Science.gov

Sample records for local differential equation

  1. Local Analytic Solutions of a Functional Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingxia

    This paper is concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of an iterative functional differential equation. Employing the method of majorant series, we need to discuss the constant α given in Schröder transformation. we study analytic solutions of the equation in the case of α at resonance and the case of α near resonance under the Brjuno condition.

  2. Localization of the eigenvalues of linear integral equations with applications to linear ordinary differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloss, J. M.; Kranzler, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The equivalence of a considered integral equation form with an infinite system of linear equations is proved, and the localization of the eigenvalues of the infinite system is expressed. Error estimates are derived, and the problems of finding upper bounds and lower bounds for the eigenvalues are solved simultaneously.

  3. Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method for differential equations with local fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Srivastava, H. M.; He, Ji-Huan; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, we propose to use the Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate method in order to investigate a family of local fractional differential operators on Cantor sets. Some testing examples are given to illustrate the capability of the proposed method for the heat-conduction equation on a Cantor set and the damped wave equation in fractal strings. It is seen to be a powerful tool to convert differential equations on Cantor sets from Cantorian-coordinate systems to Cantor-type cylindrical-coordinate systems.

  4. The method of local linear approximation in the theory of nonlinear functional-differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2010-10-06

    Conditions for the existence of solutions to the nonlinear functional-differential equation (d{sup m}x(t))/dt{sup m} + (fx)(t)=h(t), t element of R in the space of functions bounded on the axes are obtained by using local linear approximation to the operator F. Bibliography: 21 items.

  5. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Partial Differential Equations with Higher Order Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jue; Shu, Chi-Wang; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the existing and develop new continuous Galerkin methods for solving time dependent partial differential equations with higher order derivatives in one and multiple space dimensions. We review local discontinuous Galerkin methods for convection diffusion equations involving second derivatives and for KdV type equations involving third derivatives. We then develop new local discontinuous Galerkin methods for the time dependent bi-harmonic type equations involving fourth derivatives, and partial differential equations involving fifth derivatives. For these new methods we present correct interface numerical fluxes and prove L(exp 2) stability for general nonlinear problems. Preliminary numerical examples are shown to illustrate these methods. Finally, we present new results on a post-processing technique, originally designed for methods with good negative-order error estimates, on the local discontinuous Galerkin methods applied to equations with higher derivatives. Numerical experiments show that this technique works as well for the new higher derivative cases, in effectively doubling the rate of convergence with negligible additional computational cost, for linear as well as some nonlinear problems, with a local uniform mesh.

  6. Partial differential equation-based localization of a monopole source from a circular array.

    PubMed

    Ando, Shigeru; Nara, Takaaki; Levy, Tsukassa

    2013-10-01

    Wave source localization from a sensor array has long been the most active research topics in both theory and application. In this paper, an explicit and time-domain inversion method for the direction and distance of a monopole source from a circular array is proposed. The approach is based on a mathematical technique, the weighted integral method, for signal/source parameter estimation. It begins with an exact form of the source-constraint partial differential equation that describes the unilateral propagation of wide-band waves from a single source, and leads to exact algebraic equations that include circular Fourier coefficients (phase mode measurements) as their coefficients. From them, nearly closed-form, single-shot and multishot algorithms are obtained that is suitable for use with band-pass/differential filter banks. Numerical evaluation and several experimental results obtained using a 16-element circular microphone array are presented to verify the validity of the proposed method. PMID:24116418

  7. The Local Brewery: A Project for Use in Differential Equations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starling, James K.; Povich, Timothy J.; Findlay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modeling project designed for an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) course using first-order and systems of first-order differential equations to model the fermentation process in beer. The project aims to expose the students to the modeling process by creating and solving a mathematical model and effectively communicating their…

  8. Local polynomial chaos expansion for linear differential equations with high dimensional random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Jakeman, John; Gittelson, Claude; Xiu, Dongbin

    2015-01-08

    In this paper we present a localized polynomial chaos expansion for partial differential equations (PDE) with random inputs. In particular, we focus on time independent linear stochastic problems with high dimensional random inputs, where the traditional polynomial chaos methods, and most of the existing methods, incur prohibitively high simulation cost. Furthermore, the local polynomial chaos method employs a domain decomposition technique to approximate the stochastic solution locally. In each subdomain, a subdomain problem is solved independently and, more importantly, in a much lower dimensional random space. In a postprocesing stage, accurate samples of the original stochastic problems are obtained from the samples of the local solutions by enforcing the correct stochastic structure of the random inputs and the coupling conditions at the interfaces of the subdomains. Overall, the method is able to solve stochastic PDEs in very large dimensions by solving a collection of low dimensional local problems and can be highly efficient. In our paper we present the general mathematical framework of the methodology and use numerical examples to demonstrate the properties of the method.

  9. Local invertible analytic solution of a functional differential equation with deviating arguments depending on the state derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Ma, Minghuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a functional differential equation of the formx'(z)=1/x(az+bx'(z)) with the distinctive feature that the argument of the unknown function depends on the state derivative, where a,b are two complex numbers. By reducing the equation with the Schroder transformation to another functional differential equation with proportional delay, we give existence of its local invertible analytic solutions. We discuss not only that the constant [alpha] given in Schroder transformation at resonance, i.e., at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  10. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  11. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Local invertible analytic solutions for an iterative differential equation related to a discrete derivatives sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jianguo; Zhao, Houyu

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the existence of analytic solutions of a class of iterative differential equation in the complex field , where , , fi(z) denotes ith iterate of f(z), i=1,2,...,n. The above equation is closely related to a discrete derivatives sequence F'(m) (see [Y.-F.S. Pétermann, Jean-Luc Rémy, Ilan Vardi, Discrete derivative of sequences, Adv. in Appl. Math. 27 (2001) 562-584]). We first give the existence of analytic solutions of the form of power functions for such an equation. Then by constructing a convergent power series solution y(z) of an auxiliary equation of the formx'(z)=K[alpha]x'([alpha]z)(x([alpha]z))a1(x([alpha]2z))a2...(x([alpha]nz))an, invertible analytic solutions of the form f(z)=x([alpha]x-1(z)) for the original equation are obtained. We discuss not only the constant [alpha] at resonance, i.e. at a root of the unity, but also those [alpha] near resonance (near a root of the unity) under the Brjuno condition.

  13. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  15. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  16. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  17. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  18. The instantaneous local transition of a stable equilibrium to a chaotic attractor in piecewise-smooth systems of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    An attractor of a piecewise-smooth continuous system of differential equations can bifurcate from a stable equilibrium to a more complicated invariant set when it collides with a switching manifold under parameter variation. Here numerical evidence is provided to show that this invariant set can be chaotic. The transition occurs locally (in a neighbourhood of a point) and instantaneously (for a single critical parameter value). This phenomenon is illustrated for the normal form of a boundary equilibrium bifurcation in three dimensions using parameter values adapted from of a piecewise-linear model of a chaotic electrical circuit. The variation of a secondary parameter reveals a period-doubling cascade to chaos with windows of periodicity. The dynamics is well approximated by a one-dimensional unimodal map which explains the bifurcation structure. The robustness of the attractor is also investigated by studying the influence of nonlinear terms.

  19. Strong stability of a scheme on locally uniform meshes for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential convection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.

    2012-06-01

    The Dirichlet problem for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential convection-diffusion equation with a small parameter ɛ (ɛ ∈ (0, 1]) multiplying the higher order derivative is considered. For the problem, a difference scheme on locally uniform meshes is constructed that converges in the maximum norm conditionally, i.e., depending on the relation between the parameter ɛ and the value N defining the number of nodes in the mesh used; in particular, the scheme converges almost ɛ-uniformly (i.e., its accuracy depends weakly on ɛ). The stability of the scheme with respect to perturbations in the data and its conditioning are analyzed. The scheme is constructed using classical monotone approximations of the boundary value problem on a priori adapted grids, which are uniform on subdomains where the solution is improved. The boundaries of these subdomains are determined by a majorant of the singular component of the discrete solution. On locally uniform meshes, the difference scheme converges at a rate of O(min[ɛ-1 N - K ln N, 1] + N -1ln N), where K is a prescribed number of iterations for refining the discrete solution. The scheme converges almost ɛ-uniformly at a rate of O( N -1ln N) if N -1 ≤ ɛν, where ν (the defect of ɛ-uniform convergence) determines the required number K of iterations ( K = K(ν) ˜ ν-1) and can be chosen arbitrarily small from the half-open interval (0, 1]. The condition number of the difference scheme satisfies the bound κ P = O(ɛ-1/ K ln1/ K ɛ-1δ-( K + 1)/ K ), where δ is the accuracy of the solution of the scheme in the maximum norm in the absence of perturbations. For sufficiently large K, the scheme is almost ɛ-uniformly strongly stable.

  20. Application of a local linearization technique for the solution of a system of stiff differential equations associated with the simulation of a magnetic bearing assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, K. S.; Mcdaniel, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    A digital local linearization technique was used to solve a system of stiff differential equations which simulate a magnetic bearing assembly. The results prove the technique to be accurate, stable, and efficient when compared to a general purpose variable order Adams method with a stiff option.

  1. Solving Nonlinear Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, L.; David, J.

    1986-01-01

    Harmonic balance method developed to obtain approximate steady-state solutions for nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations. Method usable with transfer matrices commonly used to analyze shaft systems. Solution to nonlinear equation, with periodic forcing function represented as sum of series similar to Fourier series but with form of terms suggested by equation itself.

  2. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 2: Two-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    A two-step semidirect procedure is developed to accelerate the one-step procedure described in NASA TP-2529. For a set of constant coefficient model problems, the acceleration factor increases from 1 to 2 as the one-step procedure convergence rate decreases from + infinity to 0. It is also shown numerically that the two-step procedure can substantially accelerate the convergence of the numerical solution of many partial differential equations (PDE's) with variable coefficients.

  3. Solving Differential Equations in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although R is still predominantly applied for statistical analysis and graphical representation, it is rapidly becoming more suitable for mathematical computing. One of the fields where considerable progress has been made recently is the solution of differential equations. Here w...

  4. Some problems in fractal differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weiyi

    2016-06-01

    Based upon the fractal calculus on local fields, or p-type calculus, or Gibbs-Butzer calculus ([1],[2]), we suggest a constructive idea for "fractal differential equations", beginning from some special examples to a general theory. However, this is just an original idea, it needs lots of later work to support. In [3], we show example "two dimension wave equations with fractal boundaries", and in this note, other examples, as well as an idea to construct fractal differential equations are shown.

  5. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 1: One-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a large class of two- and three-dimensional nonseparable elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) is developed and tested. It uses a modified D'Yakanov-Gunn iterative procedure in which the relaxation factor is grid-point dependent. It is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions. It is also computationally efficient, as indicated by the results of numerical comparisons with other established methods. Furthermore, the current algorithm has the advantage of possessing two important properties which the traditional iterative methods lack; that is: (1) the convergence rate is relatively insensitive to grid-cell size and aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate can be easily estimated by using the coefficient of the PDE being solved.

  6. Ordinary Differential Equation System Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-05

    LSODE is a package of subroutines for the numerical solution of the initial value problem for systems of first order ordinary differential equations. The package is suitable for either stiff or nonstiff systems. For stiff systems the Jacobian matrix may be treated in either full or banded form. LSODE can also be used when the Jacobian can be approximated by a band matrix.

  7. Pendulum Motion and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Thomas F.; King, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    A common example of real-world motion that can be modeled by a differential equation, and one easily understood by the student, is the simple pendulum. Simplifying assumptions are necessary for closed-form solutions to exist, and frequently there is little discussion of the impact if those assumptions are not met. This article presents a…

  8. Radiative Damping and Functional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat; Raju, C. K.

    We propose a general technique to solve the classical many-body problem with radiative damping. We modify the short-distance structure of Maxwell electrodynamics. This allows us to avoid runaway solutions as if we had a covariant model of extended particles. The resulting equations of motion are functional differential equations (FDEs) rather than ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Using recently developed numerical techniques for stiff, retarded FDEs, we solve these equations for the one-body central force problem with radiative damping. Our results indicate that locally the magnitude of radiation damping may be well approximated by the standard third-order expression but the global properties of our solutions are dramatically different. We comment on the two-body problem and applications to quantum field theory and quantum mechanics.

  9. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-08-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  10. Generalized Directional Gradients, Backward Stochastic Differential Equations and Mild Solutions of Semilinear Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrman, Marco Tessitore, Gianmario

    2005-05-15

    We study a forward-backward system of stochastic differential equations in an infinite-dimensional framework and its relationships with a semilinear parabolic differential equation on a Hilbert space, in the spirit of the approach of Pardoux-Peng. We prove that the stochastic system allows us to construct a unique solution of the parabolic equation in a suitable class of locally Lipschitz real functions. The parabolic equation is understood in a mild sense which requires the notion of a generalized directional gradient, that we introduce by a probabilistic approach and prove to exist for locally Lipschitz functions.The use of the generalized directional gradient allows us to cover various applications to option pricing problems and to optimal stochastic control problems (including control of delay equations and reaction-diffusion equations),where the lack of differentiability of the coefficients precludes differentiability of solutions to the associated parabolic equations of Black-Scholes or Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman type.

  11. Note on parallel processing techniques for algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Allidina, A.Y.; Malinowski, K.; Singh, M.G.

    1982-12-01

    The possibilities were explored for enhancing parallelism in the simulation of systems described by algebraic equations, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. These techniques, using multiprocessors, were developed to speed up simulations, e.g. for nuclear accidents. Issues involved in their design included suitable approximations to bring the problem into a numerically manageable form and a numerical procedure to perform the computations necessary to solve the problem accurately. Parallel processing techniques used as simulation procedures, and a design of a simulation scheme and simulation procedure employing parallel computer facilities, were both considered.

  12. A local equation for differential diagnosis of β-thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia by logistic regression analysis in Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Sargolzaie, Narjes; Miri-Moghaddam, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    The most common differential diagnosis of β-thalassemia (β-thal) trait is iron deficiency anemia. Several red blood cell equations were introduced during different studies for differential diagnosis between β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia. Due to genetic variations in different regions, these equations cannot be useful in all population. The aim of this study was to determine a native equation with high accuracy for differential diagnosis of β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia for the Sistan and Baluchestan population by logistic regression analysis. We selected 77 iron deficiency anemia and 100 β-thal trait cases. We used binary logistic regression analysis and determined best equations for probability prediction of β-thal trait against iron deficiency anemia in our population. We compared diagnostic values and receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve related to this equation and another 10 published equations in discriminating β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia. The binary logistic regression analysis determined the best equation for best probability prediction of β-thal trait against iron deficiency anemia with area under curve (AUC) 0.998. Based on ROC curves and AUC, Green & King, England & Frazer, and then Sirdah indices, respectively, had the most accuracy after our equation. We suggest that to get the best equation and cut-off in each region, one needs to evaluate specific information of each region, specifically in areas where populations are homogeneous, to provide a specific formula for differentiating between β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia. PMID:25155260

  13. MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The MACSYMA's symbolic ordinary differential equation solver ODE2 is described. The code for this routine is delineated, which is of interest because it is written in top-level MACSYMA language, and may serve as a good example of programming in that language. Other symbolic ordinary differential equation solvers are mentioned.

  14. Symbolic Solution of Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, R. B.; Grooms, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations is presented. The computational complexity of the algorithm is discussed and its implementation in the FORMAC system is described. A comparison is made between the algorithm and some classical algorithms for solving differential equations.

  15. Modeling Projects in a Differential Equations Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus-McGahan, Elly

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the value of student-designed, in-depth, modeling projects in a differential equations course and how to prepare students. Provides excerpts from worksheets, a list of computer software for Macintosh that can be used in teaching differential equations, and an annotated bibliography. (Author/ASK)

  16. Lie algebras and linear differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. W.; Rahimi, A.

    1972-01-01

    Certain symmetry properties possessed by the solutions of linear differential equations are examined. For this purpose, some basic ideas from the theory of finite dimensional linear systems are used together with the work of Wei and Norman on the use of Lie algebraic methods in differential equation theory.

  17. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  18. Stochastic differential equation model to Prendiville processes

    SciTech Connect

    Granita; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-10-22

    The Prendiville process is another variation of the logistic model which assumes linearly decreasing population growth rate. It is a continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) taking integer values in the finite interval. The continuous time Markov chain can be approximated by stochastic differential equation (SDE). This paper discusses the stochastic differential equation of Prendiville process. The work started with the forward Kolmogorov equation in continuous time Markov chain of Prendiville process. Then it was formulated in the form of a central-difference approximation. The approximation was then used in Fokker-Planck equation in relation to the stochastic differential equation of the Prendiville process. The explicit solution of the Prendiville process was obtained from the stochastic differential equation. Therefore, the mean and variance function of the Prendiville process could be easily found from the explicit solution.

  19. Sparse dynamics for partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Hayden; Caflisch, Russel; Hauck, Cory D.; Osher, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the approximate dynamics of several differential equations when the solutions are restricted to a sparse subset of a given basis. The restriction is enforced at every time step by simply applying soft thresholding to the coefficients of the basis approximation. By reducing or compressing the information needed to represent the solution at every step, only the essential dynamics are represented. In many cases, there are natural bases derived from the differential equations, which promote sparsity. We find that our method successfully reduces the dynamics of convection equations, diffusion equations, weak shocks, and vorticity equations with high-frequency source terms. PMID:23533273

  20. Local Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    Three local observed-score kernel equating methods that integrate methods from the local equating and kernel equating frameworks are proposed. The new methods were compared with their earlier counterparts with respect to such measures as bias--as defined by Lord's criterion of equity--and percent relative error. The local kernel item response…

  1. Conservation laws, differential identities, and constraints of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharinov, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We consider specific cohomological properties such as low-dimensional conservation laws and differential identities of systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). We show that such properties are inherent to complex systems such as evolution systems with constraints. The mathematical tools used here are the algebraic analysis of PDEs and cohomologies over differential algebras and modules.

  2. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  3. Program for solution of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloate, H.

    1973-01-01

    A program for the solution of linear and nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations is described and user instructions are included. The program contains a new integration algorithm for the solution of initial value problems which is particularly efficient for the solution of differential equations with a wide range of eigenvalues. The program in its present form handles up to ten state variables, but expansion to handle up to fifty state variables is being investigated.

  4. Normal Forms for Nonautonomous Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    We extend Henry Poincarés normal form theory for autonomous differential equations x=f(x) to nonautonomous differential equations x=f(t, x). Poincarés nonresonance condition λj-∑ni=1 ℓiλi≠0 for eigenvalues is generalized to the new nonresonance condition λj∩∑ni=1 ℓiλi=∅ for spectral intervals.

  5. Extended Trial Equation Method for Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gepreel, Khaled A.; Nofal, Taher A.

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to use the extended trial equation method to construct a series of some new solutions for some nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) in mathematical physics. We will construct the solutions in many different functions such as hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions, Jacobi elliptic function solutions, and rational functional solutions for the nonlinear PDEs when the balance number is a real number via the Zhiber-Shabat nonlinear differential equation. The balance number of this method is not constant as we shown in other methods, but it is changed by changing the trial equation derivative definition. This method allowed us to construct many new types of solutions. It is shown by using the Maple software package that all obtained solutions satisfy the original PDEs.

  6. A Unified Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how a presentation from the point of view of differential operators can be used to (partially) unify the myriad techniques in an introductory course in ordinary differential equations by providing students with a powerful, flexible paradigm that extends into (or from) linear algebra. (Contains 1 footnote.)

  7. Differential geometry techniques for sets of nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Frank B.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to show that the Cartan theory of partial differential equations can be a useful technique for applied mathematics. Techniques for finding consistent subfamilies of solutions that are generically rich and well-posed and for introducing potentials or other usefully consistent auxiliary fields are introduced. An extended sample calculation involving the Korteweg-de Vries equation is given.

  8. Lipschitz regularity of solutions for mixed integro-differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barles, Guy; Chasseigne, Emmanuel; Ciomaga, Adina; Imbert, Cyril

    We establish new Hölder and Lipschitz estimates for viscosity solutions of a large class of elliptic and parabolic nonlinear integro-differential equations, by the classical Ishii-Lions's method. We thus extend the Hölder regularity results recently obtained by Barles, Chasseigne and Imbert (2011). In addition, we deal with a new class of nonlocal equations that we term mixed integro-differential equations. These equations are particularly interesting, as they are degenerate both in the local and nonlocal term, but their overall behavior is driven by the local-nonlocal interaction, e.g. the fractional diffusion may give the ellipticity in one direction and the classical diffusion in the complementary one.

  9. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations. PMID:24184349

  10. Stochastic Differential Equation of Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Tweneboah, Osei K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Serpa, Laura

    2016-07-01

    This work is devoted to modeling earthquake time series. We propose a stochastic differential equation based on the superposition of independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes driven by a Γ (α, β ) process. Superposition of independent Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes offer analytic flexibility and provides a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behavior. The stochastic differential equation is applied to the study of earthquakes by fitting the superposed Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model to earthquake sequences in South America containing very large events (Mw ≥ 8). We obtained very good fit of the observed magnitudes of the earthquakes with the stochastic differential equations, which supports the use of this methodology for the study of earthquakes sequence.

  11. Stochastic Differential Equation of Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Tweneboah, Osei K.; Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Serpa, Laura

    2016-05-01

    This work is devoted to modeling earthquake time series. We propose a stochastic differential equation based on the superposition of independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes driven by a Γ (α, β ) process. Superposition of independent Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes offer analytic flexibility and provides a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behavior. The stochastic differential equation is applied to the study of earthquakes by fitting the superposed Γ (α, β ) Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model to earthquake sequences in South America containing very large events (Mw ≥ 8). We obtained very good fit of the observed magnitudes of the earthquakes with the stochastic differential equations, which supports the use of this methodology for the study of earthquakes sequence.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Differential-Algebraic Equations and Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, L; Cao, Y; Li, S; Serban, R

    2005-08-09

    Sensitivity analysis generates essential information for model development, design optimization, parameter estimation, optimal control, model reduction and experimental design. In this paper we describe the forward and adjoint methods for sensitivity analysis, and outline some of our recent work on theory, algorithms and software for sensitivity analysis of differential-algebraic equation (DAE) and time-dependent partial differential equation (PDE) systems.

  13. Algorithms For Integrating Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Walker, K. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved algorithms developed for use in numerical integration of systems of nonhomogenous, nonlinear, first-order, ordinary differential equations. In comparison with integration algorithms, these algorithms offer greater stability and accuracy. Several asymptotically correct, thereby enabling retention of stability and accuracy when large increments of independent variable used. Accuracies attainable demonstrated by applying them to systems of nonlinear, first-order, differential equations that arise in study of viscoplastic behavior, spread of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus and predator/prey populations.

  14. On some differential transformations of hypergeometric equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounkonnou, M. N.; Ronveaux, A.

    2015-04-01

    Many algebraic transformations of the hypergeometric equation σ(x)z"(x) + τ(x)z'(x) + lz(x) = 0, where σ, τ, l are polynomial functions of degrees 2 (at most), 1, 0, respectively, are well known. Some of them involve x = x(t), a polynomial of degree r, in order to recover the Heun equation, extension of the hypergeometric equation by one more singularity. The case r = 2 was investigated by K. Kuiken (see 1979 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 10 (3) 655-657) and extended to r = 3,4, 5 by R. S. Maier (see 2005 J. Differ. Equat. 213 171 - 203). The transformations engendered by the function y(x) = A(x)z(x), also very popular in mathematics and physics, are used to get from the hypergeometric equation, for instance, the Schroedinger equation with appropriate potentials, as well as Heun and confluent Heun equations. This work addresses a generalization of Kimura's approach proposed in 1971, based on differential transformations of the hypergeometric equations involving y(x) = A(x)z(x) + B(x)z'(x). Appropriate choices of A(x) and B(x) permit to retrieve the Heun equations as well as equations for some exceptional polynomials. New relations are obtained for Laguerre and Hermite polynomials.

  15. Bounded and periodic solutions of nonlinear functional differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusarchuk, Vasilii E

    2012-05-31

    Conditions for the existence of bounded and periodic solutions of the nonlinear functional differential equation d{sup m}x(t)/dt{sup m} + (Fx)(t) = h(t), t element of R, are presented, involving local linear approximations to the operator F. Bibliography: 23 titles.

  16. Parallel Algorithm Solves Coupled Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical methods adapted to concurrent processing. Algorithm solves set of coupled partial differential equations by numerical integration. Adapted to run on hypercube computer, algorithm separates problem into smaller problems solved concurrently. Increase in computing speed with concurrent processing over that achievable with conventional sequential processing appreciable, especially for large problems.

  17. Computational Differential Equations: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roubides, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The following article presents a proposal for the redesign of a traditional course in Differential Equations at Middle Georgia College. The redesign of the course involves a new approach to teaching traditional concepts: one where the understanding of the physical aspects of each problem takes precedence over the actual mechanics of solving the…

  18. Stability of solutions to stochastic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gess, Benjamin; Tölle, Jonas M.

    2016-03-01

    We provide a general framework for the stability of solutions to stochastic partial differential equations with respect to perturbations of the drift. More precisely, we consider stochastic partial differential equations with drift given as the subdifferential of a convex function and prove continuous dependence of the solutions with regard to random Mosco convergence of the convex potentials. In particular, we identify the concept of stochastic variational inequalities (SVI) as a well-suited framework to study such stability properties. The generality of the developed framework is then laid out by deducing Trotter type and homogenization results for stochastic fast diffusion and stochastic singular p-Laplace equations. In addition, we provide an SVI treatment for stochastic nonlocal p-Laplace equations and prove their convergence to the respective local models.

  19. Solving Parker's transport equation with stochastic differential equations on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunzlaff, P.; Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    The numerical solution of transport equations for energetic charged particles in space is generally very costly in terms of time. Besides the use of multi-core CPUs and computer clusters in order to decrease the computation times, high performance calculations on graphics processing units (GPUs) have become available during the last years. In this work we introduce and describe a GPU-accelerated implementation of Parker's equation using Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) for the simulation of the transport of energetic charged particles with the CUDA toolkit, which is the focus of this work. We briefly discuss the set of SDEs arising from Parker's transport equation and their application to boundary value problems such as that of the Jovian magnetosphere. We compare the runtimes of the GPU code with a CPU version of the same algorithm. Compared to the CPU implementation (using OpenMP and eight threads) we find a performance increase of about a factor of 10-60, depending on the assumed set of parameters. Furthermore, we benchmark our simulation using the results of an existing SDE implementation of Parker's transport equation.

  20. Quasi-Newton methods for parameter estimation in functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Dennis W.

    1988-01-01

    A state-space approach to parameter estimation in linear functional differential equations is developed using the theory of linear evolution equations. A locally convergent quasi-Newton type algorithm is applied to distributed systems with particular emphasis on parameters that induce unbounded perturbations of the state. The algorithm is computationally implemented on several functional differential equations, including coefficient and delay estimation in linear delay-differential equations.

  1. A differential equation for the Generalized Born radii.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2013-06-28

    The Generalized Born (GB) model offers a convenient way of representing electrostatics in complex macromolecules like proteins or nucleic acids. The computation of atomic GB radii is currently performed by different non-local approaches involving volume or surface integrals. Here we obtain a non-linear second-order partial differential equation for the Generalized Born radius, which may be solved using local iterative algorithms. The equation is derived under the assumption that the usual GB approximation to the reaction field obeys Laplace's equation. The equation admits as particular solutions the correct GB radii for the sphere and the plane. The tests performed on a set of 55 different proteins show an overall agreement with other reference GB models and "perfect" Poisson-Boltzmann based values. PMID:23676843

  2. Differential equation-based seismic data filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao; Larner, K.

    1992-05-01

    Suppressing noise and enhancing useful seismic signal by filtering is one of the important tasks of seismic data processing. conventional filtering methods are implemented through either the convolution operation or various mathematical transforms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for studying and implementing filters, which, unlike those conventional filtering methods, is based on solving differential equations in the time and space domain. We call this kind of filtering differential equation-based filtering (DEBF). DEBF does not require that seismic data be stationary, so filtering parameters can vary with every time and space point. Also, in 2-D and 3-D, DEBF has higher computational efficiency than do conventional multiple-trace filtering methods. Examples with synthetic and field seismic data show the DEBF methods presented here to be efficient and effective.

  3. On the Inclusion of Difference Equation Problems and Z Transform Methods in Sophomore Differential Equation Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoye, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, I started covering difference equations and z transform methods in my introductory differential equations course. This allowed my students to extend the "classical" methods for (ordinary differential equation) ODE's to discrete time problems arising in many applications.

  4. LORENE: Spectral methods differential equations solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric; Grandclément, Philippe; Marck, Jean-Alain; Novak, Jérôme; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2016-08-01

    LORENE (Langage Objet pour la RElativité NumériquE) solves various problems arising in numerical relativity, and more generally in computational astrophysics. It is a set of C++ classes and provides tools to solve partial differential equations by means of multi-domain spectral methods. LORENE classes implement basic structures such as arrays and matrices, but also abstract mathematical objects, such as tensors, and astrophysical objects, such as stars and black holes.

  5. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  6. Spurious Numerical Solutions Of Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, A.; Yee, H. C.

    1995-01-01

    Paper presents detailed study of spurious steady-state numerical solutions of differential equations that contain nonlinear source terms. Main objectives of this study are (1) to investigate how well numerical steady-state solutions of model nonlinear reaction/convection boundary-value problem mimic true steady-state solutions and (2) to relate findings of this investigation to implications for interpretation of numerical results from computational-fluid-dynamics algorithms and computer codes used to simulate reacting flows.

  7. Spurious Solutions Of Nonlinear Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.; Griffiths, D. F.

    1992-01-01

    Report utilizes nonlinear-dynamics approach to investigate possible sources of errors and slow convergence and non-convergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using time-dependent approach for problems containing nonlinear source terms. Emphasizes implications for development of algorithms in CFD and computational sciences in general. Main fundamental conclusion of study is that qualitative features of nonlinear differential equations cannot be adequately represented by finite-difference method and vice versa.

  8. Partial differential equation models in macroeconomics.

    PubMed

    Achdou, Yves; Buera, Francisco J; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Moll, Benjamin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this article is to get mathematicians interested in studying a number of partial differential equations (PDEs) that naturally arise in macroeconomics. These PDEs come from models designed to study some of the most important questions in economics. At the same time, they are highly interesting for mathematicians because their structure is often quite difficult. We present a number of examples of such PDEs, discuss what is known about their properties, and list some open questions for future research. PMID:25288811

  9. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  10. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  11. Generalized Halanay inequalities for dissipativity of Volterra functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liping; Yu, Yuexin; Wang, Wansheng

    2008-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the dissipativity of theoretical solutions to nonlinear Volterra functional differential equations (VFDEs). At first, we give some generalizations of Halanay's inequality which play an important role in study of dissipativity and stability of differential equations. Then, by applying the generalization of Halanay's inequality, the dissipativity results of VFDEs are obtained, which provides unified theoretical foundation for the dissipativity analysis of systems in ordinary differential equations (ODEs), delay differential equations (DDEs), integro-differential equations (IDEs), Volterra delay-integro-differential equations (VDIDEs) and VFDEs of other type which appear in practice.

  12. Stability at systems of usual differential equations in virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    In this paper we discuss different models of differential equations systems, that describe virus dynamics in different situations (HIV-virus and Hepatitis B-virus). We inquire the stability of differential equations. We use theorems of the stability theory.

  13. Differential equations, associators, and recurrences for amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhlfürst, Georg; Stieberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We provide new methods to straightforwardly obtain compact and analytic expressions for ɛ-expansions of functions appearing in both field and string theory amplitudes. An algebraic method is presented to explicitly solve for recurrence relations connecting different ɛ-orders of a power series solution in ɛ of a differential equation. This strategy generalizes the usual iteration by Picard's method. Our tools are demonstrated for generalized hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we match the ɛ-expansion of specific generalized hypergeometric functions with the underlying Drinfeld associator with proper Lie algebra and monodromy representations. We also apply our tools for computing ɛ-expansions for solutions to generic first-order Fuchsian equations (Schlesinger system). Finally, we set up our methods to systematically get compact and explicit α‧-expansions of tree-level superstring amplitudes to any order in α‧.

  14. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  15. The existence of solutions of q-difference-differential equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Li; Wang, Hua; Xu, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    By using the Nevanlinna theory of value distribution, we investigate the existence of solutions of some types of non-linear q-difference differential equations. In particular, we generalize the Rellich-Wittich-type theorem and Malmquist-type theorem about differential equations to the case of q-difference differential equations (system). PMID:27218006

  16. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines appr...

  17. Characteristic exponents of impulsive differential equations in a Banach space

    SciTech Connect

    Zabreiko, P.P.; Bainov, D.D.; Kostadinov, S.I.

    1988-06-01

    The notion of general exponent of impulsive homogeneous differential equations is defined. A formula for the solution of impulsive nonhomogeneous differential equations is obtained and is used to establish a dependence between the existence of bounded solutions of such equations and the general exponent of the respective homogeneous equation.

  18. Spherical harmonics approach to parabolic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SenGupta, Indranil; Mariani, Maria C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is devoted to extend the spherical harmonics technique to the solution of parabolic differential equations and to integro-differential equations. The heat equation and the Black-Scholes equation are solved by using the method of spherical harmonics.

  19. A differential equation for specific catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, John C.; Hutchinson, Michael F.

    2011-05-01

    Analysis of the behavior of specific catchment area in a stream tube leads to a simple nonlinear differential equation describing the rate of change of specific catchment area along a flow path. The differential equation can be integrated numerically along a flow path to calculate specific catchment area at any point on a digital elevation model without requiring the usual estimates of catchment area and width. The method is more computationally intensive than most grid-based methods for calculating specific catchment area, so its main application is as a reference against which conventional methods can be tested. This is the first method that provides a benchmark for more approximate methods in complex terrain with both convergent and divergent areas, not just on simple surfaces for which analytical solutions are known. Preliminary evaluation of the D8, M8, digital elevation model networks (DEMON), and D∞ methods indicate that the D∞ method is the best of those methods for estimating specific catchment area, but all methods overestimate in divergent terrain.

  20. Numerical Methods for Stochastic Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.H.; Habib, S.; Mineev, M.B.

    1999-07-08

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this proposal were (1) the development of methods for understanding and control of spacetime discretization errors in nonlinear stochastic partial differential equations, and (2) the development of new and improved practical numerical methods for the solutions of these equations. The authors have succeeded in establishing two methods for error control: the functional Fokker-Planck equation for calculating the time discretization error and the transfer integral method for calculating the spatial discretization error. In addition they have developed a new second-order stochastic algorithm for multiplicative noise applicable to the case of colored noises, and which requires only a single random sequence generation per time step. All of these results have been verified via high-resolution numerical simulations and have been successfully applied to physical test cases. They have also made substantial progress on a longstanding problem in the dynamics of unstable fluid interfaces in porous media. This work has lead to highly accurate quasi-analytic solutions of idealized versions of this problem. These may be of use in benchmarking numerical solutions of the full stochastic PDEs that govern real-world problems.

  1. Parallels between control PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and systems of ODE's (Ordinary Differential Equations)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    System theorists understand that the same mathematical objects which determine controllability for nonlinear control systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) also determine hypoellipticity for linear partial differentail equations (PDEs). Moreover, almost any study of ODE systems begins with linear systems. It is remarkable that Hormander's paper on hypoellipticity of second order linear p.d.e.'s starts with equations due to Kolmogorov, which are shown to be analogous to the linear PDEs. Eigenvalue placement by state feedback for a controllable linear system can be paralleled for a Kolmogorov equation if an appropriate type of feedback is introduced. Results concerning transformations of nonlinear systems to linear systems are similar to results for transforming a linear PDE to a Kolmogorov equation.

  2. Stochastic Computational Approach for Complex Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaid, Ali Khan; Muhammad, Asif Zahoor Raja; Ijaz Mansoor, Qureshi

    2011-02-01

    We present an evolutionary computational approach for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NLODEs). The mathematical modeling is performed by a feed-forward artificial neural network that defines an unsupervised error. The training of these networks is achieved by a hybrid intelligent algorithm, a combination of global search with genetic algorithm and local search by pattern search technique. The applicability of this approach ranges from single order NLODEs, to systems of coupled differential equations. We illustrate the method by solving a variety of model problems and present comparisons with solutions obtained by exact methods and classical numerical methods. The solution is provided on a continuous finite time interval unlike the other numerical techniques with comparable accuracy. With the advent of neuroprocessors and digital signal processors the method becomes particularly interesting due to the expected essential gains in the execution speed.

  3. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications. PMID:25101095

  4. Extrapolation methods for dynamic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1978-01-01

    Several extrapolation procedures are presented for increasing the order of accuracy in time for evolutionary partial differential equations. These formulas are based on finite difference schemes in both the spatial and temporal directions. On practical grounds the methods are restricted to schemes that are fourth order in time and either second, fourth or sixth order in space. For hyperbolic problems the second order in space methods are not useful while the fourth order methods offer no advantage over the Kreiss-Oliger method unless very fine meshes are used. Advantages are first achieved using sixth order methods in space coupled with fourth order accuracy in time. Computational results are presented confirming the analytic discussions.

  5. Fault Detection in Differential Algebraic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Roderick

    Fault detection and identification (FDI) is important in almost all real systems. Fault detection is the supervision of technical processes aimed at detecting undesired or unpermitted states (faults) and taking appropriate actions to avoid dangerous situations, or to ensure efficiency in a system. This dissertation develops and extends fault detection techniques for systems modeled by differential algebraic equations (DAEs). First, a passive, observer-based approach is developed and linear filters are constructed to identify faults by filtering residual information. The method presented here uses the least squares completion to compute an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that contains the solution of the DAE and applies the observer directly to this ODE. While observers have been applied to ODE models for the purpose of fault detection in the past, the use of observers on completions of DAEs is a new idea. Moreover, the resulting residuals are modified requiring additional analysis. Robustness with respect to disturbances is also addressed by a novel frequency filtering technique. Active detection, as opposed to passive detection where outputs are passively monitored, allows the injection of an auxiliary control signal to test the system. These algorithms compute an auxiliary input signal guaranteeing fault detection, assuming bounded noise. In the second part of this dissertation, a novel active detection approach for DAE models is developed by taking linear transformations of the DAEs and solving a bi-layer optimization problem. An efficient real-time detection algorithm is also provided, as is the extension to model uncertainty. The existence of a class of problems where the algorithm breaks down is revealed and an alternative algorithm that finds a nearly minimal auxiliary signal is presented. Finally, asynchronous signal design, that is, applying the test signal on a different interval than the observation window, is explored and discussed.

  6. Introduction to Adaptive Methods for Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Kenneth; Estep, Don; Hansbo, Peter; Johnson, Claes

    Knowing thus the Algorithm of this calculus, which I call Differential Calculus, all differential equations can be solved by a common method (Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, 1646-1719).When, several years ago, I saw for the first time an instrument which, when carried, automatically records the number of steps taken by a pedestrian, it occurred to me at once that the entire arithmetic could be subjected to a similar kind of machinery so that not only addition and subtraction, but also multiplication and division, could be accomplished by a suitably arranged machine easily, promptly and with sure results. For it is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labour of calculations, which could safely be left to anyone else if the machine was used. And now that we may give final praise to the machine, we may say that it will be desirable to all who are engaged in computations which, as is well known, are the managers of financial affairs, the administrators of others estates, merchants, surveyors, navigators, astronomers, and those connected with any of the crafts that use mathematics (Leibniz).

  7. First-order partial differential equations in classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Carathèodory's classic work on the calculus of variations explores in depth the connection between ordinary differential equations and first-order partial differential equations. The n second-order ordinary differential equations of a classical dynamical system reduce to a single first-order differential equation in 2n independent variables. The general solution of first-order partial differential equations touches on many concepts central to graduate-level courses in analytical dynamics including the Hamiltonian, Lagrange and Poisson brackets, and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. For all but the simplest dynamical systems the solution requires one or more of these techniques. Three elementary dynamical problems (uniform acceleration, harmonic motion, and cyclotron motion) can be solved directly from the appropriate first-order partial differential equation without the use of advanced methods. The process offers an unusual perspective on classical dynamics, which is readily accessible to intermediate students who are not yet fully conversant with advanced approaches.

  8. Legendre-tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1986-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations are considered using the so-called Legendre-tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time-differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time-varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximation is made.

  9. Legendre-Tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear functional differential equations are considered using the so called Legendre tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximations is made.

  10. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  11. Improved local linearization algorithm for solving the quaternion equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, K.; Cook, G.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a new and more accurate local linearization algorithm for numerically solving sets of linear time-varying differential equations. Of special interest is the application of this algorithm to the quaternion rate equations. The results are compared, both analytically and experimentally, with previous results using local linearization methods. The new algorithm requires approximately one-third more calculations per step than the previously developed local linearization algorithm; however, this disadvantage could be reduced by using parallel implementation. For some cases the new algorithm yields significant improvement in accuracy, even with an enlarged sampling interval. The reverse is true in other cases. The errors depend on the values of angular velocity, angular acceleration, and integration step size. One important result is that for the worst case the new algorithm can guarantee eigenvalues nearer the region of stability than can the previously developed algorithm.

  12. Differential Equations Compatible with Boundary Rational qKZ Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    We give diffierential equations compatible with the rational qKZ equation with boundary reflection. The total system contains the trigonometric degeneration of the bispectral qKZ equation of type (Cěen, Cn) which in the case of type GLn was studied by van Meer and Stokman. We construct an integral formula for solutions to our compatible system in a special case.

  13. From differential to difference equations for first order ODEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    When constructing an algorithm for the numerical integration of a differential equation, one should first convert the known ordinary differential equation (ODE) into an ordinary difference equation. Given this difference equation, one can develop an appropriate numerical algorithm. This technical note describes the derivation of two such ordinary difference equations applicable to a first order ODE. The implicit ordinary difference equation has the same asymptotic expansion as the ODE itself, whereas the explicit ordinary difference equation has an asymptotic that is similar in structure but different in value when compared with that of the ODE.

  14. Differential form of the Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen'Kov, F. M.; Sandhas, W.

    2005-12-01

    The Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan three-boson integral equations in momentum space are transformed into differential equations. This allows us to take into account quite directly the Danilov condition providing self-adjointness of the underlying three-body Hamiltonian with zero-range pair interactions. For the helium trimer the numerical solutions of the resulting differential equations are compared with those of the Faddeev-type AGS equations.

  15. Differential form of the Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pen'kov, F. M.; Sandhas, W.

    2005-12-15

    The Skornyakov-Ter-Martirosyan three-boson integral equations in momentum space are transformed into differential equations. This allows us to take into account quite directly the Danilov condition providing self-adjointness of the underlying three-body Hamiltonian with zero-range pair interactions. For the helium trimer the numerical solutions of the resulting differential equations are compared with those of the Faddeev-type AGS equations.

  16. Patchwork sampling of stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Behn, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to sample stationary properties of solutions of stochastic differential equations, which is accurate and efficient if there are rarely visited regions or rare transitions between distinct regions of the state space. The method is based on a complete, nonoverlapping partition of the state space into patches on which the stochastic process is ergodic. On each of these patches we run simulations of the process strictly truncated to the corresponding patch, which allows effective simulations also in rarely visited regions. The correct weight for each patch is obtained by counting the attempted transitions between all different patches. The results are patchworked to cover the whole state space. We extend the concept of truncated Markov chains which is originally formulated for processes which obey detailed balance to processes not fulfilling detailed balance. The method is illustrated by three examples, describing the one-dimensional diffusion of an overdamped particle in a double-well potential, a system of many globally coupled overdamped particles in double-well potentials subject to additive Gaussian white noise, and the overdamped motion of a particle on the circle in a periodic potential subject to a deterministic drift and additive noise. In an appendix we explain how other well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be related to truncated Markov chains. PMID:27078484

  17. Electrocardiogram classification using delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainscsek, Claudia; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-06-01

    Time series analysis with nonlinear delay differential equations (DDEs) reveals nonlinear as well as spectral properties of the underlying dynamical system. Here, global DDE models were used to analyze 5 min data segments of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings in order to capture distinguishing features for different heart conditions such as normal heart beat, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. The number of terms and delays in the model as well as the order of nonlinearity of the model have to be selected that are the most discriminative. The DDE model form that best separates the three classes of data was chosen by exhaustive search up to third order polynomials. Such an approach can provide deep insight into the nature of the data since linear terms of a DDE correspond to the main time-scales in the signal and the nonlinear terms in the DDE are related to nonlinear couplings between the harmonic signal parts. The DDEs were able to detect atrial fibrillation with an accuracy of 72%, congestive heart failure with an accuracy of 88%, and normal heart beat with an accuracy of 97% from 5 min of ECG, a much shorter time interval than required to achieve comparable performance with other methods.

  18. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Xiaolei; Cao, Jiguo; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J.; Maity, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown, and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the present of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE, and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from LIDAR data. PMID:24363476

  19. Parameter Estimation of Partial Differential Equation Models.

    PubMed

    Xun, Xiaolei; Cao, Jiguo; Mallick, Bani; Carroll, Raymond J; Maity, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) models are commonly used to model complex dynamic systems in applied sciences such as biology and finance. The forms of these PDE models are usually proposed by experts based on their prior knowledge and understanding of the dynamic system. Parameters in PDE models often have interesting scientific interpretations, but their values are often unknown, and need to be estimated from the measurements of the dynamic system in the present of measurement errors. Most PDEs used in practice have no analytic solutions, and can only be solved with numerical methods. Currently, methods for estimating PDE parameters require repeatedly solving PDEs numerically under thousands of candidate parameter values, and thus the computational load is high. In this article, we propose two methods to estimate parameters in PDE models: a parameter cascading method and a Bayesian approach. In both methods, the underlying dynamic process modeled with the PDE model is represented via basis function expansion. For the parameter cascading method, we develop two nested levels of optimization to estimate the PDE parameters. For the Bayesian method, we develop a joint model for data and the PDE, and develop a novel hierarchical model allowing us to employ Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to make posterior inference. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method and parameter cascading method are comparable, and both outperform other available methods in terms of estimation accuracy. The two methods are demonstrated by estimating parameters in a PDE model from LIDAR data. PMID:24363476

  20. Robust estimation for ordinary differential equation models.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, L; Xu, J

    2011-12-01

    Applied scientists often like to use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model complex dynamic processes that arise in biology, engineering, medicine, and many other areas. It is interesting but challenging to estimate ODE parameters from noisy data, especially when the data have some outliers. We propose a robust method to address this problem. The dynamic process is represented with a nonparametric function, which is a linear combination of basis functions. The nonparametric function is estimated by a robust penalized smoothing method. The penalty term is defined with the parametric ODE model, which controls the roughness of the nonparametric function and maintains the fidelity of the nonparametric function to the ODE model. The basis coefficients and ODE parameters are estimated in two nested levels of optimization. The coefficient estimates are treated as an implicit function of ODE parameters, which enables one to derive the analytic gradients for optimization using the implicit function theorem. Simulation studies show that the robust method gives satisfactory estimates for the ODE parameters from noisy data with outliers. The robust method is demonstrated by estimating a predator-prey ODE model from real ecological data. PMID:21401565

  1. Patchwork sampling of stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Behn, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method to sample stationary properties of solutions of stochastic differential equations, which is accurate and efficient if there are rarely visited regions or rare transitions between distinct regions of the state space. The method is based on a complete, nonoverlapping partition of the state space into patches on which the stochastic process is ergodic. On each of these patches we run simulations of the process strictly truncated to the corresponding patch, which allows effective simulations also in rarely visited regions. The correct weight for each patch is obtained by counting the attempted transitions between all different patches. The results are patchworked to cover the whole state space. We extend the concept of truncated Markov chains which is originally formulated for processes which obey detailed balance to processes not fulfilling detailed balance. The method is illustrated by three examples, describing the one-dimensional diffusion of an overdamped particle in a double-well potential, a system of many globally coupled overdamped particles in double-well potentials subject to additive Gaussian white noise, and the overdamped motion of a particle on the circle in a periodic potential subject to a deterministic drift and additive noise. In an appendix we explain how other well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be related to truncated Markov chains.

  2. Regularized Semiparametric Estimation for Ordinary Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Zhu, Ji; Wang, Naisyin

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are widely used in modeling dynamic systems and have ample applications in the fields of physics, engineering, economics and biological sciences. The ODE parameters often possess physiological meanings and can help scientists gain better understanding of the system. One key interest is thus to well estimate these parameters. Ideally, constant parameters are preferred due to their easy interpretation. In reality, however, constant parameters can be too restrictive such that even after incorporating error terms, there could still be unknown sources of disturbance that lead to poor agreement between observed data and the estimated ODE system. In this paper, we address this issue and accommodate short-term interferences by allowing parameters to vary with time. We propose a new regularized estimation procedure on the time-varying parameters of an ODE system so that these parameters could change with time during transitions but remain constants within stable stages. We found, through simulation studies, that the proposed method performs well and tends to have less variation in comparison to the non-regularized approach. On the theoretical front, we derive finite-sample estimation error bounds for the proposed method. Applications of the proposed method to modeling the hare-lynx relationship and the measles incidence dynamic in Ontario, Canada lead to satisfactory and meaningful results. PMID:26392639

  3. A complex Noether approach for variational partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, R.; Mahomed, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar complex partial differential equations which admit variational formulations are studied. Such a complex partial differential equation, via a complex dependent variable, splits into a system of two real partial differential equations. The decomposition of the Lagrangian of the complex partial differential equation in the real domain is shown to yield two real Lagrangians for the split system. The complex Maxwellian distribution, transonic gas flow, Maxwellian tails, dissipative wave and Klein-Gordon equations are considered. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the split system that correspond to both the Lagrangians are constructed by the Noether approach. In the case of coupled split systems, the same Noether symmetries are obtained. The Noether symmetries for the uncoupled split systems are different. The conserved vectors of the split system which correspond to both the Lagrangians are compared to the split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation for the examples. The split conserved vectors of the complex partial differential equation are the same as the conserved vectors of the split system of real partial differential equations in the case of coupled systems. Moreover a Noether-like theorem for the split system is proved which provides the Noether-like conserved quantities of the split system from knowledge of the Noether-like operators. An interesting result on the split characteristics and the conservation laws is shown as well. The Noether symmetries and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the split system with the split Noether-like operators and gauge terms of the Lagrangian of the given complex partial differential equation are compared. Folklore suggests that the split Noether-like operators of a Lagrangian of a complex Euler-Lagrange partial differential equation are symmetries of the Lagrangian of the split system of real partial differential equations. This is not the case. They are proved to be the same if the

  4. Stochastic partial differential equations in turbulence related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P.-L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of stochastic partial differential equations (PDEs) and problems relating to turbulence are discussed by employing the theories of Brownian motion and diffusion in infinite dimensions, functional differential equations, and functional integration. Relevant results in probablistic analysis, especially Gaussian measures in function spaces and the theory of stochastic PDEs of Ito type, are taken into account. Linear stochastic PDEs are analyzed through linearized Navier-Stokes equations with a random forcing. Stochastic equations for waves in random media as well as model equations in turbulent transport theory are considered. Markovian models in fully developed turbulence are discussed from a stochastic equation viewpoint.

  5. On exact traveling-wave solutions for local fractional Korteweg-de Vries equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.; Baleanu, Dumitru; Cattani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the Korteweg-de Vries equation within the scope of the local fractional derivative formulation. The exact traveling wave solutions of non-differentiable type with the generalized functions defined on Cantor sets are analyzed. The results for the non-differentiable solutions when fractal dimension is 1 are also discussed. It is shown that the exact solutions for the local fractional Korteweg-de Vries equation characterize the fractal wave on shallow water surfaces.

  6. On exact traveling-wave solutions for local fractional Korteweg-de Vries equation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Tenreiro Machado, J A; Baleanu, Dumitru; Cattani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the Korteweg-de Vries equation within the scope of the local fractional derivative formulation. The exact traveling wave solutions of non-differentiable type with the generalized functions defined on Cantor sets are analyzed. The results for the non-differentiable solutions when fractal dimension is 1 are also discussed. It is shown that the exact solutions for the local fractional Korteweg-de Vries equation characterize the fractal wave on shallow water surfaces. PMID:27586629

  7. Solving Space-Time Fractional Differential Equations by Using Modified Simple Equation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Melike; Akbulut, Arzu; Bekir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we establish new and more general traveling wave solutions of space-time fractional Klein–Gordon equation with quadratic nonlinearity and the space-time fractional breaking soliton equations using the modified simple equation method. The proposed method is so powerful and effective to solve nonlinear space-time fractional differential equations by with modified Riemann–Liouville derivative.

  8. Monograph - The Numerical Integration of Ordinary Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, T. E.

    The materials presented in this monograph are intended to be included in a course on ordinary differential equations at the upper division level in a college mathematics program. These materials provide an introduction to the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, and they can be used to supplement a regular text on this…

  9. Undergraduate Students' Mental Operations in Systems of Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Karen; Rasmussen, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on research conducted to understand undergraduate students' ways of reasoning about systems of differential equations (SDEs). As part of a semester long classroom teaching experiment in a first course in differential equations, we conducted task-based interviews with six students after their study of first order differential…

  10. BIFURCATIONS OF RANDOM DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH BOUNDED NOISE ON SURFACES.

    PubMed

    Homburg, Ale Jan; Young, Todd R

    2010-03-01

    In random differential equations with bounded noise minimal forward invariant (MFI) sets play a central role since they support stationary measures. We study the stability and possible bifurcations of MFI sets. In dimensions 1 and 2 we classify all minimal forward invariant sets and their codimension one bifurcations in bounded noise random differential equations. PMID:22211081

  11. Sourcing for Parameter Estimation and Study of Logistic Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This article offers modelling opportunities in which the phenomena of the spread of disease, perception of changing mass, growth of technology, and dissemination of information can be described by one differential equation--the logistic differential equation. It presents two simulation activities for students to generate real data, as well as…

  12. Nonstandard Topics for Student Presentations in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMasurier, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    An interesting and effective way to showcase the wide variety of fields to which differential equations can be applied is to have students give short oral presentations on a specific application. These talks, which have been presented by 30-40 students per year in our differential equations classes, provide exposure to a diverse array of topics…

  13. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the need for devoting time in differential equations courses to modelling and the completion of the modelling process with efforts to estimate the parameters in the models using data. We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of chemical reactions of order n, where n = 0, 1, 2, and apply more general…

  14. Stochastic fuzzy differential equations of a nonincreasing type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Marek T.

    2016-04-01

    Stochastic fuzzy differential equations constitute an apparatus in modeling dynamic systems operating in fuzzy environment and governed by stochastic noises. In this paper we introduce a new kind of such the equations. Namely, the stochastic fuzzy differential of nonincreasing type are considered. The fuzzy stochastic processes which are solutions to these equations have trajectories with nonincreasing fuzziness in their values. In our previous papers, as a first natural extension of crisp stochastic differential equations, stochastic fuzzy differential equations of nondecreasing type were studied. In this paper we show that under suitable conditions each of the equations has a unique solution which possesses property of continuous dependence on data of the equation. To prove existence of the solutions we use sequences of successive approximate solutions. An estimation of an error of the approximate solution is established as well. Some examples of equations are solved and their solutions are simulated to illustrate the theory of stochastic fuzzy differential equations. All the achieved results apply to stochastic set-valued differential equations.

  15. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  16. Real-time optical laboratory solution of parabolic differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Jackson, James

    1988-01-01

    An optical laboratory matrix-vector processor is used to solve parabolic differential equations (the transient diffusion equation with two space variables and time) by an explicit algorithm. This includes optical matrix-vector nonbase-2 encoded laboratory data, the combination of nonbase-2 and frequency-multiplexed data on such processors, a high-accuracy optical laboratory solution of a partial differential equation, new data partitioning techniques, and a discussion of a multiprocessor optical matrix-vector architecture.

  17. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  18. Intuitive Understanding of Solutions of Partially Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses diagrams that help the observer see how solutions of the wave equation and heat conduction equation are obtained. The analytical approach cannot necessarily show the mechanisms of the key to the solution without transforming the differential equation into a more convenient form by separation of variables. The visual clues based…

  19. Solving Differential Equations Analytically. Elementary Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 335.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, J. W.

    This unit introduces analytic solutions of ordinary differential equations. The objective is to enable the student to decide whether a given function solves a given differential equation. Examples of problems from biology and chemistry are covered. Problem sets, quizzes, and a model exam are included, and answers to all items are provided. The…

  20. Local search strategies for equational satisfiability.

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, K.

    2004-09-21

    The search for models of an algebra is an important and demanding aspect of automated reasoning. Typically, a model is represented in the form of a matrix or a set of matrices. When a model is found that satisfies all the given theorems of an algebra, it is called a solution model. This paper considers algebras that can be represented by using a single operation, by way of the Sheffer stroke. The characteristic of needing only one operation to represent an algebra reduces the problem by requiring a search through all instances of a single matrix. This search is simple when the domain size is small, say 2, but for a larger domain size, say 10, the search space increases dramatically. Clearly, a method other than a brute-force, global search is desirable. Most modern model-finding programs use a global search; instead of checking every possible matrix, however a set of heuristics is used that allows the search space to be dramatically smaller and thus increases the likelihood of reaching a solution. An alternative approach is local search. This paper discusses several local search strategies that were applied to the problem of equational satisfiability.

  1. New exact solutions to some difference differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong-Qing

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we use our method to solve the extended Lotka-Volterra equation and discrete KdV equation. With the help of Maple, we obtain a number of exact solutions to the two equations including soliton solutions presented by hyperbolic functions of sinh and cosh, periodic solutions presented by trigonometric functions of sin and cos, and rational solutions. This method can be used to solve some other nonlinear difference-differential equations.

  2. Alternative to the Kohn-Sham equations: The Pauli potential differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levämäki, H.; Nagy, Á.; Kokko, K.; Vitos, L.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed theoretical framework of performing self-consistent orbital-free (OF) density functional theory (DFT) calculations at Kohn-Sham DFT level accuracy is tested in practice. The framework is valid for spherically symmetric systems. Numerical results for the Beryllium atom are presented and compared to accurate Kohn-Sham data. These calculations make use of a differential equation that we have developed for the so called Pauli potential, a key quantity in OF-DFT. The Pauli potential differential equation and the OF Euler equation form a system of two coupled differential equations, which have to be solved simultaneously within the DFT self-consistent loop.

  3. A neuro approach to solve fuzzy Riccati differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrir, Mohammad Shazri; Kumaresan, N. Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, Kurunathan

    2015-10-22

    There are many applications of optimal control theory especially in the area of control systems in engineering. In this paper, fuzzy quadratic Riccati differential equation is estimated using neural networks (NN). Previous works have shown reliable results using Runge-Kutta 4th order (RK4). The solution can be achieved by solving the 1st Order Non-linear Differential Equation (ODE) that is found commonly in Riccati differential equation. Research has shown improved results relatively to the RK4 method. It can be said that NN approach shows promising results with the advantage of continuous estimation and improved accuracy that can be produced over RK4.

  4. Rational approximations to solutions of linear differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Chudnovsky, D. V.; Chudnovsky, G. V.

    1983-01-01

    Rational approximations of Padé and Padé type to solutions of differential equations are considered. One of the main results is a theorem stating that a simultaneous approximation to arbitrary solutions of linear differential equations over C(x) cannot be “better” than trivial ones implied by the Dirichlet box principle. This constitutes, in particular, the solution in the linear case of Kolchin's problem that the “Roth's theorem” holds for arbitrary solutions of algebraic differential equations. Complete effective proofs for several valuations are presented based on the Wronskian methods and graded subrings of Picard-Vessiot extensions. PMID:16593357

  5. A neuro approach to solve fuzzy Riccati differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrir, Mohammad Shazri; Kumaresan, N.; Kamali, M. Z. M.; Ratnavelu, Kurunathan

    2015-10-01

    There are many applications of optimal control theory especially in the area of control systems in engineering. In this paper, fuzzy quadratic Riccati differential equation is estimated using neural networks (NN). Previous works have shown reliable results using Runge-Kutta 4th order (RK4). The solution can be achieved by solving the 1st Order Non-linear Differential Equation (ODE) that is found commonly in Riccati differential equation. Research has shown improved results relatively to the RK4 method. It can be said that NN approach shows promising results with the advantage of continuous estimation and improved accuracy that can be produced over RK4.

  6. On the singular perturbations for fractional differential equation.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the possible extension of the singular perturbation differential equation to the concept of fractional order derivative. To achieve this, we presented a review of the concept of fractional calculus. We make use of the Laplace transform operator to derive exact solution of singular perturbation fractional linear differential equations. We make use of the methodology of three analytical methods to present exact and approximate solution of the singular perturbation fractional, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous differential equation. These methods are including the regular perturbation method, the new development of the variational iteration method, and the homotopy decomposition method. PMID:24683357

  7. Almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzinbi, Khalil; N'guerekata, Gaston Mandata

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we study the existence of almost automorphic solutions for some partial functional differential equations. We prove that the existence of a bounded solution on implies the existence of an almost automorphic solution. Our results extend the classical known theorem by Bohr and Neugebauer on the existence of almost periodic solutions for inhomegeneous linear almost periodic differential equations. We give some applications to hyperbolic equations and Lotka-Volterra type equations used to describe the evolution of a single diffusive animal species.

  8. Solutions to Class of Linear and Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Emad A.-B.; Hassan, Gamal F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the fractional auxiliary sub-equation expansion method is proposed to solve nonlinear fractional differential equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method, we discuss the space-time fractional KdV equation, the space-time fractional RLW equation, the space-time fractional Boussinesq equation, and the (3+1)-space-time fractional ZK equation. The solutions are expressed in terms of fractional hyperbolic and fractional trigonometric functions. These solutions are useful to understand the mechanisms of the complicated nonlinear physical phenomena and fractional differential equations. Among these solutions, some are found for the first time. The analytical solution of homogenous linear FDEs with constant coefficients are obtained by using the series and the Mittag–Leffler function methods. The obtained results recover the well-know solutions when α = 1.

  9. Solutions to Class of Linear and Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad A-B., Abdel-Salam; Gamal, F. Hassan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the fractional auxiliary sub-equation expansion method is proposed to solve nonlinear fractional differential equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method, we discuss the space-time fractional KdV equation, the space-time fractional RLW equation, the space-time fractional Boussinesq equation, and the (3+1)-space-time fractional ZK equation. The solutions are expressed in terms of fractional hyperbolic and fractional trigonometric functions. These solutions are useful to understand the mechanisms of the complicated nonlinear physical phenomena and fractional differential equations. Among these solutions, some are found for the first time. The analytical solution of homogenous linear FDEs with constant coefficients are obtained by using the series and the Mittag-Leffler function methods. The obtained results recover the well-know solutions when α = 1.

  10. Existence of anti-periodic (differentiable) mild solutions to semilinear differential equations with nondense domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghuai; Zhang, Litao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence of anti-periodic (or anti-periodic differentiable) mild solutions to the semilinear differential equation [Formula: see text] with nondense domain. Furthermore, an example is given to illustrate our results. PMID:27350933

  11. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations of various orders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gear, C. W.

    1969-01-01

    Report describes techniques for the numerical integration of differential equations of various orders. Modified multistep predictor-corrector methods for general initial-value problems are discussed and new methods are introduced.

  12. Nonlinear ordinary differential equations: A discussion on symmetries and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Leach, P. G. L.

    2016-06-01

    Two essential methods, the symmetry analysis and the singularity analysis, for the study of the integrability of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is the purpose of this work. The main similarities and the differences of these two different methods are discussed.

  13. Oscillation theorems for second order nonlinear forced differential equations.

    PubMed

    Salhin, Ambarka A; Din, Ummul Khair Salma; Ahmad, Rokiah Rozita; Noorani, Mohd Salmi Md

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a class of second order forced nonlinear differential equation is considered and several new oscillation theorems are obtained. Our results generalize and improve those known ones in the literature. PMID:25077054

  14. Systems of Differential Equations with Skew-Symmetric, Orthogonal Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2008-01-01

    The solution of a system of linear, inhomogeneous differential equations is discussed. The particular class considered is where the coefficient matrix is skew-symmetric and orthogonal, and where the forcing terms are sinusoidal. More general matrices are also considered.

  15. Long-Term Dynamics of Autonomous Fractional Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Xu, Wei; Xu, Yong; Han, Qun

    This paper aims to investigate long-term dynamic behaviors of autonomous fractional differential equations with effective numerical method. The long-term dynamic behaviors predict where systems are heading after long-term evolution. We make some modification and transplant cell mapping methods to autonomous fractional differential equations. The mapping time duration of cell mapping is enlarged to deal with the long memory effect. Three illustrative examples, i.e. fractional Lotka-Volterra equation, fractional van der Pol oscillator and fractional Duffing equation, are studied with our revised generalized cell mapping method. We obtain long-term dynamics, such as attractors, basins of attraction, and saddles. Compared with some existing stability and numerical results, the validity of our method is verified. Furthermore, we find that the fractional order has its effect on the long-term dynamics of autonomous fractional differential equations.

  16. Transformation matrices between non-linear and linear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartain, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    In the linearization of systems of non-linear differential equations, those systems which can be exactly transformed into the second order linear differential equation Y"-AY'-BY=0 where Y, Y', and Y" are n x 1 vectors and A and B are constant n x n matrices of real numbers were considered. The 2n x 2n matrix was used to transform the above matrix equation into the first order matrix equation X' = MX. Specially the matrix M and the conditions which will diagonalize or triangularize M were studied. Transformation matrices P and P sub -1 were used to accomplish this diagonalization or triangularization to return to the solution of the second order matrix differential equation system from the first order system.

  17. Symmetries of stochastic differential equations: A geometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, Francesco C.; Morando, Paola; Ugolini, Stefania

    2016-06-01

    A new notion of stochastic transformation is proposed and applied to the study of both weak and strong symmetries of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The correspondence between an algebra of weak symmetries for a given SDE and an algebra of strong symmetries for a modified SDE is proved under suitable regularity assumptions. This general approach is applied to a stochastic version of a two dimensional symmetric ordinary differential equation and to the case of two dimensional Brownian motion.

  18. International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hou

    2006-12-12

    The International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations (ICMMPDE for short) was held at IPAM, UCLA on August 26-27, 2005. The conference brought together researchers, students and practitioners with interest in the theoretical, computational and practical aspects of multiscale problems and related partial differential equations. The conference provided a forum to exchange and stimulate new ideas from different disciplines, and to formulate new challenging multiscale problems that will have impact in applications.

  19. Rough differential equations driven by signals in Besov spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prömel, David J.; Trabs, Mathias

    2016-03-01

    Rough differential equations are solved for signals in general Besov spaces unifying in particular the known results in Hölder and p-variation topology. To this end the paracontrolled distribution approach, which has been introduced by Gubinelli, Imkeller and Perkowski [24] to analyze singular stochastic PDEs, is extended from Hölder to Besov spaces. As an application we solve stochastic differential equations driven by random functions in Besov spaces and Gaussian processes in a pathwise sense.

  20. Canonical coordinates for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are found under which operators of the form Sigma(m, j=1) X(2)sub j + X sub 0 can be made constant coefficient. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are derived which classify those linear partial differential operators that can be moved to the Kolmogorov type.

  1. Canonical coordinates for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1988-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are found under which operators of the form Sigma (m, j=1) x (2) sub j + X sub O can be made constant coefficient. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are derived which classify those linear partial differential operators that can be moved to the Kolmogorov type.

  2. Chaotic Dynamics in Partial Differential Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanguang

    The existence of chaotic behavior, for a certain damped and driven perturbation of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation under even periodic boundary conditions, is established. More specifically, the existence of a symmetric pair of homoclinic orbits is established for the perturbed NLS equation through two main arguments: Argument 1 is a combination of Melnikov analysis and a geometric singular perturbation theory for the pde. The geometric singular perturbation theory involves the theory of persistence of invariant manifolds for the pde and the theory of Hadamard-Fenichel fiber coordinatization for those invariant manifolds. Argument 2 is a purely geometric argument. Finally, an argument is sketched which, we believe, provides a core of an existence proof for Smale "horseshoes" and a symbolic dynamics in a neighborhood of the persistent homoclinic orbits.

  3. Symbolic computation of recurrence equations for the Chebyshev series solution of linear ODE's. [ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geddes, K. O.

    1977-01-01

    If a linear ordinary differential equation with polynomial coefficients is converted into integrated form then the formal substitution of a Chebyshev series leads to recurrence equations defining the Chebyshev coefficients of the solution function. An explicit formula is presented for the polynomial coefficients of the integrated form in terms of the polynomial coefficients of the differential form. The symmetries arising from multiplication and integration of Chebyshev polynomials are exploited in deriving a general recurrence equation from which can be derived all of the linear equations defining the Chebyshev coefficients. Procedures for deriving the general recurrence equation are specified in a precise algorithmic notation suitable for translation into any of the languages for symbolic computation. The method is algebraic and it can therefore be applied to differential equations containing indeterminates.

  4. Student Difficulties with Units in Differential Equations in Modelling Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2006-01-01

    First-year undergraduate engineering students' understanding of the units of factors and terms in first-order ordinary differential equations used in modelling contexts was investigated using diagnostic quiz questions. Few students appeared to realize that the units of each term in such equations must be the same, or if they did, nevertheless…

  5. The Use of Kruskal-Newton Diagrams for Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    T. Fishaleck and R.B. White

    2008-02-19

    The method of Kruskal-Newton diagrams for the solution of differential equations with boundary layers is shown to provide rapid intuitive understanding of layer scaling and can result in the conceptual simplification of some problems. The method is illustrated using equations arising in the theory of pattern formation and in plasma physics.

  6. Variational Iteration Method for Delay Differential Equations Using He's Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyud-Din, Syed Tauseef; Yildirim, Ahmet

    2010-12-01

    January 21, 2010 In this paper, we apply the variational iteration method using He's polynomials (VIMHP) for solving delay differential equations which are otherwise too difficult to solve. These equations arise very frequently in signal processing, digital images, physics, and applied sciences. Numerical results reveal the complete reliability and efficiency of the proposed combination.

  7. FORSIM. Solution of Partial or Ordinary Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, P.

    1980-10-10

    FORSIM is a FORTRAN oriented simulation program which automates the continuous transient solution of systems of ordinary and/or partial differential equations. The user writes equations in a FORTRAN subroutine, following prescribed rules, and loads this routine along with the executive routines. The executive routines then read in initial data supplied by the user and proceed with the integration.

  8. Stochastic differential equations for non-linear hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Pep

    1998-02-01

    We formulate the stochastic differential equations for non-linear hydrodynamic fluctuations. The equations incorporate the random forces through a random stres tensor and random heat flux as in the Landau and Lifshitz theory. However, the equations are non-linear and the random forces are non-Gaussian. We provide explicit expressions for these random quantities in terms of the well-defined increments of the Wienner process.

  9. Integro-differential diffusion equation and neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau Fa, Kwok

    2015-02-01

    An integro-differential diffusion equation with linear force, based on the continuous time random walk model, is considered. The equation generalizes the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations which includes short, intermediate and long-time memory effects. Analytical expression for the intermediate scattering function is obtained and applied to ribonucleic acid (RNA) hydration water data from torula yeast. The model can capture the dynamics of hydrogen atoms in RNA hydration water, including the long-relaxation times.

  10. Similarity analysis of differential equations by Lie group.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Na, T. Y.; Hansen, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    Methods for transforming partial differential equations into forms more suitable for analysis and solution are investigated. The idea of Lie's infinitesimal contact transformation group is introduced to develop a systematic method which involves mostly algebraic manipulations. A thorough presentation of the application of this general method to the problem of similarity analysis in a broader sense - namely, the similarity between partial and ordinary differential equations, boundary value and initial value problems, and nonlinear and linear equations - is given with new and very general methods evolved for deriving the possible groups of transformations.

  11. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  12. Generating functionals and Lagrangian partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vankerschaver, Joris; Liao, Cuicui; Leok, Melvin

    2013-08-15

    The main goal of this paper is to derive an alternative characterization of the multisymplectic form formula for classical field theories using the geometry of the space of boundary values. We review the concept of Type-I/II generating functionals defined on the space of boundary data of a Lagrangian field theory. On the Lagrangian side, we define an analogue of Jacobi's solution to the Hamilton–Jacobi equation for field theories, and we show that by taking variational derivatives of this functional, we obtain an isotropic submanifold of the space of Cauchy data, described by the so-called multisymplectic form formula. As an example of the latter, we show that Lorentz's reciprocity principle in electromagnetism is a particular instance of the multisymplectic form formula. We also define a Hamiltonian analogue of Jacobi's solution, and we show that this functional is a Type-II generating functional. We finish the paper by defining a similar framework of generating functions for discrete field theories, and we show that for the linear wave equation, we recover the multisymplectic conservation law of Bridges.

  13. Solving constant-coefficient differential equations with dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weixuan; Qu, Che; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the concept of metamaterial analog computing has been proposed (Silva et al 2014 Science 343 160–3). Some mathematical operations such as spatial differentiation, integration, and convolution, have been performed by using designed metamaterial blocks. Motivated by this work, we propose a practical approach based on dielectric metamaterial to solve differential equations. The ordinary differential equation can be solved accurately by the correctly designed metamaterial system. The numerical simulations using well-established numerical routines have been performed to successfully verify all theoretical analyses.

  14. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations on manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, P. E.; Grossman, R.

    1993-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of developing numerical integration algorithms for differential equations that, when viewed as equations in some Euclidean space, naturally evolve on some embedded submanifold. It is desired to construct algorithms whose iterates also evolve on the same manifold. These algorithms can therefore be viewed as integrating ordinary differential equations on manifolds. The basic method “decouples” the computation of flows on the submanifold from the numerical integration process. It is shown that two classes of single-step and multistep algorithms can be posed and analyzed theoretically, using the concept of “freezing” the coefficients of differential operators obtained from the defining vector field. Explicit third-order algorithms are derived, with additional equations augmenting those of their classical counterparts, obtained from “obstructions” defined by nonvanishing Lie brackets.

  15. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Johnson, C.R.; Smith, P.J.; Fogelson, A.

    1998-12-10

    OAK-B135 Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations. Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  16. Construction and accuracy of partial differential equation approximations to the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The mesoscopic description of chemical kinetics, the chemical master equation, can be exactly solved in only a few simple cases. The analytical intractability stems from the discrete character of the equation, and hence considerable effort has been invested in the development of Fokker-Planck equations, second-order partial differential equation approximations to the master equation. We here consider two different types of higher-order partial differential approximations, one derived from the system-size expansion and the other from the Kramers-Moyal expansion, and derive the accuracy of their predictions for chemical reactive networks composed of arbitrary numbers of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. In particular, we show that the partial differential equation approximation of order Q from the Kramers-Moyal expansion leads to estimates of the mean number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-3)/2), of the variance of the fluctuations in the number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-5)/2), and of skewness accurate to order Ω(-(Q-2)). We also show that for large Q, the accuracy in the estimates can be matched only by a partial differential equation approximation from the system-size expansion of approximate order 2Q. Hence, we conclude that partial differential approximations based on the Kramers-Moyal expansion generally lead to considerably more accurate estimates in the mean, variance, and skewness than approximations of the same order derived from the system-size expansion. PMID:22181475

  17. Differential flow: Locally Generated or Coronal Artifact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterman, B. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.

    2015-12-01

    Alpha particles and proton beams differentially flow in the solar wind with respect to the proton core by about an Alfvén speed. Whether differential flow is an artifact of coronal physics or a signature of local acceleration as the solar wind propagates earthward is undetermined. A new analysis of Wind spacecraft observations in the solar wind combines Faraday Cup ion distribution functions with vector magnetic field measurements to characterize the bulk properties of the proton core, proton beam, and alpha particles with 92s time resolution. We utilize this data set to examine the occurrence of differential flow at 1 AU as a function of solar wind conditions and other parameters. We discuss the implications of observed trends on our understanding of differential flow's origin.

  18. Differentiable Cohomology on Locally Compact Groups

    PubMed Central

    Whyburn, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    In this paper the notions of vector field and differential form are extended to locally compact groups which are the inverse limit of Lie groups. This is done using Bruhat's definition of [unk]c∞ functions on such a group. Vector fields are defined as derivations on the [unk]c∞ functions. Then tangent vectors at a point are defined as elements of the inverse limit of the tangent spaces of the Lie groups. Tangent vectors then are put together to form vector fields, corresponding to a bundle definition, and the two notions are shown to be equivalent. Differential forms are defined using a bundle type definition from continuous linear functional on the tangent space. An existence and uniqueness theorem is proven for the exterior differential. Then an analog of the Poincaré lemma leads to the de Rham theorem relating the Cech cohomology with real coefficients to the cohomology of the differential forms. PMID:16591866

  19. Differentiable cohomology on locally compact groups.

    PubMed

    Whyburn, K

    1970-09-01

    In this paper the notions of vector field and differential form are extended to locally compact groups which are the inverse limit of Lie groups. This is done using Bruhat's definition of [unk](c) (infinity) functions on such a group. Vector fields are defined as derivations on the [unk](c) (infinity) functions. Then tangent vectors at a point are defined as elements of the inverse limit of the tangent spaces of the Lie groups. Tangent vectors then are put together to form vector fields, corresponding to a bundle definition, and the two notions are shown to be equivalent. Differential forms are defined using a bundle type definition from continuous linear functional on the tangent space. An existence and uniqueness theorem is proven for the exterior differential. Then an analog of the Poincaré lemma leads to the de Rham theorem relating the Cech cohomology with real coefficients to the cohomology of the differential forms. PMID:16591866

  20. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  1. Dedalus: Flexible framework for spectrally solving differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Keaton; Brown, Ben; Lecoanet, Daniel; Oishi, Jeff; Vasil, Geoff

    2016-03-01

    Dedalus solves differential equations using spectral methods. It is designed to solve initial-value, boundary-value, and eigenvalue problems involving nearly arbitrary equations sets and implements a highly flexible spectral framework that can simulate many domains and custom equations. Its primary features include symbolic equation entry, spectral domain discretization, multidimensional parallelization, implicit-explicit timestepping, and flexible analysis with HDF5. The code is written primarily in Python and features an easy-to-use interface, including text-based equation entry. The numerical algorithm produces highly sparse systems for a wide variety of equations on spectrally-discretized domains; these systems are efficiently solved by Dedalus using compiled libraries and multidimensional parallelization through MPI.

  2. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-21

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method. PMID:26696051

  3. A perturbative solution to metadynamics ordinary differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Dama, James F.; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Metadynamics is a popular enhanced sampling scheme wherein by periodic application of a repulsive bias, one can surmount high free energy barriers and explore complex landscapes. Recently, metadynamics was shown to be mathematically well founded, in the sense that the biasing procedure is guaranteed to converge to the true free energy surface in the long time limit irrespective of the precise choice of biasing parameters. A differential equation governing the post-transient convergence behavior of metadynamics was also derived. In this short communication, we revisit this differential equation, expressing it in a convenient and elegant Riccati-like form. A perturbative solution scheme is then developed for solving this differential equation, which is valid for any generic biasing kernel. The solution clearly demonstrates the robustness of metadynamics to choice of biasing parameters and gives further confidence in the widely used method.

  4. Stabilized multilevel Monte Carlo method for stiff stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulle, Assyr; Blumenthal, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    A multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for mean square stable stochastic differential equations with multiple scales is proposed. For such problems, that we call stiff, the performance of MLMC methods based on classical explicit methods deteriorates because of the time step restriction to resolve the fastest scales that prevents to exploit all the levels of the MLMC approach. We show that by switching to explicit stabilized stochastic methods and balancing the stabilization procedure simultaneously with the hierarchical sampling strategy of MLMC methods, the computational cost for stiff systems is significantly reduced, while keeping the computational algorithm fully explicit and easy to implement. Numerical experiments on linear and nonlinear stochastic differential equations and on a stochastic partial differential equation illustrate the performance of the stabilized MLMC method and corroborate our theoretical findings.

  5. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Ball, John M.; Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue. PMID:24249768

  6. Normal and quasinormal forms for systems of difference and differential-difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, Ilya; Kaschenko, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    The local dynamics of systems of difference and singularly perturbed differential-difference equations is studied in the neighborhood of a zero equilibrium state. Critical cases in the problem of stability of its state of equilibrium have infinite dimension. Special nonlinear evolution equations, which act as normal forms, are set up. It is shown that their dynamics defines the behavior of solutions to the initial system.

  7. Difference methods for stiff delay differential equations. [DDESUB, in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Mitchell G.

    1980-12-01

    Delay differential equations of the form y'(t) = f(y(t), z(t)), where z(t) = (y/sub 1/(..cap alpha../sub 1/(y(t))),..., y/sub n/(..cap alpha../sub n/(y(t))))/sup T/ and ..cap alpha../sub i/(y(t)) less than or equal to t, arise in many scientific and engineering fields when transport lags and propagation times are physically significant in a dynamic process. Difference methods for approximating the solution of stiff delay systems require special stability properties that are generalizations of those employed for stiff ordinary differential equations. By use of the model equation y'(t) = py(t) + qy(t-1), with complex p and q, the definitions of A-stability, A( )-stability, and stiff stability have been generalize to delay equations. For linear multistep difference formulas, these properties extend directly from ordinary to delay equations. This straight forward extension is not true for implicit Runge-Kutta methods, as illustrated by the midpoint formula, which is A-stable for ordinary equations, but not for delay equations. A computer code for stiff delay equations was developed using the BDF. 24 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Optimal Variational Asymptotic Method for Nonlinear Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Vipul K.; Pandey, Ram K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose optimal variational asymptotic method to solve time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations. In the proposed method, an arbitrary number of auxiliary parameters γ0, γ1, γ2,… and auxiliary functions H0(x), H1(x), H2(x),… are introduced in the correction functional of the standard variational iteration method. The optimal values of these parameters are obtained by minimizing the square residual error. To test the method, we apply it to solve two important classes of nonlinear partial differential equations: (1) the fractional advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear source term and (2) the fractional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Only few iterations are required to achieve fairly accurate solutions of both the first and second problems.

  9. Partial differential equation transform — Variational formulation and Fourier analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) models are established approaches for image/signal processing, data analysis and surface construction. Most previous geometric PDEs are utilized as low-pass filters which give rise to image trend information. In an earlier work, we introduced mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs), which behave like high-pass filters and are able to systematically provide intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of signals and images. Due to their tunable time-frequency localization and perfect reconstruction, the operation of MoDEEs is called a PDE transform. By appropriate selection of PDE transform parameters, we can tune IMFs into trends, edges, textures, noise etc., which can be further utilized in the secondary processing for various purposes. This work introduces the variational formulation, performs the Fourier analysis, and conducts biomedical and biological applications of the proposed PDE transform. The variational formulation offers an algorithm to incorporate two image functions and two sets of low-pass PDE operators in the total energy functional. Two low-pass PDE operators have different signs, leading to energy disparity, while a coupling term, acting as a relative fidelity of two image functions, is introduced to reduce the disparity of two energy components. We construct variational PDE transforms by using Euler-Lagrange equation and artificial time propagation. Fourier analysis of a simplified PDE transform is presented to shed light on the filter properties of high order PDE transforms. Such an analysis also offers insight on the parameter selection of the PDE transform. The proposed PDE transform algorithm is validated by numerous benchmark tests. In one selected challenging example, we illustrate the ability of PDE transform to separate two adjacent frequencies of sin(x) and sin(1.1x). Such an ability is due to PDE transform’s controllable frequency localization obtained by adjusting the order of PDEs. The

  10. Numerical integration of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    Classical asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations derives approximate solutions that are numerically stable. However, the analysis also leads to tedious expansions in powers of the relevant parameter for a particular problem. The expansions are replaced with integrals that can be evaluated by numerical integration. The resulting numerical solutions retain the linear independence that is the main advantage of asymptotic solutions. Examples, including the Falkner-Skan equation from laminar boundary layer theory, illustrate the method of asymptotic analysis with numerical integration.

  11. Advanced methods for the solution of differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Braun, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    This book is based on a course presented at the Lewis Research Center for engineers and scientists who were interested in increasing their knowledge of differential equations. Those results which can actually be used to solve equations are therefore emphasized; and detailed proofs of theorems are, for the most part, omitted. However, the conclusions of the theorems are stated in a precise manner, and enough references are given so that the interested reader can find the steps of the proofs.

  12. Algebraic Riccati equations in zero-sum differential games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. L.; Chao, A.

    1974-01-01

    The procedure for finding the closed-loop Nash equilibrium solution of two-player zero-sum linear time-invariant differential games with quadratic performance criteria and classical information pattern may be reduced in most cases to the solution of an algebraic Riccati equation. Based on the results obtained by Willems, necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of solutions to these equations are derived, and explicit conditions for a scalar example are given.

  13. Translationally invariant conservation laws of local Lindblad equations

    SciTech Connect

    Žnidarič, Marko; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2014-02-15

    We study the conditions under which one can conserve local translationally invariant operators by local translationally invariant Lindblad equations in one-dimensional rings of spin-1/2 particles. We prove that for any 1-local operator (e.g., particle density) there exist Lindblad dissipators that conserve that operator, while on the other hand we prove that among 2-local operators (e.g., energy density) only trivial ones of the Ising type can be conserved, while all the other cannot be conserved, neither locally nor globally, by any 2- or 3-local translationally invariant Lindblad equation. Our statements hold for rings of any finite length larger than some minimal length determined by the locality of Lindblad equation. These results show in particular that conservation of energy density in interacting systems is fundamentally more difficult than conservation of 1-local quantities.

  14. Method for constructing approximate analytic solutions of differential equations with a polynomial right-hand side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, A. P.; Dzyuba, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    A method for constructing approximate analytic solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations with a polynomial right-hand side is proposed. The implementation of the method is based on the Picard method of successive approximations and a procedure of continuation of local solutions. As an application, the problem of constructing the minimal sets of the Lorenz system is considered.

  15. Improving multilevel Monte Carlo for stochastic differential equations with application to the Langevin equation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike H.; Scheichl, Rob; Shardlow, Tony

    2015-01-01

    This paper applies several well-known tricks from the numerical treatment of deterministic differential equations to improve the efficiency of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and especially the Langevin equation. We use modified equations analysis as an alternative to strong-approximation theory for the integrator, and we apply this to introduce MLMC for Langevin-type equations with integrators based on operator splitting. We combine this with extrapolation and investigate the use of discrete random variables in place of the Gaussian increments, which is a well-known technique for the weak approximation of SDEs. We show that, for small-noise problems, discrete random variables can lead to an increase in efficiency of almost two orders of magnitude for practical levels of accuracy.

  16. Existence of a coupled system of fractional differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Siri, Zailan

    2015-10-22

    We manage the existence and uniqueness of a fractional coupled system containing Schrödinger equations. Such a system appears in quantum mechanics. We confirm that the fractional system under consideration admits a global solution in appropriate functional spaces. The solution is shown to be unique. The method is based on analytic technique of the fixed point theory. The fractional differential operator is considered from the virtue of the Riemann-Liouville differential operator.

  17. Statistical Models and Inference for the True Equating Transformation in the Context of Local Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, B. Jorge; von Davier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Based on Lord's criterion of equity of equating, van der Linden (this issue) revisits the so-called local equating method and offers alternative as well as new thoughts on several topics including the types of transformations, symmetry, reliability, and population invariance appropriate for equating. A remarkable aspect is to define equating…

  18. Power series solutions of ordinary differential equations in MACSYMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafferty, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A program is described which extends the differential equation solving capability of MACSYMA to power series solutions and is available via the SHARE library. The program is directed toward those classes of equations with variable coefficients (in particular, those with singularities) and uses the method of Frobenius. Probably the most important distinction between this package and others currently available or being developed is that, wherever possible, this program will attempt to provide a complete solution to the equation rather than an approximation, i.e., a finite number of terms. This solution will take the form of a sum of infinite series.

  19. Classical field theories from Hamiltonian constraint: Canonical equations of motion and local Hamilton-Jacobi theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatloukal, Václav

    2016-04-01

    Classical field theory is considered as a theory of unparametrized surfaces embedded in a configuration space, which accommodates, in a symmetric way, spacetime positions and field values. Dynamics is defined by a (Hamiltonian) constraint between multivector-valued generalized momenta, and points in the configuration space. Starting from a variational principle, we derive local equations of motion, that is, differential equations that determine classical surfaces and momenta. A local Hamilton-Jacobi equation applicable in the field theory then follows readily. The general method is illustrated with three examples: non-relativistic Hamiltonian mechanics, De Donder-Weyl scalar field theory, and string theory.

  20. Phaser-Based Courseware for Ordinary Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zia, Lee l.

    1991-01-01

    Presented are classroom-tested examples of instructional materials (courseware) for ordinary differential equations using the software package PHASER. All of the examples include in-class demonstration techniques and commentaries for instructor use, student homework and laboratory exercises, and suggestions for in-class examination questions. (JJK)

  1. A Second-Year Undergraduate Course in Applied Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1991-01-01

    Presents the framework for a chemical engineering course using ordinary differential equations to solve problems with the underlying strategy of concisely discussing the theory behind each solution technique without extensions to formal proofs. Includes typical class illustrations, student responses to this strategy, and reaction of the…

  2. Do Students Really Understand What an Ordinary Differential Equation Is?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Selahattin

    2010-01-01

    Differential equations (DEs) are important in mathematics as well as in science and the social sciences. Thus, the study of DEs has been included in various courses in different departments in higher education. The importance of DEs has attracted the attention of many researchers who have generally focussed on the content and instruction of DEs.…

  3. Numerical Aspects of Solving Differential Equations: Laboratory Approach for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Ana

    1997-01-01

    Describes three labs designed to help students in a first course on ordinary differential equations with three of the most common numerical difficulties they might encounter when solving initial value problems with a numerical software package. The goal of these labs is to help students advance to independent work on common numerical anomalies.…

  4. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  5. Cosets of meromorphic CFTs and modular differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Hampapura, Harsha R.; Mukhi, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Some relations between families of two-character CFTs are explained using a slightly generalised coset construction, and the underlying theories (whose existence was only conjectured based on the modular differential equation) are constructed. The same method also gives rise to interesting new examples of CFTs with three and four characters.

  6. Parameter Estimates in Differential Equation Models for Population Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the parameters present in several differential equation models of population growth, specifically logistic growth models and two-species competition models. We discuss student-evolved strategies and offer "Mathematica" code for a gradient search approach. We use historical (1930s) data from microbial studies of the Russian biologist,…

  7. Climate Modeling in the Calculus and Differential Equations Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Emek; Kunze, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Students in college-level mathematics classes can build the differential equations of an energy balance model of the Earth's climate themselves, from a basic understanding of the background science. Here we use variable albedo and qualitative analysis to find stable and unstable equilibria of such a model, providing a problem or perhaps a…

  8. A Simple Derivation of Kepler's Laws without Solving Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provost, J.-P.; Bracco, C.

    2009-01-01

    Proceeding like Newton with a discrete time approach of motion and a geometrical representation of velocity and acceleration, we obtain Kepler's laws without solving differential equations. The difficult part of Newton's work, when it calls for non-trivial properties of ellipses, is avoided by the introduction of polar coordinates. Then a simple…

  9. Integration of CAS in the Didactics of Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderas Puga, Angel

    In this paper are described some features of the intensive use of math software, primarily DERIVE, in the context of modeling in an introductory university course in differential equations. Different aspects are detailed: changes in the curriculum that included not only course contents, but also the sequence of introduction to various topics and…

  10. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  11. Asymptotics of Sample Entropy Production Rate for Stochastic Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Lihu

    2016-06-01

    Using the dimension-free Harnack inequality and the integration by parts formula for the associated diffusion semigroup, we prove the central limit theorem, the moderate deviation principle, and the logarithmic iteration law for the sample entropy production rate of a family of stochastic differential equations.

  12. Solutions of differential equations in a Bernstein polynomial basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrees Bhatti, M.; Bracken, P.

    2007-08-01

    An algorithm for approximating solutions to differential equations in a modified new Bernstein polynomial basis is introduced. The algorithm expands the desired solution in terms of a set of continuous polynomials over a closed interval and then makes use of the Galerkin method to determine the expansion coefficients to construct a solution. Matrix formulation is used throughout the entire procedure. However, accuracy and efficiency are dependent on the size of the set of Bernstein polynomials and the procedure is much simpler compared to the piecewise B spline method for solving differential equations. A recursive definition of the Bernstein polynomials and their derivatives are also presented. The current procedure is implemented to solve three linear equations and one nonlinear equation, and excellent agreement is found between the exact and approximate solutions. In addition, the algorithm improves the accuracy and efficiency of the traditional methods for solving differential equations that rely on much more complicated numerical techniques. This procedure has great potential to be implemented in more complex systems where there are no exact solutions available except approximations.

  13. Spatial complexity of solutions of higher order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukavica, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We address spatial oscillation properties of solutions of higher order parabolic partial differential equations. In the case of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation ut + uxxxx + uxx + u ux = 0, we prove that for solutions u on the global attractor, the quantity card {x epsi [0, L]:u(x, t) = lgr}, where L > 0 is the spatial period, can be bounded by a polynomial function of L for all \\lambda\\in{\\Bbb R} . A similar property is proven for a general higher order partial differential equation u_t+(-1)^{s}\\partial_x^{2s}u+ \\sum_{k=0}^{2s-1}v_k(x,t)\\partial_x^k u =0 .

  14. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  15. The method of patches for solving stiff nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydon, David Van George, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation describes a new method for solving very stiff sets of ordinary differential equations. The basic idea is to replace the original nonlinear equations with a set of equally stiff equations that are piecewise linear, and therefore can be solved exactly. We demonstrate the value of the method on small systems of equations for which some other methods are inefficient or produce spurious solutions, estimate error bounds, and discuss extensions of the method to larger systems of equations and to partial differential equations. Putzer's method is developed in a novel way for efficient and accurate solution of dx/dt = Ax+b. The physical problem of interest is spatial pattern formation in open reaction-diffusion chemical systems, as studied in the experiments of Kyoung Lee, Harry Swinney, et al. I develop a new experiment model that agrees reasonably well with experimental results. I solve the model, applying the new method to the two-variable Gaspar- Showalter chemical kinetics in two space dimensions. Because of time and computer limitations, only preliminary pattern-formation results are achieved and reported.

  16. [Series: Utilization of Differential Equations and Methods for Solving Them in Medical Physics (1)].

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of differential equations and methods for solving them in medical physics are presented. First, the basic concept and the kinds of differential equations were overviewed. Second, separable differential equations and well-known first-order and second-order differential equations were introduced, and the methods for solving them were described together with several examples. In the next issue, the symbolic and series expansion methods for solving differential equations will be mainly introduced. PMID:26502494

  17. Local Integral Estimates for Quasilinear Equations with Measure Data.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiaoyu; Zhang, Shengzhi; Xu, Yonglin; Mu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Local integral estimates as well as local nonexistence results for a class of quasilinear equations -Δ p u = σP(u) + ω for p > 1 and Hessian equations F k [-u] = σP(u) + ω were established, where σ is a nonnegative locally integrable function or, more generally, a locally finite measure, ω is a positive Radon measure, and P(u) ~ exp⁡αu (β) with α > 0 and β ≥ 1 or P(u) = u (p-1). PMID:27294190

  18. Local Integral Estimates for Quasilinear Equations with Measure Data

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qiaoyu; Zhang, Shengzhi; Xu, Yonglin; Mu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Local integral estimates as well as local nonexistence results for a class of quasilinear equations −Δpu = σP(u) + ω for p > 1 and Hessian equations Fk[−u] = σP(u) + ω were established, where σ is a nonnegative locally integrable function or, more generally, a locally finite measure, ω is a positive Radon measure, and P(u) ~ exp⁡αuβ with α > 0 and β ≥ 1 or P(u) = up−1. PMID:27294190

  19. Solution of some types of differential equations: operational calculus and inverse differential operators.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, K

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  20. Solution of Some Types of Differential Equations: Operational Calculus and Inverse Differential Operators

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of operational nature to analyze and obtain solutions for a variety of equations of mathematical physics and related mathematical problems. We construct inverse differential operators and produce operational identities, involving inverse derivatives and families of generalised orthogonal polynomials, such as Hermite and Laguerre polynomial families. We develop the methodology of inverse and exponential operators, employing them for the study of partial differential equations. Advantages of the operational technique, combined with the use of integral transforms, generating functions with exponentials and their integrals, for solving a wide class of partial derivative equations, related to heat, wave, and transport problems, are demonstrated. PMID:24892051

  1. The reservoir model: a differential equation model of psychological regulation.

    PubMed

    Deboeck, Pascal R; Bergeman, C S

    2013-06-01

    Differential equation models can be used to describe the relationships between the current state of a system of constructs (e.g., stress) and how those constructs are changing (e.g., based on variable-like experiences). The following article describes a differential equation model based on the concept of a reservoir. With a physical reservoir, such as one for water, the level of the liquid in the reservoir at any time depends on the contributions to the reservoir (inputs) and the amount of liquid removed from the reservoir (outputs). This reservoir model might be useful for constructs such as stress, where events might "add up" over time (e.g., life stressors, inputs), but individuals simultaneously take action to "blow off steam" (e.g., engage coping resources, outputs). The reservoir model can provide descriptive statistics of the inputs that contribute to the "height" (level) of a construct and a parameter that describes a person's ability to dissipate the construct. After discussing the model, we describe a method of fitting the model as a structural equation model using latent differential equation modeling and latent distribution modeling. A simulation study is presented to examine recovery of the input distribution and output parameter. The model is then applied to the daily self-reports of negative affect and stress from a sample of older adults from the Notre Dame Longitudinal Study on Aging. PMID:23527605

  2. Constructing general partial differential equations using polynomial and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zjavka, Ladislav; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-01-01

    Sum fraction terms can approximate multi-variable functions on the basis of discrete observations, replacing a partial differential equation definition with polynomial elementary data relation descriptions. Artificial neural networks commonly transform the weighted sum of inputs to describe overall similarity relationships of trained and new testing input patterns. Differential polynomial neural networks form a new class of neural networks, which construct and solve an unknown general partial differential equation of a function of interest with selected substitution relative terms using non-linear multi-variable composite polynomials. The layers of the network generate simple and composite relative substitution terms whose convergent series combinations can describe partial dependent derivative changes of the input variables. This regression is based on trained generalized partial derivative data relations, decomposed into a multi-layer polynomial network structure. The sigmoidal function, commonly used as a nonlinear activation of artificial neurons, may transform some polynomial items together with the parameters with the aim to improve the polynomial derivative term series ability to approximate complicated periodic functions, as simple low order polynomials are not able to fully make up for the complete cycles. The similarity analysis facilitates substitutions for differential equations or can form dimensional units from data samples to describe real-world problems. PMID:26547244

  3. Computer transformation of partial differential equations into any coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The use of tensors to provide a compact way of writing partial differential equations in a form valid in all coordinate systems is discussed. In order to find solutions to the equations with their boundary conditions they must be expressed in terms of the coordinate system under consideration. The process of arriving at these expressions from the tensor formulation was automated by a software system, TENSR. An allied system that analyzes the resulting expressions term by term and drops those that are negligible is also described.

  4. Solution of partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Voigt, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The present status of numerical methods for partial differential equations on vector and parallel computers was reviewed. The relevant aspects of these computers are discussed and a brief review of their development is included, with particular attention paid to those characteristics that influence algorithm selection. Both direct and iterative methods are given for elliptic equations as well as explicit and implicit methods for initial boundary value problems. The intent is to point out attractive methods as well as areas where this class of computer architecture cannot be fully utilized because of either hardware restrictions or the lack of adequate algorithms. Application areas utilizing these computers are briefly discussed.

  5. On discrete three-dimensional equations associated with the local Yang-Baxter relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashaev, R. M.

    1996-12-01

    The local Yang-Baxter equation (YBE), introduced by Maillet and Nijhoff, is a proper generalization to three dimensions of the zero curvature relation. Recently, Korepanov has constructed an infinite set of integrable three-dimensional lattice models, and has related them to solutions to the local YBE. The simplest Korepanov model is related to the star-triangle relation in the Ising model. In this Letter the corresponding discrete equation is derived. In the continuous limit it leads to a differential three-dimensional equation, which is symmetric with respect to all permutations of the three coordinates. A similar analysis of the star-triangle transformation in electric networks leads to the discrete bilinear equation of Miwa, associated with the BKP hierarchy. Some related operator solutions to the tetrahedron equation are also constructed.

  6. Constructive Development of the Solutions of Linear Equations in Introductory Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallet, D. G.; McCue, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    The solution of linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is commonly taught in first-year undergraduate mathematics classrooms, but the understanding of the concept of a solution is not always grasped by students until much later. Recognizing what it is to be a solution of a linear ODE and how to postulate such solutions, without resorting to…

  7. Local Influence Analysis of Nonlinear Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    By regarding the latent random vectors as hypothetical missing data and based on the conditional expectation of the complete-data log-likelihood function in the EM algorithm, we investigate assessment of local influence of various perturbation schemes in a nonlinear structural equation model. The basic building blocks of local influence analysis…

  8. An ordinary differential equation based solution path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao

    2011-01-01

    Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani (2004) proposed Least Angle Regression (LAR), a solution path algorithm for the least squares regression. They pointed out that a slight modification of the LAR gives the LASSO (Tibshirani, 1996) solution path. However it is largely unknown how to extend this solution path algorithm to models beyond the least squares regression. In this work, we propose an extension of the LAR for generalized linear models and the quasi-likelihood model by showing that the corresponding solution path is piecewise given by solutions of ordinary differential equation systems. Our contribution is twofold. First, we provide a theoretical understanding on how the corresponding solution path propagates. Second, we propose an ordinary differential equation based algorithm to obtain the whole solution path. PMID:21532936

  9. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  10. Some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the talk is the presentation of some recent advances in the numerical solution of differential equations, with special emphasis to reaction-diffusion problems, Hamiltonian problems and ordinary differential equations with discontinuous right-hand side. As a special case, in this short paper we focus on the solution of reaction-diffusion problems by means of special purpose numerical methods particularly adapted to the problem: indeed, following a problem oriented approach, we propose a modified method of lines based on the employ of finite differences shaped on the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Constructive issues and a brief analysis are presented, together with some numerical experiments showing the effectiveness of the approach and a comparison with existing solvers.

  11. Algebraic calculation of stroboscopic maps of ordinary, nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Wackerbauer, R. ); Huebler, A. . Center for Complex Systems Research); Mayer-Kress, G. California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-25

    The relation between the parameters of a differential equation and corresponding discrete maps are becoming increasingly important in the study of nonlinear dynamical systems. Maps are well adopted for numerical computation and several universal properties of them are known. Therefore some perturbation methods have been proposed to deduce them for physical systems, which can be modeled by an ordinary differential equation (ODE) with a small nonlinearity. A new iterative, rigorous algebraic method for the calculation of the coefficients of a Taylor expansion of a stroboscopic map from ODE's with not necessarily small nonlinearities is presented. It is shown analytically that most of the coefficients are small for a small integration time and grow slowly in the course of time if the flow vector field of the ODE is polynomial and if the ODE has fixed point in the origin. Approximations of different orders respectively of the rest term are investigated for several nonlinear systems. 31 refs., 16 figs.

  12. Analytic solution of differential equation for gyroscope's motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurekhodjaev, Abibulla N.; Mamatova, Gulnar U.

    2016-08-01

    Problems of motion of a rigid body with a fixed point are one of the urgent problems in classical mechanics. A feature of this problem is that, despite the important results achieved by outstanding mathematicians in the last two centuries, there is still no complete solution. This paper obtains an analytical solution of the problem of motion of an axisymmetric rigid body with variable inertia moments in resistant environment described by the system of nonlinear differential equations of L. Euler, involving the partial discretization method for nonlinear differential equations, which was built by A. N. Tyurekhodjaev based on the theory of generalized functions. To such problems belong gyroscopic instruments, in particular, and especially gyroscopes.

  13. Numerical modelling in biosciences using delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Gennadii A.; Rihan, Fathalla A.

    2000-12-01

    Our principal purposes here are (i) to consider, from the perspective of applied mathematics, models of phenomena in the biosciences that are based on delay differential equations and for which numerical approaches are a major tool in understanding their dynamics, (ii) to review the application of numerical techniques to investigate these models. We show that there are prima facie reasons for using such models: (i) they have a richer mathematical framework (compared with ordinary differential equations) for the analysis of biosystem dynamics, (ii) they display better consistency with the nature of certain biological processes and predictive results. We analyze both the qualitative and quantitative role that delays play in basic time-lag models proposed in population dynamics, epidemiology, physiology, immunology, neural networks and cell kinetics. We then indicate suitable computational techniques for the numerical treatment of mathematical problems emerging in the biosciences, comparing them with those implemented by the bio-modellers.

  14. Polynomial Solutions of Nth Order Non-Homogeneous Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Lawrence E.; Maleh, Ray

    2002-01-01

    It was shown by Costa and Levine that the homogeneous differential equation (1-x[superscript N])y([superscript N]) + A[subscript N-1]x[superscript N-1)y([superscript N-1]) + A[subscript N-2]x[superscript N-2])y([superscript N-2]) + ... + A[subscript 1]xy[prime] + A[subscript 0]y = 0 has a finite polynomial solution if and only if [for…

  15. On approximating hereditary dynamics by systems of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, E. M.; Burns, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with methods of obtaining approximate solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations (hereditary systems). The basic notion is to project the infinite dimensional space of initial functions for the hereditary system onto a finite dimensional subspace. Within this framework, two particular schemes are discussed. The first uses well-known piecewise constant approximations, while the second is a new method based on piecewise linear approximating functions. Numerical results are given.

  16. Approximate solutions for non-linear iterative fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damag, Faten H.; Kiliçman, Adem; Ibrahim, Rabha W.

    2016-06-01

    This paper establishes approximate solution for non-linear iterative fractional differential equations: d/γv (s ) d sγ =ℵ (s ,v ,v (v )), where γ ∈ (0, 1], s ∈ I := [0, 1]. Our method is based on some convergence tools for analytic solution in a connected region. We show that the suggested solution is unique and convergent by some well known geometric functions.

  17. Affine Vertex Operator Algebras and Modular Linear Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arike, Yusuke; Kaneko, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Kiyokazu; Sakai, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we list all affine vertex operator algebras of positive integral levels whose dimensions of spaces of characters are at most 5 and show that a basis of the space of characters of each affine vertex operator algebra in the list gives a fundamental system of solutions of a modular linear differential equation. Further, we determine the dimensions of the spaces of characters of affine vertex operator algebras whose numbers of inequivalent simple modules are not exceeding 20.

  18. A convex penalty for switching control of partial differential equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Kunisch, Karl; Barnard, Richard C.

    2016-01-19

    A convex penalty for promoting switching controls for partial differential equations is introduced; such controls consist of an arbitrary number of components of which at most one should be simultaneously active. Using a Moreau–Yosida approximation, a family of approximating problems is obtained that is amenable to solution by a semismooth Newton method. In conclusion, the efficiency of this approach and the structure of the obtained controls are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  19. A stability analysis for a semilinear parabolic partial differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafee, N.

    1973-01-01

    The parabolic partial differential equation considered is u sub t = u sub xx + f(u), where minus infinity x plus infinity and o t plus infinity. Under suitable hypotheses pertaining to f, a class of initial data is exhibited: phi(x), minus infinity x plus infinity, for which the corresponding solutions u(x,t) appraoch zero as t approaches the limit of plus infinity. This convergence is uniform with respect to x on any compact subinterval of the real axis.

  20. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  1. The pentabox Master Integrals with the Simplified Differential Equations approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Costas G.; Tommasini, Damiano; Wever, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We present the calculation of massless two-loop Master Integrals relevant to five-point amplitudes with one off-shell external leg and derive the complete set of planar Master Integrals with five on-mass-shell legs, that contribute to many 2 → 3 amplitudes of interest at the LHC, as for instance three jet production, γ , V, H + 2 jets etc., based on the Simplified Differential Equations approach.

  2. A differential delay equation arising from the sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A. Y.; Goldston, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the differential delay equation introduced by Buchstab (1937) in connection with an asymptotic formula for the uncanceled terms in the sieve of Eratosthenes. Maier (1985) used this result to show there is unexpected irreqularity in the distribution of primes in short intervals. The function omega(u) is studied in this paper using numerical and analytical techniques. The results are applied to give some numerical constants in Maier's theorem.

  3. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-01

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron-phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  4. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-15

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron–phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  5. ISDEP: Integrator of stochastic differential equations for plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; Bustos, A.; Castejón, F.; Fernández, L. A.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Tarancón, A.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we present a general description of the ISDEP code (Integrator of Stochastic Differential Equations for Plasmas) and a brief overview of its physical results and applications so far. ISDEP is a Monte Carlo code that calculates the distribution function of a minority population of ions in a magnetized plasma. It solves the ion equations of motion taking into account the complex 3D structure of fusion devices, the confining electromagnetic field and collisions with other plasma species. The Monte Carlo method used is based on the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck and Langevin equations. This allows ISDEP to run in distributed computing platforms without communication between nodes with almost linear scaling. This paper intends to be a general description and a reference paper in ISDEP.

  6. Computing spacetime curvature via differential-algebraic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Lee, S.L.; Petzold, L.R.; Saylor, P.E.; Seidel, E.

    1996-01-01

    The equations that govern the behavior of physical systems can often solved numerically using a method of lines approach and differential-algebraic equation (DAE) solvers. For example, such an approach can be used to solve the Einstein field equations of general relativity, and thereby simulate significant astrophysical events. In this paper, we describe some preliminary work in which two model problems in general relativity are formulated, spatially discretized, and then numerically solved as a DAE. In particular, we seek to reproduce the solution to the spherically symmetric Schwarzschild spacetime. This is an important testbed calculation in numerical relativity since the solution is the steady-state for the collision of two (or more) non-rotating black holes. Moreover, analytic late-time properties of the Schwarzschild spacetime are well known and can be used the accuracy of the simulation.

  7. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. PMID:26920245

  8. A Procedure to Construct Exact Solutions of Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Güner, Özkan; Cevikel, Adem C.

    2014-01-01

    We use the fractional transformation to convert the nonlinear partial fractional differential equations with the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The Exp-function method is extended to solve fractional partial differential equations in the sense of the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. We apply the Exp-function method to the time fractional Sharma-Tasso-Olver equation, the space fractional Burgers equation, and the time fractional fmKdV equation. As a result, we obtain some new exact solutions. PMID:24737972

  9. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  10. The condition of regular degeneration for singularly perturbed systems of linear differential-difference equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, K. L.; Meyer, K. R.

    1966-01-01

    Extension of problem of singular perturbation for linear scalar constant coefficient differential- difference equation with single retardation to several retardations, noting degenerate equation solution

  11. Computations of Wall Distances Based on Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Paul G.; Rumsey, Chris L.; Spalart, Philippe R.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    The use of differential equations such as Eikonal, Hamilton-Jacobi and Poisson for the economical calculation of the nearest wall distance d, which is needed by some turbulence models, is explored. Modifications that could palliate some turbulence-modeling anomalies are also discussed. Economy is of especial value for deforming/adaptive grid problems. For these, ideally, d is repeatedly computed. It is shown that the Eikonal and Hamilton-Jacobi equations can be easy to implement when written in implicit (or iterated) advection and advection-diffusion equation analogous forms, respectively. These, like the Poisson Laplacian term, are commonly occurring in CFD solvers, allowing the re-use of efficient algorithms and code components. The use of the NASA CFL3D CFD program to solve the implicit Eikonal and Hamilton-Jacobi equations is explored. The re-formulated d equations are easy to implement, and are found to have robust convergence. For accurate Eikonal solutions, upwind metric differences are required. The Poisson approach is also found effective, and easiest to implement. Modified distances are not found to affect global outputs such as lift and drag significantly, at least in common situations such as airfoil flows.

  12. Applying integrals of motion to the numerical solution of differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for using the integrals of systems of nonlinear, ordinary differential equations in a numerical integration process to control the local errors in these integrals and reduce the global errors of the solution. The method is general and can be applied to either scaler or vector integrals. A number of example problems, with accompanying numerical results, are used to verify the analysis and support the conjecture of global error reduction.

  13. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baritzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1988-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed employing the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  14. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1990-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed emplying the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  15. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  16. Flow equation approach to one-body and many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quito, Victor; Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We study one-body and many-body localization using the flow equation technique applied to spin-1/2 Hamiltonians. This technique, first introduced by Wegner, allows us to exact diagonalize interacting systems by solving a set of first-order differential equations for coupling constants. Besides, by the flow of individual operators we also compute physical properties, such as correlation and localization lengths, by looking at the flow of probability distributions of couplings in the Hilbert space. As a first example, we analyze the one-body localization problem written in terms of spins, the disordered XY model with a random transverse field. We compare the results obtained in the flow equation approach with the diagonalization in the fermionic language. For the many-body problem, we investigate the physical properties of the disordered XXZ Hamiltonian with a random transverse field in the z-direction.

  17. Dynamical properties of non-Markovian stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Machado, A.; San Miguel, M.

    1984-04-01

    We study nonstationary non-Markovian processes defined by Langevin-type stochastic differential equations with an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck driving force. We concentrate on the long time limit of the dynamical evolution. We derive an approximate equation for the correlation function of a nonlinear nonstationary non-Markovian process, and we discuss its consequences. Non-Markovicity can introduce a dependence on noise parameters in the dynamics of the correlation function in cases in which it becomes independent of these parameters in the Markovian limit. Several examples are discussed in which the relaxation time increases with respect to the Markovian limit. For a Brownian harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency, the non-Markovicity of the process decreases the domain of stability of the system, and it can change an infradamped evolution into an overdamped one.

  18. Paraconformal structures, ordinary differential equations and totally geodesic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryński, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    We construct point invariants of ordinary differential equations of arbitrary order that generalise the Tresse and Cartan invariants of equations of order two and three, respectively. The vanishing of the invariants is equivalent to the existence of a totally geodesic paraconformal structure which consists of a paraconformal structure, an adapted GL(2 , R) -connection and a two-parameter family of totally geodesic hypersurfaces on the solution space. The structures coincide with the projective structures in dimension 2 and with the Einstein-Weyl structures of Lorentzian signature in dimension 3. We show that the totally geodesic paraconformal structures in higher dimensions can be described by a natural analogue of the Hitchin twistor construction. We present a general example of Veronese webs that generalise the hyper-CR Einstein-Weyl structures in dimension 3. The Veronese webs are described by a hierarchy of integrable systems.

  19. Two-derivative Runge-Kutta methods for differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Robert P. K.; Wang, Shixiao; Tsai, Angela Y. J.

    2012-09-01

    Two-derivative Runge-Kutta (TDRK) methods are a special case of multi-derivative Runge-Kutta methods first studied by Kastlunger and Wanner [1, 2]. These methods incorporate derivatives of order higher than the first in their formulation but we consider only the first and second derivatives. In this paper we first present our study of both explicit [3] and implicit TDRK methods on stiff ODE problems. We then extend the applications of these TDRK methods to various partial differential equations [4]. In particular, we show how a 2-stage implicit TDRK method of order 4 and stage order 4 can be adapted to solve diffusion equations more efficiently than the popular Crank-Nicolson method.

  20. Bringing partial differential equations to life for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Cano, María; Chacón-Vera, Eliseo; Esquembre, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Teaching partial differential equations (PDEs) carries inherent difficulties that an interactive visualization might help overcome in an active learning process. However, the generation of this kind of teaching material implies serious difficulties, mainly in terms of coding efforts. This work describes how to use an authoring tool, Easy Java Simulations, to build interactive simulations using FreeFem++ (Hecht F 2012 J. Numer. Math. 20 251) as a PDE solver engine. It makes possible to build simulations where students can change parameters, the geometry and the equations themselves getting an immediate feedback. But it is also possible for them to edit the simulations to set deeper changes. The process is ilustrated with some basic examples. These simulations show PDEs in a pedagogic manner and can be tuned by no experts in the field, teachers or students. Finally, we report a classroom experience and a survey from the third year students in the Degree of Mathematics at the University of Murcia.

  1. A unique transformation from ordinary differential equations to reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain; Heiner, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Many models in Systems Biology are described as a system of Ordinary Differential Equations, which allows for transient, steady-state or bifurcation analysis when kinetic information is available. Complementary structure-related qualitative analysis techniques have become increasingly popular in recent years, like qualitative model checking or pathway analysis (elementary modes, invariants, flux balance analysis, graph-based analyses, chemical organization theory, etc.). They do not rely on kinetic information but require a well-defined structure as stochastic analysis techniques equally do. In this article, we look into the structure inference problem for a model described by a system of Ordinary Differential Equations and provide conditions for the uniqueness of its solution. We describe a method to extract a structured reaction network model, represented as a bipartite multigraph, for example, a continuous Petri net (CPN), from a system of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). A CPN uniquely defines an ODE, and each ODE can be transformed into a CPN. However, it is not obvious under which conditions the transformation of an ODE into a CPN is unique, that is, when a given ODE defines exactly one CPN. We provide biochemically relevant sufficient conditions under which the derived structure is unique and counterexamples showing the necessity of each condition. Our method is implemented and available; we illustrate it on some signal transduction models from the BioModels database. A prototype implementation of the method is made available to modellers at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn.html, and the data mentioned in the "Results" section at http://contraintes.inria.fr/~soliman/ode2pn_data/. Our results yield a new recommendation for the import/export feature of tools supporting the SBML exchange format. PMID:21203560

  2. Investigation of ODE integrators using interactive graphics. [Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Two FORTRAN programs using an interactive graphic terminal to generate accuracy and stability plots for given multistep ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrators are described. The first treats the fixed stepsize linear case with complex variable solutions, and generates plots to show accuracy and error response to step driving function of a numerical solution, as well as the linear stability region. The second generates an analog to the stability region for classes of non-linear ODE's as well as accuracy plots. Both systems can compute method coefficients from a simple specification of the method. Example plots are given.

  3. A Solution to the Fundamental Linear Fractional Order Differential Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a solution to the fundamental linear fractional order differential equation, namely, (sub c)d(sup q, sub t) + ax(t) = bu(t). The impulse response solution is shown to be a series, named the F-function, which generalizes the normal exponential function. The F-function provides the basis for a qth order "fractional pole". Complex plane behavior is elucidated and a simple example, the inductor terminated semi- infinite lossy line, is used to demonstrate the theory.

  4. A class of nonlinear differential equations with fractional integrable impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JinRong; Zhang, Yuruo

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new class of impulsive differential equations, which is more suitable to characterize memory processes of the drugs in the bloodstream and the consequent absorption for the body. This fact offers many difficulties in applying the usual methods to analysis and novel techniques in Bielecki's normed Banach spaces and thus makes the study of existence and uniqueness theorems interesting. Meanwhile, new concepts of Bielecki-Ulam's type stability are introduced and generalized Ulam-Hyers-Rassias stability results on a compact interval are established. This is another novelty of this paper. Finally, an interesting example is given to illustrate our theory results.

  5. State-Constrained Optimal Control Problems of Impulsive Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Forcadel, Nicolas; Rao Zhiping Zidani, Hasnaa

    2013-08-01

    The present paper studies an optimal control problem governed by measure driven differential systems and in presence of state constraints. The first result shows that using the graph completion of the measure, the optimal solutions can be obtained by solving a reparametrized control problem of absolutely continuous trajectories but with time-dependent state-constraints. The second result shows that it is possible to characterize the epigraph of the reparametrized value function by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation without assuming any controllability assumption.

  6. Population Uncertainty in Model Ecosystem: Analysis by Stochastic Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Satoru; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Nagata, Hiroyasu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2008-09-01

    Perturbation experiments are carried out by the numerical simulations of a contact process and its mean-field version. Here, the mortality rate increases or decreases suddenly. It is known that fluctuation enhancement (FE) occurs after perturbation, where FE indicates population uncertainty. In the present paper, we develop a new theory of stochastic differential equation. The agreement between the theory and the mean-field simulation is almost perfect. This theory enables us to find a much stronger FE than that reported previously. We discuss the population uncertainty in the recovering process of endangered species.

  7. Neural network error correction for solving coupled ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. O.; Darsey, J. A.; Sumpter, B. G.; Noid, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    A neural network is presented to learn errors generated by a numerical algorithm for solving coupled nonlinear differential equations. The method is based on using a neural network to correctly learn the error generated by, for example, Runge-Kutta on a model molecular dynamics (MD) problem. The neural network programs used in this study were developed by NASA. Comparisons are made for training the neural network using backpropagation and a new method which was found to converge with fewer iterations. The neural net programs, the MD model and the calculations are discussed.

  8. A differential delay equation arising from the sieve of Eratosthenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, A. Y.; Goldston, D. A.

    1990-07-01

    The differential delay equation defined by ω (u) = 1/u for 1 ≤ u ≤ 2 and (uω (u))' = ω (u - 1) for u ≥ 2 was introduced by Buchstab in connection with an asymptotic formula for the number of uncanceled terms in the sieve of Eratosthenes. Maier has recently used this result to show there is unexpected irregularity in the distribution of primes in short intervals. The function ω (u) is studied in this paper using numerical and analytical techniques. The results are applied to give some numerical constants in Maier's theorem.

  9. Partial differential equation models in the socio-economic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Martin; Caffarelli, Luis; Markowich, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models based on partial differential equations (PDEs) have become an integral part of quantitative analysis in most branches of science and engineering, recently expanding also towards biomedicine and socio-economic sciences. The application of PDEs in the latter is a promising field, but widely quite open and leading to a variety of novel mathematical challenges. In this introductory article of the Theme Issue, we will provide an overview of the field and its recent boosting topics. Moreover, we will put the contributions to the Theme Issue in an appropriate perspective. PMID:25288814

  10. Monotone waves for non-monotone and non-local monostable reaction-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimchuk, Elena; Pinto, Manuel; Trofimchuk, Sergei

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new approach for proving existence of monotone wavefronts in non-monotone and non-local monostable diffusive equations. This allows to extend recent results established for the particular case of equations with local delayed reaction. In addition, we demonstrate the uniqueness (modulo translations) of obtained monotone wavefront within the class of all monotone wavefronts (such a kind of conditional uniqueness was recently established for the non-local KPP-Fisher equation by Fang and Zhao). Moreover, we show that if delayed reaction is local then each monotone wavefront is unique (modulo translations) within the class of all non-constant traveling waves. Our approach is based on the construction of suitable fundamental solutions for linear integral-differential equations. We consider two alternative scenarios: in the first one, the fundamental solution is negative (typically holds for the Mackey-Glass diffusive equations) while in the second one, the fundamental solution is non-negative (typically holds for the KPP-Fisher diffusive equations).