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Sample records for lle laur maarika

  1. LLE Review

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January--March 1992, contains articles on the use of diffraction gratings in laser applications, and the fabrication of gratings for use in these applications. there are two articles on the use of lasers to explore fundamental physics issues and an article on the use of a solid-state diode array for x-ray imaging. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  2. LLE review

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  3. LLE review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. K.

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October to December 1989, contains an article discussing saturation effects and power-balance considerations in the design of high-power lasers and an article describing numerical modeling of the effects of power imbalances on target behavior. The advanced technology section reports on the development of a liquid crystal laser-beam apodizer and an experiment to study the high-intensity ionization of noble gases. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. The highlights of this issue are: The problem of achieving power balance in high-efficiency, multibeam lasers has been studied in terms of gain-saturation effects and the nonlinear nature of harmonic frequency conversion. It is shown that power imbalance can be minimized by balancing the gains and losses in equivalent amplification stages in each beamline. The effects of target implosion behavior of various power-imbalance sources in the OMEGA laser system have been studied using the two-dimensional hydrodynamics code ORCHID. The simulations show good agreement with an experiment in which a deliberate power imbalance was applied to the target drive. Laser-beam apodizers with large clear apertures have been fabricated using cholesteric liquid crystals.

  4. LLE review

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October--December 1989, contains an article discussing saturation effects and power-balance considerations in the design of high-power lasers and an article describing numerical modeling of the effects of power imbalances on target behavior. The advanced technology section reports on the development of a liquid crystal laser-beam apodizer and an experiment to study the high-intensity ionization of noble gases. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. The highlights of this issue are: The problem of achieving power balance in high-efficiency, multibeam lasers has been studied in terms of gain-saturation effects and the nonlinear nature of harmonic frequency conversion. It is shown that power imbalance can be minimized by balancing the gains and losses in equivalent amplification stages in each beamline. The effects of target implosion behavior of various power-imbalance sources in the OMEGA laser system have been studied using the two-dimensional hydrodynamics code ORCHID. The simulations show good agreement with an experiment in which a deliberate power imbalance was applied to the target drive. Laser-beam apodizers with large clear apertures have been fabricated using cholesteric liquid crystals. A soft-edge profile has been achieved by filling a cell with two separate liquid crystals with different selective-reflection bands, and allowing them to partially mix at the interface. A study of the ionization of noble gases in the tunneling regime using high- intensity, 1-ps pulses from the tabletop terawatt laser (T{sup 3}) has been carried out. The measured ion production is well predicted by a Coulomb barrier suppression ionization theory.

  5. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    Shmayda, W. T.

    2005-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  6. LLE Review 83, Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2000, features an article by F. J. Marshall, T. Ohki, D. McInnis, Z. Ninkov, and J. Carbone, who detail the conversion of the OMEGA time-integrated x-ray diagnostics to electronic readout using direct-detection x-ray cameras [charge-injection devices (CID's)]. Pinhole and x-ray microscope images are shown along with inferred calibration measurements of the CID cameras. Currently, the same cameras are being used to obtain x-ray spectra in a TIM-based spectrometer, extending their use to all time-integrated imaging and spectroscopic x-ray instruments used on OMEGA. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) V. A. Smalyuk, B. Yaakobi, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer investigate the spatial structure of the temperature and density of target-shell plasmas at peak compression (stagnation). This is accomplished by examining the energy dependence of the x-ray emission using narrow-band x-ray filters and the known absorption properties of the shell dopant (Ti). (2) F. Sequin, C. K. Ll, D. G. Hicks, J. A. Frenje, K. M. Green, R. D. Petrasso, J. M. Soures, V. Yu. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, S. Roberts, C. Sorce, T. C. Sangster, M. D. Cable, S. Padalino, and K. Fletcher detail the physics and instrumentation used to obtain and interpret secondary D-{sup 3}He proton spectra from current gas-filled-target and future cryogenic-target experiments. Through a novel extension of existing charged-particle detection techniques with track detectors, the authors demonstrate the ability to obtain secondary proton spectra with increased sensitivity. (3) M. Guardelben, L. Ning, N. Jain, D. Battaglia, and K. Marshall compare the utility of a novel liquid-crystal-based, point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) with the commercial standard phase-shifting interferometer and conclude that the LCPDI is a viable low-cost alternative. (4) A. B. Shorey, S. D. Jacobs, W. I. Kordonski, and R. F

  7. LLE Review 102 (January-March 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Shmayda, W.T., ed.

    2005-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January–March 2005, features the new “Saturn” target design concept for use in polar direct drive on National Ignition Facility (NIF) while the facility is in its initial, indirect-drive configuration.

  8. LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2001-02-19

    This issue has the following articles: (1) The Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop; (2) The Effect of Condensates and Inner Coatings on the Performance of Vacuum Hohlraum Targets; (3) Zirconia-Coated-Carbonyl-Iron-Particle-Based Magnetorheological Fluid for Polishing Optical Glasses and Ceramics; (4) All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation in Highly Terbium Doped Fiber; (5) Femtosecond Optical Pump-Probe Characterization of High-Pressure-Grown Al{sub 0.86}Ga{sub 0.14}N Single Crystals; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1984). Volume 18

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, L.

    1984-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the operations of the GDL and OMEGA facilities, energy measurement and beam characterization in the ultraviolet (UV), theoretical calculations of thermal self-focusing in laser plasmas, two aspects of the picosecond optics activities at the LLE, and the NLUF activities during this quarter (January through March 1984).

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1985). Volume 22

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.

    1985-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on completion of frequency conversion of the OMEGA system, recent progress in the laser-fusion effort, certain aspects of the LLE advanced technology program, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for January-March 1985.

  11. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1984). Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.

    1984-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on upgrade of the GDL system, theoretical advances in the laser fusion effort, improved target fabrication capabilities, x-ray laser research, developments in the picosecond optics research of the LLE advanced technology program, and on the National Laser Users Facility activities for October-December 1984.

  12. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  13. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpan, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1990, contains articles in two main sections: the OMEGA Upgrade and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article in Section 1 describes the changes in the overall system design of the 60-beam OMEGA Upgrade since the release of the OMEGA Upgrade Preliminary Design Document in October 1989. It is followed by an article that presents results of an investigation into stimulated rotational Raman scattering as it relates to the propagation of high-fluence ultraviolet laser beams in the OMEGA Upgrade. The third article is a report on the energy-transport measurements made on the multisegmented amplifier (MSA), built as a prototype amplifier for the original OMEGA Upgrade system configuration. The final article in Section 1 describes the design of the 20-cm-clear-aperture, single-segmented amplifier (SSA), which will be the final amplifier in the current OMEGA Upgrade system configuration. Section 2 presents the results to date of an intensive in-house effort at LLE to develop the various optical coatings required for the OMEGA Upgrade.

  14. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpan, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1990, contains articles in two main sections, Progress in Laser Fusion and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article presents the theoretical interpretation of the glass-ablator cryogenic-implosion experiments recently conducted on OMEGA. It is followed by an article describing the analysis of neutron time-of-flight data taken during DT and DD experiments; and a discussion of the improvements to laser diagnostics that now provide for precise control of the OMEGA laser is given. This paper contains a report on the development of transparent conductive coatings for KDP crystals, and a discussion of the study of the transient-surface Debye-Waller effect in materials irradiated with an ultrafast laser.

  15. LLE Review 116 (July-September 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Marozas, J.A., editor

    2010-03-12

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Optimizing Electron-Positron Pair Production on kJ-Class High-Intensity Lasers for the Purpose of Pair-Plasma Creation; (2) Neutron Yield Study of Direct-Drive, Low-Adiabat Cryogenic D2 Implosions on OMEGA; (3) Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil; (4) A Measurable Lawson Criterion and Hydro-Equivalent Curves for Inertial Confinement Fusion; (5) Pulsed-THz Characterization of Hg-Based, High-Temperature Superconductors; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) FY08 Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  16. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpan, S. A.

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April to June 1990, contains articles in two main sections, Progress in Laser Fusion and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article presents the theoretical interpretation of the glass-ablator cryogenic-implosion experiments recently conducted on OMEGA. It is followed by an article describing the analysis of neutron time-of-flight data taken during DT and DD experiments; and a discussion of the improvements to laser diagnostics that now provide for precise control of the OMEGA laser is given. This paper contains a report on the development of transparent conductive coatings for KDP crystals, and a discussion of the study of the transient-surface Debye-Waller effect in materials irradiated with an ultrafast laser.

  17. LLE 2008 annual report, October 2007 - September 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-31

    The research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) focuses on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research supporting the goal of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This program includes the full use of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Within the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), LLE is the lead laboratory for the validation of the performance of cryogenic target implosions, essential to all forms of ICF ignition. LLE has taken responsibility for a number of critical elements within the Integrated Experimental Teams (IET’s) supporting the demonstration of indirect-drive ignition on the NIF and is the lead laboratory for the validation of the polardrive approach to ignition on the NIF. LLE is also developing, testing, and building a number of diagnostics to be deployed on the NIF for the NIC.

  18. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1985). Volume 25

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, A.

    1985-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review comprises reports on the performance of the active-mirror-boosted glass development laser (GDL) single-beam system; the implementation of multichannel, soft x-ray diagnostic instrumentation; computer simulation of recent OMEGA laser implosion experiments; materials and ultrafast technology developments in the LLE advanced technology program; and the National Laser Users Facility activities for October-December 1985.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1986). Volume 26

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, A.

    1986-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains reports on OMEGA and GDL laser activities; characterization of laser-generated x-ray sources for nuclear level excitation; the physics of parametric instabilities driven by two pump beams in laser-produced plasmas; developments in advanced technology areas at LLE, specifically ultra-high-speed opto-electronic devices and methods and the modeling of thin-film features in physical vapor deposition; and the National Laser Users Facility activities for January- March 1986.

  20. LLE Review 98 (January-March 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V.N.

    2004-08-10

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January-March 2004, features ''Performance of 1-THz-Bandwidth, 2-D Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion and Polarization Smoothing of High-Power, Solid-State Laser Beams'', by S. P. Regan, J. A. Marozas, R. S. Craxton, J. H. Kelly, W. R. Donaldson, P. A. Jaanimagi, D. Jacobs-Perkins, R. L. Keck, T. J. Kessler, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, W. Seka, V.A. Smalyuk, S. Skupsky, and J. D. Zuegel (p. 49). Laser-beam smoothing achieved with 1-THz-bandwidth, two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA laser system is reported. These beam-smoothing techniques are directly applicable to direct-drive ignition target designs for the 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 351-nm National Ignition Facility. Equivalent-target-plane images for constant-intensity laser pulses of varying duration were used to determine the smoothing. The properties of the phase plates, frequency modulators, and birefringent wedges were simulated and found to be in good agreement with the measurements.

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1989). Volume 39

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A.

    1989-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1989, includes the second part of a two-part series dealing with the preliminary design of the OMEGA Upgrade. One article provides a general overview of the current upgrade system configuration and another article describes the target system. Future issues of the LLE Review will cover other aspects of the OMEGA Upgrade as the detailed system design develops. In addition, the advanced technology section of this issue contains an article discussing the interaction of a picosecond optical pulse with high temperature superconductors. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  2. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1986). Volume 27

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.

    1986-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1986, contains reports on GDL and OMEGA laser activities; analysis of neutron diagnostic methods of compressed laser targets; modeling of non-local heat flow in laser-heated plasmas; and development~ in advanced technology areas at LLE: protective polymeric coatings for nonlinear optical materials, time-resolved observation of electron-phonon relaxation in copper, and non-contact electro-optic sampling of high-speed electrical wave forms with a gallium-arsenide injection laser. Finally, the National Laser Users Facility activities for this period are summarized.

  3. LLE Review 114 (January-March 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Zuegel, J.D.

    2008-07-30

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January-March 2008, features 'Cryogenic Targets: Current Status and Future Development', by D. R. Harding, D. H. Edgell, M. D. Wittman, L. M. Elasky, S. J. Verbridge, A. J. Weaver, L. D. Lund, W. Seka, W. T. Shmayda, R. T. Janezic, M. J. Shoup III, M. Moore, R. Junquist, and A. V. Okishev. In this article (p. 57), the authors report on the status of layering cryogenic DT and D{sub 2} targets at LLE for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. This critical effort achieves the important milestone of routinely providing cryogenic DT targets that meet the 1.0-{micro}m (rms) OMEGA ice-quality-surface specification. The best D{sub 2}-ice layers produced so far (rms roughness of 1.1 {micro}m) are approaching the quality typically achieved in DT targets. Efforts to improve the consistency of this process are reported along with investigations supporting the National Ignition Campaign studying issues relevant to indirect-drive and direct-drive cryogenic targets. Additional highlights of recent research presented in this issue include the following: (1) an improved laser speckle smoothing scheme that augments the current NIF 1-D SSD system by using multiple-FM modulators (MultiFM 1-D SSD) (p. 73). With a judicious choice of modulator frequencies, MultiFM 1-D SSD smoothes resonances produced at the higher spatial frequencies and can attain similar or even faster smoothing rates compared to the baseline NIF 2-D SSD system. DRACO simulations have shown that MultiFM 1-D SSD beam smoothing is sufficient for the direct-drive-ignition targets and pulse shapes analyzed thus far, and may even allow reducing the bandwidth enough to eliminate the need for dual-tripler frequency conversion on the NIF. (2) describes a time-gated, monoenergetic proton radiography that provides unique measurements of implosion dynamics of spherical targets in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) (p. 81). Radiographs obtained at different implosion times

  4. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1984). Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Iwan, L.

    1984-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the activities in the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities, new theoretical and experimental developments in the physics of laser-produced plasmas, uniformity calculations for a direct-drive fusion reactor, technological advances in picosecond-measurement techniques, and NLUF activities during this quarter (April-June 1984).

  5. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1985). Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Skupsky, S.

    1985-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the fully UV converted OMEGA laser system, mass-ablation rate experiments, reactor-size target designs, plasma processes in the target corona, degradation in optical performance of dielectric thin films, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for April-June 1985.

  6. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1988). Volume 37

    SciTech Connect

    McKenty, P. W.

    1988-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1988, contains several articles devoted to our work in the understanding, identification, and correction of illumination non-uniformities on the OMEGA laser system. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  7. LLE 2004 annual report, October 2003-September 2004

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) conducted during the year, operation of the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), a status report of the new OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laser project, and programs concerning the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  8. LLE 2010 Annual Report October 2009 - September 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 2010 (FY10) concluded the third year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year including work on the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). It also reports on LLE's progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the NIC and high-energy density (HED) campaigns, the National Laser Users Facility (NLUF), and for other external users; and programs focusing on the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  9. LLE 2007 Annual Report, October 2006 - September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-01-31

    The laser-fusion research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is focused on the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Campaign-10 inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition and experimental support technology, operation of facilities (OMEGA), and the construction of OMEGA EP -- a high energy petawatt laser system. While LLE is the lead laboratory for research into the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition, it also takes a lead role in certain indirect-drive tasks within the National Ignition Campaign. During this past year progress in the laser-fusion research program was made in three principal areas: OMEGA direct drive and indirect-drive experiments and targets; development of diagnostics for experiments on OMEGA, OMEGA EP, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF); and theoretical analysis and design efforts aimed at improving direct-drive-ignition capsule designs and advanced ignition concepts such as fast ignition and shock ignition.

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1989). Volume 40

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, R.

    1989-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1989, is concerned primarily with uniformity studies. The first article is a report on a series of target experiments with improved irradiation uniformity in which major increases in neutron yields were produced. The first of two articles on theoretical developments presents a new interpretation of burn through experiments, continuing a study reported in LLE Review 35. The second theoretical article suggests a change in distributed phase-plate design that can improve beam uniformity over that achieved with random pattern plates. The fourth and fifth articles report that uniformity in the deposition of DT layers in micro balloons at very low temperatures has been achieved by a temperature-gradient technique, and that aberration free interferograms are now being obtained in the target chamber. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  11. LLE review. Volume 65. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T.R.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1995, contains a description of the generation and characterization of continuous, deep-surface-relief phase plates that are more efficient and versatile than previous designs. The LLE program plan has scheduled a number of enhancements to OMEGA`s performance and uniformity, the first of which is the implementation of these new distributed phase plates. Other articles in this volume include the discussion of an x-ray diagnostic method to measure shell-fuel mixing, the theoretical analysis of ablation-front stability, a description of a major subsystem in the OMEGA control system software, a study of the population inversions in intensely pumped Nd:YLF, and a description of a new ultrafast laser system and its uses.

  12. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1988). Volume 35

    SciTech Connect

    Kremens, R.

    1988-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1988, contains an in-depth article on recent cryogenic target experiments on the OMEGA laser system; two articles on laser-plasma interactions; and an advanced technology article discussing laser damage in polymeric materials. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1988). Volume 34

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.

    1988-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 1988, contains articles on the spectra of scattered laser radiation from laser-produced plasmas and on the bounce coating of ablation layers on fusion targets. The advanced technology section has reports on a novel technique for characterizing surface breakdown on semiconductor devices and on a versatile alexandrite regenerative amplifier. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  14. LLE Review Quarterly Report October - December 2011. Volume 129

    SciTech Connect

    Shvydky, Alex

    2011-12-01

    This volume of LLE Review, covering October–December 2011, features “Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions” by I. V. Igumenshchev, W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. T. Michel, D. H. Froula, R. S. Craxton, R. Follett, J. H. Kelly, T. Z. Kosc, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl (LLE); V. N. Goncharov and A. V. Maximov (LLE and Department of Mechanical Engineering, U. of Rochester); L. Divol and P. Michel (LLNL); and R. L. McCrory and D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE and Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Physics, U. of Rochester). In this article (p. 1), direct-drive–implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)] have shown discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicates the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10% to 20%. The authors attribute this degradation in laser coupling to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)— which is electromagnetically seeded—low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  15. LLE 1997. Annual report, October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 1997 (FY97) concluded the fifth year of the cooperative agreement (DE-FC03-92SF19460) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) and is the final report for the first five years of the cooperative agreement. In September 1997, the cooperative agreement was renewed for an additional five years. We summarize our research during FY97, the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students in LLE programs. A general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results are found on pp. 161-167. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters after three years of operation. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires precise drive uniformity, the control of hydrodynamic instabilities during the implosion of the fusion target, and accurate target fabrication and characterization. The article summarizes a wide variety of experiments relating to direct-drive laser fusion, from high-yield implosion experiments to planar and spherical Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, laser-imprinting experiments, and laser-plasma interaction experiments. A detailed analysis of the equation of motion for an electron in a plane wave is presented beginning on p. 24. A guiding center model is postulated and compared to numerical simulation of the actual particle motion. The formula is also verified analytically using the method of multiple scales. Work continues on this formalism to study the effects of the pondermotive force on laser-plasma interactions. A theoretical calculation of the dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a laser pulse is found on pp. 92-100. The trajectory of a charged particle, determined analytically for various pulse shapes, is then used to determine the dephasing time of an accelerated particle.

  16. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1984). Volume 20

    SciTech Connect

    Iwan, L.

    1984-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the activities in the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities, some design changes to be implemented on the OMEGA laser, techniques for estimating UV target-irradiation uniformity, progress in fabricating polymer-shell targets, refined estimates of thermal electron transport in IR-irradiated targets, a program to develop a surgical instrument to excise arterial blockages with a laser, a new damage criterion for optical coatings, and NI-UF activities for July-September 1984.

  17. LLE review. Quarterly report, April 1997--June 1997. Volume 71

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1997, includes an article discussing the results from recent experiments performed on OMEGA. These experiments used a new beam-smoothing device-distributed polarization rotators-in concert with existing techniques to improve the on-target uniformity of each beam. The result of this improved radiation uniformity was a substantive reduction in imprinting-the nonuniformity caused by the laser. A novel way to study the time dependence of this imprinting is also presented in this article.

  18. LLE review quarterly report, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jaanimagi, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, contains articles describing the results of imploding-target burnthrough experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and a practical nonlocal model for electron transport in laser plasmas. The section on advanced technology includes a report on explosion fraction measurements of water-cooled xenon flashlamps, results on perfluorinated copolymer coatings for high-power laser applications, and a time-resolved study of surface disordering of Pb(110). A brief report reviewing the projects from the high school summer student program is also included. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  19. LLE review quarterly report, July--September 1991. Volume 48

    SciTech Connect

    Jaanimagi, P.A.

    1991-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, contains articles describing the results of imploding-target burnthrough experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and a practical nonlocal model for electron transport in laser plasmas. The section on advanced technology includes a report on explosion fraction measurements of water-cooled xenon flashlamps, results on perfluorinated copolymer coatings for high-power laser applications, and a time-resolved study of surface disordering of Pb(110). A brief report reviewing the projects from the high school summer student program is also included. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  20. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1990). Volume 45

    SciTech Connect

    Epperlein, E. M.

    1990-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1990, contains descriptions of a new phase-conversion technique designed to improve irradiation uniformity, a report on the interpretation of highdensity implosion experiments of argon-filled targets, and an article on the use of absorption spectroscopy to diagnose compressed target layers. The section on advanced technology has a report on the application of KTP crystals as electro-optic amplitude modulators, and describes the use of chirped-pulse technology to measure X(3) by nearly degenerate four-wave mixing. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1996). Volume 67

    SciTech Connect

    Skeldon, Mark D.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1996, contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  2. LLE 2009 annual report, October 2008-September 2009

    SciTech Connect

    none, none

    2010-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 2009 (FY2009) concluded the second year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year. It also reports on LLE’s progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), and other external users; and programs focusingon the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  3. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1985). Volume 24

    SciTech Connect

    Skupsky, S.

    1985-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the first 24-beam UV experiments on the OMEGA laser system, the use of absorption spectroscopy to diagnose high-density compressions, the development of a new target fabrication technique to coat mechanically unsupported laser-fusion targets with a parylene layer, the use of liquid crystals as laser-beam apodizers, the investigation of the process of melting using a subpicosecond probe, the development of a new picosecond oscilloscope, and the National Laser Users Facility activities for June-September 1985.

  4. LLE review. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994, Volume 58

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A.

    1994-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period Jan - Mar 1994, contains articles on backlighting diagnostics; the effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; using PIC code simulations for analysis of ultrashort laser pulses interacting with solid targets; creating a new instrument for characterizing thick cryogenic layers; and a description of a large-aperture ring amplifier for laser-fusion drivers. Three of these articles - backlighting diagnostics; characterizing thick cryogenic layers; and large-aperture ring amplifier - are directly related to the OMEGA Upgrade, now under construction. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  5. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1986). Volume 28

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.

    1986-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1986, contains reports on GDL and OMEGA laser activities; generation of timing fiducials on x-ray streak cameras on OMEGA; new theoretical results on the thermodynamic properties of high-density plasmas; experimental results and analysis of target implosions on OMEGA; calculation of thermal self-focusing with multiple laser beams; and test results of multiple x-ray diffraction in crystals. Two reports describe developments in advanced technology: subpicosecond signal propagation on superconducting transmission lines, and progress in two dimensional image processing capabilities. Finally, the National Laser Users Facility activities for this period are summarized.

  6. LLE review. Quarterly report, Volume 69, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1996, includes a review of 2-D SSD as implemented on the OMEGA laser system. A summary of the detailed mathematical formalism is shown, and the predicted level of uniformity achievable on OMEGA is given. The first experimental results on uniformity using narrow-band 2-D SSD are compared to theoretical calculations. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory is found, which gives confidence that broadband 2-D SSD with polarization wedges should achieve an rms nonuniformity in the 1%-2% level necessary for cryogenic implosion experiments.

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1987). Volume 33

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, W.

    1987-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1987, contains descriptions of the implementation of distributed phase plates for improved irradiation uniformity and the implementation of a cryogenic target capability on the OMEGA facility. The section on advanced technology has reports on the design and optimization of recombination x-ray lasers and a near-infrared dichroic dye for use in both active and passive liquid-crystal devices. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  8. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1989). Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    McKenty, P. W.

    1989-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 1989, contains the first part of a two-part series of articles dealing with the OMEGA Upgrade. The two articles in this issue discuss the theoretical and laser design work performed to characterize the basic requirements for the upgrade. In addition, the advanced technology section contains articles discussing a new computer code developed to model x-ray refraction in line-focus geometry and experiments involving the use of time-resolved spectroscopy to diagnose high density in argon implosions. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1987). Volume 31

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, W.

    1987-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1987, contains a summary of the recent high-density campaign on the OMEGA laser system; a report on the absorption and radiation of energy from spherically irradiated targets; and a computer model describing the source of hot spots in the OMEGA laser. The section on advanced technology has reports on a method for accurately measuring the phase of a high power laser and the development of an extremely bright and compact laser. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  10. LLE Review. Quarterly report, January--March 1992: Volume 50

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January--March 1992, contains articles on the use of diffraction gratings in laser applications, and the fabrication of gratings for use in these applications. there are two articles on the use of lasers to explore fundamental physics issues and an article on the use of a solid-state diode array for x-ray imaging. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  11. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1987). Volume 32

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, W.

    1987-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1987, contains an article on the measurement of pR in high-compression laser-fusion experiments using secondary reactions. The section on advanced technology has reports on the development of high-repetitionrate active-mirror amplifiers; electro-optic time-domain reflectometry; a new electro-optic finger probe; picosecond high-energy electron diffraction; and a method of using radial transmission lines to obtain very high electric fields. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users facility and the glass development and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  12. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1992. Volume 51

    SciTech Connect

    Short, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1992, contains articles on laser-plasma interaction experiments in long-scale-length plasmas and on the theory of a new form of the stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilitity. The advanced technology section includes reports on the optical response of superconducting films, the development of high-reflectance transport mirrors for the OMEGA Upgrade, and a new high-brightness mono-mode laser oscillator. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1994). Volume 59

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, James P.

    1994-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of April-June 1994, contains articles on surface characterization by atomic force microscopy; electron acceleration with intense laser field; spatial intensity variations induced by nonlinear beam propagation; backlighting of implosion targets exhibiting mix; and the use of cosmic rays to monitor large, multielement detectors. Four of these articles - surface characterization; nonlinear beam propagation; backlighting of mixed targets; and monitoring of the MEDUSA detector array - are related to the OMEGA Upgrade, which is currently under construction.

  14. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July - September 2004). Volume 100

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Ansgar W.

    2004-09-01

    The key article in this volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2004, addresses "Shock Propagation in Deuterium-Tritium-Saturated Foam" by T. J. B. Collins (LLE) and A. Poludnenko, A. Cunningham, and A. Frank (UR, Department of Physics and Astronomy) (p. 227). Testing the assumption of homogeneous mixing in fibrous foams saturated with cryogenic deuterium and tritium, shock passage in wetted-foam mixtures was simulated by the adaptive-mesh, two-dimensional hydrodynamic code AstroBEAR. For foam fibers of diameter ~1/10 µm and relevant foam densities, the mixing length behind the shock is found to be of the order of microns. Transverse motion dampens out sufficiently that, at the mixing region's edge farthest from the shock, Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions are obeyed to within a few percent and shock speeds are also within a few percent of their homogeneous values. In addition, questions of feedthrough and feedout are addressed, showing that the stability of the shock front, once it leaves the wetted-foam layer, minimizes the effect of feedthrough. As a result, simulations of whole-foam-pellet implosions may model the wetted foam as a homogeneous mixture.

  15. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 2001). Volume 88

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterman, Thomas H.

    2001-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2001, features an article by C. Stoeckl, V. Yu. Glebov, J. D. Zuegel, and D. D. Meyerhofer (p. 171) that describes a simple, low-cost, wide dynamic-range, neutron bang time (NBT) detector. This instrument complements the capabilities of the streak camera-based neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD), which is also installed on the OMEGA laser. The new NBT measures the neutron bang time of D2- and DT-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion capsules at neutron yields between 107 and 1011 with an absolute timing accuracy of better than100 ps. This level of accuracy allows the modeling of the implosions to be effectively guided using hydrocode calculations. Other articles in this volume include: Functional Damage Thresholds of Hafnia/Silica Coating Designs for the NIF Laser; High-Gain Direct-Drive Target Designs for the national Ignition Facility; Ultrafast Optoelectronic Interface for Digital Superconducting Electronics; Optimizing the Fabrication of Polyimide Shells; LLE's Summer High School Research Program; FY01 Laser Facility Report; and, National Laser Users' Facility News.

  16. LLE Review quarterly report, January--March 1993. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1993-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review covers the three-month period January--March 1993. The OMEGA laser facility was decommissioned during this quarter to make room for the OMEGA Upgrade laser facility. The decommissioning is described in this volume. Electron thermal transport in the corona and laser-irradiation uniformity are related issues for direct-drive laser fusion. Thermal transport can affect the laser-irradiation uniformity requirements. The status of Fokker-Planck modeling of electron transport at LLE is reviewed and is followed by a description of a new technique for achieving high laser uniformity using zero-correlation phase masks. The use of fast, optically triggered, superconducting opening switches can, in principle, reduce the peak electrical load requirements of systems like the OMEGA Upgrade. Recent research in this area is described. The last three articles discuss vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray emission from short-pulse, laser-matter interactions. The generation of a high spectral brightness, picosecond K{alpha} source is described. The subsequent articles describe the generation of high-order harmonics of a high-intensity laser system laser system in low- density, laser-atom interactions and the novel gas target used.

  17. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2000). Volume 85

    SciTech Connect

    Sources, John M.

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2000, begins with an article by R. Betti, M. Umansky, V. Lobatchev, V. N. Goncharov, and R. L. McCrory, who report on the development of a model for the deceleration phase of an imploding inertial fusion capsule (p. 1). The model shows that the ablative flow off the inner shell surface plays a critical role in reducing the growth rate and suppressing short-wavelength modes in the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Other articles in this volume are: The Effect of Shock Heating on the Stability of Laser-Driven Targets; Spherical Cavity Expansion in Material with Densification; Design and Performance of a Selectable-Rate Streak-Camera Deflection Ramp Generator; Unique High-Bandwidth, UV Fiber Deliver System for OMEGA Diagnostics Applications; Fabrication and Properties of an Ultrafast NbN Hot-Electron Single-Photon detector; and, Preliminary Design of NIF 2-D SSD.

  18. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2001). Volume 87

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterman, Thomas H.

    2001-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April–June 2001, features ''A Self-Calibrating, Multichannel Streak Camera for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications'' by Dr. W. R. Donaldson, R. Boni, R. L. Keck, and P. A. Jaanimagi. This article (p. 109) describes the 60-beam streak camera system used on OMEGA and focuses on the hardware and software calibration techniques that maximize its utility. The system can diagnose each of the beams on every target shot and can measure beam energies with 8% accuracy and timing at 7 ps rms. Beam-to-beam power variations of less than 5% can be detected. Other articles in this volume are: Evolution of Shell Nonuniformities Near Peak Compression of a Spherical Implosion; Multibeam Stimulated Brillouin Scattering from Hot Solid-Target Plasmas; Hot-Electron Effect in Superconductors and Is Applications for Radiation Sensors; and, Scaling Law for Marginal Ignition.

  19. LLE review: Quarterly report, July--September 1995. Volume 64

    SciTech Connect

    Craxton, R.S.

    1995-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1995, includes a description of the first target experiments performed on the upgraded OMEGA laser system. These experiments, carried out to active and test several diagnostics systems, have demonstrated successful functioning of the overall experimental system and have produced high neutron yields and high core temperatures. Other articles in this volume describe the diagnosis of core conditions using krypton line spectroscopy, a mix model for LILAC that can be applied to study the deceleration instability at the pusher-core interface, a simulated-annealing algorithm for improved phase-plate design, a simple method for characterizing the thickness and uniformity of transparent laser-fusion targets, and femtosecond pump-probe experiments on semiconducting YBCO.

  20. LLE review. Volume 61, Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of October--December 1994, contains articles on a diagnostic method employing krypton spectroscopy for measurement of temperature and shell-fuel mixing in high-temperature implosions; the first direct assessment of the ion-acoustic decay instability in a large-scale length, hot plasma; measurements of polarization mode dispersion and group-velocity walkaway in birefringent media using a frequency domain interferometer; an evaluation of the magnetic flux dynamics occurring in an optically triggered, thin-film superconducting switch; the effect of slurry fluid chemistry on particle size distribution during aqueous polishing of optical glass; and the influence of thermal and mechanical processing history in the preparation of well-ordered liquid crystal elastomer systems.

  1. LLE Review quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 62

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of January-March 1995, contains articles on the evaluation of the mechanism for laser damage in OMEGA UV multilayer coatings using a combination of conventional laser-damage characterization methods and atomic force microscopy; a dual-amplitude, fiber-coupled waveguide integrated-optic modulation device for generating temporally shaped optical pulses in OMEGA-, a proposal for modifying the indirect-drive irradiation geometry of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to provide the additional flexibility for performing direct-drive experiments; direct measurements of terminal-level lifetime in several different Nd:YLF laser media; an overview of the materials science issues, basic mechanisms, and potential device applications for light-emitting porous silicon; and a study of the time-dependent reflection and surface temperatures for laser-irradiated dental hard tissue at two CO{sub 2} laser wavelengths.

  2. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1988). Volume 36

    SciTech Connect

    Kremens, R.

    1988-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1988, contains several articles on important diagnostics used during a recent high-density target experiment series; a report on a novel technique for improving laser illumination uniformity on laser-fusion experiments; and a report on non local electron transport simulations as applied to laser produced plasmas. The advanced technology section has an article discussing multiphoton ionization using the T3 (table-top-terrawatt) laser system; and a discussion of a new computer code to model x-ray refraction in line-focus geometry. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  3. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1998). Volume 75

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Reuben

    1998-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April–June 1998, includes a report on a recent series of experiments, performed by A. Babushkin, M. Guardalben, R. Keck, and W. Seka, that demonstrate a new scheme for converting the infrared light of OMEGA to the third harmonic in the ultraviolet over a bandwidth that is significantly wider than has been previously attainable. This innovative scheme, employing a second tripling crystal in addition to the doubler-tripler pair currently in use, was proposed by D. Eimerl at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and adapted to the OMEGA system by S. Craxton and S. Oskoui, a recent participant in LLE’s Summer High-School Research Program. Wider bandwidths on OMEGA will allow the use of broadband beam smoothing with faster smoothing times than have been employed until now.

  4. LLE Review quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 53

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review covers the three-month period October--December 1992. On 18 December, the OMEGA Laser Facility fired its last shot. It will be decommissioned during the next quarter to make room for the OMEGA Upgrade Laser Facility. This volume deals with two areas of interest for the OMEGA Upgrade, the development of advanced x-ray and neutron diagnostics and the development of long-pulse (>1-ns) laser sources. The first three articles discuss the development of time-dependent diagnostics. The development of an x-ray framing camera is described and measurements of the high-voltage pulse propagation in the camera are presented. Time-resolved and time-integrated neutron diagnostics for the OMEGA Upgrade are then discussed. Two schemes for the generation of >1-ns laser pulses are presented. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  5. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 1999). Volume 81

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P. B.

    1999-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October–December 1999, includes a report on the stability of direct-drive NIF capsules. V. N. Goncharov, R. Betti, J. A. Delettrez, P. W. McKenty, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town examine the conditions under which direct-drive NIF capsules ignite. Their numerical study uses two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with a model that includes the various mechanisms that can influence target performance. Inner-surface roughness of the DT ice of the direct-drive cryogenic capsules and laser nonuniformities have been identified as the principal seeds of the instabilities that can potentially quench ignition. The authors conclude that a target gain greater than 10 can be achieved for a realistic inner-surface ice roughness when beam smoothing with 2-D SSD and a bandwidth greater than 0.5 THz is used.

  6. LLE Review. Volume 68, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of July-September 1996, includes a description of an important experiment carried out on OMEGA by researchers from LANL, LLNL, and LLE to demonstrate the feasibility of using OMEGA for indirect drive. Additional topics include tetrahedral hohlraums, the speckle properties of phase- converted laser beams, design criteria for SSD phase modulators, and the design of slab amplifiers. Highlights of the research presented in this issue are (1) Results from the proof-of-principle indirect- drive experiments in which up to 40 OMEGA beams were used to irradiate cylindrical hohlraums. Nova results were reproduced, and new capabilities not available on other lasers were demonstrated. (2) A discussion of tetrahedral hohlraums (spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes) as a means of achieving better capsule irradiation uniformity. Tetrahedral hohlraums also allow the use of all 60 OMEGA beams and may provide an alternate route to ignition on the NIF. (3) An analysis of the residual target irradiation nonuniformity due to the fine laser speckle remaining on the beam after being phase converted by the DPP`s. A model shows how a uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere reduces the speckle contribution to the effective time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity. (4) A discussion of the theory, design, manufacture, testing, and implementation of the microwave SSD phase modulators used on OMEGA for two-dimensional SSD. The modulators are capable of operating in the gigahertz frequency range. (5) A discussion of the design and performance of a large-aperture, high-gain Nd:glass zig-zag slab amplifier for materials testing. The design incorporates improvements from previous work in addition to improvements obtained from careful design choices guided by analytic calculations.

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 2001). Volume 86

    SciTech Connect

    Sources, John M.

    2001-03-01

    This volume of LLE Review, covering January-March 2001, includes a report on the characterization of direct-drive implosion core conditions using time-resolved Ar K-shell spectroscopy. This work was carried out by a team that included S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, P. A. Jaanimagi, B. Yaakobi, V. A. Smalyuk, F. J. Marshall, D. D. Meyerhofer, and W. Seka of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), University of Rochester; D. A. Haynes, Jr. of the Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin; and C. F. Hooper, Jr. of the Department of Physics, University of Florida. The experiments involved the implosion of polymer shells filled with Ar-doped deuterium gas driven with up to 24-kJ, 1-ns square laser pulses smoothed with 1-THz, 2-D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS). The emissivity-averaged core electron temperature and density were inferred from the measured time-dependent Ar K-shell spectral line shapes. Electron densities in excess of 2.5 × 1024 cm-3 and electron temperatures ~2.5 keV were measured in these experiments. This represents the highest combination of electron temperature and density measured for these types of implosions in laser-driven inertial fusion experiments. Other articles in this volume are titled: Study of Direct-Drive, DT-Gas-Filled-Plastic-Capsule Implosions Using Nuclear Diagnostics on OMEGA; A Consistent Measurement-Based Picture of Core-Mix in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA; High-Resolution Neutron Imaging of Laser-Imploded DT Targets; The Smoothing Performance of Ultrafast Pickets on the NIF; Tests of EXAFS on OMEGA: Feasibility for Shock Heating Measurements; and, Microhardness and Indention Fracture of Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP).

  8. LLE review. Quarterly report, July 1997--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1997, begins with a general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters. Other highlights of the wide variety of research presented in this issue are: a promising method to directly observe the cold compressed shell of an imploding target. The shell is normally observed by backlighting. The proposal described here is to use a high-Z dopant that fluoresces under radiation from the hot core in the K{alpha} line. A study of the instabilities associated with near-forward stimulated Brillouin scattering. It includes a calculation of the saturation times and steady-state gain exponents. A successful program of pulse shaping for the OMEGA laser system. Examples of a variety of pulse shapes that can be programmed are presented. A description of the angular-scattering characteristics of ferroelectric liquid crystal electro-optical devices operating in transient and extended scattering modes. The possibility of applying these devices as modulators in practical IR imaging systems is evaluated. A faster method of shaping and finishing IR materials by the use of magnetorheological fluids. Detailed specifications and test results are included. An integrated circuit tester based on interferometric imaging. This technique holds promise of ultrafast noninvasive testing of the voltage states of sections of microchips. Continued success of the Laboratory`s High School Summer Research Program. The program, which started in 1989, has brought several dozen young people into intimate contact with modern science and technology. The volume concludes with a Laser Facility Report and the National Laser Users` Facility News.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1998). Volume 76

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Reuben

    1998-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1998, includes reports on two of the newest subsystems in the OMEGA laser facility. A. V. Okishev, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have developed a highly stable, diode-pumped Nd:YLF master oscillator for the OMEGA laser system. This new master oscillator produces either single-frequency Q-switched pulses or cw radiation for the OMEGA pulse-shaping system. The switch-over between these two regimes requires no laser realignment. The new master oscillator is completely computer controlled and has been operating continuously in OMEGA for six months without operator intervention. A. Babushkin, W. Bittle, S. A. Letzring, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have designed a negative-feedback–controlled regenerative amplifier that has been part of the OMEGA laser system for the past two years. The negative feedback makes the energy output of the regenerative amplifier stable and insensitive to the variations in pulse energy. This amplifier’s long-term output energy stability is the highest ever demonstrated for a millijoule-level laser system, either flashlamp pumped or diode pumped. Other articles in this volume are titled: Transcient Bandwidth Analysis of Photoconductive Microwave Switches Implemented in the OMEGA Pulse-Shaping System; Simulations of Near-Field Intensity Modulations in High-Intensity Laser Beams due to Self- and Cross-Phase Modulation Between Orthogonally Polarized Laser Beams Emerging from a Diamond-Turned KDP Wedge; X-Ray Radiographic System Used to Measure the Evolution of Broadband Imprint in Laser-Driven Planar Targets; Collisionless Damping of Localized Plasma Waves in Laser-Produces Plasmas and Application to Stimulated Raman Scattering in Filaments; LLE's Summer High School Research Program; FY98 Laser Facility Report; and, National Laser Users' Facilty News.

  10. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October-December 2001). Volume 89

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, William R.

    2001-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2001, features “Time-Integrated Light Images of OMEGA Implosions” by P. Morley and W. Seka (p. 1). E. Kowaluk initiated this project for aesthetic rather than scientific reasons when he began taking visible light photographs of imploding OMEGA targets. These beautiful images are used to communicate LLE’s mission to the general public. A closer examination of the images revealed a one-to-one correspondence between the bright spots in the image and each of the 60 laser beams. The intensity of the bright spots has been related to refraction and absorption in the plasma surrounding the imploding target. These photographs are now proving to be the basis of a new laser-plasma interaction diagnostic. Other articles in this volume are titled the following: Analytical Model of Nonlinear, Single-Mode, Classical Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at Arbitrary Atwood Numbers; A High-Pass Phase Plate Design for OMEGA and the NIF; Advanced Tritium Recovery System; Establishing Links Between Single Gold Nanoparticles Buried Inside SiO2 Thin Film and 351-nm Pulsed-Laser-Damage Morphology; Resistive Switching Dynamics in Current-Biased Y-Ba-Cu-O Microbridges Excited by Nanosecond Electrical Pulses; and, Properties of Amorphous Carbon Films.

  11. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 1991). Volume 48

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-09-01

    This report was prepared as an account of work conducted by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics and sponsored by New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the University of Rochester, the U.S. Department of Energy, and other agencies. Neither the above-named sponsors, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed. or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, mark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or any other sponsor. Results reported in the LLE Review should not be taken as necessarily final results as they represent active research. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of any of the above sponsoring entities.

  12. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  13. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October - December 2007). Volume 113

    SciTech Connect

    Zuegel, Jonathan D.

    2007-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October–December 2007, features “High-Intensity Laser–Plasma Interactions in the Refluxing Limit,” by P. M. Nilson, W. Theobald, J. Myatt, C. Stoeckl, M. Storm, O. V. Gotchev, J. D. Zuegel, R. Betti, D. D. Meyerhofer, and T. C. Sangster. In this article (p. 1), the authors report on target experiments using the Multi-Terawatt (MTW) Laser Facility to study isochoric heating of solid-density targets by fast electrons produced from intense, short-pulse laser irradiation. Electron refluxing occurs due to target-sheath field effects and contains most of the fast electrons within the target volume. This efficiently heats the solid-density plasma through collisions. X-ray spectroscopic measurements of absolute Kα (x-radiation) photon yields and variations of the Kβ/Kα b emission ratio both indicate that laser energy couples to fast electrons with a conversion efficiency of approximately 20%. Bulk electron temperatures of at least 200 eV are inferred for the smallest mass targets.

  14. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1993). Volume 54

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1993-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review covers the three-month period January-March1993. The OMEGA laser facility was decommissioned during this quarter to make room for the OMEGA Upgrade laser facility. The decommissioning is described in this volume. Electron thermal transport in the corona and laserirradiation uniformity are related issues for direct-drive laser fusion. Thermal transport can affect the laser-irradiation uniformity requirements. The status of Fokker-Planckmodeling of electron transport at LLEis reviewed and is followed by a description of a new technique for achieving high laser uniformity using zero-correlation phase masks. The use of fast, optically triggered, superconducting opening switches can, in principle, reduce the peak electrical load requirements of systems like the OMEGA Upgrade. Recent research in this area is described. The last three articles discuss vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray emission from shortpulse, laser-matter interactions. The generation of a high spectral brightness, picosecond K, source is described.The subsequent articles describe the generation of high-order harmonics of a high-intensity laser system in low-density, laseratom interactions and the novel gas target used.

  15. LLE 1995 annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 1995 (FY95) concluded the third year of the cooperative agreement (DE-FC03-92SF19460) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) and reports on the successful completion of the OMEGA Upgrade. Previous annual reports describe the OMEGA Upgrade design. The preliminary design for the system was complete in October 1989 and the detailed design started in October 1990. The original 24-beam OMEGA system was decommissioned in December 1992 as construction for the OMEGA Upgrade began. We discuss the initial performance results (p. 99) of the upgraded OMEGA laser system. All acceptance tests were completed, and we demonstrated that all 60 beams can irradiate a target with more energy and better beam balance than was required by DOE`s acceptance criteria. We are most proud that all program milestones were met or exceeded, and that the system was completed on time and on budget.

  16. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 2000). Volume 82

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P. B.

    2000-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 2000, includes a report on OMEGA cryogenic target designs for the soon-to-be-commissioned OMEGA Cryogenic Target Handling System. R. P. J. Town, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, P. W. McKenty, P. B. Radha, and S. Skupsky use two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with a stability analysis model to study the performance of OMEGA cryogenic capsules. They show that these targets are energy-scaled from the NIF ignition designs and have similar 1-D behavior and stability properties. This similarity will facilitate the extrapolation of cryogenic target studies on OMEGA to ignition targets on the NIF. Other articles in this volume are: Imprint Reduction using an Intensity Spike in Omega Cryogenic Targets; Measurement of Preheat Due to Fast Electrons in Laser Implosions; Holographic Transmission Gratings for Spectral Dispersion; Laser Beam Smoothing Caused by the Small-Spatial-Scale B-Integral; Three-Dimensional Modeling of Capsule Implosions in OMEGA Tetrahedral Hohlraums; and, Nanoindentation Hardness of Particles Used in Magnetoheological finishing (MRF).

  17. LLE Review quarterly report, July--September 1992. Volume 52

    SciTech Connect

    Short, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1992, contains articles on methods of balancing the beam power on the OMEGA Upgrade and on the damping of ion-sound waves in laser-produced plasmas. The advanced technology section includes reports on optical nonlinearities in high-temperature superconductors, a method of increasing gas retention time for laser-fusion targets, and a study of stimulated Raman scattering of laser beams in air. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: An efficient method has been developed for balancing the power in the 60 beams of the OMEGA Upgrade. The method can achieve 2% power balance for both main and foot beams using only four system shots. A study of ion-sound-wave damping has substantially revised and expanded our knowledge of this effect. The damping of ion waves can have important consequences for laser-plasma interaction. The use of femtosecond laser pulses to study the properties of thin-film, high-temperature superconductors is discussed. A method for increasing the gas retention time of polymer-shell laser-fusion targets by overcoating them with a thin layer of aluminum is described. A code has been developed to study stimulated rotational Raman scattering in high-power laser beams propagating through air.

  18. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 2002). Volume 90

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, William R.

    2002-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January-March 2002, features “First Results from Cryogenic Target Implosions on OMEGA” by C. Stoeckl et al. (p. 49). This article describes initial results from direct-drive spherical cryogenic target implosions on the 60-beam OMEGA laser system. These experiments are part of the scientific base leading to direct-drive ignition implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results shown include neutron yield, secondary-neutron and proton yields, the time of peak neutron emission, and both time-integrated and time-resolved x-ray images of the imploding core. The experimental values are compared with 1-D numerical simulations. The target with an ice-layer nonuniformity of srms = 9 mm showed 30% of the 1-D predicted neutron yield. These initial results are encouraging for future cryogenic implosions on OMEGA and the NIF. Other articles in this issue are titled the following: Equation-of-State Measurements of Porous Materials on OMEGA: Numerical Modeling; Observations of Modulated Shock Waves in Solid Targets Driven by Spatially Modulated Laser Beams; Time-Dependent Electron Thermal Flux Inhibition in direct-Drive Laser Implosions; Precision Spectral Sculpting of Broadband FM Pulses Amplified in a Narrowband Medium; Electric-Field-Induced Motion of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes in a Moderately Conductive Fluid; and, Femtosecond Response of a Freestanding LT-GaAs Photoconductive Switch.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 1999). Volume 78

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Sean P.

    1999-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 1999, features two articles concerning issues relevant to 2-D SSD laser-beam smoothing on OMEGA. In the first article J. D. Zuegel and J. A. Marozas present the design of an efficient, bulk phase modulator operating at approximately 10.5 GHz, which can produce substantial phase-modulated bandwidth with modest microwave drive power. This modulator is the cornerstone of the 1-THz UV bandwidth operation planned for OMEGA this year. In the second article J. A. Marozas and J. H. Kelly describe a recently developed code -- Waasese -- that simulates the collective behavior of the optical components in the SSD driver line. The measurable signatures predicted by the code greatly enhance the diagnostic capability of the SSD driver line. Other articles in this volume are titled: Hollow-Shell Implosion Studies on the 60-Beam, UC OMEGA Laser System; Simultaneous Measurements of Fuel Areal Density, Shell Areal Density, and Fuel Temperature in D3He-Filled Imploding Capsules; The Design of Optical Pulse Shapes with an Aperture-Coupled-Stripline Pulse-Shaping System; Measurement Technique for Characterization of Rapidly Time- and Frequency-Varying Electronic Devices; and, Damage to Fused-Silica, Spatial-Filter Lenses on the OMEGA Laser System.

  20. Late language emergence in 24 month twins: Heritable and increased risk for LLE in twins

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mabel L.; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Gayán, Javier; Bontempo, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the etiology of Late Language Emergence (LLE) in 24-month-old twins considering possible twinning, zygosity, gender, and heritability effects for vocabulary and grammar phenotypes. Method A population-based sample of 473 twin pairs participated. Multilevel modelling estimated means and variances of vocabulary and grammar phenotypes, controlling for familiality. Heritability was estimated with DeFries-Fulker regression, and variance components models, to determine effects of heritability, shared-environment, and non-shared environment. Results Twins had lower average language scores than norms for singleborn children, with lower average performance for MZ than DZ twins, and lower for boys than girls, although gender and zygosity did not interact. Gender did not predict LLE. Significant heritability was detected for vocabulary (.26) and grammar phenotypes (.52/.43 for males/females) in the full sample, and in the sample selected for LLE (.42 and .44). LLE and the appearance of Word Combinations were also significantly heritable (.22-.23). Conclusion The findings revealed an increased likelihood of LLE in twin toddlers compared to singleborn children that is modulated by zygosity and gender differences. Heritability estimates are consistent with previous research for vocabulary and add further suggestion of heritable differences in early grammar acquisition. PMID:24167238

  1. LLE Review Quarterly Report July-September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2000, begins with an article by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, O. Gotchev, J. P. Knauer, D. D. Meyerhofer, D. Oron, S. P. Regan, Y. Srebro, W. Seka, D. Shvarts, S. Skupsky, and V.A. Smalyuk, who describe measurements of the effect of beam smoothing and pulse shape on imprinting. (Imprinting is defined as the imposition of pressure perturbations on the target by spatial variations in the laser intensity.) A principal result is the observation of reduced levels of imprint with the higher beam smoothing afforded by 1-THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Additional highlights of research presented in this issue are: (1) P. W. McKenty, V. N. Goncharov, R. P. J. Town, S. Skupsky, R. Betti, and R. L. McCrory describe calculations of directly driven ignition capsule performance on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The authors detail how the various contributors to implosion disruption (laser imprint, power imbalance, and target roughness) affect target performance and final gain. The conclusions are obtained by examining the simulated target evolution with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics computer code ORCHID. (2) D. D. Meyerhofer, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. Yu. Glebov, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. Keck, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, F. J. Marshall, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, S. Roberts, W. Seka, S. Skupsky, V. A. Smalyuk, C. Sorce, C. Stoeckl, J. M. Soures, R. P. J. Town, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel, J. Frenje, C. K. L1,R. D. Petrasso, F. Seguin, K. Fletcher, S. Padalino, C. Freeman, N. Izumi, R. Lerche, T. W. Phillips, and T. C. Sangster describe the results of a series of direct-drive implosions of gas-fusion-fuel-filled plastic shells performed on the OMEGA laser system. The experiments include those performed with 1-THZ SSD and high-quality power balance. (3) V. Yu. Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, C. Stoeckl, and J. D. Zuegel describe the technique of measuring secondary neutron yield (DT neutron yield from D

  2. LLE review, Volume 77. Quarterly report, October--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S.P.

    1998-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October--December 1998, includes two articles addressing issues applicable to direct-drive ICF on the National Ignition Facility (NIF): laser-plasma interactions and laser-irradiation uniformity. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) P.B. Radha and S. Skupsky present a novel charged-particle diagnostic that performs simultaneous {rho}R measurements of the fuel, shell, and ablator regions of a compressed ICF target, consisting of an inner DT fuel region, a plastic (CH) shell, and an ablator (CD), by measuring the knock-on deuteron spectrum. (2) F. Dahmani, S. Burns, J. Lambropoulos, S. Papernov, and A. Schmid report results from stress-inhibited laser-driven crack propagation and stress-delayed damage-initiation experiments in fused silica at 351 nm. Research is underway presently to determine the ramifications of these findings for large-aperture systems, such as OMEGA. (3) V. Goncharov presents an analytic theory of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, which shows that the main stabilizing mechanism of the ablation-front perturbations is the dynamic overpressure of the blowoff plasma with respect to the target material. The perturbation evolution during the shock transit time is studied to determine the initial conditions for the Rayleigh-Taylor phase of the instability and to analyze the level of laser imprint on ICF direct-drive targets. (4) J.M. Larkin, W.R. Donaldson, T.H. Foster, and R.S. Knox examine the triplet state of rose bengal, a dye used in photodynamic therapy, that is produced by 1,064-nm excitation of T{sub 1}. (5) R. Adam, M. Currie, R. Sobolewski, O. Harnack, and M. Darula report measurements of the picosecond photoresponse of a current-biased YBCO microbridge coupled to a bicrystal YBCO Josephson junction.

  3. LLE Review quarterly report July--September 1993. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1993, contains articles on self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with angular dispersion, laser patterning of thin-film circuits, and construction of foam-shell fusion targets. Reports on the detailed designs of major subsystems of the OMEGA Upgrade and on the continuing activation of the upgraded Glass Development Laser system are summarized. Descriptions of research proposals for NLUF are also included in this issue. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: Previous investigations of self-focusing behavior of broad-bandwidth laser light without angular dispersion showed only slight differences when compared to laser light with angular dispersion. A new, numerical investigation of self-focusing with applied angular dispersion shows the development of transverse amplitude modulation, which can act to enhance or impede instantaneous self-focusing. Averaging over one period of phase modulation with imposed bandwidth shows consistent smoothing of the beam, nearly replicating the original spatial profile, including smoothing of induced perturbations due to laser-system imperfections. A continuous-wave argon-ion laser beam is focused onto a Y-Ba-Cu-O thin-film circuit. The laser beam selectively heats the epitaxy, which enriches oxygen in irradiated regions alongside depleted regions. Oxygen enrichment results in the formation of superconducting regions, while oxygen depletion results in semiconducting regions. This maskless operation yields applications in microbridges,coplanar transmisson lines, field-effect transistors, and photoconductive switches. One technique to form thick fusion fuel layers is to use a low-density polymer or aerosol foam matrix to hold the liquid DT. This issue summarizes the results of a collaborative experiment conducted at the Institute for Laser Engineering (ILE) to fabricate foam-shell targets with plastic-layer overcoats.

  4. [Neurousurpation--the expropriation and suppression of Dölle's neurobiological pioneer work].

    PubMed

    Bertram, Wulf

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of a hitherto unpublished dissertational thesis in the archive of a publishing house has lead to a lost publication by Ernst August Dölle. In this manuscript, the author reports on the stimulation of a cerebral libido area in the dog, long before Olds and Milner published their work on the discovery of the rewarding area. The reasons for the suppression of this early publication by Dölle are investigated and are ascribed to an effort to use his neurobiologic research for secret mental manipulation experiments of the CIA at the beginning of the Cold War. PMID:21823065

  5. LLE Review Quarterly Report January - March 2012. Volume 130

    SciTech Connect

    Shvydky, Alex

    2012-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January–March 2012, features “OMEGA Polar-Drive Target Designs,” by P. B. Radha, J. A. Marozas, F. J. Marshall, A. Shvydky, T. J. B. Collins, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, and S. Skupsky. This article (p. 57) describes low-adiabat, cryogenic-deuterium–tritium, and warm-plastic-shell polar-drive (PD)–implosion designs for the OMEGA laser. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, each at a different in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR). The first design permits one to study implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (7 X 1014 W/cm2 at the quarter-critical surface), where nonlocal heat conduction and laser–plasma interactions can play an important role, but at lower values of IFAR (~22). The second design permits one to study implosion energetics and target performance at a lower intensity (3 X 1014 W/cm2) but at higher IFAR (~32), where the shell instability can play an important role. The higher IFAR designs are accessible on the existing OMEGA Laser System only at lower intensities. Implosions at ignition-relevant intensities can be obtained only by reducing target radius, although only at smaller values of IFAR. Polar-drive geometry requires repointing the laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent and compensate for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing beam energies for the repointed beams and using custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the smaller target radii and custom beam profiles, are obtained. Implosion results from the combined set of high-intensity and high-IFAR implosions should yield valuable

  6. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2005). Volume 103

    SciTech Connect

    Myatt, Jason

    2005-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2005, features the following articles. ''High-Density and High ρR Fuel Assembly for Fast-Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion'' by R. Betti and C. Zhou. In this article (p. 117), the authors optimize implosion parameters for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion and design fast-ignition targets relevant to direct-drive inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is shown that a 750-kJ laser can assemble fuel with VI = 1.7 X 107 cm/s, a = 0.7, t = 400 g/cc, tR = 3 g/cm2, and a hot-spot volume of less than 10% of the compressed core. If fully ignited, this fuel assembly can produce energy gains of 150. In the second article (p. 122), C. Stoeckl, T. R. Boehly, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu. Glebov, J. Miller, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, and T. C. Sangster, along with J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Séguin (MIT), S. P. Hatchett (LLNL), and R. B. Stephens (GA) describe recent OMEGA experiments that have studied the fuel assembly of gas-filled, cone-in-shell, fast-ignition targets. Using both fusion products and backlit images, an areal density of ~60-70 mg/cm2 was inferred for the dense core assembly. The results are promising for successful integrated fast-ignition experiments on the OMEGA EP facility, scheduled to be completed in 2007. Other articles are titled ''Planar Cryogenic Target Hangling Capability for the OMEGA Laser-Fusion Facility''; "Fourier-Space, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3-D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets''; ''Technologies for Mitigating Tritum Releases to the Environment''; ''All-Solid-State, Diode-Pumped, Multiharmonic Laser System for Timing Fiducial''; and ''EXAFS Measurement of Iron bcc-to-hcp Phase Transformation in Nanosecond-Laser Shocks''.

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report. Volume 79, April-June 1999 [Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    This volume of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) Review, covering the period April-June 1999, features a theoretical analysis of direct-drive target performance on National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this article R. P. J. Town, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, R. W. Short, and S. Skupsky detail ignition target designs developed at LLE specifically to achieve successful direct-drive ignition on the NIF facility. A baseline ''all-DT'' target design is described along with a two shock compression analysis, which includes discussion of the parameters leading to variability in shock timing. The modeling and analysis presented flow down to specification requirements for the laser and target parameters to ignite this baseline target design with the NIF laser.

  8. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review: Quarterly report, January-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.

    1988-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 1988, contains articles on the spectra of scattered laser radiation from laser-produced plasmas and on the bounce coating of ablation layers on fusion targets. The advanced technology section has reports on a novel technique for characterizing surface breakdown on semiconductor devices and on a versatile alexandrite regenerative amplifier. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users. Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. 49 refs., 30 figs.

  9. LLE experimental data, thermodynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis in the ethyl biodiesel from macauba pulp oil settling step.

    PubMed

    Basso, Rodrigo Corrêa; da Silva, César Augusto Sodré; Sousa, Camila de Oliveira; Meirelles, Antonio José de Almeida; Batista, Eduardo Augusto Caldas

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain experimental data related to liquid–liquid equilibrium (LLE) of systems containing glycerol + ethanol + ethyl biodiesel from macauba pulp oil, perform thermodynamic modeling and simulate the settling step of this biodiesel using simulation software. Binary interaction parameters were adjusted for NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The UNIFAC-LLE and UNIFAC-Dortmund models were used to predict the LLE of the systems. A sensitivity analysis was applied to the settling step to describe the composition of the output streams as a function of ethanol in the feed stream. Ethanol had greater affinity for the glycerol-rich phase. The deviations between experimental data and calculated values were 0.44%, 1.07%, 3.52% and 2.82%, respectively, using the NRTL, UNIQUAC, UNIFAC-LLE and UNIFAC-Dortmund models. Excess ethanol in the feed stream causes losses of ethyl ester in the glycerol-rich stream and high concentration of glycerol in the ester-rich stream. PMID:23384780

  10. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  11. Children's Literature as Tools of and for Activism: Reflections of JoLLE's inaugural Activist Literacies Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by her attendance at the inaugural JoLLE Activist Literacies conference, the author ruminates on the ways in which children's literature and activitist literacies are inextricably wed and manifested in myriad ways. References to a sampling of children's literature spanning genres and grade levels, websites, and affiliated articles provide…

  12. LLE Quarterly Report (July-September 1999)[Library for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    2000-01-07

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1999, features a theoretical analysis of a process that generates mass perturbations of an imploding target driven by modulated laser illumination. The process, referred to as laser imprint, impacts the integrity of the shell during direct-drive implosions, potentially quenching target performance. In this article V. N. Goncharov, J. A. Delettrez, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town present a model of the generation of mass perturbations and analyze the mass perturbation growth due to nonuniform ablation pressure. Stabilizing mechanisms of thermal conduction smoothing and mass ablation are shown to suppress the acceleration perturbation, and mass ablation is also shown to impact velocity perturbations. The model predicts that a direct-drive cryogenic NIF target will remain intact during the implosion when l-Thz SSD beam smoothing is used.

  13. Variable Spaced Grating (VSG) Snout, Rotator and Rails for use at LLE

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S K; Emig, J A; Griffith, L V; Heeter, R F; House, F A; James, D L; Schneider, M B; Sorce, C M

    2010-01-25

    The Variable Spaced Grating (VSG) is a spectrometer snout mounted to an X-Ray Framing Camera (XRFC) through the Unimount flange. This equipment already exists and is used at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) facility. The XRFC and the Unimount flange are designed by LLE. The Tilt Rotator fixture that mounts next to the XRFC and the cart rails are designed by LLNL, and are included in this safety note. The other related components, such as the TIM rails and the Unimount flange, are addressed in a separate safety note, EDSN09-500005-AA. The Multipurpose Spectrometer (MSPEC) and VSG are mounted on the TIM Boat through the cart rails that are very similar in design. The tilt rotator combination with the Unimount flange is also a standard mounting procedure. The later mounting system has been included in this safety note. Figure-1 shows the interface components and the VSG snout. Figure-2 shows the VSG assembly mounted on the Unimount flange. The calibration pointer attachment is shown in place of the snout. There are two types of VSG, one made of 6061-T6 aluminum, weighing approximately 3 pounds, and the other made of 304 stainless steel, weighing approximately 5.5 pounds. This safety note examines the VSG steel design. Specific experiments may require orienting the VSG snout in 90 degrees increment with respect to the Unimount flange. This is done by changing the bolts position on the VSG-main body adapter flange to the Unimount adapter plate. There is no hazard involved in handling the VSG during this procedure as it is done outside the target chamber on the cart rail before installing on the TIM. This safety note addresses the mechanical integrity of the VSG structure, the tilt rotating fixture, the cart rails with handle and their connections. Safety Factors are also calculated for the MSPEC in place of the VSG.

  14. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) Review: Quarterly report, January--March 1997. Volume 70

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review includes an article on the status of the optics on the OMEGA laser system after the first 18 months of operation. A vigorous program to monitor the performance of the optics has been followed since the inception of the OMEGA laser. The article presents results from these observations and defines the various types of possible damage. Many of the optics have not damaged, such as the frequency-conversion crystals, polarizers, calorimeters, and liquid crystal optics. The most significant damage has been sustained by the fused-silica spatial filter lenses. There has been no evidence of any propagation of damage downstream of damage optics. Other highlights of research presented here are: The development of a single-beam, ponderomotive optical trap for energetic free electrons. A description of the new diode-pumped Nd:YLF master oscillator for the OMEGA laser. Simulations of heat transfer from localized absorbing defects to the host coating material in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} 351-nm high reflectors. An experimental study of target performance and mixing in titanium-doped target implosions on OMEGA. A theoretical calculation of the dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a laser pulse. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database from articles in this volume.

  15. Cross-examination of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) methods for impurity profiling of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaesin; Park, Yonghoon; Yang, Wonkyung; Chung, Heesun; Choi, Wonjun; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kuwayama, Kenji; Park, Jeonghill

    2012-02-10

    Impurities in 48 methamphetamine (MA) samples were analyzed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) methods. MPS-2 autosampler was used to improve reproducibility of SPME method, and nonadecane (C(19)) diluted with potassium bromide (KBr) powder was used as an internal standard for standardizing retention time. Impurities identified by SPME method showed different patterns compared with LLE method. Non-volatile impurities like methamphetamine dimer were not identified by SPME method, but some volatile impurities like diphenylketone, caprolactam and lots of unknowns were identified only by SPME method. 1-Phenyl-2-propanone (P2P), 1-phenyl-2-propanol and benzylcyanide peaks could be discriminated clearly by SPME method without interference of amphetamine, an artifact originates from MA degradation. Differences in the impurity patterns resulted in different clustering results. When 48 MA samples were classified into 5 LLE and 5 SPME clusters, cross-matching of the clusters resulted in 8 sub-clusters. It shows that combination of the different extraction methods can distinguish the differences which cannot be distinguished by LLE or SPME method alone, and can improve reliability of the profiling results. PMID:21376486

  16. Analytical power of LLE-HPLC-PDA-MS/MS in drug metabolism studies: identification of new nabumetone metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nobilis, Milan; Mikušek, Jiří; Szotáková, Barbora; Jirásko, Robert; Holčapek, Michal; Chamseddin, Chamseddin; Jira, Thomas; Kučera, Radim; Kuneš, Jiří; Pour, Milan

    2013-06-01

    Nabumetone is a non-acidic, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory prodrug. Following oral administration, the prodrug is converted in the liver to 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), which was found to be the principal metabolite responsible for the NSAID effect. The pathway of nabumetone transformation to 6-MNA has not been clarified, with no intermediates between nabumetone and 6-MNA having been identified to date. In this study, a new, as yet unreported phase I metabolite was discovered within the evaluation of nabumetone metabolism by human and rat liver microsomal fractions. Extracts from the biomatrices were subjected to chiral LLE-HPLC-PDA and achiral LLE-UHPLC-MS/MS analyses to elucidate the chemical structure of this metabolite. UHPLC-MS/MS experiments detected the presence of a structure corresponding to elemental composition C15H16O3, which was tentatively assigned as a hydroxylated nabumetone. Identical nabumetone and HO-nabumetone UV spectra obtained from the PDA detector ruled out the presence of the hydroxy group in the aromatic moiety of nabumetone. Hence, the most likely structure of the new metabolite was 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-3-hydroxybutan-2-one (3-hydroxy nabumetone). To confirm this structure, the standard of this nabumetone metabolite was synthesized, its spectral (UV, CD, NMR, MS/MS) and retention properties on chiral and achiral chromatographic columns were evaluated and compared with those of the authentic nabumetone metabolite. To elucidate the subsequent biotransformation of 3-hydroxy nabumetone, the compound was used as a substrate in incubation with human and rat liver microsomal fraction. A number of 3-hydroxy nabumetone metabolites (products of conjugation with glucuronic acid, O-desmethylation, carbonyl reduction and their combination) were discovered in the extracts from the incubated microsomes using LLE-HPLC-PDA-MS/MS experiments. On the other hand, when 3-hydroxy nabumetone was incubated with isolated rat hepatocytes, 6-MNA was

  17. Process-scale reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography purification of LL-E19020 alpha, a growth promoting antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lydicus ssp. tanzanius.

    PubMed

    Williams, D R; Carter, G T; Pinho, F; Borders, D B

    1989-12-22

    LL-E19020 alpha is a novel antibiotic produced by fermentation of the soil microorganism Streptomyces lydicus ssp. tanzanius. The compound is highly effective in inducing increases in weight gain and feed conversion efficiency in livestock. In order to obtain kilogram quantities of the material for field trials, pilot plant scale fermentations (up to 7500 l) were carried out. The antibiotic was recovered from the fermentation broth by solvent extraction. The resultant crude extract was subjected to reversed-phase (C18) chromatography on a process-scale high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) unit. The heart of the instrumentation is the Millipore Kiloprep chromatograph with the standard 12-l cartridge column. The laboratory housing the chromatograph has been specifically designed for this work. Tanks for mobile phase preparation are mounted on load cells for precise measurement of components. In this explosion-proof laboratory, all solvent handling areas are well ventilated and a separate breathing air system is provided for the operators. For the purification of the LL-E19020 antibiotics, the mobile phase consisted of a gradient of acetonitrile in 0.1 M ammonium acetate at pH 4.5. The effluent was monitored by UV absorbance at 325 nm. Fractions were collected across the peaks of interest and these were analyzed by analytical HPLC. The maximum yield of LL-E19020 alpha obtained in a single run was approximately 100 g. The antibiotic was recovered from the mobile phase by extraction with methylene chloride. The methylene chloride phase was concentrated under reduced pressure to yield a gummy residue which was finally freeze-dried from tertiary butanol to yield an off-white solid suitable for blending with various feed components. PMID:2613793

  18. Simultaneous analysis of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 and ochratoxin A in breast milk by high-performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence after liquid-liquid extraction with low temperature purification (LLE-LTP).

    PubMed

    Andrade, Patricia Diniz; Gomes da Silva, Julyane Laine; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2013-08-23

    The aims of this study were to optimize and validate a methodology for the simultaneous analysis of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2, AFM1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in breast milk, and to analyze these mycotoxins in samples obtained from human milk banks in the Federal District, Brazil. The optimized analytical method was based on liquid-liquid extraction with low temperature purification (3.25mL of acidified acetonitrile+0.75mL of ethyl acetate), followed by analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector (HPLC/FLD) and a photochemical post-column reactor. Limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.005 to 0.03ng/mL, recoveries from 73 to 99.5%, and relative standard deviations (RSD) from 1.8 to 17.3%. The LLE-LTP extraction method was shown to be simple and cost-effective, since no columns were needed for clean-up. Only 2 of the 224 breast milk samples analyzed were positive for the mycotoxins, both samples containing AFB2 at the LOQ level (0.005ng/mL). The identity of the mycotoxin detected was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This result indicates that infants who are fed with breast milk from the milk banks are not at risk from aflatoxin and ochratoxin exposure. PMID:23871563

  19. LLE Review 121 (September-December 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.S., editor

    2010-04-14

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Triple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA; (2) High-Precision Measurements of the Equation of State of Hydrocarbons at 1 to 10 Mbar Using Laser-Driven Shock Waves; (3) A Generalized Measurable Ignition Condition for Inertial Confinement Fusion (4) In-Situ Detection and Analysis of Laser-Induced Damage on a 1.5-m Multilayer-Dielectric Grating Compressor for High-Energy, Petawatt-Class Laser Systems; (5) Probing High-Areal-Density ({rho}R) Cryogenic-DT Implosions Using Down-Scattered Neutron Spectra Measured by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer; (6) Strong-Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions; and (7) Neutron-Induced Nucleation Inside Bubble Chambers Using Freon 115 as the Active Medium.

  20. LLE Review 119 (April-June 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2009-10-22

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Shock-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA at NIF-Relevant Intensities; (2) Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (3) Lorentz Mapping of Magnetic Fields in Hot, Dense Plasmas; (4) Characterization and Optimization of Yb-Doped Photonic-Crystal Fiber Rod Amplifiers Using Spatially Resolved Spectral Interferometry; (5) Optical Differentiation and Multimillijoule {approx}150-ps Pulse Generation in a Regenerative Amplifier with a Temperature-Tuned Intracavity Volume Bragg Grating; (6) Slow Crack Growth During Radiatiave Cooling of LHG8 and BK7 Plates; and (7) Finite Element Simulation of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photoconductor.

  1. LLE Review 118 (January-March 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-08-03

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Applied Plasma Spectroscopy: Laser-Fusion Experiments; (2) Relativistic Electron-Beam Transport Studies Using High-Resolution, Coherent Transition Radiation Imaging; (3) Pressure-Driven, Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Interchange Instabilities in Laser-Produced, High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (4) Extended Model for Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flake Reorientation and Relaxation; (5) Modeling the Effects of Microencapsulation on the Electro-Optic Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes; (6) Capillarity and Dielectrophoresis of Liquid Deuterium; and (7) A Stable Mid-IR, GaSb-Based Diode Laser Source for Cryogenic Target Layering at the OMEGA Laser Facility.

  2. Unfälle mit Pkw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Heinz

    Der Verkehrsunfall ereignete sich innerorts auf einer Kreuzung mit rechts vor links Regelung. Es galt dort die allgemeine Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung auf 50 km/h. Zur Unfallzeit war es hell und trocken. Die Fahrbahn hatte eine Schwarzdecke.

  3. Carbon solids in oxygen-deficient explosives (LA-UR-13-21151)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peery, Travis

    2013-06-01

    The phase behavior of excess carbon in oxygen-deficient explosives has a significant effect on detonation properties and product equations of state. Mixtures of fuel oil in ammonium nitrate (ANFO) above a stoichiometric ratio demonstrate that even small amounts of graphite, on the order of 5% by mole fraction, can substantially alter the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) state properties, a central ingredient in modeling the products equation of state. Similar effects can be seen for Composition B, which borders the carbon phase boundary between graphite and diamond. Nano-diamond formation adds complexity to the product modeling because of surface adsorption effects. I will discuss these carbon phase issues in our equation of state modeling of detonation products, including our statistical mechanics description of carbon clustering and surface chemistry to properly treat solid carbon formation. This work is supported by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, under the NNSA.

  4. LLE Review, Volume 57. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the visible fruits of long design labors on the OMEGA Upgrade began to appear. The target mirror structure was put in place, along with the target chamber itself. The laser bay structures were also installed, and the bay is now being prepared to receive optomechanical, control, and laser assemblies. Further details are in the OMEGA Upgrade Status Report in this issue. Theory and analysis of previous experiments continued during this reporting period. Articles contained herein describe an improved theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a novel proposal for characterizing plasma-density profiles by using grid image refractometry; a much-improved treatment of the damping of ion sound waves in a mixture of light and heavy ions; and, finally, a new interpretation of measurements of 3/2-harmonic radiation emitted from the long-scale-length plasmas created in earlier OMEGA experiments.

  5. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1996. Volume 67

    SciTech Connect

    Skeldon, M.D.

    1996-11-01

    This volume contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  6. LLE 2005 annual report, October 2004-September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2006-01-01

    Progress in laser fusion this past year falls into five broad categories: (1) direct-drive results from OMEGA; (2) progress in the development of the cryogenic target system and experiments with cryogenic targets; (3) results for polar direct drive (the application of nonspherically disposed laser beams for direct-drive spherically symmetrically driven systems), which is of great interest for the National Ignition Facility (NIF); (4) fast ignition, which uses short-pulse (<100-ps), high-intensity (~1015-W) laser beams to ignite a compressed thermonuclear fusion capsule; and (5) high-energy-density physics results that use inertial fusion facilities to produce matter in extreme states that are central to understanding and modeling nuclear weapons phenomena important to the National Stockpile Stewardship Program.

  7. LLE 1994 annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This is the 1994 annual report for the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The report is presented as a series of research type reports. The titles emphasize the breadth of work carried out. They are: stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts; characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry; transport and sound waves in plasmas with light and heavy ions; three-halves-harmonic radiation from long-scale-length plasmas revisited; OMEGA upgrade status report; target imaging and backlighting diagnosis; effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; particle-in-cell code simulations of the interaction of gaussian ultrashort laser pulses with targets of varying initial scale lengths; characterization of thick cryogenic fuel layers: compensation for the lens effect using convergent beam interferometry; compact, multijoule-output, Nd:Glass, large-aperture ring amplifier; atomic force microscopy observation of water-induced morphological changes in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolayer coatings; observation of longitudinal acceleration of electrons born in a high-intensity laser focus; spatial intensity nonuniformities of an OMEGA beam due to nonlinear beam propagation; calculated X-ray backlighting images of mixed imploded targets; evaluation of cosmic rays for use in the monitoring of the MEDUSA scintillator-photomultiplier diagnostic array; highly efficient second-harmonic generation of ultra-intense Nd:Glass laser pulses multiple cutoff wave numbers of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ultrafast, all-silicon light modulator; angular dependence of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in homogeneous plasma; femtosecond excited-state dynamics of a conjugated ladder polymer.

  8. LLE Review: Quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 60

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    This volume contains articles on efficient generation of second-harmonic radiation from short-pulse lasers; calculation of the stabilization cutoff wave numbers for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a high-frequency silicon optical modulator; the angular dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering; and femtosecond dynamics of ladder polymers. Three of these articles--second-harmonic generation, Rayleigh-Taylor cutoff wave numbers, and angular dependence of Brillouin scattering--are directly related to the OMEGA Upgrade, currently under construction. A summary of the status of the OMEGA Upgrade laser facility and the NLUF News for FY94 are included in this volume.

  9. LLE review, volume 73. Quarterly report, October 1997--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This progress report contains discussion on the following topics: A high-bandwidth electrical-waveform generator based on aperture-coupled striplines for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications; sweep deflection circuit development using computer-aided circuit design for the OMEGA multichannel streak camera; D-{sup 3}He protons as a diagnostic for target {rho}R; growth rates of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion; three-dimensional analysis of the power transfer between crossed laser beams; characterization of freestanding polymer films for application in 351-nm, high-peak-power laser systems; subsurface damage in microgrinding optical glasses; bound-abrasive polishers for optical glass; and color gamut of cholesteric liquid crystal films and flakes by standard colorimetry.

  10. Unfälle mit motorisierten Zweirädern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirschwitz, Christian

    Der Fahrer eines Pkw Opel Astra überquerte mit seinem Pkw von einer untergeordneten Einmündung kommend eine außerörtliche Bundesstraße in gerade Richtung. Dabei kam es zur Kollision mit einem sich von rechts vorfahrtsberechtigt annähernden Krad Suzuki RGV250. Der Anprall des Krades erfolgte mit dem Heck an die rechte Pkw-Flanke zwischen vorderem Radausschnitt und Fahrzeugecke. Der Krad-Fahrer, welcher sofort tot war und das Zweirad verklemmten sich am Pkw und verblieben relativ zu selbigem annähernd in Kollisionsstellung.

  11. Improved Technologies for Decontamination of Crated Large Metal Objects LANL Release No: LA-UR-02-0072

    SciTech Connect

    McFee, J.; Stallings, E.; Barbour, K.

    2002-02-26

    The Los Alamos Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) is identifying and demonstrating technologies to reduce the cost and risk of management of transuranic element contaminated large metal objects, i.e. gloveboxes. The previously conducted demonstrations supported characterization and ''front end'' aspects of the Los Alamos Decontamination and Volume Reduction System (DVRS) project. The first demonstration was shown to save the DVRS project approximately $200,000 per year and characterization technologies have been estimated to save DVRS a month of DVRS operation per year. In FY01 demonstrations for decontamination technologies, communication systems, and waste data collection systems have provided additional savings equivalent to another $200K per year of operation. The Los Alamos Large Scale demonstration and Deployment Project continues to provide substantial cost savings to the DVRS process in this second round of demonstrations. DVRS cost savings of $400K per year can now be counted, with additional efficiency savings of up to 30% on many tasks.

  12. Current trends for packaging transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LA-UR-07-4785)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Kapil K.; Carson, Peter H.; Enriquez, Alejandro E.

    2007-07-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste leaving the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is packaged using LANL's waste acceptance criteria for onsite storage. Before shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, each payload container is subject to rigorous characterization to ensure compliance with WIPP waste acceptance criteria and Department of Transportation regulations. Techniques used for waste characterization include nondestructive examination by WIPP-certified real-time radiography (RTR) and nondestructive assay (NDA) of containers, as well as headspace gas sampling to ensure hydrogen and other flammable gases remain at safe levels during transport. These techniques are performed under a rigorous quality assurance program to confirm that results are accurate and reproducible. If containers are deemed problematic, corrective action is taken before shipment to WIPP. Currently this activity is possible only at the Laboratory's Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. To minimize additional waste requiring remediation, WIPP waste acceptance criteria must be applied at the point of waste generation. Additional criteria stem from limitations of RTR or NDA instruments or lack of appropriate sampling and analysis. This paper presents the changes that have been implemented at the Plutonium Facility and gives readers a preview of what LANL expects to accomplish to expeditiously certify and dispose of newly generated TRU waste. (authors)

  13. Modeling High Altitude EMP using a Non-Equilibrium Electron Swarm Model to Monitor Conduction Electron Evolution (LA-UR-15-26151)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, E. N.; Morris, H. E.; Nelson, E.; Ji, W.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events in the atmosphere are important physical phenomena that occur through both man-made and natural processes, such as lightning, and can be disruptive to surrounding electrical systems. Due to the disruptive nature of EMP, it is important to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation with computational models. In EMP, low-energy conduction electrons are produced from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. These conduction electrons continue to interact with the surrounding air and alter the EMP waveform. Many EMP simulation codes use an equilibrium ohmic model for computing the conduction current. The equilibrium model works well when the equilibration time is short compared to the rise time or duration of the EMP. However, at high altitude, the conduction electron equilibration time can be comparable to or longer than the rise time or duration of the EMP. This matters, for example, when calculating the EMP propagating upward toward a satellite. In these scenarios, the equilibrium ionization rate becomes very large for even a modest electric field. The ohmic model produces an unphysically large number of conduction electrons that prematurely and abruptly short the EMP in the simulation code. An electron swarm model, which simulates the time evolution of conduction electrons, can be used to overcome the limitations exhibited by the equilibrium ohmic model. We have developed and validated an electron swarm model in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure previously in Pusateri et al. (2015). This swarm model has been integrated into CHAP-LA, a state-of-the-art EMP code developed by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which previously calculated conduction current using an ohmic model. We demonstrate the EMP damping behavior caused by the ohmic model at high altitudes and show improvements on high altitude EMP modeling obtained by employing the swarm model.

  14. Waste Generator Instructions: Key to Successful Implementation of the US DOE's 435.1 for Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions (LA-UR-12-24155) - 13218

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Hayes, Timothy A.; Pope, Howard L.; Enriquez, Alejandro E.; Carson, Peter H.

    2013-07-01

    In times of continuing fiscal constraints, a management and operation tool that is straightforward to implement, works as advertised, and virtually ensures compliant waste packaging should be carefully considered and employed wherever practicable. In the near future, the Department of Energy (DOE) will issue the first major update to DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This update will contain a requirement for sites that do not have a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste certification program to use two newly developed technical standards: Contact-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions and Remote-Handled Defense Transuranic Waste Packaging Instructions. The technical standards are being developed from the DOE O 435.1 Notice, Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging, approved August 2011. The packaging instructions will provide detailed information and instruction for packaging almost every conceivable type of transuranic (TRU) waste for disposal at WIPP. While providing specificity, the packaging instructions leave to each site's own discretion the actual mechanics of how those Instructions will be functionally implemented at the floor level. While the Technical Standards are designed to provide precise information for compliant packaging, the density of the information in the packaging instructions necessitates a type of Rosetta Stone that translates the requirements into concise, clear, easy to use and operationally practical recipes that are waste stream and facility specific for use by both first line management and hands-on operations personnel. The Waste Generator Instructions provide the operator with step-by-step instructions that will integrate the sites' various operational requirements (e.g., health and safety limits, radiological limits or dose limits) and result in a WIPP certifiable waste and package that can be transported to and emplaced at WIPP. These little known but widely productive Waste Generator Instructions (WGIs) have been used occasionally in the past at large sites for treatment and packaging of TRU waste. The WGIs have resulted in highly efficient waste treatment, packaging and certification for disposal of TRU waste at WIPP. For example, a single WGI at LANL, combined with an increase in gram loading, resulted in a mind boggling 6,400% increase in waste loading for {sup 238}Pu heat source waste. In fact, the WGI combined with a new Contact Handled (CH) TRU Waste Content (TRUCON) Code provided a massive increase in shippable wattage per Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) over the previously used and more restrictive TRUCON Code that have been used previously for the heat source waste. In fact, the use of the WGI process at LANL's TA-55 facility reduced non-compliant drums for WIPP certification and disposal from a 13% failure rate down to a 0.5% failure rate and is expected to further reduce the failure rate to zero drums per year. The inherent value of the WGI is that it can be implemented in a site's current procedure issuance process and it provides documented proof of what actions were taken for each waste stream packaged. The WGI protocol provides a key floor-level operational component to achieve goal alignment between actual site operations, the WIPP TRU waste packaging instructions, and DOE O 435.1. (authors)

  15. Plasma osmolality, urine composition and tissue water content of the toad Bufo viridis Laur. in nature and under controlled laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Katz, U; Pagi, D; Hayat, S; Degani, G

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of plasma and urine were studied in toads (Bufo viridis) which were collected from three locations in Israel, and compared with toads which were kept under constant laboratory conditions for nearly 2 years. Plasma osmolality was rather constant (over 310 mOsm kg-1 H2O) during the whole year in the active toads. Urea was the most variable osmolyte in the plasma, and accounted for the higher osmolality in southern population. Urine osmolality fluctuated in a circannual fashion both in freshly captured and in the toads under constant laboratory conditions. Water content of the tissues was constant throughout the year, independent of the plasma osmolality. It is concluded that high plasma urea concentration and the excretory system (kidneys and the urinary bladder) are important in sustaining constant plasma osmolality in active toads. Both mechanisms change annually and form the basis for the high terrestriality of this species. PMID:2879673

  16. Effectiveness of Program Visualization: A Case Study with the ViLLE Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Teemu; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi; Kaila, Erkki; Salakoski, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Program visualization is one of the various methods developed over the years to aid novices with their difficulties in learning to program. It consists of different graphical--often animated--and textual objects, visualizing the execution of programs. The aim of program visualization is to enhance students' understanding of different areas of…

  17. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  18. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (lle105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.F.; Du, H.; Chen, J.G.; Lu, H.C.; Guo, W.C.; Meng, H.; Zhang, T.B.; Zhang, X.J.; Lu, D.R.; Golka, K.; Shen, J.H.

    2006-12-15

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 (5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P < 0.0001). No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P < 0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P < 0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant genotypes (30.6 vs. 52.7%, OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84, P=0.015) as well as of mutant allele G1578 (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88, P=0.017) than their Han neighbours. Conclusions Genetic predisposition influences dermal arsenism toxicity. The GSTP1 A1578G (IIe105Val) status might be a susceptibility factor for arsenic-related skin lesions.

  19. A Pilot Study Using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a Clinical Care Tool to Identify Lower Extremity Lymphedema in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Raviv, Leigh; Appollo, Kathleen; Baser, Raymond E.; Iasonos, Alexia; Barakat, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a symptom scale for lymphedema of the lower extremity (LLE). Methods Twenty-eight gynecologic cancer survivors with documented LLE and 30 without a history or presence of lymphedema completed the GCLQ and provided feedback about their satisfaction with and feasibility of using the GCLQ at their oncology follow-ups. The study survey took approximately 5–10 minutes to complete, and it was easily understood by the majority of the sample. Results Participants had a mean age of 59.6 years (range, 28–80 years). Twenty-eight women (48%) had LLE and 30 (52%) had no history or presence of LLE (confirmed by limb volume [LV] measurements at assessment). Type of cancer history included: endometrial, 38 (66%); cervical, 13 (22%); and vulvar, 7 (12%). GCLQ scores differed significantly by lymphedema diagnosis; LLE patients had higher scores (P<0.01). The large area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–1.000) suggests that the GCLQ can distinguish between patients with and without LLE. Although all 28 (100%) of the LLE patients were aware of their LLE diagnosis, only 23 (82%) underwent treatment. The GCLQ was easily understood by most (55/58, 95%); and overall, patients showed a high willingness (56/58, 96%) to complete the questionnaire at future appointments. Twenty-five (88%) of the LLE patients found the GCLQ to be helpful in identifying symptoms of lymphedema. Conclusions The GCLQ effectively distinguished between gynecologic cancer survivors with and those without LLE, with good sensitivity and specificity. The patients, particularly those with LLE, showed high confidence in the GCLQ’s ability to detect LLE symptoms. PMID:20163847

  20. The Myth of My Widow: A Dramatistic Analysis of News Portrayals of a Terrorist Victim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lule, Jack

    Dramatistic analysis suggests that the "New York Times" portrayals of the 1985 terrorist killing of Leon Klinghoffer, the 69 year old American tourist on the Achille Laurs, may contain a mythic dimension. Through the myth of the hero, the news stories invoked the symbol of the self, inviting intense identification of the individual reader with the…

  1. EVALUATION OF OPTICALLY ACQUIRED ZOOPLANKTON SIZE-SPECTRUM DATA AS A POTENTIAL TOOL FOR ASSESSMENT OF CONDITION IN THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optical zooplankton counter (OPC) potentially provides as assessment tool for zooplankton condition in ecosystems that is rapid, economical, and spatially extensive. We collected zooplankton data with an optical zooplankton counter in 20 near-shore regions of four of the Laure...

  2. Patriot Script 1.0.13 User Guide for PEM 1.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Timothy James; Kubicek, Deborah Ann; Stroud, Phillip David; Cuellar-Hengartner, Leticia; Mathis, Mark

    2015-11-02

    This document provides an updated user guide for Patriot Script Version 1.0.13, for release with PEM 1.3.1 (LAUR-1422817) that adds description and instructions for the new excursion capability (see section 4.5.1).

  3. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.; Tovesson, Fredrik K.; Sierk, Arnold John

    2014-02-06

    The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents the progress made against the goals agreed to as part of the 2013 review.

  4. Is the Standard Monte Carlo Power Iteration Approach the Wrong Approach? Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Thomas E.

    2012-07-11

    The recent work 'Is the Standard Monte Carlo Power Iteration Approach the Wrong Approach?' speculated that the second eigenfunction could be built using essentially the same 'building brick' approach that obtained the first eigenfunction in LA-UR-12-21928. This note shows that the speculation was at least partially correct, but not complete.

  5. EOS Interpolation and Thermodynamic Consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Gammel, J. Tinka

    2015-11-16

    As discussed in LA-UR-08-05451, the current interpolator used by Grizzly, OpenSesame, EOSPAC, and similar routines is the rational function interpolator from Kerley. While the rational function interpolator is well-suited for interpolation on sparse grids with logarithmic spacing and it preserves monotonicity in 1-d, it has some known problems.

  6. Becoming an L2 Learner (Again): How a Brief Language Learning Experience Sparked Connections with SLA Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Ross

    2015-01-01

    A brief "language learning experience" (LLE) in Thai was integrated into a second language development course as part of postgraduate TESOL study at an Australian university. Sixty primary and secondary teachers from a range of schools evaluated the impact of the LLE by means of a questionnaire; the teachers proved highly affirming of…

  7. The Relations between the Mental Condition of the Care House Residents and Finger Plethysmograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohashi, Yoko; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Lee, Sangjae

    2011-06-01

    We measured the fingertip pulse waves of some of the elderly living in a care house (a welfare facility for the elderly) four times a day over two days to investigate their mental condition. We analyzed the chaotic information produced by the finger pulse waves using a nonlinear analysis method. The results of our research are as follows: 1) The Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE), which synchronizes to mental revitalization, rose when the care house residents felt happy. 2) After moderate movement (a stroll, etc.), the LLE was high. 3) The LLE did not rise when a regular action was carried out non-vigorously to kill time. 4) When residents made contact (a phone call or letter, etc.) with a family member, the LLE was high. 5) The LLE of long-term residents was high. 6) The majority of residents with high LLE moved into the care house in their early seventies. 7) The LLE of short-term residents was low and their sympathetic nerves were high. 8) There was no relativity between the LLE and present age of the care house residents. On this basis, the authors propose that fuller support of care house residents is crucial for the objective ascertainment of their mental condition.

  8. Narrative Skill and Syntactic Complexity in School-Age Children with and without Late Language Emergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domsch, Celeste; Richels, Corrin; Saldana, Michelle; Coleman, Cardin; Wimberly, Clayton; Maxwell, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children who do not produce single words by the expected age have been described as "late talkers" or as demonstrating "late language emergence" (LLE). Although their short-term growth in vocabulary is often strong, longer-term consequences of LLE remain in dispute. It has been argued that the majority of school-age children who had…

  9. High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Waxer, L.J.; Maywar, D.N.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-07-25

    The 60-beam Omega laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has been a workhorse on the frontier of laser fusion and high-energy-density physics for more than a decade. LLE scientists are currently extending the performance of this unique, direct-drive laser system by adding high-energy petawatt capabilities.

  10. Principles of Stagewise Separation Process Calculations: A Simple Algebraic Approach Using Solvent Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crittenden, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    A simple liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) system involving a constant partition coefficient based on solute ratios is used to develop an algebraic understanding of multistage contacting in a first-year separation processes course. This algebraic approach to the LLE system is shown to be operable for the introduction of graphical techniques…

  11. Computing Liquid-Liquid Phase Equilibria: An Exercise for Understanding the Nature of False Solutions and How to Avoid Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaya, Maria del Mar; Ibarra, Isabel; Reyes-Labarta, Juan A.; Serrano, Maria Dolores; Marcilla, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    An exercise to compute LLE data is presented to illustrate the problems that can arise when the isoactivity equilibrium condition is used in the LLE calculations. A much more efficient condition is obtained when isoactivity is combined with the common tangent line criterion, avoiding false solutions that correspond with very low values of the…

  12. Light Lithophile Elements in Natural and Experimental Phases in Martian Basalts: Implications for the Degassing of Water from Martian Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, C. D. K.; Treiman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Lentz et al. argued that zoning trends in light lithophile elements (LLE) in pyroxene in Shergotty and Zagami are evidence for the degassing of magmatic water. We tested this inference by obtaining: additional LLE analyses of Shergotty and Zagami pyroxene; analyses of Pasamonte pyroxene; and silicate and phosphate partition coefficients for B and Li for martian magma and mineral compositions.

  13. Estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent and noise level from chaotic time series.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2012-09-01

    A novel method for estimating simultaneously the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and noise level (NL) from a noisy chaotic time series is presented in this paper. We research the influence of noise on the average distance of different pairs of points in an embedding phase space and provide a rescaled formula for calculating the LLE when the time series is contaminated with noise. Our algorithm is proposed based on this formula and the invariant of the LLE in different dimensional embedding phase spaces. With numerical simulation, we find that the proposed method provides a reasonable estimate of the LLE and NL when the NL is less than 10% of the signal content. The comparison with Kantz algorithm shows that our method gives more accurate results of the LLE for the noisy time series. Furthermore, our method is not sensitive to the distribution of the noise. PMID:23020441

  14. REDUCING THE DIMENSIONALITY OF DATA: LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING OF SLOAN GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderplas, Jake; Connolly, Andrew

    2009-11-15

    We introduce locally linear embedding (LLE) to the astronomical community as a new classification technique, using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra as an example data set. LLE is a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique that has been studied in the context of computer perception. We compare the performance of LLE to well-known spectral classification techniques, e.g., principal component analysis and line-ratio diagnostics. We find that LLE combines the strengths of both methods in a single, coherent technique, and leads to improved classification of emission-line spectra at a relatively small computational cost. We also present a data subsampling technique that preserves local information content, and proves effective for creating small, efficient training samples from large, high-dimensional data sets. Software used in this LLE-based classification is made available.

  15. GPS and Relative Sea-level Constraints on Glacial Isostatic Adjustment in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, T. S.; Simon, K.; Henton, J. A.; Craymer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new GIA models have been developed for the Innuitian Ice Sheet and for the north-central portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (Simon, 2014; Simon et al., 2015). This new combined model, herein called Innu-Laur15, was developed from the ICE-5G model and load adjustments were made to improve the fit to relative sea-level observations and to GPS-constrained vertical crustal motion in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and around Hudson Bay. Here, the predictions of Innu-Laur15 are compared to observations and other GIA models over an extended region comprising much of North America east of the Rocky Mountains. GIA predictions are made using compressible Maxwell Earth models with gravitationally self-consistent ocean loading, changing coastlines, and ocean-water inundation where marine ice retreats or floats. For this study, GPS time series are the NA12 solution (Blewitt et al., 2013) downloaded from http://geodesy.unr.edu/NGLStationPages/GlobalStationList and fit with a linear trend, annual and semi-annual terms, and offsets as indicated by station logs and by inspection of the time series. For example, a comparison of GPS observations of vertical crustal motion from the NA12 solution at 360 sites gives root-mean-square (RMS) residuals of 3.2 mm/yr (null hypothesis), 1.8 mm/yr (Innu-Laur15), and 2.9 mm/yr (ICE-5G) for the VM5a Earth model. Preliminary comparisons with other Earth models give similar patterns where Innu-Laur15 provides a better fit than ICE-5G. Further adjustments to the Innu-Laur15 ice sheet history could improve the fit to GPS rates in other regions of North America.

  16. Partitioning of light lithophile elements during basalt eruptions on Earth and application to Martian shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Marie

    2015-02-01

    An enigmatic record of light lithophile element (LLE) zoning in pyroxenes in basaltic shergottite meteorites, whereby LLE concentrations decrease dramatically from the cores to the rims, has been interpreted as being due to partitioning of LLE into a hydrous vapor during magma ascent to the surface on Mars. These trends are used as evidence that Martian basaltic melts are water-rich (McSween et al., 2001). Lithium and boron are light lithophile elements (LLE) that partition into volcanic minerals and into vapor from silicate melts, making them potential tracers of degassing processes during magma ascent to the surface of Earth and of other planets. While LLE degassing behavior is relatively well understood for silica-rich melts, where water and LLE concentrations are relatively high, very little data exists for LLE abundance, heterogeneity and degassing in basaltic melts. The lack of data hampers interpretation of the trends in the shergottite meteorites. Through a geochemical study of LLE, volatile and trace elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, it can be demonstrated that lithium behaves similarly to the light to middle rare Earth elements during melting, magma mixing and fractionation. Considerable heterogeneity in lithium and boron is inherited from mantle-derived primary melts, which is dominant over the fractionation and degassing signal. Lithium and boron are only very weakly volatile in basaltic melt erupted from Kilauea Volcano, with vapor-melt partition coefficients <0.1. Degassing of LLE is further inhibited at high temperatures. Pyroxene and associated melt inclusion LLE concentrations from a range of volcanoes are used to quantify lithium pyroxene-melt partition coefficients, which correlate negatively with melt H2O content, ranging from 0.13 at low water contents to <0.08 at H2O contents >4 wt%. The observed terrestrial LLE partitioning behavior is extrapolated to Martian primitive melts through modeling. The zoning

  17. Monte Carlo modelling of the low-loss electron signal in scanning electron microscopy and comparison with the BSE signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonet, C.; El-Gomati, M. M.; Matthew, J. A. D.; Tear, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Nanotechnology places increasing demands on techniques for sample characterisation on the sub-100 nm length scale, and the low-loss electron (LLE) signal may provide one possible way of addressing this need. Simulations of the LLE signal from a line-scan across a semiconductor superlattice structure have been performed using two different Monte Carlo models in order to assess their effectiveness in predicting spatial resolution for compositional imaging. Additionally, experimental measurements of LLE data using a detector added to a scanning electron microscope were made to investigate compositional contrast.

  18. Event-shape of dileptons plus missing energy at a linear collider as a supersymmetry/Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali discriminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Probir

    2007-11-01

    An event-shape analysis of the dileptons in the process e+e- → l+l-E, studied in ILC or CLIC, can clearly discriminate between a supersymmetric or a large extra dimensional (ADD) production mechanism.

  19. [Diverse sustainability--sustainable diversity].

    PubMed

    Schmeling-Kludas, Christoph; Koch-Gromus, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    In spite of its plenitude, the scientific works of the important German psychologist Ernst August Dölle (1898-1972) are little adapted till today, mostly they are being reduced to his studies about dichotomy and duplicity. But based on his diaries of the year 1968, the authors can verify without doubt, that Dölle far ahead of his time, carried on research about sustainability and diversity. He was the first scientist worldwide to connect these two concepts. PMID:21837611

  20. Evaluation of Risk for Late Language Emergence after In Utero Antiretroviral Drug Exposure in HIV-exposed Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mabel L.; Zeldow, Bret; Siberry, George K.; Purswani, Murli; Malee, Kathleen; Hoffman, Howard J.; Frederick, Toni; Buchanan, Ashley; Sirois, Patricia A.; Allison, Susannah M.; Williams, Paige L

    2013-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral (cARV) regimens are recommended for pregnant women with HIV to prevent perinatal HIV transmission. Safety is a concern for infants who were HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU), particularly for neurodevelopmental problems, such as language delays. Methods We studied late language emergence (LLE) in HEU children enrolled in a US-based prospective cohort study. LLE was defined as a caregiver-reported score ≤ 10th percentile in any of 4 domains of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory for one-year-olds and as ≥1 standard deviation below age-specific norms for the Ages and Stages Questionnaire for two-year-olds. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations of in utero cARV exposure with LLE, adjusting for infant, maternal, and environmental characteristics. Results 1,129 language assessments were conducted among 792 one- and two-year-olds (50% male, 62% black, and 37% Hispanic). Overall, 86% had in utero exposure to cARV and 83% to protease inhibitors. LLE was identified in 26% of one-year-olds and 23% of two-year-olds, with higher rates among boys. In adjusted models, LLE was not associated with maternal cARV or ARV drug classes in either age group. Among cARV-exposed one-year-olds, increased odds of LLE was observed for those exposed to atazanavir (aOR=1.83, 95% CI=1.10-3.04), particularly after the first trimester (aOR=3.56, p=0.001), compared to atazanavir-unexposed infants. No associations of individual ARV drugs with LLE were observed among two-year-olds. Conclusions In utero cARV exposure showed little association with LLE, except for a higher risk of language delay observed in one-year-old infants with atazanavir exposure. PMID:24067563

  1. Thiolene and SIFEL-based Microfluidic Platforms for Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sachit; Desai, Amit V.; Lewis, Robert W.; Ranganathan, David R.; Li, Hairong; Zeng, Dexing; Reichert, David E.; Kenis, Paul J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms provide several advantages for liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) processes over conventional methods, for example with respect to lower consumption of solvents and enhanced extraction efficiencies due to the inherent shorter diffusional distances. Here, we report the development of polymer-based parallel-flow microfluidic platforms for LLE. To date, parallel-flow microfluidic platforms have predominantly been made out of silicon or glass due to their compatibility with most organic solvents used for LLE. Fabrication of silicon and glass-based LLE platforms typically requires extensive use of photolithography, plasma or laser-based etching, high temperature (anodic) bonding, and/or wet etching with KOH or HF solutions. In contrast, polymeric microfluidic platforms can be fabricated using less involved processes, typically photolithography in combination with replica molding, hot embossing, and/or bonding at much lower temperatures. Here we report the fabrication and testing of microfluidic LLE platforms comprised of thiolene or a perfluoropolyether-based material, SIFEL, where the choice of materials was mainly guided by the need for solvent compatibility and fabrication amenability. Suitable designs for polymer-based LLE platforms that maximize extraction efficiencies within the constraints of the fabrication methods and feasible operational conditions were obtained using analytical modeling. To optimize the performance of the polymer-based LLE platforms, we systematically studied the effect of surface functionalization and of microstructures on the stability of the liquid-liquid interface and on the ability to separate the phases. As demonstrative examples, we report (i) a thiolene-based platform to determine the lipophilicity of caffeine, and (ii) a SIFEL-based platform to extract radioactive copper from an acidic aqueous solution. PMID:25246730

  2. Thiolene and SIFEL-based Microfluidic Platforms for Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sachit; Desai, Amit V; Lewis, Robert W; Ranganathan, David R; Li, Hairong; Zeng, Dexing; Reichert, David E; Kenis, Paul J A

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms provide several advantages for liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) processes over conventional methods, for example with respect to lower consumption of solvents and enhanced extraction efficiencies due to the inherent shorter diffusional distances. Here, we report the development of polymer-based parallel-flow microfluidic platforms for LLE. To date, parallel-flow microfluidic platforms have predominantly been made out of silicon or glass due to their compatibility with most organic solvents used for LLE. Fabrication of silicon and glass-based LLE platforms typically requires extensive use of photolithography, plasma or laser-based etching, high temperature (anodic) bonding, and/or wet etching with KOH or HF solutions. In contrast, polymeric microfluidic platforms can be fabricated using less involved processes, typically photolithography in combination with replica molding, hot embossing, and/or bonding at much lower temperatures. Here we report the fabrication and testing of microfluidic LLE platforms comprised of thiolene or a perfluoropolyether-based material, SIFEL, where the choice of materials was mainly guided by the need for solvent compatibility and fabrication amenability. Suitable designs for polymer-based LLE platforms that maximize extraction efficiencies within the constraints of the fabrication methods and feasible operational conditions were obtained using analytical modeling. To optimize the performance of the polymer-based LLE platforms, we systematically studied the effect of surface functionalization and of microstructures on the stability of the liquid-liquid interface and on the ability to separate the phases. As demonstrative examples, we report (i) a thiolene-based platform to determine the lipophilicity of caffeine, and (ii) a SIFEL-based platform to extract radioactive copper from an acidic aqueous solution. PMID:25246730

  3. Preventive effects of lignan extract from flax hulls on experimentally induced benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Simons, Rudy; Verbruggen, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of diet rich in lignans may decrease the risk of some chronic hormonal conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigated whether a lignan-rich extract from flaxseed hulls, LinumLife EXTRA (LLE), could prevent BPH using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats each: a negative control group fed with control diet and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of corn oil without TP, and three groups fed with control diet (positive control), diet containing 0.5% LLE (LLE 0.5) or 1.0% LLE (LLE 1.0) and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of TP in corn oil. Treatments with diets started 2 weeks before the induction of BPH and were carried out for 5 consecutive weeks. The influence of TP and LLE on body weight (BW), food and water consumptions, and enterolactone (ENL) levels in serum and urine of rats was examined at the end of the 5-week treatment period. TP significantly diminished the mean body weight gain (MBWG) of positive control rats and their food and water consumptions while LLE reduced significantly this MBWG reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The lignan-rich extract significantly inhibited TP-induced prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat BW) increase in comparison with positive controls (P<.001). This effect was dose dependent. Higher serum and urine levels of ENL correlated well with the dose of extract provided to rats. It was concluded that the lignan-rich flaxseed hull extract prevented the TP-induced BPH indicating it might be beneficial in the prevention of BPH. PMID:24460407

  4. 1999 Summer Research Program for High School Juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    2002-10-09

    oak-B202--During the summer of 1999, 12 students from Rochester-area high schools participated in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' Summer High School Research Program. The goal of this program is to excite a group of high school students about careers in the areas of science and technology by exposing them to research in a state-of-the-art environment. Too often, students are exposed to ''research'' only through classroom laboratories that have prescribed procedures and predictable results. In LLE's summer program, the students experience all of the trials, tribulations, and rewards of scientific research. By participating in research in a real environment, the students often become more enthusiastic about careers in science and technology. In addition, LLE gains from the contributions of the many highly talented students who are attracted to the program. The students spent most of their time working on their individual research projects with members of LLE's technical staff. The projects were related to current research activities at LLE and covered a broad range of areas of interest including laser modeling, diagnostic development, chemistry, liquid crystal devices, and opacity data visualization. The students, their high schools, their LLE supervisors and their project titles are listed in the table. Their written reports are collected in this volume. The students attended weekly seminars on technical topics associated with LLE's research. Topics this year included lasers, fusion, holography, optical materials, global warming, measurement errors, and scientific ethics. The students also received safety training, learned how to give scientific presentations, and were introduced to LLE's resources, especially the computational facilities. The program culminated with the High School Student Summer Research Symposium on 25 August at which the students presented the results of their research to an audience that included parents, teachers, and members of LIX. Each

  5. Liquid-Liquid Extraction and Solid Phase Extraction for Urinary Organic Acids: A Comparative Study from a Resource Constraint Setting.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Chandrawati; Varughese, Bijo; Ramji, Siddarth; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-10-01

    Pre analytical process of extraction for accurate detection of organic acids is a crucial step in diagnosis of organic acidemias by GCMS analysis. This process is accomplished either by solid phase extraction (SPE) or by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Both extraction procedures are used in different metabolic laboratories all over the world. In this study we compared these two extraction procedures in respect of precision, accuracy, percent recovery of metabolites, number of metabolites isolated, time and cost in a resource constraint setup. We observed that the mean recovery from SPE was 84.1 % and by LLE it was 77.4 % (p value <0.05). Moreover, the average number of metabolites isolated by SPE and LLE was 161.8 ± 18.6 and 140.1 ± 20.4 respectively. The processing cost of LLE was economical. In a cost constraint setting using LLE may be the practical option if used for organic acid analysis. PMID:27605738

  6. Spectral optimization of color temperature tunable white LEDs with excellent color rendering and luminous efficacy.

    PubMed

    He, Guoxing; Tang, Ju

    2014-10-01

    The optimization model of limited luminous efficacy (LLE) for correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable phosphor-coated white light-emitting diodes (pc-W LEDs) consisting of blue chips, green and yellow phosphors, and red chips, including downconversion energy loss, has been developed under the constraint of a designated color-rendering index (CRI) and a special CRI of R9 for strong red. The optimal spectra of pc-W LEDs are obtained with a nonlinear program for maximizing LLE under conditions of both CRI and R9 above 90, 95, and 98 at CCTs of 2700-6500 K. The pc-W LEDs with LLE>301  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 90, LLE>290  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 95, and LLE>276  lm/W for both CRI and R9 above 98 could be achieved at CCTs of 2700-6500 K. The recommended peak wavelengths and full widths at half-maximum (FWHMs) for the current LEDs and phosphors and their photometric and colorimetric performances are presented. PMID:25360930

  7. A Study of Care Work in Welfare Facilities for the Elderly, Using Non Linear Analysis of Finger Plethysmograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohashi, Yoko; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Lee, Sangjae

    2011-06-01

    The fingertip pulse waves of a number of staff working in a daycare center for the elderly and a special nursing home for the elderly were measured several times throughout the day for a period of one or two days, and the chaotic information gained was analyzed using a non linear analysis method. As a result, a relation between the staff's length of career and the change of Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) of the fingertip pulse waves that synchronized with the mental revitalization degrees and the tension of the sympathetic nerve was evident. The LLE of the staff with short careers dramatically changed and also took a long time to settle down again. In addition, staff LLE changed greatly after sessions of bathing assistance and watching residents with dementia. LLE measurements showed drops in some staff after a period of rest, but this was not the case for other staff. It can be concluded that the LLE is related to the length of the staff member's career and what is actually done during working hours and rest periods. A high level of sympathetic nerve was seen in almost all of the care workers. On this basis, the authors propose that improvements are needed in the content of the care work.

  8. Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: IV. Optimisation of sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Kjell; Jalava, Kaisa; Lock, Eric; Huizer, Henk; Kaa, Elisabet; Lopes, Alvaro; Poortman-van der Meer, Anneke; Cole, Michael D; Dahlén, Johan; Sippola, Erkki

    2007-06-14

    The suitability of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) for the preparation of impurity extracts intended for gas chromatographic profiling analyses of amphetamine were evaluated. Both techniques were optimised with respect to the extraction of selected target compounds by use of full factorial designs in which the variables affecting the performance were evaluated. Test samples consisted of amphetamine synthesised by the Leuckart reaction, by reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone and by the nitrostyrene route. The performance of LLE and SPE were comparable in terms of repeatability and recovery of the target compounds. LLE was considered the better choice for the present harmonised amphetamine profiling method due to the lack of information on the long-term stability of SPE columns. PMID:17134863

  9. Miniaturized preconcentration methods based on liquid-liquid extraction and their application in inorganic ultratrace analysis and speciation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) is widely used as a pre-treatment technique for separation and preconcentration of both organic and inorganic analytes from aqueous samples. Nevertheless, it has several drawbacks, such as emulsion formation or the use of large volumes of solvents, which makes LLE expensive and labour intensive. Therefore, miniaturization of conventional liquid-liquid extraction is needed. The search for alternatives to the conventional LLE using negligible volumes of extractant and the minimum number of steps has driven the development of three new miniaturized methodologies, i.e. single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of these novel preconcentration approaches and their potential use in analytical labs involved in inorganic (ultra)trace analysis and speciation. Relevant applications to the determination of metal ions, metalloids, organometals and non-metals are included.

  10. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  11. A simple liquid extraction protocol for overcoming the ion suppression of triacylglycerols by phospholipids in liquid chromatography mass spectrometry studies.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Pedro; Tilahun, Ephrem; Breivik, Joar Fjørtoft; Abdulkader, Bashir M; Frøyland, Livar; Zeng, Yingxu

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that triacylglycerol (TAG) ions are suppressed by phospholipid (PL) ions in regiospecific analysis of TAG by mass spectrometry (MS). Hence, it is essential to remove the PL during sample preparation prior to MS analysis. The present article proposes a cost-effective liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method to remove PL from TAG in different kinds of biological samples by using methanol, hexane and water. High performance thin layer chromatography confirmed the lack of PL in krill oil and salmon liver samples, submitted to the proposed LLE protocol, and liquid chromatography tandem MS confirmed that the identified TAG ions were highly enhanced after implementing the LLE procedure. PMID:26653473

  12. Locally linear embedding: dimension reduction of massive protostellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of the application of locally linear embedding (LLE) to reduce the dimensionality of dereddened and continuum subtracted near-infrared spectra using a combination of models and real spectra of massive protostars selected from the Red MSX Source survey data base. A brief comparison is also made with two other dimension reduction techniques; principal component analysis (PCA) and Isomap using the same set of spectra as well as a more advanced form of LLE, Hessian locally linear embedding. We find that whilst LLE certainly has its limitations, it significantly outperforms both PCA and Isomap in classification of spectra based on the presence/absence of emission lines and provides a valuable tool for classification and analysis of large spectral data sets.

  13. The Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual OMEGA users, and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback from the users to LLE management about ways to improve and keep the facility and future experimental campaigns at the cutting edge.

  14. Discovery of novel 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives as γ-secretase modulators (Part 2).

    PubMed

    Takai, Takafumi; Koike, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Minoru; Kajita, Yuichi; Yamashita, Toshiro; Taya, Naohiro; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Tomomichi; Murakami, Koji; Igari, Tomoko; Kamata, Makoto

    2016-07-15

    γ-Secretase modulators (GSMs), which lower pathogenic amyloid beta (Aβ) without affecting the production of total Aβ or Notch signal, have emerged as a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD). A novel series of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives was discovered and characterized as GSMs. Optimization of substituents at the 8-position of the core scaffold using ligand-lipophilicity efficiency (LLE) as a drug-likeness guideline led to identification of various types of high-LLE GSMs. Phenoxy compound (R)-17 exhibited especially high LLE as well as potent in vivo Aβ42-lowering effect by single administration. Furthermore, multiple oral administration of (R)-17 significantly reduced soluble and insoluble brain Aβ42, and ameliorated cognitive deficit in novel object recognition test (NORT) using Tg2576 mice as an AD model. PMID:27255179

  15. Comparison of two extraction methods for evaluation of volatile constituents patterns in commercial whiskeys Elucidation of the main odour-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, M; Rodrigues, F; Perestrelo, R; Marques, J C; Câmara, J S

    2007-11-15

    An analytical procedure based on manual dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method and the conventional extraction method by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), were compared for their effectiveness in the extraction and quantification of volatile compounds from commercial whiskey samples. Seven extraction solvents covering a wide range of polarities and two SPME fibres coatings, has been evaluated. The highest amounts extracted, were achieved using dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) by LLE method (LLE(CH2Cl2)) and using a CAR/PDMS fibre (SPME(CAR/PDMS)) in HS-SPME. Each method was used to determine the responses of 25 analytes from whiskeys and calibration standards, in order to provide sensitivity comparisons between the two methods. Calibration curves were established in a synthetic whiskey and linear correlation coefficient (r) were greater than 0.9929 for LLE(CH2Cl2) and 0.9935 for SPME(CAR/PDMS), for all target compounds. Recoveries greater than 80% were achieved. For most compounds, precision (expressed by relative standard deviation, R.S.D.) are very good, with R.S.D. values lower than 14.78% for HS-SPME method and than 19.42% for LLE method. The detection limits ranged from 0.13 to 19.03 microg L(-1) for SPME procedure and from 0.50 to 12.48 microg L(-1) for LLE. A tentative study to estimate the contribution of a specific compound to the aroma of a whiskey, on the basis of their odour activity values (OAV) was made. Ethyl octanoate followed by isoamyl acetate and isobutyl alcohol, were found the most potent odour-active compounds. PMID:18371616

  16. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  17. A Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Model for the Central and Northern Laurentide Ice Sheet based on Relative Sea-level and GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The thickness and equivalent global sea-level contribution of an improved model of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet is constrained by 24 relative sea-level histories and 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates. The final model, termed Laur16, is derived from the ICE-5 G model by holding the timing history constant and iteratively adjusting the thickness history, in four regions of northern Canada. In the final model, the last glacial maximum (LGM) thickness of the Laurentide Ice Sheet west of Hudson Bay was ˜3.4-3.6 km. Conversely, east of Hudson Bay, peak ice thicknesses reached ˜4 km. The ice model thicknesses inferred for these two regions represent, respectively, a ˜30% decrease and an average ˜20-25% increase to the load thickness relative to the ICE-5 G reconstruction, which is generally consistent with other recent studies that have focussed on Laurentide Ice Sheet history. The final model also features peak ice thicknesses of 1.2-1.3 km in the Baffin Island region, a modest reduction relative to ICE-5 G, and unchanged thicknesses for a region in the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago west of Baffin Island. Vertical land motion predictions of the final model fit observed crustal uplift rates well, after an adjustment is made for the elastic crustal response to present-day ice mass changes of regional ice cover. The new Laur16 model provides more than a factor of two improvement of the fit to the RSL data (χ2 measure of misfit) and a factor of nine improvement to the fit of the GPS data (mean squared error measure of fit), compared to the ICE-5 G starting model. Laur16 also fits the regional RSL data better by a factor of two and gives a slightly better fit to GPS uplift rates than the recent ICE-6 G model. The volume history of the Laur16 reconstruction corresponds to an up to 8 m reduction in global sea-level equivalent compared to ICE-5 G at LGM.

  18. Preshot Predictions for Defect Induced Mix (DIME) Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Schmitt, Mark J.

    2012-07-31

    In this memo, we evaluate the most probable yield and other results for the Defect Induced Mix (DIME-12A) Polar Direct Drive (PDD) capsule-only shots. We evaluate the expected yield, bang time, burn averaged ion temperature, and the average electron temperature of the Ge line-emitting region. We also include synthetic images of the capsule backlit by Cu K-{alpha} emission (8.39 keV) and core self-emission synthetic images. This memo is a companion to the maximum credible yield memo (LA-UR-12-00287) published earlier.

  19. A glacial isostatic adjustment model for the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet based on relative sea level and GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    The thickness and equivalent global sea level contribution of an improved model of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet is constrained by 24 relative sea level histories and 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates. The final model, termed Laur16, is derived from the ICE-5G model by holding the timing history constant and iteratively adjusting the thickness history, in four regions of northern Canada. In the final model, the last glacial maximum (LGM) thickness of the Laurentide Ice Sheet west of Hudson Bay was ˜3.4-3.6 km. Conversely, east of Hudson Bay, peak ice thicknesses reached ˜4 km. The ice model thicknesses inferred for these two regions represent, respectively, a ˜30 per cent decrease and an average ˜20-25 per cent increase to the load thickness relative to the ICE-5G reconstruction, which is generally consistent with other recent studies that have focussed on Laurentide Ice Sheet history. The final model also features peak ice thicknesses of 1.2-1.3 km in the Baffin Island region, a modest reduction relative to ICE-5G and unchanged thicknesses for a region in the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago west of Baffin Island. Vertical land motion predictions of the final model fit observed crustal uplift rates well, after an adjustment is made for the elastic crustal response to present-day ice mass changes of regional ice cover. The new Laur16 model provides more than a factor of two improvement of the fit to the RSL data (χ2 measure of misfit) and a factor of nine improvement to the fit of the GPS data (mean squared error measure of fit), compared to the ICE-5G starting model. Laur16 also fits the regional RSL data better by a factor of two and gives a slightly better fit to GPS uplift rates than the recent ICE-6G model. The volume history of the Laur16 reconstruction corresponds to an up to 8 m reduction in global sea level equivalent compared to ICE-5G at LGM.

  20. Engineering test plan for Tank 241-SY-101 in situ viscometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.

    1994-11-01

    To obtain in situ measurements of the rheological properties within tank 241-SY-101, this document will implement the test strategy defined in PNLMIT-041994, acquisition and Reduction of Data Obtained in Tank SY-101 with the Ball Rheometer. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  1. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II to Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gray, George T.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2006-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a semi-crystalline polymer exhibiting complicated pressure and temperature dependent phases. High strain rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of PTFE and resulting changes in the polymer structure. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Gas launcher experiments were performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C momentum trapped assemblies with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. [LAUR-05-5945

  2. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems. (TEM)

  3. Prospective Changes in Infertile Patients using Nonlinear Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuko; Tomiyama, Tatsuhiro; Matsubayashi, Hidehiko; Tsukamoto, Asami; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    We measured pulse waves in 22 infertile women from the beginning of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) through to pregnancy testing. The largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and autonomic nerve balance in the pregnancy group were significantly lower than that in the non-pregnancy group. In this study, we measured plethysmograms of four women who became pregnant and 18 who did not, ten times from each. We calculated LLE and a value for the autonomic nerve balance; from this analysis, we conclude that a mental state that allows for the possibility of becoming pregnant is necessary for a successful pregnancy.

  4. Comparative evaluation of the efficiency of low-cost adsorbents and ligninolytic fungi to remove a combination of xenoestrogens and pesticides from a landfill leachate and abate its phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Castellana, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two widely available low-cost adsorbents, almond shells and a green compost, and two ligninolytic fungi, Pleurotus ostreatus and Stereum hirsutum, were used to remove organic contaminants from a landfill leachate (LLe) and abate its phytotoxicity. The methodology adopted was based on the occurrence of two simultaneous processes, such as adsorption and bioremoval. The leachate was artificially contaminated with a mixture of the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), ethynilestadiol (EE2) and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), the herbicide linuron and the insecticide dimethoate at concentrations of 10, 1, 1, 10 and 10 mg L(-1), respectively. Three adsorption substrates were prepared: potato dextrose agar alone or the same incorporating each adsorbent. The substrates were either not inoculated or inoculated with each fungus, separately, before to be superimposed on LLe. After 2 months, the residual amount of each contaminant, the electrical conductivity, the pH and the content of total phenols were measured in treated LLe. Germination assays using lettuce, ryegrass and radish were performed to evaluate LLe phytotoxicity. The combination substrate+P. ostreatus showed the best results with average removals of 88, 96, 99, 58 and 46% for BPA, EE2, NP, linuron and dimethoate, respectively. The same treatment considerably reduced the phenol content in LLe compared to no treatment. The combination substrate+S. hirsutum produced average removals of 39, 71, 100, 61 and 32% for BPA, EE2, NP, linuron and dimethoate, respectively. Also uninoculated substrates showed relevant adsorption capacities towards the five contaminants. Most treatments significantly reduced LLe phytotoxicity, especially on lettuce. The best results were obtained with the treatment compost+S. hirsutum, which produced root and shoot lengths and seedling biomass of lettuce, respectively, 2.3, 3.3, and 1.9 times those measured in untreated LLe. In general, germination results were negatively correlated with LLe

  5. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Lignin: Separation of Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneault, A.; Johnson, D. K.; Chornet, E.

    2007-12-01

    In our quest for fractionating lignocellulosic biomass and valorizing specific constitutive fractions, we have developed a strategy for the separation of 12 added value monomers generated during the hydrolytic based-catalyzed depolymerization of a Steam Exploded Aspen Lignin. The separation strategy combines liquid-liquid-extraction (LLE), followed by vacuum distillation, liquid chromatography (LC) and crystallization. LLE, vacuum distillation and flash LC were tested experimentally. Batch vacuum distillation produced up to 4 fractions. Process simulation confirmed that a series of 4 vacuum distillation columns could produce 5 distinct monomer streams, 3 of which require further chromatography and crystallization for purification.

  6. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%). PMID:26819671

  7. Advanced liquid and solid extraction procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizera, J.; Kučera, J.; Řanda, Z.; Lučaníková, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trioctyl-methyl-ammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented have been compared and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials.

  8. Determination of the Spatial Location of Coke in Catalysts by a Novel NMR Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinathan, Navin; Rigby, Sean; Greaves, Malcolm; Lowe, John; Wood, Joseph; Dong, Leilei

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a liquid-liquid exchange (LLE) process within nanoporous heterogeneous catalysts has been followed using NMR relaxometry. Under so-called `metered' supply conditions, when a high affinity liquid (water) displaced a low affinity liquid (cyclohexane) from a nanoporous sol-gel silica, entrapment of the low affinity liquid was observed which was similar to that observed in mercury porosimetry. In a similar experiment, comparing LLE in fresh and coked samples of bimodal Pt-alumina catalyst pellets, it was found that, while for the fresh sample water initially displaced cyclohexane from the smallest pores, as expected under metered conditions, this did not occur for coked catalysts.

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of inhibition activity of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) leaves against ultraviolet B-induced phototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Zhu, Ling; Liu, Song; Li, Dong; Chen, Yuxin; Ma, Bingxin; Wang, Youwei

    2013-04-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.), an aquatic vegetable, is extensively cultivated in eastern Asia, particularly in China. Our previous study showed that lotus leaf extracts (LLEs) have strong antioxidant effects in vitro and in vivo. The main antioxidants in lotus leaf have been identified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Ultraviolet B (UVB) protective effects have been associated with plant extracts rich in antioxidants. The current study focuses on the mitochondria model to evaluate the potent inhibition activity of LLE against UVB-induced phototoxicity. The level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glutathione, lipid hydroperoxide, conjugated diene, and 4-hydroxynonenal were measured. The in vivo activity of LLE was also investigated in mice model. The results showed that all concentrations of LLE (10, 100, and 1000μg/ml) possessed strong protective effect against UVB-induced phototoxicity in the mitochondria model. The in vivo test showed that LLE have significant protective effects on the level of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the contents of hydroxyproline and malondialdehyde in the skin samples. This study would provide a foundation for broadening the applications of lotus leaf in both the medical and food industries. PMID:23474526

  10. Late Language Emergence at 24 Months: An Epidemiological Study of Prevalence, Predictors, and Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrick, Stephen R.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Rice, Mabel L.; Slegers, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of late language emergence (LLE) and to investigate the predictive status of maternal, family, and child variables. Method: This is a prospective cohort study of 1,766 epidemiologically ascertained 24-month-old singleton children. The framework was an ecological model…

  11. Final Report: Development of X-ray tracer diagnostics for radiatively-driven ablator experiments, November 1, 1997 - October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Cohen, D.H.; Ping Wang, G.A.; Moses, R.R.; Peterson, P.A.; Jaanimagi; Landen, O.L.; Olson, R.E.; Murphy, T.J.; Magelssen, G.R.; Delamater, N.D.

    1999-06-01

    This is a combined experimental and theoretical analysis of tracer layers as spectral diagnostics for radiation burn-through of ablator materials. German-doped plastic is attached as a witness plate to a laser driven hohlraum. Backlit absorption spectroscopy is used as a diagnostic. Target shots were performed on the OMEGSA laser at UR/LLE.

  12. Simultaneous Promotion of Indigenisation and Internationalisation: New Language-in-Education Policy in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Su-Chiao

    2006-01-01

    The indigenisation and internationalisation of Taiwan emerged as issues of national concern as a result of the democratisation of politics in the late 1980s which profoundly changed the sociopolitical and economic climate. One manifestation of these changes was "new" language-in-education policies. These were the Local-Language-in-Education (LLE)…

  13. Late Language Emergence in 24-Month-Old Twins: Heritable and Increased Risk for Late Language Emergence in Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Gayán, Javier; Bontempo, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the etiology of late language emergence (LLE) in 24-month-old twins, considering possible twinning, zygosity, gender, and heritability effects for vocabulary and grammar phenotypes. Method: A population-based sample of 473 twin pairs participated. Multilevel modeling estimated means and variances of vocabulary and…

  14. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  15. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determine operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.

  16. Sparsity divergence index based on locally linear embedding for hyperspectral anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imagery (HSI) has high spectral and spatial resolutions, which are essential for anomaly detection (AD). Many anomaly detectors assume that the spectrum signature of HSI pixels can be modeled with a Gaussian distribution, which is actually not accurate and often leads to many false alarms. Therefore, a sparsity model without any distribution hypothesis is usually employed. Dimensionality reduction (DR) as a preprocessing step for HSI is important. Principal component analysis as a conventional DR method is a linear projection and cannot exploit the nonlinear properties in hyperspectral data, whereas locally linear embedding (LLE) as a local, nonlinear manifold learning algorithm works well for DR of HSI. A modified algorithm of sparsity divergence index based on locally linear embedding (SDI-LLE) is thus proposed. First, kernel collaborative representation detection is adopted to calculate the sparse dictionary matrix of local reconstruction weights in LLE. Then, SDI is obtained both in the spectral and spatial domains, where spatial SDI is computed after DR by LLE. Finally, joint SDI, combining spectral SDI and spatial SDI, is computed, and the optimal SDI is performed for AD. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm significantly improves the performance, when compared with its counterparts.

  17. Bearing Fault Diagnosis Based on Statistical Locally Linear Embedding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Zheng, Yuan; Zhao, Zhenzhou; Wang, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Fault diagnosis is essentially a kind of pattern recognition. The measured signal samples usually distribute on nonlinear low-dimensional manifolds embedded in the high-dimensional signal space, so how to implement feature extraction, dimensionality reduction and improve recognition performance is a crucial task. In this paper a novel machinery fault diagnosis approach based on a statistical locally linear embedding (S-LLE) algorithm which is an extension of LLE by exploiting the fault class label information is proposed. The fault diagnosis approach first extracts the intrinsic manifold features from the high-dimensional feature vectors which are obtained from vibration signals that feature extraction by time-domain, frequency-domain and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and then translates the complex mode space into a salient low-dimensional feature space by the manifold learning algorithm S-LLE, which outperforms other feature reduction methods such as PCA, LDA and LLE. Finally in the feature reduction space pattern classification and fault diagnosis by classifier are carried out easily and rapidly. Rolling bearing fault signals are used to validate the proposed fault diagnosis approach. The results indicate that the proposed approach obviously improves the classification performance of fault pattern recognition and outperforms the other traditional approaches. PMID:26153771

  18. Bearing Fault Diagnosis Based on Statistical Locally Linear Embedding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Zheng, Yuan; Zhao, Zhenzhou; Wang, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Fault diagnosis is essentially a kind of pattern recognition. The measured signal samples usually distribute on nonlinear low-dimensional manifolds embedded in the high-dimensional signal space, so how to implement feature extraction, dimensionality reduction and improve recognition performance is a crucial task. In this paper a novel machinery fault diagnosis approach based on a statistical locally linear embedding (S-LLE) algorithm which is an extension of LLE by exploiting the fault class label information is proposed. The fault diagnosis approach first extracts the intrinsic manifold features from the high-dimensional feature vectors which are obtained from vibration signals that feature extraction by time-domain, frequency-domain and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and then translates the complex mode space into a salient low-dimensional feature space by the manifold learning algorithm S-LLE, which outperforms other feature reduction methods such as PCA, LDA and LLE. Finally in the feature reduction space pattern classification and fault diagnosis by classifier are carried out easily and rapidly. Rolling bearing fault signals are used to validate the proposed fault diagnosis approach. The results indicate that the proposed approach obviously improves the classification performance of fault pattern recognition and outperforms the other traditional approaches. PMID:26153771

  19. Factors Mititating against the Establishment, Development, Management and Utilization of Instructional Television (ITV) in Higher Institutions in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofowora, Olaniyi Alaba

    2007-01-01

    This paper highlights the problems facing the establishment, development, management and utilization of instructional television (ITV) in higher institutions in Nigeria. The paper also discusses chronicle of activities and achievements made at Obafemi Awolowo University, lle-lfe in the effort at revamping the television system. Obafemi Awolowo…

  20. Expression of fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) from Staphylococcus aureus at the cell surface of Lactococcus lactis improves its immunomodulatory properties when used as protein delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Juliana F; Breyner, Natalia M; Mahi, Miloud; Ahmed, Bensoltane; Benbouziane, Bouasria; Boas, Priscilla C B Vilas; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    A recombinant strain of Lactococcus lactis displaying a cell-surface anchored fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) from Staphylococcus aureus (LL-FnBPA) had been shown to be more efficient in delivering plasmid than its wild-type counterpart both in vitro and in vivo, and have the ability to orientate the immune response toward a Th2 profile in a context of a DNA vaccination. The aim of this work was to test whether this LL-FnBPA strain could shape the immune response after mucosal administration in mice. For this, we used a mouse model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced cancer and a L. lactis strain displaying at its cell surface both HPV-16-E7 antigen (LL-E7) and FnBPA (LL-E7+FnBPA). Our results revealed a more efficient systemic Th1 immune response with recombinant LL-E7+FnBPA. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with LL-E7+FnBPA were better protected when challenged with HPV-16-induced tumors. Altogether, the results suggest that FnBPA displays adjuvant properties when used in the context of mucosal delivery using L. lactis as a live vector. PMID:26854905

  1. Plethysmogram and EEG: Effects of Music and Voice Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Sato, Sadaka; Kojima, Junji; Lin, Juan; Reika, Sato

    2011-06-01

    We studied a relation of chaotic dynamics of finger plethysmogram to complexity of high cerebral center in both theoretical and experimental approaches. We proposed a mathematical model to describe emergence of chaos in finger tip pulse wave, which gave a theoretical prediction indicating increased chaoticity in higher cerebral center leading to an increase of chaos dynamics in plethysmograms. We designed an experiment to observe scalp-EEG and finger plethysmogram using two mental tasks to validate the relationship. We found that scalp-EEG showed an increase of the largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE) during speaking certain voices. Topographical scalp map of LLE showed enhanced arise around occipital and right cerebral area. Whereas there was decreasing tendency during listening music, where LLE scalp map revealed a drop around center cerebral area. The same tendency was found for LLE obtained from finger plethysmograms as ones of EEG under either speaking or listening tasks. The experiment gave results that agreed well with the theoretical relation derived from our proposed model.

  2. Intrinsic modulation of ENSO predictability viewed through a local Lyapunov lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamperidou, Christina; Cane, Mark A.; Lall, Upmanu; Wittenberg, Andrew T.

    2013-04-01

    The presence of rich ENSO variability in the long unforced simulation of GFDL's CM2.1 motivates the use of tools from dynamical systems theory to study variability in ENSO predictability, and its connections to ENSO magnitude, frequency, and physical evolution. Local Lyapunov exponents (LLEs) estimated from the monthly NINO3 SSTa model output are used to characterize periods of increased or decreased predictability. The LLEs describe the growth of infinitesimal perturbations due to internal variability, and are a measure of the immediate predictive uncertainty at any given point in the system phase-space. The LLE-derived predictability estimates are compared with those obtained from the error growth in a set of re-forecast experiments with CM2.1. It is shown that the LLEs underestimate the error growth for short forecast lead times (less than 8 months), while they overestimate it for longer lead times. The departure of LLE-derived error growth rates from the re-forecast rates is a linear function of forecast lead time, and is also sensitive to the length of the time series used for the LLE calculation. The LLE-derived error growth rate is closer to that estimated from the re-forecasts for a lead time of 4 months. In the 2,000-year long simulation, the LLE-derived predictability at the 4-month lead time varies (multi)decadally only by 9-18 %. Active ENSO periods are more predictable than inactive ones, while epochs with regular periodicity and moderate magnitude are classified as the most predictable by the LLEs. Events with a deeper thermocline in the west Pacific up to five years prior to their peak, along with an earlier deepening of the thermocline in the east Pacific in the months preceding the peak, are classified as more predictable. Also, the GCM is found to be less predictable than nature under this measure of predictability.

  3. Intrinsic modulation of ENSO predictability viewed through a local Lyapunov lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamperidou, Christina; Cane, Mark A.; Lall, Upmanu; Wittenberg, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of rich ENSO variability in the long unforced simulation of GFDL's CM2.1 motivates the use of tools from dynamical systems theory to study variability in ENSO predictability, and its connections to ENSO magnitude, frequency, and physical evolution. Local Lyapunov exponents (LLEs) estimated from the monthly NINO3 SSTa model output are used to characterize periods of increased or decreased predictability. The LLEs describe the growth of infinitesimal perturbations due to internal variability, and are a measure of the immediate predictive uncertainty at any given point in the system phase-space. The LLE-derived predictability estimates are compared with those obtained from the error growth in a set of re-forecast experiments with CM2.1. It is shown that the LLEs underestimate the error growth for short forecast lead times (less than 8 months), while they overestimate it for longer lead times. The departure of LLE-derived error growth rates from the re-forecast rates is a linear function of forecast lead time, and is also sensitive to the length of the time series used for the LLE calculation. The LLE-derived error growth rate is closer to that estimated from the re-forecasts for a lead time of 4 months. In the 2,000-year long simulation, the LLE-derived predictability at the 4-month lead time varies (multi)decadally only by 9-18 %. Active ENSO periods are more predictable than inactive ones, while epochs with regular periodicity and moderate magnitude are classified as the most predictable by the LLEs. Events with a deeper thermocline in the west Pacific up to five years prior to their peak, along with an earlier deepening of the thermocline in the east Pacific in the months preceding the peak, are classified as more predictable. Also, the GCM is found to be less predictable than nature under this measure of predictability.

  4. V&V of MCNP 6.1.1 Beta Against Intermediate and High-Energy Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2014-09-08

    This report presents a set of validation and verification (V&V) MCNP 6.1.1 beta results calculated in parallel, with MPI, obtained using its event generators at intermediate and high-energies compared against various experimental data. It also contains several examples of results using the models at energies below 150 MeV, down to 10 MeV, where data libraries are normally used. This report can be considered as the forth part of a set of MCNP6 Testing Primers, after its first, LA-UR-11-05129, and second, LA-UR-11-05627, and third, LA-UR-26944, publications, but is devoted to V&V with the latest, 1.1 beta version of MCNP6. The MCNP6 test-problems discussed here are presented in the /VALIDATION_CEM/and/VALIDATION_LAQGSM/subdirectories in the MCNP6/Testing/directory. README files that contain short descriptions of every input file, the experiment, the quantity of interest that the experiment measures and its description in the MCNP6 output files, and the publication reference of that experiment are presented for every test problem. Templates for plotting the corresponding results with xmgrace as well as pdf files with figures representing the final results of our V&V efforts are presented. Several technical “bugs” in MCNP 6.1.1 beta were discovered during our current V&V of MCNP6 while running it in parallel with MPI using its event generators. These “bugs” are to be fixed in the following version of MCNP6. Our results show that MCNP 6.1.1 beta using its CEM03.03, LAQGSM03.03, Bertini, and INCL+ABLA, event generators describes, as a rule, reasonably well different intermediate- and high-energy measured data. This primer isn’t meant to be read from cover to cover. Readers may skip some sections and go directly to any test problem in which they are interested.

  5. Magnetized collisionless shock studies using high velocity plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, Thomas; Gao, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvènic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  6. Shock Hugoniot equations of state for binary water-alcohol liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David; Bolme, Cynthia; Brown, Kathryn; McGrane, Shawn; Schulze, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data were obtained using laser generated shock and ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) methods for several non-ideal water-alcohol liquid mixtures, using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and t-butanol (a.k.a., 2-methyl-2-propanol or tert-butanol). The sound speeds of the mixtures were obtained using Brillouin scattering when not available in the literature. The shock and particle velocities obtained from the UDE data were compared to expectations of the universal liquid Hugoniot (ULH) and to literature shock (plate impact) data where available. The shock Hugoniot trends for all these mixtures, represented as deviations from predictions of the ULH, versus fraction of alcohol are quite similar to each other and suggest that complex hydrogen bonding networks in water-alcohol mixtures alter the compressibility of the mixtures. Data and trends will be presented. LA-UR-15-20328.

  7. LANL Experience Rolling Zr-Clad LEU-10Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Hammon, Duncan L.; Clarke, Kester D.; Alexander, David J.; Kennedy, Patrick K.; Edwards, Randall L.; Duffield, Andrew N.; Dombrowski, David E.

    2015-05-29

    The cleaning, canning, rolling and final trimming of Low Enriched Uranium-10 wt. pct. Molybdenum (LEU-10Mo) foils for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) fuel plates to be used in the AFIP-7 (ATR Full Size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position) experiments are summarized. Six Zr-clad foils were produced from two LEU-10Mo castings supplied to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Y-12 National Security Complex. Details of cleaning and canning procedures are provided. Hot- and cold-rolling results are presented, including rolling schedules, images of foils in-process, metallography and local compositions of regions of interest, and details of final foil dimensions and process yield. This report was compiled from the slides for the presentation of the same name given by Duncan Hammon on May 12, 2011 at the AFIP-7 Lessons Learned meeting in Salt Lake City, UT, with Los Alamos National Laboratory document number LA-UR 11-02898.

  8. First fission mass yield measurements using SPIDER at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Devlin, Matt; Bredeweg, Todd; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Shields, Dan; Blakeley, Rick; Hecht, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Robust measurements of fission product properties, including mass yields, are important for advancing our understanding of the complex fission process and as improved inputs to calculation and simulation efforts in nuclear applications. The SPIDER detector, located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), is a recently developed mass spectrometer aimed at measuring fission product mass yields with high resolution as a function of incident neutron energy and product mass, charge, and kinetic energy. The prototype SPIDER detector has been assembled, tested, installed at the Lujan Center at LANSCE, and taken initial thermal neutron induced measurements. The first results of mass yields for spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal neutron-induced fission of 235U measured with SPIDER will be presented. Ongoing upgrades and future plans for SPIDER will also be discussed. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR. LA-UR-14-24830.

  9. Measurement of Fresh Fuel Rods to Demonstrate Compliance with Criticality Safety Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Miko, David K.; Desimone, David J.

    2015-11-03

    In order to operate TA-66 as a radiological facility with the quantity of nuclear material required to fulfil its mission, a criticality safety evaluation was required. This evaluation defined the control parameters for operations at the facility. The resulting evaluation for TA-66 placed limits on the amount of SNM, as well as other materials such as beryllium. In addition, there is a limit on the number of uranium fuel rods allowed subject to enrichment, outer diameter, and overall length restrictions. The enrichments for the rods to be shipped to TA-66 were documented in LA-UR-13-23581, but the outer diameter and length were not documented. This report provides this information.

  10. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  11. High-Resolution Correlated Fission Product Measurements of 235U (nth , f) with SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Dan; Spider Team

    2015-10-01

    The SPIDER detector (SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research) has obtained high-resolution, moderate-efficiency, correlated fission product data needed for many applications including the modeling of next generation nuclear reactors, stockpile stewardship, and the fundamental understanding of the fission process. SPIDER simultaneously measures velocity and energy of both fission products to calculate fission product yields (FPYs), neutron multiplicity (ν), and total kinetic energy (TKE). These data will be some of the first of their kind available to nuclear data evaluations. An overview of the SPIDER detector, analytical method, and preliminary results for 235U (nth , f) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20130 This work benefited from the use of the LANSCE accelerator facility and was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Optical distance measurements to recover the material approach missed by optical velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Matthew; Knierim, Dan; Moro, Erik; McGrane, Shawn

    2013-06-01

    Optical velocimetry is limited to measuring the component of the target velocity along the axis of the optical beam, thereby allowing a laterally moving tilted surface to approach a probe undetected. In some applications it is important to know the distance to the target surface, and the forgoing means that integrating the velocity can give incorrect calculations of position. We will present three approaches to overcome this limitation: Tilted wavefront interferometry to map time of flight into fringe displacement; pulse bursts for which we measure the change in the average arrival time of a burst, and amplitude modulation interferometry in which a change in path length shows up as a change in the phase of the modulation. All three of these have the potential to be integrated with existing velocimetry probes for simultaneous velocity and displacement measurements. We will also report on initial tests of these approaches. LAUR - 13-21022.

  13. Detonation Performance Testing of LX-19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Samuel; Aslam, Tariq; Jackson, Scott

    2015-06-01

    CL-20 was developed at the Naval Surface Weapons Center at China Lake, CA in the mid 80's. Being less sensitive than PETN, but considerably more powerful than HMX, it is the highest energy and density compound known among organic chemicals. LX-19 was developed at LLNL in the early 90's. It is a high-energy plastic bonded explosive, composed of 95.8 wt% CL-20 and 4.2 wt% Estane binder, and is similar to LX-14 (composed of HMX and Estane), but with greater sensitivity characteristics with use of the more energetic CL-20 explosive. We report detonation performance results for unconfined cylindrical rate sticks of LX-19. The experimental diameter effects are shown, along with detonation front shapes, and reaction zone profiles for different test diameters. This data is critical for calibration to Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). LA-UR-15-20672.

  14. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  15. Overview and recent progress of the Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Boguski, J. C.; Sears, J. A.; Swan, H. O.; Gao, K. W.; Chapdelaine, L. J.; Winske, D.; Dunn, J. P.

    2013-10-01

    The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) has been constructed to study the physics of super-Alfvènic, supercritical, magnetized shocks. Exhibiting transitional length and time scales much smaller than can be produced through collisional processes, these shocks are observed to create non-thermal distributions, amplify magnetic fields, and accelerate particles to relativistic velocities. Shocks are produced through the acceleration and subsequent stagnation of Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids against a high-flux magnetic mirror with a conducting boundary or a plasma target with embedded field. Adjustable shock velocity, density, and magnetic geometry (B parallel, perpendicular, or oblique to k) provide unique access to a wide range of dimensionless parameters relevant to astrophysical shocks. Information regarding the experimental configuration, diagnostics suite, recent simulations, experimental results, and physics goals will be presented. This work is supported by DOE OFES and NNSA under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369 Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-13-24859.

  16. Radio-frequency electromagnetic emissions from materials under high-frequency mechanical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Christian; Moore, David

    2015-06-01

    Direct contact piezoelectric transducers were used to excite compacted polycrystalline dielectric material samples with high amplitude but short duration ultrasound through a frequency range of 50 kHz to 10 MHz, while near field RF emissions were measured in 12 frequency bands from 18 to 750 GHz using a suite of detectors. Emissions were observed only in three detectors, covering the 40-75 GHz, 110-170 GHz, and 170-260 GHz frequency ranges. Emission amplitudes appear to rise nonlinearly with applied ultrasound amplitude, and the emission amplitudes versus ultrasound frequency are different than the thermal responses of these samples. Data comparing thermal responses and electromagnetic emissions versus ultrasound frequency and amplitude for several sample types (oxidizers and energetic materials) will be presented. LA-UR-15-20605.

  17. Evaluating source separation of plastic waste using conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Jun; Aramaki, Toshiya; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2008-11-01

    Using conjoint analysis, we estimated the willingness to pay (WTP) of households for source separation of plastic waste and the improvement of related environmental impacts, the residents' loss of life expectancy (LLE), the landfill capacity, and the CO2 emissions. Unreliable respondents were identified and removed from the sample based on their answers to follow-up questions. It was found that the utility associated with reducing LLE and with the landfill capacity were both well expressed by logarithmic functions, but that residents were indifferent to the level of CO2 emissions even though they approved of CO2 reduction. In addition, residents derived utility from the act of separating plastic waste, irrespective of its environmental impacts; that is, they were willing to practice the separation of plastic waste at home in anticipation of its "invisible effects", such as the improvement of citizens' attitudes toward solid waste issues. PMID:18207727

  18. Face Recognition Using ALLE and SIFT for Human Robot Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yaozhang; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; He, Hongsheng

    Face recognition is a very important aspect in developing human-robot interaction (HRI) for social robots. In this paper, an efficient face recognition algorithm is introduced for building intelligent robot vision system to recognize human faces. Dimension deduction algorithms locally linear embedding (LLE) and adaptive locally linear embedding (ALLE) and feature extraction algorithm scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) are combined to form new methods called LLE-SIFT and ALLE-SIFT for finding compact and distinctive descriptors for face images. The new feature descriptors are demonstrated to have better performance in face recognition applications than standard SIFT descriptors, which shows that the proposed method is promising for developing robot vision system of face recognition.

  19. Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2010-04-16

    This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

  20. TRITIUM OPERATIONS AT THE LABORATORY FOR LASER ENERGETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shmayda, W.T.; Loucks, S.J.; Janezic, R.; Duffy, T.W.; Harding, D. R.; Lund, L.D.

    2006-05-17

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester has conducted inertial confinement fusion experiments since the early 1970s. Beginning in 1996, LLE filled and fielded targets containing DT gas with pressures as high as 30 atm. Facilities are being upgraded to prepare, characterize, and field targets with DT ice on their inner surface. To this end, process loops that can pressurize DT gas to 1200 bar and operate at 17 K are in the final stages of commissioning. To preclude both accidental and chronic tritium releases and to minimize the potential for exposures to personnel, both metal hydride-based and oxidation drier-based cleanup systems have been installed and commissioned with hydrogen. Cryogenic DT targets will be fielded in 2006.

  1. Sicherheitssysteme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Fahrerassistenzsysteme helfen, Unfälle zu vermeiden. Das Ziel ist das unfallfreie Fahren. Mit immer effizienteren elektronischen Systemen und verbesserter Sensorik versucht, diesem Ziel nahezukommen. Für die Fälle, in denen ein Unfall nicht verhindert werden kann, müssen die Unfallfolgen gemildert werden. Das erste passive Sicherheitssystem für Pkw wurde mit dem Sicherheitsgurt eingeführt. In Deutschland ist er für die Vordersitze seit 1970, für die Rücksitze seit 1979 vorgeschrieben. Die Gurtanlegepflicht wurde 1976 eingeführt. Die Elektronik ermöglichte seit den 1980 er- Jahren weitere Systeme, die die Sicherheit der Insassen im Falle eines Unfalls erhöhen.

  2. Strahlungsfeldbedingungen bei der Ionisationsdosimetrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Hanno

    Bei der Dosimetrie von Photonenstrahlungen mit luftgefüllten Ionisationskammern werden in diesem Kapitel zwei Grenzfälle unterschieden. Der eine Fall ist die Bedingung des so genannten Sekundärelektronengleichwichts im Kammervolumen. In diesem Fall bestimmen ausschließlich die Photonen im Messvolumen die dosimetrische Anzeige. Der zweite Grenzfall ist gegeben, wenn das Luftvolumen und die Kammer das Strahlungsfeld im Phantom so wenig stören, dass der Sekundärelektronenfluss unverändert bleibt. Diese Bedingungen nennt man BRAGG-GRAY-Bedingungen. Beide Grenzfälle sind in der Praxis nur näherungsweise zu verwirklichen. Abweichungen müssen durch entsprechende Korrekturen oder Kalibrierungen berücksichtigt werden.

  3. RaPToRS Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henchen, Robert; Shibata, Kye; Krieger, Michael; Pogozelski, Edward; Padalino, Stephen; Glebov, Vladimir; Sangster, Craig

    2010-11-01

    At various labs (NIF, LLE, NRL), activated material samples are used to measure reaction properties. The Rapid Pneumatic Transport of Radioactive Samples (RaPToRS) system quickly and safely moves these radioactive samples through a closed PVC tube via airflow. The carrier travels from the reaction chamber to the control and analysis station, pneumatically braking at the outlet. A reversible multiplexer routes samples from various locations near the shot chamber to the analysis station. Also, the multiplexer allows users to remotely load unactivated samples without manually approaching the reaction chamber. All elements of the system (pneumatic drivers, flow control valves, optical position sensors, multiplexers, Geiger counters, and release gates at the analysis station) can be controlled manually or automatically using a custom LabVIEW interface. A prototype is currently operating at NRL in Washington DC. Prospective facilities for Raptors systems include LLE and NIF.

  4. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  6. Optimal spectra of white LED integrated with quantum dots for mesopic vision.

    PubMed

    Zan, Linlin; Lin, Duyang; Zhong, Ping; He, Guoxing

    2016-04-01

    The spectral optimization model for limited mesopic luminous efficacy (LLEm) of white LED integrated with quantum dots (QD-WLED) consisting of a blue chip, green, yellow and red quantum dots, including down-conversion energy loss, was developed under constraint of designated color rendering properties. The optimal spectra of QD-WLEDs with CRI ≥ 70 and CQS ≥ 60 as well as CRI ≥ 85 and CQS ≥ 85 for mesopic vision, photometric and colorimetric performances at correlated color temperature of 2700 K to 45000 K, as well as the LLEms of optimal QD-WLEDs for four road lighting standards of the USA and the UK were presented. These results suggest that QD-WLEDs make strong candidates for replacing conventional light sources in the future as they enhance the vision quality in the road lighting in addition to energy saving. PMID:27137051

  7. Application of the largest Lyapunov exponent algorithm for feature extraction in low speed slew bearing condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Moodie, Craig A. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new application of the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm for feature extraction method in low speed slew bearing condition monitoring. The LLE algorithm is employed to measure the degree of non-linearity of the vibration signal which is not easily monitored by existing methods. The method is able to detect changes in the condition of the bearing and demonstrates better tracking of the progressive deterioration of the bearing during the 139 measurement days than comparable methods such as the time domain feature methods based on root mean square (RMS), skewness and kurtosis extraction from the raw vibration signal and also better than extracting similar features from selected intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) result. The application of the method is demonstrated with laboratory slew bearing vibration data and industrial bearing data from a coal bridge reclaimer used in a local steel mill.

  8. State Anxiety and Nonlinear Dynamics of Heart Rate Variability in Students

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriev, Aleksey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical and experimental research studies have demonstrated that the emotional experience of anxiety impairs heart rate variability (HRV) in humans. The present study investigated whether changes in state anxiety (SA) can also modulate nonlinear dynamics of heart rate. Methods A group of 96 students volunteered to participate in the study. For each student, two 5-minute recordings of beat intervals (RR) were performed: one during a rest period and one just before a university examination, which was assumed to be a real-life stressor. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed. The Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess the level of SA. Results Before adjusting for heart rate, a Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed significant decreases in Poincaré plot measures, entropy, largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), and pointwise correlation dimension (PD2), and an increase in the short-term fractal-like scaling exponent of detrended fluctuation analysis (α1) during the exam session, compared with the rest period. A Pearson analysis indicated significant negative correlations between the dynamics of SA and Poincaré plot axes ratio (SD1/SD2), and between changes in SA and changes in entropy measures. A strong negative correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and LLE. A significant positive correlation was found between the dynamics of SA and α1. The decreases in Poincaré plot measures (SD1, complex correlation measure), entropy measures, and LLE were still significant after adjusting for heart rate. Corrected α1 was increased during the exam session. As before, the dynamics of adjusted LLE was significantly correlated with the dynamics of SA. Conclusions The qualitative increase in SA during academic examination was related to the decrease in the complexity and size of the Poincaré plot through a reduction of both the interbeat interval and its variation. PMID:26807793

  9. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  10. University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-01-01

    In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

  11. Free trade negotiations can be harmful to your health.

    PubMed

    Krikorian, Gaëlle

    2006-12-01

    When negotiating free trade agreements (FTAs), the U.S. uses its considerable power to get countries to agree to intellectual property (IP) provisions that go beyond what is mandated in international IP accords. In this article, which is based on a poster presented at the conference, Gaëlle Krikorian describes the tactics used by the U.S. and explains how the results of its efforts can impede access to newer medicines in developing countries. PMID:17375436

  12. Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer for use at Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, S L

    2010-04-07

    The Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer (EPPS) is mounted in a TIM (Ten-Inch Manipulator) system on the Omega-60 or Omega-EP laser facilities at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), when in use, see Fig. 1. The Spectrometer assembly, shown in Fig. 2, is constructed of a steel box containing magnets, surrounded by Lead 6% Antimony shielding with SS threaded insert, sitting on an Aluminum 6061-T6 plate.

  13. Cleaning Process Versus Laser-Damage Threshold of Coated Optical Components

    SciTech Connect

    Rigatti, A.L.

    2005-03-31

    The cleaning of optical surfaces is important in the manufacture of high-laser-damage-threshold coatings, which are a key component on peak-power laser systems such as OMEGA located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Since cleaning adds time, labor, and ultimately cost to the final coated component, this experiment was designed to determine the impact of different cleaning protocols on the measured laser-damage performance.

  14. Structural Optimization of Ghrelin Receptor Inverse Agonists to Improve Lipophilicity and Avoid Mechanism-Based CYP3A4 Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Bitoku; Funami, Hideaki; Shibata, Makoto; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Koyama, Makoto; Kanki, Satomi; Muto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Structural optimization of 2-aminonicotinamide derivatives as ghrelin receptor inverse agonists is reported. So as to avoid mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of CYP3A4, 1,3-benzodioxol ring of the lead compound was modified. Improvement of the main activity and lipophilicity was achieved simultaneously, leading to compound 18a, which showed high lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) and low MBI activity. PMID:26423040

  15. Was the Risk from Nursing-Home Evacuation after the Fukushima Accident Higher than the Radiation Risk?

    PubMed

    Murakami, Michio; Ono, Kyoko; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nomura, Shuhei; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Tosihiro; Kami, Masahiro; Oki, Taikan

    2015-01-01

    After the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, nursing-home residents and staff were evacuated voluntarily from damaged areas to avoid radiation exposure. Unfortunately, the evacuation resulted in increased mortalities among nursing home residents. We assessed the risk trade-off between evacuation and radiation for 191 residents and 184 staff at three nursing homes by using the same detriment indicator, namely loss of life expectancy (LLE), under four scenarios, i.e. "rapid evacuation (in accordance with the actual situation; i.e. evacuation on 22 March)," "deliberate evacuation (i.e. evacuation on 20 June)," "20-mSv exposure," and "100-mSv exposure." The LLE from evacuation-related mortality among nursing home residents was assessed with survival probability data from nursing homes in the city of Minamisoma and the city of Soma. The LLE from radiation mortality was calculated from the estimated age-specific mortality rates from leukemia and all solid cancers based on the additional effective doses and the survival probabilities. The total LLE of residents due to evacuation-related risks in rapid evacuation was 11,000 persons-d-much higher than the total LLEs of residents and staff due to radiation in the other scenarios (27, 1100, and 5800 persons-d for deliberate evacuation, 20 mSv-exposure, and 100 mSv-exposure, respectively). The latitude for reducing evacuation risks among nursing home residents is surprisingly large. Evacuation regulation and planning should therefore be well balanced with the trade-offs against radiation risks. This is the first quantitative assessment of the risk trade-off between radiation exposure and evacuation after a nuclear power plant accident. PMID:26359666

  16. Was the Risk from Nursing-Home Evacuation after the Fukushima Accident Higher than the Radiation Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Michio; Ono, Kyoko; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nomura, Shuhei; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Tosihiro; Kami, Masahiro; Oki, Taikan

    2015-01-01

    After the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, nursing-home residents and staff were evacuated voluntarily from damaged areas to avoid radiation exposure. Unfortunately, the evacuation resulted in increased mortalities among nursing home residents. We assessed the risk trade-off between evacuation and radiation for 191 residents and 184 staff at three nursing homes by using the same detriment indicator, namely loss of life expectancy (LLE), under four scenarios, i.e. “rapid evacuation (in accordance with the actual situation; i.e. evacuation on 22 March),” “deliberate evacuation (i.e. evacuation on 20 June),” “20-mSv exposure,” and “100-mSv exposure.” The LLE from evacuation-related mortality among nursing home residents was assessed with survival probability data from nursing homes in the city of Minamisoma and the city of Soma. The LLE from radiation mortality was calculated from the estimated age-specific mortality rates from leukemia and all solid cancers based on the additional effective doses and the survival probabilities. The total LLE of residents due to evacuation-related risks in rapid evacuation was 11,000 persons-d—much higher than the total LLEs of residents and staff due to radiation in the other scenarios (27, 1100, and 5800 persons-d for deliberate evacuation, 20 mSv-exposure, and 100 mSv-exposure, respectively). The latitude for reducing evacuation risks among nursing home residents is surprisingly large. Evacuation regulation and planning should therefore be well balanced with the trade-offs against radiation risks. This is the first quantitative assessment of the risk trade-off between radiation exposure and evacuation after a nuclear power plant accident. PMID:26359666

  17. Hyperspectral target detection using graph theory models and manifold geometry via an adaptive implementation of locally linear embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Messinger, David W.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral images comprise, by design, high dimensional image data. However, research has shown that for a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, it is typical for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space, with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to a recent increase in the use of non-linear manifold learning, which aims to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, non-linear manifold upon which the hyperspectral data inherently lie. Classic hyperspectral data models include statistical, linear subspace, and linear mixture models, but these can place restrictive assumptions on the distribution of the data. With graph theory and manifold learning based models, the only assumption is that the data reside on an underlying manifold. In previous publications, we have shown that manifold coordinate approximation using locally linear embedding (LLE) is a viable pre-processing step for target detection with the Adaptive Cosine/Coherence Estimator (ACE) algorithm. Here, we improve upon that methodology using a more rigorous, data-driven implementation of LLE that incorporates the injection of a cloud" of target pixels and the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) detector. The LLE algorithm, which holds that the data is locally linear, is typically governed by a user defined parameter k, indicating the number of nearest neighbors to use in the initial graph model. We use an adaptive approach to building the graph that is governed by the data itself and does not rely upon user input. This implementation of LLE can yield greater separation between the target pixels and the background pixels in the manifold space. We present an analysis of target detection performance in the manifold coordinates using scene-derived target spectra and laboratory-measured target spectra across two different data sets.

  18. Determination of tamoxifen and its metabolites using micelle to solvent stacking in nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Thang, Lee Yien; See, Hong Heng; Quirino, Joselito P

    2016-05-01

    Micelle to solvent stacking was implemented for the recently established NACE-C(4) D method to determine tamoxifen and its metabolites in standard samples and human plasma of breast cancer patients. For stacking, the standard samples and extract after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) were prepared in methanol and the resulting sample solution was pressure injected after a micellar plug of SDS. Factors that affected the stacking such as SDS concentration, micelle, and sample plug length were examined. The sensitivity enhancement factor (peak height from stacking/peak height from typical injection of sample in BGE) was 15-22. The method detection limits with LLE were in the range of 5-10 ng/mL, which was lower than the established method (where the LLE extract was also prepared in methanol) with reported method detection limits of 25-40 ng/mL. The intraday and interday repeatability were in the range of 1.0-3.4% and 3.8-6.5%, respectively. PMID:26873060

  19. Pattern Freezing Process Free Litho-Litho-Etch Double Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tomoyuki; Takeshita, Masaru; Takasu, Ryoichi; Yoshii, Yoshihiro; Iwashita, Jun; Matsumaru, Shogo; Abe, Sho; Iwai, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    Double patterning technology based on existing ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most viable option for complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) node of 32 nm and below. Most of double patterning approaches previously described requires intermediate processing step such as hard mask etching, spacer material deposition, and resist pattern freezing. The requirement of these additional steps is now leading way to requests for throughput reduction and low cost for production for double patterning technology applications. In this paper, litho-litho-etch (LLE) double patterning without any intermediate processing steps is investigated to achieve narrow pitch resist imaging. The LLE options examined in this work are combinations of positive tone-negative tone and positive tone-positive tone photoresist double patterning process. These are the alternative processes in pattern freezing process free LLE double patterning. The goals of this work are to determine witch of these approaches is the most viable for future application and to confirm the patterning potential for 32 nm and below half pitch resist imaging.

  20. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  1. Characteristic Extraction of Mental Disease Patients by Nonlinear Analysis of Plethysmograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuyu; Wang, Wenbiao; Suzuki, Takashi; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    We measured the pulse waves of 196 mentally ill patients and 113 healthy students. Using heartbeat changes, we calculated the values of their sympathetic nerves, parasympathetic nerves, and autonomic nerve balance. In addition, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE) by non-linear analysis of plethysmograms. Values were analyzed by group. The results revealed a significant relationship between LLE and the autonomic nerve balance. The sympathetic nerve values in the patient group were significantly higher than those in the student group, whereas the LLE values were significantly lower. Furthermore, we illustrated the dynamic change in the results for single participants over several testing times. The measurement of pulse waves is easy and economical and does not put a strain on the subject. Additionally, these values can provide information that is more accurate than medical examination obtained from an interview. Our study contributed to the existing methodology in this field, and future data collection and measurement will be carried out. We hope that our study will be useful for neurologists and psychotherapists in their detection and treatment of mental illness.

  2. Approximate Orthogonal Sparse Embedding for Dimensionality Reduction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jian; Zhang, David

    2016-04-01

    Locally linear embedding (LLE) is one of the most well-known manifold learning methods. As the representative linear extension of LLE, orthogonal neighborhood preserving projection (ONPP) has attracted widespread attention in the field of dimensionality reduction. In this paper, a unified sparse learning framework is proposed by introducing the sparsity or L1-norm learning, which further extends the LLE-based methods to sparse cases. Theoretical connections between the ONPP and the proposed sparse linear embedding are discovered. The optimal sparse embeddings derived from the proposed framework can be computed by iterating the modified elastic net and singular value decomposition. We also show that the proposed model can be viewed as a general model for sparse linear and nonlinear (kernel) subspace learning. Based on this general model, sparse kernel embedding is also proposed for nonlinear sparse feature extraction. Extensive experiments on five databases demonstrate that the proposed sparse learning framework performs better than the existing subspace learning algorithm, particularly in the cases of small sample sizes. PMID:25955995

  3. 1991 Summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Student research reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Ten students participated in the 1991 summer high school student research program at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The participants spent 8 weeks working and learning at LLE. They spent most of their time working on individual research projects. Each student was assigned a project, upon which he/she worked under the direct supervision of one of the staff members of the laboratory. The students, their high schools, and their projects are listed in Table 1. The program culminated in oral and written reports describing their work. The oral reports were presented at a symposium on 23 August 1991, at which the student`s parents and teachers and members of the LLE staff were present. The written reports are collected in this volume. The titles of the works are UV alignment table; neutron yields can be measured by using the relative gain of a photomultiplier tube; scattering in isotropic and anisotropic media; a better approximation of the diffusion equation; use of the SLAC code to produce a photoemissive electrostatic electron gun; spatial resolution deteriorates with increasing film exposure; analysis of refractive image distortion; making of pinholes for x-ray pinhole cameras; does perturbation theory accurately describe multiphoton ionization? and wave front analysis using shearing interferometry.

  4. 1991 Summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, David D.

    1991-09-01

    Ten students participated in the 1991 summer high school student research program at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The participants spent 8 weeks working and learning at LLE. They spent most of their time working on individual research projects. Each student was assigned a project, upon which he/she worked under the direct supervision of one of the staff members of the laboratory. The students, their high schools, and their projects are listed in Table 1. The program culminated in oral and written reports describing their work. The oral reports were presented at a symposium on 23 August 1991, at which the student's parents and teachers and members of the LLE staff were present. The written reports are collected in this volume. The titles of the works are UV alignment table; neutron yields can be measured by using the relative gain of a photomultiplier tube; scattering in isotropic and anisotropic media; a better approximation of the diffusion equation; use of the SLAC code to produce a photoemissive electrostatic electron gun; spatial resolution deteriorates with increasing film exposure; analysis of refractive image distortion; making of pinholes for x-ray pinhole cameras; does perturbation theory accurately describe multiphoton ionization and wave front analysis using shearing interferometry.

  5. Determination of fluoride in toothpaste using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Wejnerowska, Grazyna; Karczmarek, Anna; Gaca, Jerzy

    2007-05-25

    A new method for determination of fluoride in toothpaste employing the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) has been proposed. It is a development of the method for determination of fluoride using trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) as the derivatization reagent to form trimethylfluorosilane (TMFS), with the liquid/liquid extraction (LLE) step replaced by HS-SPME. To introduce the latter, it was necessary to determine the conditions of the reaction and to optimize the two stages of the SPME procedure: extraction and desorption. The parameters of the SPME analysis using carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber were defined and compared with the corresponding ones for the LLE method, used as a reference. Also, these two methods were compared with respect to their linearity, precision, and accuracy. Results from toothpaste analyses using these two methods were highly correlated, indicating the potential to use the SPME extraction as an inexpensive and solventfree alternative to the LLE method. PMID:17070826

  6. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Ding, Shun-Liang; Litak, Grzegorz; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  7. A simultaneous extraction method for organophosphate, pyrethroid, and neonicotinoid insecticides in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    de Perre, Chloé; Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A method was developed for the extraction and analysis of 2 organophosphate, 8 pyrethroid, and 5 neonicotinoid insecticides from the same water sample. A salted liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) was optimized with a solid-phase extraction (SPE) step that separated the organophosphates (OPs) and pyrethroids from the neonicotinoids. Factors that were optimized included volume of solvent and amount of salt used in the LLE, homogenization time for the LLE, and type and volume of eluting solvent used for the SPE. The OPs and pyrethroids were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the neonicotinoids were quantified using liquid chromatography-diode array detector. Results showed that the optimized method was accurate, precise, reproducible, and robust; recoveries in river water spiked with 100 ng L(-1) of each of the insecticides were all between 86 and 114 % with RSDs between 2 and 8 %. The method was also sensitive with method detection limits ranging from 0.1 to 27.2 ng L(-1) depending on compounds and matrices. The optimized method was thus appropriate for the simultaneous extraction of 15 widely applied insecticides from three different classes and was shown to provide valuable information on their environmental fate from field-collected aqueous samples. PMID:25608617

  8. Influence of Salts on the Partitioning of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water/MIBK.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Sultan; Held, Christoph; Altuntepe, Emrah; Köse, Tülay; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-04-28

    This study investigates the influence of electrolytes on the performance of extracting 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from aqueous media using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). For that purpose, liquid-liquid phase equilibria (LLE) of quaternary systems containing HMF, water, MIBK and salts were measured at atmospheric pressure and 298.15 K. The salts under investigation were composed of one of the anions NO(3-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), or CH3COO(-) and of one of the alkali cations Li(+), Na(+), or K(+). On the basis of these LLE data, the partition coefficient of HMF between the aqueous and the MIBK phase KHMF was determined. It could be shown that KHMF significantly depends on the kind and concentration of the added salt. Weak electrolytes (e.g., sulfates, acetates) caused salting-out, whereas nitrates caused salting-in of HMF to the aqueous phase. Unexpectedly, LiCl caused salting-out at low LiCl concentrations and salting-in at LiCl concentrations higher than 3 mol/kgH2O. The model electrolyte perturbed-chain SAFT (ePC-SAFT) was used to predict the salt influence on the LLE in the quaternary systems water/MIBK/HMF/salt in good agreement with the experimental data. On the basis of ePC-SAFT, it could be concluded that the different salting-out/salting-in behavior of the various salts is mainly caused by their different tendency to form ion pairs in aqueous solutions. PMID:27027570

  9. Automated GC-MS Determination of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabinol and Cannabidiol in Hair.

    PubMed

    Heinl, Sonja; Lerch, Oliver; Erdmann, Freidoon

    2016-09-01

    The determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN) and cannabidiol (CBD) in hair is a major routine task in forensic laboratories worldwide. A comprehensively automated liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method has been developed. The automation was carried out by an x-y-z sample robot equipped with modules capable of shaking, centrifugation and solvent evaporation. It comprises digestion of hair in sodium hydroxide solution, LLE, extract evaporation, reconstitution in silylation reagent, inlet derivatization and GC-MS analysis. Method validation guidelines of the Society for Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry were fulfilled. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.01 ng/mg for THC, 0.06 ng/mg for CBN and 0.03 ng/mg for CBD. This is below the required LOQ for THC (0.02 ng/mg) in medical psychological assessments in Germany. Also it is far below the required LOQ of the Society of Hair Testing of 0.1 ng/mg for THC. Four-round robin tests were passed successfully and several post- and ante-mortem samples were analyzed. To date the method is routinely employed at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen, Germany. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication on a comprehensively automated classical LLE workflow in the field of hair analysis. PMID:27344041

  10. Late Language Emergence at 24 Months: An Epidemiological Study of Prevalence, Predictors, and Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Zubrick, Stephen R.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Rice, Mabel L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The primary objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of late language emergence (LLE) and to investigate the predictive status of maternal, family, and child variables. Method This is a prospective cohort study of 1766 epidemiologically ascertained twenty-four-month singleton children. The framework was an ecological model of child development, encompassing a wide range of maternal, family, and child variables. Data were obtained using postal questionnaire. Item analyses of the 6-item Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) Communication Scale yielded a composite score encompassing comprehension as well as production items. One standard deviation below the mean yielded good separation of affected from unaffected children. Analyses of bivariate relationships with maternal, family, and child variables were carried out, followed by multivariate logistic regression to predict LLE group membership. Results 13.4% of the sample showed late language emergence via the ASQ criterion; 19.1% using a single item “combining words.” Risk for LLE at 24 months was not associated with particular strata of parental educational levels, socioeconomic resources, parental mental health, parenting practices or family functioning. Significant predictors included familial history of late language emergence, male gender and early neurobiological growth. Covariates included psychosocial indicators. Conclusion Results are congruent with models of language emergence and impairment that posit a strong role for neurobiological and genetic mechanisms of onset that operate across a wide variation in maternal and family characteristics. PMID:18055773

  11. Use of domesticated pigs by Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in northwestern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Krause-Kyora, Ben; Makarewicz, Cheryl; Evin, Allowen; Flink, Linus Girdland; Dobney, Keith; Larson, Greger; Hartz, Sönke; Schreiber, Stefan; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Nebel, Almut

    2013-01-01

    Mesolithic populations throughout Europe used diverse resource exploitation strategies that focused heavily on collecting and hunting wild prey. Between 5500 and 4200 cal BC, agriculturalists migrated into northwestern Europe bringing a suite of Neolithic technologies including domesticated animals. Here we investigate to what extent Mesolithic Ertebølle communities in northern Germany had access to domestic pigs, possibly through contact with neighbouring Neolithic agricultural groups. We employ a multidisciplinary approach, applying sequencing of ancient mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (coat colour-coding gene MC1R) as well as traditional and geometric morphometric (molar size and shape) analyses in Sus specimens from 17 Neolithic and Ertebølle sites. Our data from 63 ancient pig specimens show that Ertebølle hunter-gatherers acquired domestic pigs of varying size and coat colour that had both Near Eastern and European mitochondrial DNA ancestry. Our results also reveal that domestic pigs were present in the region ~500 years earlier than previously demonstrated. PMID:23982268

  12. Sustainable efficient way for opioid peptide LVV-h7 preparation from enzymatic proteolysis in a microfluidic-based reaction-extraction process with solvent recycling.

    PubMed

    Elagli, Adil; Belhacene, Kalim; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Renato

    2016-05-01

    LVV-h7 (LVVYPWTQFR) is a bioactive peptide that can be obtained from blood as waste of food industry, more precisely from hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin. This opioid peptide belongs to the hemorphins family and have strong physiological effects that bring its use in pharmaceutics and various therapeutic treatments attractive, in particular for substituting its costly chemically synthetized analogous. Hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin generates a huge variety of peptides among whose LVV-h7 can be purified by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Herein, selective preparation of this peptide is proposed by a microfluidic-based continuous reaction-separation process. Hemoglobin hydrolysis in microreactor was firstly coupled to LVV-h7 LLE in octan-1-ol and then coupled to LVV-h7 back LLE in acidic water. This continuous process allowed to prepare pure LVV-h7, as confirmed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The microfluidic circuit also allowed octan-1-ol recycling in a closed loop, making this method more sustainable than similar biphasic batch process. PMID:26998857

  13. Analytical Treatment of the Metabolic Effects of Isocaloric Stimulant on Heart Rate Variability as Measured by Electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taffe, Lauren Rachelle

    Heart Rate variability (HRV) is measured during a period that includes ingestion and digestion of 900 kilogram calories of carbohydrate and fat beverages on two separate occasions. Autoregressive (AR) analysis, Poincare Plot Analysis (PPA), Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), and the Largest Lyapunov Exponent (LLE) highlights variations in the linear and non-linear indices with respect to time. DFA indices indicated that all individuals were healthy (α≈1). In addition, an overall increase of α over the 3-hour observation time shows increased sympathetic intonation. Body Mass Index (BMI) influences on HRV were found. Over short time scales, DFA's α 1 index suggests the potentiality for future patho-physiological risk in those with high BMI>25. Over longer time scales, α2 has no significant differentiation among different BMI groups. The application of k-means cluster analysis revealed a connection to BMI when α and α 1 /α2 parameters were used. We believe that the LLE indicates an increased stability during digestion of the hypercaloric beverages. Groups with BMI>25 have smaller LLE, on average, than BMI≤ 25. This does substantiate the AR, Poincare, and DFA analyses of groups with higher BMI having less sympathetic increase when compared to lower BMI groups due to caloric metabolism.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CRYOGENIC TARGET ICE LAYERS USING MULTIPLE SHADOWGRAPH VIEWS

    SciTech Connect

    Edgell, D.H.; Craxton, R.S.; Elasky, L.M.; Harding, D.R.; Iwan, L.S.; Keck, R.L.; Lund, L.D.; Verbridge, S.J.; WIttman, M.D.; Warrick, A.; Brown, T.; Seka, W.

    2006-05-17

    Backlit optical shadowgraphy is the primary diagnostic for D2 ice layer characterization of cryogenic targets for the OMEGA Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Reflection and refraction of light passing through the ice layer produce characteristic rings. The position of the most prominent of the shadowgraph rings, known as the bright ring, can be resolved to ~0.1-pixel rms, corresponding to about 0.12 um for typical LLE target shadowgraphs. Measurement of the bright ring position in conjuction with ray-trace model predictions determines the ice layer thickness and the Fourier-mode spectrum of the ice roughness for that view. The LLE target characterization stations use two camera angles and target rotation to record target shadowgraphs from many different views. Combining these views allows construction of a 3-D ice layer representation, an estimation of the global surface roughness, and a determination of a Legendre-mode spectrum suitable for implosion modeling. The standard operating procedure is to construct a 3-D ice layer representation using the analysis of 48 separate shadowgraphic views. The 3-D ice surface is then decomposed in terms of spherical harmonics, allowing the determination of low-mode number (l < 8 to 10) elements of a Legendre-mode power spectrum. High-mode number elements of the Legendre power spectrum are determined by mapping the Fourier-mode power spectrum averaged over all views.

  15. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article. PMID:21154887

  16. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  17. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  18. Detection of sulfonamide drug in urine using liquid-liquid extraction and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, Natalia E.; Shalabay, Victoria V.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Markin, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    In this article we have applied liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) as a sample preparation technique for detection of sulfadimethoxine (one of sulfonamide drugs) in urine using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). SERS substrate based on silver nanoparticles has been prepared by citrate reduction of silver nitrate. Obtained calibration curve (SERS intensity vs. sulfadimethoxine concentration) has been used for detection of sulfadimethoxine in human urine samples artificially contaminated by sulfadimethoxine. Three different solvents (ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, chloroform) have been used for LLE performance tests. Chloroform being found as the most effective one based on calculation of recoveries after SERS measurements. Thus we would like to propose fast (less than 20 minutes), simple and sensitive (detection limit up to 1 μg/ml) test for detecting sulfa drugs in urine using a combination of SERS with LLE with sample volume as low as 100 μL. Such test can be applied for evaluation of the degree of drug extraction from human body and half-life of such drug applied in the course of therapeutic treatments of certain diseases.

  19. Loss of lifetime due to radiation exposure-averaging problems.

    PubMed

    Raicević, J J; Merkle, M; Ehrhardt, J; Ninković, M M

    1997-04-01

    A new method is presented for assessing a years of life lost (YLL) due to stochastic effects caused by the exposure to ionizing radiation. The widely accepted method from the literature uses a ratio of means of two quantities, defining in fact the loss of life as a derived quantity. We start from the real stochastic nature of the quantity (YLL), which enables us to obtain its mean values in a consistent way, using the standard averaging procedures, based on the corresponding joint probability density functions needed in this problem. Our method is mathematically different and produces lower values of average YLL. In this paper we also found certain similarities with the concept of loss of life expectancy among exposure induced deaths (LLE-EID), which is accepted in the recently published UNSCEAR report, where the same quantity is defined as years of life lost per radiation induced case (YLC). Using the same data base, the YLL and the LLE-EID are calculated and compared for the simplest exposure case-the discrete exposure at age a. It is found that LLE-EID overestimates the YLL, and that the magnitude of this overestimation reaches more than 15%, which depends on the effect under consideration. PMID:9119679

  20. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    , reduced models for the inversion, non-linear inverse scattering, image reconstruction and restoration, applications (bio-medical imaging, non-destructive evaluation etc). NCMIP 2012 was a one-day workshop. Each of the submitted papers was reviewed by 2 to 4 reviewers. Among the accepted papers, there are 8 oral presentations and 5 posters. Three international speakers were invited for a long talk. This second edition attracted 60 registered attendees in May 2012. NCMIP 2012 was supported by Institut Farman (ENS Cachan) and endorsed by the following French research networks (GDR ISIS, GDR Ondes, GDR MOA, GDR MSPC). The program committee acknowledges the following laboratories CMLA, LMT, LSV, LURPA, SATIE, as well as DIGITEO Network. Laure Blanc-Féraud and Pierre-Yves Joubert Workshop Co-chairs Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory, CNRS, France Pierre-Yves Joubert, IEF laboratory, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, France Technical Program Committee Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Jerôme Darbon, CMLA, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK Mário Figueiredo, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal Laurent Fribourg, LSV, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Marc Lambert, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Anthony Quinn, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland Christian Rey, LMT, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Joachim Weickert, Saarland University, Germany Local Chair Alejandro Mottini, Morpheme group I3S-INRIA Sophie Abriet, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Béatrice Bacquet, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Reviewers Gilles Aubert, J-A Dieudonné Laboratory, CNRS and University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory, CNRS, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Jerôme Darbon, CMLA, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK G

  1. Development of a low-density polyethylene-containing passive sampler for measuring dissolved hydrophobic organic compounds in open waters.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lian-Jun; Xu, Shi-Ping; Liang, Yan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-05-01

    A passive water sampler with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) as the sorbent phase was built and field-tested for sensing freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in fresh and coastal water. Based on the measured LDPE-water partition coefficients (K(pew)) of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its seven metabolites, the detection limits with the passive sampler containing 10-g LDPE ranged from 0.04 to 56.9 pg/L in the equilibrium sampling mode. Furthermore, the utility of the passive sampler in measuring dissolved HOC concentrations in open waters was examined through a comparison with solid-phase extraction combined with liquid-liquid extraction (SPE-LLE) and poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS) coated fiber samplers. The total concentrations of PAHs (3.8-16 ng/L) obtained by the passive sampler were lower than those (87.7-115.5 ng/L) obtained through SPE-LLE. This large difference was probably attributable to slower water exchange in and out of the passive sampler as time progressed because of blockage by algae in eutrophia reservoirs and high dissolved organic carbon contents resulting in higher-than-expected PAH concentrations by SPE-LLE. Furthermore, the concentrations and compositional profiles of DDXs (sum of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDMU) at site A obtained by the passive sampler agreed with the results obtained with the PDMS-coated fibers, suggesting that the passive sampler was able to reasonably quantify dissolved HOCs in seawater. PMID:22388779

  2. Effects of hypercapnia and hypocapnia on ventilatory variability and the chaotic dynamics of ventilatory flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Thibault, Sylvain; Wysocki, Marc; Baconnier, Pierre; Similowski, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    In humans, lung ventilation exhibits breath-to-breath variability and dynamics that are nonlinear, complex, sensitive to initial conditions, unpredictable in the long-term, and chaotic. Hypercapnia, as produced by the inhalation of a CO(2)-enriched gas mixture, stimulates ventilation. Hypocapnia, as produced by mechanical hyperventilation, depresses ventilation in animals and in humans during sleep, but it does not induce apnea in awake humans. This emphasizes the suprapontine influences on ventilatory control. How cortical and subcortical commands interfere thus depend on the prevailing CO(2) levels. However, CO(2) also influences the variability and complexity of ventilation. This study was designed to describe how this occurs and to test the hypothesis that CO(2) chemoreceptors are important determinants of ventilatory dynamics. Spontaneous ventilatory flow was recorded in eight healthy subjects. Breath-by-breath variability was studied through the coefficient of variation of several ventilatory variables. Chaos was assessed with the noise titration method (noise limit) and characterized with numerical indexes [largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), sensitivity to initial conditions; Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy (KSE), unpredictability; and correlation dimension (CD), irregularity]. In all subjects, under all conditions, a positive noise limit confirmed chaos. Hypercapnia reduced breathing variability, increased LLE (P = 0.0338 vs. normocapnia; P = 0.0018 vs. hypocapnia), increased KSE, and slightly reduced CD. Hypocapnia increased variability, decreased LLE and KSE, and reduced CD. These results suggest that chemoreceptors exert a strong influence on ventilatory variability and complexity. However, complexity persists in the quasi-absence of automatic drive. Ventilatory variability and complexity could be determined by the interaction between the respiratory central pattern generator and suprapontine structures. PMID:17218438

  3. Techno-economic analysis for incorporating a liquid-liquid extraction system to remove acetic acid into a proposed commercial scale biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-01

    Mitigating the effect of fermentation inhibitors in bioethanol plants can have a great positive impact on the economy of this industry. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using ethyl acetate is able to remove fermentation inhibitors-chiefly, acetic acid-from an aqueous solution used to produce bioethanol. The fermentation broth resulting from LLE has higher performance for ethanol yield and its production rate. Previous techno-economic analyses focused on second-generation biofuel production did not address the impact of removing the fermentation inhibitors on the economic performance of the biorefinery. A comprehensive analysis of applying a separation system to mitigate the fermentation inhibition effect and to provide an analysis on the economic impact of removal of acetic acid from corn stover hydrolysate on the overall revenue of the biorefinery is necessary. This study examines the pros and cons associated with implementing LLE column along with the solvent recovery system into a commercial scale bioethanol plant. Using details from the NREL-developed model of corn stover biorefinery, the capital costs associated with the equipment and the operating cost for the use of solvent were estimated and the results were compared with the profit gain due to higher ethanol production. Results indicate that the additional capital will add 1% to the total capital and manufacturing cost will increase by 5.9%. The benefit arises from the higher ethanol production rate and yield as a consequence of inhibitor extraction and results in a $0.35 per gallon reduction in the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:971-977, 2016. PMID:27390294

  4. Critical development by design of a rugged HPLC-MS/MS method for direct determination of ibuprofen enantiomers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Nakov, Natalija; Petkovska, Rumenka; Ugrinova, Liljana; Kavrakovski, Zoran; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Svinarov, Dobrin

    2015-06-15

    Development and validation of a HPLC-MS/MS method for direct determination of R- and S-ibuprofen (Ibu) in human plasma without a need of derivatization or other complexities such as postcolumn infusion of solvents or reagents was performed. Critical steps were investigated during method development using experimental design to achieve a reliable and rugged assay. The LC-MS/MS separation of R-Ibu and S-Ibu was obtained on Lux Cellulose chiral column utilizing 0.1% (v/v) acetic acid in mixture of methanol and water (90:10%, v/v) as a mobile phase. Two types of extraction procedure for Ibu and Ketoprofen (internal standard, IS) were optimized using Full factorial 3(2) design (LLE) and D-Optimal Experimental Design (SPE). Excellent recovery values, 80% (mean) and 95% (mean) for LLE and SPE respectively, were obtained using 50μL plasma. The matrix effect was assessed for both of the extraction procedures, including hyperlipidaemic and haemolyzed plasma. The extensive investigation of matrix effect showed that LLE yields cleaner extracts than the SPE. The result of the investigation of in vitro interconversion of R-Ibu and S-Ibu showed that it does not occur under the influence of pH, temperature, and in the overall analytical procedure. The validation data, adhered to EMA guideline for validation of bioanalytical methods, showed that the proposed method provides accurate and reproducible results in range of 0.1-50mg/L with a lower limit of detection of 0.02mg/L. The applicability of the method was demonstrated through determination of R-Ibu and S-Ibu in human plasma after oral administration of 400mg rac-Ibu. PMID:25958322

  5. A different approach to evaluating health effects from radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Absorbed dose D is shown to be a composite variable, the product of the fraction of cells hit (I/sub H/) and the mean /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ (hit size) /ovr z/ to those cells. D is suitable for use with high level (HLE) to radiation and its resulting acute organ effects because, since I/sub H/ = 1.0, D approximates closely enough the mean energy density in the cell as well as in the organ. However, with low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation and its consequent probability of cancer induction from a single cell, stochastic delivery of energy to cells results in a wide distribution of hit sizes z, and the expected mean value, /ovr z/, is constant with exposure. Thus, with LLE, only I/sub H/ varies with D so that the apparent proportionality between /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ and the fraction of cells transformed is misleading. This proportionality therefore does not mean that any (cell) dose, no matter how small, can be lethal. Rather, it means that, in the exposure of a population of individual organisms consisting of the constituent relevant cells, there is a small probabililty of particle-cell interactions which transfer energy. The probability of a cell transforming and initiating a cancer can only be greater than zero if the hit size (/open quotes/dose of energy/close quotes/) to the cell is large enough. Otherwise stated, if the /open quotes/dose/close quotes/ is defined at the proper level of biological organization, namely, the cell and not the organ, only a large dose z to that cell is effective. The above precepts are utilized to develop a drastically different approach to evaluation oif risk from LLE, that holds promise of obviating any requirement for the components of the present system: absorbed organ dose, LET, a standard radiation, REB(Q), dose equivalent and rem. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  6. SU-E-J-261: Statistical Analysis and Chaotic Dynamics of Respiratory Signal of Patients in BodyFix

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, D; Huq, M; Bednarz, G; Lalonde, R; Yang, Y; Heron, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory signal of patients in BodyFix undergoing 4DCT scan with and without immobilization cover. Methods: 20 pairs of respiratory tracks recorded with RPM system during 4DCT scan were analyzed. Descriptive statistic was applied to selected parameters of exhale-inhale decomposition. Standardized signals were used with the delay method to build orbits in embedded space. Nonlinear behavior was tested with surrogate data. Sample entropy SE, Lempel-Ziv complexity LZC and the largest Lyapunov exponents LLE were compared. Results: Statistical tests show difference between scans for inspiration time and its variability, which is bigger for scans without cover. The same is for variability of the end of exhalation and inhalation. Other parameters fail to show the difference. For both scans respiratory signals show determinism and nonlinear stationarity. Statistical test on surrogate data reveals their nonlinearity. LLEs show signals chaotic nature and its correlation with breathing period and its embedding delay time. SE, LZC and LLE measure respiratory signal complexity. Nonlinear characteristics do not differ between scans. Conclusion: Contrary to expectation cover applied to patients in BodyFix appears to have limited effect on signal parameters. Analysis based on trajectories of delay vectors shows respiratory system nonlinear character and its sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Reproducibility of respiratory signal can be evaluated with measures of signal complexity and its predictability window. Longer respiratory period is conducive for signal reproducibility as shown by these gauges. Statistical independence of the exhale and inhale times is also supported by the magnitude of LLE. The nonlinear parameters seem more appropriate to gauge respiratory signal complexity since its deterministic chaotic nature. It contrasts with measures based on harmonic analysis that are blind for nonlinear features. Dynamics of breathing, so crucial for

  7. Progress towards polar-drive ignition for the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, R. L.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Li, C. K.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Padalino, S. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    The University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) performs direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. LLE's Omega Laser Facility is used to study direct-drive ICF ignition concepts, developing an understanding of the underlying physics that feeds into the design of ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The baseline symmetric-illumination, direct-drive-ignition target design consists of a 1.5 MJ multiple-picket laser pulse that generates four shock waves (similar to the NIF baseline indirect-drive design) and is predicted to produce a one-dimensional (1D) gain of 48. LLE has developed the polar-drive (PD) illumination concept (for NIF beams in the x-ray-drive configuration) to allow the pursuit of direct-drive ignition without significant reconfiguration of the beam paths on the NIF. Some less-invasive changes in the NIF infrastructure will be required, including new phase plates, polarization rotators, and a PD-specific beam-smoothing front end. A suite of PD ignition designs with implosion velocities from 3.5 to 4.3 × 107 cm s-1 are predicted to have significant 2D gains (Collins et al 2012 Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 57 155). Verification of the physics basis of these simulations is a major thrust of direct-drive implosion experiments on both OMEGA and the NIF. Many physics issues are being examined with symmetric beam irradiation on OMEGA, varying the implosion parameters over a wide region of design space. Cryogenic deuterium-tritium target experiments with symmetric irradiation have produced areal densities of ˜0.3 g cm-2, ion temperatures over 3 keV, and neutron yields in excess of 20% of the ‘clean’ 1D predicted value. The inferred Lawson criterion figure of merit (Betti R. et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas 17 058102) has increased from 1.7 atm s (IAEA 2010) to 2.6 atm s.

  8. Synthesis and optimization of N-heterocyclic pyridinones as catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhijian; Harrison, Scott T; Schubert, Jeffrey W; Sanders, John M; Polsky-Fisher, Stacey; Zhang, Nanyan Rena; McLoughlin, Debra; Gibson, Christopher R; Robinson, Ronald G; Sachs, Nancy A; Kandebo, Monika; Yao, Lihang; Smith, Sean M; Hutson, Pete H; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Barrow, James C

    2016-06-15

    A series of N-heterocyclic pyridinone catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors were synthesized. Physicochemical properties, including ligand lipophilic efficiency (LLE) and clogP, were used to guide compound design and attempt to improve inhibitor pharmacokinetics. Incorporation of heterocyclic central rings provided improvements in physicochemical parameters but did not significantly reduce in vitro or in vivo clearance. Nevertheless, compound 11 was identified as a potent inhibitor with sufficient in vivo exposure to significantly affect the dopamine metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and indicate central COMT inhibition. PMID:27133481

  9. Electric Fields Associated with Spherically Converging Shocks in Directly-Driven OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Sangster, T. C.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-01

    Time-gated, proton radiography provides direct measurements of radial electric fields and their temporal evolution in directly-driven capsule implosions. The experimental data indicate that such fields are associated with a spherically converging shock inside an imploding capsule. The implosions are simulated with the 2D hydrodynamic code DRACO. Several related mechanisms for generating such fields are discussed. The measurements provide physical insight into the structure, strength and dynamics of spherically converging shocks and have important implications in ICF implosion physics. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  10. The risk equivalent of an exposure to-, versus a dose of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    The long-term potential carcinogenic effects of low-level exposure (LLE) are addressed. The principal point discussed is linear, no-threshold dose-response curve. That the linear no-threshold, or proportional relationship is widely used is seen in the way in which the values for cancer risk coefficients are expressed - in terms of new cases, per million persons exposed, per year, per unit exposure or dose. This implies that the underlying relationship is proportional, i.e., ''linear, without threshold''. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  12. Risk assessment of mortality for all-cause, ischemic heart disease, cardiopulmonary disease, and lung cancer due to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Pei-Hsuan; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hu, Suh-Woan; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Tsai, Jeng-Lin; Tang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guan-Jie; Ku, Kai-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent understanding of PM2.5 health-related problems from fossil-fueled power plants emission inventories collected in Taiwan, we have determined the loss of life expectancy (LLE) and the lifetime (75-year) risks for PM2.5 health-related mortalities as attributed to the operation of the world's largest coal-fired power plant; the Taichung Power Plant (TCP), with an installed nominal electrical capacity of 5780 MW in 2013. Five plausible scenarios (combinations of emission controls, fuel switch, and relocation) and two risk factors were considered. It is estimated that the lifetime (75-y) risk for all-cause mortality was 0.3%-0.6% for males and 0.2%-0.4% for females, and LLE at 84 days in 1997 for the 23 million residents of Taiwan. The risk has been reduced to one-fourth at 0.05%-0.10% for males and 0.03%-0.06% for females, and LLE at 15 days in 2007, which was mainly attributed to the installation of desulfurization and de-NOx equipment. Moreover, additional improvements can be expected if we can relocate the power plant to a downwind site on Taiwan, and convert the fuel source from coal to natural gas. The risk can be significantly reduced further to one-fiftieth at 0.001%-0.002% for males and 0.001% for females, and LLE at 0.3 days. Nonetheless, it is still an order higher than the commonly accepted elevated-cancer risk at 0.0001% (10-6), indicating that the PM2.5 health-related risk for operating such a world-class power plant is not negligible. In addition, this study finds that a better-chosen site (involving moving the plant to the leeward side of Taiwan) can reduce the risk significantly as opposed to solely transitioning the fuel source to natural gas. Note that the fuel cost of using natural gas (0.11 USD/kWh in 2013) in Taiwan is about twice the price of using coal fuel (0.05 USD/kWh in 2013).

  13. Non-rigid registration of medical images based on ordinal feature and manifold learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Liu, Jin; Zang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of medical imaging technology, medical image research and application has become a research hotspot. This paper offers a solution to non-rigid registration of medical images based on ordinal feature (OF) and manifold learning. The structural features of medical images are extracted by combining ordinal features with local linear embedding (LLE) to improve the precision and speed of the registration algorithm. A physical model based on manifold learning and optimization search is constructed according to the complicated characteristics of non-rigid registration. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and applicability of the proposed registration scheme.

  14. Broad spectrum drug screening using electron-ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of drugs and internal standard (promazine) is performed by mixing urine at basic pH with 1-chlorobutane. There are no hydrolysis or derivatization steps. After centrifugation the organic (upper) layer is transferred to another tube and evaporated. The dried extract is reconstituted with ethyl acetate and 1 microL is injected onto the GCMS. Drugs are volatilized in the GC inlet and separated on a capillary column. In the EI source drugs become positively charged and fragment. Mass analysis of ionized fragments occurs with a single quadrupole. The resulting full scan mass spectra are automatically searched against three libraries. PMID:20077071

  15. Scientific Report (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedros Afeyan

    2004-05-11

    OAK-B135 An overview of our work as well as two recent publications are contained in this scientific report. The work reported here revolves around the discovery of new coherent nonlinear kinetic waves in laser produced plasmas, we call KEEN waves (kinetic, electrostatic electron nonlinear waves), and optical mixing experiments on the Imega laser system at LLE with blue-green light for the exploration of ways to suppress parametric instabilities in long scale length, long pulsewidth laser-plasmas such as those which will be found on NIF or LMJ.

  16. Mass Yields and Average Total Kinetic Energy Release in Fission for 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana

    2015-10-01

    Mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) in neutron induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets were measured with a gridded ionization chamber. Despite decades of fission research, our understanding of how fragment mass yields and TKE depend on incident neutron energy is limited, especially at higher energies (above 5-10 MeV). Improved accuracy in these quantities is important for nuclear technology as it enhances our simulation capabilities and increases the confidence in diagnostic tools. The data can also guide and validate theoretical fission models where the correlation between the fragment mass and TKE is of particular value for constraining models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam with energies from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on target nuclei 235U, 238U, and 239Pu will be presented with a focus on exploring data trends as a function of neutron energy from thermal through 30 MeV. Results indicate clear evidence of structure due to multi-chance fission in the TKE . LA-UR-15-24761.

  17. Clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA mutations in a Central European gastric cancer cohort

    PubMed Central

    Röcken, Christoph; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Böger, Christine; Krüger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Genomically stable gastric cancers (GCs) are enriched for the diffuse phenotype and hotspot mutations of RHOA. Here we aimed to validate the occurrence, phenotype and clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA mutant GCs in an independent Central European GC cohort consisting of 415 patients. The RHOA genotype (exon 2 and 3) was correlated with various genotypic, phenotypic and clinicopathological patient characteristics. Sixteen (3.9%) tumours had a RHOA mutation including four hitherto unreported mutations, that is, p.G17Efs*24, p.V24F, p.T37A and p.L69R. RHOA mutation was more prevalent in women (5.4% vs 2.8%), distal GCs (4.5% vs 2.4%), in poorly differentiated GCs (G3/G4; 4.8% vs 1.1%), T1/T2 tumours (6.2% vs 3.1%) and lacked distant metastases. Nine RHOA mutant GCs had a diffuse, four an intestinal, two an unclassified and one a mixed Laurén phenotype. KRAS and RHOA mutations were mutually exclusive. A single case showed both a RHOA and a PIK3CA mutation. No significant difference was found in the overall survival between RHOA mutant and wildtype GCs. Our study confirms the occurrence and clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA hotspot mutations in an independent patient cohort. However, we found no evidence for a prognostic or growth advantageous effect of RHOA mutations in GC. PMID:26251521

  18. Magnetized Collisionless Shock Studies Using High Velocity Plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvénic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and National Nuclear Security Administration under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369 Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  19. Magnetized collisionless shock studies using high velocity plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Intrator, T.; Gao, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvènic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and National Nuclear Security Administration under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369 Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  20. The Physics of a Spheromak with Applied Vertical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, S.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; Holcomb, C. T.; Stallard, B. W.; Wood, R. D.; Bulmer, R. H.; Cohen, B. I.; Lodestro, L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Sspx Team

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, USA. The physics basis of the initial flux configurations producible by the newly installed bias coils in SSPX is elucidated, and the anticipated results are explored. Broadly, the new configurations should increase the helicity injection rate, reduce the proportion of the spheromak flux that intersects the material boundary (‘field errors’) and increase particle confinement time. The effect of the applied field on equilibrium (CORSICA in SSPX geometry[1]) and stability (DCON[2]) will be discussed. Also, the effects on the dominant modes will be explored through 3D resistive MHD simulation (NIMROD[3]). Finally, a means for sustaining the spheromak in the absence of the n=1 mode, thought to be necessary for current drive, will be examined. [1] Hooper et al Nuc. Fusion v39, no.7, pp863-871 1999 [2] Glasser LANL report LA-UR-95-528 1995 [3] Glasser et al Plas. Phys. Cont. Fus. 41, A747 1999. Work performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  1. Oxidation and hydration of U3O8 materials following controlled exposure to temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Tamasi, Alison L; Boland, Kevin S; Czerwinski, Kenneth; Ellis, Jason K; Kozimor, Stosh A; Martin, Richard L; Pugmire, Alison L; Reilly, Dallas; Scott, Brian L; Sutton, Andrew D; Wagner, Gregory L; Walensky, Justin R; Wilkerson, Marianne P

    2015-04-21

    Chemical signatures correlated with uranium oxide processing are of interest to forensic science for inferring sample provenance. Identification of temporal changes in chemical structures of process uranium materials as a function of controlled temperatures and relative humidities may provide additional information regarding sample history. In this study, a high-purity α-U3O8 sample and three other uranium oxide samples synthesized from reaction routes used in nuclear conversion processes were stored under controlled conditions over 2-3.5 years, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize chemical speciation. Signatures measured from the α-U3O8 sample indicated that the material oxidized and hydrated after storage under high humidity conditions over time. Impurities, such as uranyl fluoride or schoepites, were initially detectable in the other uranium oxide samples. After storage under controlled conditions, the analyses of the samples revealed oxidation over time, although the signature of the uranyl fluoride impurity diminished. The presence of schoepite phases in older uranium oxide material is likely indicative of storage under high humidity and should be taken into account for assessing sample history. The absence of a signature from a chemical impurity, such as uranyl fluoride hydrate, in an older material may not preclude its presence at the initial time of production. LA-UR-15-21495. PMID:25786096

  2. Beam optics of the 2 MeV proton injection line at the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    Simulations of the beam optics of the LLUMC proton accelerator injection line have been modeled using the computer codes Parmila [Los Alamos Nat'l Lab, Internal Report LA-UR-98-4478, Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group, Los Alamos, NM] and Trace 3D [Distributed by AccelSoft Inc, P.O. Box 2813. Del Mar, CA 92014, United States]. These simulations give reasonable agreement with the known accelerator dispersion, beam energy spread and optimal debuncher setting. The purpose of this paper is to understand the beam losses and show where improvements can be made, if required, in the future. It has previously been found [G. Coutrakon et al., J. Med. Phys. 20 (11) (1994) 1691] that most intensity losses in the synchrotron can be ascribed to the narrow energy acceptance of the synchrotron. While the present intensity of the accelerator is quite adequate for patient treatments, future plans to treat larger fields will make higher intensity more desirable. A simulation has been performed which adds a second debuncher, or energy compactor, which shows a reduction in energy spread by a factor of two yielding a factor of two increase in the available intensity. The present intensity of 2.5 × 1010 protons per pulse with 34% of the injected intensity captured in the ring can possibly be improved to 5 × 1010 protons per pulse by capturing 68% of the injected beam intensity. These results are discussed in this paper.

  3. Novel Circuits for Energizing Manganin Stress Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacture and testing of novel MOSFET pulsed constant current supplies for low impedance Manganin stress gauges. The design emphasis has been on high accuracy, low noise, simple, low cost, disposable supplies that can be used to energize multiple gauges in explosive or shock experiments. Manganin gauges used to measure stresses in detonating explosive experiments have typical resistances of 50 m Ω and are energized with pulsed currents of 50 A. Conventional pulsed current supplies for these gauges are high voltage devices with outputs as high as 500 V. Common problems with the use of high voltage supplies at explosive firing sites are: erroneous signals caused by ground loops; overdrive of oscilloscopes on gauge failure; gauge signal crosstalk; cost; and errors due to finite and changing source impedances. To correct these issues a novel MOSFET circuit was designed and will be described. It is an 18-V circuit, powered by 9-V alkaline batteries, and features an optically isolated trigger, and single-point grounding. These circuits have been successfully tested at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and selected explosive tests will be described together with their results. LA-UR-15-20613.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Description of Partially Ionized Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagattuta, Ken

    2004-11-01

    A report on work in progress: the approach to steady-state of partially ionized dense plasmas, containing more than one atomic element, is being simulated with the quasi-classical method known as Fermi Molecular Dynamics (FMD). We recap the FMD method, recalling its several advantages and disadvantages, and present an overview of past work. we have continued to develop the FMD method as a tool for simulating the behaviors of a variety of inhomogeneous, partially ionized, dense plasma systems, in cases for which more rigorous methods are still unavailable. Predictions of the average ionization state Z* of atoms, in a plasma containing more than one atomic element, is complicated by many factors, especially under conditions of high density, and not too high temperature. Average atom models become problematic when two or more atomic elements are present together. In order to address this problem, we have applied the FMD method to plasmas containing selected mixtures of atomic elements, determining Z* for each element over a range of temperatures and densities. LANL archived abstract: LA-UR-04-2186

  5. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  6. The impact of boundary conditions and fluid velocity on damping for a fluid conveying pipe in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjolsing, Eric; Todd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The hydrocarbon industry has expressed interest in developing vibration based energy harvesting systems that can be deployed downhole and supplement or replace existing power sources. The energy output of such harvesters is highly dependent on the level of damping in the supporting structure which, in this case, would drive the systems vibrational input. A first step towards optimizing an energy harvester configuration is then to understand how key variables influence system damping. To this end an investigation was undertaken to identify how changing system boundary conditions effect damping in a fluid conveying pipe confined by a viscous fluid (i.e. a producing hydrocarbon well). The key variables investigated included the rotational boundary springs, the velocity of the conveyed fluid, and the viscosity of the annulus fluid. The system was modeled using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and included a hydrodynamic forcing function to capture the effects of the viscous annulus fluid. The natural frequencies of the system were solved in the frequency domain with the system damping subsequently calculated. Lower damping ratios were observed: in stiffer systems, for lower conveyed fluid velocities, and for lower annulus fluid viscosities. A numeric example is provided to illustrate the interaction between the three variables of interest. These results are of direct interest to researchers and engineers developing vibrational energy harvesting systems for downhole deployment. Approved for publication, LAUR-16-21227.

  7. Fissile material holdup measurement systems: an historical review of hardware and software

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Smith, Steven E; Rowe, Nathan C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of fissile material holdup is accomplished by passively measuring the energy-dependent photon flux and/or passive neutron flux emitted from the fissile material deposited within an engineered process system. Both measurement modalities--photon and neutron--require the implementation of portable, battery-operated systems that are transported, by hand, from one measurement location to another. Because of this portability requirement, gamma-ray spectrometers are typically limited to inorganic scintillators, coupled to photomultiplier tubes, a small multi-channel analyzer, and a handheld computer for data logging. For neutron detection, polyethylene-moderated, cadmium-back-shielded He-3 thermal neutron detectors are used, coupled to nuclear electronics for supplying high voltage to the detector, and amplifying the signal chain to the scaler for counting. Holdup measurement methods, including the concept of Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH), are well presented by T. Douglas Reilly in LA-UR-07-5149 and P. Russo in LA-14206, yet both publications leave much of the evolutionary hardware and software to the imagination of the reader. This paper presents an historical review of systems that have been developed and implemented since the mid-1980s for the nondestructive assay of fissile material, in situ. Specifications for the next-generation holdup measurements systems are conjectured.

  8. [The ATMO index: an air quality indicator for developed areas in France].

    PubMed

    2003-05-01

    The LAURE (5) of 30 december, 1996, sets the preventive, monitoring, reduction or suppression of atmospheric pollution objectives and the goals for preserving air quality. Heading 1--Article 4 of the law states in particular that the right to information on air quality and its impact on the environment is recognised as the right of every person on French territory. The decree of 10 january, 2000, about the air-quality index is derived from this determination to information for all, stated as an important element in the policy for air-quality management. This decree provides definitions of the ATMO index with "standards 2000" and the recommendations required for its calculation. Previously (1992 and before), certain local agencies had developed their own index. Naturally these indices showed sizeable differences. The effort provided by the Ministry of the Environment, ADEME and the monitoring agencies, enabled the definition of a single index for the whole of the large urban areas (> 100,000 inhabitants). The index gives a common language to the non-specialist public, which can now understand the overall air quality in different urban areas. As all aggregate indicators of the same kind, the ATMO index is designed as a tool that makes it possible to translate in a quantitative and simple way the synthesis of numerous measurement data recorded daily by official air-quality monitoring agencies (AASQA). PMID:12838780

  9. Numerical study of a linear accelerator using laser-generated proton beams as a source

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Fazi, M.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Lombardi, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-12-15

    The injection of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators (linacs) has been studied numerically. For this, we used the parameters of the proton source produced by ultraintense lasers, i.e., with an intrinsic high beam quality. The numerical particle tracing code PARMELA[L. M. Young and J. H. Billen, LANL Report No. LA-UR-96-1835, 2004] is then used to inject experimentally measured laser-generated protons with energies of 7{+-}0.1 MeV and rms un-normalized emittance of 0.180 mm mrad into one drift tube linac tank that accelerated them to more than 14 MeV. The simulations exhibit un-normalized emittance growths of 8 in x direction and 22.6 in y direction, with final emittances lower than those produced using conventional sources, allowing a potential luminosity gain for the final beam. However, the simulations also exhibit a limitation in the allowed injected proton charge as, over 0.112 mA, space charge effect worsens significantly the beam emittance.

  10. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  11. Using xRage to Model Heat Flow for Experiments to Measure Opacities in HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, L.; Vandervort, R.; Keiter, P.; Drake, R. P.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a NIF proposal to measure opacities of C, N and O at temperatures and densities relevant to the base of the solar convection zone. Our proposed experiments would provide the first opacity measurements for these elements within this HED regime. A critical feature of our experimental platform is a super-sonic radiation front propagating within the targets. Under these conditions, density remains constant across the radiation front for a couple nanoseconds, enabling a window during which the opacities of the hot and cold target may be measured simultaneously. Afterwards, hydrodynamic effects create temperature and density gradients, which would obfuscate analysis of opacity data. We are using xRage to simulate heat flow within our targets in order to estimate the time scale over which temperature and density gradients evolve. These simulations will better inform our target design and diagnostic requirements. If successful, our experiments could yield the data necessary to validate existing opacity models or provide physical insights to inform the development of new opacity models. Accurate opacity models are essential to the understanding of radiation transport within HED systems, with applications ranging from astrophysics to ICF. U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant #DE-NA0001840. Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-UR-15-25490.

  12. Asteroid Defense: Comparison of Kinetic-Impact and Nuclear Stand-Off Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisler, G. R.; Ferguson, J.; Plesko, C. S.; Weaver, R.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the deflection of hazardous near-earth objects using either a kinetic impactor or a nuclear stand-off burst. If the object is known to be competent, the kinetic impactor is shown to be highly efficient. The momentum delivered to the object can be much greater than the momentum of the impactor because of the reaction force produced by ablation from the impact crater. We use an adaptive-mesh hydrocode to study the momentum-enhancement factor, or beta, varying the assumptions regarding the equation of state and the strength of the target. Spall from the back side of the asteroid, which partly counters the favorable effect of ablation, is also included in the calculations. For objects not known to be competent, the nuclear stand-off burst option may be preferable. In this case, crucial questions surround the optimum height of burst and the radiation characteristics of the burst. The same hydrocode, with radiation diffusion included, is used to study this case as well. Figures of merit from both these studies include the bulk momentum imparted to the asteroid and the degree to which the asteroid is disrupted. LA-UR-14-26234

  13. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Brett; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for actinides have long been of great interest for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements were performed using fission chambers which provided limited information about the detected fission events. For the case of 239Pu(n,f), sensitivity studies have shown a need for more precise measurements. Recently the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure fission cross sections to better than 1% uncertainty by providing 3D tracking of fission fragments. The fissionTPC collected data to calculate the 239Pu(n,f) cross section at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during the 2014 run cycle. Preliminary analysis has been focused on studying particle identification and target and beam non-uniformities to reduce the uncertainty on the cross section. Additionally, the collaboration is investigating other systematic errors that could not be well studied with a traditional fission chamber. LA-UR-15-24906.

  14. Alpha Heating and TN Burn in NIF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Merrill, Frank; Cerjan, Charlie; Batha, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable TN burn requires alpha-particle energy deposition in the hot fuel. Recently, we developed an analytic model to estimate the neutron yield generated by the alpha-particle energy deposited in the hot spot, in terms of the measured total neutron yield, the adiabat of the cold fuel and the peak implosion kinetic energy of the pusher. Our alpha heating model has been applied to a number of inertial confinement fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our model predictions are consistent with the post-shot calibrated code simulations and experimental data. We have also studied the uncertainty and sensitivities of alpha heating on various physics parameters, such as the adiabat of cold fuel, total neutron yield and peak implosion velocity. Our analysis demonstrates that the alpha particle heating was appreciable in only high-foot experiments. Based on our work, we will discuss paths and parameters to reach ignition at NIF (LA-UR-15-25507). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  15. Tamping effects and confinement time in NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Merrill, F.; Cerjan, C.; Batha, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    Tamper is expected to play an important role in inertial confinement fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It is expected to increase the confinement time of thermonuclear burning (TN) in the hot spot. In this work, we study the dependence of the capsule performance with respect to the density ratio of the pusher to the hot fuel at the cold-hot interface numerically through LASNEX simulations in one-dimension. Our study shows that the dependence of the capsule performance (neutron yield) with respect to the square root of the density ratio is not linear: the sharper the interface, the higher the tamping effect and neutron yields. Our analysis indicates that the tamping factor in both NIC and NIF experiments has not been appreciable and the tamping factor on yield is less than 1.1. Thus, the tamping factor has not yet played a significant role in the current NIF ignition design. Furthermore, the confinement time in NIF experiments will be discussed. (LA-UR-15-25596).

  16. SESAME 96171, a three-phase equation of state for CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Chisolm, Eric D.

    2014-07-08

    This report describes an earlier version of an equation of state (EOS) for cerium (IV) oxide, CeO2. This work has been superseded by a newer version that is described in LA-UR-14-24689. Everything from this report needed to understand the new version is included in the new report. I have constructed SESAME 96171, an EOS for cerium (IV) oxide that includes two solid phases and the liquid. Unlike its immediate predecessor, this EOS is valid over a larger range in pressure due to including the extra phase. I have described the process of constructing and testing the EOS, emphasizing its continuity with the previous EOS and the modifications needed for the new frame-work. The comparison with data is good, but is still limited by the same issues with nuclear models that were present in the previous work. The remaining significant issue is the comparison of the crystal-density EOS with experimental porous Hugoniot data, which may require using more sophisticated model to represent porosity, as discussed in the previous report.

  17. Clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA mutations in a Central European gastric cancer cohort.

    PubMed

    Röcken, Christoph; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Böger, Christine; Krüger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Genomically stable gastric cancers (GCs) are enriched for the diffuse phenotype and hotspot mutations of RHOA. Here we aimed to validate the occurrence, phenotype and clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA mutant GCs in an independent Central European GC cohort consisting of 415 patients. The RHOA genotype (exon 2 and 3) was correlated with various genotypic, phenotypic and clinicopathological patient characteristics. Sixteen (3.9%) tumours had a RHOA mutation including four hitherto unreported mutations, that is, p.G17Efs*24, p.V24F, p.T37A and p.L69R. RHOA mutation was more prevalent in women (5.4% vs 2.8%), distal GCs (4.5% vs 2.4%), in poorly differentiated GCs (G3/G4; 4.8% vs 1.1%), T1/T2 tumours (6.2% vs 3.1%) and lacked distant metastases. Nine RHOA mutant GCs had a diffuse, four an intestinal, two an unclassified and one a mixed Laurén phenotype. KRAS and RHOA mutations were mutually exclusive. A single case showed both a RHOA and a PIK3CA mutation. No significant difference was found in the overall survival between RHOA mutant and wildtype GCs. Our study confirms the occurrence and clinicopathological characteristics of RHOA hotspot mutations in an independent patient cohort. However, we found no evidence for a prognostic or growth advantageous effect of RHOA mutations in GC. PMID:26251521

  18. Free-space Quantum Key Distribution over 10 km in Daylight and at Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard; Nordholt, Jane; Peterson, Charles

    2002-05-01

    In quantum key distribution (QKD) single-photon transmissions transfer the shared, secret random number sequences, known as cryptographic keys that are used to encrypt and decrypt secret communications. Because the security of QKD is based on principles of quantum physics and information theory an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection. We have performed QKD using the four-state Â"BB84Â" protocol with non-orthogonal photon polarization states across a 10-km line-of-sight path in daylight and at night [1]. We transferred secret, cryptographic quality random numbers at practical rates with security against technologically feasible eavesdropping strategies. By relating the secrecy capacity (secret bits transferred per transmitted bit), which had values up to 10-3, to properties of the atmospheric channel we are able to infer the secrecy capacity of free-space QKD under other atmospheric conditions and over other, longer transmission distances. 1. R. J. Hughes, J. E. Nordholt, D. Derkacs and C. G. Peterson, Los Alamos report LA-UR-02-449.

  19. Anti-proliferative lichen compounds with inhibitory activity on 12(S)-HETE production in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bucar, F; Schneider, I; Ogmundsdóttir, H; Ingólfsdóttir, K

    2004-11-01

    Several lichen compounds, i.e. lobaric acid (1), a beta-orcinol depsidone from Stereocaulon alpinum L., (+)-protolichesterinic acid (2), an aliphatic alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone from Cetraria islandica Laur. (Parmeliaceae), (+)-usnic acid (3), a dibenzofuran from Cladonia arbuscula (Wallr.) Rabenh. (Cladoniaceae), parietin (4), an anthraquinone from Xanthoria elegans (Link) Th. Fr. (Calaplacaceae) and baeomycesic acid (5), a beta-orcinol depside isolated from Thamnolia vermicularis (Sw.) Schaer. var. subuliformis (Ehrh.) Schaer. were tested for inhibitory activity on platelet-type 12(S)-lipoxygenase using a cell-based in vitro system in human platelets. Lobaric acid (1) and (+)-protolichesterinic acid (2) proved to be pronounced inhibitors of platelet-type 12(S)-lipoxygenase, whereas baeomycesic acid (5) showed only weak activity (inhibitory activity at a concentration of 100 microg/ml: (1) 93.4+/-6.62%, (2) 98,5+/-1.19%, 5 14.7+/-2.76%). Usnic acid (3) and parietin (4) were not active at this concentration. 1 and 2 showed a clear dose-response relationship in the range of 3.33-100 microg/ml. According to the calculated IC50 values the highest inhibitory activity was observed for the depsidone 1 (IC50 = 28.5 microM) followed by 2 (IC50 = 77.0 microM). The activity of 1 was comparable to that of the flavone baicalein, which is known as a selective 12(S)-lipoxygenase inhibitor (IC50 = 24.6 microM). PMID:15636173

  20. Time-Temperature Superposition Applied to PBX Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    The use of plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) in weapon applications requires a certain level of structural/mechanical integrity. Uniaxial tension and compression experiments characterize the mechanical response of materials over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates, providing the basis for predictive modeling in more complex geometries. After years of data collection on a wide variety of PBX formulations, we have applied time-temperature superposition principles to a mechanical properties database which includes PBX 9501, PBX 9502, PBXN-110, PBXN-9, and HPP (propellant). The results of quasi-static tension and compression, SHPB compression, and cantilever DMA are compared. Time-temperature relationships of maximum stress and corresponding strain values are analyzed in addition to the more conventional analysis of modulus. Our analysis shows adherence to the principles of time-temperature superposition and correlations of mechanical response to the binder glass transition and specimen density. Direct ties relate time-temperature analysis to the underlying basis of existing PBX mechanical models (ViscoSCRAM). Results suggest that, within limits, mechanical response can be predicted at conditions not explicitly measured. LA-UR 11-01096.

  1. Los Alamos flux comperssion systems, ASI focus area I program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Heger, Sharif

    2010-12-14

    This document is a final summary of an original plan submitted as LA-UR 10-06693. There are minor revisions, some new items have been completed, and there is a statement of some funding shortfalls. Program plan focuses on using Ranchero Technology for the ASI 43 cm Ranchero generators are being fabricated to provide a small scale load and diagnostics test capability at Los Alamos - LLNL loads and Los Alamos multi-shell loads. 43 cm Ranchero tests continue as long as they are useful. 1 or 1.4 m Ranchero tests follow in the out years - Multi-shell loads have identified needs for full length generators and one 1.4 m generator is on hand. Both LLNL and Los Alamos loads will require larger current capability, and Ranchero will be scaled up in diameter when full scale current is defined. Increased scale tests expected in FY-12. The bulk of the Los Alamos Effort will be directed toward two thrusts: (1) Perform tests for LLNL load development and (2) explore multi-shell loads. ASC program assesses development against ASI results then provides new designs.

  2. TOPS Opacities: Opacities of mixtures (calculated by TOPS« using LEDCOP« elemental opacities) and LEDCOP« Astrophysical Opacities mixed by TOPS«) from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The LANL T-4 Group develops methods for and perform calculations of atomic structure, scattering cross sections, opacities, exotic atoms, and quantum and nonlinear optics, including effects of high energy density environments and interaction with external electromagnetic fields. The Opacity databases allow User chosen mixtures and/or elements and provide precalculated astrophysical mixtures.

    The Astrophysical Opacity data base contains opacity information for all elements from hydrogen to zinc, over a temperature range from 0.5 eV to 100 keV and a density range from 10-10 to 10+9 gm/cc. Every element has approximately 1500 (T-h) points, where T is the temperature and h is the electron degeneracy parameter, which characterizes the electron pressure of the plasma at the ion-plasma boundary. [Copied from LANL T-4 Opacity Web Page, Norman H. Magee, Jr. (T-4) and Robert E. H. Clark (X-CI), a Theoretical Self-Assessment Special Feature, May,1999. See LA-UR-99-336] (Specialized Interface)

  3. The Interaction of Explosively Generated Plasma with Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Douglas; LANL Team

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that the temperature of explosively generated plasma (EGP) is of the order of 1 eV and plasma ejecta can be focused to achieve velocities as high as 25 km/s. These high velocity plasma can readily penetrate a wide range of materials including metals. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to determine if EGP could be used for explosive ordnance demolition and other applications. The test goals were: to benignly disable ordnance containing relatively sensitive high performance explosives (PBX-9501); and to investigate the possibility of interrupting an ongoing detonation in a powerful high explosive (again PBX-9501) with EGP. Experiments were performed to establish the optimum sizes of plasma generators for the benign deactivation of high explosives, i.e., the destruction of the ordnance without initiating a detonation or comparable violent event. These experiments were followed by attempts to interrupt an ongoing detonation by the destruction of the unreacted explosive in its path. The results were encouraging. First, it was demonstrated that high explosives could be destroyed without the initiation of a detonation or high order reaction. Second, ongoing detonations were successfully interrupted with EGP. LA-UR-15-20612.

  4. Gas loading system for LANL two-stage gas guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Lee; Bartram, Brian; Dattelbaum, Dana; Lang, John; Morris, John

    2015-06-01

    A novel gas loading system was designed for the specific application of remotely loading high purity gases into targets for gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. The high purity gases are loaded into well-defined target configurations to obtain Hugoniot states in the gas phase at greater than ambient pressures. The small volume of the gas samples is challenging, as slight changing in the ambient temperature result in measurable pressure changes. Therefore, the ability to load a gas gun target and continually monitor the sample pressure prior to firing provides the most stable and reliable target fielding approach. We present the design and evaluation of a gas loading system built for the LANL 50 mm bore two-stage light gas gun. Targets for the gun are made of 6061 Al or OFHC Cu, and assembled to form a gas containment cell with a volume of approximately 1.38 cc. The compatibility of materials was a major consideration in the design of the system, particularly for its use with corrosive gases. Piping and valves are stainless steel with wetted seals made from Kalrez and Teflon. Preliminary testing was completed to ensure proper flow rate and that the proper safety controls were in place. The system has been used to successfully load Ar, Kr, Xe, and anhydrous ammonia with purities of up to 99.999 percent. The design of the system, and example data from the plate impact experiments will be shown. LA-UR-15-20521

  5. Saturation of stimulated Raman scattering in short-pulse laser amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Lundquist, P.; Sarkisyan, S.; Nelson-Melby, E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has focused on using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in plasmas as a means of laser pulse amplification and compression as an alternative to the CPA technique. Initial experiments have demonstrated the amplification and compression of laser pulses in plasma to an unfocused intensity of ~1016 W/cm2. However, the amplification saturated and was accompanied by deleterious spatial and temporal incoherence, and the reasons for this incoherence are not well understood. In this presentation, we will show results from recent particle-in-cell simulations using the LSP code and discuss several factors leading to the gain saturation and the importance of electron trapping. An understanding of the saturation process can lead to models for use in 3-wave calculations and subsequent experimental designs that avoid competing instabilities. We will discuss these results in the context of plasma channels with electron temperatures of ~0.75 eV, electron densities of ~1019 cm-3, and channel lengths >1 mm. Supported under the U.S. DOE by LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-11-03808.

  6. Capsule Design for Hybrid Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Dodd, E. S.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock-Ignition (HSI) is an alternate fusion energy concept that combines indirect drive and shock ignition schemes in order to access new regimes in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum physics. Building off of tetrahedral hohlraum experiments at the OMEGA laser facility, we have preliminary designs for spherical hohlraums that combine symmetrically arranged laser entrance holes for indirect-drive beams (to initially compress the capsule) and holes for direct-drive beams to drive a strong ignitor shock (to further compress and ignite the fuel). A LANL Eulerian hydrodynamic code is being used to find optimal laser drive, hohlraum, and capsule specifications, via criteria such as implosion symmetry, implosion time, and neutron yield. At first, drive will be modeled using a radiation source to mimic the hohlraum drive, and later, ignitor beams will be added. Initial capsule designs will be presented for experiments to develop the HSI platform on the sub-ignition scale OMEGA laser facility in FY15. Supported under the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-25071.

  7. Creation of a high density, high flux target plasmoid for magneto-inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, Thomas; Sears, Jason

    2011-10-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion utilizes embedded magnetic fields to reduce thermal transport and enhance alpha particle heating during an implosion reducing the required areal density, implosion speed, and convergence for fusion ignition. This enables the use of efficient inexpensive pulsed power, reducing the gain required for breakeven (e.g. ηG = 0 . 5 * 10 (MIF), = 0 . 05 * 100 (ICF)). The FRX-L and FRCHX experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Air Force Research Laboratory at Kirtland AFB are investigating a subset of MIF called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) in which a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid is injected into a converging solid, conductive liner and compressed to fusion conditions. Traditional FRC formation techniques utilizing ringing- θ pre-ionization have proved to be incapable of forming target plasmoids with enough density and magnetic flux, limiting the particle inventory, confinement, and lifetime. An alternative formation technique utilizing magnetoplasmadynamic arc sources has been developed to increase the density and trapped flux of the target plasmoid. Plasma source technology and operation are presented, as well as changes to the target formation process, plasmoid characteristics, and implications to MTF. Work supported by the DOE, OFES, under LANS Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25369. Public release number LA-UR 11-03950.

  8. Mix Degradation in DT Filled Capsules When Shock and Compression Yields are Resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Horsfield, C. J.; Drew, D. W.; Miller, E. K.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2007-11-01

    1100μm dia. DT(5atm) + 3He (0,1,or 5 atm) filled glass capsules were directly driven on the Omega laser to measure yield, X-ray images, and especially the burn time history. The 600ps square pulse increases time separation between the ``shock'' yield (before the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell) and later ``compression'' yield. Matching the timing and amount of this early ``shock'' yield in the implosions fixes the electron conduction flux limiter. The Scannapieco and Cheng mix model results are compared with measured yield, burn temperatures and histories, and gated X-ray images. The experiment shows degradation of both the shock and compression yield, but relatively more degradation of the compression yield than explained by the model. The first gated images, which occur when the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell, show significant mixing has already occurred. But the lack of X-ray emission 60ps earlier suggests no mixing then. Work supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed by LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-07-4929.

  9. Improved Modeling of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra for Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Kawano, Toshihiko; Kahler, Albert C.; White, Morgan C.

    2015-10-01

    The prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) of major actinides such as 239Pu and 235U are quantities of interest for nuclear physics application areas including reactor physics and national security. Nuclear data evaluations provide recommended data for those application areas based on nuclear theory and experiments. Here, we present improvements made to the effective models predicting the PFNS up to incident neutron energies of 30 MeV and their impact on evaluations. These models describe relevant physics processes better than those used for the current US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In addition, the use of higher-fidelity models such as Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshbach calculations will be discussed in the context of future PFNS evaluations. (LA-UR-15-24763) This work was carried out under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Science, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Optical diagnostics on the Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguski, J. C.; Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.; Dunn, J. P.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Gao, K. W.

    2013-10-01

    The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory was built to investigate the physics of high Alfvén Mach number, supercritical, magnetized shocks through the acceleration and subsequent stagnation of a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid against a magnetic mirror and/or plasma target. A suite of optical diagnostics has recently been fielded on MSX to characterize plasma conditions during the formation, acceleration, and stagnation phases of the experiment. CCD-backed streak and framing cameras, and a fiber-based visible light array, provide information regarding FRC shape, velocity, and instability growth. Time-resolved narrow and broadband spectroscopy provides information on pre-shock plasma temperature, impurity levels, shock location, and non-thermal ion distributions within the shock region. Details of the diagnostic design, configuration, and characterization will be presented along with initial results. This work is supported by the Center for Magnetic Self Organization, DoE OFES and NNSA under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369. Approved for public release: LA-UR- 13-25190.

  11. Hohlraum Modeling of Hybrid Shock Ignition Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock Ignition (HSI) combines a hohlraum driven capsule with a directly driven shock for heating. Unlike standard Shock Ignition, the capsule is imploded with X-rays from a laser driven hohlraum to compress the fuel, which is too cold to ignite. However, as in Shock Ignition, the compressed fuel is subsequently heated to ignition temperatures with a directly-driven shock. The use of indirect and direct drive in the same target necessitates complex beam geometry, and thus HSI is being pursued with spherical hohlraums. More importantly for the NIF, the beam repointing required for polar direct drive will not be needed for the implosion phase with this target. Spherical hohlraums have been fielded previously at the OMEGA laser as a part of the Tetrahedral Hohlraum Campaign. They were originally proposed as an alternative to cylindrical hohlraums to achieve highly symmetric radiation drive. The new HSI hohlraums will require six laser entrance holes in hexahedral symmetry to accommodate all beams. This presentation will show radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of the current hexahedral OMEGA hohlraum design, as well as benchmark calculations of the old tetrahedral targets. Supported under the US DOE by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-24945.

  12. A base-line model for direct-drive ICF implosions in the xRAGE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Schmidt, J. H.; Cooley, J. H.

    2013-10-01

    xRAGE is a radiation-hydrodynamics code using a Godunov solver on an Eulerian mesh with an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm, and a radiation diffusion algorithm. It has been used to study fluid flow in highly distorted systems, where arbitrary Langrian Eulerian (ALE) methods are not the method of choice, which can include ICF. A version of the code, called CASSIO, uses an implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) method for radiation transport. However, specific physics packages relevant to ICF have not been available in the past, and which include laser propagation, three-temperature plasma physics and non-LTE opacity calculations. As these physics packages become available and undergo testing, a suite of validation problems is being developed to test the code under conditions relevant to ICF. The direct-drive ICF capsules fielded for the High-Z project will be used as the initial suite of validation problems. This presentation will discuss the capsule experiments and the physics used in the modeling, as well as a brief overview of the software framework used to standardize the verification and validation process. Supported under the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-13-25068.

  13. Magnetic Diagnostics on the Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, T. M.; Weber, T. E.; Boguski, J. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Smith, R. J.; Dunn, J. P.

    2013-10-01

    The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory was built to investigate the physics of high-Alfvénic, supercritical, magnetized shocks through the acceleration and subsequent stagnation of a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid against a magnetic mirror and/or plasma target. An array of high-bandwidth, multi-axis, robust, internal magnetic probes has been constructed to characterize flux compression ratios, instability formation, and turbulent macro-scale features of the post-shock plasma. The mirror magnet is mounted on a linear translation stage, providing a capability to axially move the shock layer through the probe field of view. An independent, external probe array also provides conventional information on the FRC shape, velocity, and total pressure during the formation and acceleration phases. Probe design, characterization, configuration, and initial results are presented. This work is supported by the DOE OFES and NNSA under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369. LA-UR-13-25189.

  14. Why have we stopped research on liquid centrifugal separation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.

    1996-05-28

    Using high-temperature high-speed liquid centrifuges for lanthanides and actinides separation was originally proposed as a physical separation method in the Los Alamos ADTT/ATW concept [C. Bowman, LA-UR-92-1065 (1992)]. The authors investigated centrifugal separation in a concerted effort of experiments, theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. They discovered that owing to the ionic-composition-dependence of the sedimentation coefficients for the fission products and actinides, separation by grouping of molecular densities would not work in general in the molten salt environment. Alternatively the lanthanides and actinides could be transferred to a liquid metal carrier (e.g. bismuth) via reductive extraction and then separated by liquid centrifuges, but the material and technical challenges are severe. Meanwhile the authors have established that the reductive extraction procedure itself can be used for desired separations. Unlike conventional aqueous-based reprocessing technologies, reductive extraction separation uses only reagent (Li) that reconstitutes carrier salts (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) and a processing medium (Bi) that can be continuously recycled and reused, with a nearly-pure fission products waste stream. The processing units are compact and reliable, and can be built at relatively low cost while maintaining high throughput. Therefore the research effort on developing liquid centrifuges for separations in ADTT/ATW was terminated in late 1995. This paper will discuss the various aspects involved in reaching this decision.

  15. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-02-12

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  16. A diffusive radiation hydrodynamics code, xRage, is implemented to compare radiation flow with experimental data from the Omega laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervort, Robert; Elgin, Laura; Farag, Ebraheem; Mussack, Katie; Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann; Keiter, Paul; Klein, Sallee; Orban, Christopher; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    A sound speed discrepancy between solar models and data collected using helioseismology exists. The sound speed discrepancy is the most pronounced at the base of the convective zone (CZ) for otherwise consistent solar models. One potential solution is that the opacity models for important elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are incomplete. At these high energy-density conditions few relevant opacity measurements exist to compare to the models. Only relatively recently have user facilities been able to reach the temperatures and densities that resemble the convective zone base. It is our long term goal to determine the opacities of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen at the relevant conditions. Preliminary testing has occurred at the Omega Laser Facility in Rochester, New York. Presented are the results of the shots taken on April 22, 2015. A half hohlraum was used to drive a supersonic radiation front through a dominantly carbon, CRF, foam. These results are compared to diffusive xRage simulations. (LA-UR-15-25495)

  17. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in plasma and its application in farmers and consumers

    PubMed Central

    Thiphom, Sarunya; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Chantara, Somporn; Mangklabruks, Ampica; Suphavilai, Chaisuree; Ahn, Ki Chang; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a plasma biomarker of exposure to pyrethroid insecticides. A major metabolite, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), can be detected in urine but urinary 3-PBA cannot be used to assess the active dose. The 3-PBA-adduct represents a much more persistent class of biomarkers than metabolites excreted into urine, having half lives up to several weeks or months. We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for total 3-PBA including adduct formed after alkaline hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE) of the sample. The developed ELISA had an IC50 value of 26.7 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (%CV) were lower than 5% and were within the optimum condition variance (OCV) range. The LLE cleanup technique satisfactorily eliminated the matrix effect from plasma samples before SPE and ELISA analysis yielding good recoveries (85.9–99.4%) with a limit of quantitation (LOQ, 5 ng/mL) that was 30- to 47-fold more sensitive than previous studies. Moreover, the developed method could separate more than 80% of 3-PBA from adduct form. The method was successfully applied to the detection of the target in real samples obtained from consumers (n=50) and farmers (n=50). To our knowledge, this is the first ELISA method for detecting 3-PBA in human plasma and applied to a field study. PMID:23667388

  18. The multiple-pulse driver line on the OMEGA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosc, T. Z.; Kelly, J. H.; Hill, E. M.; Dorrer, C.; Waxer, L. J.; Donaldson, W. R.

    2015-02-01

    The multiple-pulse driver line (MPD) provides on-shot co-propagation of two separate pulse shapes in all 60 OMEGA beams at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The two co-propagating pulse shapes would typically be (1) a series of 100-ps "picket" pulses followed by (2) a longer square or shaped "drive" pulse. Smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), which increases the laser bandwidth, can be applied to either one of the two pulse shapes. Therefore, MPD allows for dynamic bandwidth reduction, where the bandwidth is applied only to the picket portion of a pulse shape. Since the use of SSD decreases the efficiency of frequency conversion from the IR to the UV, dynamic bandwidth reduction provides an increase in the drive-pulse energy. The design of the MPD required careful consideration of beam combination as well as the minimum pulse separation for two pulses generated by two separate sources. A new combined-pulse-shape diagnostic needed to be designed and installed after the last grating used for SSD. This new driver-line flexibility is built into the OMEGA front end as one component of the initiative to mitigate cross-beam energy transfer on target and to demonstrate hydro-equivalent ignition on the OMEGA laser at LLE.

  19. Effects of inspiratory loading on the chaotic dynamics of ventilatory flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Samara, Ziyad; Raux, Mathieu; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Gharbi, Alexandre; Gottfried, Stewart B; Poon, Chi-Sang; Similowski, Thomas; Straus, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Human ventilation at rest exhibits complexity and chaos. The aim of this study was to determine whether suprapontine interferences with the automatic breathing control could contribute to ventilatory chaos. We conducted a post hoc analysis of a previous study performed in awake volunteers exhibiting cortical pre-motor potentials during inspiratory loading. In eight subjects, flow was recorded at rest, while breathing against inspiratory threshold loads (median 21.5 cm H(2)O) and resistive loads (50 cm H(2)Ol(-1)s(-1)) loads, and while inhaling 7% CO(2)-93% O(2). Chaos was identified through noise titration (noise limit, NL) and the sensitivity to initial conditions was assessed through the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). Breath-by-breath variability was evaluated using the coefficient of variation of several ventilatory variables. Chaos was consistently present in ventilatory flow recordings, but mechanical loading did not alter NL, LLE, or variability. In contrast, CO(2) altered chaos and reduced variability. In conclusion, inspiratory loading - and any resultant respiratory-related cortical activity - were not associated with changes in ventilatory chaos in this study, arguing against suprapontine contributions to ventilatory complexity. PMID:19013545

  20. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  1. The Dortmund Data Bank: A computerized system for retrieval, correlation, and prediction of thermodynamic properties of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, U.; Rarey-Nies, J.; Gmehling, J. )

    1989-05-01

    The Dortmund Data Bank (DDB) was started in 1973 with the intention to employ the vast store of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data from the literature for the development of models for the prediction of VLE. From the beginning, the structure of the DDB has been organized in such a way that it was possible to take advantage of the full potential of electronic computers. With the experience gained in fitting and processing VLE data, the authors extended the DDB system to other types of mixture properties, i.e., liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE), gas solubilities (GLE), activity coefficients at infinite dilution ({gamma}{sup {infinity}}), heats of mixing h{sup E}, and excess heat capacities. Besides the files for mixture properties, the DDB contains pure-component data and program packages for various applications. New experimental data are checked for consistency before they are stored. For data retrieval user-specified search masks can be used. The data files are available via an online data service and through the Dechema Chemistry Data Series. For the purpose of data correlation and model testing, parameter fitting is performed with an optimization routine (Nelder-Mead). In the past years the DDB system has been successfully employed for the development of prediction methods for VLE, LLE, GLE, {gamma}{sup {infinity}}, and h{sup E} (UNIFAC, mod. UNIFAC, etc.).

  2. Development and comparison of two dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction techniques coupled to high performance liquid chromatography for the rapid analysis of bisphenol A in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuhui; Xie, Qilong; Chen, Jie; Sun, Janzhi; He, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoke

    2013-06-21

    In this study, two novel sample extraction methods for the analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in edible oils were developed by using liquid-liquid extraction followed by a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LLE-DLLME) and reversed-phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (RP-DLLME). RP-DLLME showed a superior characteristic over LLE-DLLME and other previously reported procedures because of its easy operation, short extraction time, high sensitivity, low organic solvent consumption and waste generation. The optimized extraction conditions of RP-DLLME for 1.0 g of edible oil diluted in 4 mL of n-hexane were: extractant, 100 μL 0.2 M sodium hydroxide solution (80% methanol, v/v); extraction time, 1 min; centrifugation, 3 min. The determination of BPA was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a DAD detector. The method offered excellent linearity over a range of 0.010-0.5 μg g(-1) with a correlation coefficient of r>0.997. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability values expressed as relative standard deviation were 1.9% and 5.9%, respectively. The quantitation limit and detection limit were 6.3 and 2.5 ng g(-1). The target analyte was detected in 5 out of 16 edible oil samples. The recovery rates in real samples ranged from 89.5 to 99.7%. PMID:23683892

  3. Detecting a wide range of environmental contaminants in human blood samples--combining QuEChERS with LC-MS and GC-MS methods.

    PubMed

    Plassmann, Merle M; Schmidt, Magdalena; Brack, Werner; Krauss, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to environmental pollution and consumer products may result in an uptake of chemicals into human tissues. Several studies have reported the presence of diverse environmental contaminants in human blood samples. However, previously developed multi-target methods for the analysis of human blood include a fairly limited amount of compounds stemming from one or two related compound groups. Thus, the sample preparation method QuEChERS (quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe) was tested for the extraction of 64 analytes covering a broad compound domain followed by detection using liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC- and GC-MS). Forty-seven analytes showed absolute recoveries above 70% in the first QuEChERS step, being a simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using acetonitrile and salt. The second QuEChERS step, being a dispersive solid phase extraction, did not result in an overall improvement of recoveries or removal of background signals. Using solely the LLE step, eight analytes could subsequently be detected in human blood samples from the German Environmental Specimen Bank. Using a LC-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method with a triple quadrupole instrument, better recoveries were achieved than with an older LC-high-resolution (HR) MS full scan orbitrap instrument, which required a higher concentration factor of the extracts. However, the application of HRMS full scan methods could be used for the detection of additional compounds retrospectively. PMID:26206704

  4. Optimisation of olive oil phenol extraction conditions using a high-power probe ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Jerman Klen, T; Mozetič Vodopivec, B

    2012-10-15

    A new method of ultrasound probe assisted liquid-liquid extraction (US-LLE) combined with a freeze-based fat precipitation clean-up and HPLC-DAD-FLD-MS detection is described for extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) phenol analysis. Three extraction variables (solvent type; 100%, 80%, 50% methanol, sonication time; 5, 10, 20 min, extraction steps; 1-5) and two clean-up methods (n-hexane washing vs. low temperature fat precipitation) were studied and optimised with aim to maximise extracts' phenol recoveries. A three-step extraction of 10 min with pure methanol (5 mL) resulted in the highest phenol content of freeze-based defatted extracts (667 μg GAE g(-1)) from 10 g of EVOO, providing much higher efficiency (up to 68%) and repeatability (up to 51%) vs. its non-sonicated counterpart (LLE-agitation) and n-hexane washing. In addition, the overall method provided high linearity (r(2)≥0.97), precision (RSD: 0.4-9.3%) and sensitivity with LODs/LOQs ranging from 0.03 to 0.16 μg g(-1) and 0.10-0.51 μg g(-1) of EVOO, respectively. PMID:23442714

  5. β-lactam antibiotics residues analysis in bovine milk by LC-ESI-MS/MS: a simple and fast liquid-liquid extraction method.

    PubMed

    Jank, L; Hoff, R B; Tarouco, P C; Barreto, F; Pizzolato, T M

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the development and validation of a simple method for the detection and quantification of six β-lactam antibiotics residues (ceftiofur, penicillin G, penicillin V, oxacillin, cloxacillin and dicloxacillin) in bovine milk using a fast liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) for sample preparation, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LLE consisted of the addition of acetonitrile to the sample, followed by addition of sodium chloride, centrifugation and direct injection of an aliquot into the LC-MS/MS system. Separation was performed in a C(18) column, using acetonitrile and water, both with 0.1% of formic acid, as mobile phase. Method validation was performed according to the criteria of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Limits of detection ranged from 0.4 (penicillin G and penicillin V) to 10.0 ng ml(-1) (ceftiofur), and linearity was achieved. The decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), accuracy, inter- and intra-day repeatability of the method are reported. PMID:21988179

  6. Mid-Holocene paleoceanographic conditions in the Limfjord region from gastropod (Littorina littorea) oxygen and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, J.; Schmitz, B.

    2003-04-01

    Stable oxygen and carbon isotope intrashell transects of common intertidal gastropods Littorina littorea have been used to reconstruct environmental conditions in the Limfjord region during the mid-Holocene (late Atlantic time). The subfossil specimens studied are from the excavated Stone Age Kitchenmidden in Ertebølle, northern Denmark, dated between 5970±95 to 5070±90 B.P. In addition recent specimens were studied from different coastal localities within the Limfjord, along a salinity gradient from the west to east. These modern shells were used as control samples, in order to construct an oceanographic model for the Limfjord, in which the seasonal isotopic range from the Littorina subfossils could be interpreted. The coastal marine climate in the Ertebølle region during the mid-Holocene indicates summer-SST close to 22^oC and 4-5 ppm reduced salinity compared to fully marine conditions. The mid-Holocene central Limfjord can be described as a coastal area, which experienced similar salinity conditions (c. 30.5 PSU) that prevail in the western part (Odden area) today. In terms of summer-SST as compared with a 10-year average (1989-1998) for the Limfjord region, temperatures were 2-3^oC above recent climatic settings. These results point towards a mid-Holocene Limfjord in contact with the North Sea/Skagerrak with possibly more pronounced water exchange with the North Sea than today.

  7. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  8. Performance Characterization of RaPToRS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Krieger, M.; Fallica, J.; Henchen, R.; Pogozelski, E.; Padalino, S.; SUNY Geneseo Collaboration; LaboratoryLaser Energetics at University of Rochester Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The Rapid Pneumatic Transport of Radioactive Samples (RaPToRS) system can quickly and efficiently move radioactive materials from their activation site to a counting station. Facilities such as the NIF and LLE are considering these systems while NRL is currently using one. The system is essentially a 10 cm diameter pneumatic tube with a cylindrical sample carrier. The performance of the system depends on many factors, including the mass of the carrier, length of the tube, angle and difference in height of the tube's endpoints, the carrier's physical design, and the number, type, and distribution of blowers attached to the tube. These factors have been systematically examined to develop the fastest and most reliable system. The most significant factors are the mass and the vertical travel of the carrier. When the carrier mass is low, moving air supports the carrier in the tube, resulting in low friction. The terminal velocity ranges from 13.5 to 2.5 m/s for masses varying from 1 kg to 3 kg. Using a single 1100 W blower, the initial force exerted on the carrier was 11.3 N. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy through the LLE.

  9. A simple and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk.

    PubMed

    Biancardi, A; Piro, R; Dall'asta, C; Galaverna, G

    2013-01-01

    A new chromatographic method is proposed for the analysis of aflatoxin M(1) in milk. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) is performed on the defatted milk plus sodium chloride by using ethyl acetate as an extraction solvent. Accuracy and precision were evaluated at the LOQ (15 ng kg(-1)) spiked sample as well as with three other different naturally contaminated reference materials. The mean overall recovery (n = 24) was 95% with a confidence interval of 1.9% and a CV% of 4.5%. The performance of the proposed method was compared with that of the Official ISO Method based on the use of immunoaffinity chromatography columns (IAC): LLE protocol could be considered a valid alternative to the LC-IAC. In general it showed better accuracy with lower data dispersion. Moreover, the sample preparation is very simple and straightforward, potentially being applicable as a high-throughput method which, on account of its simplicity and low cost, may be applied to the analysis of a large number of samples in the occasion of outbreaks of large-scale contamination. PMID:23176386

  10. Micro-extraction techniques in analytical toxicology: short review.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Morgan, P E; Spencer, E P; Whelpton, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses new developments in plasma micro-extraction techniques in the context of established micro-extraction and protein precipitation methodology. Simple liquid-liquid solvent extraction (LLE) of plasma with direct GC or HPLC analysis of the resulting extract has been used for many years. Butyl acetate and methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) give efficient extraction of many drugs and metabolites from small volumes of plasma or whole blood at an appropriate pH, and form the upper layer, thus simplifying extract removal. Butyl acetate does not interfere with NPD, ECD or MS in GC, whilst MTBE has a relatively low UV cutoff (220 nm). Thus, HPLC eluents that use a high proportion of an organic component allow MTBE extracts to be analysed directly. 'Salting-out' and extractive derivatization using acetic anhydride or phenylboronic acid can be used with appropriate analytes. As regards protein precipitation, an important consideration is lowering the pH, although this is not feasible with acid-labile analytes. More recent developments include sold-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and liquid-phase micro-extraction (LPME). This latter technique especially may prove invaluable as analytes that cannot easily be extracted with LLE can be isolated simply at low cost with a minimum of apparatus. PMID:16779788

  11. Time Evolution and Asymmetries of OMEGA Direct-Drive D^3He Capsule Implosions Inferred from 3.0- and 14.7-MeV Protons and 3.6-MeV Alphas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Stoeckl, C.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    Fusion of D and ^3He in direct-drive, spherical-capsule implosions results in the copious production of several charged fusion products that lose energy as they pass out through the hot fuel plasma and the cool (<=1 keV) shell plasma. Energy losses reflect the areal density (ρ L) of the plasma transited at the instant of burn. In experiments on OMEGA, up to 11 spectrometers were used to simultaneously measure spectra of D^3He protons from different directions for information about the symmetry and time evolution of ρL. There are often significant differences in the individual spectra from one implosion, both in mean energy loss and in maximum energy loss, which largely reflect nonuniformities in the shell. D^3He protons are also produced at first shock coalescence when the capsule is far less compressed, and they escape with energy losses indicating lower areal densities at that time. We examine whether asymmetries are detectable at first shock coalesence, and whether they are then amplified by bang time. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion (Grant number DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement number DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), LLNL (subcontract B313975). (Petrasso: Visiting Senior Scientist at LLE.)

  12. Evaluation of Limb Load Asymmetry Using Two New Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil NS; Omar, Baharudin; Joseph, Leonard H.; Htwe, Ohnmar; Jagannathan, K.; Hamdan, Nor M Y; Rajalakshmi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of limb loading is important in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In current practice, mathematical models such as Symmetry index (SI), Symmetry ratio (SR), and Symmetry angle (SA) are used to quantify limb loading asymmetry. Literatures have identified certain limitations with the above mathematical models. Hence this study presents two new mathematical models Modified symmetry index (MSI) and Limb loading error (LLE) that would address these limitations. Furthermore, the current mathematical models were compared against the new model with the goal of achieving a better model. This study uses hypothetical data to simulate an algorithmic preliminary computational measure to perform with all numerical possibilities of even and uneven limb loading that can occur in human legs. Descriptive statistics are used to interpret the limb loading patterns: symmetry, asymmetry and maximum asymmetry. The five mathematical models were similar in analyzing symmetry between limbs. However, for asymmetry and maximum asymmetry data, the SA and SR values do not give any meaningful interpretation, and SI gives an inflated value. The MSI and LLE are direct, easy to interpret and identify the loading patterns with the side of asymmetry. The new models are notable as they quantify the amount and side of asymmetry under different loading patterns. PMID:25716372

  13. Towards the determination of the equation of state of hydrogen and helium at extreme densities: Laser induced shocks on pre-compressed samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubeyre, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The determination of the equation of state of helium and hydrogen at very high density is an important problem at the frontier between condensed matter physics and plasma physics. It is also an important issue in planetary physics for understanding the formation of giant and extrasolar planets. However, the extreme densities relevant to most of the interior of Jupiter are unreachable by either static or single-shock compression techniques alone. Recently, a laser-driven shock-wave in a hydrogen sample, pre-compressed in a diamond anvil cell, has been demonstrated [1]. Consequently, the compression factors of the dynamic and static techniques can now be multiplied. We will present our current effort with the Omega laser at LLE to measure accurately the Hugoniot curves of hydrogen and helium pre-compressed up to 1.5 GPa. The metrology and error bars of the measurements will be discussed. The Hugoniot data points will be compared to published calculations, and an interesting difference in the insulator-metal transition of hydrogen and helium will be discussed. Co-authors are Stephanie Brygoo, CEA, France; Jon Eggert, Peter Celliers, Guilbert Collins, LLNL, Livermore CA 94551 USA; Ryan McWilliam, Raymond Jeanloz, University of California, CA 94720 USA; and Tom Boehly, LLE, New-York 14623 USA. [1] P. Loubeyre et al., High Pressure Research 24, 25- 31 (2004).

  14. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Hypersaline Solutions Using Low-Volume, Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2015-08-18

    Complex, hypersaline brines-including those coproduced with oil and gas, rejected from desalination technologies, or used as working fluids for geothermal electricity generation-could contain critical materials such as the rare earth elements (REE) in valuable concentrations. Accurate quantitation of these analytes in complex, aqueous matrices is necessary for evaluation and implementation of systems aimed at recovering those critical materials. However, most analytical methods for measuring trace metals have not been validated for highly saline and/or chemically complex brines. Here we modified and optimized previously published liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) techniques using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate as the extractant in a heptane diluent, and studied its efficacy for REE recovery as a function of three primary variables: background salinity (as NaCl), concentration of a competing species (here Fe), and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Results showed that the modified LLE was robust to a range of salinity, Fe, and DOC concentrations studied as well as constant, elevated Ba concentrations. With proper characterization of the natural samples of interest, this method could be deployed for accurate analysis of REE in small volumes of hyper-saline and chemically complex brines. PMID:25920439

  15. [A Standing Balance Evaluation Method Based on Largest Lyapunov Exponent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Hongrui; Xiao, Jinzhuang; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of human standing balance scientifically, we in this study proposed a new evaluation method based on the chaos nonlinear analysis theory. In this method, a sinusoidal acceleration stimulus in forward/backward direction was forced under the subjects' feet, which was supplied by a motion platform. In addition, three acceleration sensors, which were fixed to the shoulder, hip and knee of each subject, were applied to capture the balance adjustment dynamic data. Through reconstructing the system phase space, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the dynamic data of subjects' different segments, then used the sum of the squares of the difference between each LLE (SSDLLE) as the balance capabilities evaluation index. Finally, 20 subjects' indexes were calculated, and compared with evaluation results of existing methods. The results showed that the SSDLLE were more in line with the subjects' performance during the experiment, and it could measure the body's balance ability to some extent. Moreover, the results also illustrated that balance level was determined by the coordinate ability of various joints, and there might be more balance control strategy in the process of maintaining balance. PMID:27079089

  16. Method development aspects for the quantitation of pharmaceutical compounds in human plasma with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization source in the multiple reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Peter; Grivet, Chantal; Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    The present work investigates various method development aspects for the quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in human plasma using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and multiple reaction monitoring (MALDI-MRM). Talinolol was selected as a model analyte. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and protein precipitation were evaluated regarding sensitivity and throughput for the MALDI-MRM technique and its applicability without and with chromatographic separation. Compared to classical electrospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) method development, with MALDI-MRM the tuning of the analyte in single MS mode is more challenging due to interfering matrix background ions. An approach is proposed using background subtraction. With LLE and using a 200 microL human plasma aliquot acceptable precision and accuracy could be obtained in the range of 1 to 1000 ng/mL without any LC separation. Approximately 3 s were required for one analysis. A full calibration curve and its quality control samples (20 samples) can be analyzed within 1 min. Combining LC with the MALDI analysis allowed improving the linearity down to 50 pg/mL, while reducing the throughput potential only by two-fold. Matrix effects are still a significant issue with MALDI but can be monitored in a similar way to that used for LC/ESI-MS analysis. PMID:17295425

  17. Improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer beads in aqueous media via dual-phase solvent system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuling; Liu, Ruijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Gongke

    2009-08-15

    In this study, a novel and simple dual-phase solvent system for the improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads in aqueous sample was proposed. The method integrated MIP extraction and micro-liquid-liquid extraction (micro-LLE) into only one step. A magnetic MIP beads using atrazine as template was synthesized, and was applied to aqueous media by adding micro-volume of n-hexane to form a co-extraction system. The magnetic MIP beads preferred to suspend in the organic phase, which shielded them from the disturbance of water molecule. The target analytes in the water sample was extracted into the organic phase by micro-LLE and then further bound to the solid-phase of magnetic MIP beads. The beads specificity was significantly improved with the imprinting efficiency of template increasing from 0.5 to 4.4, as compared with that in pure aqueous media. The extraction capacity, equilibration process and cross-selectivity of the MIP dual-phase solvent extraction system were investigated. The proposed method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was applied to the analysis of atrazine, simazine, propazine, simetryn, prometryne, ametryn and terbutryn in complicated sample such as tomato, strawberry juice and milk. The method is selective, sensitive and low organic solvent-consuming, and has potential to broaden the range of MIP application in biological and environmental sample. PMID:19576415

  18. Aspergillus nidulans catalase-peroxidase gene (cpeA) is transcriptionally induced during sexual development through the transcription factor StuA.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Mario; Wei, Huijun; Liese, Ralf; Fischer, Reinhard

    2002-10-01

    Catalases, peroxidases, and catalase-peroxidases are important enzymes to cope with reactive oxygen species in pro- and eukaryotic cells. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans three monofunctional catalases have been described, and a fourth catalase activity was observed in native polyacrylamide gels. The latter activity is probably due to the bifunctional enzyme catalase-peroxidase, which we characterized here. The gene, named cpeA, encodes an 81-kDa polypeptide with a conserved motif for heme coordination. The enzyme comprises of two similar domains, suggesting gene duplication and fusion during evolution. The first 439 amino acids share 22% identical residues with the C terminus. Homologous proteins are found in several prokaryotes, such as Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (both with 61% identity). In fungi the enzyme has been noted in Penicillium simplicissimum, Septoria tritici, and Neurospora crassa (69% identical amino acids) but is absent from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression analysis in A. nidulans revealed that the gene is transcriptionally induced upon carbon starvation and during sexual development, but starvation is not sufficient to reach high levels of the transcript during development. Besides transcriptional activation, we present evidence for posttranscriptional regulation. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm of Hülle cells. The Hülle cell-specific expression was dependent on the developmental regulator StuA, suggesting an activating function of this helix-loop-helix transcription factor. PMID:12455692

  19. Time-Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup for High Energy TNSA Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, Stephen; Simone, Angela; Turner, Ethan; Ginnane, Mary Kate; Dubois, Natalie; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2014-10-01

    MTW and OMEGA EP Lasers at LLE utilize ultra-intense laser light to produce bursts of high-energy ions through Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). A Time Resolved Tandem Faraday Cup (TFC) is being designed to collect and differentiate protons and alphas from heavy ions produced during TNSA. The TFC will be comprised of a replaceable thickness absorber capable of stopping a range of user-selectable heavy ions. Ions heavier than alphas emitted from the TNSA plasma will stop within the primary TFC, while less massive particles will continue through and deposit their remaining charge in the secondary TFC. The time-resolved beam current generated in each cup will be measured on a fast storage scope in multiple channels. Secondary electrons released from the impact of heavy ions with the cups will be suppressed by magnetic and electrostatic fields. A charge-exchange foil at the TFC entrance will modify the charge state distribution of the heavy ions produced by the plasma to a known distribution. Using the known distribution and the time of flight of the heavy ions, the total heavy ion current can be determined. Ultimately the TFC will be used to normalize a variety of nuclear physics cross sections and stopping power measurements. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  20. Recycling of indium from CIGS photovoltaic cells: potential of combining acid-resistant nanofiltration with liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Niewersch, Claudia; Lenz, Markus; Kül, Zöhre Zohra; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Schäffer, Andreas; Wintgens, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called "urban mining" considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than their primary ores. Indium is of foremost interest being widely used, expensive, scarce and prone to supply risk. This study first investigated the capability of different nanofiltration membranes of extracting indium from copper-indium-gallium- selenide photovoltaic cell (CIGS) leachates under low pH conditions and low transmembrane pressure differences (<3 bar). Retentates were then subjected to a further selective liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Even at very acidic pH indium was retained to >98% by nanofiltration, separating it from parts of the Ag, Sb, Se, and Zn present. LLE using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) extracted 97% of the indium from the retentates, separating it from all other elements except for Mo, Al, and Sn. Overall, 95% (2.4 g m(-2) CIGS) of the indium could be extracted to the D2EHPA phase. Simultaneously, by nanofiltration the consumption of D2EHPA was reduced by >60% due to the metal concentration in the reduced retentate volume. These results show clearly the potential for efficient scarce metal recovery from secondary resources. Furthermore, since nanofiltration was applicable at very low pH (≥ 0.6), it may be applied in hydrometallurgy typically using acidic conditions. PMID:25310266

  1. Challenges Associated with Sample Preparation for the Analysis of PBDEs in Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Shabana; Kosarac, Ivana; Kubwabo, Cariton; Harris, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in many applications; however, certain PBDE congeners are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to both humans and the environment. PBDEs have been found in human specimens, and a variety of analytical techniques have been used for their determination in biological matrixes. Nevertheless, obtaining a relatively clean analytical blank sample during PBDE analysis is a big challenge because of the ubiquitous nature of these compounds. Thus, the present study was conducted to compare the PBDE background levels associated with the three most commonly used extraction techniques: liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), SPE, and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Conventionally used blank matrixes (HPLC grade water, Milli-Q water, and air) were spiked with internal standards and extracted using LLE, SPE, or ASE. The extracts were analyzed by GC/electron ionization-tandem MS. The ASE method achieved the lowest background levels for nearly all the PBDE congeners analyzed, which may be attributed to the stainless steel and closed-vessel nature of the ASE cells. PMID:26823234

  2. OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

    2007-04-27

    We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

  3. Assessing the lipophilicity of fragments and early hits.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2011-07-01

    A key challenge in many drug discovery programs is to accurately assess the potential value of screening hits. This is particularly true in fragment-based drug design (FBDD), where the hits often bind relatively weakly, but are correspondingly small. Ligand efficiency (LE) considers both the potency and the size of the molecule, and enables us to estimate whether or not an initial hit is likely to be optimisable to a potent, druglike lead. While size is a key property that needs to be controlled in a small molecule drug, there are a number of additional properties that should also be considered. Lipophilicity is amongst the most important of these additional properties, and here we present a new efficiency index (LLE(AT)) that combines lipophilicity, size and potency. The index is intuitively defined, and has been designed to have the same target value and dynamic range as LE, making it easily interpretable by medicinal chemists. Monitoring both LE and LLE(AT) should help both in the selection of more promising fragment hits, and controlling molecular weight and lipophilicity during optimisation. PMID:21614595

  4. Light lithophile elements in pyroxenes of Northwest Africa (NWA) 817 and other Martian meteorites: Implications for water in Martian magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Musselwhite, Donald S.; Herd, Christopher D. K.; Shearer, Charles K.

    2006-06-01

    Zoning patterns of light lithophile elements (the LLE: Li, Be, and B) in pyroxenes of some Martian basaltic meteorites have been used to suggest that the parent basalts were saturated in water and exsolved an aqueous fluid phase. Here, we examine LLE zoning in the augites of a quickly cooled Martian basalt that was not water-saturated—the Northwest Africa (NWA) 817 nakhlite. Analyses for LLE were by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), supported by EMP analyses of major and minor elements. In NWA 817, zoning of Be and B is consistent with igneous fractionations while Li abundances are effectively constant across wide ranges in abundance of other incompatible elements (Be, B, Ti, and Fe*). The lack of strong zoning in Li can be ascribed to intracrystalline diffusion, despite the rapid cooling of NWA 817. Most other nakhlites, notably Nakhla and Lafayette, cooled more slowly than did NWA 817 [Treiman, A.H., 2005. The nakhlite Martian meteorites: augite-rich igneous rock from Mars. Chem. Erde65, 203-270]. In them Li abundances are constant across augite, as are abundances of other elements. In Nakhla pyroxenes, all the LLE have effectively constant abundances across significant ranges in Fe* and Ti abundance. Lafayette is more equilibrated still, and shows constant abundances of LLE and nearly constant Fe*. A pyroxene in the NWA480 shergottite has constant Li abundances, and was interpreted to represent mineral fractionation coupled with exsolution of aqueous fluid. A simple quantitative model of this process requires that the partitioning of Li between basalt and aqueous fluid, LiDaq/bas, be 15 times larger than its experimentally determined value. Thus, its seems unlikely that the Li zoning pattern in NWA480 augite represents exsolution of aqueous fluid. Late igneous or sub-solidus diffusion seems more likely as is suggested by Li isotopic studies [Beck, P., Chaussidon, M., Barrat, J.-A., Gillet, Ph., Bohn, M., 2005. An ion-microprobe study of lithium isotopes

  5. Application of an analytical testing method to improving the RI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, S.; Nanjo, K.; Tsuruoka, H.; Hirata, N.

    2010-12-01

    Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) is a global project of earthquake predictability research. The final goalof this project is to have a look for the intrinsic predictability of the earthquake rupture process through forecast testing experiments. The 1st earthquake forecast testing experiment for Japan started on November 2009 within the CSEP. The Relative Intensity of seismicity model (RI model) was submitted for the experiment. Forecasting accuracy of the RI model is higher than that of random guessing1. The RI hypothesis is based on a working assumption that future large earthquakes are considered likely to occur at sites of higher seismic activity in the past. To improve its forecast performance, we expand the RI model algorithm to belong to a general class of smoothed seismicity models. A fundamental question is the effect of smoothing on the performance of earthquake forecasting. Our attempt is to introduce the smoothing radius r over which seismicity is averaged in space and find appropriate values for r. It is in general that model optimization is carried out according to a measure of retrospective forecasting accuracy. A typical measure is based on log-likelihood (LL). The existing simulation-based approach1 is computationally intensive, while a new analytical approach2 is less intensive. If both measures based on simulation, LLC, and analysis, LLE, show higher values for the given r value used for a case study of retrospective forecasting, the corresponding r is more meaningful for model optimization to the case. We consider different smooothing radii : r = 10, 30, 50 and 100 km for 115 earthquakes in all Japan, with a focal depth down to 100 km. The LLE is calculated by the method based on Imoto3. The LLC is calculated by miniCSEP code. Both LLC and LLE are the maximum values at r = 10 km, and the minimum ones by using the simulation method. It is also found that the analytical method is positively corrected with the

  6. Inertial Confinement Fusion. Annual report 10/1/98 through 9/30/99

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Jane

    1999-12-01

    General Atomics (GA) has served as the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy since December 30, 1990. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999. During this period, GA and our partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ''Onsite Support'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). We fabricated and delivered over 1790 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNL. We produced more than 1380 glass and plastic target capsules over a wide range of sizes and designs (plus over 300 near target-quality capsules) for LLNL, LANL, SNL, and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetic (UR/LLE). We also delivered various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UWLLE in FY99. We fabricated a device to polish NIF-sized beryllium shells and prepared a laboratory for the safe operation of beryllium polishing activities. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY99, the GA/Schafer portion of the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team effort for design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA was completed. All components of the OCTS were procured, fabricated, assembled, tested, and shipped to UR/LLE. Only minor documentation tasks remain to be done in FY00. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D2 or deuterium

  7. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition, reduced models for the inversion, non-linear inverse scattering, image reconstruction and restoration, and applications (bio-medical imaging, non-destructive evaluation...). NCMIP 2013 was a one-day workshop held in May 2013 which attracted around 60 attendees. Each of the submitted papers has been reviewed by three reviewers. Among the accepted papers, there are seven oral presentations, five posters and one invited poster (On a deconvolution challenge presented by C Vonesch from EPFL, Switzerland). In addition, three international speakers were invited to present a longer talk. The workshop was supported by Institut Farman (ENS Cachan, CNRS) and endorsed by the following French research networks (GDR ISIS, GDR Ondes, GDR MOA, GDR MSPC). The program committee acknowledges the following research laboratories CMLA, LMT, LSV, LURPA, SATIE. Laure Blanc-Féraud and Pierre-Yves Joubert Workshop co-chair Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory and INRIA Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France Pierre-Yves Joubert, IEF, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, France Technical program committee Gilles Aubert, J-A Dieudonné Laboratory, CNRS and University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France Nabil Anwer, LURPA, ENS Cachan, France Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Antonin Chambolle, CMAP, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK Cécile Durieu, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Gérard Favier, I3S Laboratory, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France Mário Figueiredo, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal Laurent Fribourg, LSV, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Marc Lambert, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Dominique Lesselier, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Matteo

  8. The MIT Accelerator Laboratory for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Hahn, K.; Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved with this accelerator, and fluence and energy of the fusion products are accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  9. Exploration of kinetic and multiple-ion-fluids effects in D3He and T3He gas-filled ICF implosions using multiple nuclear reaction histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sio, Hong; Rinderknecht, Hans; Rosenberg, Michael; Zylstra, Alex; Séguin, Fredrick; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Li, Chikang; Petrasso, Richard; Hoffman, Nelson; Kagan, Krigory; Molvig, Kim; Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Wilks, Scott; Stoeckl, Christian; Glebov, Vladimir; Betti, Riccardo; Sangster, Thomas; Katz, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    To explore kinetic and multi-ion-fluid effects in D3He and T3He gas-filled shock-driven implosions, multiple nuclear reaction histories were measured using the upgraded Particle Temporal Diagnostic (PTD) on OMEGA. For D3He gas-filled implosions, the relative timing of the DD and D3He reaction histories were measured with 20 ps precision. For T3He gas-filled implosions (with 1-2% deuterium), the relative timing of the DT and D3He reaction histories were measured with 10 ps precision. The observed differences between the reaction histories on these two OMEGA experiments are contrasted to 1-D single-ion hydro simulations for different gas-fill pressure and gas mixture. This work is supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL, LLE, and NNSA SSGF.

  10. A Magnetic Particle-Time-Of-Flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression bang-times at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Shoup, M.; Glebov, V.; House, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Kimbrough, J.; Macphee, A.; Collins, G. W.; Olson, R.; Kline, J.; Kilkenny, J.

    2013-10-01

    A magnetic particle-time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been designed for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang time at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This type of measurement combined with the measured shock-burn weighted ρR will significantly constrain the modeling of the implosion dynamics. The MagPTOF design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT implosions, DT exploding pushers and D3He implosions with accuracy better than 70 ps. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet will increase proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He-filled surrogate implosions using D3He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NNSA, LLNL and LLE.

  11. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Eckart, M.; Haan, S.; Hatchett, S.; Khater, H.; Landen, O.; MacKinnon, A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.; Meyerhofer, D.; Magoon, J.; Fletcher, K.; Leeper, R.

    2010-11-01

    Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through evolution of fuel areal density (ρR), is fundamentally important for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about ρR and ρR asymmetries, Ti and yield is therefore essential for understanding how this assembly occurs. To obtain this information, a neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic-Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been implemented on the NIF. Its primary objective is to measure the absolute neutron spectrum in the range 5 to 30 MeV, from which ρR, Ti and yield can be directly inferred for both low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and high-yield DT implosions. In this talk, the results from the first measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum produced in exploding pusher and THD implosions will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  12. Bifurcation and Firing Patterns of the Pancreatic β-Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Zeng, Yanjun

    Using a model of individual isolated pancreatic β-cells, we investigated bifurcation diagrams of interspike intervals (ISIs) and largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE), which clearly demonstrated a wide range of transitions between different firing patterns. The numerical simulation results revealed the effect of different time constants and ion channels on the neuronal discharge rhythm. Furthermore, an individual cell exhibited tonic spiking, square-wave bursting, and tapered bursting. Additionally, several bifurcation phenomena can be observed in this paper, such as period-doubling, period-adding, inverse period-doubling and inverse period-adding scenarios. In addition, we researched the mechanisms underlying two kinds of bursting (tapered and square-wave bursting) by use of fast-slow dynamics analysis. Finally, we analyzed the codimension-two bifurcation of the fast subsystem and studied cusp bifurcation, generalized Hopf (or Bautin) bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation.

  13. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the synthesis of Pro-Xaa-bonds by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Schellenberger, U; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-07-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline p-guanidinophenyl ester is an "inverse substrate" for trypsin; i.e., the cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. This substrate can be used in trypsin-catalyzed acyl-transfer reactions leading to the synthesis of Pro-Xaa peptide bonds. The reaction proceeds about 20 times slower than reaction with similar alanine-containing substrates, but the ratio between synthesis and hydrolysis is more favorable. The investigation of a series of nucleophiles led to information about the specificity of the process. Nucleophiles differing only in the P(1)'-position show an increasing acyl transfer efficiency in the order Phe < Gly < Ley < Ser < Ala < lle. C terminal elongation of the nucleophiles is of minor influence on their efficiency. The formation of an H bond between the acyl-enzyme and the nucleophile seems to play an important role in the aminolysis of the acyl-enzyme. PMID:18600766

  14. Measuring spatial distributions of nuclear burn in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF using proton emission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, Fredrick; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rosenberg, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; McKenty, P.; Craxton, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Le Pape, S.; Smalyuk, V.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; MacKinnon, A.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Fusion reactions in ICF implosions of D3He-filled capsules produce 14.7-MeV D3He protons and 3-MeV DD protons. Spatial distributions of the D3He and DD reactions are studied with a penumbral imaging camera that utilizes a CR-39-based imaging detector to detect the protons. Up to three orthogonal cameras have been used simultaneously at OMEGA to study the 3-D structure of asymmetric implosions, and two orthogonal cameras have now been used to study an exploding-pusher implosion at the NIF. Recent data from OMEGA and from the NIF will be shown. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  15. EEG signal analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Subha, D Puthankattil; Joseph, Paul K; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min

    2010-04-01

    The EEG (Electroencephalogram) signal indicates the electrical activity of the brain. They are highly random in nature and may contain useful information about the brain state. However, it is very difficult to get useful information from these signals directly in the time domain just by observing them. They are basically non-linear and nonstationary in nature. Hence, important features can be extracted for the diagnosis of different diseases using advanced signal processing techniques. In this paper the effect of different events on the EEG signal, and different signal processing methods used to extract the hidden information from the signal are discussed in detail. Linear, Frequency domain, time - frequency and non-linear techniques like correlation dimension (CD), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), Hurst exponent (H), different entropies, fractal dimension(FD), Higher Order Spectra (HOS), phase space plots and recurrence plots are discussed in detail using a typical normal EEG signal. PMID:20433058

  16. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  17. A versatile high-resolution x-ray imager (HRXI) for laser-plasma experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgade, J. L.; Troussel, P.; Casner, A.; Huser, G.; Fariaud, J.; Remond, C.; Gontier, D.; Chollet, C.; Zuber, C.; Reverdin, C.; Richard, A.; Maroni, R.; Aubard, F.; Angelier, B.

    2008-10-15

    A high-resolution x-ray imager (HRXI) devoted to laser-plasma experiments combines two state-of-the-art technologies developed in France: a high-resolution x-ray microscope and a high-speed x-ray streak camera. The resulting streaked imager achieves spatial and temporal resolutions of {approx}5 {mu}m and {approx}10 ps, respectively. The HXRI has recorded enhanced spatial and temporal resolution radiographs of indirectly driven targets on OMEGA. This paper describes the main features of the instrument and details the activation process on OMEGA (particularly the alignment). Recent results obtained on joint CEA/LLE radiographic OMEGA experiments will also be presented.

  18. The NIF Ignition Program: Progress And Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, B A

    2006-06-12

    The first experimental campaign for ignition, beginning in 2010 after NIF construction and commissioning are completed, will include experiments to measure and optimize key laser and target conditions necessary for ignition. These ''tuning campaigns'' will precede the first ignition shots. Ignition requires acceptable target performance in several key areas: Energetics, Symmetry, Shock timing, and Capsule Hydrodynamics. Detailed planning and simulations for ''tuning campaigns'' in each of these areas is currently underway, as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Program. Tuning and diagnostic methods are being developed and tested on present facilities, including the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Energetics (LLE), the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  19. A 259.6 μW HRV-EEG Processor With Nonlinear Chaotic Analysis During Mental Tasks.

    PubMed

    Roh, Taehwan; Hong, Sunjoo; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2016-02-01

    A system-on-chip (SoC) with nonlinear chaotic analysis (NCA) is presented for mental task monitoring. The proposed processor treats both heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG). An independent component analysis (ICA) accelerator decreases the error of HRV extraction from 5.94% to 1.84% in the preprocessing step. Largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE), as well as linear features such as mean and standard variation and sub-band power, are calculated with NCA acceleration. Measurements with mental task protocols result in confidence level of 95%. Thanks to the hardware acceleration, the chaos-processor fabricated in 0.13 μm CMOS technology consumes only 259.6 μW. PMID:25616073

  20. Selecting protein families for environmental features based on manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingpeng; Xu, Weiwei; Park, E K; Li, Guangrong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, statistics and machine learning have been developed to identify functional or taxonomic features of environmental features or physiological status. Important proteins (or other functional and taxonomic entities) to environmental features can be potentially used as biosensors. A major challenge is how the distribution of protein and gene functions embodies the adaption of microbial communities across environments and host habitats. In this paper, we propose a novel regularization method for linear regression to adapt the challenge. The approach is inspired by local linear embedding (LLE) and we call it a manifold-constrained regularization for linear regression (McRe). The novel regularization procedure also has potential to be used in solving other linear systems. We demonstrate the efficiency and the performance of the approach in both simulation and real data. PMID:24802701

  1. Satellitenbewegung, band III: Natiirliche und gesteuerte bewegung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochim, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    Im dritten Band der Satellitenbewegung werden in fortlaufender Nummerierung einige für Untersuchungen der Bewegung der künstlichen Satelliten wichtige Grundlagen der Astrodynamik mit ausführlichen mathematischen Formelsystemen behandelt. Dazu zählen die unterschiedlichen Aspekte der Bewegung der natürlichen Himmelskörper, die Steuerung und Kontrolle von künstlichen Objekten, und insbesondere die für eine Satellitenbahnanalyse wichtigen physikalischen Beeinflussungen einer Satellitenbewegung. Mathematisch entscheidend ist die Wahl geeigneter Bahnparameter, die ein bestimmtes Bewegungsproblem widerspruchsfrei und singularitätenfrei zu behandeln gestatten. Für die Behandlung routinemäßiger Aufgabenstellungen der Satellitenbewegung, in erster Linie einer präzisen Bahnbestimmung und Bahnverbesserung, kann auf eine Fülle von lehrbuchartigen Monographien verwiesen werden, so dass diese Problematik in der vorliegenden Arbeit nur angedeutet werden soll.

  2. The MRSt for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.

    2015-11-01

    Information about the time evolution of inertial-confinement-fusion fuel assembly and hot-spot formation can be obtained with the next-generation Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometers for ICF applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and ρR -Ti trajectory during burn. As the peak burn generally occurs before and after peak compression in failed and ignited implosions, respectively, an MRSt measurement of the relative timing of these events will be critical for assessing implosion dynamics. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  3. Prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E.; Monnerat, S.; Stragevitch, L.; Pina, C.G.; Goncalves, C.B.; Meirelles, A.J.A.

    1999-12-01

    Group interaction parameters for the UNIFAC and ASOG models were specially adjusted for predicting liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol at temperatures ranging from 20 to 45 C. Experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for systems of triolein, oleic acid, and ethanol and of triolein, stearic acid, and ethanol were measured and utilized in the adjustment. The average percent deviation between experimental and calculated compositions was 0.79% and 0.52% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively. The prediction of liquid-liquid equilibrium for systems of vegetable oils, fatty acids, and ethanol was quite successful, with an average deviation of 1.31% and 1.32% for the UNIFAC and ASOG models, respectively.

  4. Gesammelte Werke / Collected Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzschild, Karl; Voigt, Hans-Heinrich

    Der bekannte Astronom Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916) gilt als der Begründer der Astrophysik und als hervorragender Forscher mit einer erstaunlichen Bandbreite seiner Interessen. Arbeiten zur Himmelsmechanik, Elektrodynamik und Relativitätstheorie weisen ihn als vorzüglichen Mathematiker und Physiker auf der Höhe seiner Zeit aus. Untersuchungen zur Photographischen Photometrie, Optik und Spektroskopie zeigen den versierten Beobachter, der sein Meßinstrumentarium beherrscht, und schließlich arbeitete Schwarzschild als Astrophysiker an Sternatmosphären, Kometen, Struktur und Dynamik von Sternsystemen. Die in seinem kurzen Leben entstandene Fülle an wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten ist in drei Bänden der Gesamtausgabe gesammelt, ergänzt durch biographisches Material, Annotationen von Fachleuten und einen Essay des Nobelpreisträgers S. Chandrasekhar.

  5. Gesammelte Werke / Collected Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzschild, Karl; Voigt, Hans-Heinrich

    Der bekannte Astronom Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916) gilt als der Begründer der Astrophysik und als hervorragender Forscher mit einer erstaunlichen Bandbreite seiner Interessen. Arbeiten zur Himmelsmechanik, Elektrodynamik und Relativitätstheorie weisen ihn als vorzüglichen Mathematiker und Physiker auf der Höhe seiner Zeit aus. Untersuchungen zur Photographischen Photometrie, Optik und Spektroskopie zeigen den versierten Beobachter, der sein Meßinstrument beherrscht, und schließlich arbeitete Schwarzschild als Astrophysiker und an Sternatmosphären, Kometen, Struktur und Dynamik von Sternsystemen. Die in seinem kurzen Leben entstandene Fülle an wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten ist in drei Bänden der Gesamtausgabe gesammelt, ergänzt durch biographisches Material und ein Essay des Nobelpreisträgers S. Chandrasekhar im ersten Band, und Annotationen von Fachleuten in jedem der drei Bände.

  6. Gesammelte Werke / Collected Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzschild, Karl; Voigt, Hans-Heinrich

    Der bekannte Astronom Karl Schwarzschild (1873-1916) gilt als der Begründer der Astrophysik und als hervorragender Forscher mit einer erstaunlichen Bandbreite seiner Interessen. Arbeiten zur Himmelsmechanik, Elektrodynamik und Relativitätstheorie weisen ihn als vorzüglichen Mathematiker und Physiker seiner Zeit aus. Untersuchungen zur Photographischen Photometrie, Optik und Spektroskopie zeigen den versierten Beobachter, der sein Meßinstrument beherrscht. Schließlich arbeitete Schwarzschild als Astrophysiker und an Sternatmosphären, Kometen, Struktur und Dynamik von Sternsystemen. Die in seinem kurzen Leben entstandene Fülle von wissenschafltichen Arbeiten ist in drei Bänden der Gesamtausgabe gesammelt, ergänzt durch biographisches Material und ein Essay des Nobelpreisträgers S. Chandrasekhar und Annotationen von Fachleuten in jedem der drei Bände.

  7. Polymerization of the E and Z Isomers of Bis-(Triethoxysilyl)-2-Butene

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.P. Dorhout, K.; Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.; Shea, K.J.

    1999-05-11

    We have synthesized the Z and E isomers of 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)-2- butene and polymerized them under acid and base catalyzed sol-gel conditions. As expected the E system formed crosslinked, insoluble gels. The Z isomer, by nature of its geometry, formed high molecular weight, soluble polymeric products under acidic conditions. We were able to prepare and isolate both the cyclic disilsesquioxane monomer, and its dimer. Comparison of their spectral characterization with that of the soluble polymers suggests that the cyclics are present within the polymers. lle synthesis of a dimer likely present at some early stage of the polymerization suggests that we may be able to control the reaction and form rigid polymers with controllable tacticity. In addition, most of the gels were found to be non-porous indicating that the gels were, in fact, more compliant than ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes leading to collapse of pores during drying.

  8. Method of analysis and quality-assurance practices by the U. S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of four selected mosquito insecticides and a synergist in water using liquid-liquid extraction and gas chrom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Strahan, A.P.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    A method of analysis and quality-assurance practices were developed for the determination of four mosquito insecticides (malathion, metho-prene, phenothrin, and resmethrin) and one synergist (piperonyl butoxide) in water. The analytical method uses liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated in reagent water, urban surface water, and ground water. The mean accuracies as percentages of the true compound concentrations from water samples spiked at 10 and 50 nanograms per liter ranged from 68 to 171 percent, with standard deviations in concentrations of 27 nanograms per liter or less. The method detection limit for all compounds was 5.9 nanograms per liter or less for 247-milliliter samples. This method is valuable for acquiring information about the fate and transport of these mosquito insecticides and one synergist in water.

  9. When Darwin meets Lorenz: Evolving new chaotic attractors through genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatically finding new chaotic attractors through a computational intelligence technique known as multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP). We apply this technique to the case of the Lorenz attractor and evolve several new chaotic attractors based on the basic Lorenz template. The MGGP algorithm automatically finds new nonlinear expressions for the different state variables starting from the original Lorenz system. The Lyapunov exponents of each of the attractors are calculated numerically based on the time series of the state variables using time delay embedding techniques. The MGGP algorithm tries to search the functional space of the attractors by aiming to maximise the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the evolved attractors. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology, we report over one hundred new chaotic attractor structures along with their parameters, which are evolved from just the Lorenz system alone.

  10. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of novel phenoxyacetamide-based free fatty acid receptor 1 agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Xuekun; Xu, Xue; Yang, Jianyong; Qiu, Qianqian; Qiang, Hao; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-10-15

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1) has attracted extensive attention as a novel antidiabetic target in the last decade. Several FFA1 agonists reported in the literature have been suffered from relatively high molecular weight and lipophilicity. We have previously reported the FFA1 agonist 1. Based on the common amide structural characteristic of SAR1 and NIH screened compound, we here describe the continued structure-activity exploration to decrease the molecular weight and lipophilicity of the compound 1 series by converting various amide linkers. All of these efforts lead to the discovery of the preferable lead compound 18, a compound with considerable agonistic activity, high LE and LLE values, lower lipophilicity than previously reported agonists, and appreciable efficacy on glucose tolerance in both normal and type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:26420383

  11. Sprache macht Kultur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Karl

    Es gibt eine Fülle von Eigenschaften und Fähigkeiten, an denen man das Besondere des Menschen gegenüber den anderen Lebewesen festmachen wollte, z. B.: aufrechter Gang, Haarlosigkeit, Werkzeuggebrauch, Werkzeugherstellung, Bewusstsein, Werfen, Sprechen, Lachen, Weinen, Lügen. Doch bei all diesen Eigenschaften konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass es sie in Ansätzen bereits im Tierreich gibt. Es bleiben noch ein paar Eigenheiten übrig, wie Religion oder Willensfreiheit, aber diese Merkmale können wiederum dem Menschen bestritten und zur bloßen Illusion erklärt werden. Bleibt dann als letzte Differenz die Fähigkeit übrig, solche Illusionen zu haben …

  12. A Review of Feature Extraction Software for Microarray Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ching Siang; Ting, Wai Soon; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Chan, Weng Howe; Deris, Safaai; Ali Shah, Zuraini

    2014-01-01

    When gene expression data are too large to be processed, they are transformed into a reduced representation set of genes. Transforming large-scale gene expression data into a set of genes is called feature extraction. If the genes extracted are carefully chosen, this gene set can extract the relevant information from the large-scale gene expression data, allowing further analysis by using this reduced representation instead of the full size data. In this paper, we review numerous software applications that can be used for feature extraction. The software reviewed is mainly for Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Independent Component Analysis (ICA), Partial Least Squares (PLS), and Local Linear Embedding (LLE). A summary and sources of the software are provided in the last section for each feature extraction method. PMID:25250315

  13. Velocity spectra and angular distributions of evaporation residues from sup 32 S + sup 12 C at 145 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, N.; Cavallaro, S.; Femino', S.; Figuera, P.; Pirrone, S.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S. )

    1991-11-01

    Velocity spectra and angular and mass distributions for the evaporation residues of the {sup 32}S+{sup 12}C system at {ital E}{sup 32}S=145 MeV in the angular range 3{degree}{le}{var theta}{sub {ital L}}{le}12{degree} have been measured. In order to separate compound nucleus evaporation residues from other heavy reaction products, a kinematic analysis based on simple statistical assumptions relative to the velocity spectra was performed. The structures in the mass distribution are compared with the LILITA code predictions. The fusion excitation function of the existing results is compared with theoretical models. The total reaction cross section has been extracted by means of the modified sum of differences method.

  14. Aroma Characterization and Safety Assessment of a Beverage Fermented by Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Müller, Julia; Schmitz, Hans-Joachim; Birk, Florian; Schrenk, Dieter; Zorn, Holger

    2015-08-12

    A cereal-based beverage was developed by fermentation of wort with the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor. The beverage possessed a fruity, fresh, and slightly floral aroma. The volatiles of the beverage were isolated by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and additionally by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME). The aroma compounds were analyzed by a gas chromatography system equipped with a tandem mass spectrometer and an olfactory detection port (GC-MS/MS-O) followed by aroma (extract) dilution analysis. Thirty-four different odor impressions were perceived, and 27 corresponding compounds were identified. Fifteen key odorants with flavor dilution (FD) factors ranging from 8 to 128 were quantitated, and their respective odor activity values (OAVs) were calculated. Six key odorants were synthesized de novo by T. versicolor. Furthermore, quantitative changes during the fermentation process were analyzed. To prepare for the market introduction of the beverage, a comprehensive safety assessment was performed. PMID:26189508

  15. Studies on Five Senses Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Sadaka; Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi

    2011-06-01

    This study proposed a therapy from complementary and alternative medicine to treat mental disorder by through interactions of five senses between therapist and patient. In this method sounding a certain six voices play an important role in healing and recovery. First, we studied effects of speaking using scalp- EEG measurement. Chaos analysis of EEG showed a largely enhanced largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) during the speaking. In addition, EEG power spectrum showed an increase over most frequencies. Second, we performed case studies on mental disorder using the therapy. Running power spectrum of EEG of patients indicated decreasing power at end of treatment, implying five senses therapy induced relaxed and lowered energy in central neural system. The results agreed with patient's reports that there were considerable decline in anxiety and improvements in mood.

  16. An empirical target discharging model for direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinenian, N.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Goncharov, V.; Delettrez, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Cobble, J.

    2012-10-01

    Capsule charging of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets, observed previously on OMEGA, is detrimental to achieving the high areal densities (ρR) required for ignition and gain. This is because the target potential traps energetic electrons that can preheat the fuel, raise the adiabat and degrade compression. The decay-time of this potential is therefore an important parameter for preheat calculations. A non-linear model of the electrical discharging of ICF capsules has been developed. The empirical model, which captures the essential dynamics of the target voltage decay, incorporates previous charged-particle spectroscopic and radiographic measurements of the fields. It is shown that return currents through the target support fiber have a profound effect on the voltage-decay time. Implications of these findings for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are considered. This work was supported in part by DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  17. Purification and characterization of coacervate-forming cuticular proteins from Papilio xuthus pupae.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Yumi; Nakagawa, Taro; Taoka, Azuma; Fukumori, Yoshihiro

    2013-07-01

    The Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) pupa expresses novel soluble proteins that undergo reversible temperature-dependent coacervate-formation. We purified two coacervate-forming proteins, PX-1 and PX-4, from the wings of pharate adults. PX-1 and PX-4 form coacervates upon warming. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that these proteins assemble ordered bead-like ultrastructures. We cloned and sequenced PX-1 and PX-4 cDNAs. The PX-1 and PX-4 amino acid sequences contain many hydrophobic residues and show homologies to insect cuticular proteins. Moreover, when recombinant PX-1 and PX-4 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, both recombinant proteins exhibited temperature-dependent coacervation. Furthermore, analyses of truncated mutants of PX-1 suggest that both the Val/Pro-rich region and Gly/lle-rich regions of PX-1 are involved in such coacervation. PMID:23829213

  18. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  19. Proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease in mice is confounded by neurotoxicity of the ethanol vehicle.

    PubMed

    Landau, Anne M; Kouassi, Edouard; Siegrist-Johnstone, Rosmarie; Desbarats, Julie

    2007-02-15

    Defects in the ubiquitin-proteasome system have been implicated in Parkinson's Disease (PD). Recently, a rat model of PD was developed using a synthetic proteasome inhibitor (PSI), (Z-lle-Glu(OtBu)-Ala-Leu-al). We attempted to transfer this model to mouse studies, where genetics can be more readily investigated due to the availability of genetically modified mice. We treated C57BL/6 (B6) mice with six intraperitoneal injections of 6 mg/kg PSI in 50 mul of 70% ethanol over a 2-week-period. We found significant decreases in nigrostriatal dopamine in PSI-treated mice compared with saline-treated mice. However, we observed similar decreases in the ethanol-treated vehicle control group. Administration of ethanol alone led to significant long-term alterations in dopamine levels. Ethanol significantly eclipses the effects of PSI in the dopamine system, and therefore is a confounding vehicle for this model. PMID:17230468

  20. Ion temperature measurements in shock-driven implosions on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Waugh, C.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sinenian, N.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J.; McKenty, P.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Pape, S.; Bionta, R.; MacKinnon, A.; Landen, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Nikroo, A.

    2011-10-01

    Y. KIM, H. HERMANN, LANL Shock-driven ``exploding pusher'' implosions are commonly used at the OMEGA and the NIF facilities as test platforms for calibrating and validating diagnostics. We present extensive data on temperatures in exploding pushers obtained through methods: measurement of Doppler broadening of fusion products (from both DD and D3He reactions), and measurement of temperature sensitive yield ratios of DD and D3He yields. Since burn-averaged nuclear observables depend on density and temperature gradients and the time evolution after the spherical shock collapse, it is not evident a priori that these methods measure the same Ti. We compare experimental results to both radiation hydrodynamics simulations and an analytic Guderley shock model. This work was supported in part by LLE, the NLUF, the FSC, the US DOE, LLNL, and GA.

  1. Studies of shock convergence in ICF implosions using nuclear burn history measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2005-10-01

    Ignition of ICF capsules on the NIF will be critically dependent on the quality of hot-spot heating due to converging shock waves. On OMEGA, the convergence of strong spherical shocks heats the inner gas sufficiently to induce nuclear fusion. Measurements of the time history of this nuclear burn show that the burn induced by shock convergence occurs several hundred picoseconds before the deceleration-phase compression burn. The nuclear burn history measurements of two distinct nuclear reactions will be compared to a Guderley self-similar imploding shock analysis, as well as to 1-D hydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, the Univ. of Rochester, and the N.Y.State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  2. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Tybo, J.; Guiseppe, V.; Rundberg, B.; Kidd, M.

    2013-04-19

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of {sup 195}Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  3. Design and characterization of a movable emittance meter for low-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Catani, Luciano; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Tazzari, Sergio; Boscolo, Manuela; Castellano, Michele; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Fusco, Valeria; Filippetto, Daniele; Palumbo, Luigi; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vicario, Carlo; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-09-15

    In order to characterize and optimize the beam emittance compensation scheme [L. Serafini and J. B. Rosenzweig, Phys. Rev. E 55, 7565 (1997)] of the Sorgente Pulsata Autoamplificata di Radiazione Coerente project [D. Alesini et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 507, 345 (2003)] high brightness preinjector a system to accurately measure the beam rms emittance evolution downstream of the rf gun has been developed. Since in a space charge dominated beam the quadrupole-scan method is not applicable, a movable emittance measurement device has been built based on the pepper-pot technique. The device consists of a double system of horizontal and vertical slit arrays and a downstream screen, all installed on a longitudinally movable support equipped with bellows and spanning the {approx_equal}1.2 m long drift space between gun and first accelerating section. The system allows the measuring of the beam rms emittance all along the spanned region so as to accurately reconstruct its evolution along the beam trajectory. More than a simple improvement over more conventional beam emittance measurement tools this device defines a new strategy for characterizing high performance photoinjectors as it allows a detailed analysis of the beam behavior over a section of the accelerator where crucial beam shaping takes place. Numerical simulations of the measurement, mainly based on PARMELA [J. Billen, PARMELA Report No. LA-UR 96-1835, 1996 (unpublished)], have been used to estimate the achievable accuracy and to optimize the experimental setup. Wake field effects induced by the beam propagation through the bellows have also been investigated with HOMDYN [M. Ferrario et al., LCLS Report No. SLAC-PUB 84000, 1999 (unpublished)]. A series of laboratory tests to evaluate its performance has been carried out at LNF in Frascati. The system was then moved to DESY Zeuthen and installed on the Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ, for further testing with beam. Design criteria and tests

  4. Characterization of the Oxidation State of 229 Th Recoils Implanted in MgF2 for the Search of the Low-lying 229 Th Isomeric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau; Meyer, Edmund; Schacht, Mike; Collins, Lee; Wilkerson, Marianne; Zhao, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    The low-lying (7.8 eV) isomeric state in 229 Th has the potential to become a nuclear frequency standard. 229 Th recoils from 233 U decays have been collected in MgF2 for use in the direct search of the transition. Of interest is the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th atoms as this can have an influence on the decay mechanisms and photon emission rate. Too determine the oxidation state of the implanted 229 Th recoils we have employed laser induced florescence (LIF), and plan-wave pseudopotential DFT calculations to search for emission from thorium ions in oxidation states less than + 4. Our search focused on detecting emission from Th3+ ions. The DFT calculations predicted the Th3+ state to be the most likely to be present in the crystal after Th4+. We also calculated the band structure for the Th3+ doped MgF2 crystal. For LIF spectra a number of excitation wavelengths were employed, emission spectra in the visible to near-IR were recorded along with time-resolved emission spectra. We have found no evidence for Th3+ in the MgF2 plates. We also analyzed the detection limit of our apprentice and found that the minimum number of Th3+ atoms that we could detect is quite small compared to the number of implanted 229 Th recoils. The number of implanted 229 Th recoils was derived from a γ-ray spectrum by monitoring emission from the daughters of 228 Th. These were present in the MgF2 plates due to a 232 U impurity, which decays to 228 Th, in the source. LA-UR-16-20442.

  5. Gauging the feasibility of a downhole energy harvesting system through a proof-of-concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjolsing, Eric; Todd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon well operators deploy downhole reservoir monitoring equipment in order to optimize the rate at which hydrocarbons are extracted. Alternative power sources are sought that could be deployed in these harsh environments to replace or supplement standard power sources currently in use. To this end, a three phase proof-of-concept study was performed to gauge the feasibility of such a device. In the first phase a parametric study was performed to understand how high uncertainty variables affect the natural frequency of a producing hydrocarbon well. In a follow up study, the relationship between boundary conditions and system damping was investigated. In the second phase a structural housing was designed to satisfy American Petroleum Institute load cases. Using finite element models and standard tube/casing geometries, design pressures were iterated until a permissible housing design was achieved. This preliminary design provided estimates of the radial width and volume in which energy harvesting and storage elements may be situated. In the last phase a software program was developed to estimate the energy that might be harvested from user specified harvester configurations. The program is dependent on user input production tube accelerations; this permits well operators to use well-specific vibrational data as inputs to generate well-specific energy output estimates. Results indicate that a downhole energy harvesting tool is structurally feasible under reasonable operating conditions but no conclusions can be made as to the sufficiency of generated power as no in-situ acceleration time histories are available. Future work is discussed. Approved for publication, LA-UR-16-21193.

  6. Challenges in Parameterizing a Landscape Evolution Model to Predict 1000 Years of Erosion on a Mesa-top Waste Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. J.; Crowell, K. J.; Lane, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    Low-level radioactive waste from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently being disposed in pits excavated into mesa-top repositories. One requirement for operation of the repositories is that no release of radioactive material will occur for up to 1000 years following closure of the repository. LANL is required to demonstrate that the repository can be successfully closed; including demonstrating that the waste pits will not be excavated by long term surface erosion processes. Here we describe the parameterization and application of the Siberia landscape evolution model in the optimization of the closure cap design for the Material Disposal Site G at LANL. The closure design is particularly challenging since some of the older waste pits are located near the edges of a slender finger mesa with complex topography. LANL scientists worked with the cap design engineer at URS in an iterative process to develop a stable design. In addition to design challenges, we faced significant challenges parameterizing the Siberia model for our site. Although we had multiple rainfall, runoff and sediment data sets at a range of scales (plot, first order basin and watershed), these data were not complete enough to develop the relationships required to parameterize Siberia. The data did however provide a strong realty-check on rainfall-runoff and runoff-sediment yield relationships derived from the IRS9 and Hillslope Erosion (HEM) models respectively, which were ultimately used to develop parameter values for the fluvial erosion in Siberia. Diffusion was constrained by eye-balling a match between Siberia generated topography and the observed topography (field and ALSM data) at the heads of first order channels. Siberia runs that generated colluvial hollows (non-existent at this site) indicated that the diffusion coefficient was too high. LA-UR-04-6328.

  7. Code System for Calculating Alpha, N; Spontaneous Fission; and Delayed Neutron Sources and Spectra.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-07-18

    Version: 04 SOURCES4C is a code system that determines neutron production rates and spectra from (alpha,n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. In this release the three-region problem was modified to correct several bugs, and new documentation was added to the package. Details are available in the included LA-UR-02-1617 (2002) report. The code is capable of calculating (alpha,n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e.,more » an intimate mixture of alpha-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of alpha-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between alpha-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and (alpha,n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of alpha-particles incident on a slab of target material. The process of creating a SOURCES input file (tape1) is streamlined with the Los Alamos SOURCES Tape1 Creator and Library Link (LASTCALL) Version 1. Intended to supplement the SOURCES manual, LASTCALL is a simple graphical user interface designed to minimize common errors made during input. The optional application, LASTCALL, consists of a single dialog window launched from an executable (lastcall.exe) on Windows-based personal computers.« less

  8. Mechanical Properties from PBX 9501 Pressing Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Darla; Wright, Walter J.

    2004-07-01

    A PBX 9501 pressing study was conducted by researchers in ESA-WMM, LANL, to identify the hydrostatic pressing parameters most important in fabricating high-density parts with uniform density. In this study, 31 charges were pressed using a full permutation of six pressing parameters. Five charges from the set of 31 were selected for an evaluation of their mechanical properties, specifically uniaxial compression and tension. Charges were selected to 1) span the density range of the study, and 2) allow two direct comparisons of pressing parameters independent of bulk density (density has a well-established affect on some material properties). Three PBX 9501 charges pressed isostatically at Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX were also included in the study. The tensile properties of the 8 charges varied significantly. Careful evaluation of the results suggests that an increase in pressing temperature may correlate with an increase in tensile stress (strength) and a decrease in strain (ductility). Trends in compression exist but are less pronounced. In an effort to explore the relationship between pressing temperature and tensile strength, four sheets of Estane polymer (a component of the PBX 9501 binder) were compression molded at 70, 90, 110 and 130°C. The tensile strength of Estane was observed to increase by a factor of nearly 20 when the molding temperature was increased from 70 to 90°C (strength increase was negligible beyond 90°C). We present an outline of ongoing work that will irrefutably quantify the mechanical property affects of both pressing temperature and dwell time on PBX 9501.(LA-UR 03-4842).

  9. Ranchero Armature Test LA-19.4-CT-3: PBX-9501 Explosive with no smoothing layer. Firing point 88, 9/16/13

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Brian B.; Goforth, James H.; Rae, Philip John; Dickson, Peter; Briggs, Matthew E.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Hare, Steven John; Herrera, Dennis Harold; Watt, Robert Gregory; Rousculp, Christopher L.

    2014-11-13

    LA-19.4-CT-3 (CT-3) was the third camera test in a series beginning in 1/11, which diagnose the performance of 6 mm thick, 6061 T-0 Al Ranchero armatures. [The test LA-43-CT-2 (CT-2) is described in LA-UR-14-21983.] The goal of CT-3 was to verify that PBX-9501, with 18 mm point spacing and no smoothing layer, could be used for Ranchero generator armatures in place of PBXN-110, which had been used in all previous Ranchero applications. CT-1 and CT-2 both had 43 cm long slapper detonator systems imbedded in the cast PBXN-110 explosive, but manufacturing a charge for a similar 9501 test was not cost effective. Instead, a single cylinder of 9501, 19.368 cm long and 15.494 cm (6.100”)in diameter, had a groove machined to accommodate a row of 11 SE-1 detonators with 18 mm point spacing along the mid-plane of the cylinder. The expansion of the armature looks like a slapper assembly along almost ½ of the circumference, and provides adequate proof of concept. Removing the smoother from PBXN-110-driven armatures increased the armature velocity from 3.1 mm/μs to 3.3 mm/μs, as seen in CT-2, and the velocity measured on CT-3 increased to 3.8 mm/μs. In addition, the camera records show that the surface of the armature is smooth enough, and free from ruptures for an expansion of greater that 2X. The advantage of using 9501 is that it precludes concerns about blow-outs seen when bubbles are left in the cast material, and gives extra velocity. The disadvantage is that the machined explosives are more expensive.

  10. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  11. Measurement of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio with the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, Rhiannon; Niffte Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear data play a fundamental role in energy and defense related applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate into calculated performance parameters. It is important therefore that nuclear data uncertainties are minimized and well-understood. To this end, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration is developing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. (n,f) cross-section measurements with the NIFFTE TPC take place at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR facility, a spallation neutron source which provides a neutron spectrum ranging from hundreds of keV to hundreds of MeV. During the 2012 LANSCE run cycle, data were collected on several actinide samples, including U-238 and U-235. These data, along with those collected during the 2013 LANSCE run cycle, will be used to deduce a U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio, to benchmark TPC performance, and to provide high-quality data to the community. A brief overview of the NIFFTE TPC and preliminary analysis of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) ratio data will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LA-UR-13-24779.

  12. The effects of laser absorption and mix on direct-drive capsule experiments at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Benage, J. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Wysocki, F. J.; Seka, W.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Frenje, J. A.

    2009-11-01

    The yield of an ICF capsule can be affected by the inclusion of high-Z material in the fuel, either as a diagnostic or from hydrodynamic mixing. A series of experiments have been fielded at the OMEGA laser to better understand these effects. The targets are glass shells filled with a mixture of D2 and ^3He, and with controlled amounts of a dopant, Ar, Kr, and/or Xe. These targets are then directly driven with a 1.0 ns (0.6 ns) square laser pulse having a total energy of 23 kJ (13.8 kJ), and the data compared with yield and burn-temperature predictions from 1-d radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. However, our calculated yields are typically a factor of two greater than the measured yield, while the calculated burn-weighted temperatures are lower. Estimates for the amount of absorbed laser energy indicate that only 65% to 70% is absorbed. However, our calculations absorb 85% of the energy. The ratio of D^3He-protons to DT-neutrons also indicates that mixing of shell material has occurred. We will discuss the results of recent 1-d calculations where the incident energy and flux limiter have been varied to match the absorption data. We will also discuss the use of a mix-model to match the charged particle data. Supported by US DOE and LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-09-04488

  13. Short-pulse laser amplification and saturation using stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Lundquist, P. B.; Sarkisyan, S.; Nelson-Melby, E.

    2010-11-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has focused on using backward-stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) in plasmas as a means of laser pulse amplification and compression [1,2,3]. We present initial computational and experimental work on SRS amplification in a capillary-discharge generated Xe plasma. The experimental set-up uses a 200 ps pump pulse with an 800 nm wavelength seeded by a 100 fs pulse from a broadband source and counter-propagates the pulses through a plasma of length 1 cm and diameter 0.1 cm. Results from initial experiments characterizing the plasma and on short-pulse amplification will be presented. Additionally, we present results from calculations using pF3d [4], and discuss the role of SRS saturation and determine the possible significance of electron trapping with a model implemented in pF3d [5]. [1] G. Shvets, N. J. Fisch, A. Pukhov, and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4879 (1998). [2] V. M. Malkin, G. Shvets, and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4448 (1999). [3] R. K. Kirkwood, E. Dewald, and C. Niemann, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14 113109 (2007). [4] R. L. Berger, B. F. Lasinski, T. B. Kaiser, et al., Phys. Fluids B 5 2243 (1993). [5] H. X. Vu, D. F. DuBois, and B. Bezzerides, Phys. Plasmas 14 012702 (2007). Supported by US DOE and LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-10-04787

  14. Toward Hydrocode Models of an Impact-Generated Martian Greenhouse: Model Validation and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Wohletz, K. H.; Coker, R. F.; Asphaug, E.; Korycansky, D. G.; Gittings, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Large impacts have been suggested by Carr (1996) and Segura et al. (2002) as a possible trigger of warm and wet climate episodes early in Martian history. Our goal is to model impacts into stratigraphically complicated media, and specifically targets containing water ice in various morphologies, in order to determine a lower bound on the energy and size scales of impact events that could trigger such a climate shift, and thus establish an upper bound on the frequency of such events. To do this, we use various analytical and numerical modeling techniques, including the RAGE hydrocode. RAGE (Baltrusaitis et al. 1996) is an Eulerian hydrocode that runs in up to three dimensions and incorporates a variety of detailed equations of state including the temperature-based SESAME tables maintained by LANL. In order to test the accuracy of RAGE predictions before applying this hydrocode to the problem of interest, we compare code results against analytical models (verification) and laboratory experiments (validation) that are related to the problem of interest. We compare RAGE against various laboratory experiments (Kato et al. 2001, Nakazawa et al. 2002, Koschny et al. 2001), and analytical crater scaling models (Housen et al. 1983, Holsapple and Schmidt 1982, Holsapple 1993, and Melosh 1989). From there, we begin to examine the potential effects of impacts on water ice in the Martian subsurface, first by examining the evolution of the temperature and pressure profiles of an impact into a geologically simple, ice-free target, and then exploring the effects of increased ice content and ice layer morphology. This effort is supported by LANL/IGPP (CSP, RFC, KHW, MLG) and by NASA PG&G (EA). LA-UR-06-6233

  15. Proton and Alpha Core Imaging of OMEGA D^3He Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Schwartz, B. E.; Stoeckl, C.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of the nuclear burn region are important for investigating the extent of the burn, the presence of burn asymmetries, the effects of mix and thermal conduction on the burn region, and the accuracy of code predictions. Charged-fusion-product core images have been obtained at OMEGA for implosions of D^3He-filled capsules with both thin and thick shells. Using multiple pinholes, images are reconstructed from 3.0-MeV and 14.7-MeV protons and 3.6-MeV alphas. For thin-shell, all three particles escape at bang time and their images reflect the different burn regions for DD and D^3He reactions. In contrast, for thick-shell implosions, only the 14.7-MeV proton can penetrate the capsule ρR at bang time, and the burn region reflects the effects of compression and mix. At first shock coalescence, when the ρR is far below its peak value, all three particles may also escape from the capsule. As mix has been experimentally shown to be inconsequential at this instant, meaningful comparisons of 1-D simulations with experiments can be made. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion (Grant number DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement number DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975. (Petrasso: Visiting Senior Scientist at LLE.)

  16. A rapid and sensitive method for the identification of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Anna; Lewis, John; Doble, Philip; Hansen, Glyn; Prolov, Tatiana; Fu, Shanlin

    2012-02-10

    A fast and sensitive method was developed for detecting delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method is suitable for samples of small volume and low concentration. For method development and validation, neat oral fluid (200 μL) spiked with THC and d(3)-THC (internal standard) was extracted via liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). The LLE method had an extraction efficiency of 75% with no significant matrix effects observed in either diluted or neat oral fluid samples. LC was performed on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 Rapid Resolution HT column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 1.8 μm particle size) with positive electrospray ionisation and selected reaction monitoring. The total run time was an efficient 3.5 min in isocratic elution mode. The limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL and the analysis was linear over the range of 1-500 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The imprecision (RSD) of the method was 13% and inaccuracy (MRE) was 4%. The method was subsequently applied to two neat oral fluid samples taken from a chronic cannabis smoker. It was also applied to buffer diluted residual oral fluid samples (n=48) collected using the Cozart RapiScan(®) system through the Roadside Drug Testing Program (RDTP) in NSW, Australia. A stability study was performed that revealed freezing or refrigerating resulted in comparable decreases in THC recovery from neat oral fluid at the end of two weeks of storage. Storage at room temperature even for one day invoked significant losses and is not recommended. PMID:21367546

  17. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1995-04-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

  18. Early-time measurements of laser-plasma conditions in OMEGA-upgrade ICF targets. Final report, April 1, 1998--January 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.

    1998-02-08

    All of the experimental results from OMEGA shots described here are from CY-1998 experiments under an (extended) FY-98 grant. This research involves fielding at LLE their two flat-field euv spectrographs in the 30--250 {angstrom} range, mainly utilizing on one o them a gated stripline microchannel plate as a time-resolved detector, with photographic recording. The experimental layout for the 1998 experiments is shown. During the week beginning May 3, 1998, the authors obtained 24 data shots over 4 days, and fielded both the time-gated extreme ultraviolet (euv) spectrograph mounted external to the target chamber, as well as their newly-constructed TIM-mounted euv spectrograph mounted closer to the target with time-integrated photographic recording on a trial basis. They also had available the LLE/LLNL streak x-ray spectrograph and x-ray imaging cameras. In this series, the first two shots appeared from the x-ray streak spectra to be normal in the sense that the spectral line emissions from the two coatings sequenced beginning with magnesium followed by aluminum as the coatings were vaporized. Unfortunately, on the following shots in this campaign it became increasingly apparent that conditions had changed radically, and later analyses showed that x-ray spectra lines from the deep aluminum undercoating appeared initially along with weak magnesium lines, indicating a premature vaporization of the magnesium heavier top layer. The second campaign in 1998 occurred during the week beginning October 18, 1998 and consisted of 21 data shots over two extended (12-hour) days following setup. For this series the authors again used their externally-mounted euv spectrography with time resolution and the x-ray streak spectrograph and imaging cameras. Much to their relief, it was immediately evident from the x-ray streak spectra obtained that significant ablation of the magnesium coatings by a (presumed) prepulse was not present, as it had been in the May campaign.

  19. Minimizing Contamination to Mulitlayer Dielectric Diffraction Gratings Within a Large Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ashe, B.; Marshall, K.L.; Mastrosimone, D.; McAtee, C.

    2008-11-25

    The University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has recently completed the construction of the OMEGA EP short-pulse, petawatt laser system. A major structure for OMEGA EP is the grating compressor chamber (GCC). This large (15,750-ft^3) vacuum chamber contains numerous optics used in laser-pulse compression of two 40-cm-sq-aperture, IR (1054-nm) laser beams. Critical to this compression, within the GCC, are eight sets (four per beamline) of tiled (e.g., three optical elements precisely held side by side to act as one element) multilayer-dielectric (MLD)-diffraction-grating assemblies (three gratings per assembly) that provide the capability for producing 2.6-kJ output IR energy per beam at 10 ps. The primary requirements for each of the 24 lareg-aperture (43-cm x 47-cm) gratings are a high diffraction efficiency greater than 95%, a peak-to-valley wavefront quality of less than lamba/4 waves at 1054 nm, and a laser-induced-damage threshold greater than 2.7 J/cm^2 at 10-ps pulse width (measured at normal beam incidence). Degradation of grating laser-damage thresholds due to adsorption of contaminants must be prevented to maintain system performance. The presence of extrinsic contaminants (either particulate or molecular) in the vacuum system puts the MLD gratings at risk with respect to lowered damage threshold. A number of protocols have been developed and implemented at LLE to minimize MLD grating contamination and to characterize the performance of the GCC. In this paper, we describe component-cleaning procedures; the qualification, testing methods, and studies undertaken for materials intended for use within the chamber; as well as the necessary cleaning procedures to integrate and operate the MLD grating assemblies.

  20. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the determination of linarin in small-volume rat plasma and tissue samples and its application to pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinchi; Liu, Youping; Wang, Xin; Di, Xin

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of linarin in small-volume rat plasma and tissue sample. Sample preparation was employed by the combination of protein precipitation (PPT) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) to allow measurement over a 5-order-of-magnitude concentration range. Fast chromatographic separation was achieved on a Hypersil Gold column (100 × 2.1 mm i.d., 5 µm). Mass spectrometric detection was achieved using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization interface operating in positive ionization mode. Quantification was performed using selected reaction monitoring of precursor-product ion transitions at m/z 593 → 285 for linarin and m/z 447 → 271 for baicalin (internal standard). The total run time was only 2.8 min per sample. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.4-200 µg/mL for PPT and 0.001-1.0 µg/mL for LLE. A lower limit of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL was achieved using only 20 μL of plasma or tissue homogenate. The intra- and inter-day precisions in all samples were ≤14.7%, while the accuracy was within ±5.2% of nominal values. The validated method has been successfully applied to pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study of linarin. PMID:26385597

  1. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  3. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  4. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  5. Characterization of paint samples used in drinking water reservoirs: identification of endocrine disruptor compounds.

    PubMed

    Romero, J; Ventura, F; Gomez, M

    2002-04-01

    Several migration tests are performed from various epoxy paint samples that, according to the regulation, can be used in food reservoirs such as drinking water reservoirs. The level of the organic compounds capable of producing migrations to water with special attention to endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs) are identified and estimated by closed loop-stripping analysis (CLSA) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) methods coupled with gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Bisphenol A, a strong endocrine disruptor, is found in all migration experiments. Its concentration level reaches between 0.02 and 0.03 mg/cm2. The higher concentration corresponds with benzylic alcohol, which is used as a solvent and curing agent in epoxy paint. Other EDCs identified in the migration tests are phthalates, 4-nonylphenol, and t-butylphenol. The main non-EDCs identified are solvents, antioxidants, and rubber-like compounds. No great differences are found in the use of metallic plates or concrete slabs for migration experiments; only additional compounds related with the pretreatment of the concrete wall have been identified, too. In the study of a drinking water sample the same organic compounds identified in the migration test is not seen. This is probably because of the dynamic situation in a drinking water reservoir. Finally, a GC profile of a direct epoxy paint analysis is shown. The main peak identified is bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, monomer, and an active principle of the polymerization of epoxy resins based on bisphenol A. In addition, we report the recoveries of a selected group of EDCs using CLSA and LLE methods coupled with GC-MS. PMID:12004937

  6. Automated High-Throughput Permethylation for Glycosylation Analysis of Biologics Using MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Shubhakar, Archana; Kozak, Radoslaw P; Reiding, Karli R; Royle, Louise; Spencer, Daniel I R; Fernandes, Daryl L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-09-01

    Monitoring glycoprotein therapeutics for changes in glycosylation throughout the drug's life cycle is vital, as glycans significantly modulate the stability, biological activity, serum half-life, safety, and immunogenicity. Biopharma companies are increasingly adopting Quality by Design (QbD) frameworks for measuring, optimizing, and controlling drug glycosylation. Permethylation of glycans prior to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a valuable tool for glycan characterization and for screening of large numbers of samples in QbD drug realization. However, the existing protocols for manual permethylation and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) steps are labor intensive and are thus not practical for high-throughput (HT) studies. Here we present a glycan permethylation protocol, based on 96-well microplates, that has been developed into a kit suitable for HT work. The workflow is largely automated using a liquid handling robot and includes N-glycan release, enrichment of N-glycans, permethylation, and LLE. The kit has been validated according to industry analytical performance guidelines and applied to characterize biopharmaceutical samples, including IgG4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO). The HT permethylation enabled glycan characterization and relative quantitation with minimal side reactions: the MALDI-TOF-MS profiles obtained were in good agreement with hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC) and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) data. Automated permethylation and extraction of 96 glycan samples was achieved in less than 5 h and automated data acquisition on MALDI-TOF-MS took on average less than 1 min per sample. This automated and HT glycan preparation and permethylation showed to be convenient, fast, and reliable and can be applied for drug glycan profiling and clinical glycan biomarker studies. PMID:27479043

  7. Exploration of the Kinked Jet in the Crab Nebula with Scaled Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chikang

    2015-11-01

    X-ray images from the Chandra X-ray Observatory show that the South-East jet in the Crab nebula changes direction every few years. This remarkable phenomenon is also frequently observed for jets in other pulsar-wind nebulae and in other astrophysical objects. Numerical simulations suggest that it may be a consequence of current-driven, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities taking place in the jet, yet that is just a hypothesis without verification in controlled experiments. To that end, we recently conducted scaled laboratory experiments that reproduced this phenomenon. In these experiments, a supersonic plasma jet was generated in the collision of two laser-produced plasma plumes, and this jet was radiographed from the side using 15-MeV and 3-MeV protons. It was observed that if self-generated toroidal magnetic fields around the jet were strong enough, they triggered plasma instabilities that caused substantial deflections throughout the jet propagation, mimicking the kinked jet structure seen in the Crab Nebula. We have modeled these laboratory experiments with comprehensive two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations, which in conjunction with the experiments provide compelling evidence that we have an accurate model of the most important physics of magnetic fields and MHD instabilities in the observed jet in the Crab Nebula. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  8. Chaotic dynamics of cardioventilatory coupling in humans: effects of ventilatory modes

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, Laurence; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Cardioventilatory coupling (CVC), a transient temporal alignment between the heartbeat and inspiratory activity, has been studied in animals and humans mainly during anesthesia. The origin of the coupling remains uncertain, whether or not ventilation is a main determinant in the CVC process and whether the coupling exhibits chaotic behavior. In this frame, we studied sedative-free, mechanically ventilated patients experiencing rapid sequential changes in breathing control during ventilator weaning during a switch from a machine-controlled assistance mode [assist-controlled ventilation (ACV)] to a patient-driven mode [inspiratory pressure support (IPS) and unsupported spontaneous breathing (USB)]. Time series were computed as R to start inspiration (RI) and R to the start of expiration (RE). Chaos was characterized with the noise titration method (noise limit), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and correlation dimension (CD). All the RI and RE time series exhibit chaotic behavior. Specific coupling patterns were displayed in each ventilatory mode, and these patterns exhibited different linear and chaotic dynamics. When switching from ACV to IPS, partial inspiratory loading decreases the noise limit value, the LLE, and the correlation dimension of the RI and RE time series in parallel, whereas decreasing intrathoracic pressure from IPS to USB has the opposite effect. Coupling with expiration exhibits higher complexity than coupling with inspiration during mechanical ventilation either during ACV or IPS, probably due to active expiration. Only 33% of the cardiac time series (RR interval) exhibit complexity either during ACV, IPS, or USB making the contribution of the cardiac signal to the chaotic feature of the coupling minimal. We conclude that 1) CVC in unsedated humans exhibits a complex dynamic that can be chaotic, and 2) ventilatory mode has major effects on the linear and chaotic features of the coupling. Taken together these findings reinforce the role of

  9. Microextraction techniques coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of organic micropollutants in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Padrón, Ma Esther Torres; Afonso-Olivares, Cristina; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, sample preparation was carried out using traditional techniques, such as liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), that use large volumes of organic solvents. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) uses much less solvent than LLE, although the volume can still be significant. These preparation methods are expensive, time-consuming and environmentally unfriendly. Recently, a great effort has been made to develop new analytical methodologies able to perform direct analyses using miniaturised equipment, thereby achieving high enrichment factors, minimising solvent consumption and reducing waste. These microextraction techniques improve the performance during sample preparation, particularly in complex water environmental samples, such as wastewaters, surface and ground waters, tap waters, sea and river waters. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF/MS) techniques can be used when analysing a broad range of organic micropollutants. Before separating and detecting these compounds in environmental samples, the target analytes must be extracted and pre-concentrated to make them detectable. In this work, we review the most recent applications of microextraction preparation techniques in different water environmental matrices to determine organic micropollutants: solid-phase microextraction SPME, in-tube solid-phase microextraction (IT-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and liquid-phase microextraction (LPME). Several groups of compounds are considered organic micropollutants because these are being released continuously into the environment. Many of these compounds are considered emerging contaminants. These analytes are generally compounds that are not covered by the existing regulations and are now detected more frequently in different environmental compartments. Pharmaceuticals, surfactants, personal care products and other chemicals are considered micropollutants. These compounds must be

  10. Determination of the location of coke in catalysts by a novel NMR-based, liquid-porosimetry approach.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Navin; Greaves, Malcolm; Lowe, John P; Wood, Joseph; Rigby, Sean P

    2012-09-01

    In this work, a new technique, suitable for chemically-heterogeneous materials, has been used to characterise the structural properties of porous heterogeneous catalysts. A liquid-liquid exchange (LLE) process within nanoporous catalysts has been followed using NMR relaxometry and NMR diffusometry. In order to validate the new technique, two model materials were used. First, a chemically-pure, sol-gel silica, with a simple, mono-disperse pore-space, was studied. The second model material was a bidisperse, eggshell Pt-alumina catalyst. The Pt-alumina catalyst was studied both fresh, and coked following chemical reaction. The degree of structural and chemical complexity added by coking was restricted by the localisation of the coke deposition to the Pt-eggshell layer. Under so-called 'metered' supply conditions, when a high affinity liquid (water) displaced a low affinity liquid (cyclohexane) from the sol-gel silica, entrapment of the low affinity liquid was observed which was similar to that observed in mercury porosimetry. In a similar experiment, comparing LLE in fresh and coked samples of the Pt-alumina catalyst pellets, it was found, for the fresh sample, that water initially displaced cyclohexane from a sub-set of the most accessible, smallest pores, as might expected under metered conditions, but this did not occur for coked catalysts. This finding suggested coking had removed some smaller pores located close to the surface of the pellet, in agreement with where the Pt-metal was preferentially located and coking was known to have occurred. PMID:22727405

  11. Molecular inflation, attrition and the rule of five.

    PubMed

    Leeson, Paul D

    2016-06-01

    Physicochemical properties underlie all aspects of drug action and are critical for solubility, permeability and successful formulation. Specific physicochemical properties shown to be relevant to oral drugs are size, lipophilicity, ionisation, hydrogen bonding, polarity, aromaticity and shape. The rule of 5 (Ro5) and subsequent studies have raised awareness of the importance of compound quality amongst bioactive molecules. Lipophilicity, probably the most important physical property of oral drugs, has on average changed little over time in oral drugs, until increases in drugs published after 1990. In contrast other molecular properties such as average size have increased significantly. Factors influencing property inflation include the targets pursued, where antivirals frequently violate the Ro5, risk/benefit considerations, and variable drug discovery practices. The compounds published in patents from the pharmaceutical industry are on average larger, more lipophilic and less complex than marketed oral drugs. The variation between individual companies' patented compounds is due to different practices and not to the targets pursued. Overall, there is demonstrable physical property attrition in moving from patents to candidate drugs to marketed drugs. The pharmaceutical industry's recent poor productivity has been due, in part, to progression of molecules that are unable to unambiguously test clinical efficacy, and attrition can therefore be improved by ensuring candidate drug quality is 'fit for purpose.' The combined ligand efficiency (LE) and lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) values of many marketed drugs are optimised relative to other molecules acting at the same target. Application of LLE in optimisation can help identify improved leads, even with challenging targets that seem to require lipophilic ligands. Because of their targets, some projects may need to pursue 'beyond Ro5' physicochemical space; such projects will require non-standard lead generation

  12. Study of 3-Ethylamino-but-2-enoic acid phenylamide as a new ligand for preconcentration of lanthanides from aqueous media by liquid-liquid extraction prior to ICP-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Evelina K; Angelov, Plamen A; Stefanova, Violeta M

    2016-11-01

    In the present work the potential of a new ligand 3-Ethylamino-but-2-enoic acid phenylamide (representing the class of enaminones) for selective preconcentration of lanthanides (La, Ce, Eu, Gd and Er) from aqueous medium is examined. Liquid-liquid extraction parameters, such as pH of the water phase, type and volume of organic solvent, quantity of ligand and reaction time are optimized on model solutions. Recovery of lanthanides by re-extraction with nitric acid makes the LLE procedure compatible with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Spectral and non-spectral interferences are studied. Two isotopes per element are measured (with exception of La) for dynamic evaluation of the potential risk of spectral interference in variable real samples. The selectivity of complex formation reaction towards concomitant alkali and alkali-earth elements eliminates the interferences from sample matrix. Subjecting the standards to the optimized extraction procedure in combination with Re as internal standard is recommended as calibration strategy. The accuracy of developed method is approved by analysis of CRM Bush branches and leaves (NCS DC 73348) and recovery of spiked water and plant samples. The method's limits of detection for both studied objects are in the ranges from 0.2 ((158)Gd) to 3.7 ((139)La) ngl(-1) and 0.02 ((158)Gd) to 0.37((139)La) ngg(-1) for waters and plants respectively. The studied compound is an effective new ligand for preconcentration/separation of lanthanides from aqueous medium by LLE and subsequent determination by ICP-MS. PMID:27591629

  13. Grundlegende Steuerungsverfahren im heterogenen Logistiknetz mit Kanban

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Eva; Dickmann, Philipp; Lödding, Hermann; Möller, Niklas; Rücker, Thomas; Schneider, Herfried M.; Zäh, Michael F.

    In vielen Unternehmen werden heterogene (verschiedene) Steuerungen in einem abgestimmten Konzept kombiniert. Je nach Anwendungsfall und Rahmenbedingungen werden Kombinationen allgemein bekannter Steuerungen oder Steuerungsvarianten gemischt eingesetzt, um eine optimale Steuerung für unterschiedliche Fälle zu erreichen. Hierbei stehen neben den bekannten und weit verbreiteten Methoden, wie Material Requirements Planning (MRP) oder Kanban, auch weniger bekannte oder neue Methoden zur Auswahl, wie die Produktionssteuerung mit dezentraler, bestandsorientierter Fertigungsregelung (DBF). Kanban ist ein simples und effizientes Steuerungskonzept, das in der klassischen Form für spezifische einfache Anwendungsfälle umsetzbar ist. Hochentwickelte Steuerungsalgorithmen können helfen, komplexe Abläufe optimal abzubilden. Mit einer grundlegenden Vereinfachung der Abläufe kann allerdings in vielen Fällen ein wesentlich stärkerer und umfassender Verbesserungseffekt erzielt werden. Die wesentliche Fragestellung sollte folglich lauten: Warum ist der Ablauf nicht mit einer einfachen Steuerung wie Kanban abzubilden? Um die Vorteile des Konzepts auch in untypischen Bereichen anwenden zu können, sind jedoch verschiedene Varianten oder Kanban-ähnliche Steuerungsmethoden entstanden. Darüber hinaus sind in der Praxis hybride Steuerungen im Einsatz, welche so kombiniert werden, dass die Zusammensetzung anspruchsvolle Eigenschaftsbilder noch exakt abbildet. In der Praxis basieren die Steuerungsentscheidungen nur zu einem kleinen Teil auf den eigentlichen Steuerungsalgorithmen, wie sie uns das MRP-System zur Verfügung stellt. Moderne Steuerungswelten" schließen alle relevanten Informationsquellen in eine heterogene Entscheidungsmatrix mit ein. Letztlich zählt nicht, ob die Entscheidung auf den Informationen aus dem MRP-System oder auf Softfacts basierend getroffen wurde, sondern nur, ob die Entscheidung erfolgreich war.

  14. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  15. Technische Systeme für den Herzersatz und die Herzunterstützung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöb, Reto; Loree, Howard M.

    Herzkrankheiten verursachen allein in den Vereinigten Staaten jährlich mehr als 700’000 Todesfälle. Ungefähr 3 Millionen Patienten in den U.S.A. leiden gemäss der American Heart Association (AHA) und dem National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) an kongestivem Herzversagen (Congestive Heart Failure, CHF), welches eine chronische, sehr entkräftende und degenerative Krankheit ist: Das Herz ist dabei unfähig, hinreichend Blut zu den Organen des Körpers zu pumpen. Über 400’000 Fälle von CHF werden jedes Jahr diagnostiziert. Ähnliche Zahlen werden für Europa und Japan zusammen geschätzt. Basierend auf Daten vom AHA und NHLBI beträgt die fünfjährige Überlebensrate für CHF-Patienten lediglich etwa 50% [1]. 70’000-120’000 dieser Patienten könnten von einer Herzverpflanzung profitieren. 1999 wurden in den USA aber nur 2185 Herztransplantationen durchgeführt während die Warteliste über 4000 Patienten beträgt [2]. Ein akuter Mangel an Spenderherzen und die enormen Kosten (250’000-400’000 USD pro Patient) sind die begrenzenden Faktoren für Herztransplantationen [3]. Dies bedeutet, dass eine riesige Anzahl von Patienten durch ein zuverlässiges und verschleissfreies, nichtthrombotisches, total implantierbares, künstliches Herz gerettet werden könnten. Bis heute jedoch kein derartiges Implantat kommerziell verfügbar.

  16. Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12-13, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-12-13

    A national ICF laboratory workshop on requirements for a magnetized target capability on NIF was held by NIF at LLNL on October 12 and 13, attended by experts from LLNL, SNL, LLE, LANL, GA, and NRL. Advocates for indirect drive (LLNL), magnetic (Z) drive (SNL), polar direct drive (LLE), and basic science needing applied B (many institutions) presented and discussed requirements for the magnetized target capabilities they would like to see. 30T capability was most frequently requested. A phased operation increasing the field in steps experimentally can be envisioned. The NIF management will take the inputs from the scientific community represented at the workshop and recommend pulse-powered magnet parameters for NIF that best meet the collective user requests. In parallel, LLNL will continue investigating magnets for future generations that might be powered by compact laser-B-field generators (Moody, Fujioka, Santos, Woolsey, Pollock). The NIF facility engineers will start to analyze compatibility of the recommended pulsed magnet parameters (size, field, rise time, materials) with NIF chamber constraints, diagnostic access, and final optics protection against debris in FY16. The objective of this assessment will be to develop a schedule for achieving an initial Bfield capability. Based on an initial assessment, room temperature magnetized gas capsules will be fielded on NIF first. Magnetized cryo-ice-layered targets will take longer (more compatibility issues). Magnetized wetted foam DT targets (Olson) may have somewhat fewer compatibility issues making them a more likely choice for the first cryo-ice-layered target fielded with applied Bz.

  17. Hysteresis-induced bifurcation and chaos in a magneto-rheological suspension system under external excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailong, Zhang; Enrong, Wang; Fuhong, Min; Ning, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    The magneto-rheological damper (MRD) is a promising device used in vehicle semi-active suspension systems, for its continuous adjustable damping output. However, the innate nonlinear hysteresis characteristic of MRD may cause the nonlinear behaviors. In this work, a two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) MR suspension system was established first, by employing the modified Bouc-Wen force-velocity (F-v) hysteretic model. The nonlinear dynamic response of the system was investigated under the external excitation of single-frequency harmonic and bandwidth-limited stochastic road surface. The largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) was used to detect the chaotic area of the frequency and amplitude of harmonic excitation, and the bifurcation diagrams, time histories, phase portraits, and power spectrum density (PSD) diagrams were used to reveal the dynamic evolution process in detail. Moreover, the LLE and Kolmogorov entropy (K entropy) were used to identify whether the system response was random or chaotic under stochastic road surface. The results demonstrated that the complex dynamical behaviors occur under different external excitation conditions. The oscillating mechanism of alternating periodic oscillations, quasi-periodic oscillations, and chaotic oscillations was observed in detail. The chaotic regions revealed that chaotic motions may appear in conditions of mid-low frequency and large amplitude, as well as small amplitude and all frequency. The obtained parameter regions where the chaotic motions may appear are useful for design of structural parameters of the vibration isolation, and the optimization of control strategy for MR suspension system. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51475246, 51277098, and 51075215), the Research Innovation Program for College Graduates of Jiangsu Province China (Grant No. KYLX15 0725), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. BK20131402).

  18. Analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls in waters and wastewaters using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Senar

    2011-03-01

    A method was developed for viable and rapid determination of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in water samples with vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At first, the most suitable extraction solvent and extraction solvent volume were determined. Later, the parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as vortex extraction time, rotational speed of the vortex, and ionic strength of the sample were optimized by using a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The optimized extraction conditions for 5 mL water sample were as follows: extractant solvent 200 μL of chloroform; vortex extraction time of 2 min at 3000 rpm; centrifugation 5 min at 4000 rpm, and no ionic strength. Under the optimum condition, limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.36 to 0.73 ng/L. Mean recoveries of PCBs from fortified water samples are 96% for three different fortification levels and RSDs of the recoveries are below 5%. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the determination of PCBs in real water and wastewater samples such as tap, well, surface, bottled waters, and municipal, treated municipal, and industrial wastewaters. The performance of the proposed method was compared with traditional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of real water samples and the results show that efficiency of proposed method is comparable to the LLE. However, the proposed method offers several advantages, i.e. reducing sample requirement for measurement of target compounds, less solvent consumption, and reducing the costs associated with solvent purchase and waste disposal. It is also viable, rapid, and easy to use for the analyses of PCBs in water samples by using GC-MS. PMID:21280211

  19. A rapid and sensitive method to determine tacrolimus in rat whole blood using liquid-liquid extraction with mild temperature ultrasonication and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Seo; Cho, Ha Ra; Kang, Myung Joo; Choi, Yong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tacrolimus (TAC) is an immunosuppressant widely used in organ transplantation, but its extremely low aqueous solubility causes poor intestinal absorption. There have been efforts to develop an alternative TAC formulation with an improved dissolution rate and oral bioavailability (BA), and the development of a rapid and sensitive analytical method for its in vivo pharmacokinetic study is an essential prerequisite. Thus, here, we develop a novel method to determine TAC in rat whole blood based on liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with mild temperature ultrasonication. For rapid and efficient separation of TAC from other hydrophobic compounds, a C8 column was chosen with isocratic mobile phase elution. With the help of the high specificity and the high sensitivity of multiple reaction monitoring in positive ion mode, the present method showed good performance including specificity, linearity (r(2) ≥ 0.996 within 1-200 ng/mL), sensitivity (the lower limit of quantitation at 1 ng/mL), intra- and inter-day accuracy (88.7-104.5 %) and precision (≤10.3 %), and recovery (94.7-102.6 %). Also, the stability of TAC and ascomycin, the internal standard, in rat whole blood was confirmed before and after the sample preparation. The validated method was satisfactorily applied to a pharmacokinetic study to determine TAC in rat whole blood following oral administration of the marketed product (Prograf(®), Astellas Pharma). In the present study, LLE with mild temperature ultrasonication was successfully expanded to the determination of a drug from whole blood or plasma for the first time. Therefore, the present method can contribute to the rapid in vivo evaluation of novel TAC formulations, and will be able to contribute to the development of TAC formulations with a higher dissolution rate and a higher BA. PMID:26589688

  20. Meconium Atazanavir Concentrations and Early Language Outcomes in HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants with Prenatal Atazanavir Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Sarah K.; Huo, Yanling; Siberry, George K.; Williams, Paige L.; Rice, Mabel L.; Sirois, Patricia A.; Frederick, Toni; Hazra, Rohan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether prenatal atazanavir (ATV) exposure, assessed by meconium antiretroviral quantification, predicts early child language outcomes. Prenatal ATV exposure previously was associated with poorer language development in one-year-olds. Methods Pregnant women with HIV and their uninfected infants enrolled in the SMARTT study. Meconium antiretroviral concentrations were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Language development at 1 year was assessed with MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI) and Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development—Third Edition (Bayley-III). Late language emergence (LLE) was defined as ≥ one of four CDI scores ≤10th percentile for age. Associations between fetal ATV exposure timing and duration, meconium ATV concentration, and language outcomes were evaluated, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Through 2013, meconium samples were available from 175 of 432 infants with prenatal ATV exposure. Valid Bayley-III (n=93) and CDI (n=106) assessments also were available. After adjustment for potential confounders, higher ATV meconium concentrations were associated with lower LLE risk (P=0.04), and cumulative ATV exposure duration also was associated with higher Bayley-III Language scores (P=0.03). Maternal ATV duration and initiation week correlated with ATV meconium concentrations (positively and negatively, respectively). Conclusions Higher meconium ATV concentrations were protective against developmental language delays at 1 year, suggesting the importance of fetal ATV detoxification into meconium. This information supports ATV exposure safety for infant language development. ATV is a preferred ARV for pregnant women with HIV, suggesting the importance of ATV safety investigations. Additionally, further pursuit of the influences on language development in HEU infants is required. PMID:26009830

  1. Quantification of maltol in Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) products by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Cheol; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Young-Chan; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Choi, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kyung-Tack; Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Young-Chul; Cho, Chang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Background: Maltol, as a type of phenolic compounds, is produced by the browning reaction during the high-temperature treatment of ginseng. Thus, maltol can be used as a marker for the quality control of various ginseng products manufactured by high-temperature treatment including red ginseng. For the quantification of maltol in Korean ginseng products, an effective high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) method was developed. Materials and Methods: The HPLC-DAD method for maltol quantification coupled with a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method was developed and validated in terms of linearity, precision, and accuracy. An HPLC separation was performed on a C18 column. Results: The LLE methods and HPLC running conditions for maltol quantification were optimized. The calibration curve of the maltol exhibited good linearity (R2 = 1.00). The limit of detection value of maltol was 0.26 μg/mL, and the limit of quantification value was 0.79 μg/mL. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the data of the intra- and inter-day experiments were <1.27% and 0.61%, respectively. The results of the recovery test were 101.35–101.75% with an RSD value of 0.21–1.65%. The developed method was applied successfully to quantify the maltol in three ginseng products manufactured by different methods. Conclusion: The results of validation demonstrated that the proposed HPLC-DAD method was useful for the quantification of maltol in various ginseng products. PMID:26246746

  2. SIRUS-M: A symmetric illumination, inertially confined direct drive materials test facility: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, B.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Attaya, H.; Engelstad, R.L.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Liang, J.H.; Lovell, E.G.; Moses, G.A.; Musicki, Z.; Peterson, R.R.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Skupsky, S.; McCrory, R.; McKenty, P.; Verdon, C.

    1988-03-01

    Over the past three years the Fusion Technology Institute of the University of Wisconsin (FTI) and the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), in cooperation with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), have conducted a study of critical issues related to the design of an ICF materials test facility, SIRIUS-M. This report summarizes the results obtained by the FTI and LLE team related to the SIRIUM-M design during 1985, 1986, and 1987. The SIRIUS-M facility uses symmetrically-illuminated targets. It is designed to duplicate the anticipated time-dependent radiation damage structure unique to ICF systems, in order to provide the technology base necessary for an ICF demonstration facility. In order to simplify the design of this first-of-a-kind facility and reduce its capital cost, its ''mission'' has been limited to materials testing. Tritium breeding has been studied in 1987 to determine what it would take to make the facility T/sub 2/ self-sufficient. During the first year of the SIRIUS-M study (1985), attention was focused on several areas unique to an ICF materials test facility including: test module design and damage rates estimation; cavity design and first wall protection; target design; placement and damage to the final mirrors. During the second year of the study (1986), efforts were devoted to resolving the critical issues identified in the first year so that a complete, self-consistent design could be initated. These included: a cost estimate, cavity design optimization, stress analysis, materials testing schedule, testing of unique ICF blanket problems, shield design, and radioactivity. In the last year (1987) the effort was concentrated on four tasks: impact of T/sub 2/ breeding and self-sufficiency; development of a beam cross-over shielding concept; cavity design optimization with enhanced target performance and economic scaling of SIRIUS-M to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor facility.

  3. FOREWORD: 2nd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2012-09-01

    , reduced models for the inversion, non-linear inverse scattering, image reconstruction and restoration, applications (bio-medical imaging, non-destructive evaluation etc). NCMIP 2012 was a one-day workshop. Each of the submitted papers was reviewed by 2 to 4 reviewers. Among the accepted papers, there are 8 oral presentations and 5 posters. Three international speakers were invited for a long talk. This second edition attracted 60 registered attendees in May 2012. NCMIP 2012 was supported by Institut Farman (ENS Cachan) and endorsed by the following French research networks (GDR ISIS, GDR Ondes, GDR MOA, GDR MSPC). The program committee acknowledges the following laboratories CMLA, LMT, LSV, LURPA, SATIE, as well as DIGITEO Network. Laure Blanc-Féraud and Pierre-Yves Joubert Workshop Co-chairs Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory, CNRS, France Pierre-Yves Joubert, IEF laboratory, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, France Technical Program Committee Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Jerôme Darbon, CMLA, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK Mário Figueiredo, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal Laurent Fribourg, LSV, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Marc Lambert, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Anthony Quinn, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland Christian Rey, LMT, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Joachim Weickert, Saarland University, Germany Local Chair Alejandro Mottini, Morpheme group I3S-INRIA Sophie Abriet, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Béatrice Bacquet, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Reviewers Gilles Aubert, J-A Dieudonné Laboratory, CNRS and University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory, CNRS, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Jerôme Darbon, CMLA, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK G

  4. Fully automated trace level determination of parent and alkylated PAHs in environmental waters by online SPE-LC-APPI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Cesar E; Wang, Chengtao; Gardinali, Piero R

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous compounds that enter the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, often used as markers to determine the extent, fate, and potential effects on natural resources after a crude oil accidental release. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE+GC-MS) has been extensively used to isolate and quantify both parent and alkylated PAHs. However, it requires labor-intensive extraction and cleanup steps and generates large amounts of toxic solvent waste. Therefore, there is a clear need for greener, faster techniques with enough reproducibility and sensitivity to quantify many PAHs in large numbers of water samples in a short period of time. This study combines online solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography (LC) separation with dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and tandem MS detection, to provide a one-step protocol that detects PAHs at low nanograms per liter with almost no sample preparation and with a significantly lower consumption of toxic halogenated solvents. Water samples were amended with methanol, fortified with isotopically labeled PAHs, and loaded onto an online SPE column, using a large-volume sample loop with an auxiliary LC pump for sample preconcentration and salt removal. The loaded SPE column was connected to an UPLC pump and analytes were backflushed to a Thermo Hypersil Green PAH analytical column where a 20-min gradient separation was performed at a variable flow rate. Detection was performed by a triple-quadrupole MS equipped with a gas-phase dopant delivery system, using 1.50 mL of chlorobenzene dopant per run. In contrast, LLE+GC-MS typically use 150 mL of organic solvents per sample, and methylene chloride is preferred because of its low boiling point. However, this solvent has a higher environmental persistence than chlorobenzene and is considered a carcinogen. The automated system is capable of

  5. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31

    and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the components—resources, facilities, and personnel—necessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative

  6. The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle: Process Analysis and Design Using Comprehensive Phase Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Mark C.; O'Connell, J. P.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.

    2010-01-10

    Of the 100+ thermochemical hydrogen cycles that have been proposed, the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) Cycle is a primary target of international interest for the centralized production of hydrogen from nuclear power. However, the cycle involves complex and highly nonideal phase behavior at extreme conditions that is only beginning to be understood and modeled for process simulation. The consequence is that current designs and efficiency projections have large uncertainties, as they are based on incomplete data that must be extrapolated from property models. This situation prevents reliable assessment of the potential viability of the system and, even more, a basis for efficient process design. The goal of this NERI award (05-006) was to generate phase-equilibrium data, property models, and comprehensive process simulations so that an accurate evaluation of the S-I Cycle could be made. Our focus was on Section III of the Cycle, where the hydrogen is produced by decomposition of hydroiodic acid (HI) in the presence of water and iodine (I2) in a reactive distillation (RD) column. The results of this project were to be transferred to the nuclear hydrogen community in the form of reliable flowsheet models for the S-I process. Many of the project objectives were achieved. At Clemson University, a unique, tantalum-based, phase-equilibrium apparatus incorporating a view cell was designed and constructed for measuring fluid-phase equilibria for mixtures of iodine, HI, and water (known as HIx) at temperatures to 350 °C and pressures to 100 bar. Such measurements were of particular interest for developing a working understanding of the expected operation of the RD column in Section III. The view cell allowed for the IR observation and discernment of vapor-liquid (VL), liquid-liquid, and liquid-liquid-vapor (LLVE) equilibria for HIx systems. For the I2-H2O system, liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) was discovered to exist at temperatures up to 310-315 °C, in contrast to the models and

  7. Features added in new release of SRFYDO - February 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-cook, Christine M; Klamann, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    Version 2.0 of SRFYDO, released in February 2009, has a number of new features. This document describes these additions and is designed to complement the document 'Calculating System Reliability with SRFYDO: A User Guide' (Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Report LA-UR 08-06161). The new features include: (1) Reliability Estimates for Combinations of Components - Users can now estimate the reliability of collections of components, such as a sections or sub-systems. This optional feature is activated via a new table, SectionDef, which is used to define names and component associations for the section or sub-system aggregate. If the SectionDef table is present, section plots and tabulated reliabilities will be created during the SRY3 phase. For more details see section 1. (2) Plots of System or Component Reliability Priors - SRFYDO now creates reliability plots for each system (if system priors were given) or each component (if component priors were given) during the SRY1 phase. These plots, written in the directory 'priorPDFs', are provided to help users visualize the impact of their estimates on the final reliability calculation. For more details see section 2. (3) Convenient Exclusion of Lifecycle Covariates - Both GUI and command-line interfaces to SRFYDO now allow the user to exclude one or both of the lifecycle covariates without requiring modification to the spreadsheet. With this capability users can readily explore the effect of adding or removing lifecycle measures on the resulting statistical analysis. Note that excluding a lifecycle covariate is not the same as setting its rate (-b or -c) to zero. For more details see section 3. (4) MCMC Diagnostic Plots - Diagnostic or 'trace' plots may optionally be created for each of the statistical parameters generated during the Monte Carlo phase (SRY2). These plots can help the user determine if (1) appropriate lifecycle variable choices have been made, (2) more sampling iterations, '-i', are required, and

  8. Enabling coherent control of trapped ions with economical multi-laser frequency stabilization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybarger, Warren Emanuel, Jr.

    referred to here as the quantum Field Programmable Gate Array (q-FPGA), which has been jointly developed by John Chiaverini and this author in an ongoing collaboration. It virtually eliminates decoherence from spontaneous emission, and it also mitigates much of the laser and optical engineering requirements associated with conceptually similar devices. LANL technical release number LA-UR 09-08135.

  9. Digital Pulse Shape Analysis with Phoswich Detectors to Simplify Coincidence Measurements of Radioactive Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Wolfgang; Tan, Hui; Warburton, William K.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2005-08-31

    detector system to the level of a single detector per sample chamber while maintaining the required sensitivity and precision to detect radioactive Xenon in the atmosphere. Ely, J. H. et al (2003), “NOVEL BETA-GAMMA COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS USING PHOSWICH DETECTORS” in Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review – Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, LA-UR-03-6029.

  10. Reorganization of the flood-prone atmospheric patterns at the onset of the 20th century?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Bruno; Vogel, Hendrik; Anselmetti, Flavio

    2015-04-01

    Frequency and intensity of heavy rainfalls, triggering floods and causing human and large economic losses, are expected to increase in the context of the global warming, due to the larger water carrying capacity of warmer air masses. However, the relationship between such events and climatic changes remains still poorly understood. In particular, the stability of the flood-prone atmospheric circulations under future climate changes is a key question for projections of extreme precipitation. This study aims at exploring this issue using flood reconstructions from the NW Mediterranean domain. We compiled existing historical records from the Southern Massif Central and lake-sediment records from the Eastern Pyrenees and the Southern French Alps. We completed this West-East transect by studying new lake sequences in the SE French Alps and the Western Italian Alps. For both of the new lake sediment sequences (Lake Foréant, Queyras massif, France and Lago Inferiore di Laurès, Aosta valley, Italy), several short cores were retrieved to understand the sedimentary processes. In the laboratory, high-resolution pictures, bulk density, geochemistry and grain size were measured. Dating was undertaken by short-lived radionuclides (EAWAG, Zürich) and radiocarbon (University of Bern) measurements. Lago Inferiore sequence covers the last 250 years and Lake Foréant sequence the last millennium. 232 turbidites were identified; 11 of which seem to be related to mass movements, whereas the other 221 were triggered by flood events. The reconstructed flood regimes were then compared to local flood activity based on historical data. The good agreement between the datasets supports the quality and sensitivity of flood reconstructions. In the NW Mediterranean domain, floods and related heavy rainfalls are mostly triggered by autumn humid air masses coming from the Mediterranean Sea. In detail, distinct atmospheric pathways transport these air masses and trigger floods in the different

  11. SMARTSware for SMARTS users to facilitate data reduction and data analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    formats) and National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois (the Hierarchical Data Format Software Library and Utilities) are used in the programs. All these subroutines and libraries are publicly available through the GNU Public License and/or Freeware. The package also contains sample input and output text files and a manual (LA-UR 04-6581). The executables and sample files will be available for down load at http://public.lanl.gov/clausen/SMARTSware.html and ftp://lansce.lanl.gov/clausen/SMARTSware/SMARTSware.zip, but the source codes will only be made available by written request to clausen@lanl.gov.« less

  12. Carbon microballoons and syntactic foams: Microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, Kipp B.

    idealized microstructure's radii and wall thickness revealed that buckling and bending are both possible failure mechanisms for these CMBs. Experimental support for dual flaw populations was provided by Weibull statistics. Using this, failure maps were created and applied to the experimental data in an attempt to estimate the contribution of buckling failure. LA-UR-06-6129.

  13. Anti-proliferative effects of lichen-derived inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase on malignant cell-lines and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogmundsdóttir, H M; Zoëga, G M; Gissurarson, S R; Ingólfsdóttir, K

    1998-01-01

    Several lichen species have been used traditionally as medicinal plants. It has previously been shown that two low-molecular-weight lichen metabolites, lobaric acid isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum Laur. and protolichesterinic acid isolated from Cetraria islandica L. (Ach.), have in-vitro inhibitory effects on arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. We have studied the effects of these compounds on cultured cells from man, including three malignant cell-lines (T-47D and ZR-75-1 from breast carcinomas and K-562 from erythro-leukaemia), as well as normal skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both test substances caused a significant reduction in DNA synthesis, as measured by thymidine uptake, in all three malignant cell-lines; the dose inducing 50% of maximum inhibition (ED50) was between 1.1 and 24.6 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and between 14.5 and 44.7 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. The breast-cancer cell-lines were more sensitive than K-562. The proliferative response of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes was inhibited with a mean ED50 of 8.4 microg mL(-1) and 24.5 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid, respectively. These concentrations are of the same order of magnitude as the IC50 values in the 5-lipoxygenase assay. Significant cell death (assessed by the MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-( 4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) assay and trypan blue exclusion) occurred in the three malignant cell-lines at protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid concentrations above 20 and 30 microg mL(-1), respectively. In K-562 morphological changes consistent with apoptosis were detected. Up to 38% cell death was observed at 20 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 15 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes but unstimulated lymphocytes were clearly less sensitive. In contrast, the DNA synthesis, proliferation and survival of normal skin fibroblasts were not affected at doses up to 20

  14. Linking Material Properties and Microstructures to Characterize Damage Associated with an Underground Explosion in Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. E.; Broome, S.; Sussman, A. J.; Townsend, M.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Technologies, LLC, was performed under Contract No. DE AC52 06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. LA-UR-13-26203.

  15. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.; Lechel, Robert A.

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  16. MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    FINFROCK SH

    2009-12-10

    The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

  17. SELENIUM and arsenic concentrations in platinum group minerals of placer origin from Borneo and Sierra Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, K. H.; Johanson, B.; Cabri, L. J.

    2003-04-01

    Laurite grains were examined from the type locality, Pontijn River, Tanah Laur, Borneo and from South Tambanio River, S.E. Borneo, and erlichmanite grains from Sierra Leone. The Borneo samples are associated with ophiolite (Alpine-type) ultramafic rocks and the Sierra Leone samples with the layered Freetown Igneous Complex. Laurite grains from Borneo are sub-rounded to spherical with pits and show conchoidal fractures. They contain rare inclusions of an exsolved chalcopyrite+ bornite+ pentlandite mixture. On the other hand, the erlichmanite grains from Sierra Leone are euhedral with minor smooth edges and contain abundant rounded inclusions of exsolved sulphides;(chalcopyrite +bornite) and (chalcopyrite+ pentlandite+ pyrrhotite). All grains examined are solid solutions of Ru and Os with minor to moderate Ir and Rh (mostly less than 1wt percent, and rarely over 5 wt percent). Arsenic contents vary from 0.4 to 1.3 wt percent and Se from 40 to 620 ppm and the two are correlated. Grains with less Se contain greater amounts of As; [As] = -55 x [Se]+ 16,000 (ppm). The evidence supports their presence at the S site, but the huge departure from 1:1 correlation is not understood. The laurite grains from Borneo are relatively homogeneous, showing rare zoning of Ru and Os. Ratios of S/Se show a narrow spread from 1600 to 2400, which are in the range for sulphides from the shallow, sub-arc mantle (Hattori et al., 2002). The data support their formation in the mantle and subsequent erosion after the obduction of the host ultramafic rocks. The laurite-erlichmanite from Sierra Leone show complicated internal zoning of Ru and Os, as shown pictorially previously (Hattori et al., 1991). The contents of Se and As systematically vary with Ru and Os. The Ru-rich parts (close to laurite composition) are enriched in Se and depleted in As. Furthermore; chalcopyrite inclusions contain even higher Se and lower As than the host laurite/erlichmanite. They show a narrow spread from 1650 to

  18. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of multicomponent systems. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system

  19. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of the phase diagram. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system simulation

  20. Rapid and automated analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products by online solid phase extraction coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Pagano, Imma; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    This study reports a fast and automated analytical procedure for the analysis of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk and dairy products. The method is based on the simultaneous protein precipitation and AFM1 extraction, by salt-induced liquid-liquid extraction (SI-LLE), followed by an online solid-phase extraction (online SPE) coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis to the automatic pre-concentration, clean up and sensitive and selective determination of AFM1. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and accuracy of the analytical method were studied in detail. In the optimal conditions, acetonitrile and NaCl were used as extraction/denaturant solvent and salting-out agent in SI-LLE, respectively. After centrifugation, the organic phase (acetonitrile) was diluted with water (1:9 v/v) and purified (1mL) by online C18 cartridge coupled with an UHPLC column. Finally, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode was applied to the detection of AFM1. Validation studies were carried out on different dairy products (whole and skimmed cow milk, yogurt, goat milk, and powder infant formula), providing method quantification limits about 25 times lower than AFM1 maximum levels permitted by EU regulation 1881/2006 in milk and dairy products for direct human consumption. Recoveries (86-102%) and repeatability (RSD<3, n=6) meet the performance criteria required by EU regulation N. 401/2006 for the determination of the levels of mycotoxins in foodstuffs. Moreover, no matrix effects were observed in the different milk and dairy products studied. The proposed method improves the performance of AFM1 analysis in milk samples as AFM1 determination is performed with a degree of accuracy higher than the conventional methods. Other advantages are the reduction of sample preparation procedure, time and cost of the analysis, enabling high sample throughput that meet the current concerns of food safety and the public

  1. Rapid analysis of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in fish plasma micro-aliquots using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Gong, Zhiyuan; Kelly, Barry C

    2015-02-27

    A sensitive analytical method based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for rapid analysis of 11 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in fish plasma micro-aliquots (∼20μL). Target PPCPs included, bisphenol A, carbamazepine, diclofenac, fluoxetine, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen, risperidone, sertraline, simvastatin and triclosan. A relatively quicker and cheaper LLE procedure exhibited comparable analyte recoveries with solid-phase extraction. Rapid separation and analysis of target compounds in fish plasma extracts was achieved by employing a high efficiency C-18 HPLC column (Agilent Poroshell 120 SB-C18, 2.1mm×50mm, 2.7μm) and fast polarity switching, enabling effective monitoring of positive and negative ions in a single 9min run. With the exception of bisphenol A, which exhibited relatively high background contamination, method detection limits of individual PPCPs ranged between 0.15 and 0.69pg/μL, while method quantification limits were between 0.05 and 2.3pg/μL. Mean matrix effect (ME) values ranged between 65 and 156% for the various target analytes. Isotope dilution quantification using isotopically labelled internal surrogates was utilized to correct for signal suppression or enhancement and analyte losses during sample preparation. The method was evaluated by analysis of 20μL plasma micro-aliquots collected from zebrafish (Danio rerio) from a laboratory bioaccumulation study, which included control group fish (no exposure), as well as fish exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of PPCPs. Using the developed LC-MS/MS based method, concentrations of the studied PPCPs were consistently detected in the low pg/μL (ppb) range. The method may be useful for investigations requiring fast, reliable concentration measurements of PPCPs in fish plasma. In particular, the method may be applicable for in situ contaminant biomonitoring, as well as

  2. Conditions of kyanite formation from fluid in an alpine shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultze, Dina; Loges, Anselm; Franz, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermally formed quartz-kyanite rocks from the WSW-ENE-striking Greiner shear zone (Pfitscher Joch, Italy) on the south-western border of Tauern window were investigated in order to reconstruct conditions and processes of kyanite formation from metamorphic fluids. It is known from experiments that kyanite does not precipitate spontaneously from a qz-saturated, Al-rich fluid in spite of p-T conditions well inside the thermodynamic stability field of kyanite. Natural samples where kyanite nucleates spontaneously from fluid were investigated in order to understand what factors may control inhibition of nucleation in experiments. The Greiner shear zone cuts a variety of metasedimentary (metapelites, -psammites) units of the lower Schieferhülle, which lie between two distinct Zentralgneis units (Tuxer gneiss core in the north, Zillertaler gneiss core in the south). At the Pfitscher Joch near to the Rotbachlspitze (2897 m), the shear zone intersects the tectonic contact between the Schieferhülle metasediments and the Zillertaler gneiss in an acute angle. A number of segregations (up to 1m in diameter) composed mainly of quartz, feldspar and tourmaline are found along strike in the most silica-rich sheared stratigraphic layers. Besides kyanite and quartz the vein rocks show a range of other refractory mineral phases, especially pyrophyllite, rutile and zircon. Minor amounts of xenotime and monazite represent the REE carrier in these rocks. Growth textures indicate simultaneous crystallization of quartz, kyanite, rutile and zircon, whereas pyrophyllite may represent alteration processes in a later stage during obduction of the rocks. Additionally, in some samples muscovite and tourmaline were observed. The potassium and boron supply is likely provided by the metapelite or gneiss units adjacent to the shear zone. In the metapelites tourmaline is most abundant in the vicinity of the shear zone, suggesting migration of boron-rich fluids either to or from the shear zone

  3. De Novo Design and Experimental Characterization of Ultrashort Self-Associating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bo; Robinson, Robert C.; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-01-01

    Self-association is a common phenomenon in biology and one that can have positive and negative impacts, from the construction of the architectural cytoskeleton of cells to the formation of fibrils in amyloid diseases. Understanding the nature and mechanisms of self-association is important for modulating these systems and in creating biologically-inspired materials. Here, we present a two-stage de novo peptide design framework that can generate novel self-associating peptide systems. The first stage uses a simulated multimeric template structure as input into the optimization-based Sequence Selection to generate low potential energy sequences. The second stage is a computational validation procedure that calculates Fold Specificity and/or Approximate Association Affinity (K*association) based on metrics that we have devised for multimeric systems. This framework was applied to the design of self-associating tripeptides using the known self-associating tripeptide, Ac-IVD, as a structural template. Six computationally predicted tripeptides (Ac-LVE, Ac-YYD, Ac-LLE, Ac-YLD, Ac-MYD, Ac-VIE) were chosen for experimental validation in order to illustrate the self-association outcomes predicted by the three metrics. Self-association and electron microscopy studies revealed that Ac-LLE formed bead-like microstructures, Ac-LVE and Ac-YYD formed fibrillar aggregates, Ac-VIE and Ac-MYD formed hydrogels, and Ac-YLD crystallized under ambient conditions. An X-ray crystallographic study was carried out on a single crystal of Ac-YLD, which revealed that each molecule adopts a β-strand conformation that stack together to form parallel β-sheets. As an additional validation of the approach, the hydrogel-forming sequences of Ac-MYD and Ac-VIE were shuffled. The shuffled sequences were computationally predicted to have lower K*association values and were experimentally verified to not form hydrogels. This illustrates the robustness of the framework in predicting self

  4. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry. PMID:27591623

  5. A randomized controlled pilot trial comparing the impact of access to clinical endocrinology video demonstrations with access to usual revision resources on medical student performance of clinical endocrinology skills

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Demonstrating competence in clinical skills is key to course completion for medical students. Methods of providing clinical instruction that foster immediate learning and potentially serve as longer-term repositories for on-demand revision, such as online videos demonstrating competent performance of clinical skills, are increasingly being used. However, their impact on learning has been little studied. The aim of this study was to determine the value of adjunctive on-demand video-based training for clinical skills acquisition by medical students in endocrinology. Methods Following an endocrinology clinical tutorial program, 2nd year medical students in the pre-assessment revision period were recruited and randomized to either a set of bespoke on-line clinical skills training videos (TV), or to revision as usual (RAU). The skills demonstrated on video were history taking in diabetes mellitus (DMH), examination for diabetes lower limb complications (LLE), and examination for signs of thyroid disease (TE). Students were assessed on these clinical skills in an observed structured clinical examination two weeks after randomization. Assessors were blinded to student randomization status. Results For both diabetes related clinical skills assessment tasks, students in the TV group performed significantly better than those in the RAU group. There were no between group differences in thyroid examination performance. For the LLE, 91.7% (n = 11/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 40% (n = 4/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.024). For the DMH, 83.3% (n = 10/12) of students randomized to the video were rated globally as competent at the skill compared with 20% (n = 2/10) of students not randomized to the video (p = 0.007). Conclusion Exposure to high quality videos demonstrating clinical skills can significantly improve medical student skill performance in an

  6. A multi-class bioanalytical methodology for the determination of bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers, p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters, benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters, triclosan, and triclocarban in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Wang, Lei; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-01-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE; ethyl acetate) protocol, followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) methodology, was developed for the determination of 19 compounds, including bisphenol A diglycidyl ethers (BADGEs; industrial ethers), benzophenone-type UV filters (BP-UV filters; precursors and metabolites), p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens; preservatives), triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) in human urine. Urine specimens were enzymatically deconjugated with β-glucuronidase (from Helix pomatia) and extracted by a LLE procedure for the measurement of total concentrations (i.e., free+conjugated forms) of target analytes. Absolute recoveries of BADGEs, BP-UV filters, parabens, TCS and TCC ranged 25-135%, 84-125%, 52-126%, 75-118% and 90-124%, respectively. Method precision (absolute values; N=5 replicate analyses at the fortification level of 10 ng, k=5 days) ranged from 5.8 (ethyl paraben) to 24.0% (TCS). The limits of quantification (LOQs) varied depending on the target compound and generally ranged from 0.2 to 2.0 ng/mL. The matrix effects ranged from +11 (2,3,4-trihydroxybenzophenone) to -86% (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone). A total of 30 urine specimens collected from Athens, Greece, were analyzed for the 19 target compounds to demonstrate the applicability of the developed method. The concentrations of target chemicals in urine were presented on volume-, specific gravity (SG)-, and creatinine-normalization bases. MeP, EtP, PrP, OH-EtP, BADGE·2H2O, BP-1 and TCS were found frequently in urine at concentrations in the range of 2.7-436 ng/mL, <0.5-25.4 ng/mL, <0.5-575 ng/mL, <2-18.4 ng/mL, <0.5-13.8 ng/mL, <1-14.6 ng/mL and <0.5-95.3 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:24315674

  7. Efficacy of head space solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determination of the trace extracellular hydrocarbons of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenna; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Yuejie; Zhang, Zhongyi; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Bai, Fali

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are widespread in cyanobacteria, and the biochemical synthetic pathways were recently identified. Intracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria have been detected by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, whether fatty alka(e)nes can be released to cyanobacterial culture media remains to be clarified. This work develops a sensitive method for analyzing the trace level of extracellular hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial culture media by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC/MS. Headspace (HS) extraction mode using polydimethylsiloxane fiber to extract for 30min at 50°C was employed as the optimal extraction conditions. Five cyanobacterial fatty alka(e)nes analogs including pentadecene (C15:1), pentadecane (C15:0), heptadecene (C17:1), heptadecane (C17:0), nonadecane (C19:0) were analyzed, and the data obtained from HS-SPME-GC/MS method were quantified using internal standard peak area comparisons. Limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantitation (LOQ), linear dynamic range, precisions (RSD) and recovery for the analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria by HS-SPME-GC/MS were evaluated. The LODs limits of detection (S/N = 3) varied from 10 to 21 ng L-1. The correlation coefficients (r) of the calibration curves ranged from 0.9873 to 0.9977 with a linearity from 0.1 to 50 μg L-1. The RSD values were ranging from 7.8 to 14.0% and from 4.0 to 8.8% at 1.0 μg L-1 and 10.0 μg L-1 standard solutions, respectively. Comparative analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes in the culture media of model cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 demonstrated that sensitivity of HS-SPME-GC/MS method was significantly higher than LLE method. Finally, we found that heptadecane can be released into the culture media of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 at the later growth period. PMID:27428454

  8. Double-salting out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) HPLC method for estimation of temozolomide from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jain, Darshana; Athawale, Rajani; Bajaj, Amrita; Shrikhande, Shruti

    2014-11-01

    The role of temozolomide (TMZ) in treatment of high grade gliomas, melanomas and other malignancies is being defined by the current clinical developmental trials. Temozolomide belongs to the group of alkylating agents and is prescribed to patients suffering from most aggressive forms of brain tumors. The estimation techniques for temozolomide from the extracted plasma or biological samples includes high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV), micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MKEC) and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). These methods suffer from disadvantages like low resolution, low sensitivity, low recovery or cost involvement. An analytical method possessing capacity to estimate low quantities of TMZ in plasma samples with high extraction efficiency (%) and high resolution with cost effectiveness needs to be developed. Cost effective, robust and low plasma component interfering HPLC method using salting out liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) technique was developed and validated for estimation of drug from plasma samples. The extraction efficiency (%) with conventional LLE technique with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile was found to be 5.99±2.45, 45.39±4.56, 46.04±1.14 and 46.23±3.67 respectively. Extraction efficiency (%) improved with SALLE where sodium chloride was used as an electrolyte and was found to be 6.80±5.56, 52.01±3.13, 62.69±2.11 and 69.20±1.18 with methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetonitrile as organic solvent. Upon utilization of two salts for extraction (double salting liquid-liquid extraction) the extraction efficiency (%) was further improved and was twice of LLE. It was found that double salting liquid-liquid extraction technique yielded extraction efficiency (%) of 11.71±5.66, 55.62±3.44, 77.28±2.89 and 87.75±0.89. Hence a method based on double SALLE was developed for quantification of TMZ demonstrating linearity in the range of

  9. Quantitative studies of kinetic effects in direct- and indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, Hans

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive set of experiments using shock-driven implosions has been conducted to quantitatively study kinetic effects by exploring deviations from hydrodynamic behavior in plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Two types of targets were imploded at OMEGA to create ~10 keV, ~1022 cm-3 plasmas with conditions comparable to the incipient hotspot in ignition designs: thin-glass targets filled with mixtures of D2 and 3He gas; and thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He. In the thin-glass experiments, the gas pressure was varied from 1 to 25 atm to scan the ion-mean-free path in the plasma at shock burn. The observed nuclear yields and temperatures deviated more strongly from hydrodynamic predictions as the ion-mean-free path increased to the order of the plasma size. This result provides the first direct experimental evidence how kinetic effects impact yields and ion temperature. The ratio of D to 3He was also varied while maintaining the fuel mass density. As the D fraction was reduced, the DD and D3He fusion products displayed an anomalous yield reduction. Separation of the D and 3He ion species across the strong (Mach ~10) shock-front will be discussed as the likely cause of this result. Finally, thin-CD shells filled with 3He produced significantly more D3He-protons when imploded than is explained by hydrodynamic mix models. This result suggests a kinetic form of mix dominates at the strongly-shocked shell-gas interface. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, M. Rosenberg, A. Zylstra, H. Sio, M. Gatu Johnson, F. Séguin, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, J. Delettrez, and C. Sangster (LLE), J. Pino, P. Amendt, C. Bellei, and S. Wilks (LLNL), G. Kagan, N. Hoffmann and K. Molvig (LANL), and A. Nikroo (GA) and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  10. A manifold learning approach to target detection in high-resolution hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.

    Imagery collected from airborne platforms and satellites provide an important medium for remotely analyzing the content in a scene. In particular, the ability to detect a specific material within a scene is of high importance to both civilian and defense applications. This may include identifying "targets" such as vehicles, buildings, or boats. Sensors that process hyperspectral images provide the high-dimensional spectral information necessary to perform such analyses. However, for a d-dimensional hyperspectral image, it is typical for the data to inherently occupy an m-dimensional space, with m << d. In the remote sensing community, this has led to a recent increase in the use of manifold learning, which aims to characterize the embedded lower-dimensional, non-linear manifold upon which the hyperspectral data inherently lie. Classic hyperspectral data models include statistical, linear subspace, and linear mixture models, but these can place restrictive assumptions on the distribution of the data; this is particularly true when implementing traditional target detection approaches, and the limitations of these models are well-documented. With manifold learning based approaches, the only assumption is that the data reside on an underlying manifold that can be discretely modeled by a graph. The research presented here focuses on the use of graph theory and manifold learning in hyperspectral imagery. Early work explored various graph-building techniques with application to the background model of the Topological Anomaly Detection (TAD) algorithm, which is a graph theory based approach to anomaly detection. This led towards a focus on target detection, and in the development of a specific graph-based model of the data and subsequent dimensionality reduction using manifold learning. An adaptive graph is built on the data, and then used to implement an adaptive version of locally linear embedding (LLE). We artificially induce a target manifold and incorporate it into

  11. A study of the early warning signals of abrupt change in the Pacific decadal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Hou, Wei; Yan, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Sen; Wang, Kuo

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the phenomenon of a critical slowing down has demonstrated its major potential in discovering whether a complex dynamic system tends to abruptly change at critical points. This research on the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) index has been made on the basis of the critical slowing down principle in order to analyze its early warning signal of abrupt change. The chaotic characteristics of the PDO index sequence at different times are determined by using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). The relationship between the regional sea surface temperature (SST) background field and the early warning signal of the PDO abrupt change is further studied through calculating the variance of the SST in the PDO region and the spatial distribution of the autocorrelation coefficient, thereby providing the experimental foundation for the extensive application of the method of the critical slowing down phenomenon. Our results show that the phenomenon of critical slowing down, such as the increase of the variance and autocorrelation coefficient, will continue for six years before the abrupt change of the PDO index. This phenomenon of the critical slowing down can be regarded as one of the early warning signals of an abrupt change. Through calculating the LLE of the PDO index during different times, it is also found that the strongest chaotic characteristics of the system occurred between 1971 and 1975 in the early stages of an abrupt change (1976), and the system was at the stage of a critical slowing down, which proves the reliability of the early warning signal of abrupt change discovered in 1970 from the mechanism. In addition, the variance of the SST, along with the spatial distribution of the autocorrelation coefficient in the corresponding PDO region, also demonstrates the corresponding relationship between the change of the background field of the SST and the change of the PDO. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos

  12. EVOLUTION OF CHEMICAL CONDITIONS AND ESTIMATED PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN THE RESIDUAL WASTE LAYER DURING POST-CLOSURE AGING OF TANK 18

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.

    2012-02-29

    This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench{reg_sign} and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid

  13. FOREWORD: 3rd International Workshop on New Computational Methods for Inverse Problems (NCMIP 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Joubert, Pierre-Yves

    2013-10-01

    aspects of inversion, Bayesian estimation, kernel methods, learning methods, convex optimization, free discontinuity problems, metamodels, proper orthogonal decomposition, reduced models for the inversion, non-linear inverse scattering, image reconstruction and restoration, and applications (bio-medical imaging, non-destructive evaluation...). NCMIP 2013 was a one-day workshop held in May 2013 which attracted around 60 attendees. Each of the submitted papers has been reviewed by three reviewers. Among the accepted papers, there are seven oral presentations, five posters and one invited poster (On a deconvolution challenge presented by C Vonesch from EPFL, Switzerland). In addition, three international speakers were invited to present a longer talk. The workshop was supported by Institut Farman (ENS Cachan, CNRS) and endorsed by the following French research networks (GDR ISIS, GDR Ondes, GDR MOA, GDR MSPC). The program committee acknowledges the following research laboratories CMLA, LMT, LSV, LURPA, SATIE. Laure Blanc-Féraud and Pierre-Yves Joubert Workshop co-chair Laure Blanc-Féraud, I3S laboratory and INRIA Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France Pierre-Yves Joubert, IEF, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, France Technical program committee Gilles Aubert, J-A Dieudonné Laboratory, CNRS and University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France Nabil Anwer, LURPA, ENS Cachan, France Alexandre Baussard, ENSTA Bretagne, Lab-STICC, France Marc Bonnet, ENSTA, ParisTech, France Antonin Chambolle, CMAP, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, France Oliver Dorn, School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, UK Cécile Durieu, SATIE, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Gérard Favier, I3S Laboratory, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France Mário Figueiredo, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal Laurent Fribourg, LSV, ENS Cachan, CNRS, France Marc Lambert, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Dominique Lesselier, L2S Laboratory, CNRS, SupElec, Paris-Sud University, France Matteo

  14. Colorimetric quantification of sucrose in presence of thermo-sensitive polymers present in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Ramalakshmi, Subbarayalu; Ooi, Chien Wei; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2014-01-01

    The use of biodegradable material such as simple carbohydrates and recyclable material such as thermo-sensitive polymers is in need to develop a sustainable aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) for the purification of biomolecules. Accurate determination of sucrose concentration is important in liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) study of carbohydrate-based ATPS. The well-established phenol-sulfuric acid method has been widely employed in the measurement of carbohydrate concentration. However, the presence of thermo-sensitive polymers, which has a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) below room temperature, in carbohydrate samples could hamper the precision of spectrophotometric analysis due to the formation of two phases or cloudiness in the sample. Thus, the following modifications were made in an attempt to eliminate the interference occurred during conventional phenol-sulfuric acid assay.•The modified assay for sucrose quantification was performed at an ice-cold temperature throughout the reaction in order to avoid the interference from thermo-sensitive polymers.•This method required a sample volume of 3 μL and hence the volume of other reagents employed was also considerably reduced.•The absorbance was measured at 520 nm which allowed a longer linearity range (0.05-7.5%, w/v). PMID:26150957

  15. Summary of the First Neutron Image Data Collected at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Clark, D J; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T.-S. F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Fittinghoff, D N; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-11-01

    A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of the data collected and measurements made to date. Data form directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as, indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data presented show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 +/- 3 um, as indirect cores (25 +/- 4 and 29 +/- 4 um and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. -14% and -7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data from on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion. This work was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration and by the National Ignition Campaign partners; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), University of Rochester -Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), General Atomics(GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). Other contributors include Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), England, and Commissariat `a l’ ´ Energie Atomique (CEA), France.

  16. Vigabatrin in dried plasma spots: validation of a novel LC-MS/MS method and application to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Jović, Nebojša; Stevanović, Galina; Malenović, Anđelija; Medenica, Mirjana

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a LC-MS/MS method for the determination of antiepileptic drug vigabatrin in dried plasma spots (DPS). Due to its zwitterionic chemical structure, a pre-column derivatization procedure was performed, aiming to yield enhanced ionization efficiency and improved chromatographic behaviour. Propyl chloroformate, in the presence of propanol, was selected as the best derivatization reagent, providing a strong signal along with reasonable run time. A relatively novel sample collection technique, DPS, was utilized, offering easy sample handling and analysis, using a sample in micro amount (∼5μL). Derivatized vigabatrin and its internal standard, 4-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid, were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and determined in positive ion mode by applying two SRM transitions per analyte. A Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C8 column (150×4.6mm, 5μm particle size) maintained at 30°C, was utilized with running mobile phase composed of acetonitrile: 0.15% formic acid (85:15, v/v). Flow rate was 550μL/min and total run time 4.5min. The assay exhibited excellent linearity over the concentration range of 0.500-50.0μg/mL, which is suitable for the determination of vigabatrin level after per os administration in children and youths with epilepsy, who were on vigabatrin therapy, with or without co-medication. Specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix-effect and stability were also estimated and assessed within acceptance criteria. PMID:24908379

  17. Determination of Tenacissoside A in rat plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luhua; Xiang, Bingren; Chen, Jing; Tan, Xiying; Wang, Dawei; Chen, Daofeng

    2009-07-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the first time for the estimation of Tenacissoside A in the rats' plasma, which is the major active constituent in Marsdenia tenacissima. Tenacissoside A was extracted from the rats' plasma by using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), medroxyprogesterone acetate was used as the internal standard. An Alltech C18 column (250 mm x 4.6mm, 5 microm) was used to provide chromatographic separation by detection with mass spectrometry operating in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method was validated over the concentration range of 1-250 ng/mL for Tenacissoside A. The precisions within and between-batch (CV%) were both less than 15% and accuracy ranged from 90 to 102%. The lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL and extraction recovery was 88.3% on average. The validated method was used to study the pharmacokinetic profile of Tenacissoside A in rat after administration. PMID:19481986

  18. Confirmatory analysis of acetylgestagens in plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Sarah Kelly; Pedersen, Mikael

    2007-03-14

    A confirmatory method has been developed and validated for the determination of chlormadinone acetate (CMA), megestrol acetate (MGA), melengestrol acetate (MLA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in bovine and porcine plasma. Analytes are extracted from plasma samples using matrix-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) on Extrelut NT columns followed by C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE). Analytes were analysed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and quantification was performed using matrix-matched calibration standards in combination with deuterated internal standards. In accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, two ion transitions were monitored for each analyte. Decision limits (CCalpha) were estimated by analysing 20 blank plasma samples and ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 ng mL(-1). Detection capabilities (CCbeta) were estimated using 20 plasma samples fortified at 0.5 ng mL(-1) and were <0.5 ng mL(-1). In the range 0.5-2 ng mL(-1), the mean intra-laboratory reproducibility of the analytes ranged from 6 to 18% (%R.S.D.). Analytes were shown to be stable in fortified plasma samples for >8 months when stored at -20 degrees C. PMID:17386714

  19. Double-exposure materials for pitch division with 193nm lithography: requirements, results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, Robert; Shykind, David; Kim, Sungwon; Borodovsky, Yan; Schwartz, Evan; Turner, Courtney; Masson, Georgeta; Min, Ke; Esswein, Katherine; Blackwell, James M.; Suetin, Nikolay

    2009-03-01

    We present the results of both theoretical and experimental investigations of materials for application either as a reversible Contrast Enhancement Layer (rCEL) or a Two-Stage PAG. The purpose of these materials is to enable Litho- Litho-Etch (LLE) patterning for Pitch Division (PD) at the 16nm logic node (2013 Manufacturing). For the rCEL, we find from modeling using an E-M solver that such a material must posses a bleaching capability equivalent to a Dill A parameter of greater than 100. This is at least a factor of ten greater than that achieved so far at 193nm by any usable organic material we have tested. In the case of the Two-Stage PAG, analytical and lithographic modeling yields a usable material process window, in terms of reversibility and two-photon vs. one-photon acid production rates (branching ratio). One class of materials, based on the cycloadduct of a tethered pair of anthracenes, has shown promise under testing at 193nm in acetonitrile. Sufficient reversibility without acid production, enabled by near-UV exposure, has been achieved. Acid production as a function of dose shows a clear quadratic component, consistent with a branching ratio greater than 1. The experimental data also supports a acid contrast value of approximately 0.05 that could in principle be obtained with this molecule under a pitch division double-exposure scenario.

  20. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  1. Feasibility of an experiment to measure stopping powers in solid-density deuterium plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S.; Sangster, C.; Graziani, F.; Collins, G. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Grabowski, P.; Glenzer, S.; Keiter, P.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental design to measure the stopping powers of charged-particles through solid-density, fully-ionized deuterium plasmas at temperatures around 10 eV is investigated. Stopping power in this regime is crucial to the understanding of alpha-heating and burn in Internal Confinement Fusion. Recent work by A.B. Zylstra et al. on the OMEGA laser facility has demonstrated such measurements of stopping power in partially ionized Be plasmas, by measuring the downshift of D3He-protons in an isochorically heated sample. As noted in their work, the effects of partial ionization are not well understood; however such effects are not applicable to hydrogenic fuels, for which the plasmas are expected to be fully ionized. This study will consider the viability of isochorically or shock heating a target to Warm Dense Matter conditions using a platform similar to the planar cryogenic system described by S.P. Regan et al. Plasma properties will be determined by x-ray Thomson scattering while stopping powers will be inferred through measuring downshift of either DD-protons, D3He-protons or D3He-alphas, the latter of which is directly applicable to the stopping of DT-alphas in ignition experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLE, and LLNL.

  2. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  3. Measuring radial profiles of nuclear burn in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF using proton emission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Le Pape, S.; Wilks, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    Fusion reactions in ICF implosions of D3He-filled capsules produce 14.7-MeV D3He protons and 3-MeV DD protons. Measurements of the spatial distributions of the D3He and DD reactions are studied with a penumbral imaging system that utilizes a CR-39-based imaging detector to simultaneously record separate penumbral images of the two types of protons. Measured burn profiles are useful for studying implosion physics and provide a critical test for benchmarking simulations. Recent implosions at OMEGA of CD capsules containing 3He gas fill and SiO2 capsules containing low-pressure D3He gas were expected to have hollow D3He burn profiles (in the 3He-filled capsule, due to fuel-shell mix), but penumbral imaging showed that the reactions were centrally peaked due to enhanced ion diffusion. The imaging technique is to be implemented soon on the NIF. This work was supported in part by NLUF, DOE, and LLE.

  4. Characterizing ICF Neutron Diagnostics on the nTOF line at SUNY Geneseo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, Angela; Padalino, Stephen; Turner, Ethan; Ginnane, Mary Kate; Dubois, Natalie; Fletcher, Kurtis; Giordano, Michael; Lawson-Keister, Patrick; Harrison, Hannah; Visca, Hannah; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2014-10-01

    Charged particle beams from the Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator produce nuclear reactions that emit neutrons in the range of 0.5 to 17.9 MeV via the d(d,n)3He and 11B(d,n)12C reactions. The neutron energy and flux can be adjusted by controlling the accelerator beam current and potential. This adjustable neutron source makes it possible to calibrate ICF and HEDP neutron scintillator diagnostics. However, gamma rays which are often present during an accelerator-based calibration are difficult to differentiate from neutron signals in scintillators. To identify neutrons from gamma rays and to determine their energy, a permanent neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) line is being constructed. By detecting the scintillator signal in coincidence with an associated charged particle (ACP) produced in the reaction, the identity of the neutron can be known and its energy determined by time of flight. Using a 100% efficient surface barrier detector to count the ACPs, the absolute efficiency of the scintillator as a function of neutron energy can be determined. This is done by determining the ratio of the ACP counts in the singles spectrum to coincidence counts for matched solid angles of the SBD and scintillator. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  5. Measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in OMEGA ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R.; Grabowski, P.; Mancini, R.; Regan, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of charged-particle stopping around the Bragg peak in plasmas relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The energy loss of DD-tritons, DD-protons, D3He-alphas and D3He-protons, which are ideal particles for validating approximations to the ion-electron collision operator, have been measured in D3He gas-filled filled implosions. These experiments are relevant to alpha-particle transport and heating in hot-sport ignition experiments. As the DD and D3He fusion products span a large range of velocities, these measurements represent the first detailed experimental study of charged-particle stopping, ranging from linear low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping. The results are contrasted to commonly used theories, including the Brown-Preston-Singleton and Li-Petrasso formalisms. The data is also used to rule out theories that neglect quantum diffraction and dynamic screening. This work was supported in part by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE and GA.

  6. Studies of ion kinetic effects in OMEGA shock-driven implosions using fusion burn imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Zimmerman, G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Marshall, F. J.; Seka, W.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Atzeni, S.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-10-01

    Ion kinetic effects have been inferred in a series of shock-driven implosions at OMEGA from an increasing yield discrepancy between observations and hydrodynamic simulations as the ion-ion mean free path increases. To more precisely identify the nature and impact of ion kinetic effects, spatial burn profile measurements of DD and D3He reactions in these D3He-filled shock-driven implosions are presented and contrasted to both purely hydrodynamic models and models that include ion kinetic effects. It is shown that in implosions where the ion mean free path is equal to or greater than the size of the fuel region, purely hydrodynamic models fail to capture the observed burn profiles, while a model that includes ion diffusion is able to recover the observed burn profile shape. These results further elucidate the ion kinetic mechanisms that are present under long mean-free-path conditions after shock convergence in both shock-driven and ablatively-driven implosions. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLE, and LLNL.

  7. Observation of variations in the T +T neutron spectrum with varying center-of-mass energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, T.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Sayre, D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hatarik, R.; McNabb, D. P.; Pino, J. E.; Bacher, A.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Bourgade, J.-. L.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.

    2014-10-01

    C. BRUNE, Ohio University - The T +T fusion reaction, which produces two neutrons and an alpha particle in a 3-body final state, has been studied in a series of direct-drive, T2-gas-filled thin (~3 μm) glass-capsule implosions at OMEGA. The shapes of the reaction product spectra are dictated by the final-state interactions between n- α (5He in the ground- and excited states) and n-n (di-neutron interaction). The theory behind final-state interactions is not well understood and detailed study of the reaction product spectra can teach us about the intricacies of the nuclear theory involved. In this presentation, measured neutron spectra are interpreted in terms of the sequential decay through 5He in the ground- and excited states. A clear energy dependence in relative reaction-channel strength at low center-of-mass energy (18-55 keV) is observed in the data. The role of the di-neutron interaction could be more clearly deduced through study of the alpha particle spectrum. In the presentation, we also identify steps required to successfully measure the T +T alpha spectrum in future experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  8. Simultaneous measurements of the X-ray and nuclear shock-bang times in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, G.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Frenje, J.; Zylstra, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rygg, J. R.; Macphee, A.; MacKinnon, A.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, C.; Kilkenny, J.; Olson, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent measurements of nuclear and x-ray shock-bang times in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF provide new constraints on implosion modeling and may elucidate the underlying physics of e-i equilibration during the shock phase. As the ions are predominantly heated by the converging and rebounding shock, the ion temperature is initially much higher than the electron temperature and the difference relaxes at the e-i equilibration time scale. Nuclear and x-ray bang times are expected to differ because of different temperature dependence. At OMEGA, nuclear shock-bang time and burn history are routinely measured using streak camera diagnostics, while x-ray self-emission is observed with x-ray framing cameras. We are exploring the possibility of measuring both x-ray and nuclear shock-bang times with a single diagnostic with high relative accuracy, and will discuss the precision with which they can be made and the diagnostics necessary at OMEGA. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  9. Studies of 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Rosenberg, Michael; Rinderknecht, Hans; Petrasso, Richard; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yong Ho; Hale, Gerry; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2014-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He γ-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during BBN as an explanation to the high observed values in primordial material. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  10. Automated identification of normal and diabetes heart rate signals using nonlinear measures.

    PubMed

    Rajendra Acharya, U; Faust, Oliver; Adib Kadri, Nahrizul; Suri, Jasjit S; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects considerable number of people in the world and the number of cases is increasing every year. Due to a strong link to the genetic basis of the disease, it is extremely difficult to cure. However, it can be controlled to prevent severe consequences, such as organ damage. Therefore, diabetes diagnosis and monitoring of its treatment is very important. In this paper, we have proposed a non-invasive diagnosis support system for DM. The system determines whether or not diabetes is present by determining the cardiac health of a patient using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. This analysis was based on nine nonlinear features namely: Approximate Entropy (ApEn), largest Lyapunov exponet (LLE), detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). Clinically significant measures were used as input to classification algorithms, namely AdaBoost, decision tree (DT), fuzzy Sugeno classifier (FSC), k-nearest neighbor algorithm (k-NN), probabilistic neural network (PNN) and support vector machine (SVM). Ten-fold stratified cross-validation was used to select the best classifier. AdaBoost, with least squares (LS) as weak learner, performed better than the other classifiers, yielding an average accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 88.7%. PMID:24034744

  11. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  12. Development of high-throughput multi-residue method for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs monitoring in swine muscle by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Castilhos, Tamara S; Barreto, Fabiano; Meneghini, Leonardo; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    A reliable and simple method for the detection and quantification of residues of 14 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a metamizole metabolite in swine muscle was developed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (ACN) in solid-liquid extraction followed by a low-temperature partitioning (LLE-LTP) process at -20 ± 2°C. After evaporation to dryness, the residue was reconstituted with hexane and a mixture of water:acetonitrile (1:1). LC separation was achieved on a reversed-phase (RP18) column with gradient elution using water (phase A) and ACN (phase B) both containing 1 mmol l(-)(1) ammonium acetate (NH4COO) with 0.025% acetic acid. Analysis was carried out on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode using an electrospray interface in negative and positive mode in a single run. Method validation was performed according to the criteria of Commission Decision No. 2002/657/EC. The matrix effect and linearity were evaluated. Decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), accuracy and repeatability of the method are also reported. The proposed method proved to be simple, easy and adequate for high-throughput analysis and was applied to routine analysis by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply. PMID:27268755

  13. The magPTOF diagnostic for shock-bang and compression-bang time measurement and charged-particles spectroscopy at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H. W.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Frenje, J.; Zylstra, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Li, C.; Petrasso, R.; House, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Kimbrough, J.; Macphee, A.; Collins, G. W.; MacKinnon, A.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bedzyk, M.; Magoon, J.; Shoup, M.; Sangster, C.; Kilkenny, J.; Olson, R.

    2015-11-01

    A magnetic particle-time-of-flight (MagPTOF) diagnostic has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of both shock- and compression-bang times. This type of measurement, combined with the measured shock-burn-weighted ρR, is used to understand shock convergence and implosion dynamics. The MagPTOF design is an upgrade to the existing particle time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, which has recorded bang times in cryogenic DT implosions, DT exploding pushers and D3He implosions with accuracy better than 70 ps. The inclusion of a deflecting magnet should increase proton signal-to-background by a factor of 1000, allowing for measurements of shock bang time (using 14.7 MeV D3He protons) and compression bang time (using 2.45 MeV DD neutrons) in D3He-filled surrogate implosions. For exploding pushers with D3He, D2, T3He, or DT fuel, from which several charged fusion products escape, CR39 surrounding the CVD diamond detector can also be used for low-energy charged-particle spectroscopy. Implementation and initial data at the NIF will be discussed. This work is supported in part by DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  14. Determination of a novel Aurora-A (AurA) kinase AKI603 by UPLC-MS/MS and its application to a bioavailability study in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenzhen; Huang, Lingjie; Gou, Xiaoli; Li, Zhangwei; Chen, Jiangying; Wen, Dingsheng; Jiang, Fulin; Lu, Gui; Bi, Huichang; Huang, Min; Zhong, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and accurate ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of AKI603 in rat plasma has been firstly developed and validated. After a simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with ethyl acetate, the analytes were separated on C18 column (2.1×100mm, 1.9μm, Thermo) by gradient elution with mobile phase of water (A) (containing 5mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid) and methanol (B) with a flow rate of 0.3mLmin(-1) and then analyzed by mass spectrometry in the positive multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode. The mass transitions monitored were m/z 410.0→352.9, m/z 457.1→367.9 for AKI603 and internal standard (Ly-7z), respectively. The developed method was validated for specificity, linearity and lower limit of quantification, intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, extraction recovery, matrix effect and stability whose values satisfied the acceptable limits. The calibration curves for AKI603 was linear in concentration ranges of 0.025-5000ngmL(-1). The method has been successfully used to the bioavailability study of AKI603 administered to rats intravenously (2.5mg/kg) or orally (25mg/kg). The oral bioavailability of AKI603 in rats was calculated as 28.7±9.7%. PMID:27070132

  15. A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) for ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm, fizzle and ignited implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Deciantis, J. L.; Kurebayashi, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hann, S. W.; Schmid, G. J.; Landen, O. L.; Izumi, N.

    2003-10-01

    A method for determining ρR_fuel of cryogenic deuterium-tritium plasmas involves measurement of the energy spectrum of elastically-scattered, primary neutrons. A spectrometer has been designed for doing this at OMEGA and the NIF, using scattered neutrons in the energy range 7-10 MeV to determine ρR_fuel and primary neutrons to measure T_i. The instrument utilizes a magnet and a conversion foil for production of charged particles. A large dynamic range (>10^6) will allow operation at yields as low as 10^12. This will allow ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm and cryogenic DT targets at OMEGA, and fizzle and ignited cryogenic DT targets at the NIF. This work was supported in part by the US DoE (contract W-7405-ENG-48 with LLNL, grant DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975).

  16. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haan, S. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Landen, O. L.; Fletcher, K. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ˜300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  17. Determination of 13 Organic Toxicants in Human Blood by Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupling High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiying

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides and antidepressants are frequently misused in drug-facilitated crime because of their toxicological effect and easy-availability. Therefore, it is essential for the development of a simple and reliable method for the determination of these organic toxicants in biological fluids. Here, we report on an applicable method by the combination of optimized liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) procedure and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify dimethoate, omethoate, dichlorvos, carbofuran, fenpropathrin, diazepam, estazolam, alprazolam, triazolamm, chlorpromazine, phenergan, barbitone and phenobarbital in human blood. The method demonstrated a linear calibration curve in range of 20 - 500 μg/L (r > 0.994). The accuracy evaluated by recovery spiked at three different concentrations (50, 100 and 200 μg/L) was in the range of 58.8 - 83.1% with a relative standard deviations (RSD) of 3.7 - 7.4%. The limits of quantification ranged over 6.7 - 33.3 μg/L. This method was proved to be simple and reliable, and was thus successfully applied to forensic toxicology. PMID:27302585

  18. On-Line Organic Solvent Field Enhanced Sample Injection in Capillary Zone Electrophoresis for Analysis of Quetiapine in Beagle Dog Plasma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuqing; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method with field enhanced sample injection (FESI) was developed and validated for the determination of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma, with a sample pretreatment by LLE in 96-well deep format plate. The optimum separation was carried out in an uncoated 31.2 cm × 75 μm fused-silica capillary with an applied voltage of 13 kV. The electrophoretic analysis was performed by 50 mM phosphate at pH 2.5. The detection wavelength was 210 nm. Under these optimized conditions, FESI with acetonitrile enhanced the sensitivity of quetiapine about 40-50 folds in total. The method was suitably validated with respect to stability, specificity, linearity, lower limit of quantitation, accuracy, precision and extraction recovery. Using mirtazapine as an internal standard (100 ng/mL), the response of quetiapine was linear over the range of 1-1000 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions for the assay were within 4.8% and 12.7%, respectively. The method represents the first application of FESI-CZE to the analysis of quetiapine fumarate in beagle dog plasma after oral administration. PMID:26805796

  19. Characterizing Awake and Anesthetized States Using a Dimensionality Reduction Method.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, M; Behnam, H; Shalbaf, R; Jelveh Moghadam, H

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing between awake and anesthetized states is one of the important problems in surgery. Vital signals contain valuable information that can be used in prediction of different levels of anesthesia. Some monitors based on electroencephalogram (EEG) such as the Bispectral (BIS) index have been proposed in recent years. This study proposes a new method for characterizing between awake and anesthetized states. We validated our method by obtaining data from 25 patients during the cardiac surgery that requires cardiopulmonary bypass. At first, some linear and non-linear features are extracted from EEG signals. Then a method called "LLE"(Locally Linear Embedding) is used to map high-dimensional features in a three-dimensional output space. Finally, low dimensional data are used as an input to a quadratic discriminant analyzer (QDA). The experimental results indicate that an overall accuracy of 88.4 % can be obtained using this method for classifying the EEG signal into conscious and unconscious states for all patients. Considering the reliability of this method, we can develop a new EEG monitoring system that could assist the anesthesiologists to estimate the depth of anesthesia accurately. PMID:26573650

  20. The use of design-of-experiments methodology to optimize polymer capsule fabrication. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Student research reports

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, L.

    1999-03-01

    Future inertial-fusion experiments on Omega will utilize {approximately} 1 mm-diameter cryogenic targets that have a {approximately} 100-{micro}m-thick, uniformly-frozen fuel layer on their interior. It is desired that they have a stress-free wall thickness < 1 {micro}m and an rms surface roughness < 20 nm. A design-of-experiments (DOE) approach was used to characterize a glow-discharge-polymerization coater built at LLE to fabricate smooth, stress-free capsules with submicron wall thicknesses. The DOE approach was selected because several parameters can be changed simultaneously in a manner which allows the minimum number of runs to be performed to obtain statistically-relevant data. Planar, silicon substrates were coated with {approximately} 3--5 {micro}m of polymer and profilometry was used to determine the coating rate, the film stress, and the surface roughness. The coating rate was found to depend on the trans-2-butene/hydrogen ratio, the total gas-flow rate, the total chamber pressure, and the RF power. In addition, a two-parameter interaction between the total pressure and the RF power also affects the coating rate. The film stress depends on the total chamber pressure and the total mass-flow rate. The surface roughness is independent of the parameters studied. Preliminary results indicate that capsules can be produced rapidly without affecting the smoothness of their outside surface and without residual stress in their walls.

  1. Performance measurements on NIF beamlines for future experiments to support polar direct drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. K.; Kruschwitz, B.; Yang, S. T.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Budge, T.; Canning, D.; Chou, J.; Consentino, A.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Dixit, S.; Dorrer, C.; Erbert, G.; Hackel, R.; Heebner, J.; Hill, E.; Johnston, M.; Kelly, J.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Shaw, M.; Smith, L.; Wegner, P.; Zuegel, J.

    2016-05-01

    We are studying the implementation of polar direct drive (PDD) ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. Part of this preparation involves testing the performance of the NIF laser system over a broader span of center wavelengths, 3.6 nm, where the laser currently operates and that gain models describe. The temporal shape for the PDD pulses consists of a drive pulse preceded by three lower power “picket pulses”. These picket pulses require a multi-FM sinusoidal phase modulation format with a bandwidth of ∼ 200 GHz and a more dispersive grating in the preamplifier module (PAM) for smoothing-by-spectral-dispersion (SSD). In this paper we discuss recent measurements of gain on the NIF laser system over this broader wavelength range. We measured FM-to-AM conversion over the 3.6 nm wavelength range. The possibility of pinhole closure due to the larger bandwidth and dispersion associated with multi-FM SSD was studied at LLE on the OMEGA EP laser.

  2. Cloud-point extraction is compatible with liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of antazoline in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Kojro, Grzegorz; Piotrowski, Roman; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Cloud-point extraction (CPE) is attracting increasing interest in a number of analytical fields, including bioanalysis, as it provides a simple, safe and environmentally-friendly sample preparation technique. However, there are only few reports on the application of this extraction technique in liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. In this study, CPE was used for the isolation of antazoline from human plasma. To date, only one method of antazoline isolation from plasma exists-liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). The aim of this study was to prove the compatibility of CPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS and the applicability of CPE to the determination of antazoline in spiked human plasma and clinical samples. Antazoline was isolated from human plasma using Triton X-114 as a surfactant. Xylometazoline was used as an internal standard. NaOH concentration, temperature and Triton X-114 concentration were optimized. The absolute matrix effect was carefully investigated. All validation experiments met international acceptance criteria and no significant relative matrix effect was observed. The compatibility of CPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS was confirmed using clinical plasma samples. The determination of antazoline concentration in human plasma in the range 10-2500ngmL(-1) by the CPE method led to results which are equivalent to those obtained by the widely used liquid-liquid extraction method. PMID:27289300

  3. Short and ultrashort wavelength lasers; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 14, 15, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. Randol

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on short and ultrashort wavelength lasers are presented. The topics addressed include: pulsed-power driven, photopumped X-ray laser research at the Naval Research Laboratory; X-ray laser studies at LLE; toward shorter wavelengths for soft X-ray lasers based on lithiumlike ions; imploding coaxial krypton gas puffs as a potential X-ray laser; gain optimization and saturation of the Xe III 109 nm Auger laser; multiphoton double ionization of barium; soft X-ray FEL using a two-beam elliptical pill-box wake-field cavity; and spectra of highly ionized atoms. Also discussed are: progress in the gamma-ray laser program at Texas; nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations; nuclear structure of the proposed gamma-ray laser candidate nucleus Re-186; conversion-electron experiment to characterize the decay of the Np-237 shape isomer; Mossbauer effect experiments applicable to GRASERS; overview of pulsed premixed short wavelength chemical laser concepts; hybrid chemical/excimer laser concept; isocyanic acid as a laser fuel.

  4. A review of available analytical technologies for qualitative and quantitative determination of nitramines.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Sofia; Gundersen, Cathrine Brecke; Lundanes, Elsa

    2014-08-01

    This review aims to summarize the available analytical methods in the open literature for the determination of some aliphatic and cyclic nitramines. Nitramines covered in this review are the ones that can be formed from the use of amines in post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plants and end up in the environment. Since the literature is quite scarce regarding the determination of nitramines in aqueous and soil samples, methods for determination of nitramines in other matrices have also been included. Since the nitramines are found in complex matrices and/or in very low concentration, an extraction step is often necessary before their determination. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using dichloromethane and solid phase extraction (SPE) with an activated carbon based material have been the two most common extraction methods. Gas chromatography (GC) or reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) has been used often combined with mass spectrometry (MS) in the final determination step. Presently there is no comprehensive method available that can be used for determination of all nitramines included in this review. The lowest concentration limit of quantification (cLOQ) is in the ng L(-1) range, however, most methods appear to have a cLOQ in the μg L(-1) range, if the cLOQ has been given. PMID:24898740

  5. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. ); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D[sub 2] or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis combined in-line with solid-phase extraction using magnetic particles as new adsorbents for the determination of drugs of abuse in human urine.

    PubMed

    Baciu, Tatiana; Borrull, Francesc; Neusüß, Christian; Aguilar, Carme; Calull, Marta

    2016-05-01

    A simple approach is presented based on the in-line coupling between magnetic particles-based SPE and CE. Silica-coated iron oxide particles functionalized with C18 were successfully synthesized and used as a reverse-phase sorbent for in-line SPE-CE. Magnets were used to locally immobilize these sorbents inside the capillary. Four drugs of abuse were preconcentrated and determined in urine samples using the developed method with a simple pretreatment procedure based on LLE. Several parameters affecting the preconcentration were evaluated. The obtained results show that this strategy enhanced detection sensitivity in the range of 125-700-fold compared with CE without preconcentration. The developed method provides LODs (S/N = 3) for standard samples in the range of 0.5-20 ng/mL with satisfactory analytical precision, in both intraday and day-to-day experiments (RSDs <20%). The LODs (S/N = 3) reached for urine samples were in the range of 20-50 ng/mL. Relative recoveries greater than 75.9% were obtained. The established method has been applied to the analysis of drugs of abuse in urine samples from drug abusers. PMID:26856766

  7. GC-MS-olfactometric characterization of the most aroma-active components in a representative aromatic extract from Iranian saffron (Crocus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Amanpour, Asghar; Sonmezdag, A Salih; Kelebek, Hasim; Selli, Serkan

    2015-09-01

    Aroma and aroma-active compounds of Iranian saffron (Crocus sativus L.) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry. The saffron aromatic extracts were obtained by four different extraction techniques including solvent-assisted flavour evaporation (SAFE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), solid phase extraction (SPE), and simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) and compared to achieve a representative aromatic extract from saffron. According to sensory analysis, the aromatic extract obtained by SAFE was the most representative of saffron odour. A total of 28 aroma compounds were identified in saffron. Ketones were quantitatively the most dominant volatiles in saffron, followed by aldehydes and acids. Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) was used for the determination of aroma-active compounds of saffron. A total of nine aroma-active compounds were detected in the aromatic extract. On the basis of the flavour dilution (FD) factor, the most powerful aroma active compounds were safranal (FD = 512), 4-ketoisophorone (FD = 256) and dihydrooxophorone (FD = 128). PMID:25842335

  8. Determination of phenolic acids in olive oil by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Buiarelli, Francesca; Di Berardino, Sonia; Coccioli, Franco; Jasionowska, Renata; Russo, Mario Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    A CZE method for the separation and quantitation of phenolic acids (cinnamic, syringic, p-coumaric, vanillic, caffeic, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic, protocatechuic), extracted from extra virgin olive oil, was developed. The sample preparation involved the LLE and SPE extraction methods. CE separation was performed in a fused silica capillary of I.D.= 50microm using as a BGE 40 mM borate buffer at pH=9.2. The separation voltage was 18kV with corresponding current of 27-28 microA. Detection was accomplished with UV-detector at lambda=200nm. The proposed method was fully validated. A good repeatability of migration time (RSD% ranged from 0.81 to 1.63) and of corrected peak area (RSD% from 2.89 to 5.77) was obtained. The linearity of detector response in the range from 5 to 50 ppm was checked, obtaining the correlation coefficient R2 values in the range: 0.9919-0.9997. Some phenolic acids in real oil samples were detected and quantified with the proposed method. PMID:15506620

  9. Application of ionic liquid for extraction and separation of bioactive compounds from plants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Baokun; Bi, Wentao; Tian, Minglei; Row, Kyung Ho

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, ionic liquids (ILs), as green and designer solvents, have accelerated research in analytical chemistry. This review highlights some of the unique properties of ILs and provides an overview of the preparation and application of IL or IL-based materials to extract bioactive compounds in plants. IL or IL-based materials in conjunction with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) analytical technologies etc., have been applied successfully to the extraction or separation of bioactive compounds from plants. This paper reviews the available data and references to examine the advantages of IL and IL-based materials in these applications. In addition, the main target compounds reviewed in this paper are bioactive compounds with multiple therapeutic effects and pharmacological activities. Based on the importance of the targets, this paper reviews the applications of ILs, IL-based materials or co-working with analytical technologies. The exploitation of new applications of ILs on the extraction of bioactive compounds from plant samples is expected to increase. PMID:22877739

  10. Development and Validation of a GC-MS Method for the Detection and Quantification of Clotiapine in Blood and Urine Specimens and Application to a Postmortem Case

    PubMed Central

    Mannocchi, Giulio; Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Catanese, Miriam; Umani Ronchi, Federica; Busardò, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Clotiapine is an atypical antipsychotic of the dibenzothiazepine class introduced in a few European countries since 1970, efficient in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. There is little published data on the therapeutic and toxic concentrations of this drug. Aims. The aim of the present study is the development and validation of a method that allows the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods. Validation was performed working on spiked postmortem blood and urine samples. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique at pH 8.5 with n-hexane/dichloromethane (85/15 v/v) and analysis was followed by GC-MS. Methadone-d9 was used as internal standard. Results. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.2 and 1.3 ng/mL for urine and blood, respectively, while the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 3.9 and 4.3 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy, and recovery were also determined. The method was applied to a postmortem case. The blood and urine clotiapine concentrations were 1.32 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. A reliable GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine samples has been developed and fully validated and then applied to a postmortem case. PMID:26236337

  11. Design of a compact, low energy charged particle spectrometer for stellar nucleosynthesis experiments at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations have been used to model an ``Orange Spectrometer'' for measuring alpha and proton energy spectra in the range ~1-5 MeV for experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). An important application will be the study of stellar nucleosynthesis reactions, in particular 3He +3He --> α + p +p, which is a step in the solar proton-proton chain. Experiments to study this reaction have been undertaken at OMEGA before, but no diagnostics have been able to measure the low-energy, low-yield alpha particles generated in the reaction. Feasibility studies were performed with particle trajectory calculations utilizing magnetic field models from COMSOL, and several designs have been identified for testing and development. Ability to study the alpha particles in addition to the protons is essential for understanding the nuclear physics governing the final-state interactions between pairs of particles in the three-body final state. This work was supported in part by NLUF, DOE, and LLE.

  12. A compact Charged-Particle Spectrometer for OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas, J. A.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu,

    2015-11-01

    A very compact scattering pinhole diagnostic (SPD) has been implemented and used to measure the mean energy of charged particles produced in Inertial Confinement (ICF) experiments. This was done by measuring the spatial distribution of mono-energetic particles that passed through a small pinhole, scattered in a thin foil that was positioned about a centimeter in front of a CR-39 detector. To determine the mean energy from the spatial distribution of the scattered particles on the CR-39, an empirical relationship between the scattering angle and the incoming particle energy for a given foil was determined using simulations. Two methods for the energy determination are discussed in this presentation. The capabilities of this diagnostic are demonstrated with DD proton and D3He alpha data from the OMEGA laser. To check the fidelity of the SPD measurements, the results are contrasted to data obtained with other well-established techniques. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  13. Studies of ion species separation in ICF-relevant plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, Hans; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Ross, Steve; Park, Hye-Sook; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; Rosenberg, Michael; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig; Zylstra, Alex; Hoffman, Nelson; Kwan, Tom; Larroche, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas produced in high-energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments generally contain multiple ion species, which allows for multiple-ion species dynamics that are not simulated in typical single-ion fluid hydro codes. In implosions of D3He-gas filled thin-glass spheres on the OMEGA laser facility, comprehensive nuclear diagnostics were used to infer the composition of the fuel during nuclear production, demonstrating that the deuterium fraction was reduced during the implosion of the fuel. Hydrodynamic simulations including an ion diffusion model indicate that pressure, temperature, and potential gradients drive diffusive separation of the ion species, producing better agreement with the experiments than standard hydrodynamic codes. The results of fully kinetic (Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and PIC) simulations confirm the importance of multi-species dynamics to the evolution of these experiments. Implications for multi-species (DT) cryogenic implosions on the National Ignition Facility will be addressed. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  14. Photolithography simulation on nonplanar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Michael S.

    1990-06-01

    A iod1 of oJ. )tica. I hthograpliy suitable for certain types of onedimensional 1)eriOdic tOpogra)hy including birds beaks afl(L reflowed BISC4 structures is described. it is based on a formalism of diffraction grating theory which uses a. coordinate t. raiisforna. tiou to iap all the nonpla. uar surfaces oiit. o parallel planes a. iid it ca. ii be used for the rigorous simulation of photoresist. latent images of oiiedimensional mask patterns with periodicity fuller j)a. ra. lleI or I)(rI)e11(Iicu1a. r to that of the topogra)hy. Effects of t. opogra)11y scattering 1)111k illiaging and )11otob1eachu1Ig are fully ta. keii into a. ccounl. for both types of mask patterns. Simulation results illustrate the combined effects of topography scattering and I) ulk iiiaging in iioiipla. na. r pliotoli tliogra. phiy using high iiuinerical aperture optics.

  15. Multi-component trace analysis of organic xenobiotics in surface water containing suspended particular matter by solid phase extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Erger, Christine; Balsaa, Peter; Werres, Friedrich; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) often disturbs the analysis of surface water by conventional methods, such as liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) or solid phase extraction (SPE), caused by insufficient extraction or by plugging. Water and SPM are therefore often separately analysed, which is associated with high expenditure of time, work and costs. Hence, SPM is partly ignored, if the fraction of sorptively bound analytes is small compared to the total analyte concentration. However, the European Water Framework Directive (WFD, Directive 2000/60/EC) requires explicitly an investigation of the whole water sample including SPM, because many priority and priority hazardous substances can sorb substantially to SPM. Therefore, an SPE disk based method was developed for the determination of 54 priority and priority hazardous pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), organic chlorinated pesticides (OCP) and other pesticides in surface water containing SPM. The developed SPE disk method allows analysis of 1L surface water containing up to 1000 mg SPM without prior separation of SPM in about 2h including gas chromatography-mass (GC-MS) spectrometry analysis. The limits of quantification vary in a range of 0.8 to 38 ng/L. PMID:22749454

  16. Analysis of a Measurement of 12C(n,2n)11C Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartshaw, Garrett; Love, Ian; Yuly, Mark; Padalino, Stephen; Russ, Megan; Bienstock, Mollie; Simone, Angela; Ellison, Drew; Desmitt, Holly; Massey, Thomas; Sangster, Craig

    2013-10-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), nuclear fusion reactions are initiated by bombarding a small fuel pellet with high power lasers. One ICF diagnostic tool involves placing graphite discs within the reaction chamber to determine the number of high-energy neutrons. This diagnostic requires accurate 12C(n, 2n)11C cross sections, which have not been previously well measured. An experiment to measure this cross section was conducted at Ohio University, in which DT neutrons irradiated polyethylene and graphite targets. The neutron flux was determined by counting recoil protons from the polyethylene in a silicon dE-E detector telescope. Preliminary cross sections were calculated using the incident neutron flux and the number of 11C nuclei in the graphite and polyethylene targets determined by counting, in a separate counting station, the gamma rays resulting from the positron decay of 11C. This poster will present the data analysis techniques used to determine these cross sections and the MCNPX simulation used to compute the corrections needed to account for the detector and target geometry. Funded in part by a LLE contract through the DOE.

  17. Fast-Ignition Target Design and Experimental-Concept Validation on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K.S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Frenje, J.A.; Goncharov, V.N.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Kelly, J.H.; MacKinnon, A.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.F.; Norreys, P.A.; Nilson, P.M.; Petrasso, R.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Solodov, A.A.; Stephens, R.B.; Storm, M.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Waxer, L.J.; Zhou, C.D.

    2008-11-25

    A comprehensive scientific program is being pursued at LLE to explore the physics of fast ignition. The OMEGA EP Laser was completed in April 2008, adjacent to the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA Laser Facility. OMEGA EP consists of four beamlines with a NIF-like architecture, each delivering up to 6.5 kJ of UV laser energy in long pulse (ns) mode into the OMEGA EP target chamber. Two of the beamlines can operate as high-energy petawatt lasers, with up to 2.6 kJ each with 10 ps pulse duration. These beams can either be injected into the OMEGA EP target chamber or combined collinearly into the existing OMEGA target chamber for integrated fast-ignitor experiments. Fuel-assembly experiments on OMEGA have achieved high fuel areal densities, and the effects of a cone on the fuel assembly are being studied. Experiments on short-pulse laser systems in collaboration with other institutions are being pursued to investigate the conversion efficiency from laser energy to fast electrons. A coherent transition radiation diagnostic to study the transport of the electrons in high-density material is being developed. Integrated experiments with room-temperature targets on OMEGA will be performed in 2008. Simulations of these integrated experiments show significant heating of up to 1 keV due to the hot electrons from the short-pulse laser.

  18. Analytical methods for the assessment of endocrine disrupting chemical exposure during human fetal and lactation stages: a review.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, I; Vela-Soria, F; Rodríguez-Gómez, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A

    2015-09-10

    In the present work, a review of the analytical methods developed in the last 15 years for the determination of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in human samples related with children, including placenta, cord blood, amniotic fluid, maternal blood, maternal urine and breast milk, is proposed. Children are highly vulnerable to toxic chemicals in the environment. Among these environmental contaminants to which children are at risk of exposure are EDCs -substances able to alter the normal hormone function of wildlife and humans-. The work focuses mainly on sample preparation and instrumental techniques used for the detection and quantification of the analytes. The sample preparation techniques include, not only liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE), but also modern microextraction techniques such as extraction with molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) or ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), which are becoming alternatives in the analysis of human samples. Most studies focus on minimizing the number of steps and using the lowest solvent amounts in the sample treatment. The usual instrumental techniques employed include liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC) mainly coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Multiresidue methods are being developed for the determination of several families of EDCs with one extraction step and limited sample preparation. PMID:26388473

  19. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  20. Analytical procedures for the determination of fuel combustion products, anti-corrosive compounds, and de-icing compounds in airport runoff water samples.

    PubMed

    Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, Żaneta; Astel, Aleksander; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to propose and evaluate new procedures for determination of fuel combustion products, anti-corrosive and de-icing compounds in runoff water samples collected from the airports located in different regions and characterized by different levels of the activity expressed by the number of flights and the number of passengers (per year). The most difficult step in the analytical procedure used for the determination of PAHs, benzotriazoles and glycols is sample preparation stage, due to diverse matrix composition, the possibility of interference associated with the presence of components with similar physicochemical properties. In this study, five different versions of sample preparation using extraction techniques, such as: LLE and SPE, were tested. In all examined runoff water samples collected from the airports, the presence of PAH compounds and glycols was observed. In majority of the samples, BT compounds were determined. Runoff water samples collected from the areas of Polish and British international airports as well as local airports had similar qualitative composition, but quantitative composition of the analytes was very diverse. New and validated analytical methodologies ensure that the necessary information for assessing the negative impact of airport activities on the environment can be obtained. PMID:24209325

  1. Suicide attempt with a mix of synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones: Case report of non-fatal intoxication with AB-CHMINACA, AB-FUBINACA, alpha-PHP, alpha-PVP and 4-CMC.

    PubMed

    Klavž, Janez; Gorenjak, Maksimiljan; Marinšek, Martin

    2016-08-01

    We report on a case of intoxication with a mix of new psychoactive substances. A 38-year-old male was brought to the emergency department (ED) following the ingestion of an unknown drug in a suicide attempt. During the transport, he became progressively more somnolent and unresponsive to painful stimuli. Urine and stomach content were collected on admission to be screened for drugs of abuse and medicinal drugs. After admission, the patient's next of kin presented five small grip seal plastic bags containing different powders/crystals, and they were sent for analysis along with urine and stomach content to the toxicology laboratory. An easy and rapid sample preparation technique was applied for the extraction of urine and stomach content. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique and analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A small amount of powder material from the bags was diluted in methanol and injected directly into the GC-MS instrument. Obtained spectra (EI) were evaluated against SWGDRUG library. Five different designer drugs were identified in the powder material, including synthetic cannabinoids (AB-CHMINACA, AB-FUBINACA) and synthetic cathinones (alpha-PHP, alpha-PVP and 4-CMC). With the exception of 4-CMC, all of these substances were also detected in the stomach content along with the prescription drugs. This is the first time that a positive identification of these five drugs has been made by a clinical laboratory in Slovenia. PMID:26890319

  2. Comparison of SVM and ANFIS for snore related sounds classification by using the largest Lyapunov exponent and entropy.

    PubMed

    Ankışhan, Haydar; Yılmaz, Derya

    2013-01-01

    Snoring, which may be decisive for many diseases, is an important indicator especially for sleep disorders. In recent years, many studies have been performed on the snore related sounds (SRSs) due to producing useful results for detection of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). The first important step of these studies is the detection of snore from SRSs by using different time and frequency domain features. The SRSs have a complex nature that is originated from several physiological and physical conditions. The nonlinear characteristics of SRSs can be examined with chaos theory methods which are widely used to evaluate the biomedical signals and systems, recently. The aim of this study is to classify the SRSs as snore/breathing/silence by using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and entropy with multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) and adaptive network fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). Two different experiments were performed for different training and test data sets. Experimental results show that the multiclass SVMs can produce the better classification results than ANFIS with used nonlinear quantities. Additionally, these nonlinear features are carrying meaningful information for classifying SRSs and are able to be used for diagnosis of sleep disorders such as SAHS. PMID:24194786

  3. Oil and Gas Exploration Planning using VOI Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskova, D. N.; Sizykh, A. V.; Rukavishnikov, V. S.

    2016-03-01

    Paper deals with actual problem about making decisions during field development. The main aim was to apply method “Value of information” in order to estimate the necessity of field exploration works and show the effectiveness of this method. The object of analysis - field X, which is located in the Eastern Siberia. The reservoir is B13 formation of Vend age. The Field has complex structure, and divided into blocks by faults. During evaluation of the project, main uncertainties and oil in place were obtained for three blocks of the field. According to uncertainty analysis, it was suggested to drill a new exploration well, and value of information method was applied to estimate results from this exploration works. Economic evaluation of the value of information method was made by choosing optimal development strategy. According to the obtained results, drilling of the exploration wells for blocks 1 and 3 of the field X is a good decision, while drilling a well in the second block is risky and not recommended. Also using the value of information, optimal well locations were advised - well l_le for the first block, and well 33 for the third block.

  4. Nonadditive entropy Sq and nonextensive statistical mechanics: Applications in geophysics and elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsallis, Constantino

    2012-06-01

    The celebrated Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) entropy, S BG = -kΣi p i ln p i, and associated statistical mechanics are essentially based on hypotheses such as ergodicity, i.e., when ensemble averages coincide with time averages. This dynamical simplification occurs in classical systems (and quantum counterparts) whose microscopic evolution is governed by a positive largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). Under such circumstances, relevant microscopic variables behave, from the probabilistic viewpoint, as (nearly) independent. Many phenomena exist, however, in natural, artificial and social systems (geophysics, astrophysics, biophysics, economics, and others) that violate ergodicity. To cover a (possibly) wide class of such systems, a generalization (nonextensive statistical mechanics) of the BG theory was proposed in 1988. This theory is based on nonadditive entropies such as S_q = kfrac{{1 - sumnolimits_i {p_i^q } }} {{q - 1}}left( {S_1 = S_{BG} } right). Here we comment some central aspects of this theory, and briefly review typical predictions, verifications and applications in geophysics and elsewhere, as illustrated through theoretical, experimental, observational, and computational results.

  5. Colloidal mode of transport in the Potomac River watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, I.L.; Foster, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Similarly to the particulate phase the colloidal phase may play an important role in the organic contaminant transport downstream the river. The colloidal phase consisting of microparticles and micromolecules which are small enough to be mobile and large enough to attract pollutants can absorb nonpolar organic compounds similarly as do soil and sediment particles. To test the hypothesis three river water samples have been analyzed for PAH content in the dissolved, the colloidal, and the particulate phase. The first sample was collected at the Blue Ridge province of Potomac River watershed, at Point of Rocks, the second one in the Pidmont province, at Riverbend Park, and the third sample at Coastal Plane, at Dyke Marsh (Belle Heven marina). In the laboratory environment each water sample was prefiltered to separate the particulate phase form the dissolved and colloidal phase. One part of the prefiltered water sample was ultrafiltered to separate colloids while the second part of the water was Goulden extracted. The separated colloidal phase was liquid-liquid extracted (LLE) while filters containing the suspended solids were Soxhlet extracted. The extracts of the particulate phase, the colloidal phase, and the dissolved plus colloidal phase were analyzed for selected PAHs via GC/MS. It is planned that concentrations of selected PAHs in three phases will be used for calculations of the partition coefficients, the colloid/dissolved partition coefficient and the particle/dissolved partition coefficient. Both partition coefficients will be compared to define the significance of organic contaminant transport by aquatic colloids.

  6. [Aspartic Acid Generated in the Process of Chlorination Disinfection By-product Dichloroacetonitrile].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Li, Nai-jun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Meng-qing

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a method was developed for the determination of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) in drinking water by liquid- liquid micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( LLE-GC/MS), which used 1,2-dibromopropane as the internal standard and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as the extractant for high accuracy. The aspartic acid was used as the precursor of the DCAN formation during chlorination and the influencing factors were evaluated. The formation mechanism of DCAN was also discussed. The results showed that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of pH value under the neutral and acidic conditions, however, the amount of DCAN decreased with the increase of pH value under the alkali condition. And the final amount of DCAN under the alkali condition was much less than that under the neutral and acidic conditions. It was also found that the DCAN amount increased with the increase of chlorine addition, while the temperature in the range of 10-30°C had little influence on the DCAN formation. The formation process of the DCAN from aspartic acid by chlorination included seven steps, such as substitution, decarboxylation, oxidation, etc and ultimately formed DCAN. PMID:27506037

  7. Analytical method for the determination and a survey of parabens and their derivatives in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Moreta, Cristina; Tena, María-Teresa; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-10-01

    Exposure of humans to parabens is a concern due to the estrogenic activity of these compounds. Parabens are widely used as preservatives in some personal care products, foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals owing to their low cost, high water solubility and broad spectrum antimicrobial properties. Despite this, little is known on the occurrence of parabens in pharmaceutical products. In this study, a method based on solid-liquid or liquid-liquid extraction (SLE or LLE), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ or MS/MS) was developed for the determination of six most frequently used parabens and four paraben derivatives (methyl- and ethyl-protocatechuates, and mono- and di-hydroxybenzoic acids) in pharmaceuticals. A sample-purification step involving solid phase extraction (SPE) was optimized for the analysis of solid and lipid-rich pharmaceuticals. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on the occurrence of parabens in pharmaceuticals. The developed method was applied for the analysis of 128 liquid/syrup, cream, solid, prescription or over-the counter (OTC) drugs collected from the USA and a few other countries in Europe and Asia. Although majority of the drugs analyzed in the study did not contain parabens, concentrations as high as 2 mg/g were found in some drugs. Methyl- and propyl- parabens were the frequently detected compounds. 4-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the major metabolite found in pharmaceutical products. PMID:26252961

  8. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Tabak, M.

    2014-05-01

    Integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ˜kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analysed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  9. Risk evaluation - conventional and low level effects of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1984-04-01

    Any discussion of the risk of exposure to potentially-hazardous agents in the environment inevitably involves the question of whether the dose effect curve is of the threshold or linear, non-threshold type. A principal objective of this presentation is to show that the function is actually two separate relationships, each representing distinctly different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different disciplines (i.e., the threshold function, of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Medicine (PTM); the linear, non-threshold function, of Public Health including safety and accident statistics (PHS)). It is shown that low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation falls clearly in the PHS category. A function for cell dose vs. the fraction of single cell quantal responses is characterized, which reflects the absolute and relative sensitivities of cells. Acceptance of this function would obviate any requirement for the use in Radiation Protection of the concepts of a standard radiation, Q, dose equivalent and rem. 9 references, 4 figures.

  10. Low temperature followed by matrix solid-phase dispersion-sonication procedure for the determination of multiclass pesticides in palm oil using LC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Sobhanzadeh, Elham; Abu Bakar, Nor Kartini; Bin Abas, Mhd Radzi; Nemati, Keivan

    2011-02-28

    A simple and effective multiresidue method based on precipitation at low temperature followed by matrix solid-phase dispersion-sonication was developed and validated to determine dimethoate, malathion, carbaryl, simazine, terbuthylazine, atrazine and diuron in palm oil using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS). Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by low temperature method were optimized by studying the effect of type and volume of organic solvent (acetonitrile, acetonitrile:n-hexane (3:2 v/v) and acetone) and time of freezing to obtain high recovery yield and low co-extract fat residue in the final extract. The optimal conditions for matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) were obtained using 5 g of palm oil, 2 g of primary secondary amine (PSA) as dispersing sorbent, 1 g of graphitized carbon black (GCB) as clean-up sorbent and 15 mL of acetonitrile as eluting solvent under conditions of 15 min ultrasonication at room temperature. Method validation was performed in order to study sensitivity, linearity, precision, and accuracy. Average recoveries at three concentration levels (25, 50 and 100 μg kg(-1)) were found in the range of 72.6-91.3% with relative standard deviations between 5.3% and 14.2%. Detection and quantification limits ranged from 1.5 to 5 μg kg(-1) and from 2.5 to 9 μg kg(-1), respectively. PMID:21177032

  11. Required length of guardrails before hazards.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, E; Sinz, W; Hoschopf, H; Gobald, M; Steffan, H; Nadler, B; Nadler, F; Strnad, B; Schneider, F

    2011-11-01

    One way to protect against impacts during run-off-road accidents with infrastructure is the use of guardrails. However, real-world accidents indicate that vehicles can leave the road and end up behind the guardrail. These vehicles have no possibility of returning to the lane. Vehicles often end up behind the guardrail because the length of the guardrails installed before hazards is too short; this can lead to a collision with a shielded hazard. To identify the basic speed for determining the necessary length of guardrails, we analyzed the speed at which vehicles leave the roadway from the ZEDATU (Zentrale Datenbank Tödlicher Unfälle) real-world accidents database. The required length of guardrail was considered the length that reduces vehicle speed at a maximum theoretically possible deceleration of 0.3g behind the barrier based on real-world road departure speed. To determine the desired length of a guardrail ahead of a hazard, we developed a relationship between guardrail length and the speed at which vehicles depart the roadway. If the initial elements are flared away from the carriageway, the required length will be reduced by up to an additional 30% The ZEDATU database analysis showed that extending the current length of guardrails to the evaluated required length would reduce the number of fatalities among occupants of vehicles striking bridge abutments by approximately eight percent. PMID:21819841

  12. Mehr Mathematik Wagen in der Medizin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuflhard, Peter; Dössel, Olaf; Louis, Alfred K.; Zachow, Stefan

    In diesem Artikel wird an drei Erfolgsmodellen dargestellt, wie das Zusammenwirken von Mathematik und Medizin eine Entwicklung hin zu patientenspezifischen Modellen auf Basis moderner medizinischer Bildgebung angestoßen hat, die in naher Zukunft dynamisch weiter Raum greifen wird. Dabei existiert ein Gleichklang der Interessen von Medizin und Mathematik: Beide Disziplinen wollen die Resultate schnell und zuverlässig. Für die Klinik heißt dies, dass notwendige Rechnungen in möglichst kurzer Zeit, und zwar auf dem PC, ablaufen müssen und dass die Resultate so genau und belastbar sein müssen, dass medizinische Entscheidungen darauf aufbauen können. Für die Mathematik folgt daraus, dass höchste Anforderungen an die Effizienz der verwendeten Algorithmen und die darauf aufbauende Software in Numerik und Visualisierung zu stellen sind. Allerdings ist es noch ein weiter Weg, bis anatomische und medizinisch brauchbare funktionelle Modelle auch nur für die wichtigsten Körperteile und die häufigsten Krankheitsfälle verfügbar sein werden. Führende Universitätskliniken könnten, als Zentren einer interdisziplinären Kooperation von Medizinern, Ingenieuren und Mathematikern, eine Vorreiterrolle dabei übernehmen, mehr Mathematik in der Medizin zu wagen. Dies wäre zweifellos ein wichtiger Schritt in Richtung auf eine individuelle quantitative Medizin, bei dem Deutschland die besten Voraussetzungen hätte, die Rolle des "Schrittmachers“ zu übernehmen.

  13. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J.; Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D{sub 2} or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  14. Simultaneous determination of pyrethroids from pesticide residues in porcine muscle and pasteurized milk using GC.

    PubMed

    Khay, Sathya; Abd El-Aty, A M; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shin, Eun-Ho; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Jin-Suk; Chang, Byung-Joon; Lee, Chi-Ho; Shin, Sung-Chul; Jeong, Ji Yoon; Shim, Jae-Han

    2009-01-01

    The principal goal of this work was to develop an efficient method for the simultaneous determination of four pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, and deltamethrin, in porcine muscle and pasteurized milk using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Sample extraction was carried out with and without additional column cleanup procedures, and the final determination was made using GC with electron-capture detector (ECD). The pesticide identity was confirmed using GC-MS in the SIM mode. Since there were minor differences between the extraction procedures, extraction without the additional cleanup procedure was used throughout the work. The method was validated by fortifying blank samples with half, two, and four times the maximum residue limit (MRL) of each PYR. The average recoveries (n = 6) ranged from 83.5 to 99.2% and 82.9 to 109% in porcine muscle and pasteurized milk, respectively. The repeatability of measurements expressed as RSDs, was in the range of 1.7-11.9 and 1.5-10.3% in porcine muscle and pasteurized milk, respectively. The LODs ranged from 3.3 to 9 and 3 to 8.1 ppm, whereas the LOQs ranged from 10 to 27.4 and 9 to 24.6 ppm, in porcine muscle and pasteurized milk, respectively. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by analyzing real samples collected from major cities in the Republic of Korea. No residues of the selected pesticides were detected in any of the samples. PMID:19107766

  15. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-11-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p +D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p +D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  16. Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis using ICF plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hale, Gerry; Paris, Mark; McEvoy, Aaron; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Frenje, Johan; Li, Chikang; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Petrasso, Richard; McNabb, Dennis; Sayre, Dan; Pino, Jesse; Brune, Carl; Bacher, Andy; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Stoeckl, Christian; Janezic, Roger; Sangster, Craig

    2015-10-01

    The 3He+3He, T+3He, and p + D reactions directly relevant to Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using high-temperature low-density `exploding pusher' implosions. The advantage of using these plasmas is that they better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. Measured proton spectra from the 3He3He reaction are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling. The resulting T+3He gamma-ray data rule out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. The proton spectrum from the T+3He reaction is also being used to constrain the R-matrix model. Recent experiments have probed the p + D reaction for the first time in a plasma; this reaction is relevant to energy production in protostars, brown dwarfs and at higher CM energies to BBN. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  17. Preparation of penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose from tannic acid and plasma pharmacokinetic analyses by liquid-liquid extraction and reverse-phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Shaik, Ahmad Ali; Zhang, Jinhui; Nhkata, Katai; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lü, Junxuan

    2011-02-20

    The gallotannin penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (PGG) has many biological activities including in vivo anti-cancer efficacy. We present in this paper a scaled-up protocol for its preparation in high purity from tannic acid by acidic methanolysis with typical yield of 15%. We also describe a method for the analysis of PGG in mouse plasma by HPLC and its application in preliminary pharmacokinetic studies. A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) protocol was optimized for the extraction of PGG from mouse plasma. The extraction efficiency for PGG at 1 μg/mL in mouse plasma was 70.0±1.3% (n=5). The limit of detection (LOD) for PGG was approximately 0.2 μg/mL. Preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters of PGG following a single i.p. injection with 5% ethanol/saline vehicle in mice were established. The peak plasma PGG concentrations (C(max)) were approximately 3-4 μM at a dose of 0.5 mg per mouse (∼20 mg/kg) at 2 h post-injection (T(max)). PMID:20970943

  18. Fast ignition integrated experiments and high-gain point design

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraga, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Tabak, M.

    2014-04-17

    Here, integrated fast ignition experiments were performed at ILE, Osaka, and LLE, Rochester, in which a nanosecond driver laser implodes a deuterated plastic shell in front of the tip of a hollow metal cone and an intense ultrashort-pulse laser is injected through the cone to heat the compressed plasma. Based on the initial successful results of fast electron heating of cone-in-shell targets, large-energy short-pulse laser beam lines were constructed and became operational: OMEGA-EP at Rochester and LFEX at Osaka. Neutron enhancement due to heating with a ~kJ short-pulse laser has been demonstrated in the integrated experiments at Osaka and Rochester. The neutron yields are being analyzed by comparing the experimental results with simulations. Details of the fast electron beam transport and the electron energy deposition in the imploded fuel plasma are complicated and further studies are imperative. The hydrodynamics of the implosion was studied including the interaction of the imploded core plasma with the cone tip. Theory and simulation studies are presented on the hydrodynamics of a high-gain target for a fast ignition point design.

  19. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C G; Fiksel, G; Stoeckl, C; Sinenian, N; Canfield, M J; Graeper, G B; Lombardo, A T; Stillman, C R; Padalino, S J; Mileham, C; Sangster, T C; Frenje, J A

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW. PMID:21806176

  20. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. G.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Sinenian, N.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Frenje, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.