR than tissues from healthy volunteers. Alcohol and fatty acids inhibited secretion of fluid and HCO3− , as well as CFTR activity, in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. These effects were mediated by sustained increases in concentrations of intracellular calcium and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate, depletion of adenosine triphosphate, and depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In pancreatic cell lines and pancreatic tissues of mice and guinea pigs, administration of ethanol reduced expression of CFTR messenger RNA, reduced the stability of CFTR at the cell surface, and disrupted folding of CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum. CFTR knockout mice given ethanol or fatty acids developed more

  4. MiR-206 is expressed in pancreatic islets and regulates glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Vinay; Frank, Saša; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Kratky, Dagmar; Kostner, Gerhard M.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a complex indispensable process, and its dysregulation causes hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK) takes a central role in these pathways and is thus rate limiting for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic islets. Several reports have described the transcriptional regulation of Gck mRNA, whereas its posttranscriptional mechanisms of regulation, especially those involving microRNAs (miR), are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-206 as a posttranscriptional regulator of Gck. In addition, we examined the effects of miR-206 on glucose tolerance, GSIS, and gene expression in control and germ line miR-206 knockout (KO) mice fed either with chow or high-fat diet (HFD). MiR-206 was found in Gck-expressing tissues and was differentially altered in response to HFD feeding. Pancreatic islets showed the most profound induction in the expression of miR-206 in response to HFD. Chow- and HFD-fed miR-206KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and GSIS but unaltered insulin sensitivity. In silico analysis of Gck mRNA revealed a conserved 8-mer miR-206 binding site. Hence, the predicted regulation of Gck by miR-206 was confirmed in reporter and GK activity assays. Concomitant with increased GK activity, miR-206KO mice had elevated liver glycogen content and plasma lactate concentrations. Our findings revealed a novel mechanism of posttranscriptional regulation of Gck by miR-206 and underline the crucial role of pancreatic islet miR-206 in the regulation of whole body glucose homeostasis in a murine model that mimics the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27221121

  5. Regulation of exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a Ser/Thr kinase that has been thought to be an important mediator for exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK-related protein kinases, of which the function in skeletal muscle has not been well documented. Our group and others have generated mice lacking AMPK activity in skeletal muscle, as well as muscle-specific LKB1 knockout mice. In this review, we discuss the potential role of AMPK and LKB1 in regulating exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. We also discuss our recent study, demonstrating the molecular mechanism of obesity-induced development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. PMID:27462580

  6. Interplay between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Wang, Yun-Feng; Li, Gang; Yang, Sheng-sheng; Liu, Che; Hu, Hao; Jin, Gang; Hu, Xian-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Menin, the product of the Men1 gene, which is frequently mutated in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, acts as a chromatin-remodeling factor to modulate the transcription of cell cycle regulators by interacting with histone modification factors. However, the function of menin and its underlying mechanisms in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain unknown. Here, we found that menin inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and that its expression was gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis. Menin overexpression significantly activated the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p18 and p27, accompanied with a decrease in DNA methylation levels of p18 and p27 promoters. Mechanistically, we found that interaction of menin with DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) competitively pulled down Dnmt1 from p18 and p27 promoters, leading to the downregulation of DNA methylation levels. Moreover, menin expression was suppressed by Dnmt1 downstream of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and menin overexpression strongly antagonized the promotion effect of hedgehog signaling on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, the interaction between menin and Dnmt1 reversibly regulates pancreatic cancer cell growth downstream of Hedgehog pathways with complex mutual modulation networks, suggesting that the Hedgehog/Dnmt1/menin axis is a potential molecular target for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26454216

  7. Somatic mutations in the STK11/LKB1 gene are uncommon in rare gynecological tumor types associated with Peutz-Jegher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Connolly, D C; Katabuchi, H; Cliby, W A; Cho, K R

    2000-01-01

    Peutz-Jegher's syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation, hamartomatous polyposis, and predisposition to benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, breast, ovary, uterine cervix, and testis. Germline-inactivating mutations in one allele of the STK11/LKB1 gene at chromosome 19p13.3 have been found in most PJS patients. Although ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTATs) and minimal deviation adenocarcinomas (MDAs) of the uterine cervix are very rare in the general population, both tumor types occur with increased frequency in women with PJS. An earlier report indicated that the 19p13.3 region containing the STK11 gene was affected by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in nearly 50% of MDAs of the uterine cervix. We investigated the role of STK11 mutations and LOH of the 19p13.3 region in two PJS-associated SCTATs and in five SCTATs and eight MDAs of the uterine cervix, which occurred in patients lacking features of PJS (referred to here as "sporadic" cases). Germline mutations in the STK11 gene, accompanied by LOH of markers near the wild-type STK11 allele, were found in the two PJS-associated SCTATs. Somatic mutations in the coding region of STK11 were not found in any of the sporadic SCTATs or MDAs studied, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in three of eight MDAs. Our findings indicate that STK11, like other tumor suppressor genes, is affected by biallelic inactivation in gynecological tumors of PJS patients. In addition, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in sporadic MDAs, somatic STK11 mutations are rare. A yet-to-be-defined tumor suppressor gene in the 19p13.3 region may be the specific target of inactivation in these tumors. PMID:10623683

  8. Somatic Mutations in the STK11/LKB1 Gene Are Uncommon in Rare Gynecological Tumor Types Associated with Peutz-Jegher’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Denise C.; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Cliby, William A.; Cho, Kathleen R.

    2000-01-01

    Peutz-Jegher’s syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucocutaneous pigmentation, hamartomatous polyposis, and predisposition to benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, breast, ovary, uterine cervix, and testis. Germline-inactivating mutations in one allele of the STK11/LKB1 gene at chromosome 19p13.3 have been found in most PJS patients. Although ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTATs) and minimal deviation adenocarcinomas (MDAs) of the uterine cervix are very rare in the general population, both tumor types occur with increased frequency in women with PJS. An earlier report indicated that the 19p13.3 region containing the STK11 gene was affected by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in nearly 50% of MDAs of the uterine cervix. We investigated the role of STK11 mutations and LOH of the 19p13.3 region in two PJS-associated SCTATs and in five SCTATs and eight MDAs of the uterine cervix, which occurred in patients lacking features of PJS (referred to here as “sporadic” cases). Germline mutations in the STK11 gene, accompanied by LOH of markers near the wild-type STK11 allele, were found in the two PJS-associated SCTATs. Somatic mutations in the coding region of STK11 were not found in any of the sporadic SCTATs or MDAs studied, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in three of eight MDAs. Our findings indicate that STK11, like other tumor suppressor genes, is affected by biallelic inactivation in gynecological tumors of PJS patients. In addition, although LOH of the 19p13.3 region was seen in sporadic MDAs, somatic STK11 mutations are rare. A yet-to-be-defined tumor suppressor gene in the 19p13.3 region may be the specific target of inactivation in these tumors. PMID:10623683

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  10. HuR is a post-transcriptional regulator of core metabolic enzymes in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Richard A; Pineda, Danielle M; Chand, Saswati N; Romeo, Carmella; Londin, Eric R; Karoly, Edward D; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Yeo, Charles J; Brody, Jonathan R; Winter, Jordan M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell metabolism differs from normal cells, yet the regulatory mechanisms responsible for these differences are incompletely understood, particularly in response to acute changes in the tumor microenvironment. HuR, an RNA-binding protein, acts under acute stress to regulate core signaling pathways in cancer through post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA targets. We demonstrate that HuR regulates the metabolic phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells and is critical for survival under acute glucose deprivation. Using three pancreatic cancer cell line models, HuR-proficient cells demonstrated superior survival under glucose deprivation when compared with isogenic cells with siRNA-silencing of HuR expression (HuR-deficient cells). We found that HuR-proficient cells utilized less glucose, but produced greater lactate, as compared with HuR-deficient cells. Acute glucose deprivation was found to act as a potent stimulus for HuR translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where HuR stabilizes its mRNA targets. We performed a gene expression array on ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitated mRNAs bound to HuR and identified 11 novel HuR target transcripts that encode enzymes central to glucose metabolism. Three (GPI, PRPS2 and IDH1) were selected for validation studies, and confirmed as bona fide HuR targets. These findings establish HuR as a critical regulator of pancreatic cancer cell metabolism and survival under acute glucose deprivation. Further explorations into HuR’s role in cancer cell metabolism should uncover novel therapeutic targets that are critical for cancer cell survival in a metabolically compromised tumor microenvironment. PMID:23807417

  11. The Brain-to-Pancreatic Islet Neuronal Map Reveals Differential Glucose Regulation From Distinct Hypothalamic Regions.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Wilfredo; Singh, Inderroop; Wautlet, Arnaud; Patterson, Christa; Flak, Jonathan; Becker, Thomas C; Ali, Almas; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H; Enquist, Lynn W; Myers, Martin G; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    The brain influences glucose homeostasis, partly by supplemental control over insulin and glucagon secretion. Without this central regulation, diabetes and its complications can ensue. Yet, the neuronal network linking to pancreatic islets has never been fully mapped. Here, we refine this map using pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing, indicating that the pancreatic islets are innervated by efferent circuits that emanate from the hypothalamus. We found that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) significantly overlap PRV and the physiological glucose-sensing enzyme glucokinase. Then, experimentally lowering glucose sensing, specifically in the ARC, resulted in glucose intolerance due to deficient insulin secretion and no significant effect in the VMN, but in the LHA it resulted in a lowering of the glucose threshold that improved glucose tolerance and/or improved insulin sensitivity, with an exaggerated counter-regulatory response for glucagon secretion. No significant effect on insulin sensitivity or metabolic homeostasis was noted. Thus, these data reveal novel direct neuronal effects on pancreatic islets and also render a functional validation of the brain-to-islet neuronal map. They also demonstrate that distinct regions of the hypothalamus differentially control insulin and glucagon secretion, potentially in partnership to help maintain glucose homeostasis and guard against hypoglycemia. PMID:27207534

  12. Obestatin Enhances In Vitro Generation of Pancreatic Islets through Regulation of Developmental Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Baragli, lessandra; Grande, Cristina; Gesmundo, Iacopo; Settanni, Fabio; Taliano, Marina; Gallo, Davide; Gargantini, Eleonora; Ghigo, Ezio; Granata, Riccarda

    2013-01-01

    Availability of large amounts of in vitro generated β-cells may support replacement therapy in diabetes. However, methods to obtain β-cells from stem/progenitor cells are limited by inefficient endocrine differentiation. We have recently shown that the ghrelin gene product obestatin displays beneficial effects on pancreatic β-cell survival and function. Obestatin prevents β-cell apoptosis, preserves β-cell mass and stimulates insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo, in both normal and diabetic conditions. In the present study, we investigated whether obestatin may promote in vitro β-cell generation from mouse pancreatic islet-derived precursor cells. Treatment of cultured islets of Langerhans with obestatin (i) enriched cells expressing the mesenchymal/neuronal marker nestin, which is associated with pancreatic precursors; (ii) increased cell survival and reduced apoptosis during precursor selection; (iii) promoted the generation of islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) with increased insulin gene expression and C-peptide secretion. Furthermore, obestatin modulated the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), Notch receptors and neurogenin 3 (Ngn3) during islet-derived precursor cell selection and endocrine differentiation. These results indicate that obestatin improves the generation of functional β-cells/ICCs in vitro, suggesting implications for cell-based replacement therapy in diabetes. Moreover, obestatin may play a role in regulating pathways involved in pancreas development and regeneration. PMID:23741322

  13. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27354262

  14. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh’d.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27354262

  15. Cathelicidins positively regulate pancreatic β-cell functions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Xu, Meng; Ortsäter, Henrik; Lundeberg, Erik; Juntti-Berggren, Lisa; Chen, Yong Q; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Diana, Julien; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2016-02-01

    Cathelicidins are pleiotropic antimicrobial peptides largely described for innate antimicrobial defenses and, more recently, immunomodulation. They are shown to modulate a variety of immune or nonimmune host cell responses. However, how cathelicidins are expressed by β cells and modulate β-cell functions under steady-state or proinflammatory conditions are unknown. We find that cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) is constitutively expressed by rat insulinoma β-cell clone INS-1 832/13. CRAMP expression is inducible by butyrate or phenylbutyric acid and its secretion triggered upon inflammatory challenges by IL-1β or LPS. CRAMP promotes β-cell survival in vitro via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and by modulating expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins: p-Bad, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL. Also via EGFR, CRAMP stimulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion ex vivo by rat islets. A similar effect is observed in diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Additional investigation under inflammatory conditions reveals that CRAMP modulates inflammatory responses and β-cell apoptosis, as measured by prostaglandin E2 production, cyclooxygenases (COXs), and caspase activation. Finally, CRAMP-deficient cnlp(-/-) mice exhibit defective insulin secretion, and administration of CRAMP to prediabetic NOD mice improves blood glucose clearance upon glucose challenge. Our finding suggests that cathelicidins positively regulate β-cell functions and may be potentially used for intervening β-cell dysfunction-associated diseases. PMID:26527065

  16. Insulin-producing cells could not mimic the physiological regulation of insulin secretion performed by pancreatic beta cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the difference between insulin-producing cells (IPCs) and normal human pancreatic beta cells both in physiological function and morphological features in cellular level. Methods The levels of insulin secretion were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The insulin gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The morphological features were detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy. Results IPCs and normal human pancreatic beta cells were similar to each other under the observation in AFM with the porous structure features in the cytoplasm. Both number of membrane particle size and average roughness of normal human beta cells were higher than those of IPCs. Conclusions Our results firstly revealed that the cellular ultrastructure of IPCs was closer to that of normal human pancreatic beta cells, but they still could not mimic the physiological regulation of insulin secretion performed by pancreatic beta cells. PMID:23421382

  17. Age-Dependent Pancreatic Gene Regulation Reveals Mechanisms Governing Human β Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Arda, H Efsun; Li, Lingyu; Tsai, Jennifer; Torre, Eduardo A; Rosli, Yenny; Peiris, Heshan; Spitale, Robert C; Dai, Chunhua; Gu, Xueying; Qu, Kun; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jing; Grompe, Markus; Scharfmann, Raphael; Snyder, Michael S; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2016-05-10

    Intensive efforts are focused on identifying regulators of human pancreatic islet cell growth and maturation to accelerate development of therapies for diabetes. After birth, islet cell growth and function are dynamically regulated; however, establishing these age-dependent changes in humans has been challenging. Here, we describe a multimodal strategy for isolating pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells from children and adults to identify age-dependent gene expression and chromatin changes on a genomic scale. These profiles revealed distinct proliferative and functional states of islet α cells or β cells and histone modifications underlying age-dependent gene expression changes. Expression of SIX2 and SIX3, transcription factors without prior known functions in the pancreas and linked to fasting hyperglycemia risk, increased with age specifically in human islet β cells. SIX2 and SIX3 were sufficient to enhance insulin content or secretion in immature β cells. Our work provides a unique resource to study human-specific regulators of islet cell maturation and function. PMID:27133132

  18. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  19. Npas4 is a novel activity-regulated cytoprotective factor in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Paul V; Krentz, Nicole A J; Zarrouki, Bader; Westwell-Roper, Clara Y; Nian, Cuilan; Uy, Ryan A; Shapiro, A M James; Poitout, Vincent; Lynn, Francis C

    2013-08-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires intrinsic sensing mechanisms to temper function in the face of prolonged activity. In the pancreatic β-cell, glucose is likely a physiological trigger that activates an adaptive response to stimulation, thereby maintaining cellular homeostasis. Immediate early genes (IEGs) are activated as a first line of defense in cellular homeostasis and are largely responsible for transmitting an environmental cue to a cellular response. Here we examine the regulation and function of the novel β-cell IEG, neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4). Using MIN6 cells, mouse and human islets, as well as in vivo infusions, we demonstrate that Npas4 is expressed within pancreatic islets and is upregulated by β-cell depolarizing agents. Npas4 tempers β-cell function through a direct inhibitory interaction with the insulin promoter and by blocking the potentiating effects of GLP-1 without significantly reducing glucose-stimulated secretion. Finally, Npas4 expression is induced by classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors and can prevent thapsigargin- and palmitate-induced dysfunction and cell death. These results suggest that Npas4 is a key activity-dependent regulator that improves β-cell efficiency in the face of stress. We posit that Npas4 could be a novel therapeutic target in type 2 diabetes that could both reduce ER stress and cell death and maintain basal cell function. PMID:23656887

  20. βIV-Spectrin and CaMKII facilitate Kir6.2 regulation in pancreatic beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Crystal F.; Wright, Patrick J.; Koval, Olha M.; Zmuda, Erik J.; Johnson, Benjamin L.; Anderson, Mark E.; Hai, Tsonwin; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Identified over a dozen years ago in the brain and pancreatic islet, βIV-spectrin is critical for the local organization of protein complexes throughout the nervous system. βIV-Spectrin targets ion channels and adapter proteins to axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier in neurons, and βIV-spectrin dysfunction underlies ataxia and early death in mice. Despite advances in βIV-spectrin research in the nervous system, its role in pancreatic islet biology is unknown. Here, we report that βIV-spectrin serves as a multifunctional structural and signaling platform in the pancreatic islet. We report that βIV-spectrin directly associates with and targets the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in pancreatic islets. In parallel, βIV-spectrin targets ankyrin-B and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Consistent with these findings, βIV-spectrin mutant mice lacking CaMKII- or ankyrin-binding motifs display selective loss of expression and targeting of key protein components, including CaMKIIδ. βIV-Spectrin–targeted CaMKII directly phosphorylates the inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, Kir6.2 (alpha subunit of KATP channel complex), and we identify the specific residue, Kir6.2 T224, responsible for CaMKII-dependent regulation of KATP channel function. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation alters channel regulation resulting in KATP channel inhibition, a cellular phenotype consistent with aberrant insulin regulation. Finally, we demonstrate aberrant KATP channel phosphorylation in βIV-spectrin mutant mice. In summary, our findings establish a broader role for βIV-spectrin in regulation of cell membrane excitability in the pancreatic islet, define the pathway for CaMKII local control in pancreatic beta cells, and identify the mechanism for CaMKII-dependent regulation of KATP channels. PMID:24101510

  1. βIV-Spectrin and CaMKII facilitate Kir6.2 regulation in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kline, Crystal F; Wright, Patrick J; Koval, Olha M; Zmuda, Erik J; Johnson, Benjamin L; Anderson, Mark E; Hai, Tsonwin; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2013-10-22

    Identified over a dozen years ago in the brain and pancreatic islet, βIV-spectrin is critical for the local organization of protein complexes throughout the nervous system. βIV-Spectrin targets ion channels and adapter proteins to axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier in neurons, and βIV-spectrin dysfunction underlies ataxia and early death in mice. Despite advances in βIV-spectrin research in the nervous system, its role in pancreatic islet biology is unknown. Here, we report that βIV-spectrin serves as a multifunctional structural and signaling platform in the pancreatic islet. We report that βIV-spectrin directly associates with and targets the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in pancreatic islets. In parallel, βIV-spectrin targets ankyrin-B and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel. Consistent with these findings, βIV-spectrin mutant mice lacking CaMKII- or ankyrin-binding motifs display selective loss of expression and targeting of key protein components, including CaMKIIδ. βIV-Spectrin-targeted CaMKII directly phosphorylates the inwardly-rectifying potassium channel, Kir6.2 (alpha subunit of KATP channel complex), and we identify the specific residue, Kir6.2 T224, responsible for CaMKII-dependent regulation of KATP channel function. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation alters channel regulation resulting in KATP channel inhibition, a cellular phenotype consistent with aberrant insulin regulation. Finally, we demonstrate aberrant KATP channel phosphorylation in βIV-spectrin mutant mice. In summary, our findings establish a broader role for βIV-spectrin in regulation of cell membrane excitability in the pancreatic islet, define the pathway for CaMKII local control in pancreatic beta cells, and identify the mechanism for CaMKII-dependent regulation of KATP channels. PMID:24101510

  2. The role of pancreatic polypeptide in the regulation of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, Neeta; Berning, Britt A; Sainsbury, Amanda; Lin, Shu

    2015-12-15

    Imbalances in normal regulation of food intake can cause obesity and related disorders. Inadequate therapies for such disorders necessitate better understanding of mechanisms that regulate energy homeostasis. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP), a robust anorexigenic hormone, effectively modulates food intake and energy homeostasis, thus potentially aiding anti-obesity therapeutics. Intra-gastric and intra-intestinal infusion of nutrients stimulate PP secretion from the gastrointestinal tract, leading to vagal stimulation that mediates complex actions via the neuropeptide Y4 receptor in arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, subsequently activating key hypothalamic nuclei and dorsal vagal complex of the brainstem to influence energy homeostasis and body composition. Novel studies indicate affinity of PP for the relatively underexplored neuropeptide y6 receptor, mediating actions via the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pathways involving vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and insulin like growth factor 1. This review highlights detailed mechanisms by which PP mediates its actions on energy balance through various areas in the brain. PMID:26123585

  3. Mitochondrial network regulation and its potential interference with inflammatory signals in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Baltrusch, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria fulfil multiple tasks in nutrient metabolism, energy production, redox homeostasis and stress response, and are essential for pancreatic beta cell function. The dynamism and health of the mitochondrial network is regulated by fission- and fusion-triggering factors and by a quality control system that removes dysfunctional organelles. Alongside the role of mitochondria in regulating apoptotic cell death mediated primarily via production of reactive oxygen species and release of cytochrome c, there is evidence of other links between mitochondria and inflammation that have implications for cell viability. This review briefly outlines two pathways that are potentially vital for pancreatic beta cell function. The first concerns the regulation of Parkin, a protein that acts, not only as a central player in regulating mitophagy, but also as an activator of the NF-ĸB pathway. The fact that expression of optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1), a mitochondrial fusion inducer and master mitochondrial cristae biogenetic factor, is increased following NF-ĸB activation highlights a point of mitochondrial control that might be influenced by TNFα signalling. A second axis of interest is suggested by IL-6-mediated upregulation of the fission inducer FIS1 alongside downregulation of mitofusin 2 (MFN2), a guard of mitochondrial fusion and metabolism and an inhibitor of apoptosis. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Islet inflammation in type 2 diabetes' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Marc Donath, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3873-z , and Jerry Nadler and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3890-y ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Piero Marchetti (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3875-x ). PMID:26873508

  4. RelA regulates CXCL1/CXCR2-dependent oncogene-induced senescence in murine Kras-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lesina, Marina; Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Morton, Jennifer; Diakopoulos, Kalliope Nina; Korneeva, Olga; Wimmer, Margit; Einwächter, Henrik; Sperveslage, Jan; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Kehl, Timo; Saur, Dieter; Sipos, Bence; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Steiner, Jörg Manfred; Wang, Timothy Cragin; Sansom, Owen J; Schmid, Roland Michael; Algül, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Tumor suppression that is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered to function as a safeguard during development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the mechanisms that regulate OIS in PDAC are poorly understood. Here, we have determined that nuclear RelA reinforces OIS to inhibit carcinogenesis in the Kras mouse model of PDAC. Inactivation of RelA accelerated pancreatic lesion formation in Kras mice by abrogating the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) gene transcription signature. Using genetic and pharmacological tools, we determined that RelA activation promotes OIS via elevation of the SASP factor CXCL1 (also known as KC), which activates CXCR2, during pancreatic carcinogenesis. In Kras mice, pancreas-specific inactivation of CXCR2 prevented OIS and was correlated with increased tumor proliferation and decreased survival. Moreover, reductions in CXCR2 levels were associated with advanced neoplastic lesions in tissue from human pancreatic specimens. Genetically disabling OIS in Kras mice caused RelA to promote tumor proliferation, suggesting a dual role for RelA signaling in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a pivotal role for RelA in regulating OIS in preneoplastic lesions and implicate the RelA/CXCL1/CXCR2 axis as an essential mechanism of tumor surveillance in PDAC. PMID:27454298

  5. Metformin and salinomycin as the best combination for the eradication of NSCLC monolayer cells and their alveospheres (cancer stem cells) irrespective of EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhiguang; Sperl, Bianca; Ullrich, Axel; Knyazev, Pjotr

    2014-01-01

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is linked to preexisting or acquired drug resistance and tumor relapse. Therefore, targeting both differentiated tumor cells and CSCs was suggested as an effective approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. After screening of chemotherapeutic agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) or monoclonal antibody in combination with the putative stem cell killer Salinomycin (SAL), we found Metformin (METF), which modestly exerted a growth inhibitory effect on monolayer cells and alveospheres/CSCs of 5 NSCLC cell lines regardless of their EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status, interacted synergistically with SAL to effectively promote cell death. Inhibition of EGFR (AKT, ERK1/2) and mTOR (p70 s6k) signaling with the combination of METF and SAL can be augmented beyond that achieved using each agent individually. Phospho-kinase assay further suggested the multiple roles of this combination in reducing oncogenic effects of modules, such as ß-catenin, Src family kinases (Src, Lyn, Yes), Chk-2 and FAK. Remarkably, significant reduction of sphere formation was seen under combinatorial treatment in all investigated NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, METF in combination with SAL could be a promising treatment option for patients with advanced NSCLC irrespective of their EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status. PMID:25375092

  6. Metformin and salinomycin as the best combination for the eradication of NSCLC monolayer cells and their alveospheres (cancer stem cells) irrespective of EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiguang; Sperl, Bianca; Ullrich, Axel; Knyazev, Pjotr

    2014-12-30

    The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is linked to preexisting or acquired drug resistance and tumor relapse. Therefore, targeting both differentiated tumor cells and CSCs was suggested as an effective approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. After screening of chemotherapeutic agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) or monoclonal antibody in combination with the putative stem cell killer Salinomycin (SAL), we found Metformin (METF), which modestly exerted a growth inhibitory effect on monolayer cells and alveospheres/CSCs of 5 NSCLC cell lines regardless of their EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status, interacted synergistically with SAL to effectively promote cell death. Inhibition of EGFR (AKT, ERK1/2) and mTOR (p70 s6k) signaling with the combination of METF and SAL can be augmented beyond that achieved using each agent individually. Phospho-kinase assay further suggested the multiple roles of this combination in reducing oncogenic effects of modules, such as ß-catenin, Src family kinases (Src, Lyn, Yes), Chk-2 and FAK. Remarkably, significant reduction of sphere formation was seen under combinatorial treatment in all investigated NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, METF in combination with SAL could be a promising treatment option for patients with advanced NSCLC irrespective of their EGFR, KRAS, EML4/ALK and LKB1 status. PMID:25375092

  7. Veratri Nigri Rhizoma et Radix (Veratrum nigrum L.) and Its Constituent Jervine Prevent Adipogenesis via Activation of the LKB1-AMPKα-ACC Axis In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinbong; Jeon, Yong-Deok; Kim, Hye-Lin; Kim, Dae-Seung; Han, Yo-Han; Jung, Yunu; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Kang, JongWook; Yoon, Daeyeon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Heon; Lee, Junhee; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to investigate the antiobese effects of the ethanolic extract of Veratri Nigri Rhizoma et Radix (VN), a herb with limited usage, due to its toxicology. An HPLC analysis identified jervine as a constituent of VN. By an Oil Red O assay and a Real-Time RT-PCR assay, VN showed higher antiadipogenic effects than jervine. In high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese C57BL/6J mice, VN administration suppressed body weight gain. The levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), adipocyte fatty-acid-binding protein (aP2), adiponectin, resistin, and LIPIN1 were suppressed by VN, while SIRT1 was upregulated. Furthermore, VN activated phosphorylation of the liver kinase B1- (LKB1-) AMP-activated protein kinase alpha- (AMPKα-) acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) axis. Further investigation of cotreatment of VN with the AMPK agonist AICAR or AMPK inhibitor Compound C showed that VN can activate the phosphorylation of AMPKα in compensation to the inhibition of Compound C. In conclusion, VN shows antiobesity effects in HFD-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, VN has antiadipogenic features, which is due to activating the LKB1-AMPKα-ACC axis. These results suggest that VN has a potential benefit in preventing obesity. PMID:27143989

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes. PMID:27059959

  9. Regulation of the Nampt-mediated NAD salvage pathway and its therapeutic implications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Zhuang, Zhuo-Nan; Li, Hao; Tian, Tian; Lu, Yun-Xin; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Mo, Hai-Yu; Sheng, Hui; Chiao, Paul J; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-08-28

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a crucial cofactor for the redox reactions in the metabolic pathways of cancer cells that have elevated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). Cancer cells are reported to rely on NAD recycling and inhibition of the NAD salvage pathway causes metabolic collapse and cell death. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms and clinical implications for the NAD salvage pathway in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain unclear. This study showed that the expression of Nampt, the rate-limiting enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway, was significantly increased in PDAC cells and PDAC tissues. Additionally, inhibition of Nampt impaired tumor growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, which was accompanied by a decreased cellular NAD level and glycolytic activity. Mechanistically, the Nampt expression was independent of Kras and p16 status, but it was directly regulated by miR-206, which was inversely correlated with the expression of Nampt in PDAC tissues. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Nampt by its inhibitor, FK866, significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of gemcitabine in PDAC cells and in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. In conclusion, the present study revealed a novel regulatory mechanism for Nampt in PDAC and suggested that Nampt inhibition may override gemcitabine resistance by decreasing the NAD level and suppressing glycolytic activity, warranting further clinical investigation for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27233476

  10. Pancreatic β-cell Enhancers Regulate Rhythmic Transcription of Genes Controlling Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perelis, Mark; Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Schipma, Matthew J.; Hutchison, Alan L.; Taguchi, Akihiko; Peek, Clara Bien; Hong, Heekyung; Huang, Wenyu; Omura, Chiaki; Allred, Amanda L.; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Barish, Grant D.; Bass, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 are essential components of the molecular clock that coordinate behavior and metabolism with the solar cycle. Genetic or environmental perturbation of circadian cycles contributes to metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. To study the impact of the cell-autonomous clock on pancreatic β-cell function, we examined islets from mice with either intact or disrupted BMAL1 expression both throughout life and limited to adulthood. We found pronounced oscillation of insulin secretion that was synchronized with the expression of genes encoding secretory machinery and signaling factors that regulate insulin release. CLOCK/BMAL1 co-localized with the pancreatic transcription factor PDX1 within active enhancers distinct from those controlling rhythmic metabolic gene networks in liver. β-cell clock ablation in adult mice caused severe glucose intolerance. Thus cell-type specific enhancers underlie the circadian control of peripheral metabolism throughout life and may help explain its deregulation in diabetes. PMID:26542580

  11. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25–30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10−6M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R. PMID:22040127

  12. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  13. Small G proteins as key regulators of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John A.; Chen, Xuequn; Sabbatini, Maria E.

    2009-01-01

    Small GTP-binding (G) proteins act as molecular switches to regulate a number of cellular processes, including vesicular transport. Emerging evidence indicates that small G proteins regulate a number of steps in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Diverse small G proteins have been localized at discrete compartments along the secretory pathway and particularly on the secretory granule. Rab3D, Rab27B, and Rap1 are present on the granule membrane and play a role in the steps leading up to exocytosis. Whether the function of these G proteins is simply to ensure appropriate targeting or if they are involved as regulatory molecules is discussed. Most evidence suggests that Rab3D and Rab27B play a role in tethering the secretory granule to its target membrane. Other Rabs have been identified on the secretory granule that are associated with different steps in the secretory pathway. The Rho family small G proteins RhoA and Rac1 also regulate secretion through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Possible mechanisms for regulation of these G proteins and their effector molecules are considered. PMID:19088252

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:26542397

  15. Metformin and Rapamycin Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Growth in Obese Prediabetic Mice by Distinct MicroRNA-Regulated Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cifarelli, Vincenza; Lashinger, Laura M; Devlin, Kaylyn L; Dunlap, Sarah M; Huang, Jennifer; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pollak, Michael N; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Metformin treatment is associated with a decreased risk and better prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the mechanism of metformin's PC growth inhibition in the context of a prediabetic state is unknown. We used a Panc02 pancreatic tumor cell transplant model in diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to compare the effects of metformin and the direct mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin on PC growth, glucose regulation, mTOR pathway signaling, and candidate microRNA (miR) expression. In DIO/prediabetic mice, metformin and rapamycin significantly reduced pancreatic tumor growth and mTOR-related signaling. The rapamycin effects centered on decreased mTOR-regulated growth and survival signaling, including increased expression of let-7b and cell cycle-regulating miRs. Metformin (but not rapamycin) reduced glucose and insulin levels and expression of miR-34a and its direct targets Notch, Slug, and Snail. Metformin also reduced the number and size of Panc02 tumor spheres in vitro and inhibited the expression of Notch in spheroids. Our results suggest that metformin and rapamycin can both inhibit pancreatic tumor growth in obese, prediabetic mice through shared and distinct mechanisms. Metformin and direct mTOR inhibitors, alone or possibly in combination, represent promising intervention strategies for breaking the diabetes-PC link. PMID:25576058

  16. PHLPP negatively regulates cell motility through inhibition of Akt activity and integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alena J.; Wen, Yang-An; Stevens, Payton D.; Liu, Jingpeng; Wang, Chi; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently the fourth leading cause for cancer-related mortality. Malignant progression of pancreatic cancer depends not only on rapid proliferation of tumor cells but also on increased cell motility. In this study, we showed that increased PHLPP expression significantly reduced the rate of migration in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells whereas knockdown of PHLPP had the opposite effect. In addition, cell motility at the individual cell level was negatively regulated by PHLPP as determined using time-lapse imaging. Interestingly, the expression of β1 and β4 integrin proteins were decreased in PHLPP overexpressing cells and increased in PHLPP knockdown cells whereas the mRNA levels of integrin were not altered by changes in PHLPP expression. In determining the molecular mechanism underlying PHLPP-mediated regulation of integrin expression, we found that inhibition of lysosome activity rescued integrin expression in PHLPP overexpressing cells, thus suggesting that PHLPP negatively controls cell motility by inhibiting Akt activity to promote lysosome-dependent degradation of integrins. Functionally, the increased cell migration observed in PHLPP knockdown cells was effectively blocked by the neutralizing antibodies against β1 or β4 integrin. Taken together, our study identified a tumor suppressor role of PHLPP in suppressing cell motility by negatively regulating integrin expression in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26760962

  17. Down-regulation of miR-223 reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jia; Fang, Binbin; Zeng, Fanpeng; Ma, Cong; Pang, Haijie; Cheng, Long; Shi, Ying; Wang, Hui; Yin, Bin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs play a crucial role in controlling EMT. The aims of this study were to explore the potential role of miR-223 in governing EMT in gemcitabine-resistant (GR) pancreatic cancer cells. To achieve this goal, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analysis were used to validate whether GR cells acquired EMT in AsPC-1 and PANC-1 cells. Invasion, migration, and detachment assays were performed to further identify the EMT characteristics in GR cells. The miR-223 inhibitor was used to determine its role in GR-induced EMT. We found that GR cells acquired EMT features, which obtained elongated fibroblastoid morphology, decreased expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin, and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, we observed that GR cells are associated with high expression of miR-223. Notably, inhibition of miR-223 led to the reversal of EMT phenotype. More importantly, miR-223 governs GR-induced EMT in part due to down-regulation of its target Fbw7 and subsequent upregulation of Notch-1 in pancreatic cancer. Our study implied that down-regulation of miR-223 could be a novel therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25638153

  18. Targeted tumor delivery and controlled release of neuronal drugs with ferritin nanoparticles to regulate pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yifeng; Hamada, Yoh; Li, Jun; Cong, Liman; Wang, Nuoxin; Li, Ying; Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-06-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal malignancy whose progression is highly dependent on the nervous microenvironment. This study develops neural drug-loaded ferritin nanoparticles (Ft NPs) to regulate the nervous microenvironment, in order to control the pancreatic cancer progression. The drug-loaded Ft NPs can target pancreatic tumors via passive targeting of EPR effects of tumors and active targeting via transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) binding on cancer cells, with a triggered drug release in acidic tumor environment. Two drugs, one activates neural activity (carbachol), the other impairs neural activity (atropine), are encapsulated into the Ft NPs to form two kinds of nano drugs, Nano-Cab NPs and Nano-Ato NPs, respectively. The activation of the nervous microenvironment by Nano-Cab NPs significantly promotes the pancreatic tumor progression, whereas the blockage of neural niche by Nano-Ato NPs remarkably impairs the neurogenesis in tumors and the progression of pancreatic cancer. The Ft-based nanoparticles thus comprise an effective and safe route of delivery of neural drugs for novel anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27046157

  19. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  20. Tetraspanin-2 promotes glucotoxic apoptosis by regulating the JNK/β-catenin signaling pathway in human pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In-Hu; Park, Junsoo; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Jong-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Min-Goo; Park, Soo Jung; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex and heterogeneous disease, which has β-cell dysfunction at its core. Glucotoxicity affects pancreatic islets, causing β-cell apoptosis. However, the role of JNK/β-catenin signaling in glucotoxic β-cell apoptosis is not well understood. Recently, we identified tetraspanin-2 (TSPAN2) protein as a proapoptotic β-cell factor induced by glucose, suggesting that TSPAN2 might contribute to pancreatic β-cell glucotoxicity. To investigate the effects of glucose concentration on TSPAN2 expression and apoptosis, we used reverted immortalized RNAKT-15 human pancreatic β cells. High TSPAN2 levels up-regulated phosphorylated (p) JNK and induced apoptosis. p-JNK enhanced the phosphorylation of β-catenin and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1). Dkk1 knockdown by small interfering (si)RNA up-regulated nuclear β-catenin, suggesting that it is a JNK/β-catenin-dependent pathway. siRNA-mediated TSPAN2 depletion in RNAKT-15 cells increased nuclear β-catenin. This decreased BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) activation, leading to marked protection against high glucose–induced apoptosis. Bax subfamily proteins induced apoptosis through caspase-3. Thus, TSPAN2 might have induced Bax translocation and caspase-3 activation in pancreatic β cells, thereby promoting the apoptosis of RNAKT-15 cells by regulating the JNK/β-catenin pathway in response to high glucose concentrations. Targeting TSPAN2 could be a potential therapeutic strategy to treat glucose toxicity-induced β-cell failure.—Hwang, I.-H., Park, J., Kim, J. M., Kim, S. I., Choi, J.-S., Lee, K.-B., Yun, S. H., Lee, M.-G., Park, S. J., Jang, I.-S. Tetraspanin-2 promotes glucotoxic apoptosis by regulating the JNK/β-catenin signaling pathway in human pancreatic β cells. PMID:27247127

  1. GLI1 is regulated through Smoothened-independent mechanisms in neoplastic pancreatic ducts and mediates PDAC cell survival and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Nolan-Stevaux, Olivier; Lau, Janet; Truitt, Morgan L.; Chu, Gerald C.; Hebrok, Matthias; Fernández-Zapico, Martin E.; Hanahan, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by the deregulation of the hedgehog signaling pathway. The Sonic Hedgehog ligand (Shh), absent in the normal pancreas, is highly expressed in pancreatic tumors and is sufficient to induce neoplastic precursor lesions in mouse models. We investigated the mechanism of Shh signaling in PDAC carcinogenesis by genetically ablating the canonical bottleneck of hedgehog signaling, the transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo), in the pancreatic epithelium of PDAC-susceptible mice. We report that multistage development of PDAC tumors is not affected by the deletion of Smo in the pancreas, demonstrating that autocrine Shh–Ptch–Smo signaling is not required in pancreatic ductal cells for PDAC progression. However, the expression of Gli target genes is maintained in Smo-negative ducts, implicating alternative means of regulating Gli transcription in the neoplastic ductal epithelium. In PDAC tumor cells, we find that Gli transcription is decoupled from upstream Shh–Ptch–Smo signaling and is regulated by TGF-β and KRAS, and we show that Gli1 is required both for survival and for the KRAS-mediated transformed phenotype of cultured PDAC cancer cells. PMID:19136624

  2. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride, a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via down-regulating AKT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Guoli; Yao, Guangmin; Zhan, Guanqun; Hu, Yufeng; Yue, Ming; Cheng, Ling; Liu, Yaping; Ye, Qi; Qing, Guoliang; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported the isolation of a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC), from Zephyranthes candida, which exhibits potent cytotoxicity in a spectrum of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action remains unclear. Using multiple cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, one of the most mortal and refractory human malignancies, we further studied the NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity and found that it induced drastic cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells whereas an insignificant effect on a noncancerous cell line. The NMHC-mediated growth inhibition was more severe than the first-line chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased glycolysis. NMHC exerted its function through down-regulating AKT activation, and the ectopic expression of activated AKT rescued the growth inhibition. Consistently, NMHC injections in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model manifested the anti-tumor effect in vivo. Engrafted tumor cells underwent AKT attenuation and apoptotic death upon treatments. As such, we here demonstrate the AKT inhibition may be one of the mechanisms by which NMHC decreases tumor cell survival rate in vitro and in vivo. Our data thereby suggest that NMHC holds great promise as a potent chemotherapeutic agent against pancreatic cancer and sheds new light on obtaining such agents from natural products toward therapeutic purposes. - Highlights: • N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid. • NMHC exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity. • NMHC leads to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased metabolism. • NMHC down-regulates the AKT signaling pathway.

  3. Association of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor expression in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyum; Song, Si Young; Kim, Sunghoon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Yim, Ga Won; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) expression is elevated in both ovarian tumors and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, PAUF expression in ovarian tumors according to histologic subtype and grade has not been investigated. In this study, we examined various clinicopathologic features of 24 patients with mucinous cystadenoma (MCA), 36 with mucinous borderline tumors (MBTs), and 46 with mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs) according to PAUF expression status assessed using immunohistochemistry. We found that MACs more frequently stained positive for PAUF than did MCAs and MBTs (P < 0.0001). Although there was no significant differences with respect to other clinicopathologic characteristics of MACs according to PAUF expression status, patients with PAUF-weakly positive and PAUF-strongly positive MACs tended to have a shorter overall survival (OS) than those with PAUF-negative MAC, determined using a Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.1885). After adjusting for various clinicopathologic parameters, PAUF positivity of MACs was a significant predictive factor for disease-free survival (DFS) (negative vs. weakly positive: P = 0.045, hazard ratio [HR] = 57.406, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.090-3022.596; and negative vs. strongly positive: P = 0.034, HR = 97.890, 95% CI: 1.412-6785.925). In conclusion, PAUF was more frequently expressed in MAC than in its benign and borderline counterparts, and was associated with a poor OS and DFS in MAC patients. Therefore, we suggest that PAUF may be a practical biomarker for histopathological categorization and a prognostic marker for patients with an ovarian mucinous tumor. PMID:25197383

  4. The canonical Wnt pathway regulates the metastasis-promoting mucin MUC4 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pai, Priya; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Macha, Muzafar A; Sheinin, Yuri; Smith, Lynette M; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-02-01

    Aberrant Wnt signaling frequently occurs in pancreatic cancer (PC) and contributes to disease progression/metastases. Likewise, the transmembrane-mucin MUC4 is expressed de novo in early pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs) and incrementally increases with PC progression, contributing to metastasis. To determine the mechanism of MUC4 upregulation in PC, we examined factors deregulated in early PC progression, such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling. MUC4 promoter analysis revealed the presence of three putative TCF/LEF-binding sites, leading us to hypothesize that MUC4 can be regulated by β-catenin. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of rapid autopsy PC tissues showed a correlation between MUC4 and cytosolic/nuclear β-catenin expression. Knock down (KD) of β-catenin in CD18/HPAF and T3M4 cell lines resulted in decreased MUC4 transcript and protein. Three MUC4 promoter luciferase constructs, p3778, p3000, and p2700, were generated. The construct p3778, encompassing the entire MUC4 promoter, elicited increased luciferase activity in the presence of stabilized β-catenin. Mutation of the TCF/LEF site closest to the transcription start site (i.e., -2629/-2612) and furthest from the start site (i.e., -3425/-3408) reduced MUC4 promoter luciferase activity. Transfection with dominant negative TCF4 decreased MUC4 transcript and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed enrichment of β-catenin on -2629/-2612 and -3425/-3408 of the MUC4 promoter in CD18/HPAF. Functionally, CD18/HPAF and T3M4 β-catenin KD cells showed decreased migration and decreased Vimentin, N-cadherin, and pERK1/2 expression. Tumorigenicity studies in athymic nude mice showed CD18/HPAF β-catenin KD cells significantly reduced primary tumor sizes and metastases compared to scrambled control cells. We show for the first time that β-catenin directly governs MUC4 in PC. PMID:26526617

  5. Glaucarubinone and gemcitabine synergistically reduce pancreatic cancer growth via down-regulation of P21-activated kinases.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Dannel; Huynh, Nhi; Beutler, John A; Christophi, Christopher; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; He, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Nearly 100% cases of pancreatic cancer carry mutations in KRas. P-21-activated kinases (PAKs) are activated by and act downstream of KRas. Glaucarubinone, a natural product first isolated from the seeds of the tree Simarouba glauca, was originally developed as an antimalarial drug, and has more recently been recognised as an anticancer agent. The aims of this study were to determine whether glaucarubinone, alone or in combination with the front-line chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine, would inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro or in vivo and the mechanism involved. Growth of the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation in vitro, and by volume as xenografts in SCID mice. The expression and activities of the two serine/threonine kinases PAK1 and PAK4, which are key regulators of cancer progression, were measured by Western blotting. Here we report that glaucarubinone decreased proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and reduced their growth as xenografts in vivo. Treatment with glaucarubinone and gemcitabine reduced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo more than treatment with either glaucarubinone or gemcitabine alone. Treatment with glaucarubinone reduced PAK1 and PAK4 activities, which were further decreased by the combination of glaucarubinone and gemcitabine. These results indicate that glaucarubinone reduced pancreatic cancer cell growth at least in part via inhibition of pathways involving PAK1 and PAK4. The synergistic inhibition by glaucarubinone and gemcitabine observed both in vitro and in vivo suggests that glaucarubinone may be a useful adjunct to current regimes of chemotherapy. PMID:24491405

  6. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  7. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  8. A novel epigenetic mechanism regulating hyaluronan production in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kohi, Shiro; Sato, Norihiro; Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Koga, Atsuhiro; Higure, Aiichiro; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an abundant stroma enriched with hyaluronan (HA), a major component of extracellular matrix known to play a critical role in tumor progression. The mechanisms that regulate HA synthesis in PDAC are poorly understood. To investigate whether DNA methylation and HA production from PDAC cells are associated, we studied the effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-aza-dC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation, or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) knockdown by small interfering RNA, on the HA production from PDAC cells. HA production into the conditioned medium was evaluated in PDAC cells treated with 5-aza-dC or DNMT1 knockdown. mRNA expression of HA synthase (HAS) genes was investigated by real-time RT-PCR. Treatment of PDAC cells with 5-aza-dC led to a significant increase in the HA production (up to 2.5-fold increase) in all 4 cell lines tested. This enhanced HA production by 5-aza-dC treatment was accompanied by increased mRNA expression of HAS2 and HAS3. Furthermore, increased HA production and HAS2/HAS3 mRNA expression was also observed in PDAC cells by knockdown of DNMT1. These findings provide evidence, for the first time, that epigenetic mechanism is involved in the regulation of HA synthesis in PDAC cells. PMID:26589701

  9. miR-184 Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Function According to Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tattikota, Sudhir G; Rathjen, Thomas; Hausser, Jean; Khedkar, Aditya; Kabra, Uma D; Pandey, Varun; Sury, Matthias; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Mollet, Inês G; Eliasson, Lena; Selbach, Matthias; Zinzen, Robert P; Zavolan, Mihaela; Kadener, Sebastian; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin; Friedländer, Marc R; Poy, Matthew N

    2015-08-14

    In response to fasting or hyperglycemia, the pancreatic β-cell alters its output of secreted insulin; however, the pathways governing this adaptive response are not entirely established. Although the precise role of microRNAs (miRNAs) is also unclear, a recurring theme emphasizes their function in cellular stress responses. We recently showed that miR-184, an abundant miRNA in the β-cell, regulates compensatory proliferation and secretion during insulin resistance. Consistent with previous studies showing miR-184 suppresses insulin release, expression of this miRNA was increased in islets after fasting, demonstrating an active role in the β-cell as glucose levels lower and the insulin demand ceases. Additionally, miR-184 was negatively regulated upon the administration of a sucrose-rich diet in Drosophila, demonstrating strong conservation of this pathway through evolution. Furthermore, miR-184 and its target Argonaute2 remained inversely correlated as concentrations of extracellular glucose increased, underlining a functional relationship between this miRNA and its targets. Lastly, restoration of Argonaute2 in the presence of miR-184 rescued suppression of miR-375-targeted genes, suggesting these genes act in a coordinated manner during changes in the metabolic context. Together, these results highlight the adaptive role of miR-184 according to glucose metabolism and suggest the regulatory role of this miRNA in energy homeostasis is highly conserved. PMID:26152724

  10. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Che, Yongzhe; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong; Gao, Ying-Tang; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan; Li, Shu Jie

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K(+)-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K(+)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26559003

  11. Downstream of Mutant KRAS, the Transcription Regulator YAP Is Essential for Neoplastic Progression to Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiying; Nandakumar, Nivedita; Shi, Yuhao; Manzano, Mark; Smith, Alias; Graham, Garrett; Gupta, Swati; Vietsch, Eveline E.; Laughlin, Sean Z.; Wadhwa, Mandheer; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Wang, Fen; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Wellstein, Anton; Yi, Chunling

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with poor survival rates and frequently carries oncogenic KRAS mutation. However, KRAS has thus far not been a viable therapeutic target. We found that the abundance of YAP mRNA, which encodes Yes-associated protein (YAP), a protein regulated by the Hippo pathway during tissue development and homeostasis, was increased in human PDAC tissue compared with that in normal pancreatic epithelia. In genetically engineered KrasG12D and KrasG12D: Trp53R172H mouse models, pancreas-specific deletion of Yap halted the progression of early neoplastic lesions to PDAC without affecting normal pancreatic development and endocrine function. Although Yap was dispensable for acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initial step in the progression to PDAC, Yap was critically required for the proliferation of mutant Kras or Kras:Trp53 neoplastic pancreatic ductal cells in culture and for their growth and progression to invasive PDAC in mice. Yap functioned as a critical transcriptional switch downstream of the oncogenic KRAS–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, promoting the expression of genes encoding secretory factors that cumulatively sustained neoplastic proliferation, a tumorigenic stromal response in the tumor microenvironment, and PDAC progression in Kras and Kras: Trp53 mutant pancreas tissue. Together, our findings identified Yap as a critical oncogenic KRAS effector and a promising therapeutic target for PDAC and possibly other types of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:24803537

  12. MUC1 mucin stabilizes and activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha to regulate metabolism in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chaika, Nina V.; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Lewallen, Michelle E.; Purohit, Vinee; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Mehla, Kamiya; Brown, Roger B.; Caffrey, Thomas; Yu, Fang; Johnson, Keith R.; Powers, Robert; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer that facilitates cancer cell survival and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that MUC1, a large, type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in several carcinomas including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, modulates cancer cell metabolism to facilitate growth properties of cancer cells. MUC1 occupies the promoter elements of multiple genes directly involved in glucose metabolism and regulates their expression. Furthermore, MUC1 expression enhances glycolytic activity in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrate that MUC1 expression enhances in vivo glucose uptake and expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in orthotopic implantation models of pancreatic cancer. The MUC1 cytoplasmic tail is known to activate multiple signaling pathways through its interactions with several transcription factors/coregulators at the promoter elements of various genes. Our results indicate that MUC1 acts as a modulator of the hypoxic response in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression/stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). MUC1 physically interacts with HIF-1α and p300 and stabilizes the former at the protein level. By using a ChIP assay, we demonstrate that MUC1 facilitates recruitment of HIF-1α and p300 on glycolytic gene promoters in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Also, by metabolomic studies, we demonstrate that MUC1 regulates multiple metabolite intermediates in the glucose and amino acid metabolic pathways. Thus, our studies indicate that MUC1 acts as a master regulator of the metabolic program and facilitates metabolic alterations in the hypoxic environments that help tumor cells survive and proliferate under such conditions. PMID:22869720

  13. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-06-15

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca(2+)-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca(2+)-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  14. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  15. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  16. HEATR1 Negatively Regulates Akt to Help Sensitize Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzheng; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Haoxing; Deng, Min; Gao, Bowen; Niu, Nifang; Yu, Jia; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Qin, Bo; Xie, Fang; Evans, Debra; Wang, Liewei; Lou, Wenhui; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-02-01

    Elucidating mechanisms of chemoresistance is critical to improve cancer therapy, especially for the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Genome-wide association studies have suggested the less studied gene HEAT repeat-containing protein 1 (HEATR1) as a possible determinant of cellular sensitivity to different chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we assessed this hypothesized link in PDAC, where HEATR1 expression is downregulated significantly. HEATR1 silencing in PDAC cells increased resistance to gemcitabine and other chemotherapeutics, where this effect was associated with increased AKT kinase phosphorylation at the Thr308 regulatory site. Mechanistically, HEATR1 enhanced cell responsiveness to gemcitabine by acting as a scaffold to facilitate interactions between AKT and the protein phosphatase PP2A, thereby promoting Thr308 dephosphorylation. Consistent with these findings, treatment with the AKT inhibitor triciribine sensitized HEATR1-depleted PDAC cells to gemcitabine, suggesting that this therapeutic combination may overcome gemcitabine resistance in patients with low HEATR1 expression. Clinically, we found that HEATR1 downregulation in PDAC patients was associated with increased AKT phosphorylation, poor response to tumor resection plus gemcitabine standard-of-care treatment, and shorter overall survival. Collectively, our findings establish HEATR1 as a novel regulator of AKT and a candidate predictive and prognostic indicator of drug responsiveness and outcome in PDAC patients. PMID:26676747

  17. HuR’s post-transcriptional regulation of death receptor 5 in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Danielle M.; Rittenhouse, David W.; Valley, Christopher C.; Cozzitorto, Joseph A.; Burkhart, Richard A.; Leiby, Benjamin; Winter, Jordan M.; Weber, Matthew C.; Londin, Eric R.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Yeo, Charles J.; Gorospe, Myriam; Witkiewicz, Agnieska K.; Sachs, Jonathan N.; Brody, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is one of the core signaling pathways disrupted in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily that is expressed in cancer cells. Binding of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to DR5 is a potent trigger of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and numerous clinical trials are based on DR5-targeted therapies for cancer, including PDA. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein, regulates a select number of transcripts under stress conditions. Here we report that HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of PDA cells upon treatment with a DR5 agonist. High doses of DR5 agonist induce cleavage of both HuR and caspase 8. HuR binds to DR5 mRNA at the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) in PDA cells in response to different cancer-associated stressors and subsequently represses DR5 protein expression; silencing HuR augments DR5 protein production by enabling its translation and thus enhances apoptosis. In PDA specimens (n = 53), negative HuR cytoplasmic expression correlated with elevated DR5 expression (odds ratio 16.1, p < 0.0001). Together, these data demonstrate a feedback mechanism elicited by HuR-mediated repression of the key apoptotic membrane protein DR5. PMID:22785201

  18. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  19. Significance of P-cadherin overexpression and possible mechanism of its regulation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Keita; Imai, Katsunori; Higashi, Takaaki; Taki, Katunobu; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Okabe, Hirohisa; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that P-cadherin, one of the classical cadherins, contributes to the malignant behavior of several types of cancer. In this study, we analyzed the expression of P-cadherin and its clinicopathological and prognostic values in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we investigated the functional role of P-cadherin in these cancer cells by knockdown and overexpression in vitro and by analyzing the correlation between the P-cadherin expression and its promoter methylation status. Thirty of 59 ICC cases (51%) and 36 of 73 pancreatic cancer cases (49%) stained positive for P-cadherin with mainly membranous distribution in tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. P-cadherin expression was significantly correlated with several clinicopathological factors, which reflect tumor behavior, and was identified as an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival in patients with ICC (relative risk [RR] 2.93, P = 0.04) and pancreatic cancer (RR 2.68, P = 0.005) via multivariate analyses. P-cadherin downregulation by siRNA suppressed migration and invasion, and P-cadherin overexpression induced the opposite effects in both ICC and pancreatic cancer cells, without any effects on cell proliferation. P-cadherin expression was related to its promoter methylation status in both cell lines and cancer tissues. In summary, P-cadherin overexpression may serve as a useful biomarker of invasive phenotype and poor prognosis; P-cadherin expression was found to be regulated by its promoter methylation. These results suggest that P-cadherin represents a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ICC and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26132727

  20. SCF, Regulated by HIF-1α, Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Ren, He; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiuchao; Lang, Mingxiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Zhao, Xiao; Sheng, Jun; Yuan, Zhanna; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and luciferase assay analysis. The SCF level was also correlated with lymph node metastasis and the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM) stage in PDAC samples. The SCF higher-expression group had significantly lower survival rates than the SCF lower-expression group (p<0.05). Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of SCF through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in PDAC cells at the protein and RNA levels. When HIF-1α was knocked down by RNA interference, the SCF level decreased significantly. Additionally, ChIP and luciferase results demonstrated that HIF-1α can directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE) region of the SCF promoter and activate the SCF transcription under hypoxia. The results of colony formation, cell scratch, and transwell migration assay showed that SCF promoted the proliferation and invasion of PANC-1 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, the down-regulated ability of cell proliferation and invasion following HIF-1α knockdown was rescued by adding exogenous SCF under hypoxia in vitro. Finally, when the HIF-1α expression was inhibited by digoxin, the tumor volume and the SCF level decreased, thereby proving the relationship between HIF-1α and SCF in vivo. In conclusion, SCF is an important factor for the growth of PDAC. In our experiments, we proved that SCF, a downstream gene of HIF-1α, can promote the development of PDAC under hypoxia. Thus, SCF might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:25799412

  1. Salt-inducible kinase 1 regulates E-cadherin expression and intercellular junction stability.

    PubMed

    Eneling, Kristina; Brion, Laura; Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria J; Sznajder, Jacob I; Mochizuki, Naoki; Emoto, Kazuo; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Bertorello, Alejandro M

    2012-08-01

    The protein kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) regulates cell polarity and intercellular junction stability. Also, LKB1 controls the activity of salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1). The role and relevance of SIK1 and its downstream effectors in linking the LKB1 signals within these processes are partially understood. We hypothesize that SIK1 may link LKB1 signals to the maintenance of epithelial junction stability by regulating E-cadherin expression. Results from our studies using a mouse lung alveolar epithelial (MLE-12) cell line or human renal proximal tubule (HK2) cell line transiently or stably lacking the expression of SIK1 (using SIK1 siRNAs or shRNAs), or with its expression abrogated (sik1(+/+) vs. sik1(-/-) mice), indicate that suppression of SIK1 (∼40%) increases the expression of the transcriptional repressors Snail2 (∼12-fold), Zeb1 (∼100%), Zeb2 (∼50%), and TWIST (∼20-fold) by activating cAMP-response element binding protein. The lack of SIK1 and activation of transcriptional repressors decreases the availability of E-cadherin (mRNA and protein expression by ∼100 and 80%, respectively) and the stability of intercellular junctions in epithelia (decreases in transepithelial resistance). Furthermore, LKB1-mediated increases in E-cadherin expression are impaired in cells where SIK1 has been disabled. We conclude that SIK1 is a key regulator of E-cadherin expression, and thereby contributes to the stability of intercellular junctions. PMID:22522110

  2. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor promotes metastasis by regulating TLR/CXCR4 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, HD; Lee, Y; Oh, YK; Jung, JG; Park, YW; Myung, K; Kim, K-H; Koh, SS; Lim, D-S

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) is overproduced in certain types of cancer. However, little is known of the tumorigenic function of PAUF. In this study, we report the X-ray crystal structure of PAUF and reveal that PAUF is a mammalian lectin normally found in plant lectins. We also identify PAUF as an endogenous ligand of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 by screening extracellular domain receptor pools.We further confirmed the specificity of the PAUF–TLR2 interaction. PAUF induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and activates the IKK-β-mediated TPL2/MEK/ERK signaling pathway through TLR2. In agreement with the result of TLR2-mediated ERK activation by PAUF, PAUF induces increased expression of the protumorigenic cytokines RANTES and MIF in THP-1 cells. However, PAUF does not fully activate Iκ-B-α signaling pathways in THP-1 cells, and fails to translocate the p65 subunit of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) complex into the nucleus, resulting in no NF-κB activation. Surprisingly, we found that PAUF also associated with the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR4)–TLR2 complex and inhibited CXCR4-dependent, TLR2-mediated NF-κB activation. Together, these findings suggest that the new cancer-associated ligand, PAUF, may activate TLR-mediated ERK signaling to produce the protumorigenic cytokines, but inhibits TLR-mediated NF-κB signaling, thereby facilitating tumor growth and escape from innate immune surveillance. PMID:20802527

  4. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  5. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  6. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21. PMID:26864640

  7. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase regulates pancreatic ductal, but not β-cell, regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Ho; Miller, Amber; Panopoulos, Andreas; Hao, Ergeng; Margolis, Robert; Terskikh, Alexey; Levine, Fred

    2014-09-01

    The maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is expressed in stem/progenitor cells in some adult tissues, where it has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including the control of cell proliferation. Here, we described studies on its role in adult pancreatic regeneration in response to injury induced by duct ligation and β-cell ablation. MELK expression was studied using transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the MELK promoter, and the role of MELK was studied using transgenic mice deleted in the MELK kinase domain. Pancreatic damage was initiated using duct ligation and chemical beta-cell ablation. By tracing MELK expression using a MELK promoter-GFP transgene, we determined that expression was extremely low in the normal pancreas. However, following duct ligation and β-cell ablation, it became highly expressed in pancreatic ductal cells while remaining weakly expressed in α-cells and β- cells. In a mutant mouse in which the MELK kinase domain was deleted, there was no effect on pancreatic development. There was no apparent effect on islet regeneration, either. However, following duct ligation there was a dramatic increase in the number of small ducts, but no change in the total number of duct cells or duct cell proliferation. In vitro studies indicated that this was likely due to a defect in cell migration. These results implicate MELK in the control of the response of the pancreas to injury, specifically controlling cell migration in normal and transformed pancreatic duct cells. PMID:25194022

  8. Profiling CCK-mediated pancreatic growth: the dynamic genetic program and the role of STATs as potential regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jackie Y.; Guo, LiLi; Ernst, Stephen A.; Williams, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Feeding mice with protease inhibitor (PI) leads to increased endogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) release and results in pancreatic growth. This adaptive response requires calcineurin (CN)-NFAT and AKT-mTOR pathways, but the genes involved, the dynamics of their expression, and other regulatory pathways remain unknown. Here, we examined the early (1–8 h) transcriptional program that underlies pancreatic growth. We found 314 upregulated and 219 downregulated genes with diverse temporal and functional profiles. Several new identifications include the following: stress response genes Gdf15 and Txnip, metabolic mediators Pitpnc1 and Hmges2, as well as components of growth factor response Fgf21, Atf3, and Egr1. The genes fell into seven self-organizing clusters, each with a distinct pattern of expression; a representative gene within each of the upregulated clusters (Egr1, Gadd45b, Rgs2, and Serpinb1a) was validated by qRT-PCR. Genes up at any point throughout the time course and CN-dependent genes were subjected to further bioinformatics-based networking and promoter analysis, yielding STATs as potential transcriptional regulators. As shown by PCR, qPCR, and Western blots, the active phospho-form of STAT3 and the Jak-STAT feedback inhibitor Socs2 were both increased throughout early pancreatic growth. Moreover, immunohistochemistry showed a CCK-dependent and acinar cell-specific increase in nuclear localization of p-STAT3, with >75% nuclear occupancy in PI-fed mice vs. <0.1% in controls. Thus, the study identified novel genes likely to be important for CCK-driven pancreatic growth, characterized and biologically validated the dynamic pattern of their expression and investigated STAT-Socs signaling as a new player in this trophic response. PMID:22010007

  9. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology. PMID:27246849

  10. Regulation of pancreatic inflammation by connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2).

    PubMed

    Charrier, Alyssa; Chen, Ruju; Kemper, Sherri; Brigstock, David R

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by long-term heavy alcohol consumption, which results in injury and death of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC). The PAC play a pivotal role in mediating early inflammatory responses but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with ethanol and cerulein resulted in increased staining for acinar interleukin- 1b (IL-1b), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3), or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) by Day 16 and this was associated with increased infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages and increased expression of pancreatic CTGF/CCN2 mRNA. Compared with wild-type Swiss Webster mice, ethanol treatment of pan-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CTGF/CCN2 transgenic mice caused enhanced acinar staining for GFP or CTGF/CCN2 and a significant increase in pancreatic infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages or NIMP-R14-positive neutrophils. Treatment of primary mouse PAC or the rat AR42J PAC line with ethanol or CTGF/CCN2 resulted in enhanced expression of IL-1b or CCL3. Conditioned medium from CTGF/CCN2-treated AR42J cells induced chemotaxis in NR8383 macrophages and this response was abrogated in a dose dependent manner by addition of BX471, an inhibitor of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1. These results reveal that acinar CTGF/CCN2 plays a novel role in alcohol-induced inflammatory processes in the pancreas by increasing infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and increasing acinar production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-1b or CCL3. The early production of CTGF/CCN2 by PAC to drive inflammation is distinct from its previously reported production by pancreatic stellate cells to drive fibrosis at later stages of pancreatic injury. PMID:24754049

  11. Regulation of pancreatic inflammation by connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2)

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Chen, Ruju; Kemper, Sherri; Brigstock, David R

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by long-term heavy alcohol consumption, which results in injury and death of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC). The PAC play a pivotal role in mediating early inflammatory responses but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with ethanol and cerulein resulted in increased staining for acinar interleukin-1β (IL-1β), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3), or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) by Day 16 and this was associated with increased infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages and increased expression of pancreatic CTGF/CCN2 mRNA. Compared with wild-type Swiss Webster mice, ethanol treatment of pan-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CTGF/CCN2 transgenic mice caused enhanced acinar staining for GFP or CTGF/CCN2 and a significant increase in pancreatic infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages or NIMP-R14-positive neutrophils. Treatment of primary mouse PAC or the rat AR42J PAC line with ethanol or CTGF/CCN2 resulted in enhanced expression of IL-1β or CCL3. Conditioned medium from CTGF/CCN2-treated AR42J cells induced chemotaxis in NR8383 macrophages and this response was abrogated in a dose-dependent manner by addition of BX471, an inhibitor of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1. These results reveal that acinar CTGF/CCN2 plays a novel role in alcohol-induced inflammatory processes in the pancreas by increasing infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and increasing acinar production of inflammatory mediators such as IL-1β or CCL3. The early production of CTGF/CCN2 by PAC to drive inflammation is distinct from its previously reported production by pancreatic stellate cells to drive fibrosis at later stages of pancreatic injury. PMID:24754049

  12. Novel thiosemicarbazone iron chelators induce up-regulation and phosphorylation of the metastasis suppressor N-myc down-stream regulated gene 1: a new strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Chikhani, Sherin; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2011-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive neoplasm, with a mortality rate close to 100%. The most successful agent for pancreatic cancer treatment is gemcitabine, although the overall effect in terms of patient survival remains very poor. This study was initiated to evaluate a novel class of anticancer agents against pancreatic cancer. This group of compounds belongs to the dipyridyl thiosemicarbazone class that have been shown to have potent and selective activity against a range of different neoplasms in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate for the first time in pancreatic cancer that these agents increase the expression of the growth and metastasis suppressor N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 and its phosphorylation at Ser330 and Thr346 that is important for its activity against this tumor. In addition, these agents increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1), whereas decreasing cyclin D1 in pancreatic cancer cells. Together, these molecular alterations account, in part, for the pronounced antitumor activity observed. Indeed, these agents had significantly higher antiproliferative activity in vitro than the established treatments for pancreatic cancer, namely gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Studies in vivo demonstrated that a novel thiosemicarbazone, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone hydrochloride, completely inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts with no evidence of marked alterations in normal tissue histology. Together, our studies have identified molecular effectors of a novel and potent antitumor agent that could be useful for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21719465

  13. GAIP Interacting Protein C-Terminus Regulates Autophagy and Exosome Biogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer through Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Lau, Julie S.; Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C.; Chari, Suresh T.; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer. PMID:25469510

  14. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas Axis Regulates the Development of Pancreatic Endocrine Cells in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Liang, Juan; Leung, Po Sing

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), its product Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], and Ang-(1-7) receptor Mas, have been shown to regulate organogenesis during embryonic development in various species. However, it is not known whether a local ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis is present in the fetal pancreas. It is hypothesized that there is a local ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the embryonic pancreas in mice that is involved in regulating islet cell development. To address this issue, the endogenous expression profile of axis constituents in embryonic mouse pancreata was examined. Involvement of the ACE2 axis in the regulation of pancreatic development was also examined. The present experiments showed in an in vivo animal model that endogenous expression levels of ACE2 and the Mas receptor were upregulated in mouse pancreata in late embryogenesis, peaking on embryonic day E16.5, when it reached 3 folds compared to that seen at E12.5. Consistently, endogenous expression of Ang-(1-7) also peaked at E16.5. Treatment with the ACE2 inhibitor DX600 did not alter islet development. However, prenatal treatment with A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, reduced the β-cell to α-cell ratio in neonatal islets, impaired islet insulin secretory function, and impaired the pups’ glucose tolerance. In ex vivo pancreas explant cultures, A779 again decreased the β-cell to α-cell ratio, apparently through its effects on β-cell proliferation (reduced proliferation shown with Ki67 staining), and also decreased Insulin and Ngn3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment of explant cultures with Ang-(1-7) increased mRNA levels of Insulin and pancreatic progenitor marker Ngn3, as well as Nox4, the ROS generation enzyme; these stimulatory effects were attenuated by co-treatment with A779, suggesting that Ang-(1-7), via Mas receptor signaling, may promote differentiation of pancreatic progenitors into insulin-producing cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species. These data together suggest that a

  15. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  16. TAp63 is a master transcriptional regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaohua; Gi, Young Jin; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Chan, Io Long; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Flores, Elsa R

    2012-10-01

    TAp63 prevents premature aging, suggesting a link to genes that regulate longevity. Further characterization of TAp63-/- mice revealed that these mice develop obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance similar to those seen in mice lacking two key metabolic regulators, Silent information regulator T1 (Sirt1) and AMPK. While the roles of Sirt1 and AMPK in metabolism have been well studied, their upstream regulators are not well understood. We found that TAp63 is important in regulating energy metabolism by accumulating in response to metabolic stress and transcriptionally activating Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1, resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, we found that TAp63 lowers blood glucose levels in response to metformin. Restoration of Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 in TAp63-/- mice rescued some of the metabolic defects of the TAp63-/- mice. Our study defines a role for TAp63 in metabolism and weight control. PMID:23040072

  17. GFRα2 prompts cell growth and chemoresistance through down-regulating tumor suppressor gene PTEN via Mir-17-5p in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiangning; Wang, Di; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Ying; Chen, Hao; Shi, Minmin; Wang, Xuelong; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Zhan, Qian; Wei, Gang; Peng, Chenghong

    2016-10-01

    Nerve growth factors and their receptors have received an increasing attention in certain cancers since they play an important role in regulating tumorigenesis, biological process and metastasis. Here we aimed at characterizing a new function of one of the subtypes of growth factor receptors (GFR), GFRα2, in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we showed that GFRα2 was up-regulated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and was positively correlated with tumor size and perineural invasion, which indicated that it may be associated with cell growth and apoptosis. Mechanically, we discovered that high GFRα2 expression level leads to PTEN inactivation via enhancing Mir-17-5p level. PMID:27400681

  18. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor negatively regulates the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Jing, Xiaoqian; Shen, Baiyong; Liu, Xinyu; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Bingrui; Fu, Zhiping; Peng, Chenghong; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Frequent metastasis and recurrence are the main reasons for the poor prognosis of PC patients. Thus, the discovery of new biomarkers and wider insights into the mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis is crucial. In the present study, we report that leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) suppresses tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC cells both in vitro and in vivo. LIFR expression was significantly lower in PC tissues and was associated with local invasion (P=0.047), lymph node metastasis (P=0.014) and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.002). Overexpression of LIFR significantly suppressed PC cell colony formation (P=0.005), migration (P=0.003), invasion (P=0.010) and wound healing ability (P=0.013) in vitro, while opposing results were observed after LIFR was silenced. Furthermore, animal xenograft and metastasis models confirm that the in vivo results were consistent with the outcomes in vitro. Meanwhile, LIFR inhibited the expression of β-catenin, vimentin and slug and induced the expression of E-cadherin, suggesting that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulation pathway may underlie the mechanism. These results indicate that LIFR negatively regulates the metastasis of PC cells. PMID:27375070

  19. VAMP7 Regulates Autophagy to Maintain Mitochondrial Homeostasis and to Control Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Kyota; Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Itakura, Makoto; Torii, Seiji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Nakamichi, Yoko; Kishimoto, Takuma; Kawakami, Hayato; Harada, Akihiro; Takahashi, Masami; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    VAMP7 is a SNARE protein that mediates specific membrane fusions in intracellular trafficking and was recently reported to regulate autophagosome formation. However, its function in pancreatic β-cells is largely unknown. To elucidate the physiological role of VAMP7 in β-cells, we generated pancreatic β-cell-specific VAMP7 knockout (Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre) mice. VAMP7 deletion impaired glucose-stimulated ATP production and insulin secretion, though VAMP7 was not localized to insulin granules. VAMP7-deficient β-cells showed defective autophagosome formation and reduced mitochondrial function. p62/SQSTM1, a marker protein for defective autophagy, was selectively accumulated on mitochondria in VAMP7-deficient β-cells. These findings suggest that accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that are degraded by autophagy caused impairment of glucose-stimulated ATP production and insulin secretion in Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre β-cells. Feeding a high-fat diet to Vamp7(flox/Y);Cre mice exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction, further decreased ATP production and insulin secretion, and consequently induced glucose intolerance. Moreover, we found upregulated VAMP7 expression in wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet and in db/db mice, a model for diabetes. Thus our data indicate that VAMP7 regulates autophagy to maintain mitochondrial quality and insulin secretion in response to pathological stress in β-cells. PMID:26953164

  20. Protein-bound Polysaccharide-K Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling Through Down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ Transcription Under Hypoxia, Suppressing the Malignant Phenotype in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akio; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Kawamoto, Makoto; Fujimura, Akiko; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog signaling is activated in pancreatic cancer and could be a therapeutic target. We previously demonstrated that recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and mastermind-like 3 (MAML3) contribute to the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Smoothened (SMO) transcription. We have also shown that protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) could be effective for refractory pancreatic cancer that down-regulates SMO transcription under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated whether the anticancer mechanism of PSK involves inhibiting RBPJ and MAML3 expression under hypoxia. PSK reduced SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ expression in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxia. PSK also blocked RBPJ-induced invasiveness under hypoxia by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase expression. Lastly, we showed that PSK attenuated RBPJ-induced proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PSK suppresses Hedgehog signaling through down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ transcription under hypoxia, inhibiting the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer. Our results may lead to development of new treatments for refractory pancreatic cancer using PSK as a Hedgehog inhibitor. PMID:27466498

  1. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  2. Fibulin-3 negatively regulates ALDH1 via c-MET suppression and increases γ-radiation-induced sensitivity in some pancreatic cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, In-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Ha; Kim, Seo-Yoen; Kim, Jeong-Yul; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FBLN-3 gene was poorly expressed in some pancreatic cancer lines. • FBLN-3 promoter region was highly methylated in some pancreatic cancer cell lines. • FBLN-3 inhibited c-MET activation and expression and reduced cellular level of ALDH1. • FBLN-3/c-Met/ALDH1 axis modulates stemness and EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. - Abstract: Fibulin-3 (FBLN-3) has been postulated to be either a tumor suppressor or promoter depending on the cell type, and hypermethylation of the FBLN-3 promoter is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. We report that the promoter region of the FBLN-3 was significantly methylated (>95%) in some pancreatic cancer cell lines and thus FBLN-3 was poorly expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines such as AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2. FBLN-3 overexpression significantly down-regulated the cellular level of c-MET and inhibited hepatocyte growth factor-induced c-MET activation, which were closely associated with γ-radiation resistance of cancer cells. Moreover, we also showed that c-MET suppression or inactivation decreased the cellular level of ALDH1 isozymes (ALDH1A1 or ALDH1A3), which serve as cancer stem cell markers, and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, forced overexpression of FBLN-3 sensitized cells to cytotoxic agents such as γ-radiation and strongly inhibited the stemness and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) property of pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, if FBLN3 was suppressed in FBLN-3-expressing BxPC3 cells, the results were opposite. This study provides the first demonstration that the FBLN-3/c-MET/ALDH1 axis in pancreatic cancer cells partially modulates stemness and EMT as well as sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of γ-radiation.

  3. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion. PMID:26927753

  4. Functional Analysis of Novel Candidate Regulators of Insulin Secretion in the MIN6 Mouse Pancreatic β Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamato, Eiji; Tanabe, Koji; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β cells is important for understanding and treating diabetes. The pancreatic β cell line, MIN6, retains GSIS but gradually loses it in long-term culture. The MIN6 subclone, MIN6c4, exhibits well-regulated GSIS even after prolonged culture. We previously used DNA microarray analysis to compare gene expression in the parental MIN6 cells and MIN6c4 cells and identified several differentially regulated genes that may be involved in maintaining GSIS. Here we investigated the potential roles of six of these genes in GSIS: Tmem59l (Transmembrane protein 59 like), Scgn (Secretagogin), Gucy2c (Guanylate cyclase 2c), Slc29a4 (Solute carrier family 29, member 4), Cdhr1 (Cadherin-related family member 1), and Celsr2 (Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 2). These genes were knocked down in MIN6c4 cells using lentivirus vectors expressing gene-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and the effects of the knockdown on insulin expression and secretion were analyzed. Suppression of Tmem59l, Scgn, and Gucy2c expression resulted in significantly decreased glucose- and/or KCl-stimulated insulin secretion from MIN6c4 cells, while the suppression of Slc29a4 expression resulted in increased insulin secretion. Tmem59l overexpression rescued the phenotype of the Tmem59l knockdown MIN6c4 cells, and immunostaining analysis indicated that the TMEM59L protein colocalized with insulin and GM130, a Golgi complex marker, in MIN6 cells. Collectively, our findings suggested that the proteins encoded by Tmem59l, Scgn, Gucy2c, and Slc29a4 play important roles in regulating GSIS. Detailed studies of these proteins and their functions are expected to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in insulin secretion. PMID:26986842

  5. Functional Analysis of Novel Candidate Regulators of Insulin Secretion in the MIN6 Mouse Pancreatic β Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Yamato, Eiji; Tanabe, Koji; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β cells is important for understanding and treating diabetes. The pancreatic β cell line, MIN6, retains GSIS but gradually loses it in long-term culture. The MIN6 subclone, MIN6c4, exhibits well-regulated GSIS even after prolonged culture. We previously used DNA microarray analysis to compare gene expression in the parental MIN6 cells and MIN6c4 cells and identified several differentially regulated genes that may be involved in maintaining GSIS. Here we investigated the potential roles of six of these genes in GSIS: Tmem59l (Transmembrane protein 59 like), Scgn (Secretagogin), Gucy2c (Guanylate cyclase 2c), Slc29a4 (Solute carrier family 29, member 4), Cdhr1 (Cadherin-related family member 1), and Celsr2 (Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 2). These genes were knocked down in MIN6c4 cells using lentivirus vectors expressing gene-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), and the effects of the knockdown on insulin expression and secretion were analyzed. Suppression of Tmem59l, Scgn, and Gucy2c expression resulted in significantly decreased glucose- and/or KCl-stimulated insulin secretion from MIN6c4 cells, while the suppression of Slc29a4 expression resulted in increased insulin secretion. Tmem59l overexpression rescued the phenotype of the Tmem59l knockdown MIN6c4 cells, and immunostaining analysis indicated that the TMEM59L protein colocalized with insulin and GM130, a Golgi complex marker, in MIN6 cells. Collectively, our findings suggested that the proteins encoded by Tmem59l, Scgn, Gucy2c, and Slc29a4 play important roles in regulating GSIS. Detailed studies of these proteins and their functions are expected to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in insulin secretion. PMID:26986842

  6. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red O–positive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleate–induced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864

  7. The chromatin regulator Brg1 suppresses formation of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Figura, Guido; Fukuda, Akihisa; Roy, Nilotpal; Liku, Muluye E.; Morris, John P.; Kim, Grace E.; Russ, Holger A.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Dawson, David W.; Ferrer, Jorge; Mueller, William F.; Busch, Anke; Hertel, Klemens J.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) develops through distinct precursor lesions, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN). However, genetic features resulting in IPMN-associated PDA (IPMN–PDA) versus PanIN-associated PDA (PanIN-PDA) are largely unknown. Here we find that loss of Brg1, a core subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes, cooperates with oncogenic Kras to form cystic neoplastic lesions that resemble human IPMN and progress to PDA. Although Brg1-null IPMN–PDA develops rapidly, it possesses a distinct transcriptional profile compared with PanIN-PDA driven by mutant Kras and hemizygous p53 deletion. IPMN–PDA also is less lethal, mirroring prognostic trends in PDA patients. In addition, Brg1 deletion inhibits Kras-dependent PanIN development from adult acinar cells, but promotes Kras-driven preneoplastic transformation in adult duct cells. Therefore, this study implicates Brg1 as a determinant of context-dependent Kras-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis and suggests that chromatin remodelling may underlie the development of distinct PDA subsets. PMID:24561622

  8. Prrx1 isoform switching regulates pancreatic cancer invasion and metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Reichert, Maximilian; Bakir, Basil; Das, Koushik K.; Nishida, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Heeg, Steffen; Collins, Meredith A.; Marchand, Benoît; Hicks, Philip D.; Maitra, Anirban; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The two major isoforms of the paired-related homeodomain transcription factor 1 (Prrx1), Prrx1a and Prrx1b, are involved in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, and carcinogenesis, although the biological role that these isoforms serve in the systemic dissemination of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been investigated. An epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is believed to be important for primary tumor progression and dissemination, whereas a mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) appears crucial for metastatic colonization. Here, we describe novel roles for both isoforms in the metastatic cascade using complementary in vitro and in vivo models. Prrx1b promotes invasion, tumor dedifferentiation, and EMT. In contrast, Prrx1a stimulates metastatic outgrowth in the liver, tumor differentiation, and MET. We further demonstrate that the switch from Prrx1b to Prrx1a governs EMT plasticity in both mouse models of PDAC and human PDAC. Last, we identify hepatocyte growth factor ( HGF) as a novel transcriptional target of Prrx1b. Targeted therapy of HGF in combination with gemcitabine in a preclinical model of PDAC reduces primary tumor volume and eliminates metastatic disease. Overall, we provide new insights into the isoform-specific roles of Prrx1a and Prrx1b in primary PDAC formation, dissemination, and metastatic colonization, allowing for novel therapeutic strategies targeting EMT plasticity. PMID:26773005

  9. Role of α5β1 Integrin Up-regulation in Radiation-Induced Invasion by Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongren; Zeng, Zhao-Zhu; Fay, Kevin S; Veine, Donna M; Staszewski, Evan D; Morgan, Meredith; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Williams, Terence M; Spalding, Aaron C; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Livant, Donna L

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used in the management of pancreatic cancer because of its high propensity for locoregional relapse: one third of patients succumb to localized disease. Thus, strategies to improve the efficacy of radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer are important to pursue. We used naturally serum-free, selectively permeable basement membranes and confocal microscopy of fluorescent antibody-stained human Panc-1, MiaPaCa-2, and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cell lines to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptor expression and on α5β1-mediated invasion. We report that radiation rapidly induces pancreatic cancer cell invasion, and that radiation-induced invasion is caused by up-regulation of α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptors by transcriptional and/or postendocytic recycling mechanisms. We also report that radiation causes α5β1 up-regulation in Panc-1, MiaPaCa-2, and BxPC-3 tumor xenografts and that upregulated α5β1 colocalizes with upregulated early or late endosomes in Panc-1 or BxPC-3 tumors, respectively, although it may colocalize significantly with both endosome types in MiaPaCa-2 tumors. Our results suggest that systemic inhibition of α5β1-mediated invasion might be an effective way to reduce radiation-induced pancreatic cancer cell invasion, thereby improving the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:21966545

  10. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  11. A hypusine-eIF5A-PEAK1 switch regulates the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Ken; Wright, Tracy; Strnadel, Jan; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression. eIF5A1, and its highly related isoform eIF5A2, are translation initiation factors that have been implicated in a range of human malignancies, but how they control cancer development and disease progression is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how eIF5A proteins regulate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis. eIF5A proteins are the only known proteins regulated by a distinct posttranslational modification termed hypusination, which is catalyzed by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The highly selective nature of the hypusine modification and its amenability to pharmacological inhibition make eIF5A proteins attractive therapeutic targets. We found that the expression and hypusination of eIF5A proteins are upregulated in human PDAC tissues and in premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) tissues isolated from Pdx-1-Cre: LSL-KRASG12D mice. Knockdown of eIF5A proteins in PDAC cells inhibited their growth in vitro and orthotopic tumor growth in vivo, whereas amplification of eIF5A proteins increased PDAC cell growth and tumor formation in mice. Small molecule inhibitors of DHPS and DOHH both suppressed eIF5A hypusination, preventing PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, we found that eIF5A proteins regulate PDAC cell growth by modulating the expression of PEAK1, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase essential for PDAC cell growth and therapy resistance. Our findings suggest that eIF5A proteins utilize PEAK1 as a downstream effector to drive PDAC pathogenesis, and that pharmacological inhibition of the eIF5A-hypusine-PEAK1 axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat this deadly disease. PMID:25261239

  12. Regulation of oncogenic KRAS signaling via a novel KRAS-integrin-linked kinase-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, P-C; Yang, M-C; Kulp, S K; Salunke, S B; Himmel, L E; Fang, C-S; Jadhav, A M; Shan, Y-S; Lee, C-T; Lai, M-D; Shirley, L A; Bekaii-Saab, T; Chen, C-S

    2016-07-28

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a mediator of aggressive phenotype in pancreatic cancer. On the basis of our finding that knockdown of either KRAS or ILK has a reciprocal effect on the other's expression, we hypothesized the presence of an ILK-KRAS regulatory loop that enables pancreatic cancer cells to regulate KRAS expression. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which this regulatory circuitry is regulated and to investigate the translational potential of targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer. Interplay between KRAS and ILK and the roles of E2F1, c-Myc and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein as intermediary effectors in this feedback loop was interrogated by genetic manipulations through small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA knockdown and ectopic expression, western blotting, PCR, promoter-luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and pull-down analyses. In vivo efficacy of ILK inhibition was evaluated in two murine xenograft models. Our data show that KRAS regulated the expression of ILK through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation, which, in turn, controlled KRAS gene expression via hnRNPA1-mediated destabilization of the G-quadruplex on the KRAS promoter. Moreover, ILK inhibition blocked KRAS-driven epithelial-mesenchymal transition and growth factor-stimulated KRAS expression. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of ILK suppressed pancreatic tumor growth, in part, by suppressing KRAS signaling. These studies suggest that this KRAS-E2F1-ILK-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop enables pancreatic cancer cells to promote oncogenic KRAS signaling and to interact with the tumor microenvironment to promote aggressive phenotypes. This regulatory loop provides a mechanistic rationale for targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling, which might foster new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26616862

  13. Isoquercitrin inhibits the progression of pancreatic cancer in vivo and in vitro by regulating opioid receptors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Li, Ping; Li, Ping; Xu, Yong; Li, Yang; Tang, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a common malignant tumour that affects individuals worldwide. In recent years, the incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer have continuously increased. Currently, the primary clinical treatment methods for pancreatic cancer include surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, these treatment methods rarely produce satisfactory therapeutic outcomes. Extensive research has also proven that the effective components of several traditional Chinese medicines, particularly flavonoids extracted from plants, have significant antitumour effects. Isoquercitrin, which is one of the flavonoids found in Bidens pilosa extracts, has a significant antitumour effect. However, the antitumour effect of isoquercitrin and its mechanism of action remain unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of isoquercitrin on the progression of pancreatic cancer and to further understand the biological characteristics of the participation of isoquercitrin in the progression of pancreatic cancer. In vitro, we found that a therapeutic dose of isoquercitrin significantly inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest within the G1 phase in pancreatic cancer cells. Isoquercitrin activated caspase-3, -8 and -9 and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, isoquercitrin inhibited the expression level of the δ opioid receptor; however, isoquercitrin had no effect on the κ and µ opioid receptors. Furthermore, isoquercitrin inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and promoted c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. In vivo, we found that a therapeutic dose of isoquercitrin significantly inhibited xenograft growth in nude mice. In summary, the present study demonstrated that isoquercitrin inhibits human pancreatic cancer progression in vivo and in vitro and that its molecular mechanism may be closely related to opioid receptors and to the activation

  14. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  15. Involvement of a mitochondrial phosphatase in the regulation of ATP production and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Pagliarini, David J; Wiley, Sandra E; Kimple, Michelle E; Dixon, Jesse R; Kelly, Patrick; Worby, Carolyn A; Casey, Patrick J; Dixon, Jack E

    2005-07-22

    Reversible phosphorylation is the cell's most prevalent form of posttranslational modification, yet its role in the regulation of mitochondrial functions is poorly understood. We have discovered that a member of the dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (DS-PTP) family, PTPMT1 (PTP localized to the Mitochondrion 1) resides nearly exclusively in mitochondria. PTPMT1 is targeted to the mitochondrion by an N-terminal signal sequence and is found anchored to the matrix face of the inner membrane. Knockdown of PTPMT1 expression in the pancreatic insulinoma cell line INS-1 832/13 alters the mitochondrial phosphoprotein profile and markedly enhances both ATP production and insulin secretion. These data define PTPMT1 as a potential drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and strengthen the notion that mitochondria are an underappreciated site of signaling by reversible phosphorylation. PMID:16039589

  16. Vitamin D analogues up-regulate p21 and p27 during growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kawa, S.; Nikaido, T.; Aoki, Y.; Zhai, Y.; Kumagai, T.; Furihata, K.; Fujii, S.; Kiyosawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    To obtain information regarding the growth-inhibitory effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its non-calcaemic analogue 22-oxa-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on pancreatic cancer cell lines, differences in the effects of G1-phase cell cycle-regulating factors were studied in vitamin D-responsive and non-responsive cell lines. Levels of expression of cyclins (D1, E and A), cyclin-dependent kinases (2 and 4) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27) were analysed by Western blotting after treatment with these compounds. In the responsive cells (BxPC-3, Hs 700T and SUP-1), our observations were: (1) marked up-regulation of p21 and p27 after 24 h treatment with 10(-7) mol l(-1) 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 22-oxa-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; and (2) marked down-regulation of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors after 7 days' treatment. In non-responsive cells (Hs 766T and Capan-1), no such changes were observed. In conclusion, vitamin D analogues up-regulate p21 and p27 as an early event, which in turn could block the G1/S transition and induce growth inhibition in responsive cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9328147

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  18. Vasohibin-1 Expression Is Regulated by Transforming Growth Factor-β/Bone Morphogenic Protein Signaling Pathway Between Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seppänen, Hanna; Kauttu, Tuuli; Vainionpää, Sanna; Ye, Yingjiang; Mustonen, Harri

    2013-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 has been detected in endothelial cells as an intrinsic angiogenesis inhibitor. Both tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling have been reported to promote angiogenesis in cancer. However, whether vasohibin-1 expression is regulated by TGF-β/BMP signaling between TAMs and cancer cells remains unclear. The expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 in TAMs and the expression of vasohibin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and VEGF-C in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (a nonmetastatic cell line Panc-1 and a distant metastatic cell line HPAF-II) were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The TGF-β receptor 1 and BMP receptor 1 were inhibited by the inhibitor SB-431542 and LDN193189, respectively. Thereafter, vasohibin-1, VEGF-A, and VEGF-C expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR. We found that the expression of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, BMP-4, and BMP-7 was upregulated in TAMs cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells. Vasohibin-1, VEGF-A, and VEGF-C mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer cells was upregulated by TAMs. Vasohibin-1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells cocultured with TAMs was upregulated significantly when TGF-β receptors or BMP receptors were inhibited, but VEGF-C expression was downregulated. Therefore, Vasohibin-1 expression is regulated by the TGF-β/BMP signaling between TAMs and pancreatic cancer cells. These results might shed a new light on the antiangiogenesis therapy in the pancreatic cancer. PMID:23651239

  19. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  20. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  1. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Simpson, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  2. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 10⁶ cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0-20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  3. Regulation of cell apoptosis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer through PI3K/Akt pathway via Polo-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    MAO, YONGHUAN; XI, LING; LI, QUAN; CAI, ZELING; LAI, YIMEI; ZHANG, XINHUA; YU, CHUNZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis. It is reported that the PI3K/Akt pathway is activated in many cancers, and inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway can induce cell apoptosis in most cancers. Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is also overexpressed in most malignancies, and it controls multiple aspects of mitosis and apoptosis. Previous studies identified that PI3K/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of Plk1-Ser99 is required for metaphase-anaphase transition. In this study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PI3K/Akt pathway regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess Akt levels in human pancreatic tissues and pancreatic cancer tissues. MTT assay was used to detect cell proliferation. The mRNA was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein levels of p-Akt, Akt, Plk1, BAX, Bcl-2, XIAP, cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3. Recombinant adenovirus vector containing Plk1-shRNA was constructed to inhibit Plk1 expression. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and the apoptosis of tumor xenograft was assessed by TUNEL assay. The study showed that inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway can induce cell apoptosis and reduce cell proliferation by downregulating Plk1 in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, Plk1 inhibition can lead to cancer cell apoptosis through inactivating XIAP, activating caspase-3, upregulating BAX and downregulating Bcl-2. Therefore, this study provided the molecular mechanism of PI3K/Akt pathway and Plk1 in the pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis, which may benefit for the therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27220401

  4. Iron Regulation of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Functions and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Moen, Ingrid Wahl; Ellervik, Christina; Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2016-07-17

    Dietary advice is the cornerstone in first-line treatment of metabolic diseases. Nutritional interventions directed at these clinical conditions mainly aim to (a) improve insulin resistance by reducing energy-dense macronutrient intake to obtain weight loss and (b) reduce fluctuations in insulin secretion through avoidance of rapidly absorbable carbohydrates. However, even in the majority of motivated patients selected for clinical trials, massive efforts using this approach have failed to achieve lasting efficacy. Less attention has been given to the role of micronutrients in metabolic diseases. Here, we review the evidence that highlights (a) the importance of iron in pancreatic beta-cell function and dysfunction in diabetes and (b) the integrative pathophysiological effects of tissue iron levels in the interactions among the beta cell, gut microbiome, hypothalamus, innate and adaptive immune systems, and insulin-sensitive tissues. We propose that clinical trials are warranted to clarify the impact of dietary or pharmacological iron reduction on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:27146016

  5. Concerted Trafficking Regulation of Kv2.1 and KATP Channels by Leptin in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Shyng, Show-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2015-12-11

    In pancreatic β-cells, voltage-gated potassium 2.1 (Kv2.1) channels are the dominant delayed rectifier potassium channels responsible for action potential repolarization. Here, we report that leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes known to inhibit insulin secretion, causes a transient increase in surface expression of Kv2.1 channels in rodent and human β-cells. The effect of leptin on Kv2.1 surface expression is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK mimics whereas inhibition of AMPK occludes the effect of leptin. Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, a known upstream kinase of AMPK, also blocks the effect of leptin. In addition, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation. Inhibition of PKA prevents leptin or AMPK activators from increasing Kv2.1 channel density, whereas stimulation of PKA is sufficient to promote Kv2.1 channel surface expression. The increased Kv2.1 surface expression by leptin is dependent on actin depolymerization, and pharmacologically induced actin depolymerization is sufficient to enhance Kv2.1 surface expression. The signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation by leptin mirror those reported recently for ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, which are critical for coupling glucose stimulation with membrane depolarization. We show that the leptin-induced increase in surface KATP channels results in more hyperpolarized membrane potentials than control cells at stimulating glucose concentrations, and the increase in Kv2.1 channels leads to a more rapid repolarization of membrane potential in cells firing action potentials. This study supports a model in which leptin exerts concerted trafficking regulation of KATP and Kv2.1 channels to coordinately inhibit insulin secretion. PMID:26453299

  6. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  7. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  8. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Inhibits Ethanol-Induced Apoptosis Through Neurod1 Regulating CHOP Expression in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tijun; Xiang, Jie; Shan, Wei; Li, Mengxiao; Zhou, Wenbo; Han, Xiao; Chen, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Epiga-llocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is one kind of polyphenol abundant extracted from green tea which has a potent antidiabetic activity. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the protection procession of EGCG are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of EGCG on pancreatic β-cells exposed to ethanol and the possible underlying mechanisms. To observe the effect of EGCG, we assessed apoptosis in βTC-6 and INS-1 cells, which were in complete medium containing 60 mM ethanol, or coincubation with different concentration of EGCG. We also evaluated the roles of Neurod1 in CHOP expression and ethanol-mediated damage through plasmid overexpression. Treatment with EGCG decreased CHOP expression and apoptosis, whereas its treatment increased Neurod1 expression in ethanol-treated βTC-6 and INS-1 cells. Overexpression of Neurod1 caused the decrease of CHOP expression and apoptosis in ethanol-treated cells. Furthermore, Neurod1 inhibited CHOP expression by deacetylation of Histone H4 at the CHOP gene promoter. In addition, EGCG partially restores the activity of Neurod1 binding to CHOP promoter in ethanol-treated cells. In conclusion, EGCG protected β-cell against ethanol-induced β-cell apoptosis by Neurod1 regulating CHOP expression. Anat Rec, 299:573-582, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916663

  9. α2 Integrin-Dependent Suppression of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion Involves Ectodomain Regulation of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase-5

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yao; Marzan, David; Lin, Grace; Goodison, Steve; Silletti, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that the α2-integrin (α2) mediates pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell interactions with collagens. We found that while well-differentiated cells use α2 exclusively to adhere and migrate on collagenI, poorly differentiated PDAC cells demonstrate reduced reliance on, or complete loss of, α2. Since well-differentiated PDAC lines exhibit reduced in vitro invasion and α2-blockade suppressed invasion of well-differentiated lines exclusively, we hypothesized that α2 may suppress the malignant phenotype in PDAC. Accordingly, ectopic expression of α2 retarded in vitro invasion and maintenance on collagenI exacerbated this effect. Affymetrix profiling revealed that kallikrein-related peptidase-5 (KLK5) was specifically upregulated by α2, and reduced α2 and KLK5 expression was observed in poorly differentiated PDAC cells in situ. Accordingly, well-differentiated PDAC lines express KLK5, and KLK5 blockade increased the invasion of KLK5-positive lines. The α2-cytoplasmic domain was dispensable for these effects, demonstrating that the α2-ectodomain and KLK5 coordinately regulate a less invasive phenotype in PDAC. PMID:22203845

  10. BET Bromodomain Proteins Brd2, Brd3 and Brd4 Selectively Regulate Metabolic Pathways in the Pancreatic β-Cell

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Belkina, Anna C.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Corkey, Barbara E.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2016-01-01

    Displacement of Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal (BET) proteins from chromatin has promise for cancer and inflammatory disease treatments, but roles of BET proteins in metabolic disease remain unexplored. Small molecule BET inhibitors, such as JQ1, block BET protein binding to acetylated lysines, but lack selectivity within the BET family (Brd2, Brd3, Brd4, Brdt), making it difficult to disentangle contributions of each family member to transcriptional and cellular outcomes. Here, we demonstrate multiple improvements in pancreatic β-cells upon BET inhibition with JQ1 or BET-specific siRNAs. JQ1 (50–400 nM) increases insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a concentration dependent manner. JQ1 increases insulin content in INS-1 cells, accounting for increased secretion, in both rat and human islets. Higher concentrations of JQ1 decrease intracellular triglyceride stores in INS-1 cells, a result of increased fatty acid oxidation. Specific inhibition of both Brd2 and Brd4 enhances insulin transcription, leading to increased insulin content. Inhibition of Brd2 alone increases fatty acid oxidation. Overlapping yet discrete roles for individual BET proteins in metabolic regulation suggest new isoform-selective BET inhibitors may be useful to treat insulin resistant/diabetic patients. Results imply that cancer and diseases of chronic inflammation or disordered metabolism are related through shared chromatin regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27008626