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Sample records for loading an organ physiological

  1. Effect of an on-hip load-carrying belt on physiological and perceptual responses during bimanual anterior load carriage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z G; Sun, S Q; Goonetilleke, R S; Chow, D H K

    2016-07-01

    Manual load carriage continues to be a major contributor of musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates the physiological and subjective effects of an on-hip load-carrying belt (HLCB) during bimanual anterior load carriage. Fifteen healthy male participants walked on a level ground treadmill at 4.5 km/h for 5 min carrying 5, 10 and 15 kg loads with hands and arms in front of the body, with and without using the HLCB (WD and ND). Heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and, central and peripheral ratings of perceived exertion were the dependent variables. The mean heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and peripheral rating of perceived exertion increased significantly with load under both WD and ND conditions. At a load of 15 kg, the mean heart rate, normalized oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and peripheral rating of perceived exertion were significantly lower by 6.6%, 8.0%, 11.8% and 13.9% respectively in WD condition when compared to the ND condition. There was no significant difference between WD and ND conditions with 5 or 10 kg load. It can be concluded that the HLCB could reduce a person's physiological and peripheral perceptual responses when walking on a level ground treadmill at 4.5 km/h with a load of 15 kg. Using a HLCB or similar device is therefore recommended for bimanual anterior load carriage for loads of 15 kg or probably larger. PMID:26995043

  2. Effect of Device Rigidity and Physiological Loading on Spinal Kinematics after Dynamic Stabilization : An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kwonsoo; Yang, Inchul; Kim, Namhoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of posterior implant rigidity on spinal kinematics at adjacent levels by utilizing a cadaveric spine model with simulated physiological loading. Methods Five human lumbar spinal specimens (L3 to S1) were obtained and checked for abnormalities. The fresh specimens were stripped of muscle tissue, with care taken to preserve the spinal ligaments and facet joints. Pedicle screws were implanted in the L4 and L5 vertebrae of each specimen. Specimens were tested under 0 N and 400 N axial loading. Five different posterior rods of various elastic moduli (intact, rubber, low-density polyethylene, aluminum, and titanium) were tested. Segmental range of motion (ROM), center of rotation (COR) and intervertebral disc pressure were investigated. Results As the rigidity of the posterior rods increased, both the segmental ROM and disc pressure at L4-5 decreased, while those values increased at adjacent levels. Implant stiffness saturation was evident, as the ROM and disc pressure were only marginally increased beyond an implant stiffness of aluminum. Since the disc pressures of adjacent levels were increased by the axial loading, it was shown that the rigidity of the implants influenced the load sharing between the implant and the spinal column. The segmental CORs at the adjacent disc levels translated anteriorly and inferiorly as rigidity of the device increased. Conclusion These biomechanical findings indicate that the rigidity of the dynamic stabilization implant and physiological loading play significant roles on spinal kinematics at adjacent disc levels, and will aid in further device development. PMID:26713140

  3. Cardiotopic organization of the nucleus ambiguus? An anatomical and physiological analysis of neurons regulating atrioventricular conduction.

    PubMed

    Massari, V J; Johnson, T A; Gatti, P J

    1995-05-15

    Previous data indicate that there are anatomically segregated and physiologically independent parasympathetic postganglionic vagal motoneurons on the surface of the heart which are capable of selective control of sinoatrial rate, atrioventricular conduction and atrial contractility. We have injected a retrograde tracer into the cardiac ganglion which selectively regulates atrioventricular conduction (the AV ganglion). Medullary tissues were processed for the histochemical detection of retrogradely labeled neurons by light and electron microscopic methods. Negative dromotropic retrogradely labeled cells were found in a long column in the ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (NA-VL), which enlarged somewhat at the level of the area postrema, but reached its largest size rostral to the area postrema in an area termed the rostral ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (rNA-VL). Three times as many cells were observed in the left rNA-VL as compared to the right (P < 0.025). Retrogradely labeled cells were also consistantly observed in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). The DMV contained one third as many cells as the NA-VL. The right DMV contained twice as many cells as the left (P < 0.05). These data are consistent with physiological evidence that suggests that the left vagus nerve is dominant in the regulation of AV conduction, but that the right vagus nerve is also influential. While recording the electrocardiogram in paced and non-paced hearts, L-glutamate (GLU) was microinjected into the rNA-VL. Microinjections of GLU caused a 76% decrease in the rate of atrioventricular (AV) conduction (P < 0.05) and occasional second degree heart block, without changing heart rate. The effects of GLU were abolished by ipsilateral cervical vagotomy. These physiological data therefore support the anatomical inference that CNS neurons that are retrogradely labeled from the AV ganglion selectively exhibit negative dromotropic properties. Retrogradely labeled negative dromotropic neurons

  4. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  5. Creative Teaching Assistant Organization to Maintain an Integrative Physiology Course with 440 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrant, Coral L.

    2007-01-01

    We were recently challenged with trying to maintain the integrity and learning experience of our Physiology course, which included the use of long-answer, essay-style test questions, with a class size that increased over 2 yr by approximately 200 students. We reorganized the teaching assistant (TA) support structure in an attempt to keep the…

  6. Prediction of micromotion initiation of an implanted femur under physiological loads and constraints using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Andreaus, U; Colloca, M

    2009-07-01

    In cementless total hip replacement surgery the conditions for micromotion initiation at the bone-stem interface and the role of stair climbing versus gait in promoting incipient slipping deserve attention. The goal of the present paper was to propose a finite element approach for analysing the structural behaviour of hip joint prostheses under physiological loadings and boundary conditions, which allows the prediction of micromotion initiation with low computational effort. In this paper, three-dimensional (3D) finite element analyses were performed of intact and implanted human femurs in order to address the above-mentioned problems. Accurate finite element models based on computed tomography images of a human femur were employed; tetrahedral elements were used to construct the models and the contact options of a full bond between the femoral bone and stem were also used. The shear strains at the contact between femoral bone and stem were evaluated. Two loading cases, namely walking and stair climbing, were applied to investigate the effect of different loading conditions on the shear strain patterns. Shear strains in the z direction can be reasonably considered a significant stimulus of slip initiation or fibrous tissue formation or both at the bone-stem interface, whereas shear strains in the x-y plane can be assumed to be a sensible measurement of the tendency to implant-bone micromotion under torsional loads. Comparisons with other studies are complicated by the difference in the methods and testing conditions used. If mobilization is to be initiated, rotational displacements at the interface should be sensible and significant parameters, i.e. the material, should be distorted to some extent. Thus, for a particular point on the bone-metal interface, the maximum shear strain in any direction within the interface plane will indicate the likelihood of slippage initiation at that point. The different femur states (intact and implanted) and loading conditions

  7. Physiology of food spoilage organisms.

    PubMed

    Roller, S

    1999-09-15

    A thorough understanding of the physiological responses of microorganisms to stresses imposed during food preservation is essential if novel combination systems based on mild food processing procedures are to be developed effectively. The influences of intrinsic characteristics as well as external factors such as water activity, temperature, preservatives, composition of the gaseous atmosphere, etc. on the stress response of microorganisms are discussed. The interaction of spoilage organisms with each other as well as with food pathogens and the ultimate consequences for food safety and quality are also explored in this review. PMID:10488850

  8. Space physiology within an exercise physiology curriculum.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; West, John B

    2013-09-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of chronic terrestrial exercise (TEx) and microgravity (μG). We used a series of peer-reviewed publications to demonstrate that many of the physiological adaptations to TEx and μG are opposite. For example, TEx typically improves cardiovascular function and orthostatic tolerance, whereas μG can lead to declines in both. TEx leads to muscle hypertrophy, and μG elicits muscle atrophy. TEx increases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass, whereas μG decreases bone mineral density and red blood cell mass. Importantly, exercise during spaceflight remains a crucial countermeasure to limit some of these adverse physiological adaptations to μG. This curriculum develops critical thinking skills by dissecting peer-reviewed articles and discussing the strengths and weaknesses associated with simulated and actual μG studies. Moreover, the curriculum includes studies on both animals and humans, providing a strong translational component to the curriculum. In summary, we have developed a novel space physiology curriculum delivered during the final weeks of an exercise physiology course in which students gain critical new knowledge that reinforces key concepts presented throughout the semester. PMID:24022767

  9. Organic-matter loading determines regime shifts and alternative states in an aquatic ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Jennie; Baiser, Benjamin; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Ellison, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Slow changes in underlying state variables can lead to “tipping points,” rapid transitions between alternative states (“regime shifts”) in a wide range of complex systems. Tipping points and regime shifts routinely are documented retrospectively in long time series of observational data. Experimental induction of tipping points and regime shifts is rare, but could lead to new methods for detecting impending tipping points and forestalling regime shifts. By using controlled additions of detrital organic matter (dried, ground arthropod prey), we experimentally induced a shift from aerobic to anaerobic states in a miniature aquatic ecosystem: the self-contained pools that form in leaves of the carnivorous northern pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea. In unfed controls, the concentration of dissolved oxygen ([O2]) in all replicates exhibited regular diurnal cycles associated with daytime photosynthesis and nocturnal plant respiration. In low prey-addition treatments, the regular diurnal cycles of [O2] were disrupted, but a regime shift was not detected. In high prey-addition treatments, the variance of the [O2] time series increased until the system tipped from an aerobic to an anaerobic state. In these treatments, replicate [O2] time series predictably crossed a tipping point at ∼45 h as [O2] was decoupled from diurnal cycles of photosynthesis and respiration. Increasing organic-matter loading led to predictable changes in [O2] dynamics, with high loading consistently driving the system past a well-defined tipping point. The Sarracenia microecosystem functions as a tractable experimental system in which to explore the forecasting and management of tipping points and alternative regimes. PMID:23613583

  10. Whey treatment by AnSBBR with circulation: effects of organic loading, shock loads, and alkalinity supplementation.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Roberto A; Rodrigues, José A D; Ratusznei, Suzana M; Zaiat, Marcelo; Foresti, Eugenio

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of volumetric loading rate (VLR), shock load, and alkalinity supplementation on the efficiency and stability of an Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR) containing polyurethane foam cubes. Mixing in the reactor, which was kept at 30 +/- 1 degrees C, occurred by recirculating the liquid phase. The reactor treated 2.5 l cheese whey in 8-h cycles, at concentrations of 1, 2, and 4 g COD l-1, which corresponded to VLRs of 3, 6, and 12 g COD l-1 day-1, respectively. Application of single-cycle shock loads of 6, 12, and 24 g COD l-1 day-1 did not impair reactor performance. In addition, for VLRs of 3, 6, and 12 g COD l-1 day-1, alkalinity supplementation to the influent, at the end of each assay, could be reduced to 75, 50, and 50%, respectively, in relation to supplementation at the beginning of the assay. During reactor operation a viscous polymer-like material was formed between the polyurethane foam cubes, which increased at higher VLR. Finally, addition of salts to the influent improved reactor efficiency. PMID:18057453

  11. Physiological Evaluation of a Wheeled Assistive Device for Load Carriage.

    PubMed

    Ketko, Itay; Yanovich, Ran; Plotnik, Meir; Gefen, Amit; Heled, Yuval

    2015-11-01

    Carrying heavy weight imposes high physiological strain on the human body, which can adversely affect physical performance. This is especially important for soldiers whose physical performance level may influence mission completion and survival. Recently, wheel-based devices (WBDs), designed to reduce the load on the soldier, have been suggested as a possible solution. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological effects of a proposed WBD prototype. Ten volunteers performed 3 exercise protocols on a treadmill as follows: without carrying any load, with a military backpack, and with the WBD. While using both modalities, they carried 40% of their body weight. Data acquisition included heart rate, body core temperature, oxygen consumption, and subjective comfort. Postural sway was also measured to evaluate the effect of WBD on standing balance. There were no significant differences between the physiological measures while using both modalities. Subjective comfort evaluation showed that the WBD may be more comfortable, yet it raises difficulty in maintaining balance while walking, as can be explained by the postural sway results. We suggest that the similarity in physiological strain while using the WBD was due to reduced walking efficiency in an attempt to maintain balance. It appears that the WBD may have some biomechanical advantages in reducing the subjective pain and pressure at the shoulder region, a matter that should be further examined together with other biomechanical measures. PMID:26506177

  12. Limulus ventral eye. Physiological properties of photoreceptor cells in an organ culture medium

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Ventral photoreceptor cells bathed in an organ culture medium typically have resting potentials of -85 mV and membrane resistances of 35 Momega and, when dark-adapted, exhibit large potential fluctuations (LPFs) of 60 mV and small potential fluctuations (SPFs) of less than 30 mV. LPFs appear to be regenerative events triggered by SPFs, the well-known quantum bumps. In the dark, SPFs and LPFs occur spontaneously. At intensities near threshold, the rate of occurrence is directly proportional to light intensity, indicating that SPFs and LPFs are elicited by single photon events. At higher intensities, SPFs and LPFs sum to produce a receptor potential that is graded over approximately a 9-log-unit range of light intensity. Amplitude histograms of the discrete potential waves are bimodal, reflecting the SPF and LPF populations. Histograms of current waves are unimodal. SPFs and LPFs are insensitive to 1 microgram tetrodotoxin. I-V characteristics show initial inward currents of approximately 15 nA for voltage clamps to - 40 mV and steady-state outward currents for all clamp potentials. Photoreceptor cells bathed in organ culture medium retain these properties for periods of at least 75 days. PMID:722278

  13. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  14. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems. PMID:26555073

  15. Influence of Organic Load on Biohydrogen Production in an AnSBBR Treating Glucose-Based Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Souza, L P; Lullio, T G; Ratusznei, S M; Rodrigues, J A D; Zaiat, M

    2015-06-01

    An anaerobic sequencing batch reactor with immobilized biomass (AnSBBR) was applied to the production of biohydrogen treating a glucose-based wastewater. The influence of the applied volumetric organic load was studied by varying the concentration of influent at 3600 and 5250 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1) and cycle lengths of 4, 3, and 2 h resulting in volumetric organic loads of 10.5 to 31.1 g COD L(-1). The results revealed system stability in the production of biohydrogen and substrate consumption. The best performance was an organic removal (COD) of 24 % and carbohydrate removal (glucose) of 99 %. Volumetric and specific molar productivity were 60.9 mol H2 m(-3) day(-1) and 5.8 mol H2 kg SVT(-1) day(-1) (biogas containing 40 % H2 and no CH4) at 20.0 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (5250 mg COD L(-1) and 3 h). The yield between produced hydrogen and removed organic matter in terms of carbohydrates was 0.94 mol H2 Mol GLU(-1) (biogas containing 52 % H2 and no CH4) at 10.5 g COD L(-1) day(-1) (3600 mg COD L(-1) and 4 h), corresponding to 23 and 47 % of the theoretical values of the acetic and butyric acid metabolic routes, respectively. Metabolites present at significant amounts were ethanol, acetic acid, and butyric acid. The conditions with higher influent concentration and intermediate cycle length, and the condition with lower influent concentration and longer cycle showed the best results in terms of productivity and yield, respectively. This indicates that the best productivity tends to occur at higher organic loads, as this parameter involves the biogas production, and the best yield tends to occur at lower and/or intermediate organic loads, as this parameter also involves substrate consumption. PMID:25900436

  16. Quantification of training load, energy intake, and physiological adaptations during a rugby preseason: a case study from an elite European rugby union squad.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Warren J; Cavanagh, Bryce P; Douglas, William; Donovan, Timothy F; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2015-02-01

    Rugby Union (RU) is a high-speed collision sport consisting of an intermittent activity profile. Given the extreme physical demands of the sport, significant emphasis is placed on players possessing high lean body mass while minimizing body fat. Anecdotally, the most significant changes in body composition are observed during the preseason; however, there are no objective data on the physiological demands and energy intake during this time. We therefore monitored 45 elite European RU players over the 10-week preseason period by assessing training load using Global Positioning System and session rate of perceived exertion (sRPE) while also assessing changes in anthropometry and physical performance. For forwards and backs, respectively, mean weekly distance covered was 9,774 m (1,404) and 11,585 m (1,810) with a total mean weekly sRPE of 3,398 (335) arbitrary units and 2,944 (410) arbitrary units. Mean daily energy intake was 14.8 MJ (1.9) and 13.3 MJ (1.9), carbohydrate (CHO) intake was 3.3 (0.7) and 4.14 (0.4) g·kg body mass, protein intake was 2.52 (0.3) and 2.59 (0.6) g·kg body mass, and fat intake was 1.0 (0.3) and 0.95 (0.3) g·kg body mass for forwards and backs, respectively. Markers of physical performance (1 repetition maximum strength, speed, and repeated sprint tests) and anthropometry (body fat and estimated lean mass) improved in all players. Interestingly, all players self-selected a "low" CHO "high" protein diet. Based on physiological improvements the training load and energy intake seems appropriate, although further research is required to evaluate if such energy intakes would also be suitable for match day performance. PMID:25029003

  17. Simulated-Physiological Loading Conditions Preserve Biological and Mechanical Properties of Caprine Lumbar Intervertebral Discs in Ex Vivo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Cornelis P. L.; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A.; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Smit, Theo H.; Helder, Marco N.; van Royen, Barend J.; Mullender, Margriet G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions. In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties. Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content. IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group. In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  18. Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review.

    PubMed

    Drain, Jace; Billing, Daniel; Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Aisbett, Brad

    2016-01-01

    This review article aims to evaluate a proposed maximum acceptable work duration model for load carriage tasks. It is contended that this concept has particular relevance to physically demanding occupations such as military and firefighting. Personnel in these occupations are often required to perform very physically demanding tasks, over varying time periods, often involving load carriage. Previous research has investigated concepts related to physiological workload limits in occupational settings (e.g. industrial). Evidence suggests however, that existing (unloaded) workload guidelines are not appropriate for load carriage tasks. The utility of this model warrants further work to enable prediction of load carriage durations across a range of functional workloads for physically demanding occupations. If the maximum duration for which personnel can physiologically sustain a load carriage task could be accurately predicted, commanders and supervisors could better plan for and manage tasks to ensure operational imperatives were met whilst minimising health risks for their workers. PMID:26360198

  19. The Language Organ: Linguistics as Cognitive Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen R.; Lightfoot, David W.

    This book treats human language as the manifestation of a faculty of the mind, a mental organ whose nature is determined by human biology, suggesting that its functional properties should be explored just as physiology explores the functional properties of physical organs. The book asserts that linguistics investigates cognition, taking as its…

  20. Retrospective Analysis of Inflight Exercise Loading and Physiological Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Buxton, R. E.; De Witt, J. K.; Guilliams, M. E.; Hanson, A. M.; Peters, B. T.; Pandorf, M. M. Scott; Sibonga, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts perform exercise throughout their missions to counter the health declines that occur as a result of long-term exposure to weightlessness. Although all astronauts perform exercise during their missions, the specific prescriptions, and thus the mechanical loading, differs among individuals. For example, inflight ground reaction force data indicate that subject-specific differences exist in foot forces created when exercising on the second-generation treadmill (T2) [1]. The current exercise devices allow astronauts to complete prescriptions at higher intensities, resulting in greater benefits with increased efficiency. Although physiological outcomes have improved, the specific factors related to the increased benefits are unknown. In-flight exercise hardware collect data that allows for exploratory analyses to determine if specific performance factors relate to physiological outcomes. These analyses are vital for understanding which components of exercise are most critical for optimal human health and performance. The relationship between exercise performance variables and physiological changes during flight has yet to be fully investigated. Identifying the critical performance variables that relate to improved physiological outcomes is vital for creating current and future exercise prescriptions to optimize astronaut health. The specific aims of this project are: 1) To quantify the exercise-related mechanical loading experienced by crewmembers on T2 and ARED during their mission on ISS; 2) To explore relationships between exercise loading variables, bone, and muscle health changes during the mission; 3) To determine if specific mechanical loading variables are more critical than others in protecting physiology; 4) To develop methodology for operational use in monitoring accumulated training loads during crew exercise programs. This retrospective analysis, which is currently in progress, is being conducted using data from astronauts that have flown long

  1. The link between organic aerosol mass loading and degree of oxygenation: an α-pinene photooxidation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenberger, L.; Barmet, P.; Slowik, J. G.; Praplan, A. P.; Dommen, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-09-01

    A series of smog chamber (SC) experiments was conducted to identify driving factors responsible for the discrepancy between ambient and SC aerosol degree of oxygenation. An Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer is used to compare mass spectra from α-pinene photooxidation with ambient aerosol. Composition is compared in terms of the fraction of organic mass measured at m/z 44 (f44), a surrogate for carboxylic/organic acids as well as the atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C), vs. f43, a surrogate for aldehydes, alcohols and ketones. Low (near-ambient) organic mass concentrations were found to be necessary to obtain oxygenation levels similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) commonly identified in ambient measurements. The effects of organic mass loading and OH (hydroxyl radical) exposure were decoupled by inter-experiment comparisons at the same integrated OH concentration. On average, an OH exposure of 2.9 ± 1.3 × 107 cm-3 h is needed to increase f44 by 1% during aerosol aging. For the first time, LV-OOA-like aerosol from the abundant biogenic precursor α-pinene was produced in a smog chamber by oxidation at typical atmospheric OH concentrations. Significant correlation between measured secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and reference LV-OOA mass spectra is shown by Pearson's R2 values larger than 0.90 for experiments with low organic mass concentrations between 1.5 and 15 μg m-3 at an OH exposure of 4 × 107 cm-3 h, corresponding to about two days oxidation time in the atmosphere, based on a global mean OH concentration of ∼1 × 106 cm-3. Not only is the α-pinene SOA more oxygenated at low organic mass loadings, but the functional dependence of oxygenation on mass loading is enhanced at atmospherically-relevant precursor concentrations. Since the degree of oxygenation influences the chemical, volatility and hygroscopic properties of ambient aerosol, smog chamber studies must be performed at near

  2. [An occupational physiology study at the Asarel Mining and Milling Works. The evaluation of the work load in the basic jobs in an open-pit mine].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, L; Khadzhiolova, I; Deianov, Kh

    1995-01-01

    This occupational physiology study was undertaken within a wider applied-research framework designed to evaluate the occupational environment and its impact on workers at "Asarel" Mining and Milling Works. Analysis of activities showed physical effort (dynamic and static) to be the major problem at the open pit, though varying in extent between jobs (most prominent for blasters and bulldozerists). Nervous/emotional strain, while not leading, was sustained mostly by diggers and blasters, followed by drivers. Organization of work (shift regimen, no regulated breaks, stepwise schedule of days off work) was hardly appropriate and did not allow for recovery. Interviewed workers qualified working conditions as extremely unfavorable; they disapproved with the physical factors of the occupational environment, the workplace, the state of machines and devices, and remuneration for work performed. Exertion from work, assessed by pulse rate and energy expended, was moderate for most activities of diggers, drivers, and drillers. The burden of physical effort was great for blasters at the open pit and for diggers and drillers performing extra repair operations (pulse rate, 100-110 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.2-5.5 Kcal/min). Hardest and least attractive was the work of blasters at stores for explosive materials (pulse rate, 120-141 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.5-6.5 Kcal/min). These adverse factors of labor activities might produce a negative impact on worker health and performance, leading to occupational impairment of their musculoskeletal system, to labor-related disorders of their cardiovascular and nervous systems, etc. Preventive measures are thus necessary to limit physical exertion, optimize the work-and-rest regimen; also, there is a need for conducting pertinent preventive medical examinations, providing social measures (conditions for transportation, rest, nutrition, sports), etc. PMID:8524750

  3. Effect of organic load on the performance and methane production of an AnSBBR treating effluent from biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Roberto Antonio; Rodrigues, José Alberto Domingues; Ratusznei, Suzana Maria; Canto, Catarina Simone Andrade; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Currently, there is an increasing demand for the production of biodiesel and, consequently, there will be an increasing need to treat wastewaters resulting from the production process of this biofuel. The main objective of this work was, therefore, to investigate the effect of applied volumetric organic load (AVOL) on the efficiency, stability, and methane production of an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor applied to the treatment of effluent from biodiesel production. As inert support, polyurethane foam cubes were used in the reactor and mixing was accomplished by recirculating the liquid phase. Increase in AVOL resulted in a drop in organic matter removal efficiency and increase in total volatile acids in the effluent. AVOLs of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 g COD L(-1) day(-1) resulted in removal efficiencies of 92%, 81%, 67%, and 50%, for effluent filtered samples, and 91%, 80%, 63%, and 47%, for non-filtered samples, respectively, whereas total volatile acids concentrations in the effluent amounted to 42, 145, 386 and 729 mg HAc L(-1), respectively. Moreover, on increasing AVOL from 1.5 to 4.5 g COD L(-1) day(-1) methane production increased from 29.5 to 55.5 N mL CH(4) g COD(-1). However, this production dropped to 36.0 N mL CH(4) g COD(-1) when AVOL was increased to 6.0 g COD L(-1) day(-1), likely due to the higher concentration of volatile acids in the reactor. Despite the higher concentration of volatile acids at the highest AVOL, alkalinity supplementation to the influent, in the form of sodium bicarbonate, at a ratio of 0.5-1.3 g NaHCO(3) g COD (fed) (-1) , was sufficient to maintain the pH near neutral and guarantee process stability during reactor operation. PMID:21494753

  4. Organic Matter Loading Affects Lodgepole Pine Seedling Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaohua; Li, Qinglin; Waterhouse, M. J.; Armleder, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Organic matter plays important roles in returning nutrients to the soil, maintaining forest productivity and creating habitats in forest ecosystems. Forest biomass is in increasing demand for energy production, and organic matter has been considered as a potential supply. Thus, an important management question is how much organic matter should be retained after forest harvesting to maintain forest productivity. To address this question, an experimental trial was established in 1996 to evaluate the responses of lodgepole pine seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments. Four organic matter loading treatments were randomly assigned to each of four homogeneous pine sites: removal of all organic matter on the forest floor, organic matter loading quantity similar to whole-tree-harvesting residuals left on site, organic matter loading quantity similar to stem-only-harvesting residuals, and organic matter loading quantity more similar to what would be found in disease- or insect-killed stands. Our 10-year data showed that height and diameter had 29 and 35 % increase, respectively, comparing the treatment with the most organic matter loading to the treatment with the least organic matter loading. The positive response of seedling growth to organic matter loading may be associated with nutrients and/or microclimate change caused by organic matter, and requires further study. The dynamic response of seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments highlights the importance of long-term studies. Implications of those results on organic matter management are discussed in the context of forest productivity sustainability.

  5. Region Specific Response of Intervertebral Disc Cells to Complex Dynamic Loading: An Organ Culture Study Using a Dynamic Torsion-Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Samantha C. W.; Walser, Jochen; Käppeli, Patrick; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Javad; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The spine is routinely subjected to repetitive complex loading consisting of axial compression, torsion, flexion and extension. Mechanical loading is one of the important causes of spinal diseases, including disc herniation and disc degeneration. It is known that static and dynamic compression can lead to progressive disc degeneration, but little is known about the mechanobiology of the disc subjected to combined dynamic compression and torsion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanobiology of the intervertebral disc when subjected to combined dynamic compression and axial torsion or pure dynamic compression or axial torsion using organ culture. We applied four different loading modalities [1. control: no loading (NL), 2. cyclic compression (CC), 3. cyclic torsion (CT), and 4. combined cyclic compression and torsion (CCT)] on bovine caudal disc explants using our custom made dynamic loading bioreactor for disc organ culture. Loads were applied for 8 h/day and continued for 14 days, all at a physiological magnitude and frequency. Our results provided strong evidence that complex loading induced a stronger degree of disc degeneration compared to one degree of freedom loading. In the CCT group, less than 10% nucleus pulposus (NP) cells survived the 14 days of loading, while cell viabilities were maintained above 70% in the NP of all the other three groups and in the annulus fibrosus (AF) of all the groups. Gene expression analysis revealed a strong up-regulation in matrix genes and matrix remodeling genes in the AF of the CCT group. Cell apoptotic activity and glycosaminoglycan content were also quantified but there were no statistically significant differences found. Cell morphology in the NP of the CCT was changed, as shown by histological evaluation. Our results stress the importance of complex loading on the initiation and progression of disc degeneration. PMID:24013824

  6. Soldier load carriage: historical, physiological, biomechanical, and medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Reynolds, Katy L; Harman, Everett

    2004-01-01

    This study reviews historical and biomedical aspects of soldier load carriage. Before the 18th century, foot soldiers seldom carried more than 15 kg while on the march, but loads have progressively risen since then. This load increase is presumably due to the weight of weapons and equipment that incorporate new technologies to increase protection, firepower, communications, and mobility. Research shows that locating the load center of mass as close as possible to the body center of mass results in the lowest energy cost and tends to keep the body in an upright position similar to unloaded walking. Loads carried on other parts of the body result in higher energy expenditures: each kilogram added to the foot increases energy expenditure 7% to 10%; each kilogram added to the thigh increases energy expenditure 4%. Hip belts on rucksacks should be used whenever possible as they reduce pressure on the shoulders and increase comfort. Low or mid-back load placement might be preferable on uneven terrain but high load placement may be best for even terrain. In some tactical situations, combat load carts can be used, and these can considerably reduce energy expenditure and improve performance. Physical training that includes aerobic exercise, resistance training targeted at specific muscle groups, and regular road marching can considerably improve road marching speed and efficiency. The energy cost of walking with backpack loads increases progressively with increases in weight carried, body mass, walking speed, or grade; type of terrain also influences energy cost. Predictive equations have been developed, but these may not be accurate for prolonged load carriage. Common injuries associated with prolonged load carriage include foot blisters, stress fractures, back strains, metatarsalgia, rucksack palsy, and knee pain. Load carriage can be facilitated by lightening loads, improving load distribution, optimizing load-carriage equipment, and taking preventive action to reduce

  7. The link between organic aerosol mass loading and degree of oxygenation: an α-pinene photooxidation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffenberger, L.; Barmet, P.; Slowik, J. G.; Praplan, A. P.; Dommen, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2013-07-01

    A series of smog chamber (SC) experiments was conducted to identify factors responsible for the discrepancy between ambient and SC aerosol degree of oxygenation. An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer is used to compare mass spectra from α-pinene photooxidation with ambient aerosol. Composition is compared in terms of the fraction of particulate CO2+, a surrogate for carboxylic acids, vs. the fraction of C2H3O+, a surrogate for aldehydes, alcohols and ketones, as well as in the Van Krevelen space, where the evolution of the atomic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio (H : C) vs. the atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O : C) is investigated. Low (near-ambient) organic mass concentrations were found to be necessary to obtain oxygenation levels similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) commonly identified in ambient measurements. The effects of organic mass loading and OH (hydroxyl radical) exposure were decoupled by inter-experiment comparisons at the same integrated OH concentration. An OH exposure between 3 and 25 × 107 cm-3 h is needed to increase O : C by 0.05 during aerosol aging. For the first time, LV-OOA-like aerosol from the abundant biogenic precursor α-pinene was produced in a smog chamber by oxidation at typical atmospheric OH concentrations. Significant correlation between measured secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and reference LV-OOA mass spectra is shown by Pearson's R2 values larger than 0.90 for experiments with low organic mass concentrations between 1.2 and 18 μg m-3 at an OH exposure of 4 × 107 cm-3 h, corresponding to about two days of oxidation time in the atmosphere, based on a global mean OH concentration of ~ 1 × 106 cm-3. α-Pinene SOA is more oxygenated at low organic mass loadings. Because the degree of oxygenation influences the chemical, volatility and hygroscopic properties of ambient aerosol, smog chamber studies must be performed at near-ambient concentrations to accurately simulate

  8. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  9. The effect of organic loading rate on VFA/COD ratio for methane production from an EGSB reactor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yuan, Linjiang; Liu, Wenhui

    2015-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) on VFA/COD ratio for continuous production of methane using an expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactor for 200 d. Reactor performances were studied in treating high OLRs ranging from 4.91 +/- 0.54 to 16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1)d(-1) of glucose-based synthetic wastewater in a mesophilic condition. Results showed that performance of anaerobic fermentation system was distinctly influenced by OLR in terms of organic removal efficiency, VFA yield, methane production rate and system stability.Acetic and propionic acids accounted for 80-90% of total VFA, and presented highest VFA concentration and composition of VFA showed minor changes with OLR variation. Moreover, an increase in OLR increased VFA/COD ratio in the whole operation period and high VFA/COD ratio could inhibit methanogenesis at high OLR (16.79 +/- 1.62 g-COD l(-1) d(-1)). PMID:26364485

  10. Influence of varying compressive loading methods on physiologic motion patterns in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevin M; Yan, Yiguo; Debski, Richard E; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-25

    The human cervical spine supports substantial compressive load in-vivo arising from muscle forces and the weight of the head. However, the traditional in-vitro testing methods rarely include compressive loads, especially in investigations of multi-segment cervical spine constructs. Various methods of modeling physiologic loading have been reported in the literature including axial forces produced with inclined loading plates, eccentric axial force application, follower load, as well as attempts to individually apply/model muscle forces in-vitro. The importance of proper compressive loading to recreate the segmental motion patterns exhibited in-vivo has been highlighted in previous studies. However, appropriate methods of representing the weight of head and muscle loading are currently unknown. Therefore, a systematic comparison of standard pure moment with no compressive loading versus published and novel compressive loading techniques (follower load - FL, axial load - AL, and combined load - CL) was performed. The present study is unique in that a direct comparison to continuous cervical kinematics over the entire extension to flexion motion path was possible through an ongoing intra-institutional collaboration. The pure moment testing protocol without compression or with the application of follower load was not able to replicate the typical in-vivo segmental motion patterns throughout the entire motion path. Axial load or a combination of axial and follower load was necessary to mimic the in-vivo segmental contributions at the extremes of the extension-flexion motion path. It is hypothesized that dynamically altering the compressive loading throughout the motion path is necessary to mimic the segmental contribution patterns exhibited in-vivo. PMID:26708967

  11. Assessments at multiple levels of biological organization allow for an integrative determination of physiological tolerances to turbidity in an endangered fish species

    PubMed Central

    Hasenbein, Matthias; Fangue, Nann A.; Geist, Juergen; Komoroske, Lisa M.; Truong, Jennifer; McPherson, Rina; Connon, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Turbidity can influence trophic levels by altering species composition and can potentially affect fish feeding strategies and predator–prey interactions. The estuarine turbidity maximum, described as an area of increased suspended particles, phytoplankton and zooplankton, generally represents a zone with higher turbidity and enhanced food sources important for successful feeding and growth in many fish species. The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endangered, pelagic fish species endemic to the San Francisco Estuary and Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, USA, where it is associated with turbid waters. Turbidity is known to play an important role for the completion of the species' life cycle; however, turbidity ranges in the Delta are broad, and specific requirements for this fish species are still unknown. To evaluate turbidity requirements for early life stages, late-larval delta smelt were maintained at environmentally relevant turbidity levels ranging from 5 to 250 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) for 24 h, after which a combination of physiological endpoints (molecular biomarkers and cortisol), behavioural indices (feeding) and whole-organism measures (survival) were determined. All endpoints delivered consistent results and identified turbidities between 25 and 80 NTU as preferential. Delta smelt survival rates were highest between 12 and 80 NTU and feeding rates were highest between 25 and 80 NTU. Cortisol levels indicated minimal stress between 35 and 80 NTU and were elevated at low turbidities (5, 12 and 25 NTU). Expression of stress-related genes indicated significant responses for gst, hsp70 and glut2 in high turbidities (250 NTU), and principal component analysis on all measured genes revealed a clustering of 25, 35, 50 and 80 NTU separating the medium-turbidity treatments from low- and high-turbidity treatments. Taken together, these data demonstrate that turbidity levels that are either too low or too high affect

  12. Assessments at multiple levels of biological organization allow for an integrative determination of physiological tolerances to turbidity in an endangered fish species.

    PubMed

    Hasenbein, Matthias; Fangue, Nann A; Geist, Juergen; Komoroske, Lisa M; Truong, Jennifer; McPherson, Rina; Connon, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Turbidity can influence trophic levels by altering species composition and can potentially affect fish feeding strategies and predator-prey interactions. The estuarine turbidity maximum, described as an area of increased suspended particles, phytoplankton and zooplankton, generally represents a zone with higher turbidity and enhanced food sources important for successful feeding and growth in many fish species. The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endangered, pelagic fish species endemic to the San Francisco Estuary and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, USA, where it is associated with turbid waters. Turbidity is known to play an important role for the completion of the species' life cycle; however, turbidity ranges in the Delta are broad, and specific requirements for this fish species are still unknown. To evaluate turbidity requirements for early life stages, late-larval delta smelt were maintained at environmentally relevant turbidity levels ranging from 5 to 250 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) for 24 h, after which a combination of physiological endpoints (molecular biomarkers and cortisol), behavioural indices (feeding) and whole-organism measures (survival) were determined. All endpoints delivered consistent results and identified turbidities between 25 and 80 NTU as preferential. Delta smelt survival rates were highest between 12 and 80 NTU and feeding rates were highest between 25 and 80 NTU. Cortisol levels indicated minimal stress between 35 and 80 NTU and were elevated at low turbidities (5, 12 and 25 NTU). Expression of stress-related genes indicated significant responses for gst, hsp70 and glut2 in high turbidities (250 NTU), and principal component analysis on all measured genes revealed a clustering of 25, 35, 50 and 80 NTU separating the medium-turbidity treatments from low- and high-turbidity treatments. Taken together, these data demonstrate that turbidity levels that are either too low or too high affect delta

  13. Oxygen flux as an indicator of physiological stress in aquatic organisms: a real-time biomonitoring system of water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Brian C.; Yale, Gowri; Chatni, Rameez; Ochoa-Acuña, Hugo G.; Porterfield, D. Marshall; Mclamore, Eric S.; Sepúlveda, María S.

    2009-05-01

    The detection of harmful chemicals and biological agents in real time is a critical need for protecting water quality. We studied the real-time effects of five environmental contaminants with differing modes of action (atrazine, pentachlorophenol, cadmium chloride, malathion, and potassium cyanide) on respiratory oxygen consumption in 2-day post-fertilization fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) eggs. Our objective was to assess the sensitivity of fathead minnow eggs using the self-referencing micro-optrode technique to detect instantaneous changes in oxygen consumption after brief exposures to low concentrations of contaminants. Oxygen consumption data indicated that the technique is indeed sensitive enough to reliably detect physiological alterations induced by all contaminants. After 2 h of exposure, we identified significant increases in oxygen consumption upon exposure to pentachlorophenol (100 and 1000 μg/L), cadmium chloride (0.0002 and 0.002 μg/L), and atrazine (150 μg/L). In contrast, we observed a significant decrease in oxygen flux after exposures to potassium cyanide (5.2, 22, and 44 μg/L) and atrazine (1500 μg/L). No effects were detected after exposures to malathion (200 and 340 μg/L). We have also tested the sensitivity of Daphnia magna embryos as another animal model for real-time environmental biomonitoring. Our results are so far encouraging and support further development of this technology as a physiologically coupled biomonitoring tool for the detection of environmental toxicants.

  14. Survival strategies of polyphosphate accumulating organisms and glycogen accumulating organisms under conditions of low organic loading.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Mónica; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-11-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is usually limited by organic carbon availability in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) were operated under extended periods with low organic carbon loading in order to examine its impact on their activity and survival. The decrease in organic carbon load affected PAOs and GAOs in different ways, where the biomass decay rate of GAOs was approximately 4times higher than PAOs. PAOs tended to conserve a relatively high residual concentration of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under aerobic conditions, while GAOs tended to deplete their available PHA more rapidly. This slower oxidation rate of PHA by PAOs at residual concentration levels enabled them to maintain an energy source for aerobic maintenance processes for longer than GAOs. This may provide PAOs with an advantage over GAOs in surviving the low organic loading conditions commonly found in full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25270044

  15. Integrative Physiology: On Mapping the Organism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelberg, Joseph

    1983-01-01

    The physiological literature exhibits a variety of diagrammatic conventions to represent cause-and-effect relationships (organismal maps). One scheme, based on mathematical studies of physiological systems, is described. The scheme involves the use of solid and dotted arrows, the former representing stimulation, the latter inhibition. (JN)

  16. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks. We then describe the neural network important for circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, including how these molecular clocks might influence neuronal function. Finally, we address a range of behaviors and physiological systems regulated by circadian clocks, including discussion of specific peripheral oscillators and key molecular effectors where they have been described. These studies reveal a remarkable complexity to circadian pathways in this “simple” model organism. PMID:20148690

  17. The role of irrigation runoff and winter rainfall on dissolved organic carbon loads in an agricultural watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oh, Neung-Hwan; Pellerin, Brian A.; Bachand, Philip A.M.; Hernes, Peter J.; Bachand, Sandra M.; Ohara, Noriaki; Kavvas, M. Levent; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Horwath, William R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of land use/land cover and agriculture practices on stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) dynamics in the Willow Slough watershed (WSW) from 2006 to 2008. The 415 km2watershed in the northern Central Valley, California is covered by 31% of native vegetation and the remaining 69% of agricultural fields (primarily alfalfa, tomatoes, and rice). Stream discharge and weekly DOC concentrations were measured at eight nested subwatersheds to estimate the DOC loads and yields (loads/area) using the USGS developed stream load estimation model, LOADEST. Stream DOC concentrations peaked at 18.9 mg L−1 during summer irrigation in the subwatershed with the highest percentage of agricultural land use, demonstrating the strong influence of agricultural activities on summer DOC dynamics. These high concentrations contributed to DOC yields increasing up to 1.29 g m−2 during the 6 month period of intensive agricultural activity. The high DOC yields from the most agricultural subwatershed during the summer irrigation period was similar throughout the study, suggesting that summer DOC loads from irrigation runoff would not change significantly in the absence of major changes in crops or irrigation practices. In contrast, annual DOC yields varied from 0.89 to 1.68 g m−2 yr−1 for the most agricultural watershed due to differences in winter precipitation. This suggests that variability in the annual DOC yields will be largely determined by the winter precipitation, which can vary significantly from year to year. Changes in precipitation patterns and intensities as well as agricultural practices have potential to considerably alter the DOC dynamics.

  18. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - women.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania

    2015-01-01

    "Anatomy is destiny": Sigmund Freud viewed human anatomy as a necessary, although not a sufficient, condition for understanding the complexity of human sexual function with a solid biologic basis. The aim of the chapter is to describe women's genital anatomy and physiology, focusing on women's sexual function with a clinically oriented vision. Key points include: embryology, stressing that the "female" is the anatomic "default" program, differentiated into "male" only in the presence of androgens at physiologic levels for the gestational age; sex determination and sex differentiation, describing the interplay between anatomic and endocrine factors; the "clitoral-urethral-vaginal" complex, the most recent anatomy reading of the corpora cavernosa pattern in women; the controversial G spot; the role of the pelvic floor muscles in modulating vaginal receptivity and intercourse feelings, with hyperactivity leading to introital dyspareunia and contributing to provoked vestibulodynia and recurrent postcoital cystitis, whilst lesions during delivery reduce vaginal sensations, genital arousability, and orgasm; innervation, vessels, bones, ligaments; and the physiology of women's sexual response. Attention to physiologic aging focuses on "low-grade inflammation," genital and systemic, with its impact on women sexual function, especially after the menopause, if the woman does not or cannot use hormone replacement therapy. PMID:26003238

  19. [Physiological evaluation of clothing made of new material for protection against the solar heat load].

    PubMed

    Watanuki, S; Hiraoka, M; Doi, T; Kiyokawa, H

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of clothing made of a new material that is, the polyester staple containing the ceramics and to reflect the solar heat load on physiological responses during rest, exercise (50% VO2max) and recovery on a cycle ergometer. Six young female subjects exposed their back to an artificial solar heat load of an intensity of 680 kcal/m2/h with an air temperature of 30 degrees C. The data were compared to those obtained by wearing clothing made of cotton material. The results were as follows. The cardiac output and oxygen consumption obtained at the end of recovery were increased by solar heat load when the subjects wore cotton material. However, these values showed no significant increase when the subjects wore solar heat reflecting clothing. Furthermore, the cardiac output at the end of submaximal work and recovery were higher for the cotton material compared to the heat reflecting clothing in the solar heat load. The increase of cardiac output for the cotton material may show the increase of skin blood flow for the body heat dissipation. Those results suggest that the solar heat reflecting clothing may decrease the physiological strain like a blood redistribution for the body heat dissipation during exercise in summer sunlight. PMID:1476560

  20. Quantification and simulation of layer-specific mitral valve interstitial cells deformation under physiological loading

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Carruthers, Christopher A.; Ayoub, Salma; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Within each of the four layers of mitral valve (MV) leaflet tissues there resides a heterogeneous population of interstitial cells that maintain the structural integrity of the MV tissue via protein biosynthesis and enzymatic degradation. There is increasing evidence that tissue stress-induced MV interstitial cell (MVIC) deformations can have deleterious effects on their biosynthetic states that are potentially related to the reduction of tissue-level maintenance and to subsequent organ-level failure. To better understand the interrelationships between tissue-level loading and cellular responses, we developed the following integrated experimental-computational approach. Since in-vivo cellular deformations are not directly measurable, we quantified the in-situ layer-specific MVIC deformations for each of the four layers under a controlled biaxial tension loading device coupled to multi-photon microscopy. Next, we explored the interrelationship between the MVIC stiffness and deformation to layer-specific tissue mechanical and structural properties using a macro-micro finite element computational model. Experimental results indicated that the MVICs in the fibrosa and ventricularis layers deformed significantly more than those in the atrialis and spongiosa layers, reaching a nucleus aspect ratio of 3.3 under an estimated maximum physiological tension of 150 N/m. The simulated MVIC moduli for the four layers were found to be all within a narrow range of 4.71–5.35 kPa, suggesting that MVIC deformation is primarily controlled by each tissue layer’s respective structure and mechanical behavior rather than the intrinsic MVIC stiffness. This novel result further suggests that while the MVICs may be phenotypically and biomechanically similar throughout the leaflet, they experience layer-specific mechanical stimulatory inputs due to distinct extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical behaviors of the four MV leaflet tissue layers. This also suggests that MVICs may

  1. Quantification and simulation of layer-specific mitral valve interstitial cells deformation under physiological loading.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Carruthers, Christopher A; Ayoub, Salma; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-05-21

    Within each of the four layers of mitral valve (MV) leaflet tissues there resides a heterogeneous population of interstitial cells that maintain the structural integrity of the MV tissue via protein biosynthesis and enzymatic degradation. There is increasing evidence that tissue stress-induced MV interstitial cell (MVIC) deformations can have deleterious effects on their biosynthetic states that are potentially related to the reduction of tissue-level maintenance and to subsequent organ-level failure. To better understand the interrelationships between tissue-level loading and cellular responses, we developed the following integrated experimental-computational approach. Since in vivo cellular deformations are not directly measurable, we quantified the in-situ layer-specific MVIC deformations for each of the four layers under a controlled biaxial tension loading device coupled to multi-photon microscopy. Next, we explored the interrelationship between the MVIC stiffness and deformation to layer-specific tissue mechanical and structural properties using a macro-micro finite element computational model. Experimental results indicated that the MVICs in the fibrosa and ventricularis layers deformed significantly more than those in the atrialis and spongiosa layers, reaching a nucleus aspect ratio of 3.3 under an estimated maximum physiological tension of 150N/m. The simulated MVIC moduli for the four layers were found to be all within a narrow range of 4.71-5.35kPa, suggesting that MVIC deformation is primarily controlled by each tissue layer's respective structure and mechanical behavior rather than the intrinsic MVIC stiffness. This novel result further suggests that while the MVICs may be phenotypically and biomechanically similar throughout the leaflet, they experience layer-specific mechanical stimulatory inputs due to distinct extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical behaviors of the four MV leaflet tissue layers. This also suggests that MVICs may behave

  2. The effect of organic load and feed strategy on biohydrogen production in an AnSBBR treating glycerin-based wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lovato, G; Moncayo Bravo, I S; Ratusznei, S M; Rodrigues, J A D; Zaiat, M

    2015-05-01

    An anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) with recirculation of the liquid phase (at 30 °C with 3.5 L of working volume and treating 1.5 L per cycle) treating pure glycerin-based wastewater was applied to biohydrogen production. The applied volumetric organic load (AVOL) ranged from 7.7 to 17.1 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1), combining different influent concentrations (3000, 4000 and 5000 mgCOD L(-1)) and cycle lengths (4 and 3 h). The feed strategy used was to maintain the feeding time equal to half of the cycle time. The increase in the influent concentration and the decrease in cycle length improved the molar yield and molar productivity of hydrogen. The highest productivity (100.8 molH2 m(-3) d(-1)) and highest yield of hydrogen per load removed (20.0 molH2 kgCOD(-1)) were reached when the reactor operated with an AVOL of 17.1 kgCOD m(-3) d(-1), with 68% of H2 and only 3% of CH4 in its biogas. It was also found that pretreatment of the sludge/inoculum does not influence the productivity/yield of the process and the use of crude industrial glycerin-based wastewater in relation to the pure glycerol-based wastewater substantially decreased the production and composition of the hydrogen produced. PMID:25721980

  3. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - men.

    PubMed

    Clement, Pierre; Giuliano, François

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual functions involve a number of organs and structures in genitalia whose role is to produce fertilizing gametes and to allow female-partner insemination. The testes belong to the reproductive and endocrine systems as they synthesize spermatozoa and androgens, and are under finely regulated hormonal control by the hypothalamopituitary axis. Sexual responses are controlled by a complex and coordinated interplay of both the somatic and the autonomic nervous system in multiple components of the brain, spinal cord, and relevant peripheral organs. Erectile bodies are an essential element of the penis and engorgement of the penis with blood leads to penile tumescence. Blood engorgement is due to relaxation of smooth-muscle cells of erectile tissue and endothelium of the penile arteries. The penis gains additional rigidity when the ischiocavernosus muscles contract. Stimuli from peripheral and/or central origins activate particular spinal nuclei, causing penile erection. Ejaculation consists of two phases, emission and expulsion, which correspond, respectively, to secretion of the different components of the semen by sex glands and forceful expulsion of semen due to rhythmic contractions of the bulbospongiosus muscle. A spinal generator of ejaculation integrates genital stimuli and sexual cues and, when the excitatory threshold is reached, triggers ejaculation by orchestrating the activation of autonomic and somatic pathways commanding the peripheral events of ejaculation. PMID:26003237

  4. Measuring Cognitive Load: A Comparison of Self-Report and Physiological Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Stacey

    2013-01-01

    This study explored three methods to measure cognitive load in a learning environment using four logic puzzles that systematically varied in level of intrinsic cognitive load. Participants' perceived intrinsic load was simultaneously measured with a self-report measure-a traditional subjective measure-and two objective, physiological measures…

  5. Physiological Signal Monitoring Bed for Infants Based on Load-Cell Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyu; Yoon, Heenam; Han, Chungmin; Joo, Kwang Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Ballistocardiographs (BCGs), which record the mechanical activity of the heart, have been a subject of interest for several years because of their advantages in providing unobtrusive physiological measurements. BCGs could also be useful for monitoring the biological signals of infants without the need for physical confinement. In this study, we describe a physiological signal monitoring bed based on load cells and assess an algorithm to extract the heart rate and breathing rate from the measured load-cell signals. Four infants participated in a total of 13 experiments. As a reference signal, electrocardiogram and respiration signals were simultaneously measured using a commercial device. The proposed automatic algorithm then selected the optimal sensor from which to estimate the heartbeat and respiration information. The results from the load-cell sensor signals were compared with those of the reference signals, and the heartbeat and respiration information were found to have average performance errors of 2.55% and 2.66%, respectively. The experimental results verify the positive feasibility of BCG-based measurements in infants. PMID:27007378

  6. High organic loading rate on thermophilic hydrogen production and metagenomic study at an anaerobic packed-bed reactor treating a residual liquid stream of a Brazilian biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ferraz Júnior, Antônio Djalma Nunes; Etchebehere, Claudia; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a high organic loading rate (OLR) on thermophilic hydrogen production at an up-flow anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) treating a residual liquid stream of a Brazilian biorefinery. The APBR, filled with low-density polyethylene, was operated at an OLR of 84.2 kg-COD m(-3) d(-1). This value was determined in a previous study. The maximum values of hydrogen production and yield were 5,252.6 mL-H2 d(-1) and 3.7 mol-H2 mol(-1)(total carbohydrates), respectively. However, whereas the OLR remained constant, the specific organic load rate (sOLR) decreased throughout operation from 1.38 to 0.72 g-Total carbohydratesg-VS(-1) h(-1), this decrease negatively affected hydrogen production. A sOLR of 0.98 g-Total carbohydratesg-VS(-1) h(-1) was optimal for hydrogen production. The microbial community was studied using 454-pyrosequencing analysis. Organisms belonging to the genera Caloramator, Clostridium, Megasphaera, Oxobacter, Thermoanaerobacterium, and Thermohydrogenium were detected in samples taken from the reactor at operation days 30 and 60, suggesting that these organisms contribute to hydrogen production. PMID:25812810

  7. A Female Ligamentous Cervical Spine Finite Element Model Validated for Physiological Loads.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Svensson, Mats Y; Linder, Astrid

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical cervical spine models allow for studying of impact loading that can cause whiplash associated disorders (WAD). However, existing models only cover the male anthropometry, despite the female population being at a higher risk of sustaining WAD in automotive rear-end impacts. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a ligamentous cervical spine intended for biomechanical research on the effect of automotive impacts. A female model has the potential to aid the design of better protection systems as well as improve understanding of injury mechanisms causing WAD. A finite element (FE) mesh was created from surface data of the cervical vertebrae of a 26-year old female (stature 167 cm, weight 59 kg). Soft tissues were generated from the skeletal geometry and anatomical literature descriptions. Ligaments were modeled with nonlinear elastic orthotropic membrane elements, intervertebral disks as composites of nonlinear elastic bulk elements, and orthotropic anulus fibrosus fiber layers, while cortical and trabecular bones were modeled as isotropic plastic-elastic. The model has geometrical features representative of the female cervical spine-the largest average difference compared with published anthropometric female data was the vertebral body depth being 3.4% shorter for the model. The majority the cervical segments compare well with respect to biomechanical data at physiological loads, with the best match for flexion-extension loads and less biofidelity for axial rotation. An average female FE ligamentous cervical spine model was developed and validated with respect to physiological loading. In flexion-extension simulations with the developed female model and an existing average male cervical spine model, a greater range of motion (ROM) was found in the female model. PMID:26974520

  8. Applied physiology of female soccer: an update.

    PubMed

    Datson, Naomi; Hulton, Andrew; Andersson, Helena; Lewis, Tracy; Weston, Matthew; Drust, Barry; Gregson, Warren

    2014-09-01

    The popularity and professionalism of female soccer has increased markedly in recent years, with elite players now employed on either a professional or semi-professional basis. The previous review of the physiological demands of female soccer was undertaken two decades ago when the sport was in its relative infancy. Increased research coupled with greater training and competition demands warrants an updated review to consider the effect on physical performance and injury patterns. The physical demands of match-play along with the influence of factors such as the standard of competition, playing position and fatigue have been explored. Total distance covered for elite female players is approximately 10 km, with 1.7 km completed at high speed (>15 kmh(-1)) [corrected].Elite players complete 28% more high-speed running and 24 % more sprinting than moderate-level players. Decrements in high-speed running distance have been reported between and within halves, which may indicate an inability to maintain high-intensity activity. Although the physical capacity of female players is the most thoroughly researched area, comparisons are difficult due to differing protocols. Elite players exhibit maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) values of 49.4-57.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Yo Yo Intermittent Endurance test level 2 (YYIE2) scores of 1,774 ± 532 m [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] and 20 m sprint times of 3.17 ± 0.03 s (mean ± SD). Reasons for the increased prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females (2-6 times greater than males) are discussed, with anatomical, biomechanical loading and neuromuscular activation differences being cited in the literature. This review presents an in-depth contemporary examination of the applied physiology of the female soccer player. PMID:24803162

  9. Arterial load and ventricular-arterial coupling: physiologic relations with body size and effect of obesity.

    PubMed

    Chirinos, Julio A; Rietzschel, Ernst R; De Buyzere, Marc L; De Bacquer, Dirk; Gillebert, Thierry C; Gupta, Amit K; Segers, Patrick

    2009-09-01

    Accurate quantification of arterial function is crucial to distinguishing disease states from normal variants. However, there are little data regarding methods to scale arterial load to body size in humans. We studied 2365 adults aged 35 to 55 years free of overt cardiovascular disease. We assessed arterial hemodynamics and ventricular-vascular coupling with carotid tonometry and Doppler echocardiography. To define normal (physiological) relationships between hemodynamic indices and body size, we used nonlinear regression to analyze a selected reference subsample (n=612) with normal weight (body mass index 18 to 25 kg/m(2)), waist circumference, and metabolic parameters. Most arterial hemodynamic indices demonstrated important relationships with body size, which were frequently allometric (nonlinear). Allometric indexation using appropriate powers (but not ratiometric indexation) effectively eliminated the relationships between indices of arterial load and body size in normal subjects. In the entire sample (n=2365), the adverse effects of obesity on arterial load and end-systolic ventricular stiffening were clearly demonstrated only after appropriate indexation to account for the expected normal relationship to body size. After adjustment for age and sex, a progressive increase in indexed systemic vascular resistance, effective arterial and ventricular end-systolic elastance, and a decrease in total arterial compliance were seen from normal weight to obesity (P<0.0001). Arterial load relates to body size in an allometric fashion, calling for scaling with the use of appropriate powers. Obesity exerts adverse effects on arterial load and ventricular stiffening that go beyond the normal relationship with body size. Allometric normalization should allow more accurate quantification of arterial load in future studies. PMID:19581507

  10. Development and Validation of a Bioreactor System for Dynamic Loading and Mechanical Characterization of Whole Human Intervertebral Discs in Organ Culture

    PubMed Central

    Walter, BA; Illien-Junger, S; Nasser, P; Hecht, AC; Iatridis, JC

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common cause of back pain, and attempts to develop therapies are frustrated by lack of model systems that mimic the human condition. Human IVD organ culture models can address this gap, yet current models are limited since vertebral endplates are removed to maintain cell viability, physiological loading is not applied, and mechanical behaviors are not measured. This study aimed to (i) establish a method for isolating human IVDs from autopsy with intact vertebral endplates, and (ii) develop and validate an organ culture loading system for human or bovine IVDs. Human IVDs with intact endplates were isolated from cadavers within 48 hours of death and cultured for up to 21 days. IVDs remained viable with ~80% cell viability in nucleus and annulus regions. A dynamic loading system was designed and built with the capacity to culture 9 bovine or 6 human IVDs simultaneously while applying simulated physiologic loads (maximum force: 4kN) and measuring IVD mechanical behaviors. The loading system accurately applied dynamic loading regimes (RMS error <2.5N and total harmonic distortion <2.45%), and precisely evaluated mechanical behavior of rubber and bovine IVDs. Bovine IVDs maintained their mechanical behavior and retained >85% viable cells throughout the 3 week culture period. This organ culture loading system can closely mimic physiological conditions and be used to investigate response of living human and bovine IVDs to mechanical and chemical challenges and to screen therapeutic repair techniques. PMID:24725441

  11. Loading-Induced Heat-Shock Response in Bovine Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Samantha Chun Wai; Gantenbein, Benjamin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading has been shown to affect cell viability and matrix maintenance in the intervertebral disc (IVD) but there is no investigation on how cells survive mechanical stress and whether the IVD cells perceive mechanical loading as stress and respond by expression of heat shock proteins. This study investigates the stress response in the IVD in response to compressive loading. Bovine caudal disc organ culture was used to study the effect of physiological range static loading and dynamic loading. Cell activity, gene expression and immunofluorescence staining were used to analyze the cell response. Cell activity and cytoskeleton of the cells did not change significantly after loading. In gene expression analysis, significant up-regulation of heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) was observed in nucleus pulposus after two hours of loading. However, the expression of the matrix remodeling genes did not change significantly after loading. Similarly, expressions of stress response and matrix remodeling genes changed with application and removal of the dynamic loading. The results suggest that stress response was induced by physiological range loading without significantly changing cell activity and upregulating matrix remodeling. This study provides direct evidence on loading induced stress response in IVD cells and contributes to our understanding in the mechanoregulation of intervertebral disc cells. PMID:27580124

  12. Toward quantitative proteomics of organ substructures: implications for renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Velic, Ana; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Carsten A

    2010-09-01

    Organs are complex structures that consist of multiple tissues with different levels of gene expression. To achieve comprehensive coverage and accurate quantitation data, organs ideally should be separated into morphologic and/or functional substructures before gene or protein expression analysis. However, because of complex morphology and elaborate isolation protocols, to date this often has been difficult to achieve. Kidneys are organs in which functional and morphologic subdivision is especially important. Each subunit of the kidney, the nephron, consists of more than 10 subsegments with distinct morphologic and functional characteristics. For a full understanding of kidney physiology, global gene and protein expression analyses have to be performed at the level of the nephron subsegments; however, such studies have been extremely rare to date. Here we describe the latest approaches in quantitative high-accuracy mass spectrometry-based proteomics and their application to quantitative proteomics studies of the whole kidney and nephron subsegments, both in human beings and in animal models. We compare these studies with similar studies performed on other organ substructures. We argue that the newest technologies used for preparation, processing, and measurement of small amounts of starting material are finally enabling global and subsegment-specific quantitative measurement of protein levels in the kidney and other organs. These new technologies and approaches are making a decisive impact on our understanding of the (patho)physiological processes at the molecular level. PMID:21044760

  13. An overview of gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, Jaime; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this review is on the response of humans and animals to the effects of the near weightless condition occurring aboard orbiting spacecraft. Gravity is an omnipresent force that has been a constant part of our lives and of the evolution of all living species. Emphasis is placed on the general mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravitational fields and vectors, i.e., both hypo- and hypergravity. A broad literature review of gravitational biology was conducted and the general state of our knowledge in this area is discussed. The review is specifically targeted at newcomers to the exciting and relatively new area of space and gravitational biology.

  14. An update on iron physiology

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Villar, Isabel; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for adequate erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune responses. Although the absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/d) is regulated tightly, it is just balanced with losses. Therefore, internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/d). Increased iron requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss may lead to iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia. Hepcidin, which is made primarily in hepatocytes in response to liver iron levels, inflammation, hypoxia and anemia, is the main iron regulatory hormone. Once secreted into the circulation, hepcidin binds ferroportin on enterocytes and macrophages, which triggers its internalization and lysosomal degradation. Thus, in chronic inflammation, the excess of hepcidin decreases iron absorption and prevents iron recycling, which results in hypoferremia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis, despite normal iron stores (functional ID), and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), which can evolve to ACD plus true ID (ACD + ID). In contrast, low hepcidin expression may lead to iron overload, and vice versa. Laboratory tests provide evidence of iron depletion in the body, or reflect iron-deficient red cell production. The appropriate combination of these laboratory tests help to establish a correct diagnosis of ID status and anemia. PMID:19787824

  15. Exploratory study of reactivity in organic compounds subjected to shock loading. [Diphenylhexadiyne

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    An exploratory study of chemical reactions occurring in organic compounds under shock loading has been carried out. Early results on shock reactivity of the organic compounds acrylamide, adamantane, hexamethylenetetramine, naphthalene, and 1,6-diphenyl-2,4-hexadiyne have established two points: (1) organic reactions occur under shock loading; and (2) chemical structure strongly influences shock reactivity.

  16. Effects of +Gz Loads on Structural Organization of Central Autonomic Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Sukhoterin, A F; Pashchenko, P S

    2015-09-01

    Structural alterations in the central autonomic nuclei (dorsal vagal complex and intermediolateral nucleus) of the centrifuged random-bred male rats subjected to +Gz loads were examined. Acute exposure to gravitational loads predominantly produced the reactive changes in these nuclei, while persistently repeated regular loads resulted in cumulation of the destructive alterations. The structural perturbations in the central autonomic nuclei can disturb the autonomic regulation of physiological functions. The character of such disturbances is partially determined by the peculiarities in structural organization of these nuclei. PMID:26463057

  17. Physiological and performance consequences of heavy thoracic load carriage in females.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Devin B; Stickland, Michael K; Petersen, Stewart R

    2016-07-01

    The purposes of this experiment were to study physiological responses to graded exercise to exhaustion (Part I) and ventilatory responses during 45 min of exercise (Part II) with and without a 25-kg backpack. In Part I, on separate days, 24 females completed randomly ordered modified Balke treadmill tests. Analysis revealed significant decreases in absolute peak oxygen uptake (3.5%), peak power output (20%), and test duration (40%) under load. There was a significant but modest negative relationship between body mass and the change in test duration between conditions (r = -0.44). While physiological responses to peak exercise were similar, exercise performance was negatively impacted under load. On separate days in Part II, 14 females completed randomly ordered, loaded and unloaded exercise challenges of submaximal treadmill walking at matched oxygen demands. Under load, breathing frequency, dead space, and minute ventilation were increased by 19.9%, 29.8%, and 11.6% (P < 0.05), respectively, while tidal volume and end-inspiratory lung volume decreased by 13.6% and 6.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. After loaded exercise, maximal inspiratory pressure was decreased by 11.5% (P < 0.05) with no changes in maximal expiratory pressure in either condition. Despite matched oxygen uptake between loaded and unloaded exercise challenges, perceived exertion and breathing discomfort were higher (P < 0.05) under load. With heavy load carriage, the altered breathing pattern led to increased dead space and minute ventilation, which likely contributed to higher perceptions of exercise stress and breathing discomfort. These results are similar to previous research in males and underscore the impact of heavy load carriage during exercise. PMID:27337671

  18. Using Physiological Metaphors to Understand and Lead Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, William; Hostiuck, Katherine; Johnson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual paper suggests and elaborates on the use of physiological metaphors pertaining to the systems and parts of the body as an approach for fostering an understanding of organizational theories among students of educational administration. The importance of this pursuit is related to the recognition that the students often reject the…

  19. Chromatographic analysis of amino and organic acids in physiological fluids to detect inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Woontner, Michael; Goodman, Stephen I

    2006-11-01

    This unit describes methods for the preparation of samples for analysis of physiological amino acids and organic acids. Amino acids are analyzed by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated system. Organic acids are analyzed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Analysis of amino and organic acids is necessary to detect and monitor the treatment of many inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:18428392

  20. Arabic Phonology: An Acoustical and Physiological Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ani, Salman H.

    This book presents an acoustical and physiological Investigation of contemporary standard Arabic as spoken in Iraq. Spectrograms and X-ray sound films are used to perform the analysis for the study. With this equipment, the author considers the vowels, consonants, pharyngealized consonants, pharyngeals and glottals, duration, gemination, and…

  1. The application of an innovative continuous multiple tube reactor as a strategy to control the specific organic loading rate for biohydrogen production by dark fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Simone D; Fuess, Lucas T; Penteado, Eduardo D; Lucas, Shaiane D M; Gotardo, Jackeline T; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Biohydrogen production in fixed-bed reactors often leads to unstable and decreasing patterns because the excessive accumulation of biomass in the bed negatively affects the specific organic loading rate (SOLR) applied to the reactor. In this context, an innovative reactor configuration, i.e., the continuous multiple tube reactor (CMTR), was assessed in an attempt to better control the SOLR for biohydrogen production. The CMTR provides a continuous discharge of biomass, preventing the accumulation of solids in the long-term. Sucrose was used as the carbon source and mesophilic temperature conditions (25°C) were applied in three continuous assays. The reactor showed better performance when support material was placed in the outlet chamber to enhance biomass retention within the reactor. Although the SOLR could not be effectively controlled, reaching values usually higher than 10gsucroseg(-1)VSSd(-1), the volumetric hydrogen production and molar hydrogen production rates peaked, respectively, at 1470mLH2L(-1)d(-1) and 45mmolH2d(-1), indicating that the CMTR was a suitable configuration for biohydrogen production. PMID:26340028

  2. [Anatomy, biology, physiology and basic pathology of the nail organ].

    PubMed

    Haneke, E

    2014-04-01

    The nail is the largest skin appendage. It grows continuously through life in a non-cyclical manner; its growth is not hormone-dependent. The nail of the middle finger of the dominant hand grows fastest with approximately 0.1 mm/day, whereas the big toe nail grows only 0.03-0.05 mm/d. The nails' size and shape vary characteristically from finger to finger and from toe to toe, for which the size and shape of the bone of the terminal phalanx is responsible. The nail apparatus consists of both epithelial and connective tissue components. The matrix epithelium is responsible for the production of the nail plate whereas the nail bed epithelium mediates firm attachment. The hyponychium is a specialized structure sealing the subungual space and allowing the nail plate to physiologically detach from the nail bed. The proximal nail fold covers most of the matrix. Its free end forms the cuticle which seals the nail pocket or cul-de-sac. The dermis of the matrix and nail bed is specialized with a morphogenetic potency. The proximal and lateral nail folds form a frame on three sides giving the nail stability and allowing it to grow out. The nail protects the distal phalanx, is an extremely versatile tool for defense and dexterity and increases the sensitivity of the tip of the finger. Nail apparatus, finger tip, tendons and ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint form a functional unit and cannot be seen independently. The nail organ has only a certain number of reaction patterns that differ in many respects from hairy and palmoplantar skin. PMID:24718505

  3. Biaxial Mechanical Evaluation of Absorbable and Nonabsorbable Synthetic Surgical Meshes Used for Hernia Repair: Physiological Loads Modify Anisotropy Response.

    PubMed

    Cordero, A; Hernández-Gascón, B; Pascual, G; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B; Peña, E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the mechanical properties of six meshes commonly used for hernia repair (Surgipro(®), Optilene(®), Infinit(®), DynaMesh(®), Ultrapro™ and TIGR(®)) by planar biaxial tests. Stress-stretch behavior and equibiaxial stiffness were evaluated, and the anisotropy was determined by testing. In particular, equibiaxial test (equal simultaneous loading in both directions) and biaxial test (half of the load in one direction following the Laplace law) were selected as a representation of physiologically relevant loads. The majority of the meshes displayed values in the range of 8 and 18 (N/mm) in each direction for equibiaxial stiffness (tangent modulus under equibiaxial load state in both directions), while a few achieved 28 and 50 (N/mm) (Infinit (®) and TIGR (®)). Only the Surgipro (®) mesh exhibited planar isotropy, with similar mechanical properties regardless of the direction of loading, and an anisotropy ratio of 1.18. Optilene (®), DynaMesh (®), Ultrapro (®) and TIGR (®) exhibited moderate anisotropy with ratios of 1.82, 1.84, 2.17 and 1.47, respectively. The Infinit (®) scaffold exhibited very high anisotropy with a ratio of 3.37. These trends in material anisotropic response changed during the physiological state in the human abdominal wall, i.e. T:0.5T test, which the meshes were loaded in one direction with half the load used in the other direction. The Surgipro (®) mesh increased its anisotropic response (Anis[Formula: see text] = 0.478) and the materials that demonstrated moderate and high anisotropic responses during multiaxial testing presented a quasi-isotropic response, especially the Infinit(®) mesh that decreased its anisotropic response from 3.369 to 1.292. PMID:26620778

  4. Septin functions in organ system physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dolat, Lee; Hu, Qicong; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2014-02-01

    Human septins comprise a family of 13 genes that encode for >30 protein isoforms with ubiquitous and tissue-specific expressions. Septins are GTP-binding proteins that assemble into higher-order oligomers and filamentous polymers, which associate with cell membranes and the cytoskeleton. In the last decade, much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical properties and cell biological functions of septins. In parallel, a growing number of studies show that septins play important roles for the development and physiology of specific tissues and organs. Here, we review the expression and function of septins in the cardiovascular, immune, nervous, urinary, digestive, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, and integumentary organ systems. Furthermore, we discuss how the tissue-specific functions of septins relate to the pathology of human diseases that arise from aberrations in septin expression. PMID:24114910

  5. Septin functions in organ system physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Dolat, Lee; Hu, Qicong

    2015-01-01

    Human septins comprise a family of 13 genes that encode for >30 protein isoforms with ubiquitous and tissue-specific expressions. Septins are GTP-binding proteins that assemble into higher-order oligomers and filamentous polymers, which associate with cell membranes and the cytoskeleton. In the last decade, much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical properties and cell biological functions of septins. In parallel, a growing number of studies show that septins play important roles for the development and physiology of specific tissues and organs. Here, we review the expression and function of septins in the cardiovascular, immune, nervous, urinary, digestive, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive, and integumentary organ systems. Furthermore, we discuss how the tissue-specific functions of septins relate to the pathology of human diseases that arise from aberrations in septin expression. PMID:24114910

  6. The Effects of Using a Ramp and Elevator to Load and Unload Trailers on the Behavior and Physiology of Piglets

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, John; Sapkota, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Transport is a routine practice in the modern swine industry. Loading the pigs into trailers can be a novel and stressful experience for the animals. This study compared behaviors and physiological variables during and after loading using a ramp or elevator to determine which method is the least stressful to the pigs. Loading pigs by ramp appears to cause more stress than loading by elevator. Abstract Transport is an inevitable process in the modern U.S. swine industry. The loading process is a novel and potentially stressful experience. This study uses behavior, heart rate and leukocyte counts to compare stress one hour before, during and after loading via ramp or elevator. Piglets were held in a home pen (control (CON)), walked up and down an aisle (handled (HAN)), or walked to a truck and loaded via elevator (ELE) or ramp (RAM). Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05). Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05). After treatment, drinking behavior was increased in RAM piglets (p < 0.05). The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05). In terms of heart rate, loading by elevator appears to be less stressful than loading by ramp. PMID:26480323

  7. Prediction of diffuse organic micropollutant loads in streams under changing climatic, socio-economic and technical boundary conditions with an integrated transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honti, Mark; Schuwirth, Nele; Rieckermann, Jörg; Ghielmetti, Nico; Stamm, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Catchments are complex systems where water quantity, quality and the ecological services provided are determined by interacting physical, chemical, biological, economical and social factors. The realization of these interactions led to the prevailing catchment management paradigm: Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). IWRM requires considering all these aspects during the design of sustainable resource utilization. Due to the complexity of this task, mathematical modeling plays a key role in IWRM, namely in the evaluation of the impacts of hypothetical scenarios and management measures. Toxicity is a key determinant of the ecological state and as such a focal point in IWRM, but we still have significant knowledge gaps about the diffuse loads of organic micropollutants (OMP) that leak from both urban and agricultural areas. Most European catchments possess mixed land use, containing rural (natural and agricultural) landscapes and settlements in varying proportions. Thus, a catchment model supporting IWRM must be able to cope with both classes. However, the majority of existing catchment models is dedicated to either rural or urban areas, while the minority capable of simulating both contain overly simplified descriptions for either land use category. We applied a conceptual model that describes all major land use classes for assessing the impacts of climate change, socio-economic development and management alternatives on diffuse OMP loads. We simulated the loads of 12 compounds (agricultural and urban pesticides and urban biocides) with daily resolution at 11 locations in the stream network of a small catchment (46 km2) in Switzerland. The model considers all important diffuse transport pathways separately, but each with a simple empirical process rate. Consequently, some site-specific observations were required to calibrate rate parameters. We assessed uncertainty during both calibration and prediction phases. Predictions indicated that future OMP loads

  8. Influence of the organic loading rate on the performance and the granular sludge characteristics of an EGSB reactor used for treating traditional Chinese medicine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguang; Su, Chengyuan; Liu, Xingzhe; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the organic loading rate (OLR) on the performance and the granular sludge characteristics of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor used for treating real traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) wastewater were investigated. Over 90% of the COD removal by the EGSB reactor was observed at the OLRs of 4 to 13 kg COD/(m(3) day). However, increasing the OLR to 20 kg COD/(m(3) day) by reducing the hydraulic retention time (HRT 6 h) reduced the COD removal efficiency to 78%. The volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration was 512.22 mg/L, resulting in an accumulation of VFAs, and propionic acid was the main acidification product, accounting for 66.51% of the total VFAs. When the OLR increased from 10 to 20 kg COD/(m(3) day), the average size of the granule sludge decreased from 469 to 258 μm. There was an obvious reduction in the concentration of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in the granular sludge. The visible humic acid-like peak was identified in the three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra of the soluble microbial products (SMPs). The fatty acid bond, amide II bond, amide III bond, and C-H bond bending were also observed in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the SMPs. Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus, and Bacteria populations exhibited significant shifts, and these changes were accompanied by an increase in VFA production. The results indicated that a short HRT and high OLR in the EGSB reactor caused the accumulation of polysaccharides, protein, and VFAs, thereby inhibiting the activity of methanogenic bacteria and causing granular sludge corruption. PMID:24677060

  9. Evaluation of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biochemical and Mechanical Properties of Trypsin-Treated Intervertebral Discs Under Physiological Compression Loading

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Demers, Caroline N.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Beaudoin, Gilles; Goswami, Tapas; Beckman, Lorne; Iatridis, James C.; Antoniou, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of targeted trypsin digestion and 16 hours compression loading on MR parameters and the mechanical and biochemical properties of bovine disc segments. Materials and Methods Twenty-two 3-disc bovine coccygeal segments underwent compression loading for 16 hours after the nucleus pulposus (NP) of each disc was injected with a solution of trypsin or buffer. The properties of the NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) tissues of each disc were analyzed by quantitative MRI, biochemical tests, and confined compression tests. Results Loading had a significant effect on the MR properties (T1, T2, T1ρ, MTR, ADC) of both the NP and AF tissues. Loading had a greater effect on the MR parameters and biochemical composition of the NP than trypsin. In contrast, trypsin had a larger effect on the mechanical properties. Our data also indicated that localized trypsin injection predominantly affected the NP. T1ρ was sensitive to loading and correlated with the water content of the NP and AF but not with their proteoglycan content. Conclusion Our studies indicate that physiological loading is an important parameter to consider and that T1ρ contributes new information in efforts to develop quantitative MRI as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to detect changes in early disc degeneration. PMID:18219615

  10. The effect of shock loading on the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor at constant organic loading rate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influences of organic loading disturbances on the process performance of a thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor treating potato-processing wastewater were investigated. For this purpose, while the reactor was operated at steady state conditions with organic loading rate of 5.5 kg COD/m3 · day, an instant acetate concentration increase (1 g/L) was introduced to the reactor. During the shock loading test of acetate, it was observed that the overall process performance was adversely affected by all the shock loading, however, the system reached steady state conditions less than 24 hours of operation indicating that thermophilic anaerobic contact reactor is resistant to shock loading and be capable of returning its normal conditions within a short time period. PMID:24872886

  11. Complexity and network dynamics in physiological adaptation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    Baffy, György; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-05-28

    Living organisms constantly interact with their surroundings and sustain internal stability against perturbations. This dynamic process follows three fundamental strategies (restore, explore, and abandon) articulated in historical concepts of physiological adaptation such as homeostasis, allostasis, and the general adaptation syndrome. These strategies correspond to elementary forms of behavior (ordered, chaotic, and static) in complex adaptive systems and invite a network-based analysis of the operational characteristics, allowing us to propose an integrated framework of physiological adaptation from a complex network perspective. Applicability of this concept is illustrated by analyzing molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptation in response to the pervasive challenge of obesity, a chronic condition resulting from sustained nutrient excess that prompts chaotic exploration for system stability associated with tradeoffs and a risk of adverse outcomes such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Deconstruction of this complexity holds the promise of gaining novel insights into physiological adaptation in health and disease. PMID:24751342

  12. Physiomodel - an integrative physiology in Modelica.

    PubMed

    Matejak, Marek; Kofranek, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    Physiomodel (http://www.physiomodel.org) is our reimplementation and extension of an integrative physiological model called HumMod 1.6 (http://www.hummod.org) using our Physiolibrary (http://www.physiolibrary.org). The computer language Modelica is well-suited to exactly formalize integrative physiology. Modelica is an equation-based, and object-oriented language for hybrid ordinary differential equations (http:// www.modelica.org). Almost every physiological term can be defined as a class in this language and can be instantiated as many times as it occurs in the body. Each class has a graphical icon for use in diagrams. These diagrams are self-describing; the Modelica code generated from them is the full representation of the underlying mathematical model. Special Modelica constructs of physical connectors from Physiolibrary allow us to create diagrams that are analogies of electrical circuits with Kirchhoff's laws. As electric currents and electric potentials are connected in electrical domain, so are molar flows and concentrations in the chemical domain; volumetric flows and pressures in the hydraulic domain; flows of heat energy and temperatures in the thermal domain; and changes and amounts of members in the population domain. PMID:26736546

  13. Damage evolution in acetabular replacements under long-term physiological loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Heaton-Adegbile, P; New, A; Hussell, J G; Tong, J

    2009-05-29

    Damage development in cemented acetabular replacements has been studied in bovine pelvic bones under long-term physiological loading conditions, including normal walking, stair climbing and a combined block loading with representative routine activities. The physiological loading conditions were achieved using a specially designed hip simulator for fixation endurance testing. Damage was detected and monitored using micro-CT scanning at regular intervals of the experiments, and verified by microscopic studies post testing. The results show that debonding at the bone-cement interface defined the failure of cement fixation in all cases, and debondings initiated near the dome of the acetabulum in the superior-posterior quadrant, consistent with the high-stress region identified from the finite element analysis of implanted acetabular models Zant, N.P., Heaton-Adegbile, P., Hussell, J.G., Tong, J., 2008b. In-vitro fatigue failure of cemented acetabular replacements-a hip simulator study. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, 130, 021019-1-9]; [Tong, J., Zant, N.P., Wang, J-Y., Heaton-Adegbile, P., Hussell, J.G., 2008. Fatigue in cemented acetabulum. International Journal of Fatigue, 30(8), 1366-1375]. PMID:19345357

  14. Human Physiology in an Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, David R; Moon, Richard E; Krasney, John J; Held, Heather E; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Water covers over 70% of the earth, has varying depths and temperatures and contains much of the earth's resources. Head-out water immersion (HOWI) or submersion at various depths (diving) in water of thermoneutral (TN) temperature elicits profound cardiorespiratory, endocrine, and renal responses. The translocation of blood into the thorax and elevation of plasma volume by autotransfusion of fluid from cells to the vascular compartment lead to increased cardiac stroke volume and output and there is a hyperperfusion of some tissues. Pulmonary artery and capillary hydrostatic pressures increase causing a decline in vital capacity with the potential for pulmonary edema. Atrial stretch and increased arterial pressure cause reflex autonomic responses which result in endocrine changes that return plasma volume and arterial pressure to preimmersion levels. Plasma volume is regulated via a reflex diuresis and natriuresis. Hydrostatic pressure also leads to elastic loading of the chest, increasing work of breathing, energy cost, and thus blood flow to respiratory muscles. Decreases in water temperature in HOWI do not affect the cardiac output compared to TN; however, they influence heart rate and the distribution of muscle and fat blood flow. The reduced muscle blood flow results in a reduced maximal oxygen consumption. The properties of water determine the mechanical load and the physiological responses during exercise in water (e.g. swimming and water based activities). Increased hydrostatic pressure caused by submersion does not affect stroke volume; however, progressive bradycardia decreases cardiac output. During submersion, compressed gas must be breathed which introduces the potential for oxygen toxicity, narcosis due to nitrogen, and tissue and vascular gas bubbles during decompression and after may cause pain in joints and the nervous system. PMID:26426465

  15. Physiological responses related to moderate mental load during car driving in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Henrik; Nilsson, Emma; Lindén, Per; Svanberg, Bo; Poom, Leo

    2015-05-01

    We measured physiological variables on nine car drivers to capture moderate magnitudes of mental load (ML) during driving in prolonged and repeated city and highway field conditions. Ecological validity was optimized by avoiding any artificial interference to manipulate drivers ML, drivers were alone in the car, they were free to choose their paths to the target, and the repeated drives familiarized drivers to the procedure. Our aim was to investigate if driver's physiological variables can be reliably measured and used as predictors of moderate individual levels of ML in naturally occurring unpredictably changing field conditions. Variables investigated were: heart-rate, skin conductance level, breath duration, blink frequency, blink duration, and eye fixation related potentials. After the drives, with support from video uptakes, a self-rating and a score made by external raters were used to distinguish moderately high and low ML segments. Variability was high but aggregated data could distinguish city from highway drives. Multivariate models could successfully classify high and low ML within highway and city drives using physiological variables as input. In summary, physiological variables have a potential to be used as indicators of moderate ML in unpredictably changing field conditions and to advance the evaluation and development of new active safety systems. PMID:25857673

  16. The Effects Of An Exercise Physiology Program on Physical Fitness Variables, Body Satisfaction, and Physiology Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Arlette C.; Rosenblatt, Evelyn S.; Kempner, Lani; Feldman, Brandon B.; Paolercio, Maria A.; Van Bemden, Angie L.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of an exercise physiology program on high school students' physical fitness, body satisfaction, and physiology knowledge. Intervention students received exercise physiology theory and active aerobic and resistance exercise within their biology course. Data from student surveys and measurements indicated that the integrated…

  17. ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTRACTORS - HYDRAULIC VERSUS ORGANIC LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional and alternative flow configurations of rotating biological contractors were compared for soluble organic carbon and ammonia-nitrogen removal. Each treatment train contained eight shafts with a cumulative surface area of 800,000 ft sq. The hydraulic bay used the conve...

  18. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  19. Biofield Physiology: A Framework for an Emerging Discipline.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Levin, Michael; McCraty, Rollin; Bat, Namuun; Ives, John A; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Oschman, James L

    2015-11-01

    Biofield physiology is proposed as an overarching descriptor for the electromagnetic, biophotonic, and other types of spatially-distributed fields that living systems generate and respond to as integral aspects of cellular, tissue, and whole organism self-regulation and organization. Medical physiology, cell biology, and biophysics provide the framework within which evidence for biofields, their proposed receptors, and functions is presented. As such, biofields can be viewed as affecting physiological regulatory systems in a manner that complements the more familiar molecular-based mechanisms. Examples of clinically relevant biofields are the electrical and magnetic fields generated by arrays of heart cells and neurons that are detected, respectively, as electrocardiograms (ECGs) or magnetocardiograms (MCGs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) or magnetoencephalograms (MEGs). At a basic physiology level, electromagnetic activity of neural assemblies appears to modulate neuronal synchronization and circadian rhythmicity. Numerous nonneural electrical fields have been detected and analyzed, including those arising from patterns of resting membrane potentials that guide development and regeneration, and from slowly-varying transepithelial direct current fields that initiate cellular responses to tissue damage. Another biofield phenomenon is the coherent, ultraweak photon emissions (UPE), detected from cell cultures and from the body surface. A physiological role for biophotons is consistent with observations that fluctuations in UPE correlate with cerebral blood flow, cerebral energy metabolism, and EEG activity. Biofield receptors are reviewed in 3 categories: molecular-level receptors, charge flux sites, and endogenously generated electric or electromagnetic fields. In summary, sufficient evidence has accrued to consider biofield physiology as a viable scientific discipline. Directions for future research are proposed. PMID:26665040

  20. Biofield Physiology: A Framework for an Emerging Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Michael; McCraty, Rollin; Bat, Namuun; Ives, John A.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Oschman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Biofield physiology is proposed as an overarching descriptor for the electromagnetic, biophotonic, and other types of spatially-distributed fields that living systems generate and respond to as integral aspects of cellular, tissue, and whole organism self-regulation and organization. Medical physiology, cell biology, and biophysics provide the framework within which evidence for biofields, their proposed receptors, and functions is presented. As such, biofields can be viewed as affecting physiological regulatory systems in a manner that complements the more familiar molecular-based mechanisms. Examples of clinically relevant biofields are the electrical and magnetic fields generated by arrays of heart cells and neurons that are detected, respectively, as electrocardiograms (ECGs) or magnetocardiograms (MCGs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) or magnetoencephalograms (MEGs). At a basic physiology level, electromagnetic activity of neural assemblies appears to modulate neuronal synchronization and circadian rhythmicity. Numerous nonneural electrical fields have been detected and analyzed, including those arising from patterns of resting membrane potentials that guide development and regeneration, and from slowly-varying transepithelial direct current fields that initiate cellular responses to tissue damage. Another biofield phenomenon is the coherent, ultraweak photon emissions (UPE), detected from cell cultures and from the body surface. A physiological role for biophotons is consistent with observations that fluctuations in UPE correlate with cerebral blood flow, cerebral energy metabolism, and EEG activity. Biofield receptors are reviewed in 3 categories: molecular-level receptors, charge flux sites, and endogenously generated electric or electromagnetic fields. In summary, sufficient evidence has accrued to consider biofield physiology as a viable scientific discipline. Directions for future research are proposed. PMID:26665040

  1. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Tripathi, Sachchida; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-01

    seemed to be reducing the negative impact of OA loading on O/C ratio via oxidation through aqueous processing. Average O/C ratio difference between HL and LL period during no-fog condition is 0.13 while it is reduced to 0.06 during foggy condition. This indicates that fog processing to an extent negating the OA loading impact on O/C ratio. This is happening due to the fact that aqueous oxidation efficiency doesn't depend on OA loading but on fog LWC (liquid water content), RH, NOx and presence/absence of transition metals. These findings indicate that only aerosol volatility based approach to predict particle phase concentration, composition and oxidation ratio of organics may result in some misleading outcome.

  2. Physiological and biochemical responses of the Polychaete Diopatra neapolitana to organic matter enrichment.

    PubMed

    Carregosa, Vanessa; Velez, Cátia; Pires, Adília; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that organic matter enrichment may be associated to aquaculture, leading to impoverished benthic communities and species succession with loss of biodiversity, but very few studies have investigated biochemical and physiological alterations that species affected by aquaculture activities undergo. Thus, in the present study, the effects of the organic enrichment originating from an oyster culture were studied in the Polychaete Diopatra neapolitana, a species already shown to be sensitive to inorganic contamination. For this, physiological responses and biochemical alterations were evaluated. The results obtained revealed that individuals from highly organically enriched areas presented lower capacity to regenerate their body but higher glycogen and protein levels. Furthermore, with increasing organic matter D. neapolitana increased the lipid peroxidation (LPO), the oxidized glutathione content (GSSG) and Glutathione S-transferase activity (GSTs) content, and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This study evidenced that organic matter enrichment induced biochemical and physiological alterations in D. neapolitana. Thus, this species was shown to be a good sentinel species to monitor organic contamination. PMID:24973779

  3. Physiological dysregulation and somatic decline among elders: modeling, applying and re-interpreting allostatic load.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Rachael; Crews, Douglas E

    2012-03-01

    Mortality rates continue to decline among post-reproductive individuals. This makes understanding long-term physiological responses to stress increasingly important. Allostatic load (AL) was developed to assess detrimental effects on the soma of responding to multiple stressors over a lifetime. AL arises from developmental experiences, genetic predispositions, environmental, psychosocial, life style and other stressors. In early life stress responsive systems are initiated that produce hormones that maintain the soma through continual allostatic responses. Later in life, systems designed to mitigate stressors may fail or be compromised, promoting unwanted somatic changes and dysregulation. This places a load on the regulatory system that impedes day-to-day stress responses, predisposing to cellular damage and degenerative diseases. Here we review 44 peer-reviewed 2005-2010 publications reportedly examining relationships between AL and risk factors, chronic diseases, morbidity and mortality in samples of elderly adults. The sum of results suggests that AL does assess aspects of physiological dysregulation and somatic decline, predicts detrimental age-related declines, and is associated with negative sociocultural attributes and psychological outcomes. Such consistent results and wide application of AL, while it is still being modeled and re-interpreted, suggest its perceived usefulness as a research and clinical tool. AL provides a possible biomarker of senescence, assessing it over the life span will aid in predicting future negative health outcomes. PMID:22816193

  4. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  5. Physiologic response of human brain death and the use of vasopressin for successful organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuma; Tang, Julin F

    2011-03-01

    The dynamic physiologic response of human brain death and the impact of vasopressin on successful organ transplantation is reported. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit after severe traumatic brain injury resulting in brain death. Initial Cushing reflex was followed by a precipitous decrease in systemic blood pressure that was refractory to the alpha-agonist phenylephrine. After intravenous vasopressin was given, hemodynamic stability was restored and maintained until successful organ transplantation. Vasopressin, a catecholamine-sparing vasopressor and antidiuretic agent, may be an effective agent in the treatment of refractory hypotension after brain death prior to organ transplantation. PMID:21377081

  6. Superexchange Charge Transport in Loaded Metal Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Tobias; Liu, Jianxi; Wächter, Tobias; Friederich, Pascal; Symalla, Franz; Welle, Alexander; Mugnaini, Veronica; Meded, Velimir; Zharnikov, Michael; Wöll, Christof; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-26

    In the past, nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been mostly studied for their huge potential with regard to gas storage and separation. More recently, the discovery that the electrical conductivity of a widely studied, highly insulating MOF, HKUST-1, improves dramatically when loaded with guest molecules has triggered a huge interest in the charge carrier transport properties of MOFs. The observed high conductivity, however, is difficult to reconcile with conventional transport mechanisms: neither simple hopping nor band transport models are consistent with the available experimental data. Here, we combine theoretical results and new experimental data to demonstrate that the observed conductivity can be explained by an extended hopping transport model including virtual hops through localized MOF states or molecular superexchange. Predictions of this model agree well with precise conductivity measurements, where experimental artifacts and the influence of defects are largely avoided by using well-defined samples and the Hg-drop junction approach. PMID:27359160

  7. Electrochemical Behavior of Novel Superelastic Biomedical Alloys in Simulated Physiological Media Under Cyclic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Yu. S.; Pustov, Yu. A.; Konopatsky, A. S.; Filonov, M. R.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to study corrosion and electrochemical behavior of Ti-22Nb-6Ta and Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) superelastic alloys under conditions which imitate the performance mode of target devices (bone implants), i.e., under cyclic load in simulated physiological solutions. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements were carried out on wire specimens in Hank's solution and artificial saliva at 37 °C with various strain values up to 1.5%. It is shown that at clinically relevant strain values (about 0.2%) the alloys exhibit OCP growth indicating their high stability and resistance to corrosion fatigue under these cycling conditions. At much higher strains (about 1%), fatigue crack initiation and propagation take place, however, the corresponding OCP variation indicates that the fracture process is significantly restrained by reversible martensitic transformation during cycling.

  8. Backpack load limit recommendation for middle school students based on physiological and psychophysical measurements.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Denise H; Freivalds, Andris

    2009-01-01

    The load of student's backpacks has raised questions over the safety and health of schoolchildren everywhere. The purpose of this study is to use electromyography (EMG), posture evaluation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion and perceptions of pain to find an acceptable backpack load limit for middle school students. Twenty middle school students aged 11 to 14 (10 female and 10 male) volunteered for the study. The subjects completed two tests, standing stationary and walking on a treadmill, where they carried 5% incremental loads from 0% body mass (BM) to 20% BM. The study indicated that the Borg-CR10 ratings and trunk flexion angle for the walking trial indicated a possible load limit of 10% BM due to the non-significant difference between 0 and 10% BM and the significant difference between 10 and 15% BM. PMID:19369726

  9. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on seven sediments with a series of ratios of total organic carbon in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) that spanned the recommendation of no less than 50:1. With increasing loading of organi...

  10. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Hubin-Barrows, Dylan; Billa, Nanditha; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, James R; Mount, David R; Norberg-King, Teresa J

    2016-07-01

    At contaminated sediment sites, the bioavailability of contaminants in sediments is assessed using sediment-bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegates (Lv). The testing protocols recommend that ratio of total organic carbon (TOC) in sediment to L. variegatus (dry weight) (TOC/Lv) should be no less than 50:1. Occasionally, this recommendation is not followed, especially with sediments having low TOC, e.g., <1 %. This study evaluated the impacts and resulting biases in the testing results when the recommendation of "no less than 50:1" is not followed. In the study, seven sediments were tested with a series of TOC/Lv ratios that spanned the recommendation. With increasing loading of organisms, growth of the organisms decreased in six of the seven sediments tested. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the L. variegatus were measured in six of the seven sediments tested, and differences in PCB residues among loading ratios across all sediments were small, i.e., ±50 %, from those measured at the minimum recommended ratio of 50:1 TOC/Lv. In all sediment, PCB residues increased with increasing loading of the organisms for the mono-, di-, and tri-chloro-PCBs. For tetra-chloro and heavier PCBs, residues increased with increasing loading of organisms for only two of the six sediments. PCB residues were not significantly different between TOC/Lv loadings of 50:1 and mid-20:1 ratios indicating that equivalent results can be obtained with TOC/Lv ratios into the mid-20:1 ratios. Overall, the testing results suggest that when testing recommendation of 50:1 TOC/Lv is not followed, potential biases in the biota-sediment accumulations factors from the sediment-bioaccumulation test will be small. PMID:27165691

  11. An Overview of Undergraduate Physiology Education in Turkish Medical Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkanci, Z. Dicle; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    Physiology education, which occupies an important place in undergraduate medical education, exhibits diversities across the world. Since there was no specific source of information about physiology education in Turkish medical faculties, the authors aimed to evaluate the general status of undergraduate physiology teaching of medical students in…

  12. Use of Concept Mapping in an Undergraduate Introductory Exercise Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henige, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Physiology is often considered a challenging course for students. It is up to teachers to structure courses and create learning opportunities that will increase the chance of student success. In an undergraduate exercise physiology course, concept maps are assigned to help students actively process and organize information into manageable and…

  13. Complex study of the physiological role of cadmium. III. Cadmium loading trials on broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bokori, J; Fekete, S; Kádár, I; Koncz, J; Vetési, F; Albert, M

    1995-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) loading trials were conducted on a total of 110 (3 x 10 and 4 x 20) broiler chickens prereared for 21 days. The control chickens received no cadmium, while chickens in the six treatment groups were given different doses of Cd as an aqueous solution of CdSO4 administered either into the crop or mixed in the feed. The chickens were kept in a climatized animal house and treated usually for 3-5 weeks (maximum 68 days), with the exception of group Cd-75 chickens which were treated up to 239 days of age. The chickens' health status, body mass and feed consumption were monitored throughout the trial. On days 14-20 and on day 42 of the trial 2 chickens per group, then at the end of trial a total of 25 chickens were killed in anaesthesia. These birds, together with chickens that died or were killed during the trial, were subjected to detailed gross pathological examination. From 11 organs (kidney, liver, spleen, testicle, brain, myocardium, skeletal muscle, lungs, digestive tract, pancreas, tubular bones) of these chickens samples were taken for assay for a total of 16 elements, as well as for light and electron microscopic examination. With the exception of groups Cd-30 and Cd-600, no abnormal clinical signs were observed in the first two weeks of the trial. Chickens of group Cd-30 died before day 8-12 of the trial among signs of complete anorexia, rapid emaciation, huddling and diarrhoea, while chickens of group Cd-600 died before day 28, showing similar clinical signs. The body mass of chickens fed a Cd-supplemented diet either remained constant or decreased substantially, in a degree proportional to the Cd load. The only exception was group Cd-2.5, in which the average body mass of birds at the end of week 8 slightly exceeded that of the controls. Four out of the 10 cockerel chicks fed a diet containing 75 ppm Cd up to 239 days of age died of intercurrent diseases; the remaining six grew well and reached a body mass of 3.8-4.3 kg. Feed conversion efficiency

  14. System and method employing a self-organizing map load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Harley, Ronald G.; Du, Liang; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K.; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A.

    2014-06-17

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a self-organizing map load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types and a plurality of neurons, each of the load types corresponding to a number of the neurons; employing a weight vector for each of the neurons; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the loads; determining a load feature vector including at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the loads; and identifying by a processor one of the load types by relating the load feature vector to the neurons of the database by identifying the weight vector of one of the neurons corresponding to the one of the load types that is a minimal distance to the load feature vector.

  15. Phloem loading: an integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.

    1986-01-01

    This study focuses on the regulation of sucrose transport across the plasmalemma. Initially, we re-examined the use of leaf discs to study the kinetics of phloem loading using Allium cepa leaves. All tissues exhibited the same linear plus saturable profile as Beta vulgaris, except fructose uptake into the inner parenchyma and bundle-sheath cells; in this case the response was linear. These results indicate that all tissues of the leaf retrieve exogenous sucrose such that kinetics from leaf discs cannot be taken to represent phloem loading per se. We continued our study by investigating the influence of internal sugars on sugar transport across the plasmalemma. We found that if internal sugars were manipulated by heat-girdling techniques or DCMU treatment there was no appreciable change in sucrose influx. However, longer term heat-girdling decreased sucrose uptake. These data indicate that carbohydrate partitioning among the chloroplast, cytosol, and vacuole modulates cytosolic sugar levels. One interesting discovery was that leaves excised from the plant and allowed to undergo their normal day/night cycle do not transfer (/sup 14/C) sucrose to their minor veins.

  16. Physiological responses of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb.) Aschers as indicators of nutrient loading.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Huang, Xiaoping; Jiang, Zhijian

    2014-06-30

    To select appropriate bioindicators for the evaluation of the influence of nutrients from human activities in a Thalassia hemprichii meadow, environmental variables and plant performance parameters were measured in Xincun Bay, Hainan Island, South China. Nutrient concentrations in the bay decreased along a gradient from west to southeast. Moreover, the nutrients decreased with an increase in the distance from the shore on the southern side of the bay. Among the candidate indicators, the P content of the tissues closely mirrored the two nutrient loading gradients. The epiphytic algae biomass and the N content in the tissues mirrored one of the two nutrient loading trends. The leaf length, however, exhibited a significant negative correlation with the nutrient gradients. We propose that changes in the P content of T. hemprichii, followed by epiphytic algae biomass and N content of the tissues, may be the useful indicators of nutrient loading to coastal ecosystems. PMID:24433998

  17. Responses of stream nitrate and dissolved organic carbon loadings to hydrological forcing and climate change in an upland forest of the northeast USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Shanley, James B.

    2009-01-01

    [1] In coming decades, higher annual temperatures, increased growing season length, and increased dormant season precipitation are expected across the northeastern United States in response to anthropogenic forcing of global climate. We synthesized long-term stream hydrochemical data from the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, United States, to explore the relationship of catchment wetness to stream nitrate and DOC loadings. We modeled changes in growing season length and precipitation patterns to simulate future climate scenarios and to assess how stream nutrient loadings respond to climate change. Model results for the 2070–2099 time period suggest that stream nutrient loadings during both the dormant and growing seasons will respond to climate change. During a warmer climate, growing season stream fluxes (runoff +20%, nitrate +57%, and DOC +58%) increase as more precipitation (+28%) and quick flow (+39%) occur during a longer growing season (+43 days). During the dormant season, stream water and nutrient loadings decrease. Net annual stream runoff (+8%) and DOC loading (+9%) increases are commensurate with the magnitude of the average increase of net annual precipitation (+7%). Net annual stream water and DOC loadings are primarily affected by increased dormant season precipitation. In contrast, decreased annual loading of stream nitrate (−2%) reflects a larger effect of growing season controls on stream nitrate and the effects of lengthened growing seasons in a warmer climate. Our findings suggest that leaching of nitrate and DOC from catchment soils will be affected by anthropogenic climate forcing, thereby affecting the timing and magnitude of annual stream loadings in the northeastern United States.

  18. Fifty years of genetic load: An odyssey

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is an engaging, personalized account of attempts in population genetics to develop a useful quantitative theory of genetic load. The author concludes that genetic loads do not tell us anything about real populations because of the conceptual ambiguities and the oversimplified view of differential reproductive success.

  19. Assessment of mechanical properties of porcine aortas under physiological loading conditions using vascular elastography.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Edgar J S; Peters, Mathijs F J; Nijs, Jan; Rutten, Marcel C M; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2016-06-01

    Non-invasive assessment of the elastic properties of the arterial wall is often performed with ultrasound (US) imaging. The purpose of this study is to estimate mechanical properties of the vascular wall using in vitro inflation testing on biological tissue and two-dimensional (2-D) US elastography, and investigate the performance of the proposed methodology for physiological conditions. An inflation experiment was performed on 12 porcine aortas for (a) a large pressure range (0-140mmHg); and (b) physiological pressures (70-130mmHg) to mimic in vivo hemodynamic conditions. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired for one longitudinal and two transverse cross-sections for both experiments, and were analyzed to obtain the geometry and diameter-time behavior. The shear modulus (G) was estimated from these data for each pressure range applied. In addition, an incremental study based on the static data was performed to (1) investigate the changes in G for increasing mean arterial pressure (MAP) for a certain pressure difference (30, 40, 50 and 60mmHg); (2) compare the results with those from the dynamic experiment, for the same pressure range. The resulting stress-strain curves and shear moduli G (94±16kPa) for the static experimentare in agreement with literature and previous work. A linear dependency on MAP was found for G, yet the effect of the pulse pressure difference was negligible. The dynamic data revealed a G of 250±20kPa, whereas the incremental shear modulus (Ginc) was 240±39kPa. For all experiments, no significant differences in the values of G were found between different image planes. This study shows that 2-D US elastography of aortas during inflation testing is feasible and reproducible under controlled and physiological circumstances. In future studies, the in vivo, dynamic experiment should be repeated for a range of MAPs, and pathological vessels should be examined. PMID:26766329

  20. The necessity of physiological muscle parameters for computing the muscle forces: application to lower extremity loading during pedalling.

    PubMed

    Cadová, Michala; Vilímek, Miloslav

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how the use of physiological parameters of muscles is important. This work is focused on musculoskeletal loading analysis during pedalling adopting two approaches: without (1) and with (2) the use of physiological parameters of muscles. The static-optimization approach together with the inverse dynamics problem makes it possible to obtain forces in individual muscles of the lower extremity. Input kinematics variables were examined in a cycling experiment. The significant difference in the resultant forces in one-joint and two-joint muscles using the two different approaches was observed. PMID:20131752

  1. Usefulness of daily +2Gz load as a countermeasure against physiological problems during weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ken-ichi; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Hirayanagi, Kaname; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    2001-08-01

    Adaptation to head-down-tilt bed rest as a simulated microgravity leads to an abnormality of reflex control of circulation, hypovolemia and reduction of exercise capacity. We hypothesized that this cardiovascular deconditioning and reduction of exercise capacity could be prevented by a daily 1 hr centrifugation at +2Gz. To test this hypothesis, twenty healthy male subjects underwent 4 day of 6° head-down-tilt bed rest. Ten of them were exposed to a +2Gz load for up to 30 min twice per day (the Gz group). The remaining 10 were not exposed to a Gz load (the no-Gz group). We estimated autonomic cardiovascular control by power spectral analysis of blood pressure and R-R interval variability, and baroreflex regulation by the transfer function analysis and the sequence method, before and after bed rest. Further, we measured hematocrit as an index of changes in plasma volume and maximal oxygen consumption as an index of exercise capacity, before and after bed rest. Result: In the no-Gz group, heart rate increased after bed rest. The high frequency power of R-R interval variability as an index of cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity, baroreflex gains estimated by transfer function analysis and the sequence method as index of the integrated arterial-cardiac baroreflex function decreased significantly. Associated with these changes, the ratio of low to high frequency power of R-R as an indicator of cardiac sympathovagal balance tended to increase after bed rest in the no-Gz group. However, those showed no significant changes after bed rest in the Gz group. Hematocrit increased after bed rest in the no-Gz group. It also tended to increase in the Gz group, however it did not achieve statistical significance. Maximal oxygen consumption decreased significantly to similar extent in both the groups. Conclusion: This result suggested that 1) a daily 1hr +2Gz load produced by a centrifuge might eliminate the changes in autonomic cardiovascular control during simulated

  2. An integrated physiology model to study regional lung damage effects and the physiologic response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This work expands upon a previously developed exercise dynamic physiology model (DPM) with the addition of an anatomic pulmonary system in order to quantify the impact of lung damage on oxygen transport and physical performance decrement. Methods A pulmonary model is derived with an anatomic structure based on morphometric measurements, accounting for heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion observed experimentally. The model is incorporated into an existing exercise physiology model; the combined system is validated using human exercise data. Pulmonary damage from blast, blunt trauma, and chemical injury is quantified in the model based on lung fluid infiltration (edema) which reduces oxygen delivery to the blood. The pulmonary damage component is derived and calibrated based on published animal experiments; scaling laws are used to predict the human response to lung injury in terms of physical performance decrement. Results The augmented dynamic physiology model (DPM) accurately predicted the human response to hypoxia, altitude, and exercise observed experimentally. The pulmonary damage parameters (shunt and diffusing capacity reduction) were fit to experimental animal data obtained in blast, blunt trauma, and chemical damage studies which link lung damage to lung weight change; the model is able to predict the reduced oxygen delivery in damage conditions. The model accurately estimates physical performance reduction with pulmonary damage. Conclusions We have developed a physiologically-based mathematical model to predict performance decrement endpoints in the presence of thoracic damage; simulations can be extended to estimate human performance and escape in extreme situations. PMID:25044032

  3. Physiology, structure, and regulation of the cloned organic anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    SRIMAROENG, C.; PERRY, J. L.; PRITCHARD, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    1. The transport of negatively charged drugs, xenobiotics, and metabolites by epithelial tissues, particularly the kidney, plays critical roles in controlling their distribution, concentration, and retention in the body. Thus, organic anion transporters (OATs) impact both their therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity. 2. This review summarizes current knowledge of the properties and functional roles of the cloned OATs, the relationships between transporter structure and function, and those factors that determine the efficacy of transport. Such factors include plasma protein binding of substrates, genetic polymorphisms among the transporters, and regulation of transporter expression. 3. Clearly, much progress has been made in the decade since the first OAT was cloned. However, unresolved questions remain. Several of these issues — drug–drug interactions, functional characterization of newly cloned OATs, tissue differences in expression and function, and details of the nature and consequences of transporter regulation at genomic and intracellular sites — are discussed in the concluding Perspectives section. PMID:18668434

  4. A comparison of physiological and transcriptome responses to water deprivation and salt loading in the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael P.; Mecawi, Andre S.; Hoe, See Ziau; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Johnson, Kory R.; Al-Mahmoud, Ghada A.; Elias, Lucila L. K.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Gainer, Harold; Murphy, David

    2015-01-01

    Salt loading (SL) and water deprivation (WD) are experimental challenges that are often used to study the osmotic circuitry of the brain. Central to this circuit is the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of the hormones, arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT), and their transport to terminals that reside in the posterior lobe of the pituitary. On osmotic challenge evoked by a change in blood volume or osmolality, the SON undergoes a function-related plasticity that creates an environment that allows for an appropriate hormone response. Here, we have described the impact of SL and WD compared with euhydrated (EU) controls in terms of drinking and eating behavior, body weight, and recorded physiological data including circulating hormone data and plasma and urine osmolality. We have also used microarrays to profile the transcriptome of the SON following SL and remined data from the SON that describes the transcriptome response to WD. From a list of 2,783 commonly regulated transcripts, we selected 20 genes for validation by qPCR. All of the 9 genes that have already been described as expressed or regulated in the SON by osmotic stimuli were confirmed in our models. Of the 11 novel genes, 5 were successfully validated while 6 were false discoveries. PMID:25632023

  5. Annual loads of organic contaminants in Chesapeake Bay contributed through fluvial transport

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.D.; Lippa, K.A.

    1994-12-31

    Organic contaminants in fluvial transport, atmospheric deposition, urban runoff, and shoreline erosion are being quantified and compared in an effort to understand contaminant inputs and mass balances in Chesapeake Bay. Concentrations of nine organonitrogen and organophosphorus (organo-N/P) pesticides, eight organochlorine (OC) pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and four polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in fluvial transport were determined at the Susquehanna, Potomac, and James River fall lines for the period of March 1992 through February 1993. Together these rivers account for ca. 75% of the freshwater inflow to the bay from fluvial sources. Sampling was conducted monthly during base flow conditions and during all major storm events. Analysis of nanogram and picogram per liter concentrations of the organic contaminants was performed for both the dissolved and particulate phases of the surface water samples. Daily fluvial loads were calculated using an iterative-increment method from concentration and discharge data, and the resulting daily load estimates were summed to provide annual loads. Loads contributed by the three tributaries from March 1992 through February 1993 were 6.9 metric tons for the organo-N/P pesticides, 0.73 metric tons for the OC compounds and PCBs, and 1.2 metric tons for the PAH. Preliminary comparisons show that loads from fluvial transport are generally greater than other sources for most contaminants except PAH, where atmospheric deposition and urban runoff contribute greater loads of some compounds.

  6. [Effect of different backpack loads on physiological parame ters in walking].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meiya; Tian, Shan; Tang, Qiaohong; Ni, Yikun; Wang, Lizhen; Fan, Yubo

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of prolonged walking with load carriage on body posture, muscle fatigue, heart rate and blood pressure of the tested subjects. Ten healthy volunteers performed 30 min walking trials on treadmill (speed = 1.1 m/s) with different backpack loads [0% body weight (BW), 10% BW, 15% BW and 20% BW]. The change of body posture, muscle fatigue, heart rate and blood pressure before and after walking and the recovery of muscle fatigue during the rest time (0, 5, 10 and 15 min) were collected using the Bortec AMT-8 and the NDI Optotrak Certus. Results showed that the forward trunk and head angle, muscle fatigue, heart rate and blood pressure increased with the increasing backpack loads and bearing time. With the 20% BW load, the forward angle, muscle fatigue and systolic pressure were significantly higher than with lighter weights. No significantly increased heart rate and diastolic pressure were found. Decreased muscle fatigue was found after removing the backpack in each load trial. But the recovery of the person with 20% BW load was slower than that of 0% BW, 10% BW and 15% BW. These findings indicated that the upper limit of backpack loads for college-aged students should be between 15% BW and 20% BW according to muscle fatigue and forward angle. It is suggested that backpack loads should be restricted to no more than 15% BW for walks of up to 30 min duration to avoid irreversible muscle fatigue. PMID:25764707

  7. Curved bones: An adaptation to habitual loading.

    PubMed

    Milne, Nick

    2016-10-21

    Why are long bones curved? It has long been considered a paradox that many long bones supporting mammalian bodies are curved, since this curvature results in the bone undergoing greater bending, with higher strains and so greater fracture risk under load. This study develops a theoretical model wherein the curvature is a response to bending strains imposed by the requirements of locomotion. In particular the radioulna of obligate quadrupeds is a lever operated by the triceps muscle, and the bending strains induced by the triceps muscle counter the bending resulting from longitudinal loads acting on the curved bone. Indeed the theoretical model reverses this logic and suggests that the curvature is itself a response to the predictable bending strains induced by the triceps muscle. This, in turn, results in anatomical arrangements of bone, muscle and tendon that create a simple physiological mechanism whereby the bone can resist the bending due to the action of triceps in supporting and moving the body. The model is illustrated by contrasting the behaviour of a finite element model of a llama radioulna to that of a straightened version of the same bone. The results show that longitudinal and flexor muscle forces produce bending strains that effectively counter strains due to the pull of the triceps muscle in the curved but not in the straightened model. It is concluded that the curvature of these and other curved bones adds resilience to the skeleton by acting as pre-stressed beams or strainable pre-buckled struts. It is also proposed that the cranial bending strains that result from triceps, acting on the lever that is the radioulna, can explain the development of the curvature of such bones. PMID:27444401

  8. Effects of feeding and organism loading rate on PCB accumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in sediment bioaccumulation testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methods published by USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specify that the Lumbriculus variegatus, a freshwater oligochaete, should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry we...

  9. Sediment bioaccumulation test with Lumbriculus variegatus (EPA test method 100.3) effects of feeding and organism loading rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methodology of USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specifies that the Lumbriculus variegatus should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry weight of no less than 50:1. It ...

  10. Transient Thermoelectric Generator: An Active Load Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockholm, J. G.; Goupil, C.; Maussion, P.; Ouerdane, H.

    2015-06-01

    Under stationary conditions, the optimization of maximum power output and efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is a well-known subject. Use of a finite-time thermodynamics (FTT) approach to the description of TEGs has demonstrated that there exists a closed feedback effect between the output electrical load value and the entering heat current. From the practical point of view, this effect is strongly evidenced by the use of direct current (DC-to-DC) converters as active loads. Both transient conditions and FTT contribute to a complex landscape of the optimization of the power and efficiencies of a TEG. It has been claimed that the use of inductive load may lead to a strong enhancement of the efficiency, and the frequency response of a TEG as a band-pass filter has also been recently reported. We consider these results using a classical linear Onsager approach of a TEG operating under transient conditions. We show that a trans-admittance may be defined as a coupling element between the input and the output, leading to the observed electric-to-thermal feedback. We discuss recent experiments on a TEG connected to an active load, which is reported to boast an efficiency exceeding the usual stationary DC thermoelectric efficiency.

  11. [Physiological-occupational assessment of acoustic load with equal energy but different time and informational characteristics].

    PubMed

    Suvorov, G A; Shkarinov, L N; Kravchenko, O K; Kur'erov, N N

    1999-01-01

    The article deals with results of experimental study comparing effects of 4 types of acoustic load--noise (constant and impulse) and music (electronic symphonic one and rap)--on hearing sensitivity, processes in nervous system and subjective evaluation. All types of acoustic load were equal in energy (on evaluation according to equivalent level during the experiment). The study included 2 levels of load--90 and 95 dB. The differences revealed demonstrate importance of impulse parameters of noise and musical load for reactions of acoustic analyzer and central nervous system. The experiments show that evaluation of harm caused by temporary and impulse noises should be based not only on assessment of specific (hearing) function, but also on parameters of central nervous system state. The authors found that music of certain acoustic and informational parameters may harm hearing function. PMID:10420710

  12. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE AND DISPOSITION OF WATERBORNE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model was developed to predict the uptake and disposition of waterborne organic chemicals in fish, he model consists of a set of mass-balance differential equations which describe the time course of chemical concentration within each of five ...

  13. Tannins Alter Soil Organic Matter Extraction, Solubility of Metals, and Root Physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are common plant-derived polyphenolic compounds that precipitate proteins and react with other biomolecules but knowledge of their effects on soil organic matter, the solubility of metals, and root physiology is incomplete. Soil from forest and pasture systems was treated with tannic acid (...

  14. Sugarcane growth and physiological responses to water deficit stress on organic and sand soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genotype selection has been more successful for organic (muck) than sand soils in Florida, perhaps due to differences in water availability. A greenhouse study was conducted at Canal Point, Florida to compare sugarcane physiological responses to water deficit stress during...

  15. A highly sensitive near-infrared luminescent metal-organic framework thermometer in the physiological range.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Yue, Dan; Lian, Xiusheng; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    A near-infrared luminescent metal-organic framework Nd0.866Yb0.134BTB was developed as a self-calibrated thermometer in the physiological range. Its features include high sensitivity and resolution, and good biocompatibility, making such a material useful for biomedical applications. PMID:27284589

  16. Comparing the performance and operation stability of an SBR and MBBR for single-stage nitritation-anammox treating wastewater with high organic load.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Single stage nitritation-anammox reactors have gained increasing attention for their application in municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The most commonly used system in municipal reject water treatment is at present the sequencing batch reactor (SBR), the moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is the second most common. However, little is known about their applicability to industrial wastewaters with high C/N ratios. This study presents a comparative approach to evaluate the performance of these two systems by changing the influent from reject water (C:N ratio 1:1) stepwise to an industrial wastewater (C:N ratio 3:1). An intentionally induced temperature drop that led to nitrite accumulation was also tested. The results showed that the MBBR (1.9 kg-N m(-3) d(-1)) was superior to the SBR (0.5 kg-N m(-3) d(-1)) with at maximum up to four times higher volumetric nitrogen removal rates. Both systems accumulated nitrite (> 100 mg-N L(-1)) during the temperature drop from 30 degrees C to as low as 18 degrees C (MBBR) and 20 degrees C (SBR), which subsequently resulted in almost complete loss in the removal capacities. However, the previous removal rates could be re-established in both systems within approximately 40 days. In comparison, the MBBR showed the more stable and higher performance even though higher nitrite concentrations (up to 500 mg-N L(-1)) were encountered. Overall, MBBR operation and handling was also easier and the system was more robust to disturbances compared to the SBR. PMID:24191464

  17. The Dynamics of Speed Selection and Psycho-Physiological Load during a Mountain Ultramarathon

    PubMed Central

    Kerhervé, Hugo A.; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Solomon, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise intensity during ultramarathons (UM) is expected to be regulated as a result of the development of psycho-physiological strain and in anticipation of perceived difficulties (duration, topography). The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of speed, heart rate and perceived exertion during a long trail UM in a mountainous setting. Methods Fifteen participants were recruited from competitors in a 106 km trail mountain UM with a total elevation gain and loss of 5870 m. Speed and gradient, heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (dissociated between the general [RPEGEN] and knee extensor fatigue [RPEKE] and collected using a voice recorder) were measured during the UM. Self-selected speed at three gradients (level, negative, positive), HR, RPEGEN and RPEKE were determined for each 10% section of total event duration (TED). Results The participants completed the event in 18.3 ± 3.0 h, for a total calculated distance of 105.6 ± 1.8 km. Speed at all gradients decreased, and HR at all gradients significantly decreased from 10% to 70%, 80% and 90%, but not 100% of TED. RPEGEN and RPEKE increased throughout the event. Speed increased from 90% to 100% of TED at all gradients. Average speed was significantly correlated with total time stopped (r = -.772; p = .001; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.15, -0.39) and the magnitude of speed loss (r = .540; p = .038; 95% CI = -1.04, -0.03), but not with the variability of speed (r = -.475; p = .073; 95% CI = -1.00, 0.05). Conclusions Participants in a mountain UM event combined positive pacing strategies (speed decreased until 70–90% of TED), an increased speed in the last 10% of the event, a decrease in HR at 70–90% of TED, and an increase in RPEGEN and RPEKE in the last 30% of the event. A greater speed loss and less total time stopped were the factors associated with increased total performance. These results could be explained by theoretical perspectives of a complex regulatory

  18. Sensitivity of Physiological and Psychological Markers to Training Load Intensification in Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Victor H.; Nakamura, Fabio Y.; Miloski, Bernardo; Samulski, Dietmar; Bara-Filho, Mauricio G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the sensitivity of; performance in the countermovement vertical Jump (CMJ); the Recovery and Stress Questionnaire for Athletes (RESTQ-Sport); the Total Quality Recovery Scale (TQR) and the creatine kinase (CK) to the deliberate intensification of volleyball training loads. For this purpose 8 athletes underwent a training period (FP) of 11 days of deliberate training load (TL) intensification followed by a second period (SP) of 14 days of reduction of loads (IT group). A further 8 athletes continued training with normal TL (NT group). Both groups were tested before the FP (baseline), after the FP and after the SP. The TL evaluated using the session rating of perceived exertion method (session-RPE) was higher after the FP compared to the SP, and higher in the IT group, compared to the NT group. The CMJ did not change in either group (p > 0.05). In the IT group, the RESTQ-Sport was altered after the FP compared to both the baseline and the SP (p < 0.05), while no change was observed in the NT group. In the IT group, the CK increased and the TQR decreased after the FP compared to both the baseline and after the SP and were higher and lower, respectively, than the NT group (p < 0.05). The results suggest that performance in the CMJ is not a sensitive variable to the fatigue caused by intensification of training loads during a pre-competitive period in volleyball, whereas CK, TQR and RESTQ-Sport were shown to be sensitive measures. Key Points The RESTQ-Sport and the TQR scales were sensitive to deliberate intensification of training loads during the pre-competitive period in volleyball athletes; The CK can be used to complement this monitoring; The CMJ performance was not sensitive to deliberate intensification of training loads in volleyball athletes. PMID:25177184

  19. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  20. Organizing an Intramural Triathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Bruce

    1984-01-01

    Suggestions for developing an intramural triathlon consisting of a 1000-yard swim, 15-mile bike ride, and 5-mile run are presented in this article. Topics to consider when organizing this event include course selection, publicity, personnel, equipment, and awards. (DF)

  1. Calcification, a physiological process to be considered in the context of the whole organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, H. S.; Wood, H. L.; Kendall, M. A.; Spicer, J. I.; Twitchett, R. J.; Widdicombe, S.

    2009-02-01

    Marine organisms that produce calcium carbonate structures are predicted to be most vulnerable to a decline in oceanic pH (ocean acidification) based on the understanding that calcification rates will decrease as a result of changes in the seawater carbonate chemistry thereby reducing carbonate ion concentration (and associated saturation states). Coastal seas are critical components of the global carbon cycle yet little research has been conducted on acidification impacts on coastal benthic organisms. Here, a critical appraisal of calcification in six benthic species showed, contrary to popular predictions, calcification can increase, and not decrease, in acidified seawater. Measuring the changes in calcium in isolated calcium carbonate structure as well as structures from live animals exposed to acidified seawater allowed a comparison between a species' ability to calcify and the dissolution affects across decreasing levels of pH. Calcium carbonate production is dependant on the ability to increase calcification thus counteracting an increase in dissolution. Comparison with paleoecological studies of past high carbon dioxide (CO2) events presents a similar picture. This conclusion implies that calcification may not be the critical process impacted by ocean acidification; particularly as all species investigated displayed physiological trade offs including reduced metabolism, health, and behavioural responses, in association with this calcification upregulation, which possess as great a threat to survival as an inability to calcify.

  2. A self organizing map approach to physiological data analysis for enhanced group performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Doser, Adele Beatrice; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2004-10-01

    A Self Organizing Map (SOM) approach was used to analyze physiological data taken from a group of subjects participating in a cooperative video shooting game. The ultimate aim was to discover signatures of group cooperation, conflict, leadership, and performance. Such information could be fed back to participants in a meaningful way, and ultimately increase group performance in national security applications, where the consequences of a poor group decision can be devastating. Results demonstrated that a SOM can be a useful tool in revealing individual and group signatures from physiological data, and could ultimately be used to heighten group performance.

  3. General physiology, experimental psychology, and evolutionism. Unicellular organisms as objects of psychophysiological research, 1877-1918.

    PubMed

    Schloegel, Judy Johns; Schmidgen, Henning

    2002-12-01

    This essay aims to shed new light on the relations between physiology and psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the use of unicellular organisms as research objects during that period. Within the frameworks of evolutionism and monism advocated by Ernst Haeckel, protozoa were perceived as objects situated at the borders between organism and cell and individual and society. Scholars such as Max Verworn, Alfred Binet, and Herbert Spencer Jennings were provoked by these organisms to undertake experimental investigations situated between general physiology and psychology that differed from the physiological psychology advocated by Wilhelm Wundt. Some of these investigations sought to locate psychological properties in the molecular structure of protoplasm; others stressed the existence of organic and psychological individuality in protozoa. In the following decades, leading philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Henri Bergson, as well as psychological researchers like Sigmund Freud, integrated the results of these investigations into their reflections on such problems as the nature of the will, the structure of the ego, and the holistic nature of the reactions of organisms to their environment. PMID:12664793

  4. Novel and potential physiological roles of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-07-15

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA) is a multi-subunit enzyme that uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to transport H(+) across biological membranes. VHA plays a universal role in essential cellular functions, such as the acidification of lysosomes and endosomes. In addition, the VHA-generated H(+)-motive force can drive the transport of diverse molecules across cell membranes and epithelia for specialized physiological functions. Here, I discuss diverse physiological functions of VHA in marine animals, focusing on recent discoveries about base secretion in shark gills, potential bone dissolution by Osedax bone-eating worms and its participation in a carbon-concentrating mechanism that promotes coral photosynthesis. Because VHA is evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes, it is likely to play many other essential physiological roles in diverse marine organisms. Elucidating and characterizing basic VHA-dependent mechanisms could help to determine species responses to environmental stress, including (but not limited to) that resulting from climate change. PMID:27445397

  5. Tools for Physiology Labs: An Inexpensive Means of Temperature Control

    PubMed Central

    Krans, Jacob L.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple means of modulating preparation temperature, which may be useful in undergraduate physiology laboratories. The device was developed in an effort to make teaching exercises that involve temperature modulation accessible at low cost. Although we were interested in using the device specifically with the larval fruit fly preparation, it is applicable to many preparations and temperature sensitive phenomena. Feedback driven thermoregulators offer superior precision in experiments requiring temperature control, but can be prohibitively expensive, require power supplies and circuitry, and often generate large switching transients (artifacts) during physiological recording. Moreover, many interesting exercises involving temperature control can be carried out with a slightly reduced level of temperature precision. PMID:23493108

  6. EFFECTS OF VENTILATION RATES AND PRODUCT LOADING ON ORGANIC EMISSION RATES FROM PARTICLEBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of ventilation rates and product loading on organic emission rates from particleboard. Recently, investigators have confirmed the presence of varied and significant amounts of organic compounds in indoor environment, including compounds known or su...

  7. The Cartesian Diver as an Aid for Teaching Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Greg K.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism by which air enters the mammalian lung is difficult for many students of physiology. In particular, some students have trouble seeing how pressure can be transmitted through a fluid such as the intrapleural fluid and how the magnitude of that pressure can change. A Cartesian diver, an old-time child's toy, may be used as a visual aid…

  8. Long-term physiological effects of enhanced O/sub 2/ release by inositol hexaphosphate-loaded erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Teisseire, B.; Ropars, C.; Villereal, M.C.; Nicolau, C.

    1987-10-01

    A continuous lysing and resealing procedure with erythrocytes permitted incorporation in these cells of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP/sub 6/), a strong allosteric effector of Hb. This leads to significant rightward shifts of the HbO/sub 2/ dissociation curves with in vitro P/sub 50/, values increasing from 32.2 +/- 1.8 torr for control erythrocytes to 86 +/- 60 torr. The shape of the dissociation curve was still sigmoidal, although the Hill coefficient was decreased. The life span of InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes equaled that of control erythrocytes. Erythrocyte-survival studies were done using /sub 51/Cr labeling of cells. The long-term physiological effects of the InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes on piglets were increased O/sub 2/ release and reduced cardiac output. The reduced O/sub 2/ affinity of the InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes was still effective 20 days after transfusion in awake piglets. The electrolyte concentration appeared stable over the 5-day observation period except for a transient, but significant, hyperkalemia immediately after transfusion. The reductions in the O/sub 2/ affinity of Hb reported here are large compared with previously reported values. Introduction of InsP/sub 6/ into viable erythrocytes improves tissue oxygenation when, for any reason, normal blood flow is impaired.

  9. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  10. An overview of estrogen-associated endocrine disruption in fishes: evidence of effects on reproductive and immune physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.

    2011-01-01

    Simply and perhaps intuitively defined, endocrine disruption is the abnormal modulation of normal hormonal physiology by exogenous chemicals. In fish, endocrine disruption of the reproductive system has been observed worldwide in numerous species and is known to affect both males and females. Observations of biologically relevant endocrine disruption most commonly occurs near waste water treatment plant outfalls, pulp and paper mills, and areas of high organic loading sometimes associated with agricultural practices. Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EEDCs) have received an overwhelmingly disproportionate amount of scientific attention compared to other EDCs in recent years. In male fishes, exposure to EEDCs can lead to the induction of testicular oocytes (intersex), measurable plasma vitellogenin protein, altered sex steroid profiles, abnormal spawning behavior, skewed population sex ratios, and lessened reproductive success. Interestingly, contemporary research purports that EDCs modulate aspects of non-reproductive physiology including immune function. Here we present an overview of endocrine disruption in fishes associated with estrogenic compounds, implications of this phenomenon, and examples of EDC related research findings by our group in the Potomac River Watershed, USA.

  11. An Advanced Buffet Load Alleviation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnham, Jay K.; Pitt, Dale M.; White, Edward V.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an advanced buffet load alleviation (BLA) system that utilizes distributed piezoelectric actuators in conjunction with an active rudder to reduce the structural dynamic response of the F/A-18 aircraft vertical tails to buffet loads. The BLA system was defined analytically with a detailed finite-element-model of the tail structure and piezoelectric actuators. Oscillatory aerodynamics were included along with a buffet forcing function to complete the aeroservoelastic model of the tail with rudder control surface. Two single-input-single-output (SISO) controllers were designed, one for the active rudder and one for the active piezoelectric actuators. The results from the analytical open and closed loop simulations were used to predict the system performance. The objective of this BLA system is to extend the life of vertical tail structures and decrease their life-cycle costs. This system can be applied to other aircraft designs to address suppression of structural vibrations on military and commercial aircraft.

  12. Load-shortening behavior of an initially curved eccentrically loaded column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.; Pinson, Mark W.

    1989-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of using buckled columns to provide a soft support system for simulating a free-free boundary condition in dynamic testing, the nonlinear load-shortening behavior of initially imperfect, eccentrically loaded slender columns is analyzed. Load-shortening curves are obtained for various combinations of load eccentricity and uniform initial curvature and are compared, for reference purposes, with the limiting case of the classical elastica. Results for numerous combinations of initial curvature and load eccentricity show that, over a wide range of shortening, an axially loaded slender column exhibits load-deflection compliance which is of the same order as that of a straight but otherwise identical cantilever beam under lateral tip loading.

  13. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  14. Gastrointestinal Tract Commensal Bacteria and Probiotics: Influence on End-Organ Physiology.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Palacios, Talia; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria represent the earliest form of independent life on this planet. Bacterial development has included cooperative symbiosis with plants (e.g., Leguminosae family and nitrogen fixing bacteria in soil) and animals (e.g., the gut microbiome). It is generally agreed upon that the fusion of two prokaryotes evolutionarily gave rise to the eukaryotic cell in which mitochondria may be envisaged as a genetically functional mosaic, a relic from one of the prokaryotes. This is expressed by the appearance of mitochondria in eukaryotic cells (an alpha-proteobacteria input), a significant endosymbiotic evolutionary event. As such, the evolution of human life has been complexly connected to bacterial activities. Hence, microbial colonization of mammals has been a progressively driven process. The interactions between the human host and the microbiome inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for example, afford the human host the necessary cues for the development of regulated signals that in part are induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). This regulated activity then promotes immunological tolerance and metabolic regulation and stability, which then helps establish control of local and extraintestinal end-organ (e.g., kidneys) physiology. Pharmacobiotics, the targeted administration of live probiotic cultures, is an advancing area of potential therapeutics, either directly or as adjuvants. Hence the continued scientific understanding of the human microbiome in health and disease may further lead to fine tuning the targeted delivery of probiotics for a therapeutic gain. PMID:26462363

  15. An organic thyristor.

    PubMed

    Sawano, F; Terasaki, I; Mori, H; Mori, T; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, N; Nogami, Y; Noda, Y

    2005-09-22

    Thyristors are a class of nonlinear electronic device that exhibit bistable resistance--that is, they can be switched between two different conductance states. Thyristors are widely used as inverters (direct to alternating current converters) and for the smooth control of power in a variety of applications such as motors and refrigerators. Materials and structures that exhibit nonlinear resistance of this sort are not only useful for practical applications: they also provide systems for exploring fundamental aspects of solid-state and statistical physics. Here we report the discovery of a giant nonlinear resistance effect in the conducting organic salt theta-(BEDT-TTF)2CsCo(SCN)4, the voltage-current characteristics of which are essentially the same as those of a conventional thyristor. This intrinsic organic thyristor works as an inverter, generating an alternating current when a static direct-current voltage is applied. Whereas conventional thyristors consist of a series of diodes (their nonlinearity comes from interface effects at the p-n junctions), the present salt exhibits giant nonlinear resistance as a bulk phenomenon. We attribute the origin of this effect to the current-induced melting of insulating charge-order domains, an intrinsically non-equilibrium phenomenon in the sense that ordered domains are melted by a steady flow. PMID:16177784

  16. Iron deficiency and bioavailability in anaerobic batch and submerged membrane bioreactors (SAMBR) during organic shock loads.

    PubMed

    Ketheesan, Balachandran; Thanh, Pham Minh; Stuckey, David C

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the effects of Fe(2+) and its bioavailability for controlling VFAs during organic shock loads in batch reactors and a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). When seed grown under Fe-sufficient conditions (7.95±0.05mgFe/g-TSS), an organic shock resulted in leaching of Fe from the residual to organically bound and soluble forms. Under Fe-deficient seed conditions (0.1±0.002mgFe/gTSS), Fe(2+) supplementation (3.34mgFe(2+)/g-TSS) with acetate resulted in a 2.1-3.9 fold increase in the rate of methane production, while with propionate it increased by 1.2-1.5 fold compared to non-Fe(2+) supplemented reactors. Precipitation of Fe(2+) as sulphides and organically bound Fe were bioavailable to methanogens for acetate assimilation. The results confirmed that the transitory/long term limitations of Fe play a significant role in controlling the degradation of VFAs during organic shock loads due to their varying physical/chemical states, and bioavailability. PMID:27015020

  17. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  18. Bridging Between Proline Structure, Functions, Metabolism, and Involvement in Organism Physiology.

    PubMed

    Saibi, Walid; Feki, Kaouthar; Yacoubi, Ines; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-08-01

    Much is now known about proline multifunctionality and metabolism; some aspects of its biological functions are still unclear. Here, we discuss some cases in the proline, structure, definition, metabolism, compartmentalization, accumulation, plausible functions and also its implication in homeostasis and organism physiology. Indeed, we report the role of proline in cellular homeostasis, including redox balance and energy status and their implication as biocatalyst for aldolase activity. Proline can act as a signaling molecule to modulate mitochondrial functions, influence cell proliferation or cell death, and trigger specific gene expression, which can be essential for plant recovery from stresses. Although, the regulation and the function of proline accumulation, during abiotic stresses, are not yet completely understood. The engineering of proline metabolism could lead to new opportunities to improve plant tolerance against environmental stresses. This atypical amino acid has a potential role in the toxicity during growth of some microorganism, vegetal, and mammalian species. Furthermore, we note that the purpose through the work is to provide a rich, concise, and mostly cohesive source on proline, considered as a platform and an anchor between several disciplines and biological functions. PMID:26100388

  19. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for dermal absorption of organic chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J W; McKim, J M; Lien, G J; Hoffman, A D; Bertelsen, S L; Elonen, C M

    1996-06-01

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model was developed to describe dermal absorption of waterborne organic chemicals by fish. The skin was modeled as a discrete compartment into which compounds diffuse as a function of chemical permeability and the concentration gradient. The model includes a countercurrent description of chemical flux at fish gills and was used to simulate dermal-only exposures, during which the gills act as a route of elimination. The model was evaluated by exposing adult rainbow trout and channel catfish to hexachloroethane (HCE), pentachloroethane (PCE), and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE). Skin permeability coefficients were obtained by fitting model simulations to measured arterial blood data. Permeability coefficients increased with the number of chlorine substituent groups, but not in the manner expected from a directly proportional relationship between dermal permeability and skin:water chemical partitioning. An evaluation of rate limitations on dermal flux in both trout and catfish suggested that chemical absorption was limited more by diffusion across the skin than by blood flow to the skin. Modeling results from a hypothetical combined dermal and branchial exposure indicate that dermal uptake could contribute from 1.6% (TCE) to 3.5% (HCE) of initial uptake in trout. Dermal uptake rates in catfish are even higher than those in trout and could contribute from 7.1% (TCE) to 8.3% (PCE) of initial uptake in a combined exposure. PMID:8789789

  20. Evaluation of a subject-specific finite-element model of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint under physiological load.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Simon M; Whitton, R Chris; Kawcak, Chris E; Stover, Susan M; Pandy, Marcus G

    2014-01-01

    The equine metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is frequently injured, especially by racehorses in training. Most injuries result from repetitive loading of the subchondral bone and articular cartilage rather than from acute events. The likelihood of injury is multi-factorial but the magnitude of mechanical loading and the number of loading cycles are believed to play an important role. Therefore, an important step in understanding injury is to determine the distribution of load across the articular surface during normal locomotion. A subject-specific finite-element model of the MCP joint was developed (including deformable cartilage, elastic ligaments, muscle forces and rigid representations of bone), evaluated against measurements obtained from cadaver experiments, and then loaded using data from gait experiments. The sensitivity of the model to force inputs, cartilage stiffness, and cartilage geometry was studied. The FE model predicted MCP joint torque and sesamoid bone flexion angles within 5% of experimental measurements. Muscle-tendon forces, joint loads and cartilage stresses all increased as locomotion speed increased from walking to trotting and finally cantering. Perturbations to muscle-tendon forces resulted in small changes in articular cartilage stresses, whereas variations in joint torque, cartilage geometry and stiffness produced much larger effects. Non-subject-specific cartilage geometry changed the magnitude and distribution of pressure and the von Mises stress markedly. The mean and peak cartilage stresses generally increased with an increase in cartilage stiffness. Areas of peak stress correlated qualitatively with sites of common injury, suggesting that further modelling work may elucidate the types of loading that precede joint injury and may assist in the development of techniques for injury mitigation. PMID:24210848

  1. An Earth-based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving microgravity for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in microgravity. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of microgravity by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of microgravity on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventillation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of microgravity will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  2. What is conservation physiology? Perspectives on an increasingly integrated and essential science(†).

    PubMed

    Cooke, Steven J; Sack, Lawren; Franklin, Craig E; Farrell, Anthony P; Beardall, John; Wikelski, Martin; Chown, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Globally, ecosystems and their constituent flora and fauna face the localized and broad-scale influence of human activities. Conservation practitioners and environmental managers struggle to identify and mitigate threats, reverse species declines, restore degraded ecosystems, and manage natural resources sustainably. Scientific research and evidence are increasingly regarded as the foundation for new regulations, conservation actions, and management interventions. Conservation biologists and managers have traditionally focused on the characteristics (e.g. abundance, structure, trends) of populations, species, communities, and ecosystems, and simple indicators of the responses to environmental perturbations and other human activities. However, an understanding of the specific mechanisms underlying conservation problems is becoming increasingly important for decision-making, in part because physiological tools and knowledge are especially useful for developing cause-and-effect relationships, and for identifying the optimal range of habitats and stressor thresholds for different organisms. When physiological knowledge is incorporated into ecological models, it can improve predictions of organism responses to environmental change and provide tools to support management decisions. Without such knowledge, we may be left with simple associations. 'Conservation physiology' has been defined previously with a focus on vertebrates, but here we redefine the concept universally, for application to the diversity of taxa from microbes to plants, to animals, and to natural resources. We also consider 'physiology' in the broadest possible terms; i.e. how an organism functions, and any associated mechanisms, from development to bioenergetics, to environmental interactions, through to fitness. Moreover, we consider conservation physiology to include a wide range of applications beyond assisting imperiled populations, and include, for example, the eradication of invasive species

  3. The Effects of Using a Ramp and Elevator to Load and Unload Trailers on the Behavior and Physiology of Piglets.

    PubMed

    McGlone, John; Sapkota, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Transport is an inevitable process in the modern U.S. swine industry. The loading process is a novel and potentially stressful experience. This study uses behavior, heart rate and leukocyte counts to compare stress one hour before, during and after loading via ramp or elevator. Piglets were held in a home pen (control (CON)), walked up and down an aisle (handled (HAN)), or walked to a truck and loaded via elevator (ELE) or ramp (RAM). Sitting, feeding and blood parameters did not show a significant treatment by time effect (p > 0.05). Standing behavior did not differ between CON and HAN piglets nor between RAM and ELE piglets (p > 0.05); however, CON and HAN piglets stood more than RAM and ELE piglets during treatment (p < 0.05). After treatment, drinking behavior was increased in RAM piglets (p < 0.05). The heart rate of ELE piglets decreased 6.3% after treatment; whereas the heart rate of RAM piglets remained elevated 2.4% (p < 0.05). In terms of heart rate, loading by elevator appears to be less stressful than loading by ramp. PMID:26480323

  4. Loading an Inductively Coupled Ring Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Paul; Dinkelaker, Aline; Vangeleyn, Matthieu; Arnold, Aidan; Riis, Erling

    2011-05-01

    We report on experimental progress towards an atom--interferometry experiment in a smooth ring geometry. We have proposed a new form of toroidal trap for ultra-cold and quantum degenerate atomic gases. By applying a time-varying magnetic field about an electrically isolated conducting loop a stable, time-averaged minimum of the magnetic field is formed from the superposition of the applied and induced fields. This geometry resolves the issue of perturbations of the ideal symmetry of the toroidal geometry due to electrical connections and benefits from time averaging of corrugating potentials due to current meandering. We present the status of a new experimental apparatus to use Bose (87Rb) and Fermi (40K) degenerate gases for Sagnac interferometry. We describe the procedure for loading an ultra-cold cloud of atoms into the trapping potential through a moving molasses in a magnetic field. Our laser system for cooling of K and its integration into the project are discussed, along with future development of the project.

  5. CONSIDERATIONS ON ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF LYMPH VESSELS OF UPPER AERO DIGESTIVE ORGANS AND CERVICAL SATELLITE LYMPH NODE GROUP.

    PubMed

    Ciupilan, Corina; Stan, C I

    2016-01-01

    The almost constant local regional development of the cancers of upper aero digestive organs requires the same special attention to cervical lymph node metastases, as well as to the primary neoplastic burning point. The surgical therapy alone or associated has a mutilating, damaging character, resulting in loss of an organ and function, most of the times with social implications, involving physical distortions with aesthetic consequences, which make the reintegration of the individual into society questionable. The problem of cervical lymph node metastases is vast and complex, reason why we approached several anatomical and physiological aspects of lymph vessels of the aero digestive organs. Among the available elements during treatment, the headquarters of the tumour, its histologic degree, and its infiltrative nature, each of them significantly influences the possibility of developing metastases. PMID:27483727

  6. Dynamic OCT for physiological functions of micro organs in human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Toshie; Yamada, Akihiro; Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Kuwabara, Mitsuo

    2007-11-01

    OCT is a powerful tool for detection of physiological functions of micro organs underneath the human skin surface, besides the clinical application to ophthalmology, as recently demonstrated by the authors' group. In particular, dynamics of peripheral vessels and eccrin sweat glands can be observed clearly in the time-sequential OCT images. The physiological functions of these micro organs, sweating and blood circulation, are controlled by the skin sympathetic nerve in response to externally applied stress. In this paper, we present microscopically analytical results based on the dynamic OCT of the micro organs in human fingers. In sweating dynamics, it is found that a spiral sweat duct is expanded by abrupt increase of sweat due to application of stress to a volunteer, resulting in remarkable increase of the reflection light intensity of the spiral duct in OCT. Mental-stress-induced sweating in each eccrin sweat gland, therefore, is analyzed quantitatively. Furthermore, dynamic OCT observation of peripheral vessels is interesting. A small vein of a human finger is observed clearly by the TD-OCT, where the vein expands and contracts repeatedly even in the resting state for temperature control on the fingertip. A change in the cross-sectional area of the vein exceeds 80 % for a young volunteer. The dynamic OCT will allow us to propose novel diagnoses of excessive sweating and diseases related to the sympathetic nerve.

  7. Physiological roles for the subfornical organ: a dynamic transcriptome shaped by autonomic state.

    PubMed

    Hindmarch, Charles Colin Thomas; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2016-03-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular organ recognized for its ability to sense and integrate hydromineral and hormonal circulating fluid balance signals, information which is transmitted to central autonomic nuclei to which SFO neurons project. While the role of SFO was once synonymous with physiological responses to osmotic, volumetric and cardiovascular challenge, recent data suggest that SFO neurons also sense and integrate information from circulating signals of metabolic status. Using microarrays, we have confirmed the expression of receptors already described in the SFO, and identified many novel transcripts expressed in this circumventricular organ including receptors for many of the critical circulating energy balance signals such as adiponectin, apelin, endocannabinoids, leptin, insulin and peptide YY. This transcriptome analysis also identified SFO transcripts, the expressions of which are significantly changed by either 72 h dehydration, or 48 h starvation, compared to fed and euhydrated controls. Expression and potential roles for many of these targets are yet to be confirmed and elucidated. Subsequent validation of data for adiponectin and leptin receptors confirmed that receptors for both are expressed in the SFO, that discrete populations of neurons in this tissue are functionally responsive to these adipokines, and that such responsiveness is regulated by physiological state. Thus, transcriptomic analysis offers great promise for understanding the integrative complexity of these physiological systems, especially with development of technologies allowing description of the entire transcriptome of single, carefully phenotyped, SFO neurons. These data will ultimately elucidate mechanisms through which these uniquely positioned neurons respond to and integrate complex circulating signals. PMID:26227400

  8. MODELLING THE UPTAKE AND DISPOSITION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN FISH USING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models for hydrophobic chemicals in fish requires: 1) an understanding of chemical efflux at fish gills; 2) knowledge of the factors that limit chemical exchange between blood and tissues; and, 3) a mechanistic descrip...

  9. Organic photoreceptors: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, Andrew R.; Pai, David M.

    1990-07-01

    When Chester Carison invented xerography, he employed sulfur and anthracene as photoconductors. Although the initial commercialization of his idea relied on inorganic photoconductors, the current trend is towards use of organic photoconductors because of their material variety, economy and flexibility. High speed copying and printing machines use belts coated with organic photoreceptors, while personal copiers and printers use aluminum drums dip-coated with organic photoreceptors. Multilayered, organic photoreceptors are now routinely mass produced by the millions with both visible sensitivity for copiers and infrared sensitivity for printers. This paper presents a brief overview of key photoreceptor properties and follow with a survey of electronic organic materials of current interest. The photodischarge characteristic is determined mainly by three factors: the photogeneration, the injection, and the transport of charge carriers. These functions can be accomplished by separate electronic material layers; photogeneration by organic pigments and charge transport by aromatic-amine electron-donor molecules. The photogeneration layers are usually fabricated by solvent coating a dispersion of a pigment in a polymeric binder while the charge transport layers are solvent coated to form a solid solution of the aromatic amine in a polymeric binder. Examples and characteristics of organic pigments and charge transport molecules of current interest are discussed.

  10. Enhanced desorption of persistent organic pollutants from microplastics under simulated physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-02-01

    Microplastics have the potential to uptake and release persistent organic pollutants (POPs); however, subsequent transfer to marine organisms is poorly understood. Some models estimating transfer of sorbed contaminants to organisms neglect the role of gut surfactants under differing physiological conditions in the gut (varying pH and temperature), examined here. We investigated the potential for polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) to sorb and desorb (14)C-DDT, (14)C-phenanthrene (Phe), (14)C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and (14)C-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Desorption rates of POPs were quantified in seawater and under simulated gut conditions. Influence of pH and temperature was examined in order to represent cold and warm blooded organisms. Desorption rates were faster with gut surfactant, with a further substantial increase under conditions simulating warm blooded organisms. Desorption under gut conditions could be up to 30 times greater than in seawater alone. Of the POP/plastic combinations examined Phe with PE gave the highest potential for transport to organisms. PMID:24212067

  11. High organic loading treatment for industrial molasses wastewater and microbial community shifts corresponding to system development.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kyohei; Chosei, Tomoaki; Nakahara, Nozomi; Hatamoto, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi; Kawai, Toshikazu; Araki, Nobuo; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Molasses wastewater contains high levels of organic compounds, cations, and anions, causing operational problems for anaerobic biological treatment. To establish a high organic loading treatment system for industrial molasses wastewater, this study designed a combined system comprising an acidification tank, a thermophilic multi-stage (MS)-upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, mesophilic UASB reactor, and down-flow hanging sponge reactor. The average total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand removal rates were 85%±3% and 95%±2%, respectively, at an organic loading rate of 42kgCODcrm(-3)d(-1) in the MS-UASB reactor. By installation of the acidification tank, the MS-UASB reactor achieved low H2-partial pressure. The abundance of syntrophs such as fatty acid-degrading bacteria increased in the MS-UASB and 2nd-UASB reactors. Thus, the acidification tank contributed to maintaining a favorable environment for syntrophic associations. This study provides new information regarding microbial community composition in a molasses wastewater treatment system. PMID:26241842

  12. Physiological load associated with a Zumba(®) fitness workout: a comparison pilot study between classes and a DVD.

    PubMed

    Delextrat, Anne; Neupert, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The objectives were to compare the metabolic load elicited by Zumba(®) classes and DVD workouts and link the physiological responses to participants' psychological characteristics. Fifteen women (25.4 ± 4.3 years old; 164.9 ± 5.1 cm; 56.9 ± 5.8 kg; 23.9 ± 4.9% body fat) performed three Zumba(®) classes and three Zumba(®) DVD workouts using a repeated measure design. Energy expenditure was assessed by extrapolating oxygen cost from heart rate (HR) using regressions from a preliminary incremental running test. Differences between Zumba(®) classes and Zumba(®) DVD workouts were assessed by Student's T tests and repeated measures analysis of variance and correlations between physiological and psychological variables by the Pearson's coefficient. Results showed that Zumba(®) classes allowed greater energy expenditure compared to Zumba(®) DVD workouts (6.8 ± 0.9 vs 5.6 ± 0.9 kcal · min(-1), 95% confidence interval (CI) limits: 0.3-2.1, P = 0.016), with significant differences in the time spent with a HR above 85% of HR reserve (14.7 vs 1.7%, 95% CI: 5.6-20.4, P = 0.021). Furthermore, women with a greater autonomy score showed a smaller difference between DVD and class (r = 0.511, P = 0.048), while greater differences were shown in women with greater interpersonal skills (r = -0.563, P = 0.028). The results suggest that while both types of workouts are suitable to maintain fitness Zumba(®) classes allow greater energy expenditure. PMID:25854638

  13. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  14. TRICKLING FILTER/SOLIDS CONTACT PERFORMANCE WITH ROCK FILTERS AT HIGH ORGANIC LOADINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of the trickling filter/solids contact (TF/SC) process at high organic loadings was studied at the Morro Bay-Cayucos treatment plant. The average secondary effluent TSS increased only slightly (from 13 mg/L to 15 mg/L) when the filter BOD5 loading was doubled from...

  15. Continuous loading of an atom beam into an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V.

    I propose a method of deceleration and continuous loading of an atom beam into a far-off-resonance optical lattice. The loading of moving atoms into a conservative far-off-resonance potential requires the removal of the atom's excess kinetic energy. Here this is achieved by the Sisyphus cooling method, where a differential lattice-induced ac Stark shift is utilized. The proposed method is described for the case of ytterbium atoms. Numerical simulations demonstrate the possibility of reaching cold and dense samples in a continuous manner on the example of ytterbium atoms.

  16. AN AUTOMATED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a data acquisition and control (DAC) system that was constructed to manage selected physiological measurements and sample control for aquatic physiology and toxicology. Automated DAC was accomplished with a microcomputer running menu-driven software develope...

  17. Ammonium removal in constructed wetland microcosms as influenced by season and organic carbon load.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kate A; Stein, Otto R; Hook, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated ammonium nitrogen removal and nitrogen transformations in three-year-old, batch-operated, subsurface wetland microcosms. Treatments included replicates of Typha latifolia, Carex rostrata, and unplanted controls when influent carbon was excluded, and C. rostrata with an influent containing organic carbon. A series of 10-day batch incubations were conducted over a simulated yearlong cycle of seasons. The presence of plants significantly enhanced ammonium removal during both summer (24 degrees C, active plant growth) and winter (4 degrees C, plant dormancy) conditions, but significant differences between plant species were evident only in summer when C. rostrata outperformed T. latifolia. The effect of organic carbon load was distinctly seasonal, enhancing C. rostrata ammonium removal in winter but having an inhibitory effect in summer. Season did not influence ammonium removal in T. latifolia or unplanted columns. Net production of organic carbon was evident year-round in units without an influent organic carbon source, but was enhanced in summer, especially for C. rostrata, which produced significantly more than T. latifolia and unplanted controls. No differences in production were evident between species in winter. COD values for C. rostrata microcosms with and without influent organic carbon converged within 24 hours in winter and 7 days in summer. Gravel sorption, microbial immobilization and sequential nitrification/denitrification appear to be the major nitrogen removal mechanisms. All evidence suggests differences between season and species are due to differences in seasonal variation of root-zone oxidation. PMID:15921269

  18. Can Radiocarpal-Spanning Fixation Be Made More Functional by Placing the Wrist in Extension? A Biomechanical Study Under Physiologic Loads.

    PubMed

    Mann, Tobias; Lee, Daniel J; Dahl, Jason; Elfar, John C

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether applying an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate with the wrist in slight extension affects the biomechanical stability of the construct. An unstable distal radius fracture was simulated in 10 cadaveric specimens and immobilized with a radiocarpal-spanning plate holding the wrist in a neutral position. This construct was then physiologically loaded through the wrist flexor and extensor tendons. The resulting motion at the fracture was captured with a displacement sensor. The plate was then extended using an in situ bending technique, placing the wrist in extension, and the experiment was repeated. No statistically significant difference in the biomechanical stability afforded by the radiocarpal-spanning plate was detected with the wrist in extension compared to that in the traditional neutral position. The radiocarpal-spanning plate fixation was more stable when loaded through the extensor tendons. We conclude that immobilizing a distal radius fracture with an internal radiocarpal-spanning plate that holds the wrist in extension does not compromise biomechanical stability. PMID:26929853

  19. Organic micropollutants in the Yangtze River: seasonal occurrence and annual loads.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weixiao; Müller, Beat; Pernet-Coudrier, Benoit; Singer, Heinz; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Berg, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Twenty percent of the water run-off from China's land surface drains into the Yangtze River and carries the sewage of approximately 400 million people out to sea. The lower stretch of the Yangtze therefore offers the opportunity to assess the pollutant discharge of a huge population. To establish a comprehensive assessment of micropollutants, river water samples were collected monthly from May 2009 to June 2010 along a cross-section at the lowermost hydrological station of the Yangtze River not influenced by the tide (Datong Station, Anhui province). Following a prescreening of 268 target compounds, we examined the occurrence, seasonal variation, and annual loads of 117 organic micropollutants, including 51 pesticides, 43 pharmaceuticals, 7 household and industrial chemicals, and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During the 14-month study, the maximum concentrations of particulate PAHs (1-5 μg/g), pesticides (11-284 ng/L), pharmaceuticals (5-224 ng/L), and household and industrial chemicals (4-430 ng/L) were generally lower than in other Chinese rivers due to the dilution caused of the Yangtze River's average water discharge of approximately 30,000 m(3)/s. The loads of most pesticides, anti-infectives, and PAHs were higher in the wet season compared to the dry season, which was attributed to the increased agricultural application of chemicals in the summer, an elevated water discharge through the sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) as a result of high hydraulic loads and the related lower treatment efficiency, and seasonally increased deposition from the atmosphere and runoff from the catchment. The estimated annual load of PAHs in the river accounted for some 4% of the total emission of PAHs in the whole Yangtze Basin. Furthermore, by using sucralose as a tracer for domestic wastewater, we estimate a daily disposal of approximately 47 million m(3) of sewage into the river, corresponding to 1.8% of its average hydraulic load. In summary

  20. The anthropogenic contribution to the organic load of the Lippe River (Germany). Part II: Quantification of specific organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dsikowitzky, Larissa; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Littke, Ralf

    2004-12-01

    The major goal of this study was to investigate the organic pollution of a river on a quantitative basis. To this end, 14 anthropogenic contaminants which were identified in Lippe River water samples as reported in part I (Dsikowitzky et al., submitted parallel to this manuscript) were surveyed. Dissolved organic loads of the specific compounds were calculated on the basis of their concentrations in water and river runoff on the day of sampling. The organic loads of each compound were compiled along the longitudinal section of the river in order to generate individual spatial pollution profiles. It was observed that distribution of organic loads along the river showed distinctive patterns, depending upon the input situation and physico-chemical properties of the compound. The compounds were classified into three types of which Type 1, due to their stability in the aqueous phase, are of special interest for potential application as anthropogenic markers. PMID:15519373

  1. Measuring Dynamic Kidney Function in an Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on…

  2. Biological treatment of mining wastewaters by fixed-bed bioreactors at high organic loading.

    PubMed

    Bratkova, Svetlana; Koumanova, Bogdana; Beschkov, Venko

    2013-06-01

    Acid wastewaters contaminated with Fe - 1000 mg L(-1) and Cu - 100 mg L(-1) were remediated by microbial sulfate-reduction at high organic loading (theoretical TOC/SO4(2-) ratio 1.1) in a laboratory installation. The installation design includes a fixed-bed anaerobic bioreactor for sulfate-reduction, a chemical reactor, a settler and a three-sectional bioreactor for residual organic compounds and hydrogen sulfide removal. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are immobilized on saturated zeolite in the fixed-bed bioreactor. The source of carbon and energy for bacteria was concentrated solution, containing ethanol, glycerol, lactate and citrate. Heavy metals removal was achieved by produced H2S at sulfate loading rate 88 mg L(-1)h(-1). The effluent of the anaerobic bioreactor was characterized with high concentrations of acetate and ethanol. The design of the second bioreactor (presence of two aerobic and an anoxic zones) makes possible the occurrence of nitrification and denitrification as well as the efficiently removal of residual organic compounds and H2S. PMID:23611703

  3. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  4. Blended learning within an undergraduate exercise physiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Steven J; Carter, Kathryn R; Armga, Austin J; Carter, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    In physiological education, blended course formats (integration of face-to-face and online instruction) can facilitate increased student learning, performance, and satisfaction in classroom settings. There is limited evidence on the effectiveness of using blending course formats in laboratory settings. We evaluated the impact of blended learning on student performance and perceptions in an undergraduate exercise physiology laboratory. Using a randomized, crossover design, four laboratory topics were delivered in either a blended or traditional format. For blended laboratories, content was offloaded to self-paced video demonstrations (∼15 min). Laboratory section 1 (n = 16) completed blended laboratories for 1) neuromuscular power and 2) blood lactate, whereas section 2 (n = 17) completed blended laboratories for 1) maximal O2 consumption and 2) muscle electromyography. Both sections completed the same assignments (scored in a blinded manner using a standardized rubric) and practicum exams (evaluated by two independent investigators). Pre- and postcourse surveys were used to assess student perceptions. Most students (∼79%) watched videos for both blended laboratories. Assignment scores did not differ between blended and traditional laboratories (P = 0.62) or between sections (P = 0.91). Practicum scores did not differ between sections (both P > 0.05). At the end of the course, students' perceived value of the blended format increased (P < 0.01) and a greater percentage of students agreed that learning key foundational content through video demonstrations before class greatly enhanced their learning of course material compared with a preassigned reading (94% vs. 78%, P < 0.01). Blended exercise physiology laboratories provided an alternative method for delivering content that was favorably perceived by students and did not compromise student performance. PMID:26847259

  5. An Organic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adshead, Mary Lois Timbes

    2001-01-01

    A former student reminisces about attending the Organic School in Fairhope, Alabama, in the 1950s. Founded in 1903, the school pioneered child-centered education; had multigraded classes; incorporated dance, pottery, weaving, and art into the curriculum; and was guided generally by the philosophy that education is not preparation for life, but…

  6. Physiological responses to exercise at altitude : an update.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Studies performed over the past decade have yielded new information related to the physiological and metabolic adjustments made in response to both short- and long-term high-altitude exposure. These investigations have examined the potential mechanisms responsible for the alterations observed in such key variables as heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, muscle blood flow, substrate utilization and mitochondrial function, both at rest and during exercise of varying intensities. Additionally, the occurrence and mechanisms related to the 'lactate paradox' continues to intrigue investigators. It is apparent that exposure to high altitude is an environmental stressor that elicits a robust sympathoadrenal response that contributes to many of the critical adjustments and adaptations mentioned above. Furthermore, as some of these important physiological adaptations are known to enhance performance, it has become popular to incorporate an aspect of altitude living/training into the training regimens of endurance athletes (e.g. 'live high-train low'). Finally, it is important to note that many factors influence the extent to which individuals adjust and adapt to the stress imposed by exposure to high altitude. Included among these are (i) the degree of hypoxia; (ii) the duration of exposure to hypoxic conditions; (iii) the exercise intensity (absolute vs relative workload); and (iv) the inter-individual variability in adapting to hypoxic environments ('responders' vs 'non-responders'). PMID:18081363

  7. An Interinstitutional Analysis of Faculty Teaching Load.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Stephen W.

    A two-year interinstitutional study among 15 cooperating universities was conducted to determine whether significant differences exist in teaching loads among the selected universities as measured by student credit hours produced by full-time equivalent faculty. The statistical model was a multivariate analysis of variance with fixed effects and…

  8. Ocean warming and acidification: Unifying physiological principles linking organism response to ecosystem change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pörtner, H. O.; Bock, C.; Lannig, G.; Lucassen, M.; Mark, F. C.; Stark, A.; Walther, K.; Wittmann, A.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 levels. Furthermore, a decrease in the efficiency of energy production may occur and affect growth and fitness as well as larval development. Different sensitivities of life history stages indicate physiologically sensitive bottlenecks during the life cycle of marine organisms. Available evidence suggests that the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) provides access to the physiological mechanisms closely defining the sensitivities and responses of species to various stressors. It provides causality and quantifies the levels and changes of performance and resistance, and supports more realistic estimates of species and ecosystem sensitivities to environmental change. The emerging picture of differential sensitivities across animal phyla is in line with existing categorizations of sensitivities from palaeo-observations during the Permian-Triassic mass extinctions (A.H. Knoll et al., Earth and Planetary Science Letters 256, 295-313, 2007).

  9. Physiological and behavioral effects of an antivertigo antihistamine in adults.

    PubMed

    Lauter, J L; Lynch, O; Wood, S B; Schoeffler, L

    1999-06-01

    12 neurologically normal adults were tested before and after administration of meclizine, an over-the-counter medication for motion sickness. A battery of four tests was used: (1) distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, (2) the Repeated Evoked Potentials version of the Auditory Brainstem Response, (3) quantitative electroencephalography measured over the left and right sides of the auditory cortex, and (4) a hand-eye coordination task. The battery required approximately 1.5 hr. to complete. Each subject was tested with the battery in each of eight longitudinal sessions: three times on a control day (9 am, 1 pm, 3 pm--no medication); the same times on a second day one week later (medication at approximately 11:30 am), and 24- and 48-hr. check-up sessions following the medication day. Analysis indicated changes in all components, with details suggesting the site(s) of action of this type of antihistamine. The cross-section of the auditory system yielded by this battery makes it possible to observe effects at the periphery, in the brainstem, and in the cortex, including evidence linking otoacoustic emissions with central auditory physiology. Implications range from cautions regarding the use of antihistamines to physiological support for employing such medications to enhance patients' response to vestibular rehabilitation as well as to improve performance in learning-disordered children. PMID:10407877

  10. Physiological Waterfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, David E.

    1976-01-01

    Provides background information, defining areas within organ systems where physiological waterfalls exist. Describes pressure-flow relationships of elastic tubes (blood vessels, airways, renal tubules, various ducts). (CS)

  11. Increased Cloud Activation Potential of Secondary Organic Aerosol for Atmospheric Mass Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    King, Stephanie M.; Rosenoern, Thomas; Shilling, John E.; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T.

    2009-05-01

    The effect of organic particle mass loading from 1 to ≥100 μg m-3 on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties of mixed organic-sulfate particles was investigated in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. Mixed particles were produced by the condensation of organic molecules onto ammonium sulfate particles during the dark ozonolysis of α-pinene. A continuous-flow mode of the chamber provided stable conditions over long time periods, allowing for signal integration and hence increased measurement precision at low organic mass loadings representative of atmospheric conditions. CCN activity was measured at eight mass loadings for 80- and 100-nm particles grown on 50-nm sulfate seeds. A two-component (organic/sulfate) Köhler model, which included the particle heterogeneity arising from DMA size selection and from organic volume fraction for the selected 80- and 100-nm particles, was used to predict CCN activity. For organic mass loadings of 2.9 μg m-3 and greater, the observed activation curves were well predicted using a single set of physicochemical parameters for the organic component. For mass loadings of 1.74 μg m-3 and less, the observed CCN activity increased beyond predicted values using the same parameters, implying changed physicochemical properties of the organic component. Of possible changes in surface tension, effective molecular weight, and effective density, a sensitivity analysis implicated a decrease of up to 10% in surface tension at low mass loadings as the plausible dominant mechanism for the observed increase in CCN activity.

  12. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Tahira M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention) × 4 (within-subjects time points) mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities. PMID:26999186

  13. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions.

    PubMed

    Probst, Tahira M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention) × 4 (within-subjects time points) mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities. PMID:26999186

  14. Effect of organic loading rate and feedstock composition on foaming in manure-based biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Angelidaki, I

    2013-09-01

    Foaming is one of the major problems that occasionally occur in biogas plants, affecting negatively the overall digestion process. In the present study, the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) and feedstock composition on foaming was elucidated in continuous reactor experiments. By stepwise increasing the OLR and the concentration of proteins or lipids in the substrate, foaming in biogas reactors was investigated. No foam formation was observed at the OLR of 3.5 g volatile solids/(L-reactor·day). Organic loading was the main factor affecting foam formation in manure digester, while the organic composition, such as content of proteins or lipids were factors that in combination with the organic loading were triggering foaming. More specifically, gelatine could initiate foam formation at a lower OLR than sodium oleate. Moreover, the volume of foam produced by gelatine was relatively stable and was not increased when further increasing either OLR or gelatine concentration in the feed. PMID:23850819

  15. Response of a continuous biomethanation process to transient organic shock loads under controlled and uncontrolled pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-04-15

    The organic loading rate (OLR) is a critical factor that controls the treatment efficiency and biogas production in anaerobic digestion (AD). Therefore, organic shock loads may cause significant process imbalances accompanied by a drop in pH and acid accumulation or even failure. This study investigated the response of a continuous mesophilic anaerobic bioreactor to a series of transient organic shock loads of the substrate whey permeate, a high-strength organic wastewater from cheese making. The reactor was subjected to organic shock loads of increasing magnitude (a one-day pulse of elevated feed organic concentration) under controlled (near 7) and uncontrolled pH conditions at a fixed HRT of 10 days. The reactor was resilient to up to a shock load of up to 8.0 g SCOD/L·d under controlled pH conditions but failed to recover from the serious imbalance caused by a 3.0-g SCOD/L·d shock load, thus indicating the critical effect of pH on system resilience. The acidified reactor was not restored by interrupted feeding under the acidic conditions that were formed (pH ≤ 4.5) but was successfully restored after pH adjustment to 7. The reactor subsequently reverted to continuous mode without pH control and showed a performance comparable to the stable performance at the design OLR of 1.0 g SCOD/L·d. The bacterial community structure shifted dynamically in association with disturbances in the reactor conditions, whereas the archaeal community structure remained simple and less variable during the shock loading experiments. The structural shifts of the bacterial community were well correlated with the process performance changes, and performance recovery was generally accompanied by recovery of the bacterial community structure. The overall results suggest that the reactor pH, rather than simply acting as an accumulation of organic acids, had a crucial effect on the resilience and robustness of the microbial community and thus on the reactor performance under organic

  16. What is conservation physiology? Perspectives on an increasingly integrated and essential science†

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Steven J.; Sack, Lawren; Franklin, Craig E.; Farrell, Anthony P.; Beardall, John; Wikelski, Martin; Chown, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, ecosystems and their constituent flora and fauna face the localized and broad-scale influence of human activities. Conservation practitioners and environmental managers struggle to identify and mitigate threats, reverse species declines, restore degraded ecosystems, and manage natural resources sustainably. Scientific research and evidence are increasingly regarded as the foundation for new regulations, conservation actions, and management interventions. Conservation biologists and managers have traditionally focused on the characteristics (e.g. abundance, structure, trends) of populations, species, communities, and ecosystems, and simple indicators of the responses to environmental perturbations and other human activities. However, an understanding of the specific mechanisms underlying conservation problems is becoming increasingly important for decision-making, in part because physiological tools and knowledge are especially useful for developing cause-and-effect relationships, and for identifying the optimal range of habitats and stressor thresholds for different organisms. When physiological knowledge is incorporated into ecological models, it can improve predictions of organism responses to environmental change and provide tools to support management decisions. Without such knowledge, we may be left with simple associations. ‘Conservation physiology’ has been defined previously with a focus on vertebrates, but here we redefine the concept universally, for application to the diversity of taxa from microbes to plants, to animals, and to natural resources. We also consider ‘physiology’ in the broadest possible terms; i.e. how an organism functions, and any associated mechanisms, from development to bioenergetics, to environmental interactions, through to fitness. Moreover, we consider conservation physiology to include a wide range of applications beyond assisting imperiled populations, and include, for example, the eradication of invasive

  17. Concentrations, loads, and yields of organic carbon in streams of agricultural watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kronholm, Scott; Capel, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Carbon is cycled to and from large reservoirs in the atmosphere, on land, and in the ocean. Movement of organic carbon from the terrestrial reservoir to the ocean plays an important role in the global cycling of carbon. The transition from natural to agricultural vegetation can change the storage and movement of organic carbon in and from a watershed. Samples were collected from 13 streams located in hydrologically and agriculturally diverse watersheds, to better understand the variability in the concentrations and loads of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) in the streams, and the variability in watershed yields. The overall annual median concentrations of DOC and POC were 4.9 (range: 2.1–6.8) and 1.1 (range: 0.4–3.8) mg C L−1, respectively. The mean DOC watershed yield (± SE) was 25 ± 6.8 kg C ha−1 yr−1. The yields of DOC from these agricultural watersheds were not substantially different than the DOC yield from naturally vegetated watersheds in equivalent biomes, but were at the low end of the range for most biomes. Total organic carbon (DOC + POC) annually exported from the agricultural watersheds was found to average 0.03% of the organic carbon that is contained in the labile plant matter and top 1 m of soil in the watershed. Since the total organic carbon exported from agricultural watersheds is a relatively small portion of the sequestered carbon within the watershed, there is the great potential to store additional carbon in plants and soils of the watershed, offsetting some anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  18. Linking CDOM spectral absorption to dissolved organic carbon concentrations and loadings in boreal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmala, Eero; Stedmon, Colin A.; Thomas, David N.

    2012-10-01

    The quantity of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three Finnish estuaries (Karjaanjoki, Kyrönjoki and Kiiminkijoki) was investigated, with respect to predicting DOC concentrations and loadings from spectral CDOM absorption measurements. Altogether 87 samples were collected from three estuarine transects which were studied in three seasons, covering a salinity range between 0 and 6.8, and DOC concentrations from 1572 μmol l-1 in freshwater to 222 μmol l-1 in coastal waters. CDOM absorption coefficient, aCDOM(375) values followed the trend in DOC concentrations across the salinity gradient and ranged from 1.67 to 33.4 m-1. The link between DOC and CDOM was studied using a range of wavelengths and algorithms. Wavelengths between 250 and 270 nm gave the best predictions with single linear regression. Total dissolved iron was found to influence the prediction in wavelengths above 520 nm. Despite significant seasonal and spatial differences in DOC-CDOM models, a universal relationship was tested with an independent data set and found to be robust. DOC and CDOM yields (loading/catchment area) from the catchments ranged from 1.98 to 5.44 g C m-2 yr-1, and 1.67 to 11.5 aCDOM(375) yr-1, respectively.

  19. Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score versus Simplified Acute Physiology score to analyze multiple organ dysfunction in infectious diseases in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Remyasri; Bhandary, Nithish M.; D’Souza, Ashton D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score of patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who were diagnosed with infectious disease, as an indicator of multiple organ dysfunction and to examine if initial SOFA score is a better mortality predictor compared to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). Materials and Methods: Hospital-based study done in medical ICU, from June to September 2014 with a sample size of 48. Patients aged 18 years and above, diagnosed with infectious disease were included. Patients with history of chronic illness (renal/hepatic/pulmonary/  cardiovascular), diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, those on immunosuppressive therapy/chemoradiotherapy for malignancy and patients in immunocompromised state were excluded. Blood investigations were obtained. Six organ dysfunctions were assessed using initial SOFA score and graded from 0 to 4. SAPS was calculated as the sum of points assigned to each of the 17 variables (12 physiological, age, type of admission, and three underlying diseases). The outcome measure was survival status at ICU discharge. Results: We categorized infectious diseases into dengue fever, leptospirosis, malaria, respiratory tract infections, and others which included undiagnosed febrile illness, meningitis, urinary tract infection and gastroenteritis. Initial SOFA score was both sensitive and specific; SAPS lacked sensitivity. We found no significant association between age and survival status. Both SAPS and initial SOFA score were found to be statistically significant as mortality predictors. There is significant association of initial SOFA score in analyzing organ dysfunction in infectious diseases (P < 0.001). SAPS showed no statistical significance. There was statistically significant (P = 0.015) percentage of nonsurvivors with moderate and severe dysfunction, based on SOFA score. Nonsurvivors had higher SAPS but was not statistically significant (P

  20. [Distance methods of cardiologic monitoring in diagnostics of high loading effects on organism of sportsman and cosmonaut].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V I; Ryzhakov, N I; Tarakanov, S A; Nikitenko, A N; Rassadina, A A; Kozlenok, A V; Moroshkin, V S

    2012-01-01

    Increase of cardiovascular tension is a common thing for professional athletic training. Cardiovascular pathologies can be prevented by permanent physiological monitoring using, among others, the methods of cardiologic monitoring so far available in stationary diagnostic centers. On-line remote diagnostics during training is potent to enhance effectiveness and efficiency of sporting people's health management. In addition, RD will also enable extensive investigations of the bodily responses of individually determined training loads. The paper gives an overview of the current RM technologies. PMID:23457962

  1. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, G.R.

    1983-11-29

    A dc switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load is provided. The regulator basic circuit is a bridge arrangement of diodes and transistors. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. A dc power supply is connected to the input of the bridge and the output is connected to the load. A servo controller is provided to control the switching rate of the transistors to maintain a desired current to the load. The regulator may be operated in three stages or modes: (1) for current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned on and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned off, and load current flywheels through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays off, allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load.

  2. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, George R.

    1986-01-01

    A power supply for driving an inductive load current from a dc power supply hrough a regulator circuit including a bridge arrangement of diodes and switching transistors controlled by a servo controller which regulates switching in response to the load current to maintain a selected load current. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. The regulator may be operated in three "stages" or modes: (1) For current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned "on" and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned "off", and load current "flywheels" through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays "off", allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load. The three operating states are controlled automatically by the controller.

  3. Growth, physiological and molecular traits in Salicaceae trees investigated for phytoremediation of heavy metals and organics.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Marta; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Maestri, Elena; Zacchini, Massimo; Marmiroli, Nelson; Massacci, Angelo

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, there are many large areas moderately contaminated with heavy metals and/or organics that have not been remediated due to the high cost and technical drawbacks of currently available technologies. Methods with a good potential for coping with these limitations are emerging from phytoremediation techniques, using, for example, specific amendments and/or plants selected from various candidates proven in several investigations to be reasonably efficient in extracting heavy metals from soil or water, or in co-metabolizing organics with bacteria flourishing or inoculated in their rhizospheres. Populus and Salix spp., two genera belonging to the Salicaceae family, include genotypes that can be considered among the candidates for this phytoremediation approach. This review shows the recent improvements in analytical tools based on the identification of useful genetic diversity associated with classical growth, physiological and biochemical traits, and the importance of plant genotype selection for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Particularly interesting are studies on the application of the phytoremediation of heavy metals and of chlorinated organics, in which microorganisms selected for their degradation capabilities were bioaugmented in the rhizosphere of Salicaceae planted at a high density for biomass and bioenergy production. PMID:22052656

  4. Quantitative effects of some pesticides on certain physiological groups of micro-organisms in soil.

    PubMed

    Makawi, A A; Abdel-Nasser, M; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative effects of temik (insecticide and nematocide), orthocide (fungicide), or treflan (herbicide), added to soil at field rate application, on counts of certain desirable soil microorganisms were studied. In the presence of any of the pesticides, counts of aerobic cellulose-decomposers were either stimulated or depressed. Despite the temporarily slight stimulation, observed in some instances of the initial periods, the effect of any pesticide on counts of Azotobacter, N-fixing clostridia, and ammonifiers was subsequently depressive. The period of retardation or stimulation differed according to the chemical composition of the pesticides and physiological properties of micro-organisms. However, the autotrophic nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonium-oxidizers, seemed to be more sensitive and their counts in treated in treated soil were sharply depressed. PMID:494851

  5. Soil organic matter influences cerium translocation and physiological processes in kidney bean plants exposed to cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Sun, Youping; Barrios, Ana C; Niu, Genhua; Margez, Juan P Flores-; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter plays a major role in determining the fate of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil matrix and effects on the residing plants. In this study, kidney bean plants were grown in soils varying in organic matter content and amended with 0-500mg/kg cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) under greenhouse condition. After 52days of exposure, cerium accumulation in tissues, plant growth and physiological parameters including photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), net photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance were recorded. Additionally, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in the tissues. The translocation factor of cerium in the nano-CeO2 exposed plants grown in organic matter enriched soil (OMES) was twice as the plants grown in low organic matter soil (LOMS). Although the leaf cover area increased by 65-111% with increasing nano-CeO2 concentration in LOMS, the effect on the physiological processes were inconsequential. In OMES leaves, exposure to 62.5-250mg/kg nano-CeO2 led to an enhancement in the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but to a simultaneous decrease in carotenoid contents by 25-28%. Chlorophyll a in the OMES leaves also decreased by 27 and 18% on exposure to 125 and 250mg/kg nano-CeO2. In addition, catalase activity increased in LOMS stems, and ascorbate peroxidase increased in OMES leaves of nano-CeO2 exposed plants, with respect to control. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that the properties of the complex soil matrix play decisive roles in determining the fate, bioavailability, and biological transport of ENMs in the environment. PMID:27343939

  6. Characterization of Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 and its physiological potential for biodegradation of selected organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Vojtková, Hana; Kosina, Marcel; Sedláček, Ivo; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Harwotová, Markéta; Molinková, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 bacterial strain, deposited at the Czech Collection of Microorganisms, was originally isolated by Haľama and Augustín (1980) as a bacterium degrading aromatic hydrocarbons and derivates. A detailed study supported by a molecular genetics method of sequence analyses of rrs and rpoD genes was used to reclassify the strain, originally stored as 'Pseudomonas putida'. The physiological characteristics of the strain are complemented with research in the capacity to utilize selected organic pollutants (anthracene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene). The obtained results point at very good biodegradation properties of the strain. Already after 7 days of the bacterial strain's action, there was a decrease in all the organic contaminants to 79.8 ± 2.6 %. In 14 days, the amount of organic contaminants dropped to 59.3 ± 2.8 %. After 21 days of biodegradation experiments, the overall quantity of the observed organic substances fell below the half limit to 45.7 ± 2.5 % of residuals. Finally, after 28 days, the residue was 35.4 ± 2.2 %, and after 35 days of the action of P. monteilii, the tested samples contained mere 27.8 ± 2.8 % of organic pollutants. The results imply that Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 is a prospective strain in terms of further biotechnological application in contaminated environment. PMID:25543262

  7. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    PubMed

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (<1.6 and 1.6-1.8 g cm(-3) ) and bulk soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for

  8. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  9. Exploration of PBPK Model-Calculation of Drug Time Course in Tissue Using IV Bolus Drug Plasma Concentration-Time Profile and the Physiological Parameters of the Organ.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2016-08-01

    An uncommon innovative consideration of the well-stirred linear physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the drug plasma concentration-time profile, which is measured in routine intravenous bolus pharmacokinetic study, was applied for the calculation of the drug time course in human tissues. This cannot be obtained in the in vivo pharmacokinetic study. The physiological parameters of the organ such as organ tissue volume, organ blood flow rate, and its vascular volume were used in the calculation. The considered method was applied to calculate the time course of midazolam, alprazolam, quinidine, and diclofenac in human organs or tissues. The suggested method might be applied for the prediction of drug concentration-time profile in tissues and consequently the drug concentration level in the targeted tissue, as well as the possible undesirable toxic levels in other tissues. PMID:27290628

  10. Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Youngman, A.L.

    1997-12-31

    Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

  11. Effects of manufactured nanomaterials on fishes: a target organ and body systems physiology approach.

    PubMed

    Handy, R D; Al-Bairuty, G; Al-Jubory, A; Ramsden, C S; Boyle, D; Shaw, B J; Henry, T B

    2011-10-01

    Manufactured nanomaterials (NM) are already used in consumer products and exposure modelling predicts releases of ng to low µg l(-1) levels of NMs into surface waters. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems, and therefore fishes, to manufactured NMs is inevitable. This review uses a physiological approach to describe the known effects of NMs on the body systems of fishes and to identify the internal target organs, as well as outline aspects of colloid chemistry relevant to fish biology. The acute toxicity data, suggest that the lethal concentration for many NMs is in the mg l(-1) range, and a number of sublethal effects have been reported at concentrations from c. 100 µg to 1 mg l(-1). Exposure to NMs in the water column can cause respiratory toxicity involving altered ventilation, mucus secretion and gill pathology. This may not lead, however, to overt haematological disturbances in the short term. The internal target organs include the liver, spleen and haematopoietic system, kidney, gut and brain; with toxic effects involving oxidative stress, ionoregulatory disturbances and organ pathologies. Some pathology appears to be novel for NMs, such as vascular injury in the brain of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss with carbon nanotubes. A lack of analytical methods, however, has prevented the reporting of NM concentrations in fish tissues, and the precise uptake mechanisms across the gill or gut are yet to be elucidated. The few dietary exposure studies conducted show no effects on growth or food intake at 10-100 mg kg(-1) inclusions of NMs in the diet of O. mykiss, but there are biochemical disturbances. Early life stages are sensitive to NMs with reports of lethal toxicity and developmental defects. There are many data gaps, however, including how water quality alters physiological responses, effects on immunity and chronic exposure data at environmentally relevant concentrations. Overall, the data so far suggest that the manufactured NMs are not as toxic as some

  12. ORGANIC LOADING STUDY OF FULL-SCALE SEQUENCING BATCH REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at Culver, Indiana, has two 440(sup 3) aeration basins that have received primary effluent on an alternating, fill-and-draw basis since May 1980. During normal SBR operation, liquid level variation and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concen...

  13. Organic Carbon Trends, Loads, and Yields to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, Water Years 1980 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saleh, Dina K.; Domagalski, Joseph L.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2003-01-01

    concentrations of DOC is released from reservoirs and used for irrigation. On the other hand, during the nonirrigation season, streamflow results from surface water runoff and has higher concentrations of organic carbon, nutrients, and suspended sediment. The 1986 and 1987 water years were selected to describe loads in the San Joaquin River Basin. Organic carbon, nutrient, and suspended sediment loads in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis included transported loads from upstream sites, such as the Mud and Salt Sloughs, the Merced River at River Roads Bridge near Newman, the Tuolumne River at Modesto, and the Stanislaus River at Ripon. Loads at the San Joaquin River near Vernalis also were analyzed for the two seasons. The DOC load for the San Joaquin River at Vernalis is slightly higher during the irrigation season. Yields were calculated in an attempt to rank the subbasins in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins. Five sites delivered streamflow from agricultural and urban sources that had relatively high yields of organic carbon: Sacramento Slough near Knights Landing, Arcade Creek near Del Paso Heights, Salt Slough, Mud Slough, and Colusa Basin Drain at Road 99E near Knights Landing.

  14. Evolution: what is an organism?

    PubMed

    West, Stuart A; Kiers, E Toby

    2009-12-15

    Defining an organism has long been a tricky problem for biologists. Recent work has shown how an approach based on adaptation can solve this problem, giving a conceptually simple two-dimensional measure of 'organismality'. PMID:20064409

  15. Dynamic digestive physiology of a female reproductive organ in a polyandrous butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Plakke, Melissa S.; Deutsch, Aaron B.; Meslin, Camille; Clark, Nathan L.; Morehouse, Nathan I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reproductive traits experience high levels of selection because of their direct ties to fitness, often resulting in rapid adaptive evolution. Much of the work in this area has focused on male reproductive traits. However, a more comprehensive understanding of female reproductive adaptations and their relationship to male characters is crucial to uncover the relative roles of sexual cooperation and conflict in driving co-evolutionary dynamics between the sexes. We focus on the physiology of a complex female reproductive adaptation in butterflies and moths: a stomach-like organ in the female reproductive tract called the bursa copulatrix that digests the male ejaculate (spermatophore). Little is known about how the bursa digests the spermatophore. We characterized bursa proteolytic capacity in relation to female state in the polyandrous butterfly Pieris rapae. We found that the virgin bursa exhibits extremely high levels of proteolytic activity. Furthermore, in virgin females, bursal proteolytic capacity increases with time since eclosion and ambient temperature, but is not sensitive to the pre-mating social environment. Post copulation, bursal proteolytic activity decreases rapidly before rebounding toward the end of a mating cycle, suggesting active female regulation of proteolysis and/or potential quenching of proteolysis by male ejaculate constituents. Using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we report identities for nine proteases actively transcribed by bursal tissue and/or expressed in the bursal lumen that may contribute to observed bursal proteolysis. We discuss how these dynamic physiological characteristics may function as female adaptations resulting from sexual conflict over female remating rate in this polyandrous butterfly. PMID:25994634

  16. Dynamic digestive physiology of a female reproductive organ in a polyandrous butterfly.

    PubMed

    Plakke, Melissa S; Deutsch, Aaron B; Meslin, Camille; Clark, Nathan L; Morehouse, Nathan I

    2015-05-15

    Reproductive traits experience high levels of selection because of their direct ties to fitness, often resulting in rapid adaptive evolution. Much of the work in this area has focused on male reproductive traits. However, a more comprehensive understanding of female reproductive adaptations and their relationship to male characters is crucial to uncover the relative roles of sexual cooperation and conflict in driving co-evolutionary dynamics between the sexes. We focus on the physiology of a complex female reproductive adaptation in butterflies and moths: a stomach-like organ in the female reproductive tract called the bursa copulatrix that digests the male ejaculate (spermatophore). Little is known about how the bursa digests the spermatophore. We characterized bursa proteolytic capacity in relation to female state in the polyandrous butterfly Pieris rapae. We found that the virgin bursa exhibits extremely high levels of proteolytic activity. Furthermore, in virgin females, bursal proteolytic capacity increases with time since eclosion and ambient temperature, but is not sensitive to the pre-mating social environment. Post copulation, bursal proteolytic activity decreases rapidly before rebounding toward the end of a mating cycle, suggesting active female regulation of proteolysis and/or potential quenching of proteolysis by male ejaculate constituents. Using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we report identities for nine proteases actively transcribed by bursal tissue and/or expressed in the bursal lumen that may contribute to observed bursal proteolysis. We discuss how these dynamic physiological characteristics may function as female adaptations resulting from sexual conflict over female remating rate in this polyandrous butterfly. PMID:25994634

  17. Myosin VI as a transporter and an anchor: A model for kinetics of the motor under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Peiying; Spudich, James; Dunn, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Myosin VI is an actin-based motor that is thought to function both as a transporter and an anchor in vivo. In an earlier study (Altman et al, Cell 2004), inhibition of myosin VI stepping kinetics by load applied using an optical trap was observed at saturating ATP and low ADP concentrations (< 2.5 μM). A simple mechanism whereby the rate of ADP binding increases exponentially with load was proposed. This model predicts that myosin VI functions primarily as an anchor at loads greater than ˜0.5 pN under physiological nucleotide conditions, which is potentially inconsistent with its roles in vivo. Here we present myosin VI stepping data taken at a variety of applied loads and ADP concentrations, and show that the Altman model only holds at low ADP concentrations. At higher, physiologically relevant ADP concentrations under load we observe dwell times that are an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by the Altman model. We present a modified model in which applied load alters the equilibrium between two myosin VI states with different nucleotide affinities. This new kinetic scheme accurately describes myosin VI behavior at various nucleotide conditions under a large range of loads, and explains how the motor is able to carry out its roles in vivo, both as a force-generating transporter and as an anchor.

  18. What does germane load mean? An empirical contribution to the cognitive load theory

    PubMed Central

    Debue, Nicolas; van de Leemput, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    While over the last decades, much attention has been paid to the mental workload in the field of human computer interactions, there is still a lack of consensus concerning the factors that generate it as well as the measurement methods that could reflect workload variations. Based on the multifactorial Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), our study aims to provide some food for thought about the subjective and objective measurement that can be used to disentangle the intrinsic, extraneous, and germane load. The purpose is to provide insight into the way cognitive load can explain how users' cognitive resources are allocated in the use of hypermedia, such as an online newspaper. A two-phase experiment has been conducted on the information retention from online news stories. Phase 1 (92 participants) examined the influence of multimedia content on performance as well as the relationships between cognitive loads and cognitive absorption. In Phase 2 (36 participants), eye-tracking data were collected in order to provide reliable and objective measures. Results confirmed that performance in information retention was impacted by the presence of multimedia content such as animations and pictures. The higher number of fixations on these animations suggests that users' attention could have been attracted by them. Results showed the expected opposite relationships between germane and extraneous load, a positive association between germane load and cognitive absorption and a non-linear association between intrinsic and germane load. The trends based on eye-tracking data analysis provide some interesting findings about the relationship between longer fixations, shorter saccades and cognitive load. Some issues are raised about the respective contribution of mean pupil diameter and Index of Cognitive Activity. PMID:25324806

  19. An integrated model of stomatal development and leaf physiology.

    PubMed

    Dow, Graham J; Bergmann, Dominique C; Berry, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    • Stomatal conductance (g(s)) is constrained by the size and number of stomata on the plant epidermis, and the potential maximum rate of g(s) can be calculated based on these stomatal traits (Anatomical g(smax)). However, the relationship between Anatomical g(smax) and operational g(s) under atmospheric conditions remains undefined. • Leaf-level gas-exchange measurements were performed for six Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that have different Anatomical g(smax) profiles resulting from mutations or transgene activity in stomatal development. • We found that Anatomical g(smax) was an accurate prediction of g(s) under gas-exchange conditions that maximized stomatal opening, namely high-intensity light, low [CO₂], and high relative humidity. Plants with different Anatomical g(smax) had quantitatively similar responses to increasing [CO₂] when g(s) was scaled to Anatomical g(smax). This latter relationship allowed us to produce and test an empirical model derived from the Ball-Woodrow-Berry equation that estimates g(s) as a function of Anatomical g(smax), relative humidity, and [CO₂] at the leaf. • The capacity to predict operational g(s) via Anatomical g(smax) and the pore-specific short-term response to [CO₂] demonstrates a precise link between stomatal development and leaf physiology. This connection should be useful to quantify the gas flux of plants in past, present, and future CO₂ regimes based upon the anatomical features of stomata. PMID:24251982

  20. An automated dynamic load for power system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Norma Dugal; Kapustka, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic load which is computer-controlled and has an increased bandwidth of more than 10 times that commercially available at the time the development of the project began. The load is 3 kW with a bandwidth of 35 kHz. The hardware and software are described, and the control circuitry is shown.

  1. The determination of organomercurials in surface waters containing high organic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar, T.M.; Arrecis, J.J.; Witt, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    A method to measure trace quantities of methyl mercuric chloride and other organomercurials in surface waters containing high organic loads has been developed. Since organomercurials are usually present at ultra trace levels (0.02 to 0.2 ng/L) in surface waters, sample pre concentration is often necessary. This paper outlines the use of solid phase extraction to achieve the desired pre concentration. The compounds are then separated using gas chromatography and detected using an atomic fluorescence detector. Unlike the conventional approach which employs ethylation, there is no need to derivative the organomercurials to their more volatile ethylated analogs, and direct injection of the SPE extract onto a column is possible. Moreover this technique lends itself to a limited amount of automation, and higher throughput. Results from the analysis of surface waters from the Florida Everglades will be presented.

  2. Tolerance to hydraulic and organic load fluctuations in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Masi, F; Martinuzzi, N; Bresciani, R; Giovannelli, L; Conte, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a two-year performance evaluation of four different constructed wetland (CW) treatment systems designed by IRIDRA Srl, located in central Italy. All four CW systems were established to treat wastewater effluent from different tourist activities: (1) one single-stage CW for secondary treatment of domestic wastewater (30 p.e.) at a holiday farm site; (2) a hybrid compact system consisting of two stages, a horizontal flow (HF) system followed by a vertical flow (VF) system for the secondary treatment of effluent from a 140 p.e. tourist resort; (3) a single-stage vertical flow (VF) CW for a 100 p.e. mountain shelter; and (4) a pair of single-stage, HF CWs for the secondary treatment of segregated grey and black water produced by an 80 p.e. camping site. These tourism facilities are located in remote areas and share some common characteristics concerning their water management: they have high variability of water consumption and wastewater flow, depending on the season, weather and weekly regularities; they have no connection to a public sewer and most sites are located in a sensitive environment. Total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), ammonium (N-NH4+), nitrate (N-NOx), total nitrogen (Ntot), total phosphorus (Ptot), total coliform (TC), faecal coliform (FC), E. coli removal efficiencies for all four CW systems are presented. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of CWs as a suitable technology for treating wastewater from tourism facilities in remote areas. A very efficient COD reduction (83-95%) and pathogen elimination (3-5 logs) have been achieved. Furthermore, the CWs are easily maintained, robust (not sensitive to peak flows), constructed with local materials, and operate with relatively low cost. PMID:17802836

  3. Higher organism load associated with failure of azithromycin to treat rectal chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Kong, F Y S; Tabrizi, S N; Fairley, C K; Phillips, S; Fehler, G; Law, M; Vodstrcil, L A; Chen, M; Bradshaw, C S; Hocking, J S

    2016-09-01

    Repeat rectal chlamydia infection is common in men who have sex with men (MSM) following treatment with 1 g azithromycin. This study describes the association between organism load and repeat rectal chlamydia infection, genovar distribution, and efficacy of azithromycin in asymptomatic MSM. Stored rectal chlamydia-positive samples from MSM were analysed for organism load and genotyped to assist differentiation between reinfection and treatment failure. Included men had follow-up tests within 100 days of index infection. Lymphogranuloma venereum and proctitis diagnosed symptomatically were excluded. Factors associated with repeat infection, treatment failure and reinfection were investigated. In total, 227 MSM were included - 64 with repeat infections [28·2%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 22·4-34·5]. Repeat positivity was associated with increased pre-treatment organism load [odds ratio (OR) 1·7, 95% CI 1·4-2·2]. Of 64 repeat infections, 29 (12·8%, 95% CI 8·7-17·8) were treatment failures and 35 (15·4%, 95% CI 11·0-20·8) were reinfections, 11 (17·2%, 95% CI 8·9-28·7) of which were definite reinfections. Treatment failure and reinfection were both associated with increased load (OR 2·0, 95% CI 1·4-2·7 and 1·6, 95% CI 1·2-2·2, respectively). The most prevalent genovars were G, D and J. Treatment efficacy for 1 g azithromycin was 83·6% (95% CI 77·2-88·8). Repeat positivity was associated with high pre-treatment organism load. Randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to evaluate azithromycin's efficacy and whether extended doses can overcome rectal infections with high organism load. PMID:27180823

  4. Pulse shape discrimination capability of metal-loaded organic liquid scintillators for a short-baseline reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. R.; Han, B. Y.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, Jeongsoo; Khan, N.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, J. Y.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Yeongduk; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Lee, J. Y.; Ma, K. J.; Park, Hyeonseo; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Seo, K. M.; Seon, Gwang-Min; Yeo, I. S.; Yeo, K. M.

    2015-05-01

    A new short-baseline (SBL) reactor neutrino experiment is proposed to investigate a reactor anti-neutrino anomaly. A liquid scintillator (LS) is used to detect anti-neutrinos emitted from a Hanaro reactor, and the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) ability of the metal-loaded organic LSs is evaluated on small-scale laboratory samples. PSD can be affected by selecting different base solvents, and several of the LSs used two different organic base solvents, such as linear alkyl benzene and di-isopropylnaphthalene. For the metallic content, gadolinium (Gd) or lithium (6Li) was loaded into a home-made organic LS and into a commercially available liquid scintillation cocktail. A feasibility study was performed for the PSD using several different liquid scintillation cocktails. In this work, the preparation and the PSD characteristics of a promising candidate, which will be used in an above-ground environment, are summarized and presented.

  5. Explicit finite element modelling of heel pad mechanics in running: inclusion of body dynamics and application of physiological impact loads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2015-01-01

    Many heel pathologies including plantar heel pain may result from micro tears/trauma in the subcutaneous tissues, in which internal tissue deformation/stresses within the heel pad play an important role. Previously, many finite element models have been proposed to evaluate stresses inside the heel pad, but the majority of these models only focus on static loading boundary conditions. This study explored a dynamics modelling approach to the heel pad subjected to realistic impact loads during running. In this model, the inertial property and action of the body are described by a lumped parameter model, while the heel/shoe interactions are modelled using a viscoelastic heel pad model with contact properties. The impact force pattern, dynamic heel pad deformation and stress states predicted by the model were compared with published experimental data. Further parametrical studies revealed the model responses, in terms of internal stresses in the skin and fatty tissue, change nonlinearly when body dynamics changes. A reduction in foot's touchdown velocity resulted in a less severe impact landing and stress relief inside the heel pad, for example peak von-Mises stress in fatty tissue, was reduced by 11.3%. Applications of the model may be extendable to perform iterative analyses to further understand the complex relationships between body dynamics and stress distributions in the soft tissue of heel pad during running. This may open new opportunities to study the mechanical aetiology of plantar heel pain in runners. PMID:24980181

  6. Nest ectoparasites increase physiological stress in breeding birds: an experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-de La Puente, Josué; Merino, Santiago; Tomás, Gustavo; Moreno, Juan; Morales, Judith; Lobato, Elisa; Martínez, Javier

    2011-02-01

    Parasites are undoubtedly a biotic factor that produces stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important molecules buffering cellular damage under adverse conditions. During the breeding season, blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus (L.) adults are affected by blood parasites, nest-dwelling parasites and biting flies, potentially affecting their HSP-mediated responses. Here, we treated females with primaquine to reduce blood parasites and fumigated nests with permethrin to reduce nest-dwelling parasites to test whether these treatments affect HSP60 level during the breeding season. Medicated females, but not controls, had a significant reduction of the intensity of infection by Haemoproteus spp. blood parasites. However, final intensity of infection did not differ significantly between groups, and we did not find an effect of medication on change in HSP60 level. Fumigation reduced the abundance of nest-dwelling parasites (mites, fleas and blowfly larvae) and engorged biting midges in nests. Females breeding in non-fumigated nests increased HSP60 levels during the season more than those breeding in fumigated nests. Furthermore, the change in HSP60 level was positively correlated with the abundance of biting midges. These results show how infections by nest ectoparasites during the breeding period can increase the level of HSPs and suggest that biting midges impose physiological costs on breeding female blue tits. Although plausible, the alternative that biting midges prefer to feed on more stressed birds is poorly supported by previous studies.

  7. Cyclic loading of an elastic-plastic adhesive spherical microcontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Y.; Kligerman, Y.; Etsion, I.

    2008-10-01

    A previous study of a single load-unload cycle of an adhesive contact between an elastic-plastic microscopic sphere and a rigid flat is extended here for several load-unload cycles. The interacting forces between the sphere and the flat obey the Lennard-Jones potential. Kinematic hardening is assumed for the sphere material to account for possible plastic shakedown, and the difference between kinematic and isotropic hardenings is discussed. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the evolution of the load-approach curves for the elastic-plastic spherical contact during its cyclic loading-unloading. These curves are presented for different physical conditions, represented by three main dimensionless parameters, which affect the behavior of the elastic-plastic adhesive contact. A transition value of the Tabor parameter is found, below which the load-approach curves are always continuous and jump-in and jump-out instabilities are not expected.

  8. Chewing over physiology integration.

    PubMed

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; Miranda, Manoel de Arcisio; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-03-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the different areas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it comes to cuts in expenses. With the aim of addressing this kind of problem, the graduate students of our department organized a physiology summer course offered to undergraduate students. The objective was to present the different physiological systems in an integrated fashion. The strategy pursued was to plan laboratory classes whose experimental results were the basis for the relevant theoretical discussions. The subject we developed to illustrate physiology integration was the study of factors influencing salivary secretion. PMID:15718383

  9. A comparison of rating scale, secondary-task, physiological, and primary-task workload estimation techniques in a simulated flight task emphasizing communications load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casali, J. G.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen potential metrics of pilot mental workload were investigated regarding their sensitivity to communication load and their intrusion on primary-task performance. A moving-base flight simulator was used to present three cross-country flights. The flights varied only in the difficulty of the communications requirements. Rating scale measures were obtained immediately postflight; all others were taken over a 7-min segment of the flight task. The results indicated that both the Modified Cooper-Harper Scale and the workload Multi-descriptor Scale were sensitive to changes in communications load. The secondary-task measure of time estimation and the physiological measure of pupil diameter were also sensitive. As expected, those primary-task measures that were direct measures of communicative performance were also sensitive to load, whereas aicraft control primary-task measures were not, attesting to the task specificity of such measures. Finally, the intrusion analysis revealed no differential interference between workload measures.

  10. METHODOLOGY FOR ESTIMATING ENVIRONMENTAL LOADINGS FROM MANUFACTURE OF SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a methodology for estimating multimedia environmental loadings of a 'new' organic chemical (Section 2), the output data of which can be used to determine population exposure (within and without the manufacturing process plant battery limits) and to isolate th...

  11. Financial Management: An Organic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Although textbooks present corporate finance using a topical approach, good financial management requires an organic approach that integrates the various assignments financial managers confront every day. Breaking the tasks into meaningful subcategories, the current article offers one approach.

  12. LabVIEW Serial Driver Software for an Electronic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scullin, Vincent; Garcia, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A LabVIEW-language computer program enables monitoring and control of a Transistor Devices, Inc., Dynaload WCL232 (or equivalent) electronic load via an RS-232 serial communication link between the electronic load and a remote personal computer. (The electronic load can operate at constant voltage, current, power consumption, or resistance.) The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) at the computer that looks and acts like the front panel of the electronic load. Once the electronic load has been placed in remote-control mode, this program first queries the electronic load for the present values of all its operational and limit settings, and then drops into a cycle in which it reports the instantaneous voltage, current, and power values in displays that resemble those on the electronic load while monitoring the GUI images of pushbuttons for control actions by the user. By means of the pushbutton images and associated prompts, the user can perform such operations as changing limit values, the operating mode, or the set point. The benefit of this software is that it relieves the user of the need to learn one method for operating the electronic load locally and another method for operating it remotely via a personal computer.

  13. Blended Learning within an Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmer, Steven J.; Carter, Kathryn R.; Armga, Austin J.; Carter, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    In physiological education, blended course formats (integration of face-to-face and online instruction) can facilitate increased student learning, performance, and satisfaction in classroom settings. There is limited evidence on the effectiveness of using blending course formats in laboratory settings. We evaluated the impact of blended learning…

  14. Bingo!: An Engaging Activity for Learning Physiological Terms in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanags, Thea; George, Amanda M.; Grace, Diana M.; Brown, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain Bingo is a tutorial activity for helping undergraduate psychology students learn complex physiological terms. In two experiments, the authors tested pretest and posttest knowledge, and in Experiment 2, the authors tested retention after 5 weeks. In Experiment 1 (n = 41), the experimental group (Brain Bingo) recalled more terms than the…

  15. An Acoustical and Physiological Investigation of the Arabic /E/.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ani, Salman H.

    Using acoustical evidence from spectrograms and physiological evidence from X-ray sound films, it appears that the most common allophone for the Arabic voiced pharyngeal fricative, at least in Iraqi, is a voiceless stop, and not a voiced fricative, as many believe. The author considers the phoneme in different environments and describes its…

  16. An Elementary Organic Review Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1980-01-01

    An elementary organic review exercise is described which can be given to a secondary school student who has completed an elementary unit on the chemistry of carbon. This is recommended as an exercise, not a test, but can be utilized for evaluative purposes. The format includes both multiple-choice and essay questions. (DS)

  17. Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2011-12-01

    The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

  18. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  19. Fate of alkylphenolic compounds during activated sludge treatment: impact of loading and organic composition.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Ewan J; Bagnall, John P; Soares, Ana; Koh, Yoong K K; Chiu, Tze Y; Scrimshaw, Mark D; Lester, John N; Cartmell, Elise

    2011-01-01

    The impact of loading and organic composition on the fate of alkylphenolic compounds in the activated sludge plant (ASP) has been studied. Three ASP designs comprising carbonaceous, carbonaceous/nitrification, and carbonaceous/nitrification/denitrification treatment were examined to demonstrate the impact of increasing levels of process complexity and to incorporate a spectrum of loading conditions. Based on mass balance, overall biodegradation efficiencies for nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), short chain carboxylates (NP(1-3)EC) and nonylphenol (NP) were 37%, 59%, and 27% for the carbonaceous, carbonaceous/nitrification, and carbonaceous/nitrification/denitrification ASP, respectively. The presence of a rich community of ammonia oxidizing bacteria does not necessarily facilitate effective alkylphenolic compound degradation. However, a clear correlation between alkylphenolic compound loading and long chain ethoxylate compound biodegradation was determined at the three ASPs, indicating that at higher initial alkylphenolic compound concentrations (or load), greater ethoxylate biotransformation can occur. In addition, the impact of settled sewage organic composition on alkylphenolic compound removal was evaluated. A correlation between the ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD) to alkylphenolic compound concentration and biomass activity was determined, demonstrating the inhibiting effect of bulk organic matter on alkylphenol polyethoxylate transformation activity. At all three ASPs the biodegradation pathway proposed involves the preferential biodegradation of the amphiphilic ethoxylated compounds, after which the preferential attack of the lipophilic akylphenol moiety occurs. The extent of ethoxylate biodegradation is driven by the initial alkylphenolic compound concentration and the proportion of COD constituted by the alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) and their metabolites relative to the bulk organic concentration of the sewage composed of proteins, acids, fats

  20. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket.

    PubMed

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria; Krämer, Heiko; Rückerl, Dominik; Söderhäll, J Arvid; Gupta, Shashank; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Kühne, Ronald; Freund, Christian; Jung, Günther; Falk, Kirsten; Rötzschke, Olaf

    2006-12-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify immune responses by catalyzing the peptide loading of human class II MHC molecules HLA-DR. Here we show now that they achieve this by interacting with a defined binding site of the HLA-DR peptide receptor. Screening of a compound library revealed a set of adamantane derivatives that strongly accelerated the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule. Apparently, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental factors could induce allergic or autoimmune reactions in an allele-selective manner. PMID:17005558

  1. Static versus dynamic loads as an influence on bone remodelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Bone remodelling activity in the avian ulna was assessed under conditions of disuse alone, disuse with a superimposed continuous compressive load, and disuse interrupted by a short daily period of intermittent loading. The ulna preparation is made by two submetaphyseal osteotomies, the cut ends of the bone being covered with stainless steel caps which, together with the bone they enclosed, are pierced by pins emerging transcutaneously on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the wing. The 110 mm long undisturbed section of the bone shaft can be protected from functional loading, loaded continuously in compression by joining the pins with springs, or loaded intermittently in compression by engaging the pins in an Instron machine. Similar loads (525 n) were used in both static and dynamic cases engendering similar peak strains at the bone's midshaft (-2000 x 10-6). The intermitent load was applied at a frequency of 1 Hz during a single 100 second period per day as a ramped square wave, with a rate of change of strain during the ramp of 0.01 per second.

  2. Migration impact on load balancing - an experience on Amoeba

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Socko, P.

    1996-12-31

    Load balancing has been extensive study by simulation, positive results were received in most of the researches. With the increase of the availability oftlistributed systems, a few experiments have been carried out on different systems. These experimental studies either depend on task initiation or task initiation plus task migration. In this paper, we present the results of an 0 study of load balancing using a centralizedpolicy to manage the load on a set of processors, which was carried out on an Amoeba system which consists of a set of 386s and linked by 10 Mbps Ethernet. The results on one hand indicate the necessity of a load balancing facility for a distributed system. On the other hand, the results question the impact of using process migration to increase system performance under the configuration used in our experiments.

  3. The physiological consequences of crib-biting in horses in response to an ACTH challenge test.

    PubMed

    Briefer Freymond, S; Bardou, D; Briefer, E F; Bruckmaier, R; Fouché, N; Fleury, J; Maigrot, A-L; Ramseyer, A; Zuberbühler, K; Bachmann, I

    2015-11-01

    Stereotypies are repetitive and relatively invariant patterns of behavior, which are observed in a wide range of species in captivity. Stereotypic behavior occurs when environmental demands produce a physiological response that, if sustained for an extended period, exceeds the natural physiological regulatory capacity of the organism, particularly in situations that include unpredictability and uncontrollability. One hypothesis is that stereotypic behavior functions to cope with stressful environments, but the existing evidence is contradictory. To address the coping hypothesis of stereotypies, we triggered physiological reactions in 22 horses affected by stereotypic behavior (crib-biters) and 21 non-crib-biters (controls), using an ACTH challenge test. Following administration of an ACTH injection, we measured saliva cortisol every 30 min and heart rate (HR) continuously for a period of 3h. We did not find any differences in HR or HR variability between the two groups, but crib-biters (Group CB) had significantly higher cortisol responses than controls (Group C; mean ± SD: CB, 5.84 ± 2.62 ng/ml, C, 4.76 ± 3.04 ng/ml). Moreover, crib-biters that did not perform the stereotypic behavior during the 3-hour test period (Group B) had significantly higher cortisol levels than controls, which was not the case of crib-biters showing stereotypic behavior (Group A) (B, 6.44 ± 2.38 ng/ml A, 5.58 ± 2.69 ng/ml). Our results suggest that crib-biting is a coping strategy that helps stereotypic individuals to reduce cortisol levels caused by stressful situations. We conclude that preventing stereotypic horses from crib-biting could be an inappropriate strategy to control this abnormal behavior, as it prevents individuals from coping with situations that they perceive as stressful. PMID:26187578

  4. An Alternative to the Physiological Psychology Laboratory: Identification of an Unknown Drug Through Behavioral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Susan J.

    1982-01-01

    A laboratory project introduced physiological psychology students to research by requiring them to identify an unknown drug given to laboratory animals. Students read material about drugs and animal drug studies, designed behavioral tests, constructed the testing apparatus, conducted the tests, and wrote progress reports. (SR)

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Klotho: Physiology and Pathophysiology of an Endocrine Network of Mineral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolically active and perpetually remodeling calcium phosphate–based endoskeleton in terrestrial vertebrates sets the demands on whole-organism calcium and phosphate homeostasis that involves multiple organs in terms of mineral flux and endocrine cross talk. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-Klotho endocrine networks epitomize the complexity of systems biology, and specifically, the FGF23-αKlotho axis highlights the concept of the skeleton holding the master switch of homeostasis rather than a passive target organ as hitherto conceived. Other than serving as a coreceptor for FGF23, αKlotho circulates as an endocrine substance with a multitude of effects. This review covers recent data on the physiological regulation and function of the complex FGF23-αKlotho network. Chronic kidney disease is a common pathophysiological state in which FGF23-αKlotho, a multiorgan endocrine network, is deranged in a self-amplifying vortex resulting in organ dysfunction of the utmost severity that contributes to its morbidity and mortality. PMID:23398153

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and Klotho: physiology and pathophysiology of an endocrine network of mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W

    2013-01-01

    The metabolically active and perpetually remodeling calcium phosphate-based endoskeleton in terrestrial vertebrates sets the demands on whole-organism calcium and phosphate homeostasis that involves multiple organs in terms of mineral flux and endocrine cross talk. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-Klotho endocrine networks epitomize the complexity of systems biology, and specifically, the FGF23-αKlotho axis highlights the concept of the skeleton holding the master switch of homeostasis rather than a passive target organ as hitherto conceived. Other than serving as a coreceptor for FGF23, αKlotho circulates as an endocrine substance with a multitude of effects. This review covers recent data on the physiological regulation and function of the complex FGF23-αKlotho network. Chronic kidney disease is a common pathophysiological state in which FGF23-αKlotho, a multiorgan endocrine network, is deranged in a self-amplifying vortex resulting in organ dysfunction of the utmost severity that contributes to its morbidity and mortality. PMID:23398153

  7. Reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations associated with organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Haruta, Shin; Sasaki, Daisuke; Hanajima, Dai; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ogata, Atsushi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    Organic loading conditions are an important factor influencing reactor performances in methanogenic bioreactors. Yet the underlying microbiological basis of the process stability, deterioration, and recovery remains to be understood. Here, structural responses of the bacterial and archaeal populations to the change of organic loading conditions in a thermophilic anaerobic digester were investigated by process analyses and 16S rRNA gene-based molecular approaches. The biogas was produced stably without the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) at low organic loading rates (OLRs) in the beginning of reactor operation. Increasing OLR in stages disrupted the stable reactor performance, and high OLR conditions continued the deteriorated performance with slight biogas production and high accumulation of VFAs. Thereafter, the gradual decrease of OLR resulted in the recovery from the deterioration, giving rise to the stable performance again. The stable performances before and after the high OLR conditions conducted were associated with compositionally similar but not identical methanogenic consortia. The bacterial and archaeal populations were synchronously changed at both the transient phases toward the deteriorated performance and in recovery process, during which the dynamic shift of aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens including the recently identified Methanomassiliicoccus might contribute to the maintenance of the methanogenic activity. The distinctive bacterial population with a high predominance of Methanobacterium formicicum as archaeal member was found for the deteriorated performance. The results in this study indicate the coordinated reorganization of the bacterial and archaeal populations in response to functional states induced by the change of organic loading conditions in the anaerobic digester. PMID:25293692

  8. Phragmites australis response to Cu in terms of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) exudation: Influence of the physiological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere for several purposes, including in response to metal contamination. Despite this, little is yet known about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots in response to metal exposure. This work aimed at assessing the influence of the physiological cycle of marsh plants on the exudation of ALMWOAs in response to Cu contamination. In vitro experiments were carried out with Phragmites australis specimens, collected in different seasons. Plant roots were exposed to freshwater contaminated with two different Cu concentrations (67 μg/L and 6.9 mg/L), being the ALMWOAs released by the roots measured. Significant differences (both qualitative and quantitative) were observed during the Phragmites australis life cycle. At growing stage, Cu stimulated the exudation of oxalic and formic acids but no significant stimulation was observed for citric acid. At developing stage, exposure to Cu caused inhibition of oxalic acid exudation whereas citric acid liberation was stimulated but only in the media spiked with the lowest Cu concentration tested. At the decaying stage, no significant variation on oxalic acid was observed, whereas the citric and formic acids release increased as a consequence of the plant exposure to Cu. The physiological cycle of Phragmites australis, and probably also of other marsh plants, is therefore an important feature conditioning plants response to Cu contamination, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation. Hence this aspect should be considered when conducting studies on rhizodeposition involving marsh plants exposed to metals and in the event of using marsh plants for phytoremediation purposes in contaminated estuarine areas.

  9. Physiological Evaluation of Childcare-Associated Muscle Load on the Neck and Shoulder Region in Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Saori; Kiyokawa, Takuma; Kuramoto, Eriko; Kinoshita, Hiroe; Nemoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    The awkward movements and postures associated with childcare activities can lead to musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders. “Dakko” is a method for carrying a child in Japan, and recently it has been reported to cause shoulder stiffness. To our knowledge, the relationship between childcare activities and the physical load on the neck and shoulders is poorly understood. The present study aims to clarify the muscle load on the neck and shoulder region through dakko simulations. First, the association between dakko movements and trapezius muscle activity is clarified by image and electromyogram analyses. Based on this clarification, the distributions and intensity of the muscle load from repetitive dakko movements are clarified using myogenic potential topography. During dakko movements, trapezius muscle activity was observed when lifting up and setting down the child, but not when holding the child. For the repetitive movements, myogenic electrical potentials were observed in the trapezius region after movement load, and individual characteristics of participants were revealed in both the load distributions and the recovery process. Repetitive dakko movements likely induced sustained muscle tonus in the trapezius, which may be a factor related to shoulder stiffness. PMID:27064421

  10. Physiological Evaluation of Childcare-Associated Muscle Load on the Neck and Shoulder Region in Japanese Women.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Saori; Kiyokawa, Takuma; Kuramoto, Eriko; Kinoshita, Hiroe; Nemoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    The awkward movements and postures associated with childcare activities can lead to musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders. "Dakko" is a method for carrying a child in Japan, and recently it has been reported to cause shoulder stiffness. To our knowledge, the relationship between childcare activities and the physical load on the neck and shoulders is poorly understood. The present study aims to clarify the muscle load on the neck and shoulder region through dakko simulations. First, the association between dakko movements and trapezius muscle activity is clarified by image and electromyogram analyses. Based on this clarification, the distributions and intensity of the muscle load from repetitive dakko movements are clarified using myogenic potential topography. During dakko movements, trapezius muscle activity was observed when lifting up and setting down the child, but not when holding the child. For the repetitive movements, myogenic electrical potentials were observed in the trapezius region after movement load, and individual characteristics of participants were revealed in both the load distributions and the recovery process. Repetitive dakko movements likely induced sustained muscle tonus in the trapezius, which may be a factor related to shoulder stiffness. PMID:27064421

  11. A dynamic multibody model of the physiological knee to predict internal loads during movement in gravitational field.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Sansone, Valerio; Frigo, Carlo A

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining tibio-femoral (TF) contact forces, ligament deformations and loads during daily life motor tasks would be useful to better understand the aetiopathogenesis of knee joint diseases or the effects of ligament reconstruction and knee arthroplasty. However, methods to obtain this information are either too simplified or too computationally demanding to be used for clinical application. A multibody dynamic model of the lower limb reproducing knee joint contact surfaces and ligaments was developed on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging. Several clinically relevant conditions were simulated, including resistance to hyperextension, varus-valgus stability, anterior-posterior drawer, loaded squat movement. Quadriceps force, ligament deformations and loads, and TF contact forces were computed. During anterior drawer test the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was maximally loaded when the knee was extended (392 N) while the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) was much more stressed during posterior drawer when the knee was flexed (319 N). The simulated loaded squat revealed that the anterior fibres of ACL become inactive after 60° of flexion in conjunction with PCL anterior bundle activation, while most components of the collateral ligaments exhibit limited length changes. Maximum quadriceps and TF forces achieved 3.2 and 4.2 body weight, respectively. The possibility to easily manage model parameters and the low computational cost of each simulation represent key points of the present project. The obtained results are consistent with in vivo measurements, suggesting that the model can be used to simulate complex and clinically relevant exercises. PMID:26057607

  12. Anatomical and physiological studies of bigheaded carps demonstrate that the epibranchial organ functions as a pharyngeal taste organ

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne; Ghosal, Ratna; Caprio, John; Claus, Aaron W.; Sorensen, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    The epibranchial organ (EO) is an enigmatic tubular organ found in the pharyngeal cavity of many filter-feeding fishes. We investigated whether it might function as a taste organ that mediates aggregation and ingestion of planktonic food within the buccal cavity. The EO and associated structures of bighead and silver carps, two successful and invasive planktivorous fishes, were examined using histological and electrophysiological techniques. Both species possess finely structured gill rakers that extend directly via a series of protrusions into each of the four blind canals which are organized as the muscular EO, suggesting that the gill rakers and EO probably function in an integrated manner. Both the interior and exterior surfaces of the EOs of both species are covered with high densities of taste buds and solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) as well as mucous cells. Conversely, taste buds are scarce in both the buccal cavities and external portions of the head and mouth of both species. Electrophysiological recordings from a caudal branch of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) found to innervate the EO showed it to be sensitive to chemicals found in a planktonic diet. l-Amino acids accounted for some, but not all of the neural activity. We conclude that taste buds and SCCs located on the EO and gill rakers probably serve to chemically detect food particles, which the EO then aggregates by mucus secretion before eventually expelling them onto the floor of the pharynx for ingestion. This specialized, pharyngeal chemosensory structure may explain the feeding success of these, and perhaps other planktivorous, filter-feeding fishes. PMID:25214490

  13. An approach to distribution short-term load forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.C.; Gaustad, K.L.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reports on the developments and findings of the Distribution Short-Term Load Forecaster (DSTLF) research activity. The objective of this research is to develop a distribution short-term load forecasting technology consisting of a forecasting method, development methodology, theories necessary to support required technical components, and the hardware and software tools required to perform the forecast The DSTLF consists of four major components: monitored endpoint load forecaster (MELF), nonmonitored endpoint load forecaster (NELF), topological integration forecaster (TIF), and a dynamic tuner. These components interact to provide short-term forecasts at various points in the, distribution system, eg., feeder, line section, and endpoint. This paper discusses the DSTLF methodology and MELF component MELF, based on artificial neural network technology, predicts distribution endpoint loads for an hour, a day, and a week in advance. Predictions are developed using time, calendar, historical load, and weather data. The overall DSTLF architecture and a prototype MELF module for retail endpoints have been developed. Future work will be focused on refining and extending MELF and developing NELF and TIF capabilities.

  14. Nonenzymatic amperometric organic peroxide sensor based on nano-cobalt phthalocyanine loaded functionalized graphene film.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin; Chen, Lijian; Xu, Minrong; Su, Haichao; Ai, Shiyun

    2012-01-27

    An enzyme-free amperometric method was established for the electrochemical reduction tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) on the utilization of nano-cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) loaded functionalized graphene (FGR) and to create a highly responsive organic peroxide sensor. FGR was synthesized with a simple and fast method of electrolysis with potassium hexafluorophosphate (KPF(6)) solution as electrolyte under the static current of 0.2A. In the present work, FGR was dispersed in the solution of CoPc to fabricate chemical modified electrode to detect TBHP. The electro-reduction of TBHP can be catalyzed by FGR-CoPc, which has an excellent electrocatalytical activity due to the synergistic effect of the FGR with CoPc. The sensor can be applied to the quantification of TBHP with a linear range covering from 0.0260 to 4.81 mM, a high sensitivity of 13.64 A M(-1), and a low detection limit of 5 μM. This proposed sensor was designed as a simple, robust, and cheap analytical device for the determination of TBHP in body lotion. PMID:22177066

  15. Load and distribution of organic matter and nutrients in a separated household wastewater stream.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Heistad, Arve; Jenssen, Petter D

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater from a source-separated sanitation system connected to 24 residential flats was analysed for the content of organic matter and nutrients and other key parameters for microbiological processes used in the treatment and reuse of wastewater. Black water (BW) was the major contributor to the total load of organic matter and nutrients in the wastewater, accounting for 69% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 83% of total nitrogen (N) and 87% of phosphorus (P). With a low COD/N ratio and high content of free ammonia, treating BW alone is a challenge in traditional biological nitrogen removal approaches. However, its high nitrogen concentration (1.4-1.7 g L(-1)) open up for nutrient reuse as well as for novel, more energy efficient N-removal technologies. Grey water (GW) contained low amounts of nutrients relative to organic matter, and this may limit biological treatment processes under certain conditions. GW contains a higher proportion of soluble, readily degradable organic substances compared with BW, which facilitates simple, decentralized treatment approaches. The concentration of organic matter and nutrients varied considerably between our study and other studies, which could be related to different toilet flushing volumes and water use habits. The daily load per capita, on the other hand, was found to be in line with most of the reported studies. PMID:25495947

  16. Anaerobic co-digestion of solid waste: Effect of increasing organic loading rates and characterization of the solubilised organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Rangaraj; Torrijos, Michel; Sousbie, Philippe; Steyer, Jean Philippe; Lugardon, Aurelien; Delgenes, Jean Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The impact of stepwise increase in OLR (up to 7.5kgVS/m(3)d) on methane production, reactor performance and solubilised organic matter production in a high-loading reactor were investigated. A reference reactor operated at low OLR (<2.0kgVS/m(3)d) was used solely to observe the methane potential of the feed substrate. Specific methane yield was 0.33lCH(4)/gVS at the lowest OLR and dropped by about 20% at the maximum OLR, while volumetric methane production increased from 0.35 to 1.38m(3)CH(4)/m(3)d. At higher loadings, solids hydrolysis was affected, with consequent transfer of poorly-degraded organic material into the drain solids. Biodegradability and size-fractionation of the solubilised COD were characterized to evaluate the possibility of a second stage liquid reactor. Only 18% of the organics were truly soluble (<1kD). The rest were in colloidal and very fine particulate form which originated from grass and cow manure and were non-biodegradable. PMID:23334011

  17. Study of the load variation for an electrical consumer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vîlceanu, R. C.; Chiosa, N.; Şurianu, F. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we study the load variation for an electrical consumer when it remains powered by an emergency power supply through an uninterruptable power supply due to a circuit failure and the way that the load varies when the main and backup power supply comes on. The study was conducted due to the fact that when the main power supply tripped, the emergency power supply, ensured by a diesel power generator with a time delay of 30 seconds, always tripped immediately after connecting, thus leaving the consumer powered by the uninterruptable power supply which has a 10 minutes limited supply.

  18. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance. PMID:15319194

  19. Anaerobic slurry co-digestion of poultry manure and straw: effect of organic loading and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In order to obtain basic design criteria for anaerobic digestion of a mixture of poultry manure and wheat straw, the effects of different temperatures and organic loading rates on the biogas yield and methane contents were evaluated. Since poultry manure is a poor substrate, in term of the availability of the nutrients, external supplementation of carbon has to be regularly performed, in order to achieve a stable and efficient process. The complete-mix, pilot-scale digester with working volume of 70 L was used. The digestion operated at 25°C, 30°C and 35°C with organic loading rates of 1.0, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 kg Volatile solid/m3d and a HRT of 15 days. At a temperature of 35°C, the methane yield was increased by 43% compared to 25°C. Anaerobic co-digestion appeared feasible with a loading rate of 3.0 kg VS/m3d at 35°C. At this state, the specific methane yield was calculated about 0.12 m3/kg VS with a methane content of 53–70.2% in the biogas. The volatile solid (VS) removal was 72%. As a result of volatile fatty acid accumulation and decrease in pH, when the loading rate was less than 1 or greater than 4 kg VS/m3d, the process was inhibited or overloaded, respectively. Both the lower and higher loading rates resulted in a decline in the methane yield. PMID:24502409

  20. Salmon contributions to dissolved organic matter and nutrient loads in a coastal stream in Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E.; Fellman, J. B.; Edwards, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    In southeastern Alaska, spawning salmon can have a substantial effect on the water quality of coastal watersheds because salmon move large quantities of marine nutrients into terrestrial freshwater streams. We are measuring the effects of salmon on loads of inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in Peterson Creek near Juneau, Alaska. Peterson Creek receives sizable runs of pink (Oncorhynchus gorbushca) and chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon during the late summer (mid-August through mid-September). To test the effects of salmon on water quality, samples were collected above and below a barrier waterfall on Peterson Creek. During salmon spawning, concentrations of ammonium (NH4+) were up to two orders of magnitude higher at the downstream salmon-influenced site, while soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) increased by more than an order of magnitude at the downstream site. For the entire salmon spawning period, concentrations of NH4+, SRP, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were significantly higher at the downstream site compared to the upstream site, however nitrate (NO3-) concentrations were not significantly different between sites. Characterization of DOC samples using fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the DOC leached from salmon had a large protein component compared to DOC at the upstream site which was dominated by humic material. These results suggest that salmon provide a pulse of inorganic N and P as well as labile DOC to surface waters during the spawning period. Concurrent measurements of discharge will allow us to assess the importance of salmon-derived nutrients in the seasonal nutrient budget of Peterson Creek.

  1. Screening of 47 organic microcontaminants in agricultural irrigation waters and their soil loading.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Preciado, D; Jiménez-Cartagena, C; Matamoros, V; Bayona, J M

    2011-01-01

    Reclaimed water usage for crop irrigation is viewed both as an excellent sustainable water source and as a potential entrance for emerging organics into the food chain. This concern is backed by the already documented pollutant crop uptake potential. In the present study, irrigation waters used in agricultural fields (Torroella de Montgri, NE Spain) were screened for 47 analytes in a two year study (2007-2008). A total of 26 contaminants belonging to different chemical classes namely, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, phenolic estrogens, antioxidants and disinfection by-products, were detected. Marked differences in concentration trends for the different chemical classes were evidenced from 2007 to 2008, and attributed to a persistent drought endured by the region in 2008. Also, loading mass rates of chemical classes were estimated based on crop irrigation regimes and they ranged from 0.8 to 121.3 g ha(-1) per crop cycle. These values were contrasted with those obtained for other water sources from countries where crop irrigation is commonly practiced. Finally, crops grown under these irrigation regimes, namely alfalfa and apple, were analyzed and 5 anthropogenic compounds were identified and quantitated, whose concentrations ranged from 13.9 to 532 ng g(-1) (fresh weight). PMID:20961595

  2. Ecological correlates of variable organ sizes and fat loads in the most northerly-wintering shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Dekinga, Anne; Gill, R.E., Jr.; Summers, R.W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    Shorebirds at northern latitudes during the nonbreeding season typically carry relatively large lipid stores and exhibit an up-regulation of lean tissues associated with digestion and thermogenesis. Intraspecific variation in these tissues across sites primarily reflects differences in environmental conditions. Rock (Calidris ptilocnemis (Coues, 1873)) and Purple (Calidris maritima (Brünnich, 1764)) sandpipers are closely related species having the most northerly nonbreeding distributions among shorebirds, living at latitudes up to 61°N in Cook Inlet, Alaska, and up to 71°N in northern Norway, respectively. Cook Inlet is the coldest known site used by nonbreeding shorebirds, and the region’s mudflats annually experience extensive coverage of foraging sites by sea and shore-fast ice. Accordingly, Rock Sandpipers increase their fat stores to nearly 20% of body mass during winter. In contrast, Purple Sandpipers exploit predictably ice-free rocky intertidal foraging sites and maintain low (<6.5%) fat stores. Rock Sandpipers increase the mass of lean tissues from fall to winter, including contour feathers, stomach, and liver components. They also have greater lean pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscle and liver and kidney tissues compared with Purple Sandpipers in winter. This demonstrates a combined emphasis on digestive processes and thermogenesis, whereas Purple Sandpipers primarily augment organs associated with digestive processes. The high winter fat loads and increased lean tissues of Rock Sandpipers in Cook Inlet reflect the region’s persistent cold and abundant but sporadically unavailable food resources.

  3. Cooperative loading and release behavior of a metal-organic receptor.

    PubMed

    Gan, Quan; Ronson, Tanya K; Vosburg, David A; Thoburn, John D; Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2015-02-11

    In order to design artificial chemical systems that are capable of achieving complex functions, it is useful to design synthetic receptors that mimic their biological counterparts. Biological functions are underpinned by properties that include specific binding with high affinity and selectivity, cooperativity, and release triggered by external stimuli. Here we show that a metal-organic receptor constructed through subcomponent self-assembly can selectively and cooperatively load and release oxocarbon anions. The flexible coordination spheres of its cadmium(II) centers allow the receptor to dynamically adjust its structure upon exchanging four triflate or triflimide counterions for two oxocarbon anions, resulting in strong cooperativity and very tight binding, with an apparent association constant for C5O5(2-) of 5 × 10(10) M(-1). Substituting the cadmium(II) ions for copper(I) by switching solvent prompted a structural reorganization and release of the oxocarbon anions. Its cooperative behavior allows the receptor to carry a greater payload than would be possible in a noncooperative analogue. PMID:25615799

  4. [Effect of Increasing Organic Loading Rate on the Formation and Stabilization Process of Aerobic Granular Sludge].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-peng; Wang, Jan-fang; Qian, Fei-yue; Wang, Yan; Chen, Chong-jun; Shen, Yao-liang

    2015-09-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of organic loading rate ( OLR) on the formation of aerobic granular sludge (AGS), a lab-scale cylindrical SBR reactor (sodium acetate as carbon source) was constructed and inoculated with collected sewage sludge. The evolution of morphology, microbial activity and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics of sludge samples in the reactor were recorded and analyzed. The results showed that AGS has the highest growth rate under the condition of 3. 20-4. 84 kg.(m3.d)-1 OLR, and a selective discharging strategy of the floccular sludge was suggested to maintain the predominance of AGS in reactor. The accumulated sludge concentration, SVI30, mean granule size, settling velocity and SOUR value of the AGS in steady-state operated SBR was 23. 9 g.L-1, 20 mL.g-1, 1. 4 mm, 102 m.h-1 and 50. 2 mg.(g.h)-1, respectively. The granulation process not only obviously changed the sludge appearance, but also significantly improved the microbial activity. Meanwhile, linear correlation was observed between the variation of protein/polysaccharide concentration and the granule size of AGS. Thus, variation of protein/ polysaccharide concentration of the EPS could be applied as an indicator for optimization of the cultivation method of AGS. PMID:26717698

  5. An extended model for determining dynamic loads in spur gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.; Evans, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    In this study a large scale digitized approach is used for an uninterrupted static and dynamic analysis of spur gearing. An interactive method was developed to calculate directly the variable gear mesh stiffness as a function of transmitted load, gear profile errors, gear tooth deflections and gear hub torsional deformation, and position of contacting profile points. The developed methods are applicable to both the normal and high contact ratio gearing. Certain types of simulated sinusoidal profile errors and pitting can cause interruptions of the normal gear mesh stiffness function and, thus, increase the dynamic loads in gearing.

  6. Design and Synthesis of an MOF Thermometer with High Sensitivity in the Physiological Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dian; Rao, Xingtang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-12-01

    An important result of research on mixed-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (M'LnMOFs) is the realization of highly sensitive ratiometric luminescent thermometers. Here, we report the design and synthesis of the new M'LnMOF Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA with high relative sensitivity in the physiological temperature regime (298-318 K). The emission intensity and luminescence lifetime were investigated and compared to those of existing materials. It was found that the temperature-dependent luminescence properties of Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA are strongly associated with the distribution of the energy levels of the ligand. Such a property can be useful in the design of highly sensitive M'LnMOF thermometers. PMID:26575207

  7. The journey of a drug-carrier in the body: an anatomo-physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2012-07-20

    Recent advances in chemistry and material sciences have witnessed the emergence of an increasing number of novel and complex nanosized carriers for the delivery of drugs and imaging agents. Nevertheless, this raise in complexity does not necessarily offer more efficient systems. The lack of performance experienced by several colloidal drug carriers during the preclinical and clinical development processes can be explained by inadequate pharmacokinetic/biodistribution profiles and/or unacceptable toxicities. A comprehensive understanding of the body characteristics is necessary to predict and prevent these problems from the early stages of nanomaterial conception. In this manuscript, we review and discuss the anatomical and physiological elements which must be taken into account when designing new carriers for delivery or imaging purposes. This article gives a general overview of the main organs involved in the elimination of nanosized materials and briefly summarizes the knowledge acquired over more than 30 years of research and development in the field of drug targeting. PMID:22001607

  8. An Academic Career in a Basic Medical Science Department of Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Thomas M.

    1981-01-01

    The availability of opportunities and the development of an academic career in a physiology department within a medical school or basic science department by graduates and postgraduates who intend to participate in physiology on a full-time basis are discussed, emphasizing typical background and job responsibilities. (Author/DC)

  9. Analysis of rabbit intervertebral disc physiology based on water metabolism. II. Changes in normal intervertebral discs under axial vibratory load

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, N.; Tsuji, H.; Ohshima, H.; Kitano, S.; Itoh, T.; Sano, A.

    1988-11-01

    Metabolic changes induced by axial vibratory load to the spine were investigated based on water metabolism in normal intervertebral discs of rabbits with or without pentobarbital anesthesia. Tritiated water concentration in the intervertebral discs of unanesthetized rabbits was reduced remarkably by axial vibration for 30 minutes using the vibration machine developed for this study. Repeated vibratory load for 18 and 42 hours duration showed the recovery of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration of the intervertebral disc without anesthesia. Computer simulation suggested a reduction of blood flow surrounding the intervertebral disc following the vibration stress. However, no reduction of the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration in the intervertebral disc was noted under anesthesia. Emotional stress cannot be excluded as a factor in water metabolism in the intervertebral disc.

  10. Specimen-specific predictions of contact stress under physiological loading in the human hip: validation and sensitivity studies

    PubMed Central

    Henak, Corinne R.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Maas, Steve A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis may be initiated and advanced by abnormal cartilage contact mechanics, and finite element (FE) modeling provides an approach with the potential to allow the study of this process. Previous FE models of the human hip have been limited by single specimen validation and the use of quasi-linear or linear elastic constitutive models of articular cartilage. The effects of the latter assumptions on model predictions are unknown, partially because data for the instantaneous behavior of healthy human hip cartilage are unavailable. The aims of this study were to develop and validate a series of specimen-specific FE models, to characterize the regional instantaneous response of healthy human hip cartilage in compression, and to assess the effects of material nonlinearity, inhomogeneity and specimen-specific material coefficients on FE predictions of cartilage contact stress and contact area. Five cadaveric specimens underwent experimental loading, cartilage material characterization and specimen-specific FE modeling. Cartilage in the FE models was represented by average neo-Hookean, average Veronda Westmann and specimen- and region-specific Veronda Westmann hyperelastic constitutive models. Experimental measurements and FE predictions compared well for all three cartilage representations, which was reflected in average RMS errors in contact stress of less than 25%. The instantaneous material behavior of healthy human hip cartilage varied spatially, with stiffer acetabular cartilage than femoral cartilage and stiffer cartilage in lateral regions than in medial regions. The Veronda Westmann constitutive model with average material coefficients accurately predicted peak contact stress, average contact stress, contact area and contact patterns. The use of subject- and region-specific material coefficients did not increase the accuracy of FE model predictions. The neo-Hookean constitutive model underpredicted peak contact stress in areas of high stress. The