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Sample records for local galaxy properties

  1. Resolved Molecular Gas Properties in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe are mergers of gas-rich galaxies. The merger event funnels the molecular gas towards the central kiloparsec, compressing the gas, and triggering an extreme starburst, making LIRGs the perfect laboratory for studying extreme modes of star formation. We use the Submillimeter Array sample and observations of Wilson et al. (2008), supplemented with new CARMA and ALMA observations, to constrain the physical conditions such as temperature, density and column density of the molecular gas in the sample of 7 LIRGs. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX (van der Tak et al. 2007) and a Bayesian likelihood code to fit the most probable physical conditions. Comparison of the molecular gas physical conditions shows that earlier merger stage LIRGs such as Arp 299 and NGC 1614 have denser (> 103cm-1) molecular gas than a later stage merger such as VV 114 and NGC 2623. We measure the CO luminosity to H2 mass conversion factor, αCO, using the radiative transfer analysis results and find that the values are a factor of 4-10 times lower than the Galactic value of 4.3 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1. We also find unusually large 12CO-to-13CO abundance ratios (> 130), more than 2 times the local Galactic value.

  2. A Bridge from Optical to Infrared Galaxies: Explaining Local Properties and Predicting Galaxy Counts and the Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2002-05-01

    We give an explanation for the origin of various properties observed in local infrared galaxies and make predictions for galaxy counts and cosmic background radiation (CBR) using a new model extended from that for optical/near-infrared galaxies. Important new characteristics of this study are that (1) mass scale dependence of dust extinction is introduced based on the size-luminosity relation of optical galaxies and that (2) the large-grain dust temperature Tdust is calculated based on a physical consideration for energy balance rather than by using the empirical relation between Tdust and total infrared luminosity LIR found in local galaxies, which has been employed in most previous works. Consequently, the local properties of infrared galaxies, i.e., optical/infrared luminosity ratios, LIR-Tdust correlation, and infrared luminosity function are outputs predicted by the model, while these have been inputs in a number of previous models. Our model indeed reproduces these local properties reasonably well. Then we make predictions for faint infrared counts (in 15, 60, 90, 170, 450, and 850 μm) and CBR using this model. We found results considerably different from those of most previous works based on the empirical LIR-Tdust relation; especially, it is shown that the dust temperature of starbursting primordial elliptical galaxies is expected to be very high (40-80 K), as often seen in starburst galaxies or ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local and high-z universe. This indicates that intense starbursts of forming elliptical galaxies should have occurred at z~2-3, in contrast to the previous results that significant starbursts beyond z~1 tend to overproduce the far-infrared (FIR) CBR detected by COBE/FIRAS. On the other hand, our model predicts that the mid-infrared (MIR) flux from warm/nonequilibrium dust is relatively weak in such galaxies making FIR CBR, and this effect reconciles the prima facie conflict between the upper limit on MIR CBR from TeV gamma

  3. A Bridge from Optical to Infrared Galaxies: Explaining Local Properties, Predicting Galaxy Counts and the Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, T.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2001-12-01

    A new model of infrared galaxy counts and the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is developed by extending a model for optical/near-infrared galaxies. Important new characteristics of this model are that mass scale dependence of dust extinction is introduced based on the size-luminosity relation of optical galaxies, and that the big grain dust temperature T dust is calculated based on a physical consideration for energy balance, rather than using the empirical relation between T dust and total infrared luminosity L IR found in local galaxies, which has been employed in most of previous works. Consequently, the local properties of infrared galaxies, i.e., optical/infrared luminosity ratios, L IR-T dust correlation, and infrared luminosity function are outputs predicted by the model, while these have been inputs in a number of previous models. Our model indeed reproduces these local properties reasonably well. Then we make predictions for faint infrared counts (in 15, 60, 90, 170, 450, and 850 μ m) and CBR by this model. We found considerably different results from most of previous works based on the empirical L IR-T dust relation; especially, it is shown that the dust temperature of starbursting primordial elliptical galaxies is expected to be very high (40--80K). This indicates that intense starbursts of forming elliptical galaxies should have occurred at z ~ 2--3, in contrast to the previous results that significant starbursts beyond z ~ 1 tend to overproduce the far-infrared (FIR) CBR detected by COBE/FIRAS. On the other hand, our model predicts that the mid-infrared (MIR) flux from warm/nonequilibrium dust is relatively weak in such galaxies making FIR CBR, and this effect reconciles the prima facie conflict between the upper limit on MIR CBR from TeV gamma-ray observations and the COBE\\ detections of FIR CBR. The authors thank the financial support by the Japan Society for Promotion of Science.

  4. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies as seen from AKARI and GALEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Yuan, F.-T.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate estimation of the star formation-related properties of galaxies is crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. In galaxies, ultraviolet (UV) light emitted by recently formed massive stars is attenuated by dust, which is also produced by star formation (SF) activity, and is re-emitted at mid- and far- infrared (IR) wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and dust extinction using UV and IR data. We selected local galaxies which are detected at AKARI FIS 90 μm and matched the IRAS IIFSC z 60 μm select catalog. We measured FUV and NUV flux densities from GALEX images. We examined the SF and extinction of Local galaxies using four bands of AKARI. Then, we calculated FUV and total IR luminosities, and obtained the SF luminosity, L SF, the total luminosity related to star formation activity, and the SFR. We find that in most galaxies, L SF is dominated by L dust. We also find that galaxies with higher SF activity have a higher fraction of their SF hidden by dust. In fact, the SF of galaxies with SFRs > 20 M⊙ yr-1 is almost completely hidden by dust. Our results boast a significantly higher precision with respect to previously published works, due to the use of much larger object samples from the AKARI and GALEX all sky surveys.

  5. The intriguing properties of local compact massive galaxies: What are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré-Mateu, A.; Vazdekis, A.; Trujillo, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Ricciardelli, E.; de la Rosa, I. G.

    2013-07-01

    Studying the properties of the few compact massive galaxies that exist in the local Universe (Trujillo et al. 2009) might provide a closer look to the nature of their high redshift (z >= 1.0) massive counterparts. By this means we have characterized their main kinematics, structural properties, stellar populations and star formation histories with a set of new high quality spectroscopic and imaging data (Ferré-Mateu et al. 2012 and Trujillo et al. 2012). These galaxies seem to be truly unique, as they do not follow the characteristic kinematics, stellar surface mass density profiles and stellar population patterns of present-day massive ellipticals or spirals of similar mass. They are, instead, more alike their high-z analogs. Summarizing, local compact massive galaxies are rare, unique and the perfect laboratory to study their high redshift counterparts.

  6. WINGS-SPE. III. Equivalent width measurements, spectral properties, and evolution of local cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Marziani, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Cluster galaxies are the ideal sites to look at when studying the influence of the environment on the various aspects of the evolution of galaxies, such as the changes in their stellar content and morphological transformations. In the framework of wings, the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey, we have obtained optical spectra for ~6000 galaxies selected in fields centred on 48 local (0.04 < z < 0.07) X-ray selected clusters to tackle these issues. Aims: By classifying the spectra based on given spectral lines, we investigate the frequency of the various spectral types as a function of both the clusters' properties and the galaxies' characteristics. In this way, using the same classification criteria adopted for studies at higher redshift, we can consistently compare the properties of the local cluster population to those of their more distant counterparts. Methods: We describe a method that we have developed to automatically measure the equivalent width of spectral lines in a robust way, even in spectra with a non optimal signal-to-noise ratio. This way, we can derive a spectral classification reflecting the stellar content, based on the presence and strength of the [Oii] and Hδ lines. Results: After a quality check, we are able to measure 4381 of the ~6000 originally observed spectra in the fields of 48 clusters, of which 2744 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. The spectral classification is then analysed as a function of galaxies' luminosity, stellar mass, morphology, local density, and host cluster's global properties and compared to higher redshift samples (MORPHS and EDisCS). The vast majority of galaxies in the local clusters population are passive objects, being also the most luminous and massive. At a magnitude limit of MV < -18, galaxies in a post-starburst phase represent only ~11% of the cluster population, and this fraction is reduced to ~5% at MV < -19.5, which compares to the 18% at the same magnitude limit for high

  7. Correlating Type Ia Supernova Properties with Their Local Environment Using HST Snapshots of Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Benjamin; Garnavich, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are important tools for precision cosmology. But there are still uncertainties about how the host galaxy properties and local environment influence the luminosity, color and Hubble residuals of SN Ia. We investigate these questions by analyzing high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of SDSS-II host galaxies. These are "snapshot" images obtained while the telescope was slewing to new targets, so the total exposure times are less than 30 minutes. ACS images were obtained in F475W and F625W filters, similar to SDSS g and r-bands. In total, we observed 61 host galaxies in Stripe 82 that had SN Ia discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey. HST's resolution and low background allow for detailed analysis of both the region around the SN Ia and the galaxy as a whole. Co-added SDSS-II images of the hosts are used to supplement the HST data in regions of low surface brightness. From this data set we estimate the fractional pixel rank and photometric color of the SN Ia's location and correlate the local environment variables with SN Ia luminosity, light curve width, color and Hubble residual. We assess the impact of these correlations on the accuracy of SN Ia distance estimates and possible biases in measuring the Hubble constant and dark energy parameters.

  8. Radio properties of galaxy groups in the Local Universe (<80 Mpc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokythas, K.

    2013-09-01

    The most likely source of energy injection into the intergalactic medium of galaxy groups is AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) feedback. Since >50% of galaxies in the local Universe reside in groups and many of them host radiative cooling gas halos, which can fuel a central SMBH, they are probably the key environment for the study of AGN/hot gas interactions. Using a complete, optically selected sample of groups -the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS) project- observed in both radio and Xray bands, I examine the radio properties of AGN in nearby galaxy groups. My work targets to the characterization of the AGN population in groups, and examination of their impact on the intra-group gas and member galaxies. By focusing on low-frequency radio emission (240 MHz and 610 MHz ), past as well as current AGN activity can be identified with the combination of good spatial resolution at 610 MHz and the sensitivity to older electron populations at 235 MHz. The combination then of radio with optical and X-ray bands reveals the complex interactions with their environment and the physical processes that govern galaxy transformations. Results from our new GMRT observations at 235 and 610 MHz will be presented here for the first time for the systems of 4261, 5982, 1060 and 5903. These systems are good examples of the wide variety of radio properties: from groups dominated by a single powerful central source (4261), through weak AGN and star-formation dominated systems (1060, 5982) to diffuse, merger-related sources (5903). These are all important for the investigation of the IGM/AGN connection and the understanding of the physical mechanisms of the energy injection.

  9. Star Formation Properties in the Local Volume Galaxies via Hα and Far-ultraviolet Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.

    2013-09-01

    A distance-limited sample of 869 objects from the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog is used to characterize the star formation status of the Local Volume population. We present a compiled list of 1217 star formation rate (SFR) estimates for 802 galaxies within 11 Mpc, derived from the Hα imaging surveys and the GALEX far-ultraviolet survey. We briefly discuss some basic scaling relations between SFR and luminosity, morphology, H I mass, surface brightness, and the environment of the galaxies. About 3/4 of our sample consist of dwarf galaxies, for which we offer a more refined classification. We note that the specific SFR of nearly all luminous and dwarf galaxies does not exceed the maximum value: log (SFR/LK ) = -9.4 [yr-1]. Most spiral and blue dwarf galaxies have enough time to generate their stellar mass during the cosmological time, T 0, with the observed SFRs. They dispose of a sufficient amount of gas to support their present SFRs over the next T 0 term. We note that only a small fraction of BCD, Im, and Ir galaxies (about 1/20) proceed in a mode of vigorous starburst activity. In general, the star formation history of spiral and blue dwarf galaxies is mainly driven by their internal processes. The present SFRs of E, S0, and dSph galaxies typically have 1/30-1/300 of their former activity.

  10. On the Limits of Measuring the Bulge and Disk Properties of Local and High-redshift Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Roozbeh; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.

    2016-06-01

    A considerable fraction of the massive quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2, which are known to be much more compact than galaxies of comparable mass today, appear to have a disk. How well can we measure the bulge and disk properties of these systems? We simulate two-component model galaxies in order to systematically quantify the effects of non-homology in structures and the methods employed. We employ empirical scaling relations to produce realistic-looking local galaxies with a uniform and wide range of bulge-to-total ratios (B/T), and then rescale them to mimic the signal-to-noise ratios and sizes of observed galaxies at z ≈ 2. This provides the most complete set of simulations to date for which we can examine the robustness of two-component decomposition of compact disk galaxies at different B/T. We confirm that the size of these massive, compact galaxies can be measured robustly using a single Sérsic fit. We can measure B/T accurately without imposing any constraints on the light profile shape of the bulge, but, due to the small angular sizes of bulges at high redshift, their detailed properties can only be recovered for galaxies with B/T ≳ 0.2. The disk component, by contrast, can be measured with little difficulty.

  11. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Putko, Joseph; Dewberry, Janosz; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2012-05-10

    Tadpole galaxies have a giant star-forming region at the end of an elongated intensity distribution. Here we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to determine the ages, masses, and surface densities of the heads and tails in 14 local tadpoles selected from the Kiso and Michigan surveys of UV-bright galaxies, and we compare them to tadpoles previously studied in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The young stellar mass in the head scales linearly with rest-frame galaxy luminosity, ranging from {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at galaxy absolute magnitude U = -13 mag to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} at U = -20 mag. The corresponding head surface density increases from several M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2} locally to 10-100 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} at high redshift, and the star formation rate (SFR) per unit area in the head increases from {approx}0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} locally to {approx}1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} at high z. These local values are normal for star-forming regions, and the increases with redshift are consistent with other cosmological SFRs, most likely reflecting an increase in gas abundance. The tails in the local sample look like bulge-free galaxy disks. Their photometric ages decrease from several Gyr to several hundred Myr with increasing z, and their surface densities are more constant than the surface densities of the heads. The far-outer intensity profiles in the local sample are symmetric and exponential. We suggest that most local tadpoles are bulge-free galaxy disks with lopsided star formation, perhaps from environmental effects such as ram pressure or disk impacts, or from a Jeans length comparable to half the disk size.

  12. Clustering Properties and Halo Masses for Central Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixin; Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the clustering and dark matter halo mass for a sample of ˜16,000 central galaxies selected from the SDSS/DR7 group catalog. We select subsamples of central galaxies on three two-dimensional planes, each formed by stellar mass (M{}*) and one other property out of optical color (g - r), surface stellar mass density ({μ }*), and central stellar velocity dispersion ({σ }*). For each subsample we measure both the projected cross-correlation function ({w}p({r}p)) relative to a reference galaxy sample, and an average mass of the host dark matter halos (M{}{{h}}). Both {w}p({r}p) and M{}{{h}} show the strongest dependence on M{}*, and there is no clear dependence on the other properties when M{}* is fixed. This result provides strong support to the previously adopted assumption that, for central galaxies, stellar mass is the best indicator of the host dark halo mass. For comparison we have estimated {w}p({r}p) for the full galaxy population and the population of satellite galaxies. Both populations show similar clustering properties in all cases, but they are similar to the centrals only at high masses (M{}* ≳ {10}11 {M}⊙ ). At lower masses, their {w}p({r}p) depends more strongly on {σ }* and g - r than on M{}*. It is thus necessary to consider central and satellite galaxies separately when studying the link between galaxies and dark matter halos. We discuss the implications of our results for the relative roles of halo mass and galaxy structure in quenching the star formation in central galaxies.

  13. Local normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    In the near future, high energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Two and possibly three local galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and M31, should be visible to the high energy gamma ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory, and the first should be seen by GAMMA-1. With the assumptions of adequate cosmic ray production and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, specific predictions of the gamma ray emission can be made separating the concepts of the galactic and universal nature of cosmic rays. A study of the synchrotron radiation from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) suggests that the cosmic ray density is similar to that in the local region of our galaxy, but not uniform. It is hoped the measurements will be able to verify this independent of assumptions about the magnetic fields in the LMC.

  14. Physical properties of local star-forming analogues to z ˜ 5 Lyman-break galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greis, Stephanie M. L.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Levan, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Intense, compact, star-forming galaxies are rare in the local Universe but ubiquitous at high redshift. We interpret the 0.1-22 μm spectral energy distributions of a sample of 180 galaxies at 0.05 < z < 0.25 selected for extremely high surface densities of inferred star formation in the ultraviolet. By comparison with well-established stellar population synthesis models, we find that our sample comprises young (˜60-400 Myr), moderate mass (˜6 × 109 M⊙) star-forming galaxies with little dust extinction (mean stellar continuum extinction Econt(B - V) ˜ 0.1) and find star formation rates of a few tens of solar masses per year. We use our inferred masses to determine a mean specific star formation rate for this sample of ˜10-9 yr-1, and compare this to the specific star formation rates in distant Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs), and in other low-redshift populations. We conclude that our sample's characteristics overlap significantly with those of the z ˜ 5 LBG population, making ours the first local analogue population well tuned to match those high-redshift galaxies. We consider implications for the origin and evolution of early galaxies.

  15. DUST PROPERTIES OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH THE SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Andrews, Sean M.; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report Submillimeter Array observations of the 880 μm dust continuum emission for four dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the local universe. Two DOGs are clearly detected with S{sub ν}(880 μm) =10-13 mJy and S/N > 5, but the other two are not detected with 3σ upper limits of S{sub ν}(880 μm) =5-9 mJy. Including an additional two local DOGs with submillimeter data from the literature, we determine the dust masses and temperatures for six local DOGs. The infrared luminosities and dust masses for these DOGs are in the ranges of 1.2-4.9 × 10{sup 11}(L{sub ☉}) and 4-14 × 10{sup 7}(M{sub ☉}), respectively. The dust temperatures derived from a two-component modified blackbody function are 23-26 K and 60-124 K for the cold and warm dust components, respectively. Comparison of local DOGs with other infrared luminous galaxies with submillimeter detections shows that the dust temperatures and masses do not differ significantly among these objects. Thus, as argued previously, local DOGs are not a distinctive population among dusty galaxies, but simply represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution.

  16. Properties of H I-selected Galaxies: The Contribution of Gas-rich, LSB Galaxies to the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Appadoo, D. A.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Disney, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    Understanding the relationship between neutral hydrogen (H I) and stars in the interstellar medium of galaxies is integral to the study of galaxy evolution. Because stellar populations in galaxies form from collapsed clouds of hydrogen, we can naively claim that galaxies with few stars and large quantities of gas must be less ``evolved'' than those with little gas and many stars, and that galaxies evolve by converting their gas into stars. To first order this description is valid; we know that galaxies with large stellar populations must have once had fewer stars and more gas.

  17. A comparison of the morphological properties between local and z ∼ 1 infrared luminous galaxies: Are local and high-z (U)LIRGs different?

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, Kirsten L.; Lee, Nicholas; Li, Yanxia; Lockhart, Kelly; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Barnes, Joshua E.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Koss, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Smith, Howard A.

    2014-08-10

    Ultraluminous and luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs and LIRGs) are the most extreme star-forming galaxies in the universe and dominate the total star formation rate density at z > 1. In the local universe (z < 0.3), the majority of ULIRGs and a significant portion of LIRGs are triggered by interactions between gas-rich spiral galaxies, yet it is unclear if this is still the case at high z. To investigate the relative importance of galaxy interactions in infrared luminous galaxies, we carry out a comparison of optical morphological properties between local (U)LIRGs and (U)LIRGs at z = 0.5-1.5 based on the same sample selection, morphology classification scheme, and optical morphology at similar rest-frame wavelengths. In addition, we quantify the systematics in comparing local and high-z data sets by constructing a redshifted data set from local (U)LIRGs, in which its data quality mimics the high-z data set. Based on the Gini-M{sub 20} classification scheme, we find that the fraction of interacting systems decreases by ∼8% from local to z ≲ 1, and it is consistent with the reduction between local and redshifted data sets (6{sub −6}{sup +14}%). Based on visual classifications, the merger fraction of local ULIRGs is found to be ∼20% lower compared to published results, and the reduction due to redshifting is 15{sub −8}{sup +10}%. Consequently, the differences of merger fractions between local and z ≲ 1 (U)LIRGs is only ∼17%. These results demonstrate that there is no strong evolution in the fraction of (U)LIRGs classified as mergers at least out to z ∼ 1. At z > 1, the morphology types of ∼30% of (U)LIRGs cannot be determined due to their faintness in the F814W band; thus, the merger fraction measured at z > 1 suffers from large uncertainties.

  18. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  19. WHERE ARE THE FOSSILS OF THE FIRST GALAXIES? I. LOCAL VOLUME MAPS AND PROPERTIES OF THE UNDETECTED DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bovill, Mia S.; Ricotti, Massimo E-mail: ricotti@astro.umd.edu

    2011-11-01

    We present a new method for generating initial conditions for {Lambda}CDM N-body simulations which provides the dynamical range necessary to follow the evolution and distribution of the fossils of the first galaxies on Local Volume, 5-10 Mpc, scales. The initial distribution of particles represents the position, velocity, and mass distribution of the dark and luminous halos extracted from pre-reionization simulations. We confirm previous results that ultra-faint dwarfs have properties compatible with being well-preserved fossils of the first galaxies. However, because the brightest pre-reionization dwarfs form preferentially in biased regions, they most likely merge into non-fossil halos with circular velocities >20-30 km s{sup -1}. Hence, we find that the maximum luminosity of true fossils in the Milky Way is L{sub V} < 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}, casting doubts on the interpretation that some classical dSphs are true fossils. In addition, we argue that most ultra-faints at small galactocentric distance, R < 50 kpc, had their stellar properties modified by tides, while a large population of fossils is still undetected due to their extremely low surface brightness log ({Sigma}{sub V}) < -1.4. We estimate that the region outside R{sub 50} ({approx}400 kpc) up to 1 Mpc from the Milky Way contains about a hundred true fossils of the first galaxies with V-band luminosity 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} L{sub sun} and half-light radii, r{sub hl} {approx} 100-1000 pc.

  20. STAR FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME GALAXIES VIA H{alpha} AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET FLUXES

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I. E-mail: kei@sao.ru

    2013-09-15

    A distance-limited sample of 869 objects from the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog is used to characterize the star formation status of the Local Volume population. We present a compiled list of 1217 star formation rate (SFR) estimates for 802 galaxies within 11 Mpc, derived from the H{alpha} imaging surveys and the GALEX far-ultraviolet survey. We briefly discuss some basic scaling relations between SFR and luminosity, morphology, H I mass, surface brightness, and the environment of the galaxies. About 3/4 of our sample consist of dwarf galaxies, for which we offer a more refined classification. We note that the specific SFR of nearly all luminous and dwarf galaxies does not exceed the maximum value: log (SFR/L{sub K} ) = -9.4 [yr{sup -1}]. Most spiral and blue dwarf galaxies have enough time to generate their stellar mass during the cosmological time, T{sub 0}, with the observed SFRs. They dispose of a sufficient amount of gas to support their present SFRs over the next T{sub 0} term. We note that only a small fraction of BCD, Im, and Ir galaxies (about 1/20) proceed in a mode of vigorous starburst activity. In general, the star formation history of spiral and blue dwarf galaxies is mainly driven by their internal processes. The present SFRs of E, S0, and dSph galaxies typically have 1/30-1/300 of their former activity.

  1. Evolution of local luminous compact blue galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabidoux, Katherine; Pisano, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) are a type of very blue, very compact star-forming galaxy that was common at z~1 but is rare in the local universe. While it is clear from this discrepancy that LCBGs must be a rapidly-evolving class of galaxy, it is not clear what type(s) of galaxy they become. Fortunately, since they are bright and nearby, the rare examples of z~0 LCBGs are easily studied across a large range of wavelengths. We have conducted a study of z~0 analogs to the z~1 LCBGs to investigate their galaxy-wide internal properties in order to determine what is triggering their current episode of star formation, for how long the star formation can continue, and what the galaxies may become once their star formation rates decrease from current levels. We have taken resolved H I observations of nine LCBGs and unresolved radio continuum observations of 35 LCBGs and combined this data with archival broad-band data to probe their global properties. We conclude that LCBGs are rotationally-supported, star-forming disk galaxies that, while they may be forming small central bulges or bars, are highly unlikely to evolve into dwarf elliptical, dwarf spheroidal, or elliptical galaxies on their own due to their masses and rotation velocities. LCBGs will likely fade to be spiral galaxies with lower surface brightnesses once their current episodes of star formation conclude. In addition, we have modeled the SEDs of the LCBGs in our sample to determine whether LCBGs' star formation is ramping up or winding down, and for how much longer their current active phase of star formation will last. We have begun to put together a picture of the current evolutionary stage of this class of galaxies, and have better constrained their future evolutionary paths.

  2. Comparing Local and High-z X-ray Galaxy Clusters: Properties of the Gas Mass Fraction, Metallicity, and Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, S.; Tozzi, P.; Rosati, P.

    We summarize here some of the results on the properties of the X-ray emitting plasma in galaxy clusters at high redshift that we present and discuss in a series of papers (Ettori, Tozzi & Rosati 2003a; Tozzi et al. 2003; Rosati et al. 2003; Ettori et al. 2003b). In particular, we report on (1) how the gas mass fraction measured in galaxy clusters at z>0.7 is used to put significant constraints on the cosmological parameters in a independent and complementary way with respect to the power spectrum of the observed anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background and the magnitude-redshift relation for distant type Ia supernovae (Ettori et al. 2003a), (2) what is the measured metallicity of the intracluster medium at redshift between 0.3 and 1.3 (Tozzi et al. 2003, Rosati et al. 2003), (3) how the observed entropy values in the cores of these high-z systems compare with local estimates (Ettori et al. 2003b).

  3. Neutral Hydrogen in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana

    The gas content of the faintest and lowest mass dwarf galaxies provide means to study the evolution of these unique objects. The evolutionary histories of low mass dwarf galaxies are interesting in their own right, but may also provide insight into fundamental cosmological problems. These include the nature of dark matter, the disagreement between the number of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies and that predicted by lambda cold dark matter models, and the discrepancy between the observed census of baryonic matter in the Milky Way's environment and theoretical predictions. This thesis explores these questions by studying the neutral hydrogen (HI) component of dwarf galaxies. First, limits on the HI mass of the ultra-faint dwarfs are presented, and the HI content of all Local Group dwarf galaxies is examined from an environmental standpoint. We find that those Local Group dwarfs within 270 kpc of a massive host galaxy are deficient in HI as compared to those at larger galactocentric distances. Ram-pressure arguments are invoked, which suggest halo densities greater than 2-3 x 10-4 cm-3 out to distances of at least 70 kpc, values which are consistent with theoretical models and suggest the halo may harbor a large fraction of the host galaxy's baryons. We also find that accounting for the incompleteness of the dwarf galaxy count, known dwarf galaxies whose gas has been removed could have provided at most 2.1 x 108 M⊙ of HI gas to the Milky Way. Second, we examine the possibility of discovering unknown gas-rich ultra-faint galaxies in the Local Group using HI. The GALFA-HI Survey catalog is searched for compact, isolated HI clouds which are most similar to the expected HI characteristics of low mass dwarf galaxies. Fifty-one Local Group dwarf galaxy candidates are identified through column density, brightness temperature, and kinematic selection criteria, and their properties are explored. Third, we present hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies experiencing a

  4. THE HERSCHEL EXPLOITATION OF LOCAL GALAXY ANDROMEDA (HELGA). VI. THE DISTRIBUTION AND PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATIONS IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, J. M.; Gear, W. K.; Smith, M. W. L.; Ford, G.; Eales, S. A.; Gomez, H. L.; Fritz, J.; Baes, M.; De Looze, I.; Gentile, G.; Gordon, K.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Bendo, G. J.; O'Halloran, B.; Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; and others

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) data set. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalog and characterize the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith et al. A total of 326 GMCs in the mass range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} are identified; their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M {sup –2.34}, in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same correlation of cloud mass to L {sub CO} observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalog and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit, suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon et al., we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.3 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.°9 to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Last, we comment on the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have on the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system.

  5. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA). VI. The Distribution and Properties of Molecular Cloud Associations in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. M.; Gear, W. K.; Fritz, J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Ford, G.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; De Looze, I.; Eales, S. A.; Gentile, G.; Gomez, H. L.; Gordon, K.; O'Halloran, B.; Madden, S. C.; Roman-Duval, J.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Boselli, A.; Cooray, A.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spinoglio, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) data set. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalog and characterize the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith et al. A total of 326 GMCs in the mass range 104-107 M ⊙ are identified; their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M -2.34, in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same correlation of cloud mass to L CO observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalog and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit, suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon et al., we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.3 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.°9 to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Last, we comment on the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have on the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Multi-wavelength properties and smbh's masses of the isolated galaxies with active nuclei in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, Iryna; Vasylenko, Anatolij; Babyk, Iuri; Pulatova, Nadya

    2016-07-01

    We apply the specially-oriented Astro-Space databases obtained with ground-based telescopes and space observatories to study the multi-wavelength spectral and physical properties of galaxies with active nuclei (AGNs), namely of isolated AGNs that are poorly investigated especially in X-rays. Such a study allowed us 1) to separate the internal evolution mechanisms from the environment influence and consider them as two separate processes related to fueling nuclear activity, 2) to explore absorption features and the X-ray continuum radiation from accretion disks around SMBHs (e.g. to select accretion models). In the case of detecting the Fe K emission line, it was possible to analyze the physical conditions in the AGNs innermost parts in more details. Using the SDSS spectral Hβ-line data we were able to estimate the SMBH masses of several isolated AGNs in the Local Universe, which are systematically lower than the SMBH masses of AGNs located in a dense environment. We present also the results of analysis of the spectral data obtained by XMM-Newton, Swift, Chandra, and INTEGRAL space observatories for several isolated AGNs from 2MIG catalogue, for which the available X-ray data were accessed. Among these objects are CGCG 179-005, NGC 6300, NGC 1050, NGC 2989, WKK 3050, ESO 438-009, ESO 317-038 and others. We determined corresponding spectral models and values of their parameters (spectral index, intrinsic absorption etc.). X-ray spectra for bright galaxies, NGC 6300 and Circinus, were analyzed up to 250 keV and their characteristics of emission features were determined in 6-7 keV range.

  7. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES: DYNAMICS AND METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G. E-mail: cmt@iac.es E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu

    2013-04-10

    Tadpole galaxies, with a bright peripheral clump on a faint tail, are morphological types unusual in the nearby universe but very common early on. Low mass local tadpoles were identified and studied photometrically in a previous work, which we complete here analyzing their chemical and dynamical properties. We measure H{alpha} velocity curves of seven local tadpoles, representing 50% of the initial sample. Five of them show evidence for rotation ({approx}70%), and a sixth target hints at it. Often the center of rotation is spatially offset with respect to the tadpole head (three out of five cases). The size and velocity dispersion of the heads are typical of giant H II regions, and three of them yield dynamical masses in fair agreement with their stellar masses as inferred from photometry. In four cases the velocity dispersion at the head is reduced with respect to its immediate surroundings. The oxygen metallicity estimated from [N II] {lambda}6583/H{alpha} often shows significant spatial variations across the galaxies ({approx}0.5 dex), being smallest at the head and larger elsewhere. The resulting chemical abundance gradients are opposite to the ones observed in local spirals, but agrees with disk galaxies at high redshift. We interpret the metallicity variation as a sign of external gas accretion (cold-flows) onto the head of the tadpole. The galaxies are low-metallicity outliers of the mass-metallicity relationship. In particular, two of the tadpole heads are extremely metal poor, with a metallicity smaller than a tenth of the solar value. These two targets are also very young (ages smaller than 5 Myr). All these results combined are consistent with the local tadpole galaxies being disks in early stages of assembling, with their star formation sustained by accretion of external metal-poor gas.

  8. Segregation properties of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, B.X.; Da Costa, L.N. )

    1990-10-01

    Using the recently completed Southern Sky Redshift Survey, in conjunction with measurements of the central surface brightness, the existence of segregation in the way galaxies of different morphology and surface brightness are distributed in space is investigated. Results indicate that there is some evidence that low surface brightness galaxies are more randomly distributed than brighter ones and that this effect is independent of the well-known tendency of early-type galaxies to cluster more strongly than spirals. Presuming that the observed clustering was established at the epoch of galaxy formation, it may provide circumstantial evidence for biased galaxy formation. 24 refs.

  9. Morphology transformation in pairs of galaxies - the local sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junqueira, S.; de Mello, D. F.; Infante, L.

    1998-04-01

    We present photometric analysis of a local sample of 14 isolated pairs of galaxies. The photometric properties analyzed in the local pairs are: colors, morphology, tidal effects and activity. We verify that close pairs have an excess of early-type galaxies and many elliptical galaxies in this pairs are, in fact, lenticular galaxies. Many late-pairs in our sample show strong tidal damage and blue star formation regions. We conclude that pairs of different morphologies may have passed through different evolution processes which violently transformed their morphology. Pairs with at least one early-type component may be descendents of groups of galaxies. However, late-type pairs are probably long-lived showing clearly signs of interaction. Some of them could be seen as an early stage of mergers. These photometric databases will be used for future comparison with more distant pairs in order to study galaxy evolution.

  10. An infrared imaging study of galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Albert D.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Mcleod, Kim K.

    1995-01-01

    This poster was a preliminary report on a survey of galaxies in the local universe at J and K using a NICMOS3 256 x 256 infrared photometric camera attached to the 61 inch telescope on Mt. Bigelow. Deep images are being obtained for a representative sample of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue. Structural and color parameters are determined for a wide variety of galactic types. These data should prove to be valuable in characterizing stellar populations within disks and bulges, determining if IR-active galaxies have unusual global as well as- nuclear properties, and understanding the effects of evolution and redshift dimming in distant galaxies.

  11. Structural Properties of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Lee, M.; S4G Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We present that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down- bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We show that for galaxies with B/T > 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r_br/R_bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) of the bar, and thus the OLR also moves outwards at the same rate as the bar grows. For galaxies with B/T < 0.1, r_br/R_bar, spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds. We quantifiy shapes of bar radial surface brightness profiles by measuring their Sersic indices and show that bars in higher B/T galaxies have flatter radial surface brightness profile than bulgeless galaxies do. In particular, bulgeless galaxies mostly have bars with steep profiles. We show that the normalized bar length is correlated with B/T, which is consistent with bars growing longer with time.

  12. Stellar populations in local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.

    2003-11-01

    The main goal of this thesis work is studying the main properties of the stellar populations embedded in a statistically complete sample of local active star-forming galaxies: the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) Survey of emission-line galaxies. This sample contains 191 local star-forming galaxies at an average redshift of 0.026. The survey was carried out using an objective-prism technique centered at the wavelength of the Halpha nebular emission-line (a common tracer of recent star formation). (continues)

  13. The dynamics of isolated Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-03-01

    We measured velocities of 862 individual red giant stars in seven isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group: NGC 6822, IC 1613, VV 124 (UGC 4879), the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216), Leo A, Cetus and Aquarius (DDO 210). We also computed velocity dispersions, taking into account the measurement uncertainties on individual stars. None of the isolated galaxies is denser than the densest Local Group satellite galaxy. Furthermore, the isolated dwarf galaxies have no obvious distinction in the velocity dispersion-half-light radius plane from the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and M31. The similarity of the isolated and satellite galaxies' dynamics and structural parameters imposes limitations on environmental solutions to the `too big to fail' problem, wherein there are fewer dense dwarf satellite galaxies than would be expected from cold dark matter simulations. This data set also has many other applications for dwarf galaxy evolution, including the transformation of dwarf irregular into dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We intend to explore these issues in future work.

  14. Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Baildon, Taylor; Mehta, Shail; Garcia, Edgar; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey of Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and seven dwarf galaxies in (NGC6822, IC10, WLM, Sextans A and B, Phoenix and Pegasus). Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS - see Massey et al, 2006), we used continuum-subtracted Ha emission line images to define emission regions with a faint flux limit of 10 -17 ergs-sec-1-cm-2above the background. We have obtained photometric measurements for roughly 7450 Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and five of the seven dwarf galaxies (no regions for Phoenix or Pegasus). Using these regions, with boundaries defined by Hα-emission flux limits, we also measured fluxes for the continuum-subtracted [OIII] and [SII] images and constructed a catalog of Hα fluxes, region sizes and [OIII]/ Hα and [SII]/ Hα line ratios. The HII region luminosity functions and size distributions for the spiral galaxies M31 and M33 are compared with those of the dwarf galaxies NGC 6822 and IC10. For M31 and M33, the average [SII]/ Hα and [OIII]/ Hα line ratios, plotted as a function of galactocentric radius, display a linear trend with shallow slopes consistent with other studies of metallicity gradients in these galaxies. The galaxy-wide averages of [SII]/ Hα line ratios correlate with the masses of the dwarf galaxies following the previously established dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relationship. The slope of the luminosity functions for the dwarf galaxies varies with galaxy mass. The Carleton Catalog of this Local Group Emission-line Survey will be made available on-line.

  15. GOODS-Herschel: the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the far-infrared properties of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H. S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Borgne, D.; Buat, V.; Magdis, G. E.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Coia, D.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dasyra, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We study the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the far-infrared properties of galaxies and its evolution at 0 < z < 1.2. Methods: Using the high-z galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) observed by the Herschel Space Observatory in the framework of the GOODS-Herschel key program and the local IRAS or AKARI-selected galaxies in the field of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we investigate the dependence of galaxy properties on the morphology of and the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy. Results: We find that the star-formation rates (SFRs) and the specific SFRs (SSFRs) of galaxies on average depend on the morphology of and the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy in this redshift range. When a late-type galaxy has a close neighbor galaxy, the SFR and the SSFR increase as it approaches a late-type neighbor, which is supported by Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) and Monte Carlo (MC) tests with a significance level of >99%. However, the SFR and the SSFR decrease or do not change much as the galaxy approaches an early-type neighbor. The bifurcations of SFRs and SSFRs depending on the neighbor's morphology seem to occur at Rn ≈ 0.5rvir,nei (virial radius of the neighbor), which is supported by K-S and MC tests with a significance level of >98%. For all redshift bins, the SSFRs of late-type galaxies interacting with late-type neighbors are increased by factors of about 1.8 ± 0.7 and 4.0 ± 1.2 compared to those of non-interacting galaxies when the pair separation is smaller than 0.5rvir,nei and 0.1rvir,nei, respectively. The dust temperature of both local and high-z late-type galaxies that strongly interact with late-type neighbors (i.e. Rn ≤ 0.1rvir,nei) appears to be higher than that of non-interacting galaxies with a significance level of 96-99%. However, the dust temperature of local late-type galaxies that strongly interact with early-type neighbors seems to be lower than or similar to that of non

  16. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  17. The Far-Infrared Properties of the Most Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J.; Leon, S.; Espada, D.; Bergond, G.; García, E.; Sabater, J.; Santander-Vela, J. D.; Verley, S.

    2007-05-01

    A long-standing question in galaxy evolution involves the role of nature (self-regulation) vs. nurture (environment) on the observed properties (and evolution) of galaxies. A collaboration centreed at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (Granada, Spain) is trying to address this question by producing a observational database for a sample of 1050 isolated galaxies from the catalogue of Karachentseva (1973) with the overarching goal being the generation of a "zero-point" sample against which effects of environment on galaxies can be assessed. The AMIGA (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies) database (see www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html) will include optical, IR and radio line and continuum measures. The galaxies in the sample represent the most isolated galaxies in the local universe. In the present contribution, we will present the project, as well as the results of an analysis of the far-infrared (FIR) and molecular gas properties of this sample.

  18. Chemical abundances of massive stars in Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Kaufer, Andreas; Tolstoy, Eline; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Przybilla, Norbert; Smartt, Stephen J.; Lennon, Daniel J.

    The relative abundances of elements in galaxies can provide valuable information on the stellar and chemical evolution of a galaxy. While nebulae can provide abundances for a variety of light elements, stars are the only way to directly determine the abundances of iron-group and s-process and r-process elements in a galaxy. The new 8m and 10m class telescopes and high-efficiency spectrographs now make high-quality spectral observations of bright supergiants possible in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have been concentrating on elemental abundances in the metal-poor dwarf irregular galaxies, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextants A, and GR 8. Comparing abundance ratios to those predicted from their star formation histories, determined from color-magnitude diagrams, and comparing those ratios between these galaxies can give us new insights into the evolution of these dwarf irregular galaxies. Iron-group abundances also allow us to examine the metallicities of the stars in these galaxies directly, which affects their inferred mass loss rates and predicted stellar evolution properties.

  19. Isolated elliptical galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerna, I.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Avila-Reese, V.; Abonza-Sane, J.; del Olmo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We have studied a sample of 89 very isolated, elliptical galaxies at z < 0.08 and compared their properties with elliptical galaxies located in a high-density environment such as the Coma supercluster. Aims: Our aim is to probe the role of environment on the morphological transformation and quenching of elliptical galaxies as a function of mass. In addition, we elucidate the nature of a particular set of blue and star-forming isolated ellipticals identified here. Methods: We studied physical properties of ellipticals, such as color, specific star formation rate, galaxy size, and stellar age, as a function of stellar mass and environment based on SDSS data. We analyzed the blue and star-forming isolated ellipticals in more detail, through photometric characterization using GALFIT, and infer their star formation history using STARLIGHT. Results: Among the isolated ellipticals ≈20% are blue, ≲8% are star forming, and ≈10% are recently quenched, while among the Coma ellipticals ≈8% are blue and just ≲1% are star forming or recently quenched. There are four isolated galaxies (≈4.5%) that are blue and star forming at the same time. These galaxies, with masses between 7 × 109 and 2 × 1010 h-2 M⊙, are also the youngest galaxies with light-weighted stellar ages ≲1 Gyr and exhibit bluer colors toward the galaxy center. Around 30-60% of their present-day luminosity, but only <5% of their present-day mass, is due to star formation in the last 1 Gyr. Conclusions: The processes of morphological transformation and quenching seem to be in general independent of environment since most of elliptical galaxies are "red and dead", although the transition to the red sequence should be faster for isolated ellipticals. In some cases, the isolated environment seems to propitiate the rejuvenation of ellipticals by recent (<1 Gyr) cold gas accretion.

  20. Galaxy properties and the cosmic web in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metuki, Ofer; Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Crain, Robert A.; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We seek to understand the relationship between galaxy properties and their local environment, which calls for a proper formulation of the notion of environment. We analyse the Galaxies-Intergalactic Medium Interaction Calculation suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations within the framework of the cosmic web as formulated by Hoffman et al., focusing on properties of simulated dark matter haloes and luminous galaxies with respect to voids, sheets, filaments, and knots - the four elements of the cosmic web. We find that the mass functions of haloes depend on environment, which drives other environmental dependence of galaxy formation. The web shapes the halo mass function, and through the strong dependence of the galaxy properties on the mass of their host haloes, it also shapes the galaxy-(web) environment dependence.

  1. The atomic-to-molecular transition and its relation to the scaling properties of galaxy discs in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Guo, Qi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2010-12-01

    We extend the existing semi-analytic models of galaxy formation to track atomic and molecular gas in disc galaxies. Simple recipes for processes such as cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and chemical enrichment of the stars and gas are grafted on to dark matter halo merger trees derived from the Millennium Simulation. Each galactic disc is represented by a series of concentric rings. We assume that the surface density profile of an infalling gas in a dark matter halo is exponential, with scale radius rd that is proportional to the virial radius of the halo times its spin parameter λ. As the dark matter haloes grow through mergers and accretion, disc galaxies assemble from the inside out. We include two simple prescriptions for molecular gas formation processes in our models: one is based on the analytic calculations by Krumholz, McKee & Tumlinson, and the other is a prescription where the H2 fraction is determined by the pressure of the interstellar medium (ISM). Motivated by the observational results of Leroy et al., we adopt a star formation law in which in the regime where the molecular gas dominates the total gas surface density, and where atomic hydrogen dominates. We then fit these models to the radial surface density profiles of stars, HI and H2 drawn from recent high-resolution surveys of stars and gas in nearby galaxies. We explore how the ratios of atomic gas, molecular gas and stellar mass vary as a function of global galaxy scale parameters, including stellar mass, stellar surface density and gas surface density. We elucidate how the trends can be understood in terms of three variables that determine the partition of baryons in discs: the mass of the dark matter halo, the spin parameter of the halo and the amount of gas recently accreted from the external environment.

  2. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  3. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z∼ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  4. 'Direct' Gas-Phase Metallicities, Stellar Properties, and Local Environments of Emission-Line Galaxies at Redshifts Below 0.90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew A.; Nagao, Tohru; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Using deep narrow-band (NB) imaging and optical spectroscopy from the Keck telescope and the Multi Mirror Telescope (MMT), we identify a sample of 20 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at z = 0.065-0.90 where the weak auroral emission line, [O iii] lambda4363, is detected at >=3sigma. These detections allow us to determine the gas-phase metallicity using the "direct" method. With electron temperature measurements, and dust attenuation corrections from Balmer decrements, we find that 4 of these low-mass galaxies are extremely metal-poor with 12+log(O/H) <= 7.65 or one-tenth solar. Our most metal-deficient galaxy has 12+log(O/H)= 7.24(+0.45 / -0.30) (95% confidence), similar to some of the lowest metallicity galaxies identified in the local universe. We find that our galaxies are all undergoing significant star formation with average specific star formation rate (SFR) of (100 Myra)(exp -1), and that they have high central SFR surface densities (average of 0.5 Solar M / yr/ sq. kpc). In addition, more than two-thirds of our galaxies have between one and four nearby companions within a projected radius of 100 kpc, which we find is an excess among star-forming galaxies at z =0.4 -- 0.85. We also find that the gas-phase metallicities for a given stellar mass and SFR lie systematically lower than the local stellar M-Z-(SFR) relation by approx. = 0.2 dex (2 sigma significance). These results are partly due to selection effects, since galaxies with strong star formation and low metallicity are more likely to yield [O iii] lambda4363 detections. Finally, the observed higher ionization parameter and high electron density suggest that they are lower redshift analogs to typical z approx. > 1 galaxies.

  5. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  6. Observing Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are key probes of both dark matter and galaxy formation. They are the smallest, oldest, most dark matter-dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems currently known. However, despite two decades of major computational, theoretical, and observational advances in this field, we are still working toward a complete understanding of star and galaxy formation at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In the last year, large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS have made an unprecedented series of discoveries, nearly doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies that was known at the start of 2015. This increase in the number of nearby dwarfs may significantly improve the sensitivity of searches for dark matter annihilation radiation. Many of these new dwarfs are likely to have originated as satellites of the Magellanic Clouds, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect of galactic environment on the formation of the faintest dwarfs. I will provide an overview of recent discoveries and how they fit in to the previously known population of nearby dwarf galaxies, highlighting a few of the most interesting objects from the perspective of dark matter and stellar nucleosynthesis.

  7. Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Group and in the Local Volume (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.

    After summarizing the characteristics of different types of dwarf galaxies I briefly review our current state of knowledge of dwarf galaxy evolution in the Local Group, for which we now have a fairly detailed although by no means comprehensive picture. All Local Group dwarfs studied to date contain an old population, though its fraction varies considerably. The majority of the dwarf companions of the Milky Way shows evidence for a common epoch of ancient star formation. Spatial variations in star formation are frequently observed in many dwarf galaxies in the Local Group and beyond. These spatial variations range from a seemingly stochastic distribution of star-forming regions in gas-rich, high-mass dwarfs to radial gradients in low-mass dwarfs. The global mode of star formation may be either continuous with amplitude variations or episodic. High-mass dwarf galaxies tend to form stars over a Hubble time, whereas low-mass dwarfs eventually cease to form stars, possibly aided by environmental effects. Much less is known about the content and properties of dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, which we are trying to remedy through a large observational effort. Dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume follow a similar trend with absolute magnitude, mean metallicity, and central surface brightness as the Local Group dwarfs do, and appear to be subject to morphological segregation.

  8. The environmental properties of galaxies probed by marked statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, A.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxies are generally treated as point particles in clustering analysis. However, these objects have physical and stellar population properties that must be taken into account if one wants to study the environmental effects on galaxy evolution. In this work, we applied a statistical method to investigate the role of environment in driving galaxy properties based on the marked correlation function. This methodology was applied to a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, where the clustering of galaxies was weighted by particular galaxy properties, like luminosity and stellar mass, thus more directly quantifying the correlations between these attributes and large-scale environment. We show that marked statistics are powerful to reproduce environmental trends for variables like luminosities and stellar masses, as well as to quantify the relative importance of them with respect to the environment. For low density regions in the local universe, mark correlations relative to the mean are stronger compared to dense regions. This implies that the clustering of stellar mass, for instance, is more sensitive to environments associated to individual halos in close galaxy pairs than to massive halos found in clusters, where the correlations don't show any difference relative to the mean. We conclude that in nearby galaxy clusters, dominated by massive objects, galaxies are equally clustered (marked correlation = average clustering). On the other hand, galaxies in low density regions span a wide range in stellar mass (halo sizes) where the correlations appear more dramatically.

  9. Galaxies, their satellites and progenitors: chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, I.; Cora, S. A.; Padilla, N. D.

    We use a model that combines N-body cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation (SAG: Semi-analytical galaxies; Lagos, Cora & Padilla, 2008) in order to study the properties of galaxy progenitors, using the information provided by their stellar haloes, and surviving satellites at redshift z = 0. We model the formation of stellar haloes by considering tidal stripping events acting on the satellite galaxies before the mergers occur, being able to follow their mass, luminosity and chemical properties. We find that the satellite galaxies have lower metal- licities than the stellar haloes of central galaxies for a given host DM halo mass, as has been already noted by Lagos, Padilla & Cora (2009), using a different approach.

  10. Chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Monica

    Status quo and perspectives of standard chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies are summarized, and what we have learned from them is discussed, as well as what we have not learned yet, and what I think will be learned in the near future. Galactic chemical evolution models have shown that: I) stringent constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis can be derived from the observed Galactic abundances of the light elements; II) the Milky Way has been accreting external gas from early epochs to the present time; and III) the vast majority of Galactic halo stars have formed quite rapidly at early epochs. Chemical evolution models for the closest dwarf galaxies, although still uncertain, are expected to become extremely reliable in the immediate future, thanks to the quality of new generation photometric and spectroscopic data which are currently being acquired.

  11. What We Can Learn From the HI Properties of Galaxies-Galaxies Appear Simpler Than Expected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; West, A. A.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Disney, M. J.

    2010-06-01

    We have used the Parkes Multibeam system and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assemble a sample of 195 galaxies selected only from their HI signature to avoid biases against un-evolved or low surface brightness objects. The sample, which should be almost entirely free of either misidentification or confusion, includes a wide diversity of galaxies ranging from inchoate, low surface brightness (LSB) dwarfs to giant spirals. We study the contribution of LSB galaxies to the local Universe, find correlations among their properties and use their colour information to explore the star formation histories and physical conditions that produce the observed colours.

  12. Multi-wavelength properties of submillimeter-selected galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainline, Laura Jeannine

    The resolution of the cosmic far-infrared background at long wavelengths has uncovered a population of high-redshift, highly infrared-luminous galaxies that indicate that a significant amount of highly obscured star formation occurred in the early history of the Universe, which has not been taken into account in studies of the cosmic star formation and mass assembly histories. Since such studies are important tests of hierarchical galaxy formation models in a cold dark matter- dominated universe, it is vital that the contribution of these luminous submillimeter-selected galaxies to the buildup of stellar mass in the Universe be understood and included when testing galaxy formation models. Progress in understanding the nature of submillimeter-selected galaxies has been slow, however, due to the faintness of the population outside of the submillimeter bands and the coarse resolution of the single-dish submillimeter surveys in which the galaxies were discovered. The slow progress has at least two important consequences: (1) there is still much that is unknown about submillimeterselected galaxies at all wavelengths, so the properties of and evolutionary predictions for the population are often inferred by making analogies to local galaxies of similar luminosity and assuming the high-redshift galaxies represent a uniform population of galaxies; and (2) the relationships of the submillimeter-selected galaxies to other high-redshift galaxy populations selected at other wavelengths remain poorly understood.In this work we capitalize on recently-available observing resources of the Spitzer Space Telescope, at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, and the Green Bank Telescope, at 1 cm, to improve the characterization of the largest representative sample of submillimeter-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We combine our new data with data from the literature at a variety of wavelengths to place new constraints on the fundamental properties of gas mass, stellar mass

  13. Dust-obscured galaxies in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-06-01

    We use Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), AKARI, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data to select local analogs of high-redshift (z ∼ 2) dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). We identify 47 local DOGs with S {sub 12μm}/S {sub 0.22μm} ≥ 892 and S {sub 12μm} > 20 mJy at 0.05 < z < 0.08 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. The infrared (IR) luminosities of these DOGs are in the range 3.4 × 10{sup 10} (L {sub ☉}) ≲ L {sub IR} ≲ 7.0 × 10{sup 11} (L {sub ☉}) with a median L {sub IR} of 2.1 × 10{sup 11} (L {sub ☉}). We compare the physical properties of local DOGs with a control sample of galaxies that have lower S {sub 12μm}/S {sub 0.22μm} but have similar redshift, IR luminosity, and stellar mass distributions. Both WISE 12 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet (NUV) flux densities of DOGs differ from the control sample of galaxies, but the difference is much larger in the NUV. Among the 47 DOGs, 36% ± 7% have small axis ratios in the optical (i.e., b/a < 0.6), larger than the fraction among the control sample (17% ± 3%). There is no obvious sign of interaction for many local DOGs. No local DOGs have companions with comparable optical magnitudes closer than ∼50 kpc. The large- and small-scale environments of DOGs are similar to the control sample. Many physical properties of local DOGs are similar to those of high-z DOGs, even though the IR luminosities of local objects are an order of magnitude lower than for the high-z objects: the presence of two classes (active galactic nuclei- and star formation-dominated) of DOGs, abnormal faintness in the UV rather than extreme brightness in the mid-IR, and diverse optical morphology. These results suggest a common underlying physical origin of local and high-z DOGs. Both seem to represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution resulting from various physical mechanisms rather than a unique phase of galaxy evolution.

  14. Resolving the stellar halos of six massive disk galaxies beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David

    2016-08-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a hierarchical universe predict substantial scatter in the halo-to-halo stellar properties, owing to stochasticity in galaxies' merger histories. Currently, only few detailed observations of stellar halos are available, mainly for the Milky Way and M31. We present the stellar halo color/metallicity and density profiles of red giant branch stars out to ~60 kpc along the minor axis of six massive nearby Milky Way-like galaxies beyond the Local Group from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks and Star clusters (GHOSTS) HST survey. This enlargement of the sample of galaxies with observations of stellar halo properties is needed to understand the range of possible halo properties, i.e. not only the mean properties but also the halo-to-halo scatter, what a `typical' halo looks like, and how similar the Milky Way halo is to other halos beyond the Local Group.

  15. DEPENDENCE OF BARRED GALAXY FRACTION ON GALAXY PROPERTIES AND ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gwang-Ho; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of the occurrence of bars in galaxies on galaxy properties and environment. We use a volume-limited sample of 33,391 galaxies brighter than M{sub r} = -19.5 + 5logh at 0.02 {<=} z {<=} 0.05489, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We classify the galaxies into early and late types, and identify bars by visual inspection. Among 10,674 late-type galaxies with axis ratio b/a > 0.60, we find 3240 barred galaxies (f{sub bar} = 30.4%) which divide into 2542 strong bars (f{sub SB1} = 23.8%) and 698 weak bars (f{sub SB2} = 6.5%). We find that f{sub SB1} increases as u - r color becomes redder and that it has a maximum value at intermediate velocity dispersion ({sigma} {approx_equal}150 km s{sup -1}). This trend suggests that strong bars are dominantly hosted by intermediate-mass systems. Weak bars prefer bluer galaxies with lower mass and lower concentration. In the case of strong bars, their dependence on the concentration index appears only for massive galaxies with {sigma} > 150 km s{sup -1}. We also find that f{sub bar} does not directly depend on the large-scale background density when other physical parameters (u - r color or {sigma}) are fixed. We discover that f{sub SB1} decreases as the separation to the nearest neighbor galaxy becomes smaller than 0.1 times the virial radius of the neighbor regardless of neighbor's morphology. These results imply that strong bars are likely to be destroyed during strong tidal interactions and that the mechanism for this phenomenon is gravitational and not hydrodynamical. The fraction of weak bars has no correlation with environmental parameters. We do not find any direct evidence for environmental stimulation of bar formation.

  16. Properties of Galaxies and Groups: Nature versus Nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias

    2011-09-01

    Due to the inherently nonlinear nature of gravity cosmological N-body simulations have become an invaluable tool when the growth of structure is being studied and modelled closer to the present epoch. Large simulations with high dynamical range have made it possible to model the formation and growth of cosmic structure with unprecedented accuracy. Moreover, galaxies, the basic building blocks of the Universe, can also be modelled in cosmological context. However, despite all the simulations and successes in recent decades, there are still many unanswered questions in the field of galaxy formation and evolution. One of the longest standing issue being the significance of the formation place and thus initial conditions to a galaxy's evolution in respect to environment, often formulated simply as "nature versus nurture" like in human development and psychology. Unfortunately, our understanding of galaxy evolution in different environments is still limited, albeit, for example, the morphology-density relation has shown that the density of the galaxy's local environment can affect its properties. Consequently, the environment should play a role in galaxy evolution, however despite the efforts, the exact role of the galaxy's local environment to its evolution remains open. This thesis introduction discusses briefly the background cosmology, cosmological N-body simulations and semi-analytical models. The second part is reserved for groups of galaxies, whether they are gravitationally bound, and what this may imply for galaxy evolution. The third part of the thesis concentrates on describing results of a case study of isolated field elliptical galaxies. The final chapter discusses another case study of luminous infra-red galaxies.

  17. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  18. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  19. ORBITAL DEPENDENCE OF GALAXY PROPERTIES IN SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.k

    2010-09-01

    We study the dependence of satellite galaxy properties on the distance to the host galaxy and the orbital motion (prograde and retrograde orbits) using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. From SDSS Data Release 7, we find 3515 isolated satellite systems of galaxies at z < 0.03 that contain 8904 satellite galaxies. Using this sample, we construct a catalog of 635 satellites associated with 215 host galaxies whose spin directions are determined by our inspection of the SDSS color images and/or by spectroscopic observations in the literature. We divide satellite galaxies into prograde and retrograde orbit subsamples depending on their orbital motion with respect to the spin direction of the host. We find that the number of galaxies in prograde orbit is nearly equal to that of retrograde orbit galaxies: the fraction of satellites in prograde orbit is 50% {+-} 2%. The velocity distribution of satellites with respect to their hosts is found to be almost symmetric: the median bulk rotation of satellites is -1 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. It is found that the radial distribution of early-type satellites in prograde orbit is strongly concentrated toward the host while that of retrograde ones shows much less concentration. We also find the orbital speed of late-type satellites in prograde orbit increases as the projected distance to the host (R) decreases while the speed decreases for those in retrograde orbit. At R less than 0.1 times the host virial radius (R < 0.1r{sub vir,host}), the orbital speed decreases in both prograde and retrograde orbit cases. Prograde satellites are on average fainter than retrograde satellites for both early and late morphological types. The u - r color becomes redder as R decreases for both prograde and retrograde orbit late-type satellites. The differences between prograde and retrograde orbit satellite galaxies may be attributed to their different origin or the different strength of physical processes that they have experienced through

  20. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies from the AKARI-GALEX all-sky surveys . First results from the most secure multiband sample from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T. T.; Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Giovannoli, E.; Yuan, F.-T.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Murata, K. L.; Burgarella, D.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We explore spectral energy distributions (SEDs), star formation (SF), and dust extinction properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Methods: The AKARI all-sky survey provided the first bright point source catalog detected at 90 μm. Beginning with this catalog, we selected galaxies by matching the AKARI sources with those in the IRAS point source catalog redshift survey. We measured the total GALEX FUV and NUV flux densities with a photometry software we specifically developed for this purpose. In a further step we matched this sample with the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) and 2 micron all sky survey (2MASS) galaxies. With this procedure we obtained a basic sample which consists of 776 galaxies. After removing objects whose photometry was contaminated by foreground sources (mainly in the SDSS), we defined the “secure sample” which contains 607 galaxies. Results: The sample galaxies have redshifts of ⪉0.15, and their 90-μm luminosities range from 106 to 1012 L_⊙, with a peak at 1010 L_⊙. The SEDs display a large variety, especially more than four orders of magnitude at the mid-far-infrared (M-FIR), but if we sort the sample with respect to 90 μm, the average SED shows a coherent trend: the more luminous an SED at 90 μm, the redder the global SED becomes. The Mr - NUV - r color-magnitude relation of our sample does not show bimodality, and the distribution is centered on the green valley. We established formulae to convert the FIR luminosity from the AKARI bands to the total IR (TIR) luminosity LTIR. The luminosity related to the SF activity (LSF) is dominated by LTIR even if we take into account the FIR emission from dust heated by old stars. At a high SF rate (SFR) (>20 M_⊙ yr-1), the fraction of the directly visible SFR, SFRFUV, decreases. We also estimated the FUV attenuation AFUV from the FUV-to-TIR luminosity ratio. We examined the LTIR/LFUV-UV slope (FUV - NUV) relation. The majority of the sample has LTIR/LFUV ratios five to ten

  1. An Imaging Survey of Late-Type Galaxies: Local Benchmarks of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, V. A.

    2005-12-01

    Nearby (z ˜ 0) irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies resemble the majority of galaxy types observed at high redshift. Since optical observations of galaxies at high redshift cover their rest-frame ultraviolet emission, imaging of local late-type galaxies in the ultraviolet and optical will provide a necessary basis for understanding high-redshift galaxies and their implications for galaxy formation and evolution. For this purpose, I present an analysis of a unique, panchromatic sample of 199 mostly late-type, irregular, peculiar, and merging nearby galaxies observed in a combination of 10 different pass-bands from the far ultraviolet through the infrared. I first present results of a study of the color gradients of these galaxies. I find that although elliptical through mid-type spiral galaxies are redder in their centers than their outskirts, most late-type spirals, irregular, and merging galaxies are bluer in their centers, becoming increasingly redder at larger radii. This indicates that late-type galaxies have a significant halo or thick disk of older stars, while young UV-bright stars dominate their inner regions. These results are consistent with models of hierarchical galaxy formation. I also present measurements of the concentration, asymmetry, and clumpiness ("CAS") parameters of these galaxies. These fundamental galaxy parameters can be used for galaxy classification, and studying and identifying merging and perturbed galaxies. The dependence of these parameters on wavelength yields a quantitative measure of the "morphological k-correction," which describes how the appearance of a galaxy changes with rest-frame wavelength. I find that the CAS parameters depend on galaxy type, and vary significantly with rest-frame wavelength, especially short-ward of the Balmer break. Galaxies generally become less concentrated and more asymmetric and clumpy at shorter wavelengths. Funded by NASA grants GO-8645.01-A, GO-9124.01-A and GO-9824.01-A, GALEXGI04

  2. The coronal parameters of local Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, A.; Tortosa, A.; NuSTAR AGN Physics Working Group

    2016-05-01

    One of the open problems for AGN is the nature of the primary X-ray emission: It is likely due to Comptonization of soft UV photons, but the optical depth and temperature of the emitting corona were largely unknown before the launch of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). It is the first focusing hard X-ray telescope on orbit, ∼ 100 times more sensitive in the 10-79 keV band compared to previous observatories, enabling the study of AGN at high energies with high precision. We present and discuss the results on the hot corona parameters of active galactic nuclei that have been recently measured with NuSTAR (often in coordination with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, or wift) with unprecedented accuracy, in a number of local Seyfert galaxies.

  3. The Local Universe of Disk Galaxies: Energy, Mass, and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2015-08-01

    This talk will explore three themes: (1) Our understanding of the space density of disk systems in the nearby (z<0.1) Universe, their global properties including their panchromatic (FUV-far-IR) information (energy outputs), their dust properties (masses and temperatures), their (specific) star-formation rates, and ultimately the amount of stellar mass locked up in disc components. (2) The completeness of our local surveys, with a particular focus on the severe impact of low surface brightness selection bias, and how these can be overcome using the upcoming deep imaging studies. (3) The complexity of automated structural decomposition and experiences and results from profiling 8000 galaxies at z<0.06 allowing us to derive key relations such as the mass-size relation of disc systems. The data shown is drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. The GAMA survey builds upon the SDSS legacy by extending 2mags deeper spectroscopically (r<19.8mag) and also including panchromatic data from GALEX, VST, VISTA, WISE and Herschel-Atlas and shortly ASKAP for 300,000 galaxies over 250sq deg of sky. This talk will be aligned with the GAMA Panchromatic Data Release where all imaging data products will be publicly released.

  4. A Submillimeter Survey of Dust Continuum Emission in Local Dust-Obscured Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2015-08-01

    Dusty star-forming galaxies are responsible for the bulk of cosmic star formation at 1galaxies is far from clear because of their extreme distances. The study of their local analogs helps us to improve understanding of the drivers of the intense star formation activity at high redshift. The submillimeter data on the 'Rayleigh-Jeans' side of the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these galaxies are crucial for deriving the physical parameters of the dust content. We therefore conduct a submillimeter survey of local dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and the Submillimeter Array to study their dust properties. We determine the dust masses and temperatures for 16 local DOGs from the SED fit, and compare them with other dusty galaxies to understand a possible evolutionary link among them.

  5. Infrared Properties of Star Forming Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, Ovidiu

    2005-11-01

    Dwarf galaxies are the most common galaxies in the Universe. They are systems believed to consist of matter in a near-primordial state, from which giant galaxies probably form. As such, they are important probes for studying matter in its near-primordial state. In an effort to study the main physical and chemical properties of dwarfs, the present thesis focuses upon the main physical properties of dwarfs. Two classes of star forming dwarf galaxies are considered: dwarf irregulars (dIs), and blue compact dwarfs (BCDs). A third class, dwarf ellipticals (dEs), is studied based on its structural properties and compared with dIs. Possible evolutionary connections are addressed between dIs and BCDs. To measure the luminosity, deep imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) is considered. Compared with the visible, the NIR domain gives a better gauge of the galaxy mass contained in the old stellar populations, minimising the starburst contribution and also the effects of extinction. Two observing samples of star-forming dwarf galaxies are considered. The first includes 34 dIs in the Local Volume closer than 5 Mpc. The second sample includes 16 BCDs in the Virgo Cluster. In six observing runs between 2001 and 2004, we acquired deep NIR images (J and K_s) using the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT) in Hawaii and the 2.1m telescope at the National Astronomical Observatory ''San Pedro Martir'' (OAN-SPM) in Mexico. Deep spectrocopy was acquired in 2003 on the 8.1m Gemini-North telescope in Hawaii. We completed the observed samples with spectroscopic data from the literature, and photometry from the 2MASS survey and GOLDMine database. From a statistical study at CFHT, we derived some strategies necessary to image optimally faint extended sources in the NIR. Due to the airglow variation in the atmosphere and the thermal contribution of the dome, telescope and the instrumentation, repeated observations of the sky must be alternated every 3-4 minutes with the science images, in

  6. The stellar populations of massive galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.

    2013-07-01

    I present a brief review of the stellar population properties of massive galaxies, focusing on early-type galaxies in particular, with emphasis on recent results from the ATLAS3D Survey. I discuss the occurence of young stellar ages, cold gas, and ongoing star formation in early-type galaxies, the presence of which gives important clues to the evolutionary path of these galaxies. Consideration of empirical star formation histories gives a meaningful picture of galaxy stellar population properties, and allows accurate comparison of mass estimates from populations and dynamics. This has recently provided strong evidence of a non-universal IMF, as supported by other recent evidences. Spatially-resolved studies of stellar populations are also crucial to connect distinct components within galaxies to spatial structures seen in other wavelengths or parameters. Stellar populations in the faint outer envelopes of early-type galaxies are a formidable frontier for observers, but promise to put constraints on the ratio of accreted stellar mass versus that formed `in situ' - a key feature of recent galaxy formation models. Galaxy environment appears to play a key role in controlling the stellar population properties of low mass galaxies. Simulations remind us, however, that current day galaxies are the product of a complex assembly and environment history, which gives rise to the trends we see. This has strong implications for our interpretation of environmental trends.

  7. Local Group galaxies in a ΛCDM Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang-Shyang

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the galaxies in the Local Group including the Milky Way and its satellites and the Andromeda galaxy. I start with the analyses of satellites in a dark matter halo presumably similar to that of the Milky Way (Chapter 2). One of the goals is to establish the relation between the dark matter satellites seen in the simulations and the satellites (and especially their dark matter haloes) we see around the Milky Way. For example, do the simulated satellites have similar properties in terms of spatial distribution and kinematics to those of the Milky Way? I then take a further step to combine these dark matter simulations with phenomenological recipes to follow the evolution of the baryons that may be associated to the satellites (Chapter 3). The essential questions that I address here are: why there are only approximately 20 satellites around the Milky Way while many more are predicted in the simulations? What physical processes have affected the satellites and led them to have the variety of properties we observe today? In Chapter 4, I delve into the dynamical properties of the model satellites and compare the mass content in the innermost regions with the recent observational constraints for the Milky Way dwarfs. In Chapter 5, I estimate the masses of the Local Group and the Milky Way using a novel simulation of the Universe.

  8. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and H I masses to measure the specific SFRs (SFR/M*) and star formation efficiencies ({SFR/{M }_H I}). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, `the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and H I mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their SFR α is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total H I mass. In the global star formation picture presented by Kennicutt-Schmidt, VGS galaxies fall into the regime of low average star formation and correspondingly low H I surface density. Their mean {SFR α /{M}_{H I} and SFR α/M* are of the order of 10- 9.9 yr- 1. We conclude that while the large-scale underdense environment must play some role in galaxy formation and growth through accretion, we find that even with respect to other galaxies in the more mildly underdense regions, the increase in star formation rate is only marginal.

  9. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of their color--magnitude relations and accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo Cluster. The fraction of blue galaxies is similar to those of low-redshift richness 0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The luminosity functions (LFs) of the individual clusters are not significantly different from each other. Using these, we construct composite LFs in B, V , and R bands (to MV=-18). The faint-end of these LFs are flat, like the V-band LF of other (e.g., MKW/AWM) poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  10. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  11. The Fossils of the First Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovill, Mia Sauda

    We argue that, at least a fraction of the newly discovered population of ultra-faint dwarfs in the Local Group constitute the fossil relics of a once ubiquitous population of dwarf galaxies formed before reionization with maximum circular velocities, vmax < 20 km s -1, where vmax ˜ M 1/3. To follow the evolution and distribution of the fossils of the first galaxies on Local Volume, 5 - 10 Mpc, scales, we have developed a new method for generating initial conditions for ΛCDM N-body simulations which provides the necessary dynamic range. The initial distribution of particles represents the position, velocity and mass distribution of the dark and luminous ha- los extracted from pre-reionization simulations. We find that ultra-faint dwarfs have properties compatible with well preserved fossils of the first galaxies and are able to reproduce the observed luminosity-metallicity relation. However, because the brightest pre-reionization dwarfs form preferentially in overdense regions, they have merged into non-fossil halos with vmax > 20-30 km s-1. Hence, we find a luminosity threshold of true-fossils of 106 Lsolar, casting doubts on the classification of some classical dSphs as fossils. We also argue that the ultra-faints at R < 50 kpc, have had their stellar properties significantly modified by tides, and that a large population of fossils remains undetected due to log(Sigma V) < -1.4. Next, we show that fossils of the first galaxies have galactocentric distributions and cumulative luminosity func- tions consistent with observations. We predict there are ˜ 300 luminous satellites orbiting within Rvir of the Milky Way, ˜ 50-70% of which are fossils. Despite our multidimensional agreement at low luminosities, our primordial model produces an overabundance of bright dwarf satellites (LV > 105 Lsolar), with this "bright satellite problem" most evident in the outer parts of the Milky Way. We estimate that, although relatively bright (LV > 105 Lsolar), these ghostly

  12. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (∼1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ΛCDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  13. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN GALAXIES AND DARK MATTER STRUCTURES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Tinker, Jeremy L. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (1) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (2) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (3) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy-halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark universe.

  14. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  15. The Host Galaxies of Local PTF Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Hook, Isobel; Maguire, Kate; Blake, Sarah; Pan, Yen-Chen

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of correlations between Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) peak luminosity and the parameters defining their host galaxy stellar populations has important implications for their use as standardised candles. Using new samples of low-redshift SNe Ia located with the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a rolling transient search in the local universe, we propose to continue our campaign to study in detail the host galaxies in which SNe Ia explode. We aim to establish which physical variable (metallicity or age) primarily drives the SN Ia luminosity variations using high signal-to-noise spectroscopy of their environments. These data will also improve the derivation of SN Ia "delay-time" distributions, and place tighter constraints on the nature of their progenitor systems. Evolution in SN Ia properties is now the largest single astrophysical systematic in SN Ia cosmology, with host galaxies playing a critical role in cosmological studies, and detailed study of their environments provides a realistic opportunity to improve their use for studying dark energy. We give a status report on the progress of this program to date, and demonstrate the feasibility of our study using our observations from earlier semesters.

  16. The host galaxies of local PTF Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Hook, Isobel; Pan, Yen-Chen; Nugent, Peter; Maguire, Kate

    2012-08-01

    The discovery of correlations between Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) peak luminosity and the parameters defining their host galaxy stellar populations has important implications for their use as standardised candles. Using new samples of low-redshift SNe Ia located with the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a rolling transient search in the local universe, we finish our campaign to study in detail the host galaxies in which SNe Ia explode. We aim to establish which physical variable (metallicity or age) primarily drives the SN Ia luminosity variations using high signal-to-noise spectroscopy of their environments. These data will also place tighter constraints on the nature of their progenitor systems. Evolution in SN Ia properties is now the largest single astrophysical systematic in SN Ia cosmology, with host galaxies playing a critical role in cosmological studies, and detailed study of their environments provides a realistic opportunity to improve their use for studying dark energy. We give a status report on the progress of this program to date, and demonstrate the feasibility of our study using our observations from earlier semesters.

  17. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  18. Gas infall and stochastic star formation in galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Heckman, Timothy M.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Brinchmann, Jarle; Charlot, Stéphane; Tremonti, Christy; White, Simon D. M.; Brinkmann, Jon

    2006-04-01

    We study the recent star formation histories of local galaxies by analysing the scatter in their colours and spectral properties. We present evidence that the distribution of star formation histories changes qualitatively above a characteristic stellar surface mass density of 3 × 108Msolarkpc-2, corresponding to the transition between disc-dominated (late-type) galaxies and bulge-dominated (early-type) systems. When we average over subpopulations of galaxies with densities below this value, we find that subpopulations of all masses and densities form their stars at the same average rate per unit stellar mass. However, the scatter in galaxy colours, stellar absorption-line indices and emission-line strengths is larger for more compact galaxies of a given mass. This suggests that star formation occurs in shorter, higher amplitude events in galaxies with smaller sizes. Above the characteristic density, galaxy growth through star formation shuts down and the scatter in galaxy colours and spectral properties decreases. We propose that in low-density galaxies, star formation events are triggered when cold gas is accreted on to a galaxy. We have used a new high-resolution numerical simulation of structure formation in a `concordance' Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe to quantify the incidence of these accretion events, and we show that the observational data are well fitted by a model in which the consumption time of accreted gas decreases with the surface density of the galaxy as tcons~μ-1*. The dark matter haloes that host massive galaxies with high stellar surface mass densities are also expected to grow through accretion, but the observations indicate that in bulge-dominated galaxies, star formation is no longer coupled to the hierarchical build-up of these systems.

  19. Our Milky Way structure in the context of local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way is the closest galaxy to us, and has been studied extensively due to its proximity. Understanding its structure and dynamics will help us understand spiral galaxies in general. I will review the latest research progress in the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way in the context of local galaxies. I will cover most structural components (the bulge/bar, disk, and spiral structures) and discuss the implications of some new results on the formation history of our home galaxy.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR THE SAME STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Bei Yang; He Jizhou; Tang Xiaoxun

    2010-01-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 above and below the value of M*, we have investigated the environmental dependence of other galaxy properties for the same star formation activities. Only in the luminous passive class, a strong environmental dependence of the g - r color is observed, but the environmental dependence of other properties in this class is very weak. In other classes, we can conclude that the local density dependence of luminosity, g - r color, concentration index ci, and morphologies for star-forming galaxies and passive ones is much weaker than that obtained in the volume-limited Main galaxy samples. This suggests that star formation activity is a galaxy property very predictive of the local environment. In addition, we also note that passive galaxies are more luminous, redder, highly concentrated, and preferentially 'early type'.

  1. Environmental dependence of bulge-dominated galaxy sizes in hierarchical models of galaxy formation. Comparison with the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Mei, Simona; Huertas-Company, Marc; Moreno, Jorge; Fontanot, Fabio; Monaco, Pierluigi; Bernardi, Mariangela; Cattaneo, Andrea; Sheth, Ravi; Licitra, Rossella; Delaye, Lauriane; Raichoor, Anand

    2014-04-01

    We compare state-of-the-art semi-analytic models of galaxy formation as well as advanced subhalo abundance matching models with a large sample of early-type galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey at z < 0.3. We focus our attention on the dependence of median sizes of central galaxies on host halo mass. The data do not show any difference in the structural properties of early-type galaxies with environment, at fixed stellar mass. All hierarchical models considered in this work instead tend to predict a moderate to strong environmental dependence, with the median size increasing by a factor of ˜1.5-3 when moving from low- to high-mass host haloes. At face value the discrepancy with the data is highly significant, especially at the cluster scale, for haloes above log Mhalo ≳ 14. The convolution with (correlated) observational errors reduces some of the tension. Despite the observational uncertainties, the data tend to disfavour hierarchical models characterized by a relevant contribution of disc instabilities to the formation of spheroids, strong gas dissipation in (major) mergers, short dynamical friction time-scales and very short quenching time-scales in infalling satellites. We also discuss a variety of additional related issues, such as the slope and scatter in the local size-stellar mass relation, the fraction of gas in local early-type galaxies and the general predictions on satellite galaxies.

  2. THE CLUSTERING PROPERTIES OF THE FIRST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stiavelli, Massimo; Trenti, Michele

    2010-06-20

    We study the clustering properties of the first galaxies formed in the universe. We find that, due to chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium by isolated Population III stars formed in mini-halos at redshift z {approx_gt} 30, the (chronologically) first galaxies are composed of metal-poor Population II stars and are highly clustered on small scales. In contrast, chemically pristine galaxies in halos with mass M {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} may form at z < 20 in relatively underdense regions of the universe. This occurs once self-enrichment by Population III in mini-halos is quenched by the buildup of an H{sub 2} photodissociating radiative background in the Lyman-Werner bands. We find that these chemically pristine galaxies are spatially uncorrelated. Thus, we expect that deep fields with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) may detect clusters of chemically enriched galaxies but individual chemically pristine objects. We predict that metal-free galaxies at 10 {approx}< z {approx}< 15 have surface densities of about 80 arcmin{sup -2} and per unit redshift but most of them will be too faint even for JWST. However, the predicted density makes these objects interesting targets for searches behind lensing clusters.

  3. Superclusters of galaxies in the 2dF redshift survey. 3. The properties of galaxies in superclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Einasto, Maret; Einasto, J.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Liivamagi, L.J.; oeveer, M.J; Hutsi, G.; Heinamaki, P.; Muller, V.; Tucker, D.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    We use catalogues of superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to study the properties of galaxies in superclusters. We compare the properties of galaxies in high and low density regions of rich superclusters, in poor superclusters and in the field, as well as in groups, and of isolated galaxies in superclusters of various richness. We show that in rich superclusters the values of the luminosity density smoothed on a scale of 8 h{sup -1} Mpc are higher than in poor superclusters: the median density in rich superclusters is {sigma} {approx} 7.5, in poor superclusters {delta} {approx} 6.0. Rich superclusters contain high density cores with densities {sigma} > 10 while in poor superclusters such high density cores are absent. The properties of galaxies in rich and poor superclusters and in the field are different: the fraction of early type, passive galaxies in rich superclusters is slightly larger than in poor superclusters, and is the smallest among the field galaxies. Most importantly, in high density cores of rich superclusters ({delta} > 10) there is an excess of early type, passive galaxies in groups and clusters, as well as among those which do not belong to groups or clusters. The main galaxies of superclusters have a rather limited range of absolute magnitudes. The main galaxies of rich superclusters have larger luminosities than those of poor superclusters and of groups in the field (the median values are correspondingly M{sub bj} = -21.02, M{sub bj} = -20.9 and M{sub bj} = -19.7 for rich and poor superclusters and groups in the field). Our results show that both the local (group/cluster) environments and global (supercluster) environments influence galaxy morphologies and their star formation activity.

  4. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  5. The chemical evolution of galaxies in the local volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.

    2010-12-01

    The composition of the universe has greatly changed since the first matter condensed from the primordial soup of the Big Bang. As galaxies have grown and evolved over the past Hubble time, massive luminous galaxies have built up more heavy elements than their low mass counterparts. While sundry physical mechanisms have been proposed to account for this observed trend, the physical connection between galaxy mass and metallicity has evaded the understanding of astronomers for several decades. In order to gain a greater understanding of this metallicity-luminosity relation and the physical drivers behind the chemical evolution of galaxies, we have performed a detailed study of galaxies in both isolated and non-isolated environments: namely, galaxies in the local volume (D ≤ 5 Mpc) and galaxy members belonging to the M81 group. Our results from studying the M81 group imply that recent interactions among the central galaxies in this group, rather than mechanisms intrinsic to the galaxies, are likely responsible for the anomalously high abundances in three cluster members. While tidal interactions can alter the chemical make up the galaxies involved, the well established metallicity-luminosity relation indicates a more universal chemical evolution. To further explore this idea, we analyze galaxy abundances, stellar & gas distributions, and kinematics from both new and archival observations of forty-five low mass galaxies within 5 Mpc of the Milky Way. Our results indicate that these galaxies occupy a different mass-to-light ratio parameter space than their larger counter parts. Our study of the local volume explores the effects of various galaxy attributes such as mass, star formation rate, gas mass fraction, and the mass distribution that offer more concrete connections with the evolution of the system. We show that none of the attributes measured in this study exhibit more correlation with metallicity (measured via nebular oxygen abundances) than does the luminosity

  6. An imaging survey of late-type galaxies: Local benchmarks of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Violet

    The majority of galaxies observed at high redshift display structures and morphologies resembling those of nearby (z ~ 0) irregular, peculiar and merging galaxies. To better understand galaxy assembly and evolution, the properties of such nearby galaxies must be compared with distant ones in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), where the highest resolution and deepest observations of high-redshift galaxies were taken. To evaluate the possible dependence of galaxy structure and morphology on rest-frame wavelength, it is necessary to study the nearby galaxies in redder bands as well. For this purpose, a panchromatic imaging survey was conducted in the far-UV through the near- infrared of 199 nearby, mostly late-type, irregular, peculiar, and merging galaxies. An analysis is presented here of the color gradients, and the wavelength- dependent quantitative morphology of this sample. Whereas ellipticals and early- to mid-type spiral galaxies tend to become bluer at larger radial distances from their centers, most late-type spiral, irregular, and merging galaxies become increasingly redder at larger radii. This may indicate that late-type galaxies have a significant halo or thick disk of older stars, while their inner regions are dominated by younger, UV-bright stars. This result is consistent with recent numerical models of hierarchical galaxy assembly. Galaxy morphology is also quantitatively analyzed, as parametrized with measurements of concentration index, asymmetry, and clumpiness (CAS) parameters. These CAS parameters depend on both galaxy type and the wavelength of observation, and can be used to measure the "morphological k-correction", i.e., the change in appearance of a galaxy with rest-frame wavelength. Whereas early-type galaxies (E-S0) appear the same at all wavelengths longward of the Balmer break, there is a significant wavelength-dependence of the CAS parameters for galaxies of types later than S0, which generally become less concentrated and more asymmetric

  7. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star-forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High-redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.; Kreckel, K.; Rabidoux, K.; Guzmán, R.

    2015-07-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%) (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%) and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  8. HII regions in dwarf irregular galaxies of the local group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Paul; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    1990-01-01

    Deep, narrowband H alpha Charge Coupled Device (CCD) surveys of HII regions were carried out in several dwarf irregular galaxies in and near the local group. Data are now complete for these galaxies: NGC 6822, GR 8, IC 10, IC 1613, Sextans A, Sextans B, and Sag Irr. Observations are complete for DDO 47, 53, 167, 168 and 187. Details of some of the results for the surveys completed so far are discussed. For NGC 6822, CCD survey at H alpha resulted in the detection of 145 HII regions in the local group irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Most of them are newly detected, faint surface-brightness objects. Positions, maps and dimensions are being published elsewhere. For GR 8, a deep narrowband H alpha imaging of the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy GR 8 revealed a total of 32 HII regions. Positions, H alpha luminosities, and sizes of these objects were determined. The H alpha luminosity function has the same shape as that for more luminous galaxies, except for size of sample effects. Most HII regions detected are at the very low luminosity end of the general luminosity function. For IC 10, a deep CCD narrowband H alpha imaging of the local group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 10 revealed a total of 144 HII regions. Positions, H alpha luminosities, and sizes of these objects were determined. The H alpha luminosity function has the same shape as that for more luminous galaxies.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Wen Xiaoqing; Xu Jianying; Ding Yingping; Huang Tong

    2010-06-10

    At a stellar mass of 3 x 10{sup 10} M {sub {Theta}} we divide the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) into two distinct families and explore the environmental dependence of galaxy properties for High Stellar Mass (HSM) and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that for HSM and LSM galaxies, the environmental dependence of some typical galaxy properties, such as color, morphologies, and star formation activities, is still very strong, which at least shows that the stellar mass is not fundamental in correlations between galaxy properties and the environment. We also note that the environmental dependence of the size for HSM and LSM galaxies is fairly weak, which is mainly due to the galaxy size being insensitive to environment.

  10. ON THE DEARTH OF COMPACT, MASSIVE, RED SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Edward N.; Franx, Marijn; Brinchmann, Jarle; Glazebrook, Karl; Van der Wel, Arjen; Van Dokkum, Pieter G

    2010-09-01

    We set out to test the claim that the recently identified population of compact, massive, and quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2.3 must undergo significant size evolution to match the properties of galaxies found in the local universe. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Data Release 7), we have conducted a search for local red sequence galaxies with sizes and masses comparable to those found at z {approx} 2.3. The SDSS spectroscopic target selection algorithm excludes high surface brightness objects; we show that this makes incompleteness a concern for such massive, compact galaxies, particularly for low redshifts (z {approx}< 0.05). We have identified 63 M{sub *}>10{sup 10.7} M{sub sun} ({approx}5 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) red sequence galaxies at 0.066 < z{sub spec} < 0.12 which are smaller than the median size-mass relation by a factor of 2 or more. Consistent with expectations from the virial theorem, the median offset from the mass-velocity dispersion relation for these galaxies is 0.12 dex. We do not, however, find any galaxies with sizes and masses comparable to those observed at z {approx} 2.3, implying a decrease in the comoving number density of these galaxies, at fixed size and mass, by a factor of {approx}>5000. This result cannot be explained by incompleteness: in the 0.066 < z < 0.12 interval, we estimate that the SDSS spectroscopic sample should typically be {approx}>75% complete for galaxies with the sizes and masses seen at high redshift, although for the very smallest galaxies it may be as low as {approx}20%. In order to confirm that the absence of such compact massive galaxies in SDSS is not produced by spectroscopic selection effects, we have also looked for such galaxies in the basic SDSS photometric catalog, using photometric redshifts. While we do find signs of a slight bias against massive, compact galaxies, this analysis suggests that the SDSS spectroscopic sample is missing at most a few objects in the regime we consider

  11. Properties of Dust Extinction in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.; Kinney, A. L.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Panagia, N.

    1993-05-01

    We have studied the extinction properties of 38 starburst and Blue Compact galaxies covering the metallicity range 8.3<=log (O/H)<=9.2, by analyzing their UV+optical spectra. The UV spectra come from the compilation of IUE spectra by Kinney et al. (Kinney, Bohlin, Calzetti, Panagia, & Wyse, 1993, ApJS, to appear on the May issue). The optical spectra, spanning the wavelength range 3200-7500 Angstroms, have been observed in a IUE-matched aperture. Following standard techniques, we have derived the selective extinction E(B-V) from the Balmer decrement and the metallicity from the [OII] and [OIII] lines. In order to clarify the properties of dust extinction in the UV for starburst galaxies, we have fitted the observed UV fluxes of our galaxies in the wavelength range 1250-2600 Angstroms according to the power law F(lambda )~lambda (beta ) and studied the behaviour of beta as function of the selective extinction E(B-V). We find that these two quantities are correlated and that there is no difference between the loci occupied by the low and high metallicity galaxies in the plane beta -vs-E(B-V). The correlation indicates that a higher metallicity does not change the characteristics of individual grains, but merely increases their number. On this ground, our conclusion is that the shape of the extinction law in the UV does not depend on metallicity, for extinctions E(B-V)>0.2. Although the low metallicity galaxies in our sample follow neither the Large Magellanic Cloud nor the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction laws, the absence in our spectra of prominent 2200 Angstroms dust features illustrates that a simple application of a galactic extinction law may be inadequate to properly correct the UV spectra. Models of clumpy dust layers and of dust mixed with the ionized gas are currently under analysis.

  12. Dust Production in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, Greg; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Blommaert, Joris A. D. L.; Cioni, Maria-Rosa; Devost, Daniel; Feast, Michael W.; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Habing, Harm; Hony, Sacha; Lagadec, Eric; Loup, Cecile; Matsuura, Mikako; Menzies, John W.; Sloan, Greg C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Wood, Peter R.; van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2006-05-01

    The superwind phase on the Asymptotic Giant Branch is a crucial ingredient of stellar and galactic evolution. The superwind ejecta are responsible for much of the interstellar hydrogen of evolved galaxies, and are a dominant contributor to the dust input into the ISM. The superwind determines the final mass of stellar remnants, and therefore affects, e.g., the type-I supernova rate. The characteristics of the superwind are still very poorly known, especially at non-solar metallicities. Spitzer has contributed a large and invaluable dataset on Magellanic Cloud stars, measuring dust, molecular bands and allowing accurate mass-loss measurements. We now propose to extend the (age, metallicity) parameter range by observing a number of other Milky Way satellites. The carbon stars in these galaxies trace an older population than the Magellanic Clouds, and extend to much lower metallicities. They are therefore crucial to allow us to extrapolate the Magellanic Cloud measurements to metal-poor environments. We propose to acquire low-resolution spectra of stars in the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. The selected stars range in metallicity from -0.55 to -2.0, and in age from 5-8 Gyr. Two low-metallicity planetary nebulae in these galaxies are also included. We will study the dust continuum, dust minerals (SiC, MgS) and gas-phase molecular bands (especially acetylene). Mass loss rates will be determined using our dust models, and we will measure the fractional abundances of amorphous carbon dust and SiC grains. Only Spitzer can provide these crucial measurements of extra-galactic AGB stars. The result will be our first knowledge of mass loss efficiency, dust formation, and dust abundances, at low to very low metallicities. These data are necessary to obtain reliable models of mass loss and of stellar evolution.

  13. Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Piqueras López, Javier

    2015-05-01

    We present analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and Hα of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 1011L⊙ and 1011.8L⊙. We combined new narrow-band Hα + [N ii] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. Their SEDs(photometry and integrated Hα flux) were fitted simultaneously with a modified version of the magphys code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation into account. From the SED fits, we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them, the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyr. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enhanced by a factor of 3-20 with respect to what occurred ~1 Gyr ago. Objects with constant SFH tend to be more massive than starbursts, and they are compatible with the expected properties of a main-sequence (M-S) galaxy. Likewise, the derived SFHs show that all our objects were M-S galaxies ~1 Gyr ago with stellar masses between 1010.1 and 1011.5 M⊙. We also derived the average extinction (Av = 0.6-3 mag) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon luminosity to LIR ratio (0.03-0.16) from our fits. We combined the Av with the total IR and Hα luminosities into a diagramthat can be used to identify objects with rapidly changing (increasing or decreasing) SFR during the past 100 Myr. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFITS files for all the reduced images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A78

  14. Nebular metallicities in two isolated local void dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Jerjen, Helmut; Dopita, Michael A.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Isolated dwarf galaxies, especially those situated in voids, may provide insight into primordial conditions in the universe and the physical processes that govern star formation in undisturbed stellar systems. The metallicity of H II regions in such galaxies is key to investigating this possibility. From the SIGRID sample of isolated dwarf galaxies, we have identified two exceptionally isolated objects, the Local Void galaxy [KK98]246 (ESO 461-G036) and another somewhat larger dwarf irregular on the edge of the Local Void, MCG-01-41-006 (HIPASS J1609-04). We report our measurements of the nebular metallicities in these objects. The first object has a single low luminosity H II region, while the second is in a more vigorous star forming phase with several bright H II regions. We find that the metallicities in both galaxies are typical for galaxies of this size, and do not indicate the presence of any primordial gas, despite (for [KK98]246) the known surrounding large reservoir of neutral hydrogen.

  15. A Multivariate Analysis of Galaxy Cluster Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, P. M.; Djorgovski, S.

    1993-05-01

    We have assembled from the literature a data base on on 394 clusters of galaxies, with up to 16 parameters per cluster. They include optical and x-ray luminosities, x-ray temperatures, galaxy velocity dispersions, central galaxy and particle densities, optical and x-ray core radii and ellipticities, etc. In addition, derived quantities, such as the mass-to-light ratios and x-ray gas masses are included. Doubtful measurements have been identified, and deleted from the data base. Our goal is to explore the correlations between these parameters, and interpret them in the framework of our understanding of evolution of clusters and large-scale structure, such as the Gott-Rees scaling hierarchy. Among the simple, monovariate correlations we found, the most significant include those between the optical and x-ray luminosities, x-ray temperatures, cluster velocity dispersions, and central galaxy densities, in various mutual combinations. While some of these correlations have been discussed previously in the literature, generally smaller samples of objects have been used. We will also present the results of a multivariate statistical analysis of the data, including a principal component analysis (PCA). Such an approach has not been used previously for studies of cluster properties, even though it is much more powerful and complete than the simple monovariate techniques which are commonly employed. The observed correlations may lead to powerful constraints for theoretical models of formation and evolution of galaxy clusters. P.M.O. was supported by a Caltech graduate fellowship. S.D. acknowledges a partial support from the NASA contract NAS5-31348 and the NSF PYI award AST-9157412.

  16. STRUCTURES OF LOCAL GALAXIES COMPARED TO HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Sara M.; De Mello, DuIlia F.; Gallagher, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Matt Mountain, C.; Smith, Linda J.

    2009-08-15

    The rest-frame far-ultraviolet morphologies of eight nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 8, NGC 520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, and NGC 7673) are compared with 54 galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 46 galaxies at z {approx} 4 observed in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The nearby sample is artificially redshifted to z {approx} 1.5 and 4 by applying luminosity and size scaling. We compare the simulated galaxy morphologies to real z {approx} 1.5 and 4 UV-bright galaxy morphologies. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M {sub 20}), and the Sersic index (n). We explore the use of nonparametric methods with two-dimensional profile fitting and find the combination of M {sub 20} with n an efficient method to classify galaxies as having merger, exponential disk, or bulge-like morphologies. When classified according to G and M {sub 20} 20/30% of real/simulated galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 37/12% at z {approx} 4 have bulge-like morphologies. The rest have merger-like or intermediate distributions. Alternatively, when classified according to the Sersic index, 70% of the z {approx} 1.5 and z {approx} 4 real galaxies are exponential disks or bulge-like with n>0.8, and {approx} 30% of the real galaxies are classified as mergers. The artificially redshifted galaxies have n values with {approx} 35% bulge or exponential at z {approx} 1.5 and 4. Therefore, {approx} 20%-30% of Lyman-break galaxies have structures similar to local starburst mergers, and may be driven by similar processes. We assume merger-like or clumpy star-forming galaxies in the GOODS field have morphological structure with values n < 0.8 and M {sub 20}> - 1.7. We conclude that Mrk 8, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have structures similar to those of merger-like and clumpy star-forming galaxies observed at z {approx} 1.5 and 4.

  17. Morphological classification of local luminous infrared galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psychogyios, A.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Haan, S.; Howell, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Petty, S. M.; Evans, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    We present analysis of the morphological classification of 89 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, using non-parametric coefficients and compare their morphology as a function of wavelength. We rely on images that were obtained in the optical (B- and I-band) as well as in the infrared (H-band and 5.8 μm). Our classification is based on the calculation of Gini and the second order of light (M20) non-parametric coefficients, which we explore as a function of stellar mass (M⋆), infrared luminosity (LIR), and star formation rate (SFR). We investigate the relation between M20, the specific SFR (sSFR) and the dust temperature (Tdust) in our galaxy sample. We find that M20 is a better morphological tracer than Gini, as it allows us to distinguish systems that were formed by double systems from isolated and post-merger LIRGs. The effectiveness of M20 as a morphological tracer increases with increasing wavelength, from the B to H band. In fact, the multi-wavelength analysis allows us to identify a region in the Gini-M20 parameter space where ongoing mergers reside, regardless of the band used to calculate the coefficients. In particular, when measured in the H band, a region that can be used to identify ongoing mergers, with minimal contamination from LIRGs in other stages. We also find that, while the sSFR is positively correlated with M20 when measured in the mid-infrared, i.e. star-bursting galaxies show more compact emission, it is anti-correlated with the B-band-based M20. We interpret this as the spatial decoupling between obscured and unobscured star formation, whereby the ultraviolet/optical size of an LIRG experience an intense dust-enshrouded central starburst that is larger that in the mid-infrared since the contrast between the nuclear to the extended disk emission is smaller in the mid-infrared. This has important implications for high redshift surveys of dusty sources, where sizes of galaxies

  18. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  19. Properties of the Blue Galaxy Population in Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, D. H.; Rix, H.-W.; Caldwell, N.

    2000-12-01

    Do star-forming spirals accreted recently by massive clusters evolve in a few Gyrs. into smooth disk galaxies with little or no current star formation? Hierarchical models of large-scale structure and the observed effect of the cluster environment on galaxy morphologies and star formation rates have given rise to many theories predicting such cluster galaxy evolution. Depending on the star formation truncation mechanism timescale, the more recent cluster arrivals should still have relatively young stellar populations and thus bluer colors (esp. in U-V) than the older, red early-types (E/S0) that define the cluster color-magnitude relation. Yet to date no significant population of bluer S0's has been found in local clusters, though we note previous studies have concentrated on the inner regions (R<0.5Mpc) of nearby clusters, which are expected to be dominated by older members. Therefore, we have obtained wide-field (R>0.6/h Mpc) UVI imaging for 10 local (z<0.06) Abell clusters, with 100's of spectroscopically confirmed members, to search the cluster outskirts for bluer S0's which may be recently accreted spirals. From our detailed photometry, we have measured structural parameters for a sample of over 300 U-band selected, spectroscopically confirmed members, by fitting each galaxy surface brightness profile with a PSF-convolved, de Vaucouleur's bulge plus exponential disk model. We have found a population of blue, disk-dominated galaxies, that are predominately in the outskirts (>0.75/h Mpc projected radius) of our first analyzed cluster, Abell 754 at z=0.053. We present the photometric and structural properties of this blue population.

  20. Metallicity gradients in local Universe galaxies: Time evolution and effects of radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Coccato, Lodovico; Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Galli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the local Universe, H ii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies. Aims: We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC 300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations, aiming at studying the evolution of their radial metallicity gradients. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. Methods: For the selected galaxies, we analysed H ii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; and determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. Results: We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gradients are flatter than or equal to those of H ii regions. When radial motions are negligible, this result provides a direct measurement of the time evolution of the gradient. For galaxies with dominant radial motions, we provide upper limits on the gradient evolution. Finally, the total metal content increases with time in all target galaxies, and early morphological types have a larger increment Δ(O/H) than late-type galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings provide important constraints to discriminate among different galactic evolutionary scenarios, favouring cosmological models with enhanced feedback from supernovae. The advent of extremely large telescopes allows us to include galaxies in a wider range of morphologies and environments, thus putting firmer constraints on galaxy formation

  1. Exploring the Escape of Hydrogen Ionizing Photons from Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jesse A.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    role of dwarf galaxies in the ionization of the local IGM and cosmic reionization.

  2. FREQUENT SPIN REORIENTATION OF GALAXIES DUE TO LOCAL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-10

    We study the evolution of angular momenta of M {sub *} = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} galaxies utilizing large-scale ultra-high resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and find that the spin of the stellar component changes direction frequently because of interactions with nearby systems, such as major mergers, minor mergers, significant gas inflows, and torques. The rate and nature of change of spin direction cannot be accounted for by large-scale tidal torques, because the rates of the latter fall short by orders of magnitude and because the apparent random swings of the spin direction are inconsistent with the alignment by linear density field. The implications for galaxy formation as well as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies are profound. Assuming the large-scale tidal field is the sole alignment agent, a new picture emerging is that intrinsic alignment of galaxies would be a balance between slow large-scale coherent torquing and fast spin reorientation by local interactions. What is still open is whether other processes, such as feeding galaxies with gas and stars along filaments or sheets, introduce coherence for spin directions of galaxies along the respective structures.

  3. Constraining the Mass of the Local Group through Proper Motion Measurements of Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, S. Tony; van der Marel, R.; Anderson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Local Group and its two dominant spiral galaxies have been the benchmark for testing many aspects of cosmological and galaxy formation theories. This includes, e.g., dark halo profiles and shapes, substructure and the "missing satellite" problem, and the minimum mass for galaxy formation. But despite the extensive work in all of these areas, our knowledge of the mass of the Milky Way and M31, and thus the total mass of the Local Group remains one of the most poorly established astronomical parameters (uncertain by a factor of 4). One important reason for this problem is the lack of information in tangential motions of galaxies, which can be only obtained through proper motion measurements. In this study, we introduce our projects for measuring absolute proper motions of (1) the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I, (2) M31, and (3) the 4 dwarf galaxies near the edge of the Local Group (Cetus, Leo A, Tucana, and Sag DIG). Results from these three independent measurements will provide important clues to the mass of the Milky Way, M31, and the Local Group as a whole, respectively. We also present our proper motion measurement technique that uses compact background galaxies as astrometric reference sources.

  4. WERE PROGENITORS OF LOCAL L* GALAXIES Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Li Yuexing; Zhu Qirong; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Abel, Tom

    2012-08-01

    The Ly{alpha} emission has been observed from galaxies over a redshift span z {approx} 0-8.6. However, the evolution of high-redshift Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs), and the link between these populations and local galaxies, remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the Ly{alpha} properties of progenitors of a local L* galaxy by combining cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations using the new ART{sup 2} code. We find that the main progenitor (the most massive one) of a Milky-Way-like galaxy has a number of Ly{alpha} properties close to those of observed LAEs at z {approx} 2-6, but most of the fainter ones appear to fall below the detection limits of current surveys. The Ly{alpha} photon escape fraction depends sensitively on a number of physical properties of the galaxy, such as mass, star formation rate, and metallicity, as well as galaxy morphology and orientation. Moreover, we find that high-redshift LAEs show blueshifted Ly{alpha} line profiles characteristic of gas inflow, and that the Ly{alpha} emission by excitation cooling increases with redshift, and becomes dominant at z {approx}> 6. Our results suggest that some observed LAEs at z {approx} 2-6 with luminosity of L{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} may be similar to the main progenitor of the Milky Way at high redshift, and that they may evolve into present-day L* galaxies.

  5. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  6. A COMPARISON OF THE CLUSTERING PROPERTIES BETWEEN GALAXIES AND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa

    2013-03-01

    In this study, I apply cluster analysis and perform comparative studies of clustering properties between galaxies and groups of galaxies. It is found that the number of objects N{sub max} of the richest system and the maximal length D{sub max} of the largest system for groups in all samples are apparently larger than ones for galaxies, and that galaxies preferentially form isolated, paired, and small systems, while groups preferentially form grouped and clustered systems. These results show that groups are more strongly clustered than galaxies, which is consistent with statistical results of the correlation function.

  7. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): merging galaxies and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon P.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee; Loveday, Jon; Phillipps, Steve; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-11-01

    We derive the close pair fractions and volume merger rates for galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey with -23 < Mr < -17 (ΩM = 0.27, ΩΛ = 0.73, H0 = 100 km s-1 Mpc-1) at 0.01 < z < 0.22 (look-back time of <2 Gyr). The merger fraction is approximately 1.5 per cent Gyr-1 at all luminosities (assuming 50 per cent of pairs merge) and the volume merger rate is ≈3.5 × 10-4 Mpc-3 Gyr-1. We examine how the merger rate varies by luminosity and morphology. Dry mergers (between red/spheroidal galaxies) are found to be uncommon and to decrease with decreasing luminosity. Fainter mergers are wet, between blue/discy galaxies. Damp mergers (one of each type) follow the average of dry and wet mergers. In the brighter luminosity bin (-23 < Mr < -20), the merger rate evolution is flat, irrespective of colour or morphology, out to z ˜ 0.2. The makeup of the merging population does not appear to change over this redshift range. Galaxy growth by major mergers appears comparatively unimportant and dry mergers are unlikely to be significant in the buildup of the red sequence over the past 2 Gyr. We compare the colour, morphology, environmental density and degree of activity (BPT class, Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich) of galaxies in pairs to those of more isolated objects in the same volume. Galaxies in close pairs tend to be both redder and slightly more spheroid dominated than the comparison sample. We suggest that this may be due to `harassment' in multiple previous passes prior to the current close interaction. Galaxy pairs do not appear to prefer significantly denser environments. There is no evidence of an enhancement in the AGN fraction in pairs, compared to other galaxies in the same volume.

  8. Void galaxy properties depending on void filament straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of galaxies belonging to the filaments in cosmic void regions, using the void catalogue constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the SDSS DR7. To identify galaxy filaments within a void, voids with 30 or more galaxies are selected as a sample. We identify 3172 filaments in 1055 voids by applying the filament finding algorithm utilizing minimal spanning tree (MST) which is an unique linear pattern into which connects all the galaxies in a void. We study the correlations between galaxy properties and the specific size of filament which quantifies the degree of the filament straightness. For example, the average magnitude and the magnitude of the faintest galaxy in filament decrease as the straightness of the filament increases. We also find that the correlations become stronger in rich filaments with many member galaxies than in poor ones. We discuss a physical explanation to our findings and their cosmological implications.

  9. A GALEX ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SURVEY OF GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Janice C.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr; Bothwell, Matthew; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Funes S. J., Jose G.; Sakai, Shoko; Skillman, Evan; Tremonti, Christy; Van Zee, Liese

    2011-01-15

    We present results from a GALEX ultraviolet (UV) survey of a complete sample of 390 galaxies within {approx}11 Mpc of the Milky Way. The UV data are a key component of the composite Local Volume Legacy, an ultraviolet-to-infrared imaging program designed to provide an inventory of dust and star formation in nearby spiral and irregular galaxies. The ensemble data set is an especially valuable resource for studying star formation in dwarf galaxies, which comprise over 80% of the sample. We describe the GALEX survey programs that obtained the data and provide a catalog of far-UV ({approx}1500 A) and near-UV ({approx}2200 A) integrated photometry. General UV properties of the sample are briefly discussed. We compute two measures of the global star formation efficiency, the star formation rate (SFR) per unit H I gas mass, and the SFR per unit stellar mass, to illustrate the significant differences that can arise in our understanding of dwarf galaxies when the FUV is used to measure the SFR instead of H{alpha}. We find that dwarf galaxies may not be as drastically inefficient in converting gas into stars as suggested by prior H{alpha} studies. In this context, we also examine the UV properties of late-type dwarf galaxies that appear to be devoid of star formation because they were not detected in previous H{alpha} narrowband observations. Nearly all such galaxies in our sample are detected in the FUV and have FUV SFRs that fall below the limit where the H{alpha} flux is robust to Poisson fluctuations in the formation of massive stars. Otherwise, the UV colors and star formation efficiencies of H{alpha}-undetected, UV-bright dwarf irregulars appear to be relatively unremarkable with respect to those exhibited by the general population of star-forming galaxies.

  10. Structural properties of central galaxies in groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mo, H. J.; Katz, Neal; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Weinberg, Martin; Weinmann, Simone M.; Pasquali, Anna; Yang, Xiaohu

    2009-09-01

    Using a statistically representative sample of 911 central galaxies (CENs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4 group catalogue, we study how the structure (shape and size) of the first rank (by stellar mass) group and cluster members depends on (1) galaxy stellar mass (Mstar), (2) the global environment defined by the dark matter halo mass (Mhalo) of the host group and (3) the local environment defined by their special halocentric position. We quantify the structure of SDSS galaxies with a GALFIT-based pipeline that fits two-dimensional Sérsic models to the r-band image data. Through tests with simulated and real galaxy images, we demonstrate that our pipeline can recover Sérsic parameters without significant bias. We find that the fitting results are most sensitive to the background sky level determination, and we strongly recommend using the SDSS global value. We also find that uncertainties in the background sky level translate into a strong covariance between the total magnitude, the half-light radius (r50) and the Sérsic index (n), especially for bright/massive galaxies. Applying our pipeline to the CEN sample, we find that n of CENs depends strongly on Mstar, but only weakly or not at all on Mhalo. The n-Mstar relation holds for CENs over the full range of halo masses that we consider. Less massive CENs tend to be disc like and high-mass systems are typically spheroids, with a considerable scatter in n at all galaxy masses. Similarly, CEN sizes depend on galaxy stellar mass and luminosity, with early- and late-type galaxies exhibiting different slopes for the size-luminosity (r50-L) and the size-stellar mass (r50-Mstar) scaling relations. Moreover, to test the impact of local environment on CENs, we compare the structure of CENs with that satellite galaxies (SATs) of comparable Mstar. We find that low-mass (<1010.75h-2Msolar) SATs have somewhat larger median Sérsic indices than CENs of a similar Mstar. Furthermore, low-mass, late

  11. The Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Energetic feedback from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) is required to prevent catastrophic cooling of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters. Evidence for this is seen through the inflation of cavities in the ICM by AGN-launched, radio-emitting jets, and understanding this process is an active area of research. Radio observations play an integral role in this, as they trace the active stages of the feedback cycle. Understanding the radio properties of BCGs is therefore paramount for understanding both galaxy clusters and AGN feedback processes globally. Within this thesis, the BCGs in a large (>700) sample of X-ray selected clusters are studied. We observe these BCGs with a wide variety of facilities, building a census of their radio properties across a range of frequencies, timescales and angular resolutions. Radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are built for over 200 BCGs, and then decomposed into two components; a core, attributable to ongoing nuclear activity, and a non-core, attributable to historical accretion. Both components are not only more common, but also significantly more powerful in cool-core (CC) clusters than non-cool core (NCC) clusters. However, it is the presence of an active core that shows BCGs in CC clusters are constantly `on' - explaining how they regulate their environments over gigayear timescales. We observe 35 currently active BCGs at high (15-353 GHz) radio frequencies, and monitor their variability. Self-absorbed, active components are found to be common at high frequency. Little variability is seen on < year timescales, although longer term variation of ~10% annually over few-decade timescales is observed. Evidence is presented for a hitherto unseen component in BCG spectra that may be attributable to a naked Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF). The milli-arcsecond scale radio properties of 59 sources are studied, with a large range of morphologies recovered although no

  12. A multi-wavelength survey of AGN in massive clusters: AGN distribution and host galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klesman, Alison J.; Sarajedini, Vicki L.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effect of environment on the presence and fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) by identifying galaxies hosting AGN in massive galaxy clusters and the fields around them. We have identified AGN candidates via optical variability (178), X-ray emission (74), and mid-IR SEDs (64) in multi-wavelength surveys covering regions centred on 12 galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.5 < z < 0.9. In this paper, we present the radial distribution of AGN in clusters to examine how local environment affects the presence of an AGN and its host galaxy. While distributions vary from cluster to cluster, we find that the radial distribution of AGN generally differs from that of normal galaxies. X-ray-selected AGN candidates appear to be more centrally concentrated than normal galaxies in the inner 20 per cent of the virial radius, while becoming less centrally concentrated in the outer regions. Mid-IR-selected AGN are less centrally concentrated overall. Optical variables have a similar distribution to normal galaxies in the inner regions, then become somewhat less centrally concentrated farther from the cluster centre. The host galaxies of AGN reveal a different colour distribution than normal galaxies, with many AGN hosts displaying galaxy colours in the `green valley' between the red sequence and blue star-forming normal galaxies. This result is similar to those found in field galaxy studies. The colour distribution of AGN hosts is more pronounced in disturbed clusters where minor mergers, galaxy harassment, and interactions with cluster substructure may continue to prompt star formation in the hosts. Among normal galaxies, we find that galaxy colours become generally bluer with increasing cluster radius, as is expected. However, we find no relationship between host galaxy colour and cluster radius among AGN hosts, which may indicate that processes related to the accreting supermassive black hole have a greater impact on the star-forming properties of the host galaxy

  13. The Reddening law outside the local group galaxies: The case of NGC 7552 and NGC 5236

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne L.; Calzetti, Daniela; Bica, Eduardo; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    1994-01-01

    The dust reddening law from the UV to the near-IR for the extended regions of galaxies is here derived from the spectral distributions of the starburst spiral galaxies NGC 7552 and NGC 5236. The centers of these galaxies have similar absorption and emission line spectra, differing only if the strength of their interstellar lines and in the continuum distribution, with NGC 7552 appearing more reddened than NGC 5236. The disk of NGC 7552 is more inclined, and there is evidence that its center is observed through additional foreground dust and gas clouds, as compared to the center of NGC 5236. While the galaxies can be expected to have similar dust content, they are known to have different dust path lengths to our line of sight. Therefore, differences in the shape of the spectra can be attributed mainly to the effects of dust, allowing us to probe for the first time the properties of the reddening law outside the local group of galaxies. We derive the reddening law based on the optical depth of the emission line of H Alpha and H Beta and also based on the continuum distribtuion. We find that the optical depth from the emission line regions are about twice the optical depth of the continuum regions. Thus, dereddening a starburst galaxy by scaling the Milky Way reddening laws to optical depths obtained from the H Alpha/H Beta line ratio overcompensates for the effect of dust.

  14. Localized Starbursts in Dwarf Galaxies Produced by the Impact of Low-metallicity Cosmic Gas Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Amorín, R.; Filho, M. E.; Ascasibar, Y.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  15. Dwarf galaxies in the coma cluster: Star formation properties and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek M.

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for studying the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. This intermediate region links the low-density field environment and the dense core of the cluster, and is thought to host recently accreted galaxies whose star formation is being quenched by external processes associated with the cluster. In this dissertation, we measure the star formation properties of galaxies at the infall region of the nearby rich cluster of galaxies, Coma. We rely primarily on Ultraviolet (UV) data owing to its sensitivity to recent star formation and we place more emphasis on the properties of dwarf galaxies. Dwarf galaxies are good tracers of external processes in clusters but their evolution is poorly constrained as they are intrinsically faint and hence more challenging to detect. We make use of deep GALEX far-UV and near-UV observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster. This area of the cluster has supporting photometric coverage at optical and IR wavelengths in addition to optical spectroscopic data that includes deep redshift coverage of dwarf galaxies in Coma. Our GALEX observations were the deepest exposures taken for a local galaxy cluster. The depth of these images required alternative data analysis techniques to overcome systematic effects that limit the default GALEX pipeline analysis. Specifically, we used a deblending method that improved detection efficiency by a factor of ˜2 and allowed reliable photometry a few magnitudes deeper than the pipeline catalog. We performed deep measurements of the total UV galaxy counts in our field that were used to measure the source confusion limit for crowded GALEX fields. The star formation properties of Coma members were studied for galaxies that span from starbursts to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies in Coma tend to have lower specific star formation rates, on average, as compared to field galaxies. We show that the majority of these galaxies are likely

  16. The Effects of the Local Environment and Stellar Mass on Galaxy Quenching to z ∼ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Sobral, David; Rettura, Alessandro; Scoville, Nick; Faisst, Andreas; Capak, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We study the effects of the local environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties using a mass complete sample of quiescent and star-forming systems in the COSMOS field at z≲ 3. We show that at z≲ 1 the median star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of all galaxies depend on the environment, but they become independent of the environment at z ≳ 1. However, we find that only for star-forming galaxies, the median SFR and sSFR are similar in different environments regardless of redshift and stellar mass. We find that the quiescent fraction depends on the environment at z ≲ 1 and on stellar mass out to z ∼ 3. We show that at z ≲ 1 galaxies become quiescent faster in denser environments and that the overall environmental quenching efficiency increases with cosmic time. Environmental and mass quenching processes depend on each other. At z ≲ 1 denser environments more efficiently quench galaxies with higher masses (log(M/{M}ȯ ) ≳ 10.7), possibly due to a higher merger rate of massive galaxies in denser environments. We also show that mass quenching is more efficient in denser regions. We show that the overall mass quenching efficiency ({ε }{mass}) for more massive galaxies (log(M/{M}ȯ ) ≳ 10.2) rises with cosmic time until z ∼ 1 and then flattens out. However, for less massive galaxies, the rise in {ε }{mass} continues to the present time. Our results suggest that environmental quenching is only relevant at z ≲ 1 and is likely a fast process, whereas mass quenching is the dominant mechanism at z ≳ 1 with a possible stellar feedback physics.

  17. A z = 1.82 ANALOG OF LOCAL ULTRA-MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, M.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Arimoto, N.; Yamada, Y.; Renzini, A.; Mancini, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Capak, P.; Carollo, M.; Lilly, S.; Cimatti, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Ilbert, O.; Kong, X.; Motohara, K.; Ohta, K.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.

    2010-05-20

    We present observations of a very massive galaxy at z = 1.82 that show that its morphology, size, velocity dispersion, and stellar population properties are fully consistent with those expected for passively evolving progenitors of today's giant ellipticals. These findings are based on a deep optical rest-frame spectrum obtained with the Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope of a high-z passive galaxy candidate (pBzK) from the COSMOS field, for which we accurately measure its redshift of z = 1.8230 and obtain an upper limit on its velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub *} < 326 km s{sup -1}. By detailed stellar population modeling of both the galaxy broadband spectral energy distribution and the rest-frame optical spectrum, we derive a star formation-weighted age and formation redshift of t {sub sf} {approx_equal} 1-2 Gyr and z {sub form} {approx_equal} 2.5-4, and a stellar mass of M {sub *} {approx_equal} (3-4) x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}. This is in agreement with a virial mass limit of M {sub vir} < 7 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}, derived from the measured {sigma}{sub *} value and stellar half-light radius, as well as with the dynamical mass limit based on the Jeans equations. In contrast to previously reported super-dense passive galaxies at z {approx} 2, the present galaxy at z = 1.82 appears to have both size and velocity dispersion similar to early-type galaxies in the local universe with similar stellar mass. This suggests that z {approx} 2 massive and passive galaxies may exhibit a wide range of properties, then possibly following quite different evolutionary histories from z {approx} 2 to z = 0.

  18. Global properties of infrared bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Judith S.; Xie, Shuding; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Rice, Walter L.

    1989-01-01

    Infrared flux densities of 182 galaxies, including 50 galaxies in the Virgo cluster, were analyzed using IRAS data for 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns, and the results were compared with data listed in the Point Source Catalog (PSC, 1985). In addition, IR luminosities, L(IRs), colors, and warm dust masses were derived for these galaxies and were compared with the interstellar gas masses and optical luminosities of the galaxies. It was found that, for galaxies whose optical diameter measures between 5 and 8 arcmin, the PSC flux densities are underestimated by a factor of 2 at 60 microns, and by a factor of 1.5 at 100 microns. It was also found that, for 49 galaxies, the mass of warm dust correlated well with the H2 mass, and that L(IR) correlated with L(H-alpha), demonstrating that the L(IR) measures the rate of star formation in these galaxies.

  19. CORRELATIONS AMONG GALAXY PROPERTIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies are complex systems with many properties. Correlations among galaxy properties can supply important clues for studying the formation and evolution of galaxies. Using principal component analysis and least-squares fitting, this paper investigates the correlations among galactic parameters involving more properties (color, morphology, stellar population, and absolute magnitude) than previous studies. We use a volume-limited sample (whole sample) of 75,423 galaxies that was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 and divided into two subsamples (blue and red samples) using a critical color of (g - r) = 0.70 mag. In addition to recovering some previous results, we also obtain some new results. First, all separators for dividing galaxies into two groups can be related via good parameter-first principal component (PC1) correlations. A critical PC1 that indicates whether or not stellar age (or the evolution of a stellar population over time) is important can be used to separate galaxies. This suggests that a statistical parameter, PC1, is helpful in understanding the physical separators of galaxies. In addition, stellar age is shown to be unimportant for red galaxies, while both stellar age and mass are dominating parameters of blue galaxies. This suggests that the various numbers of dominating parameters of galaxies may result from the use of different samples. Finally, some parameters are shown to be correlated, and quantitative fits for a few correlations are obtained, e.g., log(t) = 8.57 + 1.65 (g - r) for the age (log t) and color (g - r) of blue galaxies and log (M{sub *}) = 4.31 - 0.30 M{sub r} for the stellar mass (log M{sub *}) and absolute magnitude (M{sub r}) of red galaxies. The median relationships between various parameter pairs are also presented for comparison.

  20. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  1. Dwarfs and Giants in the local flows of galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on nearby dwarf and giant galaxies to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the local expansion flows of galaxies. It is found that antigravity of dark energy dominates the force field of the flows and makes them expand with acceleration. It also cools the flows and introduces to them the nearly linear velocity-distance relation with the time-rate close to the global Hubble's factor. There are grounds to expect that this is the universal physical regularity that is common not only for the nearby flows we studied here, but also for all the expansion flows of various spatial scales from the 1 Mpc scale and up to the scale of the global cosmological expansion.

  2. Optical and X-ray Properties of Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Antonio, I. P.; Geller, M. J.; Fabricant, D.

    1992-12-01

    We study the optical and x-ray properties of 30 groups of galaxies observed with EINSTEIN. We have obtained redshifts for the galaxies in the group fields down to a limiting magnitude M_B<= 15.7. Typically this corresponds to ~ 18 redshifts per group. Our sample contains 14 MKW-AWM clusters, three of which are actually superpositions of two groups. We compare the velocity dispersions and virial masses we derive from the optical data with the x-ray luminosity and structure. We find remarkable correlations between the x-ray structure and optical galaxy positions. The x-ray emission associated with the galaxies is extended even in more distant groups. This emission is probably due to hot gas in the individual galaxy potentials, which implies that the poor clusters of galaxies are dynamically young. This is consistent with results from N-body simulations of group formation.

  3. Shocked Outflows and Gas Disks in Local Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt; Martin, C. L.; Prescott, M. K. M.; Armus, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have mapped the kinematic and physical properties of gas emitting optical emission lines across 39 gas-rich mergers, which were previously shown to host tidally-induced gas inflows, with deep ESI spectroscopy. In our unique analysis of these longslit spectra, we fitted multiple kinematic components to forbidden lines and recombination lines simultaneously, enabling an examination of the excitation mechanism in different kinematic components. We identify many rotating gas disks in systems whose stellar component is no longer a disk due to the merger. Many of these disks present gas excited by hot stars, but some of the disks present shock-like ratios of diagnostic emission lines, an observation we attribute to the collision of the two galaxies. In another subset of galaxies, we find very broad (sigma > 150 km/s) emission components that also present shock-like emission-line ratios. The large spatial extent of this emission favors shocks over the narrow-line region of a hidden AGN as the excitation mechanism. The high star formation rate, high dust content, and blueshift of the broad emission further suggest an origin in a galactic outflow. If this interpretation is correct, then our study of these nearby galaxies provides important insight for interpreting the broad emission lines associated with giant star-forming clumps in z 2 galaxies. It also shows that galactic outflows can be recognized via resolved emission lines, in addition to absorption lines, even in integrated spectra; and this technique could prove very powerful for studying galactic outflows in infrared spectra of high-redshift galaxies in the future. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under contract 0808161.

  4. The IR properties of ringed galaxies and the IRAS database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buta, Ronald J.; Crocker, Deborah A.

    1993-01-01

    Our study of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) properties of ringed galaxies has been largely successful. We have identified what we think is the probable cause of the differences in the IRAS properties among non-interacting barred galaxies as the pattern speed of the bar. The key to identifying this parameter has been our focusing the study on outer-ringed galaxies where we know precisely what is present in the central regions (from available BVI CCD images in our library of images). The theory is that outer rings, through their morphology and other characteristics, can be identified with the outer Lindblad resonance, one of the major resonances in galaxy structure. Using a library of n-body simulations for comparison, we can reliably infer both low and high pattern speed galaxies from the appearance of outer rings and the existence of other ring features. It is clear that in some barred galaxies, the bar pattern speed is high enough to avoid an inner Lindblad resonance, hence such objects do not contain nuclear or circumnuclear star formation. The IRAS observations are most sensitive to nuclear star formation in early-type barred galaxies, and will thus select those barred galaxies where the pattern speed is low enough to allow an inner Lindblad resonance to exist. High pattern speed barred galaxies therefore weaken the correlation between bars and infrared excess. This finding helps to reconcile the inconsistent results found between different studies on the correlation between bars and far-IR emission.

  5. Dark matter halo properties from galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimioulle, F.; Seitz, S.; Lerchster, M.; Bender, R.; Snigula, J.

    2013-06-01

    We present results for a galaxy-galaxy lensing study based on imaging data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide. From a 12 million object multicolour catalogue for 124 deg2 of photometric data in the u*g'r'i'z' filters, we compute photometric redshifts (with a scatter of σΔz/(1 + z) = 0.033 and an outlier rate of η = 2.0 per cent for i' ≤ 22.5) and extract galaxy shapes down to i' = 24.0. We select a sample of lenses and sources with 0.05 < zd ≤ 1 and 0.05 < zs ≤ 2. We fit three different galaxy halo profiles to the lensing signal, a singular isothermal sphere (SIS), a truncated isothermal sphere (BBS) and a universal density profile (NFW). We derive velocity dispersions by fitting an SIS out to 100 h-1 kpc to the excess surface mass density ΔΣ and perform maximum likelihood analyses out to a maximum scale of 2 h-1 Mpc to obtain halo parameters and scaling relations. We find luminosity scaling relations of σred ∝ L0.24 ± 0.03 for the red lens sample, σblue ∝ L0.23 ± 0.03 for blue lenses and σ ∝ L0.29 ± 0.02 for the combined lens sample with zero-points of σ ^{*}_red=162± 2 {km s^{-1}}, σ ^{*}_blue=115± 3 {km s^{-1}} and σ* = 135 ± 2 km s-1 at a chosen reference luminosity L^{*}_{r^'=1.6 × 10^{10} h^{-2} L_{r^',⊙}. The steeper slope for the combined sample is due to the different zero-points of the blue and red lenses and the fact that blue lenses dominate at low luminosities and red lenses at high luminosities. The mean effective redshifts for the lens samples are = 0.28 for red lenses, = 0.35 for blue lenses and = 0.34 for the combined lens sample. The BBS maximum likelihood analysis yields for the combined sample a velocity dispersion of σ ^{*} = 131^{+2}_{-2} km s- 1 and a truncation radius of s^{*} = 184^{+17}_{+14} h^{-1} kpc, corresponding to a total mass of M^{*}_{total,BBS} = 2.32^{+0.28}_{-0.25} × 10^{12} h^{-1} M_{{⊙}} and a mass-to-light (M/L) ratio of M^{*}_total,BBS/L^{*}=178

  6. Rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies: connecting local galaxies with the epoch of disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Demello, Duilia; Soto, Emmaris

    2015-08-01

    At all redshifts rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies tend to be patchy and clumpy or extremely compact in nature. These morphological signatures could result from either merger interactions between two or multiple systems that trigger star formation, cloud collapse via gravitational instabilities in a gaseous disk that is fed by cold gas spiraling inwards along filamentary structures, or another mechanism still to be determined. Theoretical simulations of clumpy galaxy evolution suggest they could have evolved secularly through cold gas accretion onto rotating disks. Clumps in disks could have migrated to the center of the potential well of a galaxy and combined to form a bulge, or, if gravitationally unstable, could have dissipated forming the disk component. We are exploring potential correlations amongst different morphological properties at intermediate-z which is pivotal in bridging observations at high-z to the local extragalactic universe. We will show how flocculent galaxies, starburst galaxies and compact groups of galaxies may resemble clumpy disks at intermediate redshifts in the rest-frame UV.

  7. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  8. Properties of an H I-selected galaxy sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szomoru, Arpad; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Knapen, Johan H.; Weinberg, David H.; Fruchter, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of galaxies identified in a 21cm, H I-line survey of selected areas in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and its foreground void. Twelve fields were observed in the supercluster, five of them (target fields) centered on optically bright galaxies, and the other seven (blank fields) selected to contain no bright galaxies within 45 min. of their centers. We detected nine previously uncatalogued, gas-rich galaxies, six of them in the target fields. We also detected H I from seven previously catalogued galaxies in these fields. Observations in the void covered the same volume as the 12 supercluster fields at the same H I-mass sensitivity, but no objects were detected. Combining out H I data with optical broadband and H alpha imaging, we conclude that the properties of H I-selected galaxies do not differ substantially from those of late-type galaxies found in optical surveys. In particular, the galaxies in our sample do not appear to be unusually faint for their H I mass, or for their circular velocity. We find tentative evidence for a connection between optical surface brightness and degree of isolation, in the sense that low surface brightness galaxies tend to be more isolated. The previously catalogued, optically bright galaxies in our survey volume dominate the total H I mass density and cross section; the uncatalogued galaxies contribute only approximately 19 percent of the mass and approximately 12 percent of the cross section. Thus, existing estimates of the density and cross section of neutral hydrogen, most of which are based on optically selected galaxy samples, are probably accurate. Such estimates can be used to compare the nearby universe to the high-redshift universe probed by quasar absorption lines.

  9. Observational properties of compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickson, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of galaxies with projected separations comparable to the diameters of the galaxies themselves. Two well-known examples are Stephan's Quintet (Stephan, 1877) and Seyfert's Sextet (Seyfert 1948a,b). In groups such as these, the apparent space density of galaxies approaches 10(exp 6) Mpc(sub -3), denser even than the cores of rich clusters. The apparent unlikeliness of the chance occurrence of such tight groupings lead Ambartsumyan (1958, 1975) to conclude that compact groups must be physically dense systems. This view is supported by clear signs of galaxy interactions that are seen in many groups. Spectroscopic observations reveal that typical relative velocities of galaxies in the groups are comparable to their internal stellar velocities. This should be conducive to strong gravitational interactions - more so than in rich clusters, where galaxy velocities are typically much higher. This suggests that compact groups could be excellent laboratories in which to study galaxy interactions and their effects. Compact groups often contain one or more galaxies whose redshift differs greatly from those of the other group members. If these galaxies are at the same distance as the other members, either entire galaxies are being ejected at high velocities from these groups, or some new physical phenomena must be occurring. If their redshifts are cosmological, we must explain why so many discordant galaxies are found in compact groups. In recent years much progress has been made in addressing these questions. Here, the author discusses the current observational data on compact groups and their implications.

  10. A UNIVERSAL, LOCAL STAR FORMATION LAW IN GALACTIC CLOUDS, NEARBY GALAXIES, HIGH-REDSHIFT DISKS, AND STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    Star formation laws are rules that relate the rate of star formation in a particular region, either an entire galaxy or some portion of it, to the properties of the gas, or other galactic properties, in that region. While observations of Local Group galaxies show a very simple, local star formation law in which the star formation rate per unit area in each patch of a galaxy scales linearly with the molecular gas surface density in that patch, recent observations of both Milky Way molecular clouds and high-redshift galaxies apparently show a more complicated relationship in which regions of equal molecular gas surface density can form stars at quite different rates. These data have been interpreted as implying either that different star formation laws may apply in different circumstances, that the star formation law is sensitive to large-scale galaxy properties rather than local properties, or that there are high-density thresholds for star formation. Here we collate observations of the relationship between gas and star formation rate from resolved observations of Milky Way molecular clouds, from kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies, and from unresolved observations of both disk and starburst galaxies in the local universe and at high redshift. We show that all of these data are in fact consistent with a simple, local, volumetric star formation law. The apparent variations stem from the fact that the observed objects have a wide variety of three-dimensional size scales and degrees of internal clumping, so even at fixed gas column density the regions being observed can have wildly varying volume densities. We provide a simple theoretical framework to remove this projection effect, and we use it to show that all the data, from small solar neighborhood clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} to submillimeter galaxies with masses {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, fall on a single star formation law in which the star formation rate is simply {approx}1% of

  11. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  12. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  13. Formation, evolution and properties of isolated field elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Saar, Enn

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties, evolution and formation mechanisms of isolated field elliptical (IfE) galaxies. We create a `mock' catalogue of IfE galaxies from the Millennium Simulation Galaxy Catalogue, and trace their merging histories. The formation, identity and assembly redshifts of simulated isolated and non-isolated elliptical galaxies are studied and compared. Observational and numerical data are used to compare age, mass and the colour-magnitude relation. Our results, based on simulation data, show that almost 7 per cent of all elliptical galaxies brighter than -19mag in B band can be classified as IfE galaxies. Results also show that isolated elliptical galaxies have a rather flat luminosity function; a number density of ~3 × 10-6h3Mpc-3mag-1, throughout their B-band magnitudes. IfE galaxies show bluer colours than non-isolated elliptical galaxies and they appear younger, in a statistical sense, according to their mass-weighted age. IfE galaxies also form and assemble at lower redshifts compared to non-isolated elliptical galaxies. About 46 per cent of IfE galaxies have undergone at least one major merging event in their formation history, while the same fraction is only ~33 per cent for non-isolated ellipticals. Almost all (~98 per cent) isolated elliptical galaxies show merging activity during their evolution, pointing towards the importance of mergers in the formation of IfE galaxies. The mean time of the last major merging is at z ~ 0.6 or 6Gyr ago for isolated ellipticals, while non-isolated ellipticals experience their last major merging significantly earlier at z ~ 1.1 or 8Gyr ago. After inspecting merger trees of simulated IfE galaxies, we conclude that three different, yet typical, formation mechanisms can be identified: solitude, coupling and cannibalism. Our results also predict a previously unobserved population of blue, dim and light galaxies that fulfil observational criteria to be classified as IfE galaxies. This separate population comprises

  14. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  15. Characterizing Dust Attenuation in Local Star-forming Galaxies: UV and Optical Reddening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, A. J.; Calzetti, D.; Chary, R.-R.

    2016-02-01

    The dust attenuation for a sample of ∼10,000 local (z ≲ 0.1) star-forming galaxies is constrained as a function of their physical properties. We utilize aperture-matched multiwavelength data available from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to ensure that regions of comparable size in each galaxy are being analyzed. We follow the method of Calzetti et al. and characterize the dust attenuation through the UV power-law index, β, and the dust optical depth, which is quantified using the difference in Balmer emission line optical depth, {τ }Bl={τ }{{H}β }-{τ }{{H}α }. The observed linear relationship between β and {τ }Bl is similar to the local starburst relation, but the large scatter (σint = 0.44) suggests that there is significant variation in the local universe. We derive a selective attenuation curve over the range 1250 Å < λ < 8320 Å and find that a single attenuation curve is effective for characterizing the majority of galaxies in our sample. This curve has a slightly lower selective attenuation in the UV compared to previously determined curves. We do not see evidence to suggest that a 2175 Å feature is significant in the average attenuation curve. Significant positive correlations are seen between the amount of UV and optical reddening and galaxy metallicity, mass, star formation rate (SFR), and SFR surface density. This provides a potential tool for gauging attenuation where the stellar population is unresolved, such as at high z.

  16. Metallicity inhomogeneities in local star-forming galaxies as a sign of recent metal-poor gas accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: jma20@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We measure the oxygen metallicity of the ionized gas along the major axis of seven dwarf star-forming galaxies. Two of them, SDSSJ1647+21 and SDSSJ2238+14, show ≅0.5 dex metallicity decrements in inner regions with enhanced star formation activity. This behavior is similar to the metallicity drop observed in a number of local tadpole galaxies by Sánchez Almeida et al., and was interpreted as showing early stages of assembling in disk galaxies, with the star formation sustained by external metal-poor gas accretion. The agreement with tadpoles has several implications. (1) It proves that galaxies other than the local tadpoles present the same unusual metallicity pattern. (2) Our metallicity inhomogeneities were inferred using the direct method, thus discarding systematic errors usually attributed to other methods. (3) Taken together with the tadpole data, our findings suggest a threshold around one-tenth the solar value for the metallicity drops to show up. Although galaxies with clear metallicity drops are rare, the physical mechanism responsible for them may sustain a significant part of the star formation activity in the local universe. We argue that the star formation dependence of the mass-metallicity relationship, as well as other general properties followed by most local disk galaxies, is naturally interpreted as side effects of pristine gas infall. Alternatives to the metal-poor gas accretion are examined as well.

  17. Polarisation properties of Milky-Way-like galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We study the polarisation properties, magnetic field strength, and synchrotron emission scale-height of Milky-Way-like galaxies in comparison with other spiral galaxies. Methods: We used our 3D-emission model of the Milky Way Galaxy for viewing the Milky Way from outside at various inclinations in the way that spiral galaxies are observed. We analysed these Milky Way maps with techniques used to obtain the strength of magnetic fields, rotation measures (RMs), and scale-heights of synchrotron emission from observations of resolved galaxies and compared the results with the Milky Way model parameter. We also simulated a large sample of unresolved Milky-Way-like galaxies to study their statistical polarisation properties. Results: When seen edge-on, the synchrotron emission from the Milky Way has an exponential scale-height of about 0.74 kpc, which is much lower than the values obtained from previous models. We find that current analysis methods overestimate the scale-height of synchrotron emission of galaxies by about 10% at an inclination of 80° and about 40% at an inclination of 70° because of contamination from the disk. The observed RMs for face-on galaxies derived from high-frequency polarisation measurements approximate to the Faraday depths (FDs) when scaled by a factor of two. For edge-on galaxies, the observed RMs are indicative of the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field, but are not closely related with the FDs. Assuming energy equipartition between the magnetic field and particles for the Milky Way results in an average magnetic-field strength that is about twice as high as the intrinsic value for a K factor of 100. The number distribution of the integrated polarisation percentages of a large sample of unresolved Milky-Way-like galaxies peaks at about 4.2% at 4.8 GHz and at about 0.8% at 1.4 GHz. Integrated polarisation angles rotated by 90° align very well with the position angles of the major axes, implying that unresolved galaxies do

  18. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXIES IN A CONSTRAINED SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, Peter; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-02-10

    In this Letter, we present, for the first time, a study of star formation rate (SFR), gas fraction, and galaxy morphology of a constrained simulation of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies compared to other MW-mass galaxies. By combining with unconstrained simulations, we cover a sufficient volume to compare these galaxies’ environmental densities ranging from the field to that of the Local Group (LG). This is particularly relevant as it has been shown that, quite generally, galaxy properties depend intimately upon their environment, most prominently when galaxies in clusters are compared to those in the field. For galaxies in loose groups such as the LG, however, environmental effects have been less clear. We consider the galaxy’s environmental density in spheres of 1200 kpc (comoving) and find that while environment does not appear to directly affect morphology, there is a positive trend with SFRs. This enhancement in star formation occurs systematically for galaxies in higher density environments, regardless whether they are part of the LG or in filaments. Our simulations suggest that the richer environment at megaparsec scales may help replenish the star-forming gas, allowing higher specific SFRs in galaxies such as the MW.

  19. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants. Statistics from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergvall, Nils; Marquart, Thomas; Way, Michael J.; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Ostlin, Goran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong interest in the starburst phenomenon in extragalactic astronomy, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of starburst to examine the statistical properties of starburst galaxies in the local universe. We also seek to establish links between starburst galaxies, post-starburst (hereafter postburst) galaxies, and active galaxies. Data were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. We applied a novel method of treating dust attenuation and derive star formation rates, ages, and stellar masses assuming a two-component stellar population model. Dynamical masses are calculated from the width of the H-alpha line. These masses agree excellently with the photometric masses. The mass (gas+stars) range is approximately 10( exp 9) - 10(exp 11.5) solar mass. As a selection criterion for starburst galaxies, we use, the birthrate parameter, b = SFR/SFR, requiring that b is greater than 3. For postburst galaxies, we use, the equivalent width of Hdelta in absorption with the criterion EW (sub Hdelta_abs) is greater than 6 A. Results. We find that only 1% of star-forming galaxies are starburst galaxies. They contribute 3-6% to the stellar production and are therefore unimportant for the local star formation activity. The median starburst age is 70 Myr roughly independent of mass, indicating that star formation is mainly regulated by local feedback processes. The b-parameter strongly depends on burst age. Values close to b = 60 are found at ages approximately 10 Myr, while almost no starbursts are found at ages greater than 1 Gyr. The median baryonic burst mass fraction of sub-L galaxies is 5% and decreases slowly towards high masses. The median mass fraction of the recent burst in the postburst sample is 5-10%. A smaller fraction of the postburst galaxies, however, originates in non-bursting galaxies. The age-mass distribution of the postburst progenitors (with mass fractions is greater than 3%) is bimodal with a break at logM(solar mass

  20. Observational Evidence for Galaxy Evolution in the Local Group (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, E.

    This review aims to give a summary of our understanding of galaxy evolution as infered from studies of nearby galaxies; how observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope have contributed significantly to our detailed understanding of the older stellar populations in Local Group dwarf galaxies. Recent results from VLT are also promising interesting future prospects for the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby dwarf galaxies.

  1. The properties of fossil groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical simulations as well as optical and X-ray observations over the last few years have shown that poor groups of galaxies can evolve to what is called a fossil group. Dynamical friction as the driving process leads to the coalescence of individual galaxies in ordinary poor groups leaving behind nothing more than a central, massive elliptical galaxy supposed to contain the merger history of the whole group. Due to merging timescales for less-massive galaxies and gas cooling timescales of the X-ray intragroup medium exceeding a Hubble time, a surrounding faint-galaxy population having survived this galactic cannibalism as well as an extended X-ray halo similar to that found in ordinary groups, is expected. Recent studies suggest that fossil groups are very abundant and could be the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the centers of rich galaxy clusters. However, only a few objects are known to the literature. This article aims to summarize the results of observational fossil group research over the last few years and presents ongoing work by the authors. Complementary to previous research, the SDSS and RASS surveys have been cross-correlated to identify new fossil structures yielding 34 newly detected fossil group candidates. Observations with ISIS at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma have been carried out to study the stellar populations of the central ellipticals of 6 fossil groups. In addition multi-object spectroscopy with VLTs VIMOS has been performed to study the shape of the OLF of one fossil system.

  2. Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) SEDs and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Janice C.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Calzetti, Daniela; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2014-11-01

    We present the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey which consists of 258 nearby galaxies (D < 11 Mpc). The wavelength coverage spans the ultraviolet to the infrared (1500 Å-24 μm) which is utilized to derive global physical properties (i.e. star formation rate, stellar mass, internal extinction due to dust). With these data, we find colour-colour relationships and correlated trends between observed and physical properties (i.e. optical magnitudes and dust properties, optical colour and specific star formation rate, and ultraviolet-infrared colour and metallicity). The SEDs are binned by different galaxy properties to reveal how each property affects the observed shape of these SEDs. In addition, due to the volume-limited nature of LVL, we utilize the dwarf-dominated galaxy sample to test star formation relationships established with higher mass galaxy samples. We find good agreement with the star-forming `main-sequence' relationship, but find a systematic deviation in the infrared `main sequence' at low luminosities. This deviation is attributed to suppressed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in low-metallicity environments and/or the destruction of PAHs in more intense radiation fields occurring near a suggested threshold in star formation rates (sSFR) at a value of log(sSFR) ˜ -10.2.

  3. Infrared spectral properties of wolf-rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosian, J. R.; Sargsyan, L. A.

    2012-09-01

    We present infrared properties of 22 WR galaxies having optical classifications as Starburst Galaxies and having Spitzer IRS mid-infrared spectra available from CASSIS. To understand infrared properties of these galaxies we have compared our sample with two independent ultraviolet-selected starburst galaxy samples. We have compared the hardness of radiation of these three samples, using the ratio of total fluxes of [NeIII] 15.55 μm and PAH 11.3 μm , which shows a presence of younger stars in WR galaxies, compared to other UV samples. We also have calibrated the IR and UV SFRs. Our results show that the ~35% of the UV luminosity of WR SB galaxies is observed, compared to ~9% and ~25% of other UV samples. We determine that the classification of objects to pure SB based on criteria EW(6.2μm)> 0.4μm is not applicable for SB galaxies with the youngest star populations.

  4. Photometric Properties of Face-on Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Alexander; Epstein, P.; Durbala, A.

    2011-05-01

    We want to quantify the relative role of nature versus nurture in defining the observed properties of galaxies. In simpler terms we would like to disentangle the ``genetic'’ and the environmental influences in shaping the morphology of galaxies. In order to do that one needs to firstly define a zero-order baseline, i.e., a sample of galaxies that have been minimally perturbed by neighbors in the last few billion years of their existence. Such a sample has been produced and refined in different stages in the context of the AMIGA international project (www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html). The recent catalogue ``The All-Sky Catalog of Isolated Galaxies Selected from 2MASS'’ (Karachentseva, V. E. et al. 2010) allows us to complete and enrich the initial sample constructed within AMIGA with new objects, thus enhancing the statistical relevance of our study. Our focus is to define a subset of isolated disk spiral galaxies. We constrain the sample selection by: 1) orientation, restricting to almost face-on galaxies and 2) availability of good photometric images in SDSS. The goal is to ``dissect'’ (decompose) these galaxies in major components (disk, bulge, bars, etc.) and to study the properties of the components in a statistical context. Having a reasonable representation of all morphological types, we aim to test the bimodality of bulges and bars. We present a progress report of our work.

  5. Broad Hβ Emission-line Variability in a Sample of 102 Local Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runco, Jordan N.; Cosens, Maren; Bennert, Vardha N.; Scott, Bryan; Komossa, S.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Lazarova, Mariana S.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong

    2016-04-01

    A sample of 102 local (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.1) Seyfert galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107M⊙ was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and observed using the Keck 10 m telescope to study the scaling relations between MBH and host galaxy properties. We study profile changes of the broad Hβ emission line within the three to nine year time frame between the two sets of spectra. The variability of the broad Hβ emission line is of particular interest, not only because it is used to estimate MBH, but also because its strength and width are used to classify Seyfert galaxies into different types. At least some form of broad-line variability (in either width or flux) is observed in the majority (∼66%) of the objects, resulting in a Seyfert-type change for ∼38% of the objects, likely driven by variable accretion and/or obscuration. The broad Hβ line virtually disappears in 3/102 (∼3%) extreme cases. We discuss potential causes for these changing look active galactic nuclei. While similar dramatic transitions have previously been reported in the literature, either on a case-by-case basis or in larger samples focusing on quasars at higher redshifts, our study provides statistical information on the frequency of Hβ line variability in a sample of low-redshift Seyfert galaxies.

  6. Dark energy domination in the local flow of giant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2015-05-01

    A dozen of the most luminous galaxies, at distances of up to 10 Mpc from the Local Group, move away from the group, forming the local expansion flow of giants. We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on local giants and their numerous fainter companions to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the flow. An N-body computer model, which reproduces the observed kinematics of the flow, is constructed under the assumption that the flow is embedded in the universal dark energy background. In the model, the motions of the flow members are controlled by their mutual attraction force and the repulsion force produced by the dark energy. It is found that the dark energy repulsion dominates the force field of the flow. Because of this, the flow expands with acceleration. The dark energy domination is enhanced by the environment effect of the low mean matter density on the spatial scale of 50 Mpc in the local Universe. The dark energy domination increases with time and introduces to the flow an asymptotically linear velocity-distance relation with the universal time-rate that depends on the dark energy density only.

  7. CONNECTING TRANSITIONS IN GALAXY PROPERTIES TO REFUELING

    SciTech Connect

    Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Weinberg-Wolf, Jennifer; Wei, Lisa H.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Pisano, D. J.; Baker, Andrew J.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Laine, Seppo; Jogee, Shardha; Lepore, Natasha; Hough, Loren E.

    2013-11-01

    We relate transitions in galaxy structure and gas content to refueling, here defined to include both the external gas accretion and the internal gas processing needed to renew reservoirs for star formation. We analyze two z = 0 data sets: a high-quality ∼200 galaxy sample (the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey, data release herein) and a volume-limited ∼3000 galaxy sample with reprocessed archival data. Both reach down to baryonic masses ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} and span void-to-cluster environments. Two mass-dependent transitions are evident: (1) below the 'gas-richness threshold' scale (V ∼ 125 km s{sup –1}), gas-dominated quasi-bulgeless Sd-Im galaxies become numerically dominant; while (2) above the 'bimodality' scale (V ∼ 200 km s{sup –1}), gas-starved E/S0s become the norm. Notwithstanding these transitions, galaxy mass (or V as its proxy) is a poor predictor of gas-to-stellar mass ratio M{sub gas}/M{sub *}. Instead, M{sub gas}/M{sub *} correlates well with the ratio of a galaxy's stellar mass formed in the last Gyr to its preexisting stellar mass, such that the two ratios have numerically similar values. This striking correspondence between past-averaged star formation and current gas richness implies routine refueling of star-forming galaxies on Gyr timescales. We argue that this refueling underlies the tight M{sub gas}/M{sub *} versus color correlations often used to measure 'photometric gas fractions'. Furthermore, the threshold and bimodality scale transitions reflect mass-dependent demographic shifts between three refueling regimes—accretion-dominated, processing-dominated, and quenched. In this picture, gas-dominated dwarfs are explained not by inefficient star formation but by overwhelming gas accretion, which fuels stellar mass doubling in ∼<1 Gyr. Moreover, moderately gas-rich bulged disks such as the Milky Way are transitional, becoming abundant only in the narrow range between the threshold and bimodality scales.

  8. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  9. THE ROLE OF MERGER STAGE ON GALAXY RADIO SPECTRA IN LOCAL INFRARED-BRIGHT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-11-01

    An investigation of the steep, high-frequency (i.e., ν ∼ 12 GHz) radio spectra among a sample of 31 local infrared-bright starburst galaxies is carried out in light of their Hubble-Space-Telescope-based merger classifications. Radio data covering as many as 10 individual bands allow for spectral indices to be measured over three frequency bins between 0.15 and 32.5 GHz. Sources having the flattest spectral indices measured at ∼2 and 4 GHz, arising from large free-free optical depths among the densest starbursts, appear to be in ongoing through post-stage mergers. The spectral indices measured at higher frequencies (i.e., ∼12 GHz) are steepest for sources associated with ongoing mergers in which their nuclei are distinct, but share a common stellar envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails. These results hold after excluding potential active galactic nuclei based on their low 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths. Consequently, the low-, mid-, and high-frequency spectral indices each appear to be sensitive to the exact merger stage. It is additionally shown that ongoing mergers, whose progenitors are still separated and share a common envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails, also exhibit excess radio emission relative to what is expected given the far-infrared/radio correlation, suggesting that there may be a significant amount of radio emission that is not associated with ongoing star formation. The combination of these observations, along with high-resolution radio morphologies, leads to a picture in which the steep high-frequency radio spectral indices and excess radio emission arise from radio continuum bridges and tidal tails that are not associated with star formation, similar to what is observed for so-called 'taffy' galaxies. This scenario may also explain the seemingly low far-infrared/radio ratios measured for many high-z submillimeter galaxies, a number of which are merger-driven starbursts.

  10. AGN identification and host galaxies properties in the MOSDEF survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Coil, Alison L.; MOSDEF team

    2016-06-01

    We present new results on the identification and host galaxy properties of X-ray, IR and optically-selected AGN at 1.4 < z < 3.8, using spectroscopic data from the on-going MOSDEF survey, which is obtaining rest-frame optical spectra of ~1,500 galaxies and AGN using the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument. We find clear selection effects when identifying AGN at different wavelengths, in that optically-selected AGN are more likely to be found in galaxies with low SFR, while IR AGN are typically found in galaxies with higher SFR. There is also a bias against finding AGN at any wavelength in low mass galaxies. We find that optical AGN selection identifies less powerful AGN that may be obscured at other wavelengths. Combining the AGN we identify at different wavelengths, we find that AGN host galaxies have similar stellar age and dust content as inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. Finally, we do not find a significant correlation between either SFR or stellar mass and L[OIII], which argues against the presence of strong AGN feedback.

  11. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies" in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Gargiulo, Adriana; Campusano, Luis

    2012-02-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~200 galaxies in two nearby (32, 35 Mpc) galaxy groups NGC 4261 and NGC 5353 from the CLoGS local group survey. In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occuring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear star-bursts triggered by low-velocity encounters which should be most frequent in groups.

  12. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies'' in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Egami, Eiichi; Campusano, Luis

    2012-08-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~135 galaxies in ten nearby galaxy groups (60- 80 Mpc) from the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS). In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital that we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occurring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear starbursts triggered by low-velocity encounters and mergers which should be most frequent in groups.

  13. THE ORIENTATIONS OF GALAXY GROUPS AND FORMATION OF THE LOCAL SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Flin, Piotr E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.p

    2010-01-10

    We analyzed the orientation of galaxy groups in the Local Supercluster (LSC). It is strongly correlated with the distribution of neighboring groups in the scale up to about 20 Mpc. The group major axis is in alignment with both the line joining the two brightest galaxies and the direction toward the center of the LSC, i.e., Virgo cluster. These correlations suggest that two brightest galaxies were formed in filaments of matter directed toward the protosupercluster center. Afterward, the hierarchical clustering leads to aggregation of galaxies around these two galaxies. The groups are formed on the same or similarly oriented filaments. This picture is in agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations.

  14. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  15. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time

  16. Properties of the Interstellar Medium in Star-Forming Galaxies at z ~ 1.4 Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Akifumi; Ohta, Kouji; Yabe, Kiyoto; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Akiyama, Masayuki; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Tamura, Naoyuki; Dalton, Gavin

    2016-03-01

    We conducted observations of 12CO(J = 5-4) and dust thermal continuum emission toward 20 star-forming galaxies on the main sequence at z ˜ 1.4 using ALMA to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium. The sample galaxies are chosen to trace the distributions of star-forming galaxies in diagrams of stellar mass versus star formation rate and stellar mass versus metallicity. We detected CO emission lines from 11 galaxies. The molecular gas mass is derived by adopting a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and assuming a CO(5-4)/CO(1-0) luminosity ratio of 0.23. Masses of molecular gas and its fractions (molecular gas mass/(molecular gas mass + stellar mass)) for the detected galaxies are in the ranges of (3.9-12) × 1010 M⊙ and 0.25-0.94, respectively; these values are significantly larger than those in local spiral galaxies. The molecular gas mass fraction decreases with increasing stellar mass; the relation holds for four times lower stellar mass than that covered in previous studies, and the molecular gas mass fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. Stacking analyses also show the same trends. Dust thermal emissions were clearly detected from two galaxies and marginally detected from five galaxies. Dust masses of the detected galaxies are (3.9-38) × 107 M⊙. We derived gas-to-dust ratios and found they are 3-4 times larger than those in local galaxies. The depletion times of molecular gas for the detected galaxies are (1.4-36) × 108 yr while the results of the stacking analysis show ˜3 × 108 yr. The depletion time tends to decrease with increasing stellar mass and metallicity though the trend is not so significant, which contrasts with the trends in local galaxies.

  17. THE WHIQII SURVEY: METALLICITIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF LUMINOUS COMPACT BLUE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Cooke, Jeff; Van Zee, Liese

    2010-01-10

    As part of the WIYN High Image Quality Indiana-Irvine (WHIQII) survey, we present 123 spectra of faint emission-line galaxies, selected to focus on intermediate redshift (0.4 approx< z approx< 0.8) galaxies with blue colors that appear physically compact on the sky. The sample includes 15 true Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) and an additional 27 slightly less extreme emission-line systems. These galaxies represent a highly evolving class that may play an important role in the decline of star formation since z approx 1, but their exact nature and evolutionary pathways remain a mystery. Here, we use emission lines to determine metallicities and ionization parameters, constraining their intrinsic properties and state of star formation. Some LCBG metallicities are consistent with a 'bursting dwarf' scenario, while a substantial fraction of others are not, further confirming that LCBGs are a highly heterogeneous population but are broadly consistent with the intermediate redshift field. In agreement with previous studies, we observe overall evolution in the luminosity-metallicity relation at intermediate redshift. Our sample, and particularly the LCBGs, occupies a region in the empirical R{sub 23}-O{sub 32} plane that differs from luminous local galaxies and is more consistent with dwarf irregulars at the present epoch, suggesting that cosmic 'downsizing' is observable in even the most fundamental parameters that describe star formation. These properties for our sample are also generally consistent with lying between local galaxies and those at high redshift, as expected by this scenario. Surprisingly, our sample exhibits no detectable correlation between compactness and metallicity, strongly suggesting that at these epochs of rapid star formation, the morphology of compact star-forming galaxies is largely transient.

  18. Chandra Galaxy Atals - Global Hot Gas Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer L.; McCollough, Michael L.; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Paggi, Alessandro; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2016-04-01

    The hot gas in early type galaxies (ETGs) plays a crucial role in understanding their formation and evolution. As the hot gas is often extended to the outskirts beyond the optical size, the large scale structural features identified by Chandra (including jets, cavities, cold fronts, filaments and tails) point to key evolutionary mechanisms, e.g., AGN feedback, merging history, accretion/stripping and star formation and its quenching. In our new project, the Chandra Galaxy Atlas, we systematically analyze the archival Chandra data of ~100 ETGs to study the hot ISM. Using uniformly derived data products with spatially resolved spectral information, we will present gas morphology, scaling relations and X-ray based mass profiles and address their implications.

  19. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? I. The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density - metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David.; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density vs. gas metallicity (Σ★ - Z) relation for more than 500,000 spatially-resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disk galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of four in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disk galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ★ - Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star-formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disk galaxies.

  20. Kiloparsec-scale Properties of Emission-line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Miller, Sarah H.; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Guo, Yicheng; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Papovich, Casey

    2014-12-01

    We perform a detailed study of the resolved properties of emission-line galaxies at kiloparsec scales to investigate how small-scale and global properties of galaxies are related. We use a sample of 119 galaxies in the GOODS fields. The galaxies are selected to cover a wide range in morphologies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.3. High resolution spectroscopic data from Keck/DEIMOS observations are used to fix the redshift of all the galaxies in our sample. Using the HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging data taken as a part of the CANDELS project, for each galaxy, we perform spectral energy distribution fitting per resolution element, producing resolved rest-frame U - V color, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), age, and extinction maps. We develop a technique to identify "regions" of statistical significance within individual galaxies, using their rest-frame color maps to select red and blue regions, a broader definition for what are called "clumps" in other works. As expected, for any given galaxy, the red regions are found to have higher stellar mass surface densities and older ages compared to the blue regions. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial distribution of red and blue regions with respect to both redshift and stellar mass, finding that the stronger concentration of red regions toward the centers of galaxies is not a significant function of either redshift or stellar mass. We find that the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies exists among both red and blue regions inside galaxies, with the median of blue regions forming a tighter relation with a slope of 1.1 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ~0.2 dex compared to red regions with a slope of 1.3 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ~0.6 dex. The blue regions show higher specific SFRs (sSFRs) than their red counterparts with the sSFR decreasing since z ~ 1, driven primarily by the stellar mass surface densities rather than the SFRs at a given resolution element.

  1. KILOPARSEC-SCALE PROPERTIES OF EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Miller, Sarah H.; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.

    2014-12-20

    We perform a detailed study of the resolved properties of emission-line galaxies at kiloparsec scales to investigate how small-scale and global properties of galaxies are related. We use a sample of 119 galaxies in the GOODS fields. The galaxies are selected to cover a wide range in morphologies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.3. High resolution spectroscopic data from Keck/DEIMOS observations are used to fix the redshift of all the galaxies in our sample. Using the HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 imaging data taken as a part of the CANDELS project, for each galaxy, we perform spectral energy distribution fitting per resolution element, producing resolved rest-frame U – V color, stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), age, and extinction maps. We develop a technique to identify ''regions'' of statistical significance within individual galaxies, using their rest-frame color maps to select red and blue regions, a broader definition for what are called ''clumps'' in other works. As expected, for any given galaxy, the red regions are found to have higher stellar mass surface densities and older ages compared to the blue regions. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial distribution of red and blue regions with respect to both redshift and stellar mass, finding that the stronger concentration of red regions toward the centers of galaxies is not a significant function of either redshift or stellar mass. We find that the ''main sequence'' of star-forming galaxies exists among both red and blue regions inside galaxies, with the median of blue regions forming a tighter relation with a slope of 1.1 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ∼0.2 dex compared to red regions with a slope of 1.3 ± 0.1 and a scatter of ∼0.6 dex. The blue regions show higher specific SFRs (sSFRs) than their red counterparts with the sSFR decreasing since z ∼ 1, driven primarily by the stellar mass surface densities rather than the SFRs at a given resolution element.

  2. The mean star-forming properties of QSO host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Lutz, D.; Netzer, H.; Trump, J. R.; Silverman, J. D.; Schramm, M.; Lusso, E.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Förster-Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lilly, S.; Magnelli, B.; Mainieri, V.; Maiolino, R.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Nordon, R.; Popesso, P.; Salvato, M.; Santini, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-12-01

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) occur in galaxies in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are growing substantially through rapid accretion of gas. Many popular models of the co-evolutionary growth of galaxies and black holes predict that QSOs are also sites of substantial recent star formation (SF), mediated by important processes, such as major mergers, which rapidly transform the nature of galaxies. A detailed study of the star-forming properties of QSOs is a critical test of these models. We present a far-infrared Herschel/PACS study of the mean star formation rate (SFR) of a sample of spectroscopically observed QSOs to z ~ 2 from the COSMOS extragalactic survey. This is the largest sample to date of moderately luminous QSOs (with nuclear luminosities that lie around the knee of the luminosity function) studied using uniform, deep far-infrared photometry. We study trends of the mean SFR with redshift, black hole mass, nuclear bolometric luminosity, and specific accretion rate (Eddington ratio). To minimize systematics, we have undertaken a uniform determination of SMBH properties, as well as an analysis of important selection effects of spectroscopic QSO samples that influence the interpretation of SFR trends. We find that the mean SFRs of these QSOs are consistent with those of normal massive star-forming galaxies with a fixed scaling between SMBH and galaxy mass at all redshifts. No strong enhancement in SFR is found even among the most rapidly accreting systems, at odds with several co-evolutionary models. Finally, we consider the qualitative effects on mean SFR trends from different assumptions about the SF properties of QSO hosts and from redshift evolution of the SMBH-galaxy relationship. While currently limited by uncertainties, valuable constraints on AGN-galaxy co-evolution can emerge from our approach.

  3. Measuring Galaxy Properties in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2007-10-01

    We develop a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fit a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools.'' We use ``SExtractor'' to extract sources from the images. We create software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. In future work, we will investigate substructure (clumping) within clusters and its correlation with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  4. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  5. OBSERVATIONS OF STARBURST GALAXIES WITH FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPHIC EXPLORER: GALACTIC FEEDBACK IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, J. P.; Heckman, T.; Meurer, G.; Strickland, D.; Aloisi, A.; Leitherer, C.; Sembach, K.; Calzetti, D.; Martin, C. L. E-mail: heckman@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: dks@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: leitherer@stsci.edu E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu

    2009-03-15

    quiescent gas, and can only be readily detected in the strongest absorption lines. From direct observations below the Lyman edge in the galaxy rest frame, we find no evidence of Lyman continuum radiation escaping from any of the galaxies in the sample. Moreover, the small escape fraction of light in the center of the strong C II absorption feature confirms the high opacity below the Lyman limit in the neutral ISM. The absolute fraction of escaping Lyman continuum photons is typically <1%. This sample provides a unique window on the global properties of local star-forming galaxies as observed in the far-UV and also provides a useful comparison sample for understanding spectra of high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

  6. Compact Groups of Galaxies with Complete Spectroscopic Redshifts in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jubee; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Dynamical analysis of compact groups provides important tests of models of compact group formation and evolution. By compiling 2066 redshifts from FLWO/FAST, from the literature, and from SDSS DR12 in the fields of compact groups in tet{McC09}, we construct the largest sample of compact groups with complete spectroscopic redshifts in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.22. This large redshift sample shows that the interloper fraction in the tet{McC09} compact group candidates is ˜ 42%. A secure sample of 332 compact groups includes 192 groups with four or more member galaxies and 140 groups with three members. The fraction of early-type galaxies in these compact groups is 62%, higher than for the original Hickson compact groups. The velocity dispersions of early- and late-type galaxies in compact groups change little with groupcentric radius; the radii sampled are less than 100 h^{-1} kpc, smaller than the radii typically sampled by members of massive clusters of galaxies. The physical properties of our sample compact groups include size, number density, velocity dispersion, and local environment; these properties slightly differ from those derived for the original Hickson compact groups and for the DPOSS II compact groups. Differences result from subtle differences in the way the group candidates were originally selected. The abundance of the compact groups changes little with redshift over the range covered by this sample. The approximate constancy of the abundance for this sample is a potential constraint on the evolution of compact groups on a few Gigayear timescale.

  7. The Fate of the First Galaxies. III. Properties of Primordial Dwarf Galaxies and Their Impact on the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, Massimo; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Shull, J. Michael

    2008-09-01

    In two previous papers, we presented simulations of the first galaxies in a representative volume of the universe. The simulations are unique because we model feedback-regulated galaxy formation, using time-dependent, spatially inhomogeneous radiative transfer coupled to hydrodynamics. Here we study the properties of simulated primordial dwarf galaxies with masses lesssim2 × 108 M⊙ and investigate their impact on the intergalactic medium. While many primordial galaxies are dark, about 100-500 per comoving Mpc3 are luminous but relatively faint. They form preferentially in chain structures and have low surface brightness stellar spheroids extending to 20% of the virial radius. Their interstellar medium has mean density nH ≈ 10-100 cm -3, metallicity Z ~ 0.01-0.1 Z⊙, and can sustain a multiphase structure. With large scatter, the mean efficiency of star formation scales with halo mass, langle f*rangle propto M2DM, independent of redshift. Because of feedback, halos smaller than a critical mass, Mcrit(z) , are devoid of most of their baryons. More interestingly, we find that dark halos have always a smaller Mcrit(z) than luminous ones. Metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium is inhomogeneous, with only a 1%-10% volume filling factor of enriched gas with [ Z/H ] > - 3.0 and 10%-50% with [ Z/H ] > - 5.0. At z ≈ 10, the fraction of stars with metallicity Z < 10-3 Z⊙ is 10-6 of the total stellar mass. However, this study focuses on the effects of radiative feedback: mechanical feedback from SN explosions is only included in two of the seven simulations we have analyzed. Although detections of high-redshift dwarf galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope will be a challenge, studies of their fossil records in the local universe are promising because of their large spatial density.

  8. Properties of stellar populations in isolated lenticular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, I. Yu.; Sil'chenko, O. K.; Afanasiev, V. L.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of observations of a sample of isolated lenticular galaxies, performed at the SCORPIO and SCORPIO-2 spectrographs of the 6-meter BTA telescope of the SAO RAS in the long-slit mode. By direct spectra approximation, using the evolutionary synthesis models, we have measured the radial profiles of the rotation velocity as well as the dispersions of velocities, average age, and average metallicity of stars in 12 objects. The resulting average ages of the stellar population in bulges and discs fill an entire range of possible values from 1.5 to 15 Gyr which indicates the absence in the isolated lenticular galaxies, unlike in the members of groups and clusters, of a certain epoch when the structural components are formed: they could have been formed at a redshift of z > 2 as well as only several billion years ago. Unlike the S0 galaxies in a more dense environment, isolated galaxies typically have the same age of stars in the bulges and discs. The lenses and rings of increased stellar brightness, identified from the photometry of 7 of 11 galaxies, do not significantly differ from the stellar discs by the properties of stellar populations and velocity dispersion of stars. We draw a conclusion that the final arrangement of the morphological type of a lenticular galaxy in complete isolation is critically dependent on the possible modes of accretion of the cold external gas.

  9. Optical Properties of Host Galaxies of Extragalactic Nuclear Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Zaw, Ingyin; Blanton, Michael R.; Greenhill, Lincoln J.

    2011-12-01

    We study the optical properties of the host galaxies of nuclear 22 GHz (λ = 1.35 cm) water masers. To do so, we cross-match the galaxy sample surveyed for water maser emission (123 detections and 3806 non-detections) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) low-redshift galaxy sample (z < 0.05). Out of 1636 galaxies with SDSS photometry, we identify 48 detections; out of the 1063 galaxies that also have SDSS spectroscopy, we identify 33 detections. We find that maser detection rate is higher at higher optical luminosity (MB ), larger velocity dispersion (σ), and higher [O III] λ5007 luminosity, with [O III] λ5007 being the dominant factor. These detection rates are essentially the result of the correlations of isotropic maser luminosity with all three of these variables. These correlations are natural if maser strength increases with central black hole mass and the level of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. We also find that the detection rate is higher in galaxies with higher extinction. Based on these results, we propose that maser surveys seeking to efficiently find masers should rank AGN targets by extinction-corrected [O III] λ5007 flux when available. This prioritization would improve maser detection efficiency, from an overall ~3% without pre-selection to ~16% for the strongest intrinsic [O III] λ5007 emitters, by a factor of ~5.

  10. Photometric Redshift with Bayesian Priors on Physical Properties of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of photometric redshifts with Bayesian priors on physical properties of galaxies. This concept is particularly suited for upcoming/on-going large imaging surveys, in which only several broadband filters are available and it is hard to break some of the degeneracies in the multi-color space. We construct model templates of galaxies using a stellar population synthesis code and apply Bayesian priors on physical properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate. These priors are a function of redshift and they effectively evolve the templates with time in an observationally motivated way. We demonstrate that the priors help reduce the degeneracy and deliver significantly improved photometric redshifts. Furthermore, we show that a template error function, which corrects for systematic flux errors in the model templates as a function of rest-frame wavelength, delivers further improvements. One great advantage of our technique is that we simultaneously measure redshifts and physical properties of galaxies in a fully self-consistent manner, unlike the two-step measurements with different templates often performed in the literature. One may rightly worry that the physical priors bias the inferred galaxy properties, but we show that the bias is smaller than systematic uncertainties inherent in physical properties inferred from the spectral energy distribution fitting and hence is not a major issue. We will extensively test and tune the priors in the on-going Hyper Suprime-Cam survey and will make the code publicly available in the future.

  11. The galaxy-dark matter halo connection: which galaxy properties are correlated with the host halo mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, S.; Baugh, C. M.; Norberg, P.; Padilla, N.

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate how the properties of a galaxy depend on the mass of its host dark matter subhalo, using two independent models of galaxy formation. For the cases of stellar mass and black hole mass, the median property value displays a monotonic dependence on subhalo mass. The slope of the relation changes for subhalo masses for which heating by active galactic nuclei becomes important. The median property values are predicted to be remarkably similar for central and satellite galaxies. The two models predict considerable scatter around the median property value, though the size of the scatter is model dependent. There is only modest evolution with redshift in the median galaxy property at a fixed subhalo mass. Properties such as cold gas mass and star formation rate, however, are predicted to have a complex dependence on subhalo mass. In these cases, subhalo mass is not a good indicator of the value of the galaxy property. We illustrate how the predictions in the galaxy property-subhalo mass plane differ from the assumptions made in some empirical models of galaxy clustering by reconstructing the model output using a basic subhalo abundance matching scheme. In its simplest form, abundance matching generally does not reproduce the clustering predicted by the models, typically resulting in an overprediction of the clustering signal. Using the predictions of the galaxy formation model for the correlations between pairs of galaxy properties, the basic abundance matching scheme can be extended to reproduce the model predictions more faithfully for a wider range of galaxy properties. Our results have implications for the analysis of galaxy clustering, particularly for low abundance samples.

  12. KPC-Scale Properties of Emission-line Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Mobasher, Bahram; Candels

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed -combined spectroscopic and photometric- study of resolved properties of galaxies at kpc scale and investigate how small-scale and global properties of galaxies are related. The sample consists of 119 galaxies to z~1.3 with the unique feature of having very high-resolution spectroscopic data from long exposure observations with the KECK/DEIMOS. Using HST/ACS and WFC3 data taken as part of the CANDELS project, we produce resolved rest-frame (U-V) color, stellar mass and star formation surface densities, stellar age and extinction maps and profiles along the galaxies rotation axes. We model the optical nebular emission lines using the high-resolution DEIMOS spectra and construct the optical line ratio profiles diagnostic of metallicity (R23) and nebular extinction (Ha/Hb). We find that the nebular dust extinction profile, inferred from Balmer decrement, is in agreement with the average extinction derived from the resolved SED modeling. Using the R23 metallicity profiles we examine, for the first time, the mass metallicity relation across galaxies and explore how this relation changes as a function of spatial position. We identify red and blue 'regions' of statistical significance within individual galaxies, using their rest-frame color maps. As expected, for any given galaxy, the red regions are found to have higher stellar mass surface densities and older ages compared to the blue regions. Furthermore, we quantify the spatial distribution of red and blue regions with respect to both redshift and stellar mass, finding that the stronger concentration of red regions toward the centers of galaxies is not a significant function of either redshift or stellar mass. We find that the 'main sequence' of star forming galaxies exists among both red and blue regions inside galaxies, with the median of blue regions forming a tighter relation with a slope of 1.1±0.1 and a scatter of ˜ 0.2 dex compared to red regions with a slope of 1.3 ± 0.1 and a scatter

  13. A statistical study of properties of Seyfert and starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahari, Oved; De Robertis, Michael M.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral and morphological data for 282 Seyfert and emission-line galaxies spanning radio to X-ray wavelengths are compiled. The data include a large number of optical emission-line measurements which have not been reported previously. These data are intended to provide a convenient summary of the relevant properties of these galaxies, as well as a data base to search for correlations among the various parameters in order to obtain a better understanding of the active galaxy phenomenon. The paper presents the data and analyzes the distributions of various properties of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies and starburst galaxies. It is found that Seyferts 2s have a higher 60 micron/forbidden O III 5007 A flux ratio than Seyfert 1s. This result, combined with the fact that Seyfert 2s are more heavily reddened, indicate that they have a higher dust content. It is also found that starburst nuclei are comparable to Seyfert 2s in far-infrared and 20 cm luminosities, although their optical spectra are markedly different.

  14. Environmental quantification and Halpha characterisation of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, Simon

    2005-12-01

    The role of the environment on galaxy evolution is still not fully understood. In order to quantify and set limits on the role of nurture one must identify and study a sample of isolated galaxies. The AMIGA project "Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies" is doing a multi-wavelength study of a large sample of isolated galaxies in order to examine their interstellar medium and star formation activity. We processed 950 galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (Karachentseva, 1973) and evaluated their isolation using an automated star-galaxy classification procedure (down to M_B = 17.5) on large digitised POSS-I fields surrounding each isolated galaxy. We defined, compared and discussed various criteria to quantify the degree of isolation for these galaxies: e.g. Karachentseva's revised criterion, local surface density computations, estimation of the external tidal force affecting each isolated galaxy. We find galaxies violating Karachentseva's original criterion, and we define various subsamples of galaxies according to their degree of isolation. Additionally, we sought for the redshifts of the primary and companion galaxies to access the radial dimension and have an accurate three dimensional picture of the surroundings. Finally, we applied our pipeline to triplets, compact groups and clusters and interpret the isolated galaxy population in light of these control samples. The star formation is known to be affected by the local environment of the galaxies, but the star formation rate also highly depends on the intrinsic interstellar medium features. Disentangling these two effects is still a challenging subject. To address this issue, we observed and gathered photometric data (Halpha narrow- & r Gunn broad-band filters) for 200 spiral galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies which are, by definition, in low-density regions. We subsequently studied the Halpha morphological aspect of the 45 biggest and less inclined galaxies. Using

  15. OT1_nlu_1: Herschel Spectroscopic Survey of Warm Molecular Gas in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, N.

    2010-07-01

    We propose to survey CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED), from J=4-3 up to J=13-12, on 93 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; L_{IR} > 1.0E11 L_{sun}) with Herschel SPIRE FTS spectrometer. These galaxies, plus 32 additional LIRGs that will have similar data from existing Herschel programs (mainly the HerCULES project), form a flux-limited subset of the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS) sample. Our proposal is built on the legacy of GOALS and extends beyond the existing Herschel HerCULES program, which emphasizes more on ULIRGs, to a much needed sample coverage of the more numerous and diverse population of less luminous LIRGs. The data from the proposed observations will not only provide much needed local LIRG templates for future ALMA studies of high-redshift counterparts, but also lend us a powerful diagnostic tool to probe the warm and dense molecular gas that are more closely related to the starburst or AGN activity in the nuclei of LIRGs. The data from this proposal will provide important statistical clues to the interplay between the cold and warm molecular gas, IR luminosity, star formation rate and efficiency, and the diverse properties of LIRGs. Specifically, using the homogeneous CO SLED data from this proposal, together with ground-base, low-order CO line data (mainly J=1-0) and other data that have been compiled for the GOALS sample, we will address the following questions: (1) What is the dominant nuclear power source in individual sample galaxy: starburst or AGN? (2) What are the typical physical properties of warm molecular gas in the nuclei of LIRGs? (3) How do the nuclear warm gas components correlate to the cold gas component, star formation rate and efficiency, dust temperature, etc? and (4) How does molecular gas excitation change along a merger sequence?

  16. Central galaxies in different environments: Do they have similar properties?

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerna, I.; Avila-Reese, V.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Rodríguez-Puebla, A.

    2014-06-10

    We perform an exhaustive comparison among central galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalogs in different local environments at 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.08. The central galaxies are separated into two categories: group centrals (host halos containing satellites) and field centrals (host halos without satellites). From the latter, we select two subsamples: isolated centrals and bright field centrals, both with the same magnitude limit. The stellar mass (M {sub s}) distributions of the field and group central galaxies are different, which explains why in general the field central galaxies are mainly located in the blue cloud/star-forming regions, whereas the group central galaxies are strongly biased to the red sequence/passive regions. The isolated centrals occupy the same regions as the bright field centrals since both populations have similar M {sub s} distributions. At parity of M {sub s}, the color and specific star formation rate (sSFR) distributions of the samples are similar, especially between field and group centrals. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass (M {sub s}-M {sub h}) relation of isolated galaxies does not depend on the color, sSFR, and morphological type. For systems without satellites, the M {sub s}-M {sub h} relation steepens at high halo masses compared to group centrals, which is a consequence of assuming a one-to-one relation between group total stellar mass and halo mass. Under the same assumption, the scatter around the M {sub s}-M {sub h} relation of centrals with satellites increases with halo mass. Our results suggest that the mass growth of central galaxies is mostly driven by the halo mass, with environment and mergers playing a secondary role.

  17. Dark energy in the two-body problem: The local group of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, N. V.; Kovalyov, M. Yu.; Chernin, A. D.

    2015-06-01

    The two-body problem of classical mechanics can be extended in a natural way by introducing a universal dark-energy background, which acts as a third dynamical factor. For real systems of galaxies, the corresponding additional acceleration is described by general relativity in the Newtonian limit, in which deviations from the Minkowski metric are very small. It is shown that this acceleration has the same form in different inertial and non-inertial reference frames. The invariance of the acceleration produced by dark energy reflects the fact that, according to its mechanical properties, dark energy is a vacuum that is comoving with any motion. In this generalized formulation, as in the classical case, the two-body problem with a dark-energy background reduces to the motion of a single body in a central field. Two problems of this kind are considered for the Local Group of galaxies. The first, "internal," problem concerns the binary system formed by the main bodies of the Local Group: our galaxy and M31. The subject of the second, "external," problem is the binary system formed by the Local Group as a whole and its closest neighbor, the Virgo Cluster. In the internal problem, the effect of the dark energy is that the binary system is not bound if its mass does not exceed 3 × 1012 M⊙, which is allowed by the observational data. The external problem demonstrates the possibility of an evolutionary scenario in which a group could initially be located in the volume of a cluster, but then leave it and, moving away with an acceleration created by dark energy, arrive at the observed distance from the cluster.

  18. Constraining particle dark matter using local galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Ishiwata, Koji

    2016-06-01

    It has been long discussed that cosmic rays may contain signals of dark matter. In the last couple of years an anomaly of cosmic-ray positrons has drawn a lot of attentions, and recently an excess in cosmic-ray anti-proton has been reported by AMS-02 collaboration. Both excesses may indicate towards decaying or annihilating dark matter with a mass of around 1–10 TeV . In this article we study the gamma rays from dark matter and constraints from cross correlations with distribution of galaxies, particularly in a local volume. We find that gamma rays due to inverse-Compton process have large intensity, and hence they give stringent constraints on dark matter scenarios in the TeV scale mass regime. Taking the recent developments in modeling astrophysical gamma-ray sources as well as comprehensive possibilities of the final state products of dark matter decay or annihilation into account, we show that the parameter regions of decaying dark matter that are suggested to explain the excesses are excluded. We also discuss the constrains on annihilating scenarios.

  19. Going out with a bang or a whimper? Star formation and quenching in the Local Group's satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    HST observations of the Milky Way and M31's satellite galaxies show that those galaxies have an incredible diversity of star-formation histories, yet with the exception of the Magellanic Clouds, NGC205, and NGC185, none have active star formation or cold gas at the present. What accounts for the variation in star-formation histories, and what turns off star formation? We propose to use the publicly available Galacticus semi-analytic modeling code to explore the mechanisms for star formation and quenching of Local Group dwarf galaxies, comparing the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and M31 with the star-forming "field" galaxies of the Local Group. We will create new modules for Galacticus to incorporate physical processes necessary to follow star formation and quenching {e.g., ram- pressure and tidal stripping and compression of gas}, and perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the HST-derived star-formation histories to determine the best-fit physical model and degeneracies of parameters for star formation in the Local Group. These new modules and the Markov chains will be publicly released via the Galacticus web server. With this study, we can determine to what extent the star-formation histories and quenching of Local Group dwarfs are governed by physical processes that depend on properties of the Milky Way and M31's dark and gas halos versus other "external" {e.g., reionization-induced photoionization} or "internal" {e.g., supernova feedback} processes. This study will be a window into the broader question of star formation in dwarf galaxies.

  20. Extending the Hα Survey for the Local Volume Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Kaisin, S. S.; Kaisina, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    Images in the Ha emission line are presented for 35 nearby objects observed with the 6-m BTA telescope. Three of them, NGC 3377, NGC 3384, and NGC 3390, are bright E and S0 galaxies, one is an edge-on Sd galaxy UGC 7321, two are remote globular clusters associated with M 31, and the rest are dwarf galaxies of morphological types dIr, dTr, dSph, BCD, and Sm. The measured Hα fluxes are used to estimate the integral (SFR) and specific (sSFR) star formation rates for these galaxies. The values of log[sSFR] for all these objects lie below a limit of -0.4(Gyr-1). We note that the emission disk for the nearest super-thin edge-on galaxy UGC 7321 has an extremely large axis ratio of a/b = 38.

  1. 2D kinematical study in local luminous compact blue galaxies. Starburst origin in UCM2325+2318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Morales, A.; Pérez-Gallego, J.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F.; Garland, C.; Gruel, N.; Pisano, D. J.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Ocaña, F.; Zamorano, J.

    2013-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are small, but vigorously star forming galaxies. Their presence at different redshifts denotes their cosmological relevance and implies that local starburst galaxies, when properly selected, are unique laboratories for studying the complex ecosystem of the star formation process over time. We have selected a representative sample of 22 LCBGs from the SDSS and UCM databases which, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar starbursts at high-z. We are carrying out a 2D optical spectroscopic study of this LCBG sample, including spatially resolved maps of kinematics, extinction, SFR and metallicity. This will help us to answer questions regarding the nature of these objects. In this poster we show our results on the kinematical study (Pérez-Gallego et al. 2011) which allows us to classify these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD) 48%, perturbed rotation (PR) 28% and complex kinematics (CK) 24%. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor of ongoing interactions with close companions as a mechanism for the enhanced star formation activity in these galaxies. We find only 5% of objects with clear evidence of AGN activity, and 27% with kinematics consistent with SN-driven galactic winds. Therefore, a different mechanism may be responsible for quenching the star formation in LCBGs. The detailed analysis of the physical properties for each galaxy in the sample is on progress and we show in this poster the results on UCM2325+2318 as a prototype LCBG. Between the possible mechanisms to explain the starburst activity in this galaxy, our 2D spectroscopic data support the scenario of an on-going interaction with the possibility for clump B to be the dwarf satellite galaxy (Castillo-Morales et al. 2011, Pérez-Gallego et al. 2010).

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUBBLE TYPE AND SPECTROSCOPIC CLASS IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; Huertas-Company, M. E-mail: jalfonso@iac.es E-mail: marc.huertas@obspm.fr

    2011-07-10

    We compare the Hubble type and the spectroscopic class of the galaxies with spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. As has long been known, elliptical galaxies tend to be red whereas spiral galaxies tend to be blue; however, this relationship presents a large scatter, which we measure and quantify in detail for the first time. We compare the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based classification (ASK) with most of the commonly used morphological classifications. Despite the degree of subjectivity involved in morphological classifications, all of them provide consistent results. Given a spectral class, the morphological type wavers with a standard deviation between 2 and 3 T types, and the same large dispersion characterizes the variability of spectral classes given a morphological type. The distributions of Hubble types for each ASK class are very skewed-they present long tails that extend to late morphological types in the red galaxies and to early morphological types in the blue spectroscopic classes. The scatter is not produced by problems with the classification and it remains when particular subsets are considered-low and high galaxy masses, low and high density environments, barred and non-barred galaxies, edge-on galaxies, small and large galaxies, or when a volume-limited sample is considered. A considerable fraction of red galaxies are spirals (40%-60%), but they never present very late Hubble types (Sd or later). Even though red spectra are not associated with ellipticals, most ellipticals do have red spectra: 97% of the ellipticals in the morphological catalog by Nair and Abraham used here for reference belong to ASK 0, 2, or 3; only 3% of the ellipticals are blue. The galaxies in the green valley class (ASK 5) are mostly spirals, and the active galactic nuclei class (ASK 6) presents a large scatter of Hubble types from E to Sd. We investigate variations with redshift using a volume-limited subsample mainly formed by luminous red galaxies

  3. How SN Ia host-galaxy properties affect cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, H.; Fraser, M.; Gilmore, G.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the relationship between Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) properties, and the characteristics of their host galaxies, using a sample of 581 SNe Ia from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. We also investigate the effects of this on the cosmological constraints derived from SNe Ia. Compared to previous studies, our sample is larger by a factor of >4, and covers a substantially larger redshift range (up to z ˜ 0.5), which is directly applicable to the volume of cosmological interest. We measure a significant correlation (>5σ) between the host-galaxy stellar-mass and the SN Ia Hubble Residuals (HR). We find a weak correlation (1.4σ) between the host-galaxy metallicity as measured from emission lines in the spectra, and the SN Ia HR. We also find evidence that the slope of the correlation between host-galaxy mass and HR is -0.11 mag/log(Mhost/M⊙) steeper in lower metallicity galaxies. We test the effects on a cosmological analysis using both the derived best-fitting correlations between host parameters and HR, and by allowing an additional free parameter in the fit to account for host properties which we then marginalize over when determining cosmological parameters. We see a shift towards more negative values of the equation-of-state parameter w, along with a shift to lower values of Ωm after applying mass or metallicity corrections. The shift in cosmological parameters with host-galaxy stellar-mass correction is consistent with previous studies. We find a best-fitting cosmology of Ω m =0.266_{-0.016}^{+0.016}, Ω _{Λ }=0.740_{-0.018}^{+0.018} and w=-1.151_{-0.121}^{+0.123} (statistical errors only).

  4. The 1000 Brightest HIPASS Galaxies: H I Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koribalski, B. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Kilborn, V. A.; Ryder, S. D.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Ryan-Weber, E. V.; Ekers, R. D.; Jerjen, H.; Henning, P. A.; Putman, M. E.; Zwaan, M. A.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Calabretta, M. R.; Disney, M. J.; Minchin, R. F.; Bhathal, R.; Boyce, P. J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Green, A. J.; Haynes, R. F.; Juraszek, S.; Kesteven, M. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Meyer, M.; Mould, J. R.; Oosterloo, T.; O'Brien, J.; Price, R. M.; Sadler, E. M.; Schröder, A.; Stewart, I. M.; Stootman, F.; Waugh, M.; Warren, B. E.; Webster, R. L.; Wright, A. E.

    2004-07-01

    We present the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog (BGC), which contains the 1000 H I brightest galaxies in the southern sky as obtained from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). The selection of the brightest sources is based on their H I peak flux density (Speak>~116 mJy) as measured from the spatially integrated HIPASS spectrum. The derived H I masses range from ~107 to 4×1010 Msolar. While the BGC (z<0.03) is complete in Speak, only a subset of ~500 sources can be considered complete in integrated H I flux density (FHI>~25 Jy km s-1). The HIPASS BGC contains a total of 158 new redshifts. These belong to 91 new sources for which no optical or infrared counterparts have previously been cataloged, an additional 51 galaxies for which no redshifts were previously known, and 16 galaxies for which the cataloged optical velocities disagree. Of the 91 newly cataloged BGC sources, only four are definite H I clouds: while three are likely Magellanic debris with velocities around 400 km s-1, one is a tidal cloud associated with the NGC 2442 galaxy group. The remaining 87 new BGC sources, the majority of which lie in the zone of avoidance, appear to be galaxies. We identified optical counterparts to all but one of the 30 new galaxies at Galactic latitudes |b|>10deg. Therefore, the BGC yields no evidence for a population of ``free-floating'' intergalactic H I clouds without associated optical counterparts. HIPASS provides a clear view of the local large-scale structure. The dominant features in the sky distribution of the BGC are the Supergalactic Plane and the Local Void. In addition, one can clearly see the Centaurus Wall, which connects via the Hydra and Antlia Clusters to the Puppis Filament. Some previously hardly noticable galaxy groups stand out quite distinctly in the H I sky distribution. Several new structures, including some not behind the Milky Way, are seen for the first time.

  5. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  6. Chemical substructure and inhomogeneous mixing in Local Group dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, K. A.

    Evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in the Carina, Draco, and Sculptor dwarf galaxies is examined from chemical abundance patterns. Inhomogeneous mixing at early times is indicated in the classical dwarf galaxies, though cannot be ascertained in ultra faint dwarfs. Mixing efficiencies can affect the early metallicity distribution function, the pre-enrichment levels in globular clusters, and also have an impact on the structure of dwarf systems at early times. Numerical models that include chemical evolution explicitly do a better job in reproducing the observations, and make interesting predictions for the nature of dwarf galaxies and their first stars at the earliest times.

  7. Hα survey of the local volume: Isolated southern galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisin, S. S.; Kasparova, A. V.; Knyazev, A. Yu.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2007-05-01

    We present our Hα observations of 11 isolated southern galaxies: SDIG, PGC 51659, E 222-010, E 272-025, E 137-018, IC 4662, Sag DIG, IC 5052, IC 5152, UGCA 438, and E 149-003, with distances from 1 to 7 Mpc. We have determined the total Hα fluxes from these galaxies. The star formation rates in these galaxies range from 10-1 (IC 4662) to 10-4 M ⊙ yr-1 (SDIG) and the gas depletion time at the observed star formation rates lies within the range from 1/6 to 24 Hubble times H 0 -1 .

  8. Understanding the Physical Conditions in Local Analogs of High-Redshift Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Erb, Dawn; Tremonti, Christina A.; Berg, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Observations of strong nebular emission lines in high-redshift galaxies (z~2) can be illuminated through the use of analogous local galaxies (z<0.4), for which many more emission lines can be measured. The observed offset in the "BPT" ([N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ) nebular diagnostic diagram between the locus of high redshift galaxies and that of typical local galaxies indicates a change in the physical conditions of the galaxies with redshift; the cause of this offset is unknown, but it may be associated with the ionization parameter, the hardness of the ionizing spectrum, or the N/O abundance ratio. To study the offset, we have selected a sample of local galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS-III/BOSS DR12), which occupies the same space in the [N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram as the z~2 sample. Using a suite of >50 different emission lines, most of which are unavailable in analyses of higher redshift galaxies, and a novel method of improving the spectrophotometric calibration of BOSS data, we investigate the metallicity, ionization state, and abundance ratios of this offset sample in order to shed light on the physical conditions in galaxies in the early universe.

  9. Structural Properties and Evidence for Interactions in a Sample of Luminous Blue Compact Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Cassidy L.; Fanelli, M.; Marcum, P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the life cycles of galaxies over cosmic time is a primary effort in modern astrophysics. Here we explore the nature of luminous blue compact galaxies (LBCGs), a class of galaxy in the local (z < 0.05) universe exhibiting blue optical colors [(B-V) < 0.5], high luminosity (MB < -19), one or more high surface brightness regions, and moderate to high star formation rates [> 5 M(sun) per year]. LBCGs appear to be similar in their global properties to the early evolutionary phases of most galaxies, but are more amenable to detailed analysis due to their low redshifts. We describe an ultraviolet and optical investigation of a sample of 50 LBCGs using UBVR & Hα imagery obtained at McDonald Observatory, ultraviolet photometry from GALEX, and correlative data from IRAS, 2MASS, and SDSS. Using these data, we explore the evolutionary state of LBCGs. In particular, we determine the radial and azimuthal light distributions, explore the spatial extent of ionized gas (e.g., centrally- concentrated versus spatially diffuse), compare multiwavelength measures of the high-mass star formation rate, and quantify the interaction strength using a variety of merger diagnostics. Although selected independent of their environment, most systems display either a close companion or the signature of an interaction such as tails, bridges, and possible polar rings. Interpretation of the assembly history of LBCGs provides insight on massive galaxy evolution at earlier epochs.

  10. The formation of compact groups of galaxies. I: Optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaferio, Antonaldo; Geller, Margaret J.; Ramella, Massimo

    1994-01-01

    The small crossing time of compact groups of galaxies (t(sub cr)H(sub 0) approximately less than 0.02) makes it hard to understand why they are observable at all. Our dissipationless N-body simulations show that within a single rich collapsing group compact groups of galaxies continually form. The mean lifetime of a particular compact configuration if approximately 1 Gyr. On this time scale, members may merge and/or other galaxies in the loose group may join the compact configuration. In other words, compact configurations are continually replaced by new systems. The frequency of this process explains the observability of compact groups. Our model produces compact configurations (compact groups (CG's) with optical properties remarkably similar to Hickson's (1982) compact groups (HCG's): (1) CG's have a frequency distribution of members similar to that of HCG's; (2) CG's are approximately equals 10 times as dense as loose groups; (3) CG's have dynamical properties remarkably similar to those of HCG's; (4) most of the galaxy members of CG's are not merger remnants. The crucial aspect of the model is the relationship between CG's and the surrounding rich loose group. Our model predicts the frequency of occurrence of CG's. A preliminary analysis of 18 rich loose groups is consistent with the model prediction. We suggest further observational tests of the model.

  11. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Short GRB Host Galaxies: Morphologies, Offsets and Local Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Wen-fai; Berger, E.; Fox, D.

    2010-01-01

    The morphological properties of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies are not well understood. Here, we present optical observations of eight short GRB hosts obtained with ACS and WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations allow us to characterize the galactic and local environments of short GRBs as a powerful constraint on the nature of their progenitors. Using a variety of techniques, we determine the hosts' morphological properties, measure the physical and host-normalized offsets relative to the galaxy centers, and study the locations of short GRBs relative to their host light distributions. We also compare our results to those for long GRBs. Overall, we find that the majority of short GRB hosts have exponential disk profiles, and are on average twice as large as long GRB hosts. We also find that the distribution of projected physical offsets for short GRBs has a median of 5 kpc, a factor of five larger than the median for long GRBs. However, when normalized by the size of the hosts, the offset distributions for the two populations become nearly identical. Finally, unlike long GRBs which are concentrated in the brightest regions of their hosts, short GRBs are found to uniformly trace their host light distribution. These results are consistent with a progenitor population of NS-NS binaries, but do not rule out other potential progenitor models. This research is supported by Harvard University, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and HST - Grant Number GO-10917.01.

  12. Planetary nebulae in galaxies beyond the Local Group.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. C.; Ciardullo, R.; Jacoby, G. H.; Hui, X.

    Planetary nebulae can be used to estimate the distances to galaxies and to measure stellar dynamics in faint halos. The authors discuss surveys which have netted a total of 665 candidate planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Cen A), NGC 5102, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 3115, three galaxies in the Leo Group (NGC 3379, NGC 3384, NGC 3377), NGC 5866, and finally, in NGC 4486 (M87). The highly consistent distances derived from the brightnesses of the jth nebula and the median nebula in different fields in the same galaxy and from different galaxies in the same group lend strong support to the suggestion that planetaries are an accurate standard candle in old stellar populations. Comparison of theoretical luminosity functions to be observed PNLFs shows that there is a very small dispersion in the central star masses.

  13. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  14. The Relation between Galaxy Morphology and Environment in the Local Universe: An RC3-SDSS Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, David J.; Erwin, Peter

    2012-02-01

    We present results of an analysis of the local (z ~ 0) morphology-environment relation for 911 bright (MB < -19) galaxies, based on matching classical RC3 morphologies with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey based group catalog of Yang et al., which includes halo mass estimates. This allows us to study how the relative fractions of spirals, lenticulars, and ellipticals depend on halo mass over a range of 1011.7-1014.8 h -1 M ⊙, from isolated single-galaxy halos to massive groups and low-mass clusters. We pay particular attention to how morphology relates to central versus satellite status (where "central" galaxies are the most massive within their halo). The fraction of galaxies which are elliptical is a strong function of stellar mass; it is also a strong function of halo mass, but only for central galaxies. We interpret this as evidence for a scenario where elliptical galaxies are always formed, probably via mergers, as central galaxies within their halos, with satellite ellipticals being previously central galaxies accreted onto a larger halo. The overall fraction of galaxies which are S0 increases strongly with halo mass, from ~10% to ~70%. Here, too, we find striking differences between the central and satellite populations. 20% ± 2% of central galaxies with stellar masses M * > 1010.5 M ⊙ are S0 regardless of halo mass, but satellite S0 galaxies are only found in massive (>1013 h -1 M ⊙) halos, where they are 69% ± 4% of the M * > 1010.5 M ⊙ satellite population. This suggests two channels for forming S0 galaxies: one which operates for central galaxies and another which transforms lower-mass ( M * <~ 1011 M ⊙) accreted spirals into satellite S0 galaxies in massive halos. Analysis of finer morphological structure (bars and rings in disk galaxies) shows some trends with stellar mass, but none with halo mass; this is consistent with other recent studies which indicate that bars are not strongly influenced by galaxy environment. Radio sources in high

  15. Evidence for Black Hole Growth in Local Analogs to Lyman Break Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Hornschemeier, Ann; LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used XMM-Newton to observe six Lyman break analogs (LBAs): members of the rare population of local galaxies that have properties that are very similar to distant Lyman break galaxies. Our six targets were specifically selected because they have optical emission-line properties that are intermediate between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our new X-ray data provide an important diagnostic of the presence of an AGN. We find X-ray luminosities of order 10(sup 42) erg per second and ratios of X-ray to far-IR lummositles that are higher than values in pure starburst galaxies by factors ranging from approximately 3 to 30. This strongly suggests the presence of an AGN in at least some of the galaxies. The ratios of the luminosities of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray to [O III] emission line are low by about an order of magnitude compared with Type 1 AGN, but are consistent with the broad range seen in Type 2 AGN. Either the AGN hard X-rays are significantly obscured or the [O III] emission is dominated by the starburst. We searched for an iron emission line at approximately 6.4 ke V, which is a key feature of obscured AGNs, but only detected emission at the approximately 2sigma level. Finally, we find that the ratios of the mid-infrared (24 micrometer) continuum to [O III]lambda 5007 luminosities in these LBAs are higher than the values for Type 2 AGN by an average of 0.8 dex. Combining all these clues, we conclude that an AGN is likely to be present, but that the bolometric luminosity is produced primarily by an intense starburst. If these black holes are radiating at the Eddington limit, their masses would lie in the range of 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 6) solar mass. These objects may offer ideal local laboratories to investigate the processes by which black holes grew in the early universe.

  16. Constructing massive blue elliptical galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Tim

    Over cosmic time, galaxy mass assembly has transitioned from low-mass, star-forming disk galaxies to massive, quiescent elliptical galaxies. The merger hypothesis for the formation of new elliptical galaxies provides one physical explanation to the observed buildup of this population, a key prediction of which is a brief phase of morphological transformation from highly-disturbed remnant to blue elliptical. We study 12 plausible new ellipticals with varying degrees of morphological peculiarities visually selected from a larger parent sample of nearby (0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.04), massive (M* ≥ 10 10 M⊙ ), concentrated (Petrosian R90/R50 ≥ 2.6), and optically blue galaxies from the SDSS DR4 catalog. Using integral field spectroscopy, we construct two-dimensional spectra of the stellar populations and azimuthally bin them into concentric annuli to determine the relative ages of the stellar populations as a function of radius. Using this data and conclusions from simulations, we seek to distinguish post-mergers from galaxies undergoing other modes of mass assembly. We find that 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger. Another 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a 'frosting' of recent star formation. The final 1/3 of our sample is either inconsistent with or inconclusive of having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger.

  17. Cluster galaxies in XMMU J2235-2557: galaxy population properties in most massive environments at z ~ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzullo, V.; Rosati, P.; Pannella, M.; Gobat, R.; Santos, J. S.; Nonino, M.; Demarco, R.; Lidman, C.; Tanaka, M.; Mullis, C. R.; Nuñez, C.; Rettura, A.; Jee, M. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bender, R.; Bouwens, R. J.; Dawson, K.; Fassbender, R.; Franx, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Postman, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of galaxy populations in the core of the massive, X-ray luminous cluster XMMU J2235 at z=1.39, based on high quality VLT and HST photometry at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. We derive luminosity functions in the z, H, and Ks bands, approximately corresponding to restframe U, R and z band. These show a faint-end slope consistent with being flat, and a characteristic magnitude M^* close to passive evolution predictions of M^* of local massive clusters, with a formation redshift z>2. The color-magnitude and color-mass diagrams show evidence of a tight red sequence (intrinsic scatter ⪉0.08) of massive galaxies already in place, with overall old stellar populations and generally early-type morphology. Beside the red colors, these massive (>6 × 1010 M⊙) galaxies typically show early-type spectral features, and rest-frame far-UV emission consistent with very low star formation rates (SFR < 0.2 M⊙ yr-1). Star forming spectroscopic members, with SFR of up to ~100 M⊙/yr, are all located at clustercentric distances ⪆250 kpc, with the central cluster region already appearing effectively quenched. Most part of the cluster galaxies more massive than 6 × 1010 M⊙ within the studied area do not appear to host significant levels of star formation. The high-mass end of the galaxy populations in the core of this cluster appears to be in a very advanced evolutionary stage, not only in terms of formation of the stellar populations, but also of the assembly of the stellar mass. The high-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function is essentially already in place. The stellar mass fraction estimated within r500 (~1%, Kroupa IMF) is already similar to that of local massive clusters. On the other hand, surface brightness distribution modeling of the massive red sequence galaxies may suggest that their size is often smaller than expected based on the local stellar mass vs. size relation. An evolution of the stellar mass vs. size

  18. Activity in galactic nuclei of cluster and field galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H. S.; Park, C.; Elbaz, D.; Choi, Y.-Y.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: We study the environmental effects on the activity in galactic nuclei by comparing galaxies in clusters and in the field. Methods: Using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in Abell clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we investigate the dependence of nuclear activity on the physical parameters of clusters as well as the nearest neighbor galaxy. We also compare galaxy properties between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hosts and non-AGN galaxies. Results: We find that the AGN fraction of early-type galaxies starts to decrease around one virial radius of clusters (r200,cl) as decreasing clustercentric radius, while that of late types starts to decrease close to the cluster center (R ~ 0.1-0.5r200,cl). The AGN fractions of early-type cluster galaxies, on average, are found to be lower than those of early-type field galaxies by a factor ~3. However, the mean AGN fractions of late-type cluster galaxies are similar to those of late-type field galaxies. The AGN fraction of early-type brightest cluster galaxies lies between those of other early-type, cluster and field galaxies with similar luminosities. In the field, the AGN fraction is strongly dependent on the morphology of and the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy. We find an anti-correlation between the AGN fraction and the velocity dispersion of clusters for all subsamples divided by morphology and luminosity of host galaxies. The AGN power indicated by L [OIII] /MBH is found to depend strongly on the mass of host galaxies rather than the clustercentric radius. The difference in physical parameters such as luminosity, (u - r) colors, star formation rates, and (g - i) color gradients between AGN hosts and non-AGN galaxies is seen for both early and late types at all clustercentric radii, while the difference in structure parameters between the two is significant only for late types. Conclusions: These results support the idea that the activity in galactic nuclei is triggered through

  19. Selection and Physical Properties of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. W.

    2014-09-01

    Extremely Red Objects (EROs) and BzKs continue to attract considerable interest. It has been suggested that they may be the direct progenitors of present-day massive E/S0 galaxies, and can provide crucial constraints on the current galaxy formation and evolution models. Therefore, the key question is to measure the relative fraction of OGs (old galaxies) and DGs (young, and dusty starburst galaxies) in the sample of EROs. Many groups have been currently investigating the fractions of these two ERO populations using a variety of observational approaches, but the fraction of OGs and DGs from different surveys is different. In the meantime, a number of observations suggest that the epoch of z˜2 also plays an important role in galaxy formation and evolution for various reasons: the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) begins to drop at z˜2 from a flat plateau at higher redshifts; the morphological type mix of field galaxies changes remarkably at z˜2; the number density of QSOs has a peak at z˜2; and about 50% to 70% of the stellar mass assembly of galaxies took place in the redshift range 1properties of passive and star-forming galaxies at z˜2 in the AEGIS field, and (3) the mid-infrared spectroscopy and multi-wavelength study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z˜2 in the AEGIS field. Chapter 1 gives a brief review on the research progresses of EROs at z˜1, BzKs at z˜2, and ULIRGs at z˜2, respectively. In Chapter 2 we present a quantitative study of the classification of EROs in the UDF and COSMOS field. Our sample includes 5264 (COSMOS, K_{Vega} ≤19.2) and 24 EROs (UDF, K_{Vega}≤22.0) with (i-K)_{AB}≥2.45. Using the fitting method of spectral energy distribution (SED), [3.6]-[8.0] color, and the nonparametric measures of galaxy morphology, we classify EROs into two classes: DGs and OGs. We find

  20. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Blanton, Michael R.; Moustakas, John E-mail: michael.blanton@nyu.ed

    2010-10-10

    We study the stellar populations of 1923 elliptical galaxies at z < 0.05 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, {sigma}, and environment. Our sample constitutes among the largest high-fidelity samples of elliptical galaxies with uniform imaging and optical spectroscopy assembled to date. Confirming previous studies, we find that elliptical galaxies dominate at high luminosities ({approx}>L*), and that the highest-{sigma} ellipticals favor high-density environments. We construct average, high signal-to-noise spectra in bins of {sigma} and environment and find the following: (1) lower-{sigma} galaxies have a bluer optical continuum and stronger (but still weak) emission lines; (2) at fixed {sigma}, field ellipticals have a slightly bluer stellar continuum, especially at wavelengths {approx}<4000 A, and have stronger (but still weak) emission lines compared with their group counterparts, although this environmental dependence is strongest for low-{sigma} ellipticals and the highest-{sigma} ellipticals are much less affected. Based on Lick indices measured from both the individual and average spectra, we find that (1) at a given {sigma}, elliptical galaxies in groups have systematically weaker Balmer absorption than their field counterparts, although this environmental dependence is most pronounced at low {sigma}; (2) there is no clear environmental dependence of (Fe), while the {alpha}-element absorption indices such as Mg b are only slightly stronger in galaxies belonging to rich groups. An analysis based on simple stellar populations (SSPs) reveals that more massive elliptical galaxies are older, more metal-rich, and more strongly {alpha}-enhanced. We also find that (1) the SSP-equivalent ages of galaxies in rich groups are, on average, {approx}1 Gyr older than in the field, although once again this effect is strongest at low {sigma}; (2) galaxies in rich groups have slightly lower [Fe/H] and are marginally more strongly

  1. Galaxy evolution in nearby galaxy groups - III. A GALEX view of NGC 5846, the largest group in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Antonietta; Mazzei, Paola; Rampazzo, Roberto; Bianchi, Luciana

    2016-06-01

    We explore the co-evolution of galaxies in nearby groups (Vhel ≤ 3000 km s-1) with a multiwavelength approach. We analyse GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey u, g, r, i, z data of groups spanning a large range of dynamical phases. We characterize the photometric properties of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy members and investigate the global properties of the groups through a dynamical analysis. Here, we focus on NGC 5846, the third most massive association of early-type galaxies (ETGs) after the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The group, composed of 90 members, is dominated by ETGs (about 80 per cent), and among ETGs about 40 per cent are dwarfs. Results are compared with those obtained for three groups in the LeoII cloud, which are radically different both in member-galaxy population and dynamical properties. The FUV-NUV cumulative colour distribution and the normalized UV luminosity function (LF) significantly differ due to the different fraction of late-type galaxy population. The UV LF of NGC 5846 resembles that of the Virgo cluster, however our analysis suggests that star formation episodes are still occurring in most of the group galaxies, including ETGs. The NUV-i colour distribution, the optical-UV colour-colour diagram, and NUV-r versus Mr colour-magnitude relation suggest that the gas contribution cannot be neglected in the evolution of ETG-type group members. Our analysis highlights that NGC 5846 is still in an active phase of its evolution, notwithstanding the dominance of dwarf and bright ETGs and its virialized configuration.

  2. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2008-10-01

    We continue development of a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties, as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and we have already obtained spectroscopic redshifts for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. For each CCD frame we fit a WCS (world coordinate system), remove bright cosmic rays, and extract sources using ``SExtractor.'' We create software for merging source catalogs in such a way as to reject residual cosmic rays and other invalid sources, and to combine redundant measurements without double counting. The measured properties include magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We compare our data to those of the HST (Hubble Space Telescope) and SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) archives to examine the accuracy of our star/galaxy separation and our color measurements. For our substructure investigation, we draw several subsamples of galaxies based on stellarity index, color (the color-magnitude relation), magnitude and velocity. The smallest subsample of spectroscopically confirmed members produces significant substructure signals from 1D (velocity) and 3D (x,y,velocity) diagnostics - a small, offset group may be the culprit. The 2D (x,y) diagnostics applied to the larger samples produce some significant statistics, the cause does not seem to be a large-scale merger, but perhaps several small groups. This is consistent with previous X-ray data showing X-ray emitting gas clumped around small groupings of galaxies.

  3. HST Imaging of the Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies Pisces A and B: Prototypes for Local Group Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-08-01

    We present observations of the Pisces A and B galaxies with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Photometry from these images clearly resolves a red giant branch (RGB) for both objects, demonstrating that they are nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe a Bayesian inferential approach to determining the distance to these galaxies using the magnitude of the tip of the RGB, and then apply this approach to these galaxies. This reveals the distance to these galaxies as {5.64}-0.15+0.13 {{Mpc}} and {8.89}-0.85+0.75 {{Mpc}} for Pisces A and B, respectively, placing both within the Local Volume but not the Local Group (LG). We estimate the star formation histories of these galaxies, which suggests that they have recently undergone an increase in their star formation rates. Together these yield luminosities for Pisces A and B of {M}V=-{11.57}-0.05+0.06 and ‑12.9 ± 0.2, respectively, and estimated stellar masses of {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )={7.0}-1.7+0.4 and {7.5}-1.8+0.3. We further show that these galaxies are likely at the boundary between nearby voids and higher-density filamentary structure. This suggests that they are entering a higher-density region from voids, where they would have experienced delayed evolution, consistent with their recent increased star formation rates. If this is indeed the case, they are useful for study as proxies of the galaxies that later evolved into typical LG satellite galaxies.

  4. Atomic hydrogen properties of active galactic nuclei host galaxies: H I in 16 nuclei of galaxies (NUGA) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, Sebastian; Schinnerer, Eva; Mundell, Carole G.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Combes, Francoise E-mail: schinner@mpia.de E-mail: burillo@oan.es

    2008-01-01

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN), observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ∼20'', ∼5 km s{sup –1}) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei, and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA)—a spectrally and spatially resolved interferometric survey of gas dynamics in nearby galaxies designed to identify the fueling mechanisms of AGN and the relation to host galaxy evolution. Here we investigate the relationship between the H I properties of these galaxies, their environment, their stellar distribution, and their AGN type. The large-scale H I morphology of each galaxy is classified as ringed, spiral, or centrally concentrated; comparison of the resulting morphological classification with the AGN type reveals that ring structures are significantly more common in low-ionization narrow emission-line regions (LINER) than in Seyfert host galaxies, suggesting a time evolution of the AGN activity together with the redistribution of the neutral gas. Dynamically disturbed H I disks are also more prevalent in LINER host galaxies than in Seyfert host galaxies. While several galaxies are surrounded by companions (some with associated H I emission), there is no correlation between the presence of companions and the AGN type (Seyfert/LINER).

  5. Mapping the Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies by Means of Integral Field Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairós, L. M.; Caon, N.; Weilbacher, P.; Papaderos, P.; García-Lorenzo, B.

    Blue Compact Dwarf (BCD) galaxies are metal-poor and gas-rich systems undergoing intense, spatially extended star-forming activity. These galaxies offer a unique opportunity to investigate dwarf galaxy formation and evolution, and probe violent star formation and its implications on the chemical, dynamical and structural properties of low-mass extragalactic systems near and far. Several fundamental questions in BCD research, such as their star formation histories and the mechanisms that control their cyclic starburst activity, are still far from well understood. In order to improve our understanding on BCD evolution, we are carrying out a comprehensive Integral Field Spectroscopic (IFS) survey of a large sample of BCDs. Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectroscopy provides simultaneously spectral and spatial information, allowing, in just one shot, to study the morphology and evolutionary status of the stellar component, and the physical properties of the warm interstellar medium (e.g., extinction, chemical abundances, kinematics). This ongoing IFS survey will supply much needed local templates that will ease the interpretation of IFS data for intermediate and high-redshift star-forming galaxies.

  6. A homogeneous sample of binary galaxies: Basic observational properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of optical characteristics for 585 binary systems, satisfying a condition of apparent isolation on the sky, is presented. Influences of various selection effects distorting the average parameters of the sample are noted. The pair components display mutual similarity over all the global properties: luminosity, diameter, morphological type, mass-to-luminosity ratio, angular momentum etc., which is not due only to selection effects. The observed correlations must be caused by common origin of pair members. Some features (nuclear activity, color index) could acquire similarity during synchronous evolution of double galaxies. Despite the observed isolation, the sample of double systems is seriously contaminated by accidental pairs, and also by members of groups and clusters. After removing false pairs estimates of orbital mass-to-luminosity ratio range from 0 to 30 f(solar), with the mean value (7.8 plus or minus 0.7) f(solar). Binary galaxies possess nearly circular orbits with a typical eccentrity e = 0.25, probably resulting from evolutionary selection driven by component mergers under dynamical friction. The double-galaxy population with space abundance 0.12 plus or minus 0.02 and characteristic merger timescale 0.2 H(exp -1) may significantly influence the rate of dynamical evolution of galaxies.

  7. THE PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOST GALAXIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Du-Hwan; Park, Myeong-Gu; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: mgp@knu.ac.k E-mail: yychoi@khu.ac.k

    2010-11-20

    We investigate the properties and environments of Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) host galaxies in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey centered on the celestial equator. Host galaxies are defined as the galaxy nearest to the supernova (SN) in terms of angular distance whose velocity difference from the SN is less than 1000 km s{sup -1}. Eighty seven SN Ia host galaxies are selected from the SDSS Main galaxy sample with the apparent r-band magnitude m{sub r} < 17.77, and compared with the SDSS Main galaxies. The SN Ia rates for early- and late-type galaxies are 0.81 {+-} 0.19 SN (100 yr){sup -1} and 0.99 {+-} 0.21 SN (100 yr){sup -1}, respectively. We find that the host galaxies have a color distribution consistent with that of the Main galaxies, regardless of their morphology. However, host galaxies are on average brighter than the Main galaxies by {approx}0.3 mag over the range of -18.3>M{sub r} > - 21.3. But the brighter ends of their luminosity distributions are similar. The distribution of the distance to the nearest neighbor galaxy shows that SNe Ia are more likely to occur in isolated galaxies without close neighbors. We also find that the SN Ia host galaxies are preferentially located in a region close to massive galaxy clusters compared to the Main galaxies.

  8. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies. V - The acceleration on the Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Yahil, Amos; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.; Fisher, Karl

    1992-01-01

    The acceleration on the Local Group is calculated based on a full-sky redshift survey of 5288 galaxies detected by IRAS. A formalism is developed to compute the distribution function of the IRAS acceleration for a given power spectrum of initial perturbations. The computed acceleration on the Local Group points 18-28 deg from the direction of the Local Group peculiar velocity vector. The data suggest that the CMB dipole is indeed due to the motion of the Local Group, that this motion is gravitationally induced, and that the distribution of IRAS galaxies on large scales is related to that of dark matter by a simple linear biasing model.

  9. Galaxy Clusters and Properties in the CFHTLS/VIPERS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Gallego, Sofia Carolina; Murphy, David; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    We present our analysis of clusters in the CFHTLS Wide fields using a red-sequence based cluster finding code. The deep five-band photometry and panoramic coverage permits detection of galaxy clusters between z=0 and z~1 over 132 square degrees. We present a cluster catalogue and optical richness estimates as mass proxies, derived cluster properties from a novel template-fitting analysis and cluster redshift measurements utilizing data from the VLT/VIPERS spectroscopic survey.We complement our analysis with studies of mock cluster catalogues generated from N-body simulation lightcones featuring semi-analytic prescriptions of galaxy formation. These provide us with an insight into the performance of the cluster-finding technique, uncertainties in the derived properties of the detected cluster populations and an important comparison of the popular “lambda” optical richness estimator to known dark matter halo properties.This study serves as the perfect precursor to LSST-depth cluster science, providing an important input into how models describe the evolution of clusters and their members as a function of redshift and mass, and the role high-density environments play in galaxy evolution over half the Hubble time.

  10. Local group irregular galaxies LGS 3 and Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, C.A.; Tully, R.B.

    1983-07-01

    The Galileo/IFA 500 x 500 CCD camera was used to resolve red giant stars in the gas-rich dwarf galaxy LGS 3 at magnitudes fainter than V = 21.8. Depending on whether these stars are >10/sup 9/ yr old or 10/sup 8/--10/sup 9/ yr old, the distance of the galaxy is 0.7--1.2 Mpc. Although H I gas has been detected in this system, there has been no significant star formation for at least the last 7 x 10/sup 7/ yr. The CM diagram of LGS 3 is compared with the CM diagrams of the Pegasus irregular galaxy discussed by Hoessel and Mould. A distance of 1.3 Mpc is suggested for Pegasus, rather than the larger distance preferred by Hoessel and Mould or the very much larger distance offered by Sandage and Tammann.

  11. Analysis of the Spiral Properties in Prototype Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, William Stuart

    Numerical methods and algorithms are developed for analyzing the distribution of pitch angles of global and local spiral structure in disk-shaped galaxies. From the distribution of gas clouds and young stellar associations, "partitioning" methods based on nearest neighbor and Voronoi polyhedra calculations are applied to capture regions of high population density associated with local arm segments, spurs, feathers and secondary features. The pitch angle and length of each of these features are determined using least squares procedures applied in logarithmic spiral coordinates. The spectrum of pitch angles for both prototype and observed galaxies is analyzed and discussed. The evolution of prominent secondary features is examined over a 40 Myr period and characteristic behavior is interpreted in terms of competing mechanisms such as differential rotation and the gravitational force field induced by nearby features. A refined numerical method is also presented for modeling the self-gravity force field arising in prototype galaxy simulations. The loss of resolution from previous methods is compared to results obtained using high order finite differencing and modified bicubic interpolation. ftn*This work was supported in part under W. W. Roberts' grants from the National Science Foundation (Grant AST-87-12084) and NASA (Grant NAGW-929). The computational work was carried out on the CDC 855 and the AMSUN 3/260 cluster at the University of Virginia and the CRAY Y-MP at the Pittsburgh Superconducting Center (Grant AST880019P: W. W. Roberts, P.I.).

  12. Constraining ultracompact dwarf galaxy formation with galaxy clusters in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Hilker, M.; Baumgardt, H.; Griffen, B. F.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the predictions of a semi-analytic model for ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) formation by tidal stripping to the observed properties of globular clusters (GCs) and UCDs in the Fornax and Virgo clusters. For Fornax we find the predicted number of stripped nuclei agrees very well with the excess number of GCs+UCDs above the GC luminosity function. GCs+UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ are consistent with being entirely formed by tidal stripping. Stripped nuclei can also account for Virgo UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ where numbers are complete by mass. For both Fornax and Virgo, the predicted velocity dispersions and radial distributions of stripped nuclei are consistent with that of UCDs within ˜50-100 kpc but disagree at larger distances where dispersions are too high and radial distributions too extended. Stripped nuclei are predicted to have radially biased anisotropies at all radii, agreeing with Virgo UCDs at clustercentric distances larger than 50 kpc. However, ongoing disruption is not included in our model which would cause orbits to become tangentially biased at small radii. We find the predicted metallicities and central black hole masses of stripped nuclei agree well with the metallicities and implied black hole masses of UCDs for masses >106.5 M⊙. The predicted black hole masses also agree well with that of M60-UCD1, the first UCD with a confirmed central black hole. These results suggest that observed GC+UCD populations are a combination of genuine GCs and stripped nuclei, with the contribution of stripped nuclei increasing towards the high-mass end.

  13. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  14. Galaxy populations in the Antlia cluster - III. Properties of faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, Analía. V.; Cellone, Sergio A.; Faifer, Favio R.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Richtler, Tom; Romero, Gisela A.; Calderón, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the early-type galaxy population in the central region of the Antlia cluster, focusing on the faint systems such as dwarf ellipticals (dEs) and dwarf spheroidals (dSphs). The colour-magnitude relation (CMR) and the relation between luminosity and mean effective surface brightness for galaxies in the central region of Antlia have been previously studied in Paper I of the present series. Now we confirm 22 early-type galaxies as Antlia members, using Gemini-GMOS and Magellan-MIKE spectra. Among them, 15 are dEs from the FS90 Antlia Group catalogue, two belong to the rare type of compact ellipticals (cEs) and five are new faint dwarfs that had never been catalogued before. In addition, we present 16 newly identified low-surface-brightness galaxy candidates, almost half of them displaying morphologies consistent with being Antlia's counterparts of Local Group dSphs, which extend the faint luminosity limit of our study down to MB=-10.1(BT= 22.6) mag. With these new data, we built an improved CMR in the Washington photometric system, i.e. integrated T1 magnitudes versus (C-T1) colours, which extends ˜4 mag faintwards the limit of spectroscopically confirmed Antlia members. When only confirmed early-type members are considered, this relation extends over 10 mag in luminosity with no apparent change in slope or increase in colour dispersion towards its faint end. The intrinsic colour scatter of the relation is compared with those reported for other clusters of galaxies; we argue that it is likely that the large scatter of the CMR, usually reported at faint magnitudes, is mostly due to photometric errors along with an improper membership/morphological classification. The distinct behaviour of the luminosity versus mean effective surface brightness relation at the bright and faint ends is analysed, while it is confirmed that dE galaxies on the same relation present a very similar effective radius, regardless of their colour. The projected spatial

  15. Physical properties of UDF12 galaxies in cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ikkoh; Inoue, Akio K.; Okamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    We have performed a large cosmological hydrodynamics simulation tailored to the deep survey with the Hubble Space Telescope made in 2012, the so-called UDF12 campaign. After making a light-cone output, we have applied the same colour-selection criteria as the UDF12 campaign to select galaxies from our simulation, and then, have examined the physical properties of them as a proxy of the real observed UDF12 galaxies at z > 7. As a result, we find that the halo mass is almost linearly proportional to the observed ultraviolet (UV) luminosity (4 × 1011M⊙ at MUV = -21). The dust attenuation and UV slope β well correlates with the observed UV luminosity, which is consistent with observations quantitatively. The star formation rate (SFR) is also linearly proportional to the stellar mass and the specific SFR shows only a weak dependence on the mass. We also find an increasing star formation history with a time-scale of ˜100 Myr in the high-z galaxies. An average metallicity weighted by the Lyman continuum luminosity reaches up to >0.1 Solar even at z ˜ 10, suggesting a rapid metal enrichment. We also expect ≥0.1 mJy at 350 GHz of the dust thermal emission from the galaxies with H160 ≤ 27, which can be detectable with the Atacama Large Millimetre-sub-millimetre Array. The galaxies selected by the UDF12 survey contribute to only 52-12 per cent of the cosmic SFR density from z ˜ 7 to z ˜ 10, respectively. The James Webb Space Telescope will push the detection fraction up to 77-72 per cent.

  16. The properties of Lyman break galaxies at z~ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, M. N.; Lehnert, M. D.; Waddington, I.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Boyce, P. J.; Phillipps, S.

    2004-01-01

    In a recent paper, Lehnert & Bremer have photometrically selected a sample of Lyman break galaxies at z > 4.8 from a single VLT/FORS2 pointing and spectroscopically confirmed half of them to be at 4.8 < z < 5.8. To study the properties of such galaxies further, we have photometrically selected a similar sample (VAB > 28, iAB < 26.3, iAB-zAB > 0) from the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST ACS) images of the Chandra Deep Field-South. This selection results in a sample of 44 sources from ~150 arcmin2. We find that such galaxies are often barely resolved in the ACS images, having half-light radii of 0.1-0.3 arcsec (<2 kpc). They show no difference in spatial clustering from sources selected by iAB < 26.3, iAB-zAB > 0, which are generally galaxies of lower redshift. However, their distribution over the field is not uniform and their surface density varies considerably over areas comparable to a single 8-m or HST pointing. A reliable determination of the surface and volume densities of such galaxies requires a sky area considerably larger than the current ACS imaging of this field. No individual Lyman break candidate was detected to a 3σ limit of 6 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 at 0.5-5 keV by Chandra (a limiting luminosity of below 2 × 1043 erg s-1 at z~ 5.3). By summing over all positions, we find that the mean source must be undetected at a level at least a factor of 4 times fainter than this. This rules out anything other than a weak active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the emission from these objects; we conclude that luminous AGNs made little contribution to the final stages of re-ionization of the Universe.

  17. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  18. Dynamical Family Properties and Dark Halo Scaling Relations of Giant Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Kronawitter, Andi; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, Ralf

    2001-04-01

    Based on a uniform dynamical analysis of the line-profile shapes of 21 mostly luminous, slowly rotating, and nearly round elliptical galaxies, we have investigated the dynamical family relations and dark halo properties of ellipticals. Our results include: (i) The circular velocity curves (CVCs) of elliptical galaxies are flat to within ~=10% for R>~0.2Re. (ii) Most ellipticals are moderately radially anisotropic; their dynamical structure is surprisingly uniform. (iii) Elliptical galaxies follow a Tully-Fisher (TF) relation with marginally shallower slope than spiral galaxies, and vmaxc~=300 km s-1 for an L*B galaxy. At given circular velocity, they are ~1 mag fainter in B and ~0.6 mag in R and appear to have slightly lower baryonic mass than spirals, even for the maximum M/LB allowed by the kinematics. (iv) The luminosity dependence of M/LB indicated by the tilt of the fundamental plane (FP) is confirmed. The tilt of the FP is not caused by dynamical or photometric nonhomology, although the latter might influence the slope of M/L versus L. It can also not be due only to an increasing dark matter fraction with L for the range of IMF currently discussed. It is, however, consistent with stellar population models based on published metallicities and ages. The main driver is therefore probably metallicity, and a secondary population effect is needed to explain the K-band tilt. (v) These results make it likely that elliptical galaxies have nearly maximal M/LB (minimal halos). (vi) Despite the uniformly flat CVCs, there is a spread in the luminous to dark matter ratio and in cumulative M/LB(r). Some galaxies have no indication for dark matter within 2Re, whereas for others we obtain local M/LB-values of 20-30 at 2Re. (vii) In models with maximum stellar mass, the dark matter contributes ~10%-40% of the mass within Re. Equal interior mass of dark and luminous matter is predicted at ~2-4Re. (viii) Even in these maximum stellar mass models, the halo core densities and

  19. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOCAL GROUP GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, C. B.; Cintio, A. Di; Knebe, A.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.; Hoffman, Y.; Garrison-Kimmel, S.

    2014-03-20

    We contend that a single power-law halo mass distribution is appropriate for direct matching to the stellar masses of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies, allowing the determination of the slope of the stellar mass-halo mass relation for low-mass galaxies. Errors in halo masses are well defined as the Poisson noise of simulated Local Group realizations, which we determine using local volume simulations. For the stellar mass range 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}galaxies, we find that the stellar mass-halo mass relation follows a power law with slope of 3.1, significantly steeper than most values in the literature. This steep relation between stellar and halo masses would indicate that Local Group dwarf galaxies are hosted by dark matter halos with a small range of mass. Our methodology is robust down to the stellar mass to which the census of observed Local Group galaxies is complete, but the significant uncertainty in the currently measured slope of the stellar-to-halo mass relation will decrease dramatically if the Local Group completeness limit was 10{sup 6.5} M {sub ☉} or below, highlighting the importance of pushing such limit to lower masses and larger volumes.

  20. CONNECTIONS BETWEEN GALAXY MERGERS AND STARBURST: EVIDENCE FROM THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wentao; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Youcai E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Major mergers and interactions between gas-rich galaxies with comparable masses are thought to be the main triggers of starburst. In this work, we study, for a large stellar mass range, the interaction rate of the starburst galaxies in the local universe. We focus independently on central and satellite star forming galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Here the starburst galaxies are selected in the star formation rate (SFR) stellar mass plane with SFRs five times larger than the median value found for ''star forming'' galaxies of the same stellar mass. Through visual inspection of their images together with close companions determined using spectroscopic redshifts, we find that ∼50% of the ''starburst'' populations show evident merger features, i.e., tidal tails, bridges between galaxies, double cores, and close companions. In contrast, in the control sample we selected from the normal star forming galaxies, only ∼19% of galaxies are associated with evident mergers. The interaction rates may increase by ∼5% for the starburst sample and 2% for the control sample if close companions determined using photometric redshifts are considered. The contrast of the merger rate between the two samples strengthens the hypothesis that mergers and interactions are indeed the main causes of starburst.

  1. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is

  2. Optical-to-IR Photometric Properties of Lyman Break Galaxies in the HDF-North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papovich, C.; Dickinson, M.; Ferguson, H.; NICMOS HDF--N GO Team

    1999-12-01

    We present the photometric properties of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF--N) using deep seven--band photometry from WFPC2 (UBVI, Williams et al. 1996), NICMOS (JH, Dickinson et al. 2000), and newly derived Ks--band photometry from ground--based KPNO data (Dickinson 1997; Papovich & Dickinson 2000). For the 27 HDF galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 3.5, our photometry spans rest frame wavelengths extending from the Lyman limit through rest--frame λ 0 ≳ 5000 Angstroms. In this poster, we compare the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the LBGs to empirical spectral templates from Kinney et al. (1996) and Coleman, Wu, & Weedman (1980), and to population synthesis models from Bruzual & Charlot (1996). We consider general constraints on galaxy ages, star formation histories, and extinction. By selection, the LBGs contain strong, blue UV continua. In general, they are well fit by local starburst templates. To fit the SEDs of specific galaxies, most require modest but non--zero reddening. At rest--frame optical wavelengths, many galaxies show evidence for significant contributions from longer lived (A and later) stars, but none appear to be dominated by old (red) stellar populations. In some cases, there may be significant broad band flux contributions from strong nebular emission lines ([N 2]+Hα , [O 3]+Hβ , [O 2]). We discuss the implications for the evolutionary history of these galaxies using these empirical results. Support for this work is provided by NASA through grant GO-07817.01-96A.

  3. HERSCHEL/SPIRE SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRA OF LOCAL ACTIVE GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Spinoglio, Luigi; Busquet, Gemma; Wilson, Christine D.; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Isaak, Kate G.; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Cormier, Diane

    2013-05-01

    We present the submillimeter spectra from 450 to 1550 GHz of 11 nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) on board Herschel. We detect CO transitions from J{sub up} = 4 to 12, as well as the two [C I] fine structure lines at 492 and 809 GHz and the [N II]1461 GHz line. We used radiative transfer models to analyze the observed CO spectral line energy distributions. The FTS CO data were complemented with ground-based observations of the low-J CO lines. We found that the warm molecular gas traced by the mid-J CO transitions has similar physical conditions (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx} 10{sup 3.2}-10{sup 3.9} cm{sup -3} and T{sub kin} {approx} 300-800 K) in most of our galaxies. Furthermore, we found that this warm gas is likely producing the mid-IR rotational H{sub 2} emission. We could not determine the specific heating mechanism of the warm gas, however, it is possibly related to the star formation activity in these galaxies. Our modeling of the [C I] emission suggests that it is produced in cold (T{sub kin} < 30 K) and dense (n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}) molecular gas. Transitions of other molecules are often detected in our SPIRE/FTS spectra. The HF J = 1-0 transition at 1232 GHz is detected in absorption in UGC 05101 and in emission in NGC 7130. In the latter, near-infrared pumping, chemical pumping, or collisional excitation with electrons are plausible excitation mechanisms likely related to the active galactic nucleus of this galaxy. In some galaxies, few H{sub 2}O emission lines are present. Additionally, three OH{sup +} lines at 909, 971, and 1033 GHz are identified in NGC 7130.

  4. Connecting The Interstellar Gas And Dust Properties Of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha

    The properties of interstellar gas and dust in distant galaxies are fundamental parameters in constraining galaxy evolution models. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous background quasars, provide invaluable tools to directly study gas and dust in distant normal galaxies. Recent studies of QASs have found interesting trends in both gas and dust properties, such as correlations in metallicity with redshift and dust depletions. Our Spitzer spectroscopic studies also indicate that silicate dust grains are present in QASs, and in fact, at a level higher than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Moreover, the silicate dust grains in these distant galaxies may be substantially more crystalline than those in the Milky Way interstellar medium. We now propose a comprehensive study of the gas and dust properties of all QASs with strong Ly-alpha and/or metal absorption lines that have adequate archival IR data to probe the study of dust. Our analysis will include data primarily from the NASA-supported Spitzer, Herschel, HST, and Keck Observatory archives, along with a small amount of VLT/SDSS archival data. Our specific goals are as follows: (1) We will measure a large range of metal absorption lines in high-resolution quasar spectra from Keck, HST, and VLT archives to uniformly determine the metallicity, dust depletions, ionization, and star formation rates in the foreground QASs. In particular, we will study the variations in these quantities with gas velocity, using Voigt profile fitting techniques to determine the velocity structure. This analysis will also allow us to quantify the kinematics of the absorbing gas. (2) We will use archival Spitzer IRS quasar spectra to search for and measure the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features for a much larger sample of QASs than previously studied. (3) We will fit the observed silicate absorption features in the Spitzer archival

  5. The coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes: a local perspective.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy M; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2011-07-01

    One of the most fascinating discoveries in the past decade was that galaxies typically contain a centrally located black hole with a mass that is millions or even billions of times that of the Sun. There is now compelling evidence that we cannot understand how galaxies formed and evolved without understanding the life cycles of these supermassive black holes (and vice versa). We summarize the current understanding of this coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes (based largely on observations of the local, present-day universe) and describe prospects for the future. PMID:21737734

  6. The Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822: new insight on its star formation history .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, F.; Buonanno, R.; Bono, G.; Cassisi, S.; Monelli, M.; Pietrinferni, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Aparicio, A.

    We present a new photometric analysis of the Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy NGC 6822 based on archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images. The data correspond to three fields covering the south-east region of the galaxy; for each field F475W and F814W HST bands are available. For each field an accurate color magnitude diagram (F814W, F475W-F814W) has been obtained. Preliminary hints on the galaxy star formation history are presented based on the comparison with isochrones from "A Bag of Stellar Tracks and Isochrones" (BaSTI) database.

  7. Estimated number of field stars toward Galactic globular clusters and Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, K. U.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Field star densities are estimated for 89 fields with /b/ greater than 10 degrees based on the Galaxy model of Bahcall and Soneira (1980, 1984; Bahcall et al. 1985). Calculated tables are presented for 76 of the fields toward Galactic globular clusters, and 16 Local Group Galaxies in 13 fields. The estimates can be used as an initial guide for planning both ground-based and Space Telescope observations of globular clusters at intermediate-to-high Galactic latitudes.

  8. TIGHT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MASSIVE GALAXY STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND DYNAMICS: THE MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE WAS IN PLACE BY z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-12-20

    The fundamental plane (FP) is an empirical relation between the size, surface brightness, and velocity dispersion of early-type galaxies. This relation has been studied extensively for early-type galaxies in the local universe to constrain galaxy formation mechanisms. The evolution of the zero point of this plane has been extended to high redshifts to study the luminosity evolution of massive galaxies, under the assumption of structural homology. In this work, we assess this assumption by replacing surface brightness with stellar mass density and present the evolution of the ''mass FP'' for massive, quiescent galaxies since z ∼ 2. By accounting for stellar populations, we thereby isolate and trace structural and dynamical evolution. Despite the observed dramatic evolution in the sizes and morphologies of massive galaxies since z ∼ 3, we find that quiescent galaxies lie on the mass FP out to z ∼ 2. In contrast with ∼1.4 dex evolution in the luminosity FP, average residuals from the z ∼ 0 mass FP are less than ∼0.15 dex since z ∼ 2. Assuming the Hyde and Bernardi mass FP slope, we find that this minimal offset scales as (1 + z){sup –0.095} {sup ±} {sup 0.043}. This result lends credence to previous studies that derived luminosity evolution from the FP. Therefore, despite their compact sizes and suggestions that massive galaxies are more disk-like at z ∼ 2, the relationship between their dynamics and structural properties are consistent with local early-type galaxies. Finally, we find no strong evidence for a tilt of the mass FP relative to the virial plane, but emphasize the need for full models including selection biases to fully investigate this issue.

  9. A Reference Sample of Local Rich Galaxy Clusters: Infrared Emission from Infalling Galaxies and DIffuse Intra-Cluster Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Biviano, Andrea; Marleau, Francine; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa

    2005-06-01

    Violent episodes of star formation occur in galaxies infalling into clusters when they first encounter the intra-cluster medium (ICM). Most of this star formation is dust-absorbed and therefore only observable through mid- and far-IR observations. In the long term, ram pressure and tidal interactions in the densest central region of the cluster strip gas and dust from these galaxies suppressing star-formation and enriching the ICM. A concentration of cold diffuse dust is thus expected in cluster cores and its emission can be only observed in the far-IR. We propose to map three rich clusters at redshift z=0.2 with MIPS and IRAC up to two virial radii. These clusters have been selected in regions of exceptionally low Galactic absorption to study faint mid-IR sources and put stringent limits on the far-IR diffuse emission from cold dust. The observations will be deep enough to detect star forming galaxies down to a star-formation rate of one solar mass per year, to compute the global star formation in clusters and compare the average star formation with that of coeval field galaxies. Rich clusters are commonly found at high redshift in wide-field Spitzer surveys. However, locally, they are extremely rare. These observation will provide a reference sample for studying evolutionary effects with the same class of objects.

  10. Massive Clumps in Local Galaxies: Comparisons with High-redshift Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Dewberry, J.; Putko, J.; Teich, Y.; Popinchalk, M.

    2013-09-01

    Local UV-bright galaxies in the Kiso survey include clumpy systems with kiloparsec-size star complexes that resemble clumpy young galaxies in surveys at high redshift. We compare clump masses and underlying disks in several dozen galaxies from each of these surveys to the star complexes and disks of normal spirals. Photometry and spectroscopy for the Kiso and spiral sample come from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the largest Kiso clumpy galaxies resemble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) clumpies in terms of the star formation rates, clump masses, and clump surface densities. Clump masses and surface densities in normal spirals are smaller. If the clump masses are proportional to the turbulent Jeans mass in the interstellar medium, then for the most luminous galaxies in the sequence of normal:Kiso:UDF, the turbulent speeds and surface densities increase in the proportions 1.0:4.7:5.0 and 1.0:4.0:5.1, respectively, for fixed restframe B-band absolute magnitude. For the least luminous galaxies in the overlapping magnitude range, the turbulent speed and surface density trends are 1.0:2.7:7.4 and 1.0:1.4:3.0, respectively. We also find that while all three types have radially decreasing disk intensities when measured with ellipse-fit azimuthal averages, the average profiles are more irregular for UDF clumpies (which are viewed in their restframe UV) than for Kiso galaxies (viewed at g-band), and major axis intensity scans are even more irregular for the UDF than Kiso galaxies. Local clumpy galaxies in the Kiso survey appear to be intermediate between UDF clumpies and normal spirals.

  11. MCG 06-45-001 - Not a local group galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Sage, Leslie J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of (C-12)O and (C-13)O J = 1 to 0 for MCG 06-45-001 are examined. It is argued that two features of CO emission with velocities of 1 and 10 km/s indicate that the object is similar to the Galactic molecular clouds in the immediate vicinity, and not to a spiral galaxy as suggested previously. It is considered that CO emission cannot arise from a spiral galaxy at a distance of 2-5 Mpc and that the object is unlikely to be a nearby dwarf. The feature at 10 km/s is considered to arise from a molecular cloud associated with an H II region, which produces the observed IRAS flux.

  12. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g < 11 mag. After correcting the g and i magnitudes for Galactic and internal extinction, the blue and red sequences in the color magnitude diagram are well separated, with similar slopes. In addition, we study (i) the color-magnitude diagrams in different galaxy regions, the inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  13. Gas-to-dust mass ratios in local galaxies over a 2 dex metallicity range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Madden, S. C.; Galliano, F.; Galametz, M.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Asano, R. S.; Zhukovska, S.; Lebouteiller, V.; Cormier, D.; Jones, A.; Bocchio, M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; DeLooze, I.; Doublier-Pritchard, V.; Hughes, T.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Spinoglio, L.

    2014-03-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (G/D) of local Universe galaxies over a wide metallicity range. We especially focus on the low-metallicity part of the G/D vs metallicity relation and investigate several explanations for the observed relation and scatter. Methods: We assembled a total of 126 galaxies, covering a 2 dex metallicity range and with 30% of the sample with 12 + log(O/H)≤ 8.0. We homogeneously determined the dust masses with a semi-empirical dust model including submm constraints. The atomic and molecular gas masses have been compiled from the literature. We used two XCO scenarios to estimate the molecular gas mass: the Galactic conversion factor, XCO,MW, and a XCO that depends on the metallicity XCO,Z (∝Z-2). We modelled the observed trend of the G/D with metallicity using two simple power laws (slope of -1 and free) and a broken power law. Correlations with morphological type, stellar masses, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates are also discussed. We then compared the observed evolution of the G/D with predictions from several chemical evolution models and explored different physical explanations for the observed scatter in the G/D values. Results: We find that out of the five tested galactic parameters, metallicity is the main physical property of the galaxy driving the observed G/D. The G/D versus metallicity relation cannot be represented by a single power law with a slope of -1 over the whole metallicity range. The observed trend is steeper for metallicities lower than ~8.0. A large scatter is observed in the G/D values for a given metallicity: in metallicity bins of ~0.1 dex, the dispersion around the mean value is ~0.37 dex. On average, the broken power law reproduces the observed G/D best compared to the two power laws (slope of -1 or free) and provides estimates of the G/D that are accurate to a factor of 1.6. The good agreement of observed values of the G/D and its

  14. The UV-optical colour dependence of galaxy clustering in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yeong-Shang; Rich, R. Michael; Heinis, Sébastien; Scranton, Ryan; Mallery, Ryan P.; Salim, Samir; Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted; Arnouts, Stéphane; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alex S.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2010-09-01

    We measure the UV-optical colour dependence of galaxy clustering in the local Universe. Using the clean separation of the red and blue sequences made possible by the NUV - r colour-magnitude diagram, we segregate the galaxies into red, blue and intermediate `green' classes. We explore the clustering as a function of this segregation by removing the dependence on luminosity and by excluding edge-on galaxies as a means of a non-model dependent veto of highly extincted galaxies. We find that ξ(rp, π) for both red and green galaxies shows strong redshift-space distortion on small scales - the `finger-of-God' effect, with green galaxies having a lower amplitude than is seen for the red sequence, and the blue sequence showing almost no distortion. On large scales, ξ(rp, π) for all three samples show the effect of large-scale streaming from coherent infall. On scales of 1h-1Mpc < rp < 10h-1Mpc, the projected auto-correlation function wp(rp) for red and green galaxies fits a power law with slope γ ~ 1.93 and amplitude r0 ~ 7.5 and 5.3, compared with γ ~ 1.75 and r0 ~ 3.9 h-1 Mpc for blue sequence galaxies. Compared to the clustering of a fiducial L* galaxy, the red, green and blue have a relative bias of 1.5, 1.1 and 0.9, respectively. The wp(rp) for blue galaxies display an increase in convexity at ~ 1 h-1 Mpc, with an excess of large-scale clustering. Our results suggest that the majority of blue galaxies are likely central galaxies in less massive haloes, while red and green galaxies have larger satellite fractions, and preferentially reside in virialized structures. If blue sequence galaxies migrate to the red sequence via processes like mergers or quenching that take them through the green valley, such a transformation may be accompanied by a change in environment in addition to any change in luminosity and colour.

  15. Stellar Properties of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, S.-H.; Jung, M. Y.; Kang, M.; Jung, D.; Sohn, Y.-J.

    2015-08-01

    Broadband near-infrared images obtained with the WIRCam array of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the properties of resolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613. Combining our JHKs data with optical photometric data, AGB stars were selected in color-magnitude diagrams covering a wide range of wavelength. We examined the distribution of AGB stars in the (J-Ks, H-Ks) color-color diagram, and distinguished 140 carbon-rich and 306 oxygen-rich M giant AGB stars. The number ratio of C stars to M giants (C/M) was estimated, and the metallicity of IC 1613 was derived using the C/M ratio. We also examined the local C/M ratio as a function of radial distance from the center of the galaxy, and found a small negative gradient.

  16. The Properties of IRAS Detected Mergers in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpineti, Alfredo; Kaviraj, S.; Clements, D. L.; Darg, D.; Hyde, A. K.; Lintott, C.

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy merging is a fundamental aspect of the standard hierarchical galaxy formation paradigm. We have used a large, homogeneous set of nearby mergers, selected through direct visual inspection of the entire SDSS using the GalaxyZoo project, to perform the first blind far-infrared (FIR) study of the local merger population. 3300+ mergers were cross-matched with the Imperial IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue, resulting in 606 FIR detections. The IRAS- detected mergers are typically more massive, with smaller separations, weaker tidal forces and bluer colours than their undetected counterparts. The IRAS-detected mergers are mostly (98%) spiral-spiral systems, with a median FIR luminosity of 1011 LSun and a median star-formation rate of around 15 MSun per year. They reside in low density environments but we find no dependence between group richness and their infrared properties. Their SFR seems to depend on the total mass of the system with little dependence on the mass ratio. Optical emission line ratios indicate that the AGN fraction increases with increasing FIR luminosity with a dramatic increase in the members that are ULIRGs . Comparing the typical separations of mergers that are LIRGs and those that are ULIRGs we estimate the timescale for this transition and find a value of (50 ± 16) Myr .

  17. Properties of Galaxies and Groups at z < 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we analyze a sample of galaxy groups constructed from the fourth data release of the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). This sample was obtained by Gerke et al. (2012) using the Voronoi-Delaunay Method. We selected 105 galaxy groups with at least 8 members in a radius of 4 Mpc. For each group we estimated its properties such as velocity dispersion (σ), physical radius (R_{200}) and mass (M_{200}). We also classify the groups as Gaussian and non-Gaussian (dynamic evolved or not) based on their galaxy velocity distributions. This classification is based on the following statistical tests: Anderson-Darling, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Shapiro-Wilk, Jarque-Bera, Cramer-von Mises, D'Agostino and Dip test. When the Dip test confirms the hypothesis of the unimodality and all other tests prove the normality of the system, the group is classified as Gaussian. The behavior of gaussianity was checked varying the distance to the center of the group in 2-4 times its physical radius. Our results show that the number of systems classified as non-Gaussian groups grows with the increase of the physical radius.

  18. Physical properties of molecular clouds in the southern outer Galaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Alvarez, H.; Bronfman, L.

    1997-11-01

    We have used a deep CO survey of the third galactic quadrant (May et al., 1993A&AS...99..105M) to derive the physical properties of molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy. Within the range of this survey, from 194° to 270° in galactic longitude, 177 molecular clouds have been identified beyond 2kpc from the Sun. Distances have been determined kinematically using the rotation curve of Brand (1986, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Leiden) with Rsun_=8.5kpc and {THETA}sun_=220km/s. Power-law relations between line widths and sizes of the clouds, and between their densities and sizes have been found, although they do not fulfill exactly the requirements to be in virial equilibrium. Adopting a CO luminosity-to-H_2_ conversion factor X=3.8x10^20^molecules/cm^2^/(K.km/s), the derived M_CO_ masses statistically agree with the virial masses. The derived size and mass distributions show that the clouds are smaller, less massive and with narrower lines than those in the inner Galaxy. However, the mass spectrum for the clouds in our sample with masses >=2.5x10^4^Msun_ has a slope -1.45 which is similar to that found for inner Galaxy clouds. The warping and flaring of the outer molecular disk is clearly delineated.

  19. The Metallicity Evolution of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from the Intermediate Redshift to the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianhui; Hu, Ning; Fang, Guanwen; Ye, Chengyun; Kong, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We present oxygen abundance measurements for 74 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the redshift range of [0.2, 0.5] using the strong-line method. The spectra of these objects are taken using Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. More than half of these BCDs had dust attenuation corrected using the Balmer decrement method. For comparison, we also selected a sample of 2023 local BCDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Based on the local and intermediate-z BCD samples, we investigated the cosmic evolution of the metallicity, star formation rate (SFR), and Dn(4000) index. Compared with local BCDs, the intermediate-z BCDs had a systematically higher R23 ratio but a similar O32 ratio. Interestingly, no significant deviation in the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation was found between the intermediate-z and local BCDs. Besides the metallicity, the intermediate-z BCDs also exhibited an SFR distribution that was consistent with local BCDs, suggesting a weak dependence on redshift. The intermediate-z BCDs seemed to be younger than the local BCDs with lower Dn(4000) index values. The insignificant deviation in the mass-metallicity and mass-SFR relations between intermediate-z and local BCDs indicates that the relations between the global parameters of low-mass compact galaxies may be universal. These results from low-mass compact galaxies could be used to place important observational constraints on galaxy formation and evolution models.

  20. FIRST results of FIFI-LS Far Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging of Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Suzanne C.; Krabbe, Alfred; Beckmann, Simon; Bryant, Aaron; Colditz, Sebastian; Fischer, Christian; Fumi, Fabio; Geis, Norbert; Henning, Thomas; Honle, Rainer; Iserlohe, Christoph; Klein, Randolf; Looney, Leslie; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Raab, Walfried; Rebell, Felix; Vacca, William D.

    2016-01-01

    The FIFI-LS imaging spectrometer on SOFIA gives access to the most important cooling lines of the ISM, providing mapping capability of the FIR fine-structure lines as well as molecules in local galaxies. The valuable diagnostics available with FIFI-LS span a wide range of critical densities and ionization energies and thus, along with the velocity information, can link the local star formation with the energetics of the gas in the extended neutral and ionized gas. Since the commissioning of FIFI-LS in 2015, new results have emerged on star forming galaxies, both metal-rich and metal poor. We will present some of the new results of local galaxies observed with FIFI-LS.

  1. The slow flow model of dust efflux in local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, H. J.; Torrey, P.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Kewley, L. J.; Davé, R.; Geller, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    We develop a dust efflux model of radiation pressure acting on dust grains which successfully reproduces the relation between stellar mass, dust opacity and star formation rate observed in local star-forming galaxies. The dust content of local star-forming galaxies is set by the competition between the physical processes of dust production and dust loss in our model. The dust loss rate is proportional to the dust opacity and star formation rate. Observations of the relation between stellar mass and star formation rate at several epochs imply that the majority of local star-forming galaxies are best characterized as having continuous star formation histories. Dust loss is a consequence of sustained interaction of dust with the radiation field generated by continuous star formation. Dust efflux driven by radiation pressure rather than dust destruction offers a more consistent physical interpretation of the dust loss mechanism. By comparing our model results with the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction and star formation rate in local star-forming galaxies, we are able to constrain the time-scale and magnitude of dust loss. The time-scale of dust loss is long and therefore dust is effluxed in a `slow flow'. Dust loss is modest in low-mass galaxies but massive galaxies may lose up to 70-80 per cent of their dust over their lifetime. Our slow flow model shows that mass-loss driven by dust opacity and star formation may be an important physical process for understanding normal star-forming galaxy evolution.

  2. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN GOODS AND GEMS: MASSIVE ANALOGS OF LOCAL DWARF IRREGULARS

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Marcus, Max T.; Yau, Andrew; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Shahinyan, Karlen; Petersen, Michael E-mail: mamarcus@vassar.edu E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com E-mail: mpetersen@students.colgate.edu

    2009-08-10

    Clumpy galaxies in the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields are examined for clues to their evolution into modern spirals. The magnitudes of the clumps and the surface brightnesses of the interclump regions are measured and fitted to models of stellar age and mass. There is an evolutionary trend from clump clusters with no evident interclump emission to clump clusters with faint red disks, to spiral galaxies of the flocculent or grand design types. Along this sequence, the interclump surface density increases and the mass surface density contrast between the clumps and the interclump regions decreases, suggesting a gradual dispersal of clumps to form disks. Also along this sequence, the bulge-to-clump mass ratios and age ratios increase, suggesting a gradual formation of bulges. All of these morphological types occur in the same redshift range, indicating that the clump cluster morphology is not the result of bandshifting. This redshift range also includes clear examples of interacting galaxies with tidal tails and other characteristic features, indicating that clump clusters, which do not have these features, are not generally interacting. Comparisons to local galaxies with the same rest wavelength and spatial resolution show that clump clusters are unlike local flocculent and spiral galaxies primarily because of the high clump/interclump contrasts in the clump clusters. They bear a striking resemblance to local dwarf irregulars, however. This resemblance is consistent with a model in which the clumpy morphology comes from gravitational instabilities in gas with a high turbulent speed compared to the rotation speed and a high mass fraction compared to the stars. The morphology does not depend on galaxy mass as much as it depends on evolutionary stage: clump clusters are 100 times more massive than local dwarfs. The apparent lack of star formation in damped Lyman alpha absorbers may result from fast turbulence.

  3. Luminous compact blue galaxies in the local Universe: A key reference for high-redshift studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F. J.; Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are high surface brightness starburst galaxies, bluer than a typical Sbc and brighter than ˜0.25Lstar. LCBGs have evolved more than any other galaxy class in the last ˜8 Gyr, and are a major contributor to the observed enhancement of the UV luminosity density of the Universe at z≤1. Despite the key role LCBGs may play in galaxy evolution, their statistical properties are still largely unknown. We have selected a complete sample of ˜25 LCBGs within 100 Mpc, after investigating over 106 nearby galaxies from the DR1 of the SDSS database. This sample, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar galaxies at high redshift, including the population of Lyman-break galaxies. We present preliminary results of this study using 3D spectroscopic observations obtained over a very wide range in wavelength, using WIYN/DENSEPAK in the optical, FISICA in the infrared, and the VLA at cm wavelengths.

  4. THE NATURE OF THE SECOND PARAMETER IN THE IRX-{beta} RELATION FOR LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Lee, Janice C.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2013-08-20

    We present an analysis of 98 galaxies of low-dust content, selected from the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, aimed at examining the relation between the ultraviolet (UV) color and dust attenuation in normal star-forming galaxies. The IRX-{beta} diagram relates the total dust attenuation in a galaxy, traced by the far-IR (FIR) to UV ratio, to the observed UV color, indicated by {beta}. Previous research has indicated that while starburst galaxies exhibit a relatively tight IRX-{beta} relation, normal star-forming galaxies do not, and have a much larger spread in the total-IR to far-UV (FUV) luminosity for a fixed UV color. We examine the role that the age of the stellar population plays as the ''second parameter'' responsible for the observed deviation and spread of star-forming galaxies from the starburst relation. We model the FUV to FIR spectral energy distribution of each galaxy according to two broad bins of star formation history (SFH): constant and instantaneous burst. We find clear trends between stellar population mean age estimators (extinction-corrected FUV/NIR, U - B, and EW(H{alpha})) and the UV color {beta}; the trends are mostly driven by the galaxies best-described by instantaneous burst populations. We also find a significant correlation between {beta} and the mean age directly determined from the best-fit instantaneous models. As already indicated by other authors, the UV attenuation in star-forming galaxies may not be recovered with the UV color alone and is highly influenced by the stellar population's mean age and SFH. Overall, the scatter in the IRX-{beta} diagram is better correlated with {beta} than with the perpendicular distance, d{sub p}.

  5. Properties of The Brightest Cluster Galaxy and Its Host Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, H.; Hayashida, K.; Takahara, F.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate the relation between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and its host cluster. A BCG is a bright and massive elliptical galaxy in a cluster of galaxies. The luminosity of a BCG is 10 times larger than that of normal field galaxy and the mass of a BCG is about 1013Msolar which corresponds to that of galaxy group. In order to explain the origin of BCGs, the following three models are proposed: (1) star formation from cooling flow. In this model, intracluster gas gradually condenses at the center of the cluster and forms the BCG. (2) ``Galactic cannibalism'' or the accretion of smaller galaxies. In this model, dynamical friction accounts for the formation of the BCG. These two models predict the BCG evolves with the evolution of cluster. (3) Galaxy merging in the early history of the formation of the cluster. In this model, the property of BCGs is determined no later than cluster collapse. In any model, the formation of BCGs is related to the collapse and formation of its host cluster. The relation between the BCG and its host cluster was studied by Edge (1991). Edge (1991) found that the optical luminosity of the BCG is positively correlated with the X-ray luminosity and temperature of its host cluster. Edge (1991) concludes that these correlations indicate that the BCG responds to the overall cluster properties. In order to investigate the other relation between the BCG and its host cluster, we analyzed ROSAT archival data and compared the displacement between the X-ray peak and the BCG with the Z parameter of the fundamental relation found by Fujita and Takahara (1999). It is found that the displacement is larger with decreasing Z. Furthermore, the large Z clusters tend to have a regular X-ray profile, which implies a relaxed system. The fundamental parameter Z depends mainly on the virial density ρvir, and is considered to be related to the formation epoch of the cluster, i.e., large Z clusters are old clusters and small Z clusters are young

  6. The progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies across cosmic time: from dusty star-bursting to quiescent stellar populations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Cemile Z.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Stefanon, Mauro; Brammer, Gabriel G.; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S.; Buitrago, Fernando

    2014-10-10

    Using the UltraVISTA catalogs, we investigate the evolution in the 11.4 Gyr since z = 3 of the progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies (log (M {sub star}/M {sub ☉}) ≈ 11.8; UMGs), providing a complete and consistent picture of how the most massive galaxies at z = 0 have assembled. By selecting the progenitors with a semi-empirical approach using abundance matching, we infer a growth in stellar mass of 0.56{sub −0.25}{sup +0.35} dex, 0.45{sub −0.20}{sup +0.16} dex, and 0.27{sub −0.12}{sup +0.08} dex from z = 3, z = 2, and z = 1, respectively, to z = 0. At z < 1, the progenitors of UMGs constitute a homogeneous population of only quiescent galaxies with old stellar populations. At z > 1, the contribution from star-forming galaxies progressively increases, with the progenitors at 2 < z < 3 being dominated by massive (M {sub star} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), dusty (A {sub V} ∼ 1-2.2 mag), star-forming (SFR ∼ 100-400 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxies with a large range in stellar ages. At z = 2.75, ∼15% of the progenitors are quiescent, with properties typical of post-starburst galaxies with little dust extinction and strong Balmer break, and showing a large scatter in color. Our findings indicate that at least half of the stellar content of local UMGs was assembled at z > 1, whereas the remaining was assembled via merging from z ∼ 1 to the present. Most of the quenching of the star-forming progenitors happened between z = 2.75 and z = 1.25, in good agreement with the typical formation redshift and scatter in age of z = 0 UMGs as derived from their fossil records. The progenitors of local UMGs, including the star-forming ones, never lived on the blue cloud since z = 3. We propose an alternative path for the formation of local UMGs that refines previously proposed pictures and that is fully consistent with our findings.

  7. Local expansion flows of galaxies: quantifying acceleration effect of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.

    2013-08-01

    The nearest expansion flow of galaxies observed around the Local group is studied as an archetypical example of the newly discovered local expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies in the nearby Universe. The flow is accelerating due to the antigravity produced by the universal dark energy background. We introduce a new acceleration measure of the flow which is the dimensionless ``acceleration parameter" Q (x) = x - x-2 depending on the normalized distance x only. The parameter is zero at the zero-gravity distance x = 1, and Q(x) ∝ x, when x ≫ 1. At the distance x = 3, the parameter Q = 2.9. Since the expansion flows have a self-similar structure in normalized variables, we expect that the result is valid as well for all the other expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies on the spatial scales from ˜ 1 to ˜ 10 Mpc everywhere in the Universe.

  8. On the fundamental properties of dynamically hot galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsuk, Alexei G.

    1997-01-01

    A two-component isothermal equilibrium model is applied to reproduce basic structural properties of dynamically hot stellar systems immersed in their massive dark haloes. The origin of the fundamental plane relation for giant ellipticals is naturally explained as a consequence of dynamical equilibrium in the context of the model. The existence of two galactic families displaying different behaviour in the luminosity-surface-brightness diagram is shown to be a result of a smooth transition from dwarfs, dominated by dark matter near the centre, to giants dominated by the luminous stellar component. The comparison of empirical scaling relations with model predictions suggests that probably a unique dissipative process was operating during the violent stage of development of stellar systems in the dark haloes, and the depth of the potential well controlled the observed luminosity of the resulting galaxies. The interpretation also provides some restrictions on the properties of dark haloes implied by the fundamental scaling laws.

  9. The JCMT nearby galaxies legacy survey - X. Environmental effects on the molecular gas and star formation properties of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 H I - flux selected spiral galaxies within ˜25 Mpc, using the CO J = 3 - 2 line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H2 mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean H I mass. This leads to a significantly higher H2 to H I ratio for Virgo galaxies. Combining our data with complementary Hα star formation rate measurements, Virgo galaxies have longer molecular gas depletion times compared to group galaxies, due to their higher H2 masses and lower star formation rates. We suggest that the longer depletion times may be a result of heating processes in the cluster environment or differences in the turbulent pressure. From the full sample, we find that the molecular gas depletion time has a positive correlation with the stellar mass, indicative of differences in the star formation process between low- and high-mass galaxies, and a negative correlation between the molecular gas depletion time and the specific star formation rate.

  10. The L-σ Relation of Local H II Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordalo, V.; Telles, E.

    2011-07-01

    For the first time we present a new data set of emission line widths for 118 star-forming regions in H II galaxies (HIIGs). This homogeneous set is used to investigate the L-σ relation in conjunction with optical spectrophotometric observations. We were able to classify their nebular emission line profiles due to our high-resolution spectra. Peculiarities in the line profiles such as sharp lines, wings, asymmetries, and in some cases more than one component in emission were verified. From a new independent homogeneous set of spectrophotometric data, we derived physical condition parameters and performed statistical principal component analysis. We have investigated the potential role of metallicity (O/H), Hβ equivalent width (W Hβ), and ionization ratio [O III]/[O II] to account for the observational scatter of the L-σ relation. Our results indicate that the L-σ relation for HIIGs is more sensitive to the evolution of the current starburst event (short-term evolution) and dated by W Hβ or even the [O III]/[O II] ratio. The long-term evolution measured by O/H also plays a potential role in determining the luminosity of the current burst for a given velocity dispersion and age as previously suggested. Additionally, galaxies showing Gaussian line profiles present tighter correlations indicating that they are the best targets for the application of the parametric relations as an extragalactic cosmological distance indicator. Best fits for a restricted homogeneous sample of 45 HIIGs provide us with a set of new extragalactic distance indicators with an rms scatter compatible with observational errors of δlog L Hα = 0.2 dex or 0.5 mag. Improvements may still come from future optimized observational programs to reduce the observational uncertainties on the predicted luminosities of HIIGs in order to achieve the precision required for the application of these relations as tests of cosmological models.