Science.gov

Sample records for local recurrence-free survival

  1. Tumour inflammasome-derived IL-1β recruits neutrophils and improves local recurrence-free survival in EBV-induced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lih-Chyang; Wang, Li-Jie; Tsang, Nang-Ming; Ojcius, David M; Chen, Chia-Chun; OuYang, Chun-Nan; Hsueh, Chuen; Liang, Ying; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, Chiu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Inflammasomes sense infection and cellular damage and are critical for triggering inflammation through IL-1β production. In carcinogenesis, inflammasomes may have contradictory roles through facilitating antitumour immunity and inducing oncogenic factors. Their function in cancer remains poorly characterized. Here we show that the NLRP3, AIM2 and RIG-I inflammasomes are overexpressed in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and expression levels correlate with patient survival. In tumour cells, AIM2 and RIG-I are required for IL-1β induction by EBV genomic DNA and EBV-encoded small RNAs, respectively, while NLRP3 responds to extracellular ATP and reactive oxygen species. Irradiation and chemotherapy can further activate AIM2 and NLRP3, respectively. In mice, tumour-derived IL-1β inhibits tumour growth and enhances survival through host responses. Mechanistically, IL-1β-mediated anti-tumour effects depend on infiltrated immunostimulatory neutrophils. We show further that presence of tumour-associated neutrophils is significantly associated with better survival in NPC patients. Thus, tumour inflammasomes play a key role in tumour control by recruiting neutrophils, and their expression levels are favourable prognostic markers and promising therapeutic targets in patients. PMID:23065753

  2. Predictors of recurrence free survival for patients with stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate clinico-pathologic specific predictors of recurrence for stage II/III disease. Improving recurrence prediction for resected stage II/III colon cancer patients could alter surveillance strategies, providing opportunities for more informed use of chemotherapy for high risk individuals. Methods 871 stage II and 265 stage III patients with colon cancers were included. Features studied included surgery date, age, gender, chemotherapy, tumor location, number of positive lymph nodes, tumor differentiation, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion. Time to recurrence was evaluated, using Cox’s proportional hazards models. The predictive ability of the multivariable models was evaluated using the concordance (c) index. Results For stage II cancer patients, estimated recurrence-free survival rates at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 98%, 92%, 90%, and 89%. Only T stage was significantly associated with recurrence. Estimated recurrence-free survival rates for stage III patients at one, three, five, and seven years following surgery were 94%, 78%, 70%, and 66%. Higher recurrence rates were seen in patients who didn’t receive chemotherapy (p = 0.023), with a higher number of positive nodes (p < 0.001). The c-index for the stage II model was 0.55 and 0.68 for stage III. Conclusions Current clinic-pathologic information is inadequate for prediction of colon cancer recurrence after resection for stage II and IIII patients. Identification and clinical use of molecular markers to identify the earlier stage II and III colon cancer patients at elevated risk of recurrence are needed to improve prognostication of early stage colon cancers. PMID:24886281

  3. Prediction of recurrence-free survival using a protein expression-based risk classifier for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, S S; Kaur, J; Kumar, M; Matta, A; Srivastava, G; Alyass, A; Assi, J; Leong, I; MacMillan, C; Witterick, I; Colgan, T J; Shukla, N K; Thakar, A; Sharma, M C; Siu, K W M; Walfish, P G; Ralhan, R

    2015-01-01

    Loco-regional recurrence in 50% of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients poses major challenge for oncologists. Lack of biomarkers that can predict disease aggressiveness and recurrence risk makes the scenario more dismal. On the basis of our earlier global proteomic analyses we identified five differentially expressed proteins in OSCC. This study aimed to develop protein biomarkers-based prognostic risk prediction model for OSCC. Sub-cellular expression of five proteins, S100A7, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteinK (hnRNPK), prothymosin α (PTMA), 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3σ was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in test set (282 Indian OSCCs and 209 normal tissues), correlated with clinic–pathological parameters and clinical outcome over 12 years to develop a risk model for prediction of recurrence-free survival. This risk classifier was externally validated in 135 Canadian OSCC and 96 normal tissues. Biomarker signature score based on PTMA, S100A7 and hnRNPK was associated with recurrence free survival of OSCC patients (hazard ratio=1.11; 95% confidence interval 1.08, 1.13, P<0.001, optimism-corrected c-statistic=0.69) independent of clinical parameters. Biomarker signature score stratified OSCC patients into high- and low-risk groups with significant difference for disease recurrence. The high-risk group had median survival 14 months, and 3-year survival rate of 30%, whereas low-risk group survival probability did not reach 50%, and had 3-year survival rate of 71%. As a powerful predictor of 3-year recurrence-free survival in OSCC patients, the newly developed biomarkers panel risk classifier will facilitate patient counseling for personalized treatment. PMID:25893634

  4. Nomograms to Predict Recurrence-Free and Overall Survival After Curative Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Margonis, Georgios A.; Prescott, Jason D.; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Jin, Linda X.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed I.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but aggressive endocrine tumor, and the prognostic factors associated with long-term outcomes after surgical resection remain poorly defined. OBJECTIVES To define clinicopathological variables associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after curative surgical resection of ACC and to propose nomograms for individual risk prediction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nomograms to predict RFS and OS after surgical resection of ACC were proposed using a multi-institutional cohort of patients who underwent curative-intent surgery for ACC at 13 major institutions in the United States between March 17, 1994, and December 22, 2014. The dates of our study analysis were April 15, 2015, to May 12, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The discriminative ability and calibration of the nomograms to predict RFS and OS were tested using C statistics, calibration plots, and Kaplan-Meier curves. RESULTS In total, 148 patients who underwent surgery for ACC were included in the study. The median patient age was 53 years, and 65.5% (97 of 148) of the patients were female. One-third of the patients (35.1% [52 of 148]) had a functional tumor, and the median tumor size was 11.2 cm. Most patients (77.7% [115 of 148]) underwent R0 resection, and 8.8% (13 of 148) of the patients had N1 disease. Using backward stepwise selection of clinically important variables with the Akaike information criterion, the following variables were incorporated in the prediction of RFS: tumor size of at least 12 cm (hazard ratio [HR], 3.00; 95% CI, 1.63–5.70; P < .001), positive nodal status (HR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.47–15.50; P = .01), stage III/IV (HR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.95–3.39; P = .07), cortisol-secreting tumor (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.27–4.48; P = .01), and capsular invasion (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.02–3.74; P = .04). Factors selected as predicting OS were tumor size of at least 12 cm (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.00–3.17; P = .05), positive

  5. BubR1 as a prognostic marker for recurrence-free survival rates in epithelial ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y-K; Choi, E; Kim, M A; Park, P-G; Park, N-H; Lee, H

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, and has a high recurrence rate. Thus, prognostic markers for recurrence are crucial for the care of ovarian cancer. As ovarian cancers frequently exhibit chromosome instability, we aimed at assessing the prognostic significance of two key mitotic kinases, BubR1 and Aurora A. Methods: We analysed paraffin-embedded tissue sections from 160 ovarian cancer patients whose clinical outcomes had been tracked after first-line treatment. Results: The median recurrence-free survival in patients with a positive and negative expression of BubR1 was 27 and 83 months, respectively (P<0.001). A positive BubR1 expression was also associated with advanced stage, serous histology and high grade. In contrast, Aurora A immunostaining did not correlate with any of the clinical parameters analysed. Conclusion: BubR1, but not Aurora A, is a prognostic marker for recurrence-free survival rates in epithelial ovarian cancers. PMID:19603021

  6. Haptoglobin phenotype is not a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gast, Marie-Christine W; van Tinteren, Harm; Bontenbal, Marijke; van Hoesel, René QGCM; Nooij, Marianne A; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Span, Paul N; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne CG; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Harris, Nathan; Twisk, Jos WR; Schellens, Jan HM; Beijnen, Jos H

    2008-01-01

    Background Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. We conducted a retrospective follow-up study in which we investigated sera of high-risk primary breast cancer patients, to search for proteins predictive of recurrence free survival. Methods Two sample sets of high-risk primary breast cancer patients participating in a randomised national trial investigating the effectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy were analysed. Sera in set I (n = 63) were analysed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) for biomarker finding. Initial results were validated by analysis of sample set II (n = 371), using one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Results In sample set I, the expression of a peak at mass-to-charge ratio 9198 (relative intensity ≤ 20 or > 20), identified as haptoglobin (Hp) alpha-1 chain, was strongly associated with recurrence free survival (global Log-rank test; p = 0.0014). Haptoglobin is present in three distinct phenotypes (Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1, and Hp 2-2), of which only individuals with phenotype Hp 1-1 or Hp 2-1 express the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain. As the expression of the haptoglobin alpha-1 chain, determined by SELDI-TOF MS, corresponds to the phenotype, initial results were validated by haptoglobin phenotyping of the independent sample set II by native one-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. With the Hp 1-1 phenotype as the reference category, the univariate hazard ratio for recurrence was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.56 – 1.34, p = 0.5221) and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.65 – 1.64, p = 0.8966) for the Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 phenotypes, respectively, in sample set II. Conclusion In contrast to our initial results, the haptoglobin phenotype was not identified as a predictor of recurrence free survival in high-risk primary breast cancer in our validation set. Our initial observation in the discovery set was probably the result of a type I error (i.e. false positive). This study

  7. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha-Mediated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lianya; Zhang, Helin; Duan, Lin; He, Wenshu; Zhu, Yihua; Bai, Yunfei; Zhu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis on high-throughput gene expression data to identify TNF-α-mediated genes implicated in lung cancer. We first investigated the gene expression profiles of two independent TNF-α/TNFR KO murine models. The EGF receptor signaling pathway was the top pathway associated with genes mediated by TNF-α. After matching the TNF-α-mediated mouse genes to their human orthologs, we compared the expression patterns of the TNF-α-mediated genes in normal and tumor lung tissues obtained from humans. Based on the TNF-α-mediated genes that were dysregulated in lung tumors, we developed a prognostic gene signature that effectively predicted recurrence-free survival in lung cancer in two validation cohorts. Resampling tests suggested that the prognostic power of the gene signature was not by chance, and multivariate analysis suggested that this gene signature was independent of the traditional clinical factors and enhanced the identification of lung cancer patients at greater risk for recurrence. PMID:25548907

  8. Optimized Breast MRI Functional Tumor Volume as a Biomarker of Recurrence-Free Survival Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, Nazia F.; Newitt, David C.; Kornak, John; Esserman, Laura J.; Joe, Bonnie N.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate optimal contrast kinetics thresholds for measuring functional tumor volume (FTV) by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessment of recurrence-free survival (RFS). Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective study of 64 patients (ages 29–72, median age of 48.6) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer, all patients underwent pre-MRI1 and postchemotherapy MRI4 of the breast. Tumor was defined as voxels meeting thresholds for early percent enhancement (PEthresh) and early-to-late signal enhancement ratio (SERthresh); and FTV (PEthresh, SERthresh) by summing all voxels meeting threshold criteria and minimum connectivity requirements. Ranges of PEthresh from 50% to 220% and SERthresh from 0.0 to 2.0 were evaluated. A Cox proportional hazard model determined associations between change in FTV over treatment and RFS at different PE and SER thresholds. Results The plot of hazard ratios for change in FTV from MRI1 to MRI4 showed a broad peak with the maximum hazard ratio and highest significance occurring at PE threshold of 70% and SER threshold of 1.0 (hazard ratio = 8.71, 95% confidence interval 2.86–25.5, P < 0.00015), indicating optimal model fit. Conclusion Enhancement thresholds affect the ability of MRI tumor volume to predict RFS. The value is robust over a wide range of thresholds, supporting the use of FTV as a biomarker. PMID:24347097

  9. Extended versus superextended lymph-node dissection in radical cystectomy: subgroup analysis of possible recurrence-free survival benefit.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie Kikkenborg; Høyer, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess potential benefits of different extended lymph-node dissection templates at the time of radical cystectomy as treatment for invasive bladder cancer. Materials and methods Between 2004 and 2012, 578 patients underwent radical cystectomy with lymph-node dissection without prior radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Two different historical cohorts were constructed: 262 patients underwent intended superextended lymph-node dissection (seLND) from January 2004 to January 2009 and 316 patients underwent intended extended lymph-node dissection (eLND) from February 2009 to December 2012. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was analysed as the primary outcome. Median follow-up was 93 (63-123) months and 38 (16-63) months in the two groups, respectively. Results There was no significant difference in RFS in the two cohorts (p = 0.87). When analysed according to lymph-node status (N0 or N+), there was no significant difference in RFS between the two cohorts in the two subgroups (p = 0.41 and p = 0.48, respectively). When analysed according to tumour stage, patients with non-organ-confined disease revealed a tendency towards better RFS in the seLND cohort (p = 0.14). This tendency was most clearly seen in the subgroup of T3-4 patients without lymph-node metastases (N0) (p = 0.14). Conclusions Extending LND up to the inferior mesenteric artery (seLND) does not seem to be beneficial to the overall population of patients with invasive bladder cancer compared to performing an eLND to the aortic bifurcation only. However, a subgroup of patients with non-organ-confined disease without macrometastases may benefit from seLND. PMID:27049808

  10. Investigating molecular alterations to profile short- and long-term recurrence-free survival in patients with primary glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    FRANCESCHI, SARA; MAZZANTI, CHIARA M.; LESSI, FRANCESCA; ARETINI, PAOLO; CARBONE, FRANCESCO G.; LA FERLA, MARCO; SCATENA, CRISTIAN; ORTENZI, VALERIO; VANNOZZI, RICCARDO; FANELLI, GIOVANNI; PASQUALETTI, FRANCESCO; BEVILACQUA, GENEROSO; ZAVAGLIA, KATIA; NACCARATO, ANTONIO G.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most aggressive type of primary brain tumor. Despite the progress in recent years regarding the diagnosis and treatment of GB, the recurrence rate remains high, due to the infiltrative and dispersive nature of the tumor, which typically results in poor patient prognosis. In the present study, 19 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded GB samples were selected from patients with GB tumors. The samples were classified into a short or long recurrence-free survival (RFS) group, based on the time of first recurrence of the disease in the patients. The 19 samples were molecularly characterized for mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene, amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, presence of the EGFR variant III, and methylation of the promoter region of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. Then, the expression of 84 genes involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and that of 84 microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with brain cancer, was profiled. In addition, a copy number variation analysis of 23 genes reported to undergo frequent genomic alterations in human glioma was also performed. Differences in the expression levels of a number of genes were detected across the short and long RFS groups. Among these genes, 5 in particular were selected, and a 5-genes combination approach was developed, which was able to differentiate between patients with short and long RFS outcome. The high levels of sensitivity and precision displayed by this 5-genes combination approach, which were confirmed with a cross-validation method, provide a strong foundation for further validation of the involvement of the aforementioned genes in GB in a larger patient population. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated how the expression pattern of miRNAs and mRNAs in patients with GB defines a particular molecular hallmark that may increase or reduce the aggressive behavior of GB tumors, thus influencing the

  11. Effects of loco regional treatments before living donor liver transplantation on overall survival and recurrence-free survival in South Korean patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Na, Gun H.; Kim, Eun Y.; Hong, Tae H.; You, Young K.; Kim, Dong G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the effects of pre-transplant locoregional treatment on survival in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and the most accurate method for predicting survival after LDLT in patients who received pre-transplant locoregional treatment. Methods From December 2003 to December 2012, 234 patients underwent LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at our transplant center. We retrospectively reviewed 86 patients newly diagnosed with HCC and who received pre-transplant locoregional treatments at our hospital. Results Of the 33 patients with HCC initially beyond the Milan criteria, 12 experienced successful down-staging after locoregional treatments, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival was 81.8%, which was comparable to those in patients with HCC initially within the Milan criteria. A bad responder according to the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) [HR, 4.874 (1.059–22.442), p = 0.042], and increased AFP levels [HR 4.002 (1.540–10.397), p = 0.004] during pre-transplant locoregional treatments were independent risk factors for HCC recurrence after LDLT in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Liver transplantation may be considered after successful down-staging in patients with HCC initially beyond the Milan criteria. The mRECIST and serum AFP level changes are better selection criteria for LDLT in patients who have received locoregional treatments. PMID:26776857

  12. Preoperative Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI and Simultaneous Treatment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prolonged Recurrence-Free Survival of Progressed Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Amemiya, Hidetake; Maki, Akira; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Sano, Katsuhiro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Fujii, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and simultaneous treatment of suspected early hepatocellular carcinoma (eHCC) at the time of resection for progressed HCC affected patient prognosis following hepatic resection. Methods. A total of 147 consecutive patients who underwent their first curative hepatic resection for progressed HCC were enrolled. Of these, 77 patients underwent EOB-MRI (EOB-MRI (+)) before hepatic resection and the remaining 70 patients did not (EOB-MRI (−)). Suspected eHCCs detected by preoperative imaging were resected or ablated at the time of resection for progressed HCC. Results. The number of patients who underwent treatment for eHCCs was significantly higher in the EOB-MRI (+) than in the EOB-MRI (−) (17 versus 6; P = 0.04). Recurrence-free survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 81.4, 62.6, 48.7% versus 82.1, 41.5, 25.5%, resp., P < 0.01), but not overall survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 98.7, 90.7, 80.8% versus 97.0, 86.3, 72.4%, resp., P = 0.38), was significantly better in the EOB-MRI (+). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that preoperative EOB-MRI was one of the independent factors significantly correlated with better recurrence-free survival. Conclusions. Preoperative EOB-MRI and simultaneous treatment of eHCC prolonged recurrence-free survival after hepatic resection. PMID:24701029

  13. Image-based computer-aided prognosis of lung cancer: predicting patient recurrent-free survival via a variational Bayesian mixture modeling framework for cluster analysis of CT histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohamatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Moriyama, N.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a computer-aided prognosis (CAP) scheme that utilizes quantitatively derived image information to predict patient recurrent-free survival for lung cancers. Our scheme involves analyzing CT histograms to evaluate the volumetric distribution of CT values within pulmonary nodules. A variational Bayesian mixture modeling framework translates the image-derived features into an image-based risk score for predicting the patient recurrence-free survival. Using our dataset of 454 patients with NSCLC, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of the CAP scheme which can provide a quantitative risk score that is strongly correlated with prognostic factors.

  14. [A case of small bowel cancer with positive peritoneal cytology and five-year recurrence-free survival].

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Atsushi; Shimizu, Keiji; Nishibeppu, Keiji; Matsuyama, Takehisa; Ogino, Shiro; Takemura, Manabu; Mugitani, Tatsuro; Ishida, Hidekazu; Akami, Toshikazu; Okano, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    Small bowel cancer is frequently detected at an advanced stage and its prognosis is poor. We report on a patient with small bowel cancer with positive peritoneal cytology who survived for 5 years without recurrence after surgery.The case involved a 73-year-old woman who had undergone partial resection of the small intestine and lymphadenectomy for a small bowel tumor with obstruction. Pathological examination confirmed papillary adenocarcinoma with partial serosal invasion. Ascites cytology indicated a class V tumor. Adjuvant chemotherapy with TS-1 was administered for 20 months, and the patient has survived without evidence of disease for over 5 years.In this case, it is possible that TS-1 chemotherapy was effective for prevention against small bowel cancer recurrence.Furthermore , peritoneal cytology in patients with small bowel cancer should be evaluated as a predictor of prognosis. PMID:25731552

  15. A novel five gene signature derived from stem-like side population cells predicts overall and recurrence-free survival in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Deepak; Singh, Sandeep; Yoder, Sean J; Bloom, Gregory C; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has been used to characterize prognosis in various cancers. Earlier studies had shown that side population cells isolated from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cell lines exhibit cancer stem cell properties. In this study we apply a systems biology approach to gene expression profiling data from cancer stem like cells isolated from lung cancer cell lines to identify novel gene signatures that could predict prognosis. Microarray data from side population (SP) and main population (MP) cells isolated from 4 NSCLC lines (A549, H1650, H460, H1975) were used to examine gene expression profiles associated with stem like properties. Differentially expressed genes that were over or under-expressed at least two fold commonly in all 4 cell lines were identified. We found 354 were upregulated and 126 were downregulated in SP cells compared to MP cells; of these, 89 up and 62 downregulated genes (average 2 fold changes) were used for Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and MetaCore pathway analysis. The pathway analysis demonstrated representation of 4 up regulated genes (TOP2A, AURKB, BRRN1, CDK1) in chromosome condensation pathway and 1 down regulated gene FUS in chromosomal translocation. Microarray data was validated using qRT-PCR on the 5 selected genes and all showed robust correlation between microarray and qRT-PCR. Further, we analyzed two independent gene expression datasets that included 360 lung adenocarcinoma patients from NCI Director's Challenge Set for overall survival and 63 samples from Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) for recurrence free survival. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test analysis predicted poor survival of patients in both data sets. Our results suggest that genes involved in chromosome condensation are likely related with stem-like properties and might predict survival in lung adenocarcinoma. Our findings highlight a gene signature for effective identification of lung adenocarcinoma patients with poor prognosis and designing

  16. Expression pattern of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 acts as a novel prognostic marker of recurrence recurrence-free survival in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Timsah, Zahra; Berrout, Jonathan; Suraokar, Milind; Behrens, Carmen; Song, Juhee; Lee, J Jack; Ivan, Cristina; Gagea, Mihai; Shires, Michael; Hu, Xin; Vallien, Courtney; Kingsley, Charles V; Wistuba, IgnacioI; Ladbury, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is characterized by complex biology involving alterations at the genomic and protein expression levels. FGFR2 mutation and/or amplification are key drivers of disease progression and drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These genetic alterations drive oncogenic downstream signalling due to the deregulated activity of the receptor. We have previously reported that wild type FGFR2 provides a binding site for which two proteins, Grb2 and Plcγ1, compete in a concentration-dependent manner. Metastasis and invasion ensue when Plcγ1 prevails on the receptor giving rise to oncogenic outcome in the absence of gene mutation/deletion. The effect of this signalling mechanism on FGFR2-driven lung adenocarcinoma has not previously been considered. In this study we show that fluctuation in the combinatorial expression levels of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 modulates cell invasive properties, tumor formation and is linked to recurrence-free survival in 150 lung adenocarcinoma patients. High levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a low background of Grb2 significantly correlates with poor prognosis. On the other hand, low levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a high background of Grb2 correlates with favourable prognosis. This study defines the expression pattern of FGFR2, Plcγ1 and Grb2 as a novel prognostic marker in human lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, consideration of the Grb2 and Plcγ1-mediated mechanism of FGFR2 regulation will enhance the therapeutic targeting of aberrant FGFR2 activity to provide the much-needed improvement to the treatment regimen of this high mortality disease. PMID:26693065

  17. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of CT histogram based feature space for predicting recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Aokage, K.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2015-03-01

    Advantages of CT scanners with high resolution have allowed the improved detection of lung cancers. In the recent release of positive results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) in the US showing that CT screening does in fact have a positive impact on the reduction of lung cancer related mortality. While this study does show the efficacy of CT based screening, physicians often face the problems of deciding appropriate management strategies for maximizing patient survival and for preserving lung function. Several key manifold-learning approaches efficiently reveal intrinsic low-dimensional structures latent in high-dimensional data spaces. This study was performed to investigate whether the dimensionality reduction can identify embedded structures from the CT histogram feature of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) space to improve the performance in predicting the likelihood of RFS for patients with NSCLC.

  18. Expression of coinhibitory receptors on T cells in the microenvironment of usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia is related to proinflammatory effector T cells and an increased recurrence-free survival.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Edith M G; van Poelgeest, Mariette I E; Kouwenberg, Simone; Osse, E Michelle; Trimbos, J Baptist M Z; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-02-15

    Human papillomavirus-induced usual-type vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (uVIN) are infiltrated by immune cells but apparently not cleared. A potential explanation for this is an impaired T cell effector function by an immunesuppressive milieu, coinfiltrating regulatory T cells or the expression of coinhibitory molecules. Here, the role of these potential inhibitory mechanisms was evaluated by a detailed immunohistochemical analysis of T cell infiltration in the context of FoxP3, Tbet, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, programmed cell death 1, T cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM3), natural killer cell lectin-like receptor A (NKG2A) and galectins-1, -3 and -9. Paraffin-embedded tissues of primary uVIN lesions (n=43), recurrent uVIN lesions (n=20), vulvar carcinoma (n=21) and healthy vulvar tissue (n=26) were studied. We show that the vulva constitutes an area intensely surveyed by CD8+, CD4+, Tbet+ and regulatory T cell populations, parts of which express the examined coinhibitory molecules. In uVIN especially, the number of regulatory T cells and TIM3+ T cells increased. The expression of the coinhibitory markers TIM3 and NKG2A probably reflected a higher degree of T cell activation as a dense infiltration with stromal CD8+TIM3+ T cells and CD3+NKG2A+ T cells was related to the absence of recurrences and/or a prolonged recurrence-free survival. A dense coinfiltrate with regulatory T cells was negatively associated with the time to recurrence, most dominantly when the stromal CD8+TIM3+ infiltration was limited. This notion was sustained in vulvar carcinoma's where the numbers of regulatory T cells progressively increased to outnumber coinfiltrating CD8+TIM3+ T cells and CD3+NKG2A+ T cells. PMID:25220367

  19. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer: Functional Tumor Volume by MR Imaging Predicts Recurrence-free Survival-Results from the ACRIN 6657/CALGB 150007 I-SPY 1 TRIAL.

    PubMed

    Hylton, Nola M; Gatsonis, Constantine A; Rosen, Mark A; Lehman, Constance D; Newitt, David C; Partridge, Savannah C; Bernreuter, Wanda K; Pisano, Etta D; Morris, Elizabeth A; Weatherall, Paul T; Polin, Sandra M; Newstead, Gillian M; Marques, Helga S; Esserman, Laura J; Schnall, Mitchell D

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To evaluate volumetric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) of breast cancer and to consider its predictive performance relative to pathologic complete response (PCR). Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective multicenter study was approved by institutional review boards with written informed consent. Women with breast tumors 3 cm or larger scheduled for NACT underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging before treatment (examination 1), after one cycle (examination 2), midtherapy (examination 3), and before surgery (examination 4). Functional tumor volume (FTV), computed from MR images by using enhancement thresholds, and change from baseline (ΔFTV) were measured after one cycle and before surgery. Association of RFS with FTV was assessed by Cox regression and compared with association of RFS with PCR and residual cancer burden (RCB), while controlling for age, race, and hormone receptor (HR)/ human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) status. Predictive performance of models was evaluated by C statistics. Results Female patients (n = 162) with FTV and RFS were included. At univariate analysis, FTV2, FTV4, and ΔFTV4 had significant association with RFS, as did HR/HER2 status and RCB class. PCR approached significance at univariate analysis and was not significant at multivariate analysis. At univariate analysis, FTV2 and RCB class had the strongest predictive performance (C statistic = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58, 0.76), greater than for FTV4 (0.64; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.74) and PCR (0.57; 95% CI: 0.39, 0.74). At multivariate analysis, a model with FTV2, ΔFTV2, RCB class, HR/HER2 status, age, and race had the highest C statistic (0.72; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.84). Conclusion Breast tumor FTV measured by MR imaging is a strong predictor of RFS, even in the presence of PCR and RCB class. Models combining MR imaging, histopathology, and breast cancer

  20. Local Response and Impact on Survival After Local Ablation of Liver Metastases From Colorectal Carcinoma by Computed Tomography-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ricke, Jens; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Seidensticker, Max; Ruehl, Ricarda; Wieners, Gero; Gaffke, Gunnar; Kropf, Siegfried; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy at various dose levels and the prognostic impact of extensive cytoreduction in colorectal liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients were treated on a single-center prospective trial that was initially designed to be randomized to three dose levels of 15 Gy, 20 Gy, or 25 Gy per lesion, delivered in a single fraction. However, because there was a high rate of cross-over of subjects from higher to lower dose levels, this study is better understood as a prospective trial with three dose levels. No upper size limit for the metastases was applied. We assessed time to local progression, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Results: According to safety constraints cross-over was performed. The final assignment was n = 98, n = 68, and n = 33 in the 15-Gy, 20-Gy, and 25-Gy groups, respectively. Median diameter of the largest tumor lesion in each patient was 5 cm (range, 1-13.5 cm). Estimated mean local recurrence-free survival for all lesions was 34 months (median not reached). The group assigned to 15 Gy after cross-over displayed 34 local recurrences out of 98 lesions; 20 Gy, 15 out of 68 lesions; 25 Gy, 1 out of 33 lesions. The difference between the 25-Gy and the 20-Gy or 15-Gy group was significant (p < 0.05). Repeated local tumor ablations were the most prominent factor for increased survival and dominated additional systemic antitumor treatments. Conclusions: Local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases demonstrated a strong dose dependency. The role of extensive minimally invasive tumor ablation in metastatic colorectal cancer needs to be further established.

  1. Mallard survival from local to immature stage in southwestern Saskatchewan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hestbeck, J.B.; Dzubin, A.; Gollop, J.B.; Nichols, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    We used 3,670 reciveries from 32,647 bandings of mallards in southwestern Saskatchewan during 1956-59 to estimate the probability of surviving from the local, flightless stage to the flighted, immature stage. The probability of surviving from the local to the immature stage was 0.84 +/- 0.05 (SE) for males and females. The geographic distribution of direct recoveries was similar for the birds banded as local and immature. Probabilities of surivival for banded mallards can only be estimated from late summer to late summer. The estimate of survival from local to immature stage fills a gap in our knowledge of mallard mortality from female-brood breakup to the time of banding in late summer.

  2. Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

  3. Locally advanced hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: single-institution outcomes in a cohort of patients curatively treated either with or without larynx preservation*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Isabel; Aguiar, Artur; Alzamora, Cristiana; Ferreira, Carolina; Castro, Vera; Soares, André; Lobão, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at describing a single-institution experience in the curative treatment of patients diagnosed with locally advanced hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods Data concerning all patients treated for locally advanced hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma between January 2006 and June 2012 were reviewed. Results A total of 144 patients were included in the present study. The median follow-up period was 36.6 months. Median survival was 26 months, and 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were, 51% and 30.5%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival was 18 months and 2-year and 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 42.8% and 28.5%, respectively. Conclusion The outcomes in the present series are in line with the literature. PMID:26929457

  4. Embryo Localization Enhances the Survival of Acidovorax citrulli in Watermelon Seeds.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Bhabesh; Schneider, Raymond W; Robertson, Clark L; Walcott, Ronald R

    2016-04-01

    Acidovorax citrulli, the causal agent of bacterial fruit blotch (BFB) of cucurbits has been observed to survive for >34 years in stored melon and watermelon seeds. To better understand this remarkable longevity, we investigated the bacterium's tolerance to desiccation and the effect of bacterial localization in different watermelon seed tissues on its survival. We compared the ability of A. citrulli to tolerate desiccation on filter paper discs and on host (watermelon) and nonhost (cabbage, corn and tomato) seeds to two seedborne (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii) and one soilborne (Ralstonia solanacearum) plant-pathogenic bacteria. A. citrulli survival on dry filter paper (>12 weeks) was similar to that of X. campestris pv. campestris but longer than P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Ralstonia solanacearum survived longer than all other bacteria tested. On all seeds tested, A. citrulli and X. campestris pv. campestris populations declined by 5 orders of magnitude after 12 weeks of incubation at 4°C and 50% relative humidity, while R. solanacearum populations declined by 3 orders. P. stewartii subsp. stewartii was not recovered after 12 weeks of incubation. To determine the effect of tissue localization on bacterial survival, watermelon seeds infested with A. citrulli by flower stigma inoculation (resulting in bacterial localization in the embryo/endosperm) or by ovary pericarp inoculations (resulting in bacterial localization under the testa) were treated with peroxyacetic acid or chlorine (Cl2) gas. Following these treatments, a significantly higher reduction in BFB seed-to-seedling transmission was observed for seeds generated by ovary pericarp inoculation (≥89.5%) than for those generated by stigma inoculation (≤76.5%) (P<0.05). Additionally, higher populations of A. citrulli survived when the bacteria were localized to the embryo/endosperm versus the seed coat, suggesting that tissue localization is important for

  5. Factors affecting survivability of local Rohilkhand goats under organized farm

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, D.; Patel, B. H. M.; Sahu, S.; Gaur, G. K.; Singh, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the pattern of mortality as affected by age, season and various diseases in local goats of Rohilkhand region maintained at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly. Materials and Methods: Post-mortem records of 12 years (2000-01 to 2011-12) were used, and total 243 mortality data were collected and analyzed. The causes of mortality were classified into seven major classes viz. digestive disorders, respiratory disorders, cardiovascular disorders, musculoskeletal disorder, parasitic disorders, mixed disorders (combination of digestive, respiratory, parasitic, and cardiovascular disorders) and miscellaneous disorders (cold, hypoglycemia, emaciation, endometritis, traumatic injury, etc.). Results: The average mortality was 10.93%. The overall mortality was more during rainy season followed by winter and summer season. The mortality in 4-6 months of age was high (2.52%) followed by 0-1 month (2.34%) and 2-3 months (1.35%). The average mortality among adult age groups (>12 months) was 3.42%. The mortality showed declining trend with the advancement of age up to 3 months and then again increased in 4-6 months age group. The digestive diseases (3.51%) followed by respiratory diseases (1.89%) and parasitic diseases (1.48%) contributed major share to the total mortality occurred and the remaining disorders were of lesser significance in causing death in goats. There is significant (p<0.01; χ2=55.62) association between year with season and age with the season (p<0.05, χ2=16.083) found in the present study. Conclusion: This study confirms that overall mortality rate averaged 10.93% (ranged between 1.10% and 25.56%) over 12 years under semi-intensive farm condition. It was generally higher in rainy season. The mortality remains higher in kids particularly under 1 month of age. The digestive diseases contributed major share to overall mortality. PMID:27047020

  6. An exception that proves the rule: recurrence free survival five years after extrapleural pneumonectomy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Tom; Macbeth, Fergus

    2014-01-01

    Are case reports at all relevant and useful? A case report of an unusual case of mesothelioma prompts a discussion and concludes that they do have a role but that their observations and conclusions need to be treated with care. PMID:25403951

  7. [A Case of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei Derived from Cecum Colon Cancer with Long-Term Recurrence-Free Survival].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Satoru; Takahashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Shusaku; Nakano, Shiro; Akabane, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    A 29-year-old woman was diagnosed with advanced cecum colon cancer, and right hemicolectomy was performed. The pathological findings showed stage Ⅲa disease, including moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma>mucinous adenocarcinoma, pT3, pN1, cM0, and Cur A resection. The patient was treated with 5-FU plus l-LV adjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen months after surgery, bilateral ovarian metastasis and ascites were found, and another surgery was performed, revealing that the abdominal cavity was filled with a gelatinous ascites. Under the diagnosis of pseudomyxoma peritonei, resection of both ovaries, abdominal lavage, and intraperitoneal administration of CDDP were performed, followed by S-1 plus CDDP treatment. Two years after the recurrence, peritoneal re-recurrence on the vaginal fornix was detected. A total hysterectomy, partial vaginectomy, and resection of disseminated peritoneal nodules were performed. The patient received mFOLFOX6 treatment postoperatively. To date, 8 years and 9 months after her re-recurrence, the patient is alive and without signs of a third recurrence. PMID:26805284

  8. Local control and survival after external irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rangala, N.; Cox, J.D.; Byhardt, R.W.; Wilson, J.F.; Greenberg, M.; Da Conceicao, A.L.

    1982-11-01

    From 1966 through 1978, 128 patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent external irradiation to the entire pelvis followed by additional irradiation with a field that encompassed the entire prostate with generous margins. Local recurrence was diagnosed when palpable regrowth occurred and was confirmed by biopsy. Eighteen patients (14%) had local recurrence. Actuarial (life table) local recurrence rates, however, were 24% for both for Stage B and C patients. Actuarial five year survival was 100% for the 10 Stage A patients, 91% for the 25 Stage B, and 78% for the 93 Stage C patients. Actuarial five year disease-free survival was 59% for Stage B and 69% for Stage C patients. Local recurrence was affected by the total dose to the whole pelvis and the dose at the center of the prostate. Disease-free survival was influenced by differentiation. High dose external irradiation to the prostate and regional lymph nodes offers the greatest probability of long-term disease-free survival for patients with localized disease. Late bowel complications were seen in 14 patients (11%), two of whom required colostomies. Late urinary tract complications were observed in five patients (4%).

  9. Osteosarcoma of the spine: prognostic variables for local recurrence and overall survival, a multicenter ambispective study.

    PubMed

    Dekutoski, Mark B; Clarke, Michelle J; Rose, Peter; Luzzati, Alessandro; Rhines, Laurence D; Varga, Peter P; Fisher, Charles G; Chou, Dean; Fehlings, Michael G; Reynolds, Jeremy J; Williams, Richard; Quraishi, Nasir A; Germscheid, Niccole M; Sciubba, Daniel M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Boriani, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Primary spinal osteosarcomas are rare and aggressive neoplasms. Poor outcomes can occur, as obtaining marginal margins is technically demanding; further Enneking-appropriate en bloc resection can have significant morbidity. The goal of this study is to identify prognostic variables for local recurrence and mortality in surgically treated patients diagnosed with a primary osteosarcoma of the spine. METHODS A multicenter ambispective database of surgically treated patients with primary spine osteosarcomas was developed by AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor. Patient demographic, diagnosis, treatment, perioperative morbidity, local recurrence, and cross-sectional survival data were collected. Tumors were classified in 2 cohorts: Enneking appropriate (EA) and Enneking inappropriate (EI), as defined by pathology margin matching Enneking-recommended surgical margins. Prognostic variables were analyzed in reference to local recurrence and survival. RESULTS Between 1987 and 2012, 58 patients (32 female patients) underwent surgical treatment for primary spinal osteosarcoma. Patients were followed for a mean period of 3.5 ± 3.5 years (range 0.5 days to 14.3 years). The median survival for the entire cohort was 6.7 years postoperative. Twenty-four (41%) patients died, and 17 (30%) patients suffered a local recurrence, 10 (59%) of whom died. Twenty-nine (53%) patients underwent EA resection while 26 (47%) patients underwent EI resection with a postoperative median survival of 6.8 and 3.7 years, respectively (p = 0.048). EI patients had a higher rate of local recurrence than EA patients (p = 0.001). Patient age, previous surgery, biopsy type, tumor size, spine level, and chemotherapy timing did not significantly influence recurrence and survival. CONCLUSIONS Osteosarcoma of the spine presents a significant challenge, and most patients die in spite of aggressive surgery. There is a significant decrease in recurrence and an increase in survival with en bloc resection (EA

  10. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam; Manning, Matthew; Moody, John S.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued

  11. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  12. Local-scale drivers of tree survival in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xugao; Comita, Liza S; Hao, Zhanqing; Davies, Stuart J; Ye, Ji; Lin, Fei; Yuan, Zuoqiang

    2012-01-01

    Tree survival plays a central role in forest ecosystems. Although many factors such as tree size, abiotic and biotic neighborhoods have been proposed as being important in explaining patterns of tree survival, their contributions are still subject to debate. We used generalized linear mixed models to examine the relative importance of tree size, local abiotic conditions and the density and identity of neighbors on tree survival in an old-growth temperate forest in northeastern China at three levels (community, guild and species). Tree size and both abiotic and biotic neighborhood variables influenced tree survival under current forest conditions, but their relative importance varied dramatically within and among the community, guild and species levels. Of the variables tested, tree size was typically the most important predictor of tree survival, followed by biotic and then abiotic variables. The effect of tree size on survival varied from strongly positive for small trees (1-20 cm dbh) and medium trees (20-40 cm dbh), to slightly negative for large trees (>40 cm dbh). Among the biotic factors, we found strong evidence for negative density and frequency dependence in this temperate forest, as indicated by negative effects of both total basal area of neighbors and the frequency of conspecific neighbors. Among the abiotic factors tested, soil nutrients tended to be more important in affecting tree survival than topographic variables. Abiotic factors generally influenced survival for species with relatively high abundance, for individuals in smaller size classes and for shade-tolerant species. Our study demonstrates that the relative importance of variables driving patterns of tree survival differs greatly among size classes, species guilds and abundance classes in temperate forest, which can further understanding of forest dynamics and offer important insights into forest management. PMID:22347996

  13. Local weather, regional climate, and annual survival of the northern spotted owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, E.M.; Anthony, R.G.; Forsman, E.D.; Olson, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    We used an information-theoretical approach and Cormack-Jolly-Seber models for open populations in program MARK to examine relationships between survival rates of Northern Spotted Owls and a variety of local weather variables and long-term climate variables. In four of the six populations examined, survival was positively associated with wetter than normal conditions during the growing season or high summer temperatures. At the three study areas located at the highest elevations, survival was positively associated with winter temperature but also had a negative or quadratic relation with the number of storms and winter precipitation. A metaanalysis of all six areas combined indicated that annual survival was most strongly associated with phase shifts in the Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which reflect large-scale temperature and precipitation patterns in this region. Climate accounted for a variable amount (1-41%) of the total process variation in annual survival but for more year-to-year variation (3-66%) than did spatial variation among owl territories (0-7%). Negative associations between survival and cold, wet winters and nesting seasons were similar to those found in other studies of the Spotted Owl. The relationships between survival and growing-season precipitation and regional climate patterns, however, had not been reported for this species previously. Climate-change models for the first half of the 21st century predict warmer, wetter winters and hotter, drier summers for the Pacific Northwest. Our results indicate that these conditions could decrease Spotted Owl survival in some areas. Copyright ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  14. Localized Resectable Genitourinary Sarcoma in Adult Korean Patients: Experiences at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Yong; Moon, Kyung Chul; Cheong, Min Su; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of localized resectable genitourinary sarcomas in adults. Materials and Methods Between September, 1996 and November, 2008, 18 consecutive cases of adults (12 men and 6 women; median age 48.8 years) who were treated for primary genitourinary sarcomas were identified. The following variables were analyzed: patient age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, primary organ, tumor histology, size, necrosis, Fédération Nationale des Centres de Lutte Contre le Cancer (FNCLCC) grade, and surgical margin positivity. Recurrence-free survival and disease-specific survival were the study end-points. Results The most common presenting symptom was a palpable mass (six cases, 33.3%), the most common site was the kidney (six cases, 33.3%), and the most common histological subtype was leiomyosarcoma (eight patients, 44.4%). Complete resection with negative surgical margins was achieved in 13 patients (72.2%). The median follow-up period was 49.9 months (range 6.4 to 147.6). The recurrence-free survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 81.6%, 66.5%, and 66.5%, respectively. Recurrence-free survival only associated significantly with ASA score (p=0.018). The disease-specific survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.9%, 76.2%, and 67.7%, respectively. Disease-specific survival was associated significantly only with FNCLCC grade (p=0.042). Conclusion Although genitourinary sarcomas in adults are a rare group of tumors with a poor prognosis, some patients may have a favorable prognosis. Our findings suggest that FNCLCC grade is the most important prognostic factor for these patients. PMID:21786440

  15. Early Local Recurrence Presents Adverse Effect on Outcomes of Primary Breast Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qun-Chao; Mei, Xin; Feng, Yan; Ma, Jin-Li; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Shao, Zhi-Min; Yu, Xiao-Li; Guo, Xiao-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary breast sarcomas (PBSs) are spectrum heterogeneous sarcomas in breast and the optimal treatment for them is still under discussion. Our study was to investigate clinical characteristics and identify potential prognostic factors for this rare malignancy. The authors retrospectively reviewed 38 patients with PBSs between October 2000 and February 2014 in FuDan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Local control rate and overall survival (OS) were determined by Kaplan–Meier actuarial method. Univariate analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were applied to identify potential prognostic factors. With median follow-up of 40.19 months, 14 patients (14/38) were found with local recurrence. Extensive operation like mastectomy was not superior to local resection (P = 0.167). Three-year recurrence-free survival and OS rate were 61.9% and 89%, respectively. Larger tumor size and local recurrence were indicated as unfavorable prognostic factors in univariate analysis. Cox model identified narrow interval of recurrence free survival as an unfavorable factor (P = 0.048). Surgery remains crucial treatment for PBSs. Mastectomy, however, is not routinely necessary if clear margin could be achieved by local excision. Early recurrence indicates a poor OS. PMID:26735546

  16. Locally Applied Valproate Enhances Survival in Rats after Neocortical Treatment with Tetanus Toxin and Cobalt Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Hebel, Jonas M.; Rassner, Michael P.; Freiman, Thomas M.; Feuerstein, Thomas J.; Zentner, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. In neocortical epilepsies not satisfactorily responsive to systemic antiepileptic drug therapy, local application of antiepileptic agents onto the epileptic focus may enhance treatment efficacy and tolerability. We describe the effects of focally applied valproate (VPA) in a newly emerging rat model of neocortical epilepsy induced by tetanus toxin (TeT) plus cobalt chloride (CoCl2). Methods. In rats, VPA (n = 5) or sodium chloride (NaCl) (n = 5) containing polycaprolactone (PCL) implants were applied onto the right motor cortex treated before with a triple injection of 75 ng TeT plus 15 mg CoCl2. Video-EEG monitoring was performed with intracortical depth electrodes. Results. All rats randomized to the NaCl group died within one week after surgery. In contrast, the rats treated with local VPA survived significantly longer (P < 0.01). In both groups, witnessed deaths occurred in the context of seizures. At least 3/4 of the rats surviving the first postoperative day developed neocortical epilepsy with recurrent spontaneous seizures. Conclusions. The novel TeT/CoCl2 approach targets at a new model of neocortical epilepsy in rats and allows the investigation of local epilepsy therapy strategies. In this vehicle-controlled study, local application of VPA significantly enhanced survival in rats, possibly by focal antiepileptic or antiepileptogenic mechanisms. PMID:24151604

  17. Impact of local tumor relapse on patient survival after cobalt 60 plaque radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vrabec, T.R.; Augsburger, J.J.; Gamel, J.W.; Brady, L.W.; Hernandez, C.; Woodleigh, R. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors investigated the impact of local intraocular tumor relapse on survival in a matched-group comparison study of patients with primary choroidal or ciliary body melanoma managed with cobalt 60 plaque radiotherapy. Sixty-two patients with local relapse were matched with an equal number of relapse-free patients in terms of known clinical prognostic factors for both melanoma-specific mortality (largest linear tumor dimension, location of anterior tumor margin, age) and local tumor relapse (location of posterior tumor margin). The follow-up of every relapse-free patient equaled or exceeded the interval to relapse for each matched patient with local relapse. The estimated 5-year survival (Kaplan-Meier) in the relapse-free patients was 87% (standard error = 4%), while that in the local relapse group was 58% (standard error = 6%). This difference is statistically significant (P less than 0.0001, log rank test). These results support the hypothesis that local tumor relapse after cobalt 60 plaque radiotherapy is an important post-treatment clinical indicator of the tumor's greater malignant potential and the patient's increased risk of melanoma-specific mortality.

  18. What is the survival after surgery for localized malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    PubMed

    Gelvez-Zapata, Sandra M; Gaffney, Daniel; Scarci, Marco; Coonar, Aman S

    2013-04-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. This was with the purpose of assisting our management of patients with localized malignant mesothelioma of the pleura (LMM). Although the terminology is used inconsistently, this variant has been formally defined by the WHO as a distinct entity defined as localized disease histologically identical to the diffuse form but without any evidence of pleural spread. Treatments for LMM include different combinations of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There is an impression that LMM may have a better outcome than the commoner diffuse form of malignant mesothelioma that has been reported to have a survival between 8 and 14 months. In order to advise our patients on prognosis, we studied the duration of survival after surgical resection of LMM. A total of 150 papers were found, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. It is difficult to combine the results of these 16 papers because both treatments and results are reported differently. Some report median survival (range: 11.6-36 months) and others disease-free survival (range: 0 months to 11 years). Median survival to the longest follow-up was 29 months when calculated by pooling data from informative papers using the Kaplan-Meier method. Our review suggests that survival in LMM is longer than that generally quoted for the more common diffuse form of malignant mesothelioma. Hence, aggressive treatment of LMM may be reasonable in appropriate patients. PMID:23328002

  19. Radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors: outcomes, effects on survival, and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhan, Okan; Güler, Ezgi; Akıncı, Devrim; Çiftçi, Türkmen; Köse, Ilgaz Çağatay

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the survival benefit achieved with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors and determine significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. METHODS Forty-nine patients with lung cancer (10 primary and 39 metastatic) underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous RF ablation between June 2005 and October 2013. A total of 112 tumors (101 metastatic and 11 primary non-small cell lung cancer) were treated with RF ablation. Tumor diameter ranged from 0.6 to 4 cm (median 1.5 cm). Effectiveness of treatment, complications, and survival were analyzed. RESULTS Primary success rate was 79.5% and local tumor progression occurred in 23 tumors. Among tumors showing progression, 10 were re-treated with RF ablation and secondary success rate was 87.5%. One-, two-, and three-year overall survival rates of 10 patients with primary lung cancer were 100%, 86%, and 43%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, four-, and five-year overall survival rates for 39 patients with metastatic lung tumors were 90%, 73%, 59%, 55%, and 38%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, and four-year overall survival rates for 16 patients with colorectal pulmonary metastases were 94%, 80%, 68%, and 23%, respectively. Complications occurred in 30 sessions (24.6%). Pneumothorax occurred in 19 sessions with seven requiring image-guided percutaneous chest tube drainage. Tumor status (solitary or multiple) and presence of extrapulmonary metastasis at initial RF ablation were significant prognostic factors in terms of recurrence-free survival. CONCLUSION RF ablation is a safe and effective treatment with a survival benefit for selected patients with primary and secondary lung tumors. PMID:26611111

  20. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  1. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Daniel; Danilovic, Ivan; Seemann, Rudolf; Kornek, Gabriela; Engelmann, Johannes; Pillerstorff, Robert; Holawe, Simone; Psyrri, Amanda; Erovic, Boban M.; Farwell, Gregory; Perisanidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for survival analyses. Results Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL). Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037). In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008) Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.90, p = 0.021) and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11–2.86, p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC. PMID:27362659

  2. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results: Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Conclusion: Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:27306773

  3. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  4. Localized hypoxia within the subgranular zone determines the early survival of newborn hippocampal granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Schnell, Eric; Westbrook, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    The majority of adult hippocampal newborn cells die during early differentiation from intermediate progenitors (IPCs) to immature neurons. Neural stem cells in vivo are located in a relative hypoxic environment, and hypoxia enhances their survival, proliferation and stemness in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that migration of IPCs away from hypoxic zones within the SGZ might result in oxidative damage, thus triggering cell death. Hypoxic niches were observed along the SGZ, composed of adult NSCs and early IPCs, and oxidative byproducts were present in adjacent late IPCs and neuroblasts. Stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α with dimethyloxallyl glycine increased early survival, but not proliferation or differentiation, in neurospheres in vitro and in newly born SGZ cells in vivo. Rescue experiments in Baxfl/flmutants supported these results. We propose that localized hypoxia within the SGZ contributes to the neurogenic microenvironment and determines the early, activity-independent survival of adult hippocampal newborn cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08722.001 PMID:26476335

  5. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, NG Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer. An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate. The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively. Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  6. Local annual survival and seasonal residency rates of semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) in Puerto rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, S.M.; Collazo, J.A.; Alldredge, M.W.; Harrington, B.A.; Lewis, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    We report seasonal residency and local annual survival rates of migratory Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) at the Cabo Rojo salt flats, Puerto Rico. Residency rate (daily probability of remaining on the flats) was 0.991 ?? 0.001 (x?? ?? SE), yielding a mean length of stay of 110 days. This finding supports the inclusion of the Caribbean as part of the species' winter range. Average estimated percentage of fat was low but increased throughout the season, which suggests that birds replenish some spent fat reserves and strive for energetic maintenance. Local annual survival rate was 0.62 ?? 0.04, within the range of values reported for breeding populations at Manitoba and Alaska (0.53-0.76). The similarity was not unexpected because estimates were obtained annually but at opposite sites of their annual migratory movements. Birds captured at the salt flats appeared to be a mix of birds from various parts of the breeding range, judging from morphology (culmen's coefficient of variation = 9.1, n = 106). This suggested that origin (breeding area) of birds and their proportion in the data should be ascertained and accounted for in analyses to glean the full conservation implications of winter-based annual survival estimates. Those data are needed to unravel the possibility that individuals of distinct populations are affected by differential mortality factors across different migratory routes. Mean length of stay strongly suggested that habitat quality at the salt flats was high. Rainfall and tidal flow combine to increase food availability during fall. The salt flats dry up gradually toward late January, at the onset of the dry season. Semipalmated Sandpipers may move west to other Greater Antilles or south to sites such as coastal Surinam until the onset of spring migration. They are not an oversummering species at the salt flats. Conservation efforts in the Caribbean region require understanding the dynamics of this species throughout winter to protect

  7. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. )

    1993-04-30

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

  8. Monoubiquitination of survival motor neuron regulates its cellular localization and Cajal body integrity.

    PubMed

    Han, Ke-Jun; Foster, Daniel; Harhaj, Edward W; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein cause spinal muscular atrophy, the leading genetic disorder for infant mortality. SMN is ubiquitously expressed in various cell types and localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it concentrates in two subnuclear structures termed Cajal body (CB) and gems. In addition, SMN can also be detected in the nucleolus of neurons. Mechanisms that control SMN sorting in the cell remain largely unknown. Here, we report that the ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Itch directly interacts with and monoubiquitinates SMN. Monoubiquitination of SMN has a mild effect on promoting proteasomal degradation of SMN. We generated two SMN mutants, SMN(K0), in which all lysines are mutated to arginines and thereby abolishing SMN ubiquitination, and Ub-SMN(K0), in which a single Ub moiety is fused at the N-terminus of SMN(K0) and thereby mimicking SMN monoubiquitination. Immunostaining assays showed that SMN(K0) mainly localizes in the nucleus, whereas Ub-SMN(K0) localizes in both the cytoplasm and the nucleolus in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Interestingly, canonical CB foci and coilin/small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) co-localization are significantly impaired in SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing SMN(K0) or Ub-SMN(K0). Thus, our studies discover that Itch monoubiquitinates SMN and monoubiquitination of SMN plays an important role in regulating its cellular localization. Moreover, mislocalization of SMN disrupts CB integrity and likely impairs snRNP maturation. PMID:26908624

  9. Impact of metformin use on survival in locally-advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Inaya; Ferro, Adam; Cohler, Alan; Langenfeld, John; Surakanti, Sujani G.; Aisner, Joseph; Zou, Wei; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated survival outcomes in diabetic patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent metformin and definitive chemoradiation. Methods This single-institution, retrospective cohort study included 166 patients with NSCLC who were treated definitively with chemoradiation between 1999 and 2013. Of 40 patients who had type II diabetes, 20 (50%) were on metformin, and 20 (50%) were not on metformin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS), and secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan Meier method and log-rank test were performed in survival analysis. Cox regression was utilized in univariate analysis of potential confounders. Results Median follow-up was 17.0 months. Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients on metformin demonstrated similar OS (16.3 vs. 14.3 mo, P=0.23), PFS (11.6 vs. 9.7 mo, P=0.26), LRRFS (14.1 vs. 11.9 mo, P=0.78), and DMFS (13.4 vs. 10.0 mo, P=0.69). Compared with diabetic patients not on metformin, diabetic patients on metformin also exhibited similar OS (14.3 vs. 19.2 mo, P=0.18), PFS (19.7 vs. 10.1 mo, P=0.38), LRRFS (11.9 vs. 15.5 mo, P=0.69), and DMFS (10.0 vs. 17.4 mo, P=0.12). Identified negative prognostic factors on included squamous cell histology, lower performance status, higher T stage, and non-caucasian ethnicity. Conclusions No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found among the three cohorts in this small set of patients. No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found between the three cohorts in this small set of patients. Though it is possible that metformin use may in fact have no effect on survival in NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT, larger-scale retrospective and prospective studies are implicated for clarification. PMID:25922712

  10. Nanoparticle tumor localization, disruption of autophagosomal trafficking, and prolonged drug delivery improve survival in peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Colby, Aaron H; Gilmore, Denis; Schulz, Morgan; Zeng, Jialiu; Padera, Robert F; Shirihai, Orian; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-09-01

    The treatment outcomes for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma are poor and associated with high co-morbidities due to suboptimal drug delivery. Thus, there is an unmet need for new approaches that concentrate drug at the tumor for a prolonged period of time yielding enhanced antitumor efficacy and improved metrics of treatment success. A paclitaxel-loaded pH-responsive expansile nanoparticle (PTX-eNP) system is described that addresses two unique challenges to improve the outcomes for peritoneal mesothelioma. First, following intraperitoneal administration, eNPs rapidly and specifically localize to tumors. The rate of eNP uptake by tumors is an order of magnitude faster than the rate of uptake in non-malignant cells; and, subsequent accumulation in autophagosomes and disruption of autophagosomal trafficking leads to prolonged intracellular retention of eNPs. The net effect of these combined mechanisms manifests as rapid localization to intraperitoneal tumors within 4 h of injection and persistent intratumoral retention for >14 days. Second, the high tumor-specificity of PTX-eNPs leads to delivery of greater than 100 times higher concentrations of drug in tumors compared to PTX alone and this is maintained for at least seven days following administration. As a result, overall survival of animals with established mesothelioma more than doubled when animals were treated with multiple doses of PTX-eNPs compared to equivalent dosing with PTX or non-responsive PTX-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:27343465

  11. Daily nest survival rates of Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus): assessing local- and landscape-scale drivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Thomas R.; Cameron Aldridge; Joanne Saher; Theresa Childers

    2015-01-01

    The Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of conservation concern and is a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act because of substantial declines in populations from historic levels. It is thought that loss, fragmentation, and deterioration of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitat have contributed to the decline and isolation of this species into seven geographically distinct subpopulations. Nest survival is known to be a primary driver of demography of Greater Sage-Grouse (C. urophasianus), but no unbiased estimates of daily nest survival rates (hereafter nest survival) exist for Gunnison Sage-Grouse or published studies identifying factors that influence nest survival. We estimated nest survival of Gunnison Sage-Grouse for the western portion of Colorado's Gunnison Basin subpopulation, and assessed the effects and relative importance of local- and landscape-scale habitat characteristics on nest survival. Our top performing model was one that allowed variation in nest survival among areas, suggesting a larger landscape-area effect. Overall nest success during a 38-day nesting period (egg-laying plus incubation) was 50% (daily survival rate; SE  =  0.982 [0.003]), which is higher than previous estimates for Gunnison Sage-Grouse and generally higher than published for the closely related Greater Sage-Grouse. We did not find strong evidence that local-scale habitat variables were better predictors of nest survival than landscape-scale predictors, nor did we find strong evidence that any of the habitat variables we measured were good predictors of nest survival. Nest success of Gunnison Sage-Grouse in the western portion of the Gunnison Basin was higher than previously believed.

  12. Survival advantage of partial over radical nephrectomy in patients presenting with localized renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial nephrectomy (PN) preserves renal function and has become the standard approach for T1a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there is still an ongoing debate as to which patients will actually derive greater benefit from partial than from radical nephrectomy (RN). The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of the type of surgery on overall survival (OS) in patients with localized RCC. Methods Renal surgery was performed in 4326 patients with localized RCC (pT ≤ 3a N/M0) at six German tertiary care centers from 1980 to 2010: RN in 2955 cases (68.3%), elective (ePN) in 1108 (25.6%), and imperative partial nephrectomy (iPN) in 263 (6.1%) cases. The median follow-up for all patients was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify prognosticators for OS. Results PN was performed significantly more often than RN in patients presenting with lower tumor stages, higher RCC differentiation, and non-clear cell histology. Accordingly, the calculated 5 (10)-year OS rates were 90.0 (74.6)% for ePN, 83.9 (57.5)% for iPN, and 81.2 (64.7)% for RN (p < 0.001). However, multivariate analysis including age, sex, tumor diameter and differentiation, histological subtype, and the year of surgery showed that ePN compared to RN still qualified as an independent factor for improved OS (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66-0.94, p = 0.008). Conclusion Even allowing for the weaknesses of this retrospective analysis, our multicenter study indicates that in patients with localized RCC, PN appears to be associated with better OS than RN irrespective of age or tumor size. PMID:24885955

  13. Subcellular Localization Determines the Stability and Axon Protective Capacity of Axon Survival Factor Nmnat2

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Stefan; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Axons require a constant supply of the labile axon survival factor Nmnat2 from their cell bodies to avoid spontaneous axon degeneration. Here we investigate the mechanism of fast axonal transport of Nmnat2 and its site of action for axon maintenance. Using dual-colour live-cell imaging of axonal transport in SCG primary culture neurons, we find that Nmnat2 is bidirectionally trafficked in axons together with markers of the trans-Golgi network and synaptic vesicles. In contrast, there is little co-migration with mitochondria, lysosomes, and active zone precursor vesicles. Residues encoded by the small, centrally located exon 6 are necessary and sufficient for stable membrane association and vesicular axonal transport of Nmnat2. Within this sequence, a double cysteine palmitoylation motif shared with GAP43 and surrounding basic residues are all required for efficient palmitoylation and stable association with axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, however, disrupting this membrane association increases the ability of axonally localized Nmnat2 to preserve transected neurites in primary culture, while re-targeting the strongly protective cytosolic mutants back to membranes abolishes this increase. Larger deletions within the central domain including exon 6 further enhance Nmnat2 axon protective capacity to levels that exceed that of the slow Wallerian degeneration protein, WldS. The mechanism underlying the increase in axon protection appears to involve an increased half-life of the cytosolic forms, suggesting a role for palmitoylation and membrane attachment in Nmnat2 turnover. We conclude that Nmnat2 activity supports axon survival through a site of action distinct from Nmnat2 transport vesicles and that protein stability, a key determinant of axon protection, is enhanced by mutations that disrupt palmitoylation and dissociate Nmnat2 from these vesicles. PMID:23610559

  14. The Effect of Linkage on Establishment and Survival of Locally Beneficial Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aeschbacher, Simon; Bürger, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    We study invasion and survival of weakly beneficial mutations arising in linkage to an established migration–selection polymorphism. Our focus is on a continent–island model of migration, with selection at two biallelic loci for adaptation to the island environment. Combining branching and diffusion processes, we provide the theoretical basis for understanding the evolution of islands of divergence, the genetic architecture of locally adaptive traits, and the importance of so-called “divergence hitchhiking” relative to other mechanisms, such as “genomic hitchhiking”, chromosomal inversions, or translocations. We derive approximations to the invasion probability and the extinction time of a de novo mutation. Interestingly, the invasion probability is maximized at a nonzero recombination rate if the focal mutation is sufficiently beneficial. If a proportion of migrants carries a beneficial background allele, the mutation is less likely to become established. Linked selection may increase the survival time by several orders of magnitude. By altering the timescale of stochastic loss, it can therefore affect the dynamics at the focal site to an extent that is of evolutionary importance, especially in small populations. We derive an effective migration rate experienced by the weakly beneficial mutation, which accounts for the reduction in gene flow imposed by linked selection. Using the concept of the effective migration rate, we also quantify the long-term effects on neutral variation embedded in a genome with arbitrarily many sites under selection. Patterns of neutral diversity change qualitatively and quantitatively as the position of the neutral locus is moved along the chromosome. This will be useful for population-genomic inference. Our results strengthen the emerging view that physically linked selection is biologically relevant if linkage is tight or if selection at the background locus is strong. PMID:24610861

  15. Importance of adult survival, local recruitment and immigration in a declining boreal forest passerine, the willow tit Parus montanus.

    PubMed

    Lampila, Satu; Orell, Markku; Belda, Eduardo; Koivula, Kari

    2006-06-01

    Population growth rate (lambda) and its components (adult survival, local recruitment, immigration and their relative contributions to lambda) were studied in the declining willow tit Parus montanus in Northern Finland. Capture-recapture models for open populations were used to estimate the population parameters and their process variation. Adult survival was fairly high with low variation (0.593, CV=0.067). As expected, local recruitment was lower and more variable (0.063, CV=0.610). During the 12-year study, the population growth rate averaged to one (0.988, CV=0.197; calculated as [see text]. However, if the present processes continue, population projections show that the population is likely to decline. There was considerable temporal variation in the relative contributions of demographic parameters to lambda. In all years, adult survival had the highest relative contribution (mean 64%) to the population growth rate and it was the least variable trait. Immigration had a higher relative contribution (22%) to lambda than local recruitment (14%). Based on the results for the contributions to lambda, the main conservation concern for willow tits is adult survival. Due to low variation, adult survival may be difficult to enhance, but at least it should be prevented from declining. High stochasticity in local recruitment and immigration is probably an inherent characteristic of highly seasonal environments, making these traits difficult to address for conservation practices. PMID:16514536

  16. Radicality of Resection and Survival After Multimodality Treatment is Influenced by Subsite of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters, Miranda; Dresen, Raphaela C.; Martijn, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A.; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Berg, Hetty A. van den; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Rutten, Harm J.T.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze results of multimodality treatment in relation to subsite of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Method and Materials: A total of 170 patients with LRRC who underwent treatment between 1994 and 2008 were studied. The basic principle of multimodality treatment was preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy, intended radical surgery, and intraoperative radiotherapy. The subsites of LRRC were classified as presacral, posterolateral, (antero)lateral, anterior, anastomotic, or perineal. Subsites were related to radicality of the resection, local re-recurrence rate, distant metastasis rate, and cancer-specific survival. Results: R0 resections were achieved in 54% of the patients, and 5-year cancer-specific survival was 40.5%. The worst outcomes were seen in presacral LRRC, with only 28% complete resections and 19% 5-year survival (p = 0.03 vs. other subsites). Anastomotic LRRC resulted in the most favorable outcomes, with 77% R0 resections and 60% 5-year survival (p = 0.04). Generally, if a complete resection was achieved, survival improved, except in posterolateral LRRC. Local re-recurrence and metastasis rate were lowest in anastomotic LRRC. Conclusions: Classification of the subsite of LRRC is a predictor of potentially resectable and consequently curable disease. Treatment of posterior LRRC imposes poor results, whereas anastomotic LRRC location shows superior results.

  17. The role of surgery in the multidisciplinary management of patients with localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Brian K; Pisters, Peter W T; Hunt, Kelly K

    2012-08-01

    Surgical resection of localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is associated with recurrence rates of approximately 50% at 5 years of follow-up. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib, improved overall survival rates in advanced disease, while in the adjuvant setting, improved recurrence-free survival following resection of high-risk GIST. The demonstration of the clinical benefit of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in both the metastatic and adjuvant settings generated interest in neoadjuvant approaches for patients with operable locally advanced disease, particularly in difficult anatomic locations. The potential impact of tumor downsizing in areas such as the gastroesophageal junction, the duodenum or the rectum, on the extent of surgical resection and morbidity is real. The ongoing research regarding neoadjuvant therapy, the duration of adjuvant therapy and the optimal means by which to risk stratify patients with GIST continues to keep the treatment of this disease at the forefront of personalized cancer care. PMID:23030225

  18. Genetic Profiling to Determine Risk of Relapse Free Survival in High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christine M.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Lim, Jeong; Nelson, Dylan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Higano, Celestia S.; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David; Corless, Christopher L.; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The characterization of actionable mutations in human tumors is a prerequisite for the development of individualized, targeted therapy. We examined the prevalence of potentially therapeutically actionable mutations in patients with high risk clinically localized prostate cancer. Experimental Design 48 samples of formalin fixed paraffin embedded prostatectomy tissue from a neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial were analyzed. DNA extracted from microdissected tumor was analyzed for 643 common solid tumor mutations in 53 genes using mass spectroscopy based sequencing. In addition, PTEN loss and ERG translocations were examined using immunohistochemistry in associated tissue microarrays. Association with relapse during 5 years of follow-up was examined in exploratory analyses of the potential clinical relevance of the genetic alterations. Results Of the 40 tumors evaluable for mutations, 10% had point mutations in potentially actionable cancer genes. Of the 47 tumors evaluable for IHC, 36% had PTEN loss and 40% had ERG rearrangement. Individual mutations were not frequent enough to determine associations with relapse. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a log-rank test, the 16 patients who had PTEN loss had a significantly shorter median relapse free survival, 19 vs. 106 months (p = .01). Conclusions This study confirms that point mutations in the most common cancer regulatory genes in prostate cancer are rare. However, the PIK3CA/AKT pathway was mutated in 10% of our samples. While point mutations alone did not have a statistically significant association with relapse, PTEN loss was associated with an increased relapse in high risk prostate cancer treated with chemotherapy followed by surgery. PMID:24352642

  19. Degradation and Local Survival of Permafrost Through the Last Interglaciation in Interior Alaska and Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, A. V.; Froese, D. G.; Jensen, B. J.

    2006-12-01

    interglaciation is present at Ch'ijee's Bluff in northern Yukon Territory. At multiple sites along the bluff, OCt underlies a 10-20 cm thick organic-rich silt horizon that grades laterally into wedge-shaped accumulations of deformed organic-rich silt and woody debris, including large stumps and tree stems. These wedge-shaped accumulations consistently truncate OCt and represent melting and subsequent infilling of ice wedge networks. The exposures at these three sites, separated by nearly 1000 km, illustrate the variable response of permafrost to climate warming during the last interglaciation that probably reflects the importance of local site factors (ie. aspect, slope, vegetation cover) in determining the extent of permafrost degradation. Significantly, relict ice below OCt indicates that permafrost survived peak warmth of the last interglaciation at Thistle Creek, despite the dramatic melting suggested by the steeply dipping thaw unconformity. It is commonly assumed that permafrost disappeared from interior Alaska during the last interglaciation and that peak warmth was likely 3°C higher than present, based on the apparent absence of massive ice bodies underlying OCt in the Fairbanks region. Our observations suggest that reports of the death of permafrost in interior Alaska and Yukon during the last interglaciation may be greatly exaggerated, and that deep permafrost is likely to persist in the discontinuous permafrost zone, at least locally, despite future global warming.

  20. Ecological Values amid Local Interests: Natural Resource Conservation, Social Differentiation, and Human Survival in Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareau, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Local peoples living in protected areas often have a different understanding about their natural space than do non-local groups that promote and declare such areas "protected." By designing protected areas without local involvement, or understandings of local social differentiation and power, natural resources management schemes will likely be…

  1. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Reduces Local Recurrence Rates in Patients With Microscopically Involved Circumferential Resection Margins After Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alberda, Wijnand J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Meerten, Esther van; Rothbarth, Joost; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de; Burger, Jacobus W.A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is advocated by some for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who have involved or narrow circumferential resection margins (CRM) after rectal surgery. This study evaluates the potentially beneficial effect of IORT on local control. Methods and Materials: All surgically treated patients with LARC treated in a tertiary referral center between 1996 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome in patients treated with IORT with a clear but narrow CRM (≤2 mm) or a microscopically involved CRM was compared with the outcome in patients who were not treated with IORT. Results: A total of 409 patients underwent resection of LARC, and 95 patients (23%) had a CRM ≤ 2 mm. Four patients were excluded from further analysis because of a macroscopically involved resection margin. In 43 patients with clear but narrow CRMs, there was no difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival of patients treated with (n=21) or without (n=22) IORT (70% vs 79%, P=.63). In 48 patients with a microscopically involved CRM, there was a significant difference in the cumulative 5-year local recurrence-free survival in favor of the patients treated with IORT (n=31) compared with patients treated without IORT (n=17) (84 vs 41%, P=.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed that IORT was independently associated with a decreased local recurrence rate (hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.86). There was no significant difference in complication rate of patients treated with or without IORT (65% vs 52%, P=.18) Conclusion: The current study suggests that IORT reduces local recurrence rates in patients with LARC with a microscopically involved CRM.

  2. Molecular markers to complement sentinel node status in predicting survival in patients with high-risk locally invasive melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey J; Tang, Fiona; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Rodero, Mathieu P; Malt, Maryrose; Lambie, Duncan; Barbour, Andrew; Hayward, Nicholas K; Smithers, B Mark; Green, Adele C; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-08-01

    Sentinel lymph node status is a major prognostic marker in locally invasive cutaneous melanoma. However, this procedure is not always feasible, requires advanced logistics and carries rare but significant morbidity. Previous studies have linked markers of tumour biology to patient survival. In this study, we aimed to combine the predictive value of established biomarkers in addition to clinical parameters as indicators of survival in addition to or instead of sentinel node biopsy in a cohort of high-risk melanoma patients. Patients with locally invasive melanomas undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy were ascertained and prospectively followed. Information on mortality was validated through the National Death Index. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse proteins previously reported to be associated with melanoma survival, namely Ki67, p16 and CD163. Evaluation and multivariate analyses according to REMARK criteria were used to generate models to predict disease-free and melanoma-specific survival. A total of 189 patients with available archival material of their primary tumour were analysed. Our study sample was representative of the entire cohort (N = 559). Average Breslow thickness was 2.5 mm. Thirty-two (17%) patients in the study sample died from melanoma during the follow-up period. A prognostic score was developed and was strongly predictive of survival, independent of sentinel node status. The score allowed classification of risk of melanoma death in sentinel node-negative patients. Combining clinicopathological factors and established biomarkers allows prediction of outcome in locally invasive melanoma and might be implemented in addition to or in cases when sentinel node biopsy cannot be performed. PMID:26990817

  3. Habitat edges have weak effects on duck nest survival at local spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raquel, Amelia J; Ringelman, Kevin M.; Ackerman, Josh; Eadie, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Edge effects on nesting success have been documented in breeding birds in a variety of contexts, but there is still uncertainty in how edge type and spatial scale determine the magnitude and detectability of edge effects. Habitat edges are often viewed as predator corridors that surround or penetrate core habitat and increase the risk of predation for nearby nests. We studied the effects of three different types of potential predator corridors (main perimeter roads, field boundaries, and ATV trails within fields) on waterfowl nest survival in California. We measured the distance from duck nests to the nearest edge of each type, and used distance as a covariate in a logistic exposure analysis of nest survival. We found only weak evidence for edge effects due to predation. The best supported model of nest survival included all three distance categories, and while all coefficient estimates were positive (indicating that survival increased with distance from edge), 85% coefficient confidence intervals approached or bounded zero indicating an overall weak effect of habitat edges on nest success. We suggest that given the configuration of edges at our site, there may be few areas far enough from hard edges to be considered ‘core’ habitat, making edge effects on nest survival particularly difficult to detect.

  4. Oral health-related quality of life and depression/anxiety in long-term recurrence-free patients after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Alexander J; Danner, Daniel; Freier, Kolja; Hofele, Christof; Becker-Bikowski, Kirsten; Engel, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This report focuses on the association between oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and depression/anxiety of a homogeneous group of cancer patients who were recurrence-free for 8 years after treatment for advanced oral squamous cell. Participants were 24 patients (mean age 55 years, 75% men) treated with neoadjuvant concurrent radiochemotherapy followed by surgery with a mean recurrence-free period of 95 months (from 39 to 164 months). The OHRQoL (OHIP) and the anxiety/depression (HADS) were assessed twice (1 year between t1 and t2). OHRQoL was impaired in this group (mean OHIP score 65 units). In cross-lagged correlation analysis, the correlation between OHRQoL to t1 and depression to t2 was significant and greater than the non-significant correlation for depression to t1 and OHRQoL to t2 indicating that OHRQoL predicts depression better than vice versa. However, the difference in the correlation coefficients was not significant (ZPF-test). The same was true for OHRQoL and anxiety. The OHRQoL measured with the OHIP was impaired in comparison to the normal population. In the limitations of the study design and bearing the small sample size in mind, the results give evidence that OHRQoL predicts psychological outcomes, namely depression and anxiety, better than vice versa. PMID:21733701

  5. Long-Term Progression-Free Survival in a Patient with Locally Advanced, Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Leonel A; Matin, Mahan; Bold, Richard J; Tanaka, Michael I; Monjazeb, Arta M

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is amongst the most lethal malignancies with dismal five-year survival rates. Surgical excision is the mainstay of therapy and unresectable disease is considered incurable. Herein, we describe a patient with unresectable, advanced stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma with a remarkable clinical course following definitive chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26824007

  6. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  7. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Mehta, Vivek; Blough, David; Tock, Lauri; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  8. Fifteen-Year Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival, Cause-Specific Survival, and Overall Survival Following I{sup 125} Prostate Brachytherapy in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Seattle Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, John E.; Grimm, Peter D.; Wong, Jason; Galbreath, Robert W.; Merrick, Gregory; Blasko, John C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I{sup 125} brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I{sup 125} monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS were evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I{sup 125} monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.

  9. Survival, growth, and localization of epiphytic fitness mutants of pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, G.A.; Lindow, S.E. )

    1994-10-01

    Among 82 epiphytic fitness mutants of a Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain that were characterized in a previous study, 4 mutants were particularly intolerant of the stresses associated with dry leaf surfaces. These four mutants each exhibited distinctive behaviors when inoculated into and into plant leaves. For example, while non showed measurable growth on dry potato leaf surfaces, they grew to different population sizes in the intercellular space of bean leaves and on dry bean leaf surfaces, and one mutant appeared incapable of growth in both environments although it grew well on moist bean leaves. The presence of the parental strain did not influence the survival of the mutants immediately following exposure of leaves to dry, high-light incubation conditions, suggesting that the reduced survival of the mutants did not result from an inability to produce extracellular factors in planta. On moist bean leaves that were colonized by either a mutant or the wild type, the proportion of the total epiphytic population that was located in sizes protected from a surface sterilant was smaller for the mutants than for the wild type, indicating that the mutants were reduced in their ability to locate, multiply in, and/or survive in such protected sites. This reduced ability was only one of possible several factors contributing to the reduced epiphytic fitness of each mutant. Their reduced fitness was not specific to the host plant bean, since they also exhibited reduced fitness on the nonhost plant potato; the functions altered in these strains are thus of interest for their contribution to the general fitness of bacterial epiphytes. 52 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  11. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerregaard, Jon K.; Mortensen, Michael B.; Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  12. The Effect of Transient Local Anti-inflammatory Treatment on the Survival of Pig Retinal Progenitor Cell Allotransplants

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Murilo; Baranov, Petr; Hicks, Caroline; Patel, Sara; Lieppman, Burke; Regatieri, Caio; Sinden, John; Isaac, David; Avila, Marcos; Young, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The development of photoreceptor replacement therapy for retinal degenerative disorders requires the identification of the optimal cell source and immunosuppressive regimen in a large animal model. Allotransplants are not acutely rejected in swine subretinal space, although it is not known if survival can be improved with immunosuppression. Here we investigated the survival and integration of expanded pig retinal progenitor cells (pRPCs) in normal recipients with and without transient anti-inflammatory suppression. Methods pRPCs were derived from the neural retina of E60 GFP transgenic pigs, expanded for six passages, characterized, and transplanted into the subretinal space of 12 pigs. Six recipients received a single intravitreal injection of rapamycin and dexamethasone. Results pRPCs expressed the photoreceptor development genes Sox2, Pax6, Lhx2, Crx, Nrl, and Recoverin in vitro. Transplanted cells were identified in 9 out of 12 recipients 4 weeks after the injection. pRPCs integrated primarily into the photoreceptor inner segment layer and outer nuclear layer with single cells present in the inner nuclear layer. Donor cells remained recoverin-positive and acquired rhodopsin. We did not observe any signs of graft proliferation. The immunosuppression did not affect the survival or distribution of grafts. No macrophage infiltration or loss of retinal structure was observed in either group. Conclusions Local immunosuppression with rapamycin and dexamethasone does not improve the outcome of pRPC allotransplantation into the subretinal space. Translational Relevance Survival and integration of pRPC together with the lack of graft proliferation suggests that allogeneic RPC transplantation without transient immunosuppression is a favorable approach for photoreceptor cell replacement. PMID:26425402

  13. Competing with giants. Survival strategies for local companies in emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Dawar, N; Frost, T

    1999-01-01

    The arrival of a multinational corporation often looks like a death sentence to local companies in an emerging market. After all, how can they compete in the face of the vast financial and technological resources, the seasoned management, and the powerful brands of, say, a Compaq or a Johnson & Johnson? But local companies often have more options than they might think, say the authors. Those options vary, depending on the strength of globalization pressures in an industry and the nature of a company's competitive assets. In the worst case, when globalization pressures are strong and a company has no competitive assets that it can transfer to other countries, it needs to retreat to a locally oriented link within the value chain. But if globalization pressures are weak, the company may be able to defend its market share by leveraging the advantages it enjoys in its home market. Many companies in emerging markets have assets that can work well in other countries. Those that operate in industries where the pressures to globalize are weak may be able to extend their success to a limited number of other markets that are similar to their home base. And those operating in global markets may be able to contend head-on with multinational rivals. By better understanding the relationship between their company's assets and the industry they operate in, executives from emerging markets can gain a clearer picture of the options they really have when multinationals come to stay. PMID:10387768

  14. Surviving the crisis: Adaptive wisdom, coping mechanisms and local responses to avian influenza threats in Haining, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Letian; Pan, Tianshu

    2008-04-01

    Based on ethnographic research conducted in the summer of 2006, this paper examines local responses to the imminent threat of avian flu in Haining County of Zhejiang Province. During our field investigation, we conducted interviews with officials from local medical institutions (including the hospitals, the animal husbandry and veterinary station, and health clinics), to bureaus of public health and agro-economy. We also visited chicken farms, restaurants and farming households. We address the following factors that commonly structured the perceptions and actions of different social actors in the area of study: The changing mode of information-sharing and communication practices in the local communities; the official drive to professionalize the emergency response management system in the county; and the coping mechanisms that helped the villagers and town residents to weather the storm of avian flu. Our field research suggests that collective survival consciousness was translated into a spirit of voluntarism during the crisis. One important practical lesson we have learned from this study is that the adaptive wisdom embedded in local memories demonstrated its operational worth as a resourceful knowledge base for ordinary farmers to deal with food shortage, famine, plague and future pandemics. PMID:27268990

  15. Subcellular Localization of the Intracellular Survival-Enhancing Eis Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, John L.; Wei, Jun; Moulder, James W.; Laal, Suman; Friedman, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that has evolved the ability to survive and multiply within human macrophages. It is not clear how M. tuberculosis avoids the destructive action of macrophages, but this ability is fundamental in the pathogenicity of tuberculosis. A gene previously identified in M. tuberculosis, designated eis, was found to enhance intracellular survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis in the human macrophage-like cell line U-937 (J. Wei et al., J. Bacteriol. 182:377–384, 2000). When eis was introduced into M. smegmatis on a multicopy vector, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the appearance of a unique 42-kDa protein band corresponding to the predicted molecular weight of the eis gene product. This band was electroeluted from the gel with a purity of >90% and subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, which demonstrated that the 42-kDa band was indeed the protein product of eis. The Eis protein produced by M. tuberculosis H37Ra had an identical N-terminal amino acid sequence. A synthetic polypeptide corresponding to a carboxyl-terminal region of the deduced eis protein sequence was used to generate affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies that reacted with the 42-kDa protein in Western blot analysis. Hydropathy profile analysis showed the Eis protein to be predominantly hydrophilic with a potential hydrophobic amino terminus. Phase separation of M. tuberculosis H37Ra lysates by the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 revealed the Eis protein in both the aqueous and detergent phases. After fractionation of M. tuberculosis by differential centrifugation, Eis protein appeared mainly in the cytoplasmic fraction but also in the membrane, cell wall, and culture supernatant fractions as well. Forty percent of the sera from pulmonary tuberculosis patients tested for anti-Eis antibody gave positive reactions in Western blot analysis. Although the function of Eis remains unknown, evidence

  16. Percutaneous cryoablation of metastatic lesions from non-small cell lung carcinoma: Initial survival, local control, and cost observations

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Klein, Lydia C.; Kuo, Jarret C.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Gadgeel, Shirish; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess feasibility, complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS) and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multi-site cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). Materials and Methods 49 CT and/or US-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 60 tumors in 31 oligo-mNSCLC patients. Average patient age was 65 years, including 19 females and 12 males. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Median OS was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and defined life years gained (LYG). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomical site are as follows: 20, 18 – lung; 9, 7 – liver; 12, 11 - superficial; 7, 7 – adrenal; 2, 2 – para-aortic/isolated; and 10, 7 – bone. A mean 1.6 procedures per patient were performed with a median clinical follow-up of 11 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 8% (4/49) and 8% (5/60), respectively. Median OS for MCA was 1.33 years with an estimated 1-year survival of ~53%. MCA appeared cost-effective even when added to the cost of BSC or systemic regimens, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER) of $49,008 – $87,074. Conclusions Multi-site cryoablation had very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, and possibly increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligo-mNSCLC. PMID:22626267

  17. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5–7 and 11–15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. Conclusion The

  18. Immunization of mice with live attenuated encephalomyocarditis virus: local immunity and survival.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, W J; Durville-van der Oord

    1973-10-01

    Mice were vaccinated with an attenuated encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus strain by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route and by various ways of respiratory administration: aerosol exposure and intratracheal (i.t.) and intranasal (i.n.) instillation. A linear relationship was found between vaccine dose and the resulting serum antibody titer. The effectiveness of the vaccine was determined by measuring the 50% protective doses (ED(50) values) after a lethal challenge with live virulent virus given by the i.p. route. For all three methods of respiratory immunization essentially the same ED(50) value was found, about 200 plaqueforming units (PFU), but i.p. immunization was less effective, the ED(50) value being about 600 PFU. To investigate the protective effect of local immunity, mice were vaccinated i.p. or i.n. and challenged by the i.n. route. The same ED(50) values were found as after i.p. challenge, indicating that the degree of protection afforded by the vaccine depends only on the route of vaccination and not on the route of challenge. This means that protection depends largely on systemic immunity and that local immunity plays only a minor role in this system. The results are discussed in relation to the feasibility of respiratory immunization against animal viruses. PMID:4355137

  19. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Rate and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomonori Ishimaru, Hideki; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Daikoku, Manabu; Honda, Sumihisa; Koshiishi, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To analyze local recurrence-free rates and risk factors for recurrence following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. One hundred and nine nodules treated by RFA and 173 nodules treated by TACE were included. Hypovascular nodules were excluded from this study. Overall local recurrence-free rates of each treatment group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The independent risk factors of local recurrence and the hazard ratios were analyzed using Cox's proportional-hazards regression model. Based on the results of multivariate analyses, we classified HCC nodules into four subgroups: central nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm and peripheral nodules {<=}2 cm or >2 cm. The local recurrence-free rates of these subgroups for each treatment were also calculated. Results. The overall local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p = 0.013). The 24-month local recurrence-free rates in the RFA and TACE groups were 60.0% and 48.9%, respectively. In the RFA group, the only significant risk factor for recurrence was tumor size >2 cm in greatest dimension. In the TACE group, a central location was the only significant risk factor for recurrence. In central nodules that were {<=}2 cm, the local recurrence-free rate was significantly higher in the RFA group than in the TACE group (p < 0.001). In the remaining three groups, there was no significant difference in local recurrence-free rate between the two treatment methods. Conclusion. A tumor diameter of >2 cm was the only independent risk factor for local recurrence in RFA treatment, and a central location was the only independent risk factor in TACE treatment. Central lesions measuring {<=}2 cm should be treated by RFA.

  20. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yunseon; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Ki Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2) in local control was evaluated. Results: The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m2 as a cutoff value. Conclusion: Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted. PMID:27306771

  1. SVI implantation for carcinoma of the prostate: 5-year survival free of disease and incidence of local failure

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.E.; Ladaga, L.E.; Schultheiss, T.

    1985-12-01

    Interstitial implantation with the iodine isotope, SVI has been used as definitive treatment in 115 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate. The disease was staged surgically by bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy in all of the patients. Followup has been for a minimum of 1 year and 64 patients have been followed for a minimum of 5 years. There has been no operative mortality in this series. Mean patient age at implantation was 63 years. Potency has been maintained in 31 of 46 patients (78 per cent) followed for a minimum of 5 years and 15 of 26 (58 per cent) followed for a minimum of 7 years. At 5 years the actuarial survival free of disease by surgical stage was 100, 81, 49 and 41 per cent for patients with stages A2, B, C and D1 disease, respectively. Local failure was defined as palpable evidence of prostatic enlargement or irregularity with biopsy confirmation of neoplasm. The actuarial probability of local failure at 5 years was 0, 13, 27 and 44 per cent for patients with surgical stages A2, B, C and D1 disease, respectively, and 5, 23 and 43 per cent for those with well, moderately and poorly differentiated tumors, respectively. Based on our experience, interstitial implantation with SVI is reserved for patients with well or moderately differentiated stage B lesions. The ultimate success of this treatment modality awaits 10 and 15 years of followup.

  2. Local Tumor Treatment in Combination with Systemic Ipilimumab Immunotherapy Prolongs Overall Survival in Patients with Advanced Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Theurich, Sebastian; Rothschild, Sacha I; Hoffmann, Michael; Fabri, Mario; Sommer, Andrea; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Thelen, Martin; Schill, Catherine; Merki, Ramona; Schmid, Thomas; Koeberle, Dieter; Zippelius, Alfred; Baues, Christian; Mauch, Cornelia; Tigges, Christian; Kreuter, Alexander; Borggrefe, Jan; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Schlaak, Max

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition with ipilimumab has revolutionized cancer immunotherapy and significantly improved outcomes of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. Local peripheral treatments (LPT), such as radiotherapy or electrochemotherapy, have been shown to modulate systemic immune responses, and preliminary data have raised the hypothesis that the combination of LPT with systemic immune checkpoint blockade might be beneficial. Clinical data from 127 consecutively treated melanoma patients at four cancer centers in Germany and Switzerland were analyzed. Patients received either ipilimumab (n = 82) or ipilimumab and additional LPT (n = 45) if indicated for local tumor control. The addition of LPT to ipilimumab significantly prolonged overall survival (OS; median OS 93 vs. 42 weeks, unadjusted HR, 0.46; P = 0.0028). Adverse immune-related events were not increased by the combination treatment, and LPT-induced local toxicities were in most cases mild. In a multivariable Cox regression analysis, we show that the effect of added LPT on OS remained statistically significant after adjusting for BRAF status, tumor stage, tumor burden, and central nervous system metastases (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.01, P = 0.05). Our data suggest that the addition of LPT to ipilimumab is safe and effective in patients with metastatic melanoma irrespective of clinical disease characteristics and known risk factors. Induction of antitumor immune responses is most likely the underlying mechanism and warrants prospective validation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 744-54. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27466265

  3. Comparison of Survival Rates, Tumor Stages, and Localization in between Obese and Nonobese Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Hakan; Oguz, Basak; Ocak Serin, Sibel; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Gunaldi, Meral; Erismis, Betul; Ozdemir, Bahar; Tural, Deniz; Hursitoglu, Mehmet; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study we tried to determine the association between body-mass index (BMI), survival rate, and the stage of tumor at the time of diagnosis in patients with gastric cancer. Methods. A total of 270 gastric cancer patients' hospital records were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were grouped according to their BMI at the time of tumor diagnosis. Tumor stages at admission were compared according to their BMI values. Results. There were no differences in OS among BMI subgroups (p = 0.230). The percent of patients with stage III tumor was significantly higher in nonobese while the percent of stage IV tumor was surprisingly higher in obese patients (p was 0.011 and 0.004, resp.). Percent of patients who did not have any surgical intervention was significantly lower in overweight and obese patients than normal and/or underweight patients. Conclusions. At the time of diagnosis, obese patients had significantly higher percent of stage IV tumor than nonobese patients. Despite of that, there were no differences in survival rates among BMI subgroups. Our study results are consistent with “obesity paradox” in gastric cancer patients. We also did not find any relationship between BMI and localization of gastric tumor. PMID:27418926

  4. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer: An International Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, Ng Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer.An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate.The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively.Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  5. Survival Outcomes and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients with Stage III or IV Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated with Primary Surgery or Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Warkentin, Heather; Ghosh, Sunita; Scrimger, Rufus; Jha, Naresh; Parliament, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare and contrast the patterns of failure in patients with locally advanced squamous cell oropharyngeal cancers undergoing curative-intent treatment with primary surgery or radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. Methods and materials Two hundred and thirty-three patients with stage III or IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent curative-intent treatment from 2006-2012, were reviewed. The median length of follow-up for patients still alive at the time of analysis was 4.4 years. Data was collected retrospectively from a chart review. Results One hundred and thirty-nine patients underwent primary surgery +/- adjuvant therapy, and 94 patients underwent primary radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy (CRT). Demographics were similar between the two groups, except primary radiotherapy patients had a higher age-adjusted Charleston co-morbidity score (CCI). Twenty-nine patients from the surgery group recurred; 15 failed distantly only, seven failed locoregionally, and seven failed both distantly and locoregionally. Twelve patients recurred who underwent chemoradiotherapy; ten distantly alone, and two locoregionally. One patient who underwent radiotherapy (RT) alone failed distantly. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients undergoing primary RT were 86.6% and 84.9% respectively. Two and five-year recurrence-free survival rates for primary surgery was 80.9% and 76.3% respectively (p=0.21). There was no significant difference in either treatment when they were stratified by p16 status or smoking status. Conclusions Our analysis does not show any difference in outcomes for patients treated with primary surgery or radiotherapy. Although the primary pattern of failure in both groups was distant metastatic disease, some local failures may be preventable with careful delineation of target volumes, especially near the base of skull region. PMID:27610285

  6. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderas, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Tveit, Kjell M.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  7. Local Recurrence After Uveal Melanoma Proton Beam Therapy: Recurrence Types and Prognostic Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caujolle, Jean-Pierre; Paoli, Vincent; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Maschi, Celia; Baillif, Stéphanie; Herault, Joël; Gastaud, Pierre; Hannoun-Levi, Jean Michel

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To study the prognosis of the different types of uveal melanoma recurrences treated by proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 61 cases of uveal melanoma local recurrences on a total of 1102 patients treated by PBT between June 1991 and December 2010. Survival rates have been determined by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Prognostic factors have been evaluated by using log-rank test or Cox model. Results: Our local recurrence rate was 6.1% at 5 years. These recurrences were divided into 25 patients with marginal recurrences, 18 global recurrences, 12 distant recurrences, and 6 extrascleral extensions. Five factors have been identified as statistically significant risk factors of local recurrence in the univariate analysis: large tumoral diameter, small tumoral volume, low ratio of tumoral volume over eyeball volume, iris root involvement, and safety margin inferior to 1 mm. In the local recurrence-free population, the overall survival rate was 68.7% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 83.6% at 10 years. In the local recurrence population, the overall survival rate was 43.1% at 10 years and the specific survival rate was 55% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis of death risk factors has shown a better prognosis for marginal recurrences. Conclusion: Survival rate of marginal recurrences is superior to that of the other recurrences. The type of recurrence is a clinical prognostic value to take into account. The influence of local recurrence retreatment by proton beam therapy should be evaluated by novel studies.

  8. Perioperative blood transfusions and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood transfusions have been associated with poor clinical outcomes in the context of oncological surgery. Current literature is inconclusive whether blood transfusions are linked to shorter recurrence free and overall survival after lung cancer surgery. We hypothesize that blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgery for non-small cell lung cancer are associated with poor oncological survival. Methods After IRB approval, perioperative data from 636 patients who underwent lung cancer surgery was collected. Patients were evaluated for time to tumor recurrence and overall survival. Results 60 patients were transfused and 576 subjects were not. Patients who received transfusion were more likely to have more advanced disease (p = 0.018), and preoperative low hemoglobin concentrations (p < 0.0001) compared to non-transfused patients. In the multivariable Cox regression analysis, blood transfusion was associated with a significant reduction in recurrence free survival (p = 0.025), HR: 1.55 (95% CI: 1.06-2.27) and overall survival (p = 0.0002) HR: 2.04 (95% CI: 1.41-2.97). However, analysis after propensity score matching between the two groups revealed that the effect of blood transfusion was significant for reduction in overall survival (p = 0.0356), HR: 1.838 (95% CI: 1.04-3.22) but not for recurrence free survival (p = 0.1460), HR: 1.493 (95% CI: 0.87-2.56). Conclusions Perioperative administration of red blood cells appears be associated with a decreased overall survival but not recurrence free survival after lung cancer surgery. Our study has the limitations of a retrospective review. Hence, our results should be confirmed by a prospective randomized control trial. PMID:24228905

  9. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  10. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Chen Changhu

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  11. Prognostic score models for survival of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lei; Guo, Pi; Li, Jin-Gao; Han, Fei; Li, Qiang; Lu, Yong; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Zhang, Qing-Ying; Lu, Tai-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish accurate prognostic score models to predict survival for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy. Materials and methods Six hundred and seventy-five patients with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic and histologically proven NPC who were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Samples were split randomly into a training set (n = 338) and a test set (n = 337) to analyze. All data from the training set were used to perform an extensive survival analysis and to develop multivariate nomograms based on Cox regression. Data from the test set was used as an external validation set. Risk group stratification was proposed for the nomograms. Results The nomograms are able to predict survival with a C-index for external validation of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS; 0.66, 95% CI: 0.58-0.74), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS; 0.73, 95% CI: 0.66-0.79), and disease-specific survival (DSS; 0.73, 95% CI: 0.67-0.79). The calibration curve for probability of survival showed good agreement between prediction by nomogram and actual observation. The C-index of the nomogram for LRFS, DMFS and DSS were statistically higher than the C-index values of the AJCC seventh edition (P < 0.001). In the test set, the nomogram discrimination was also superior to the AJCC Staging systems (P < 0.001). The stratification in risk groups allows significant distinction between Kaplan-Meier curves for outcome. Conclusions Prognostic score models were successfully established and validated to predict LRFS, DMFS, and DSS over a 5-year period after IMRT and chemotherapy, which will be useful for individual treatment. PMID:26415223

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Metastases From Soft-Tissue Sarcomas: Excellent Local Lesion Control and Improved Patient Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Milano, Michael T.; Philip, Abraham; Sahasrabudhe, Deepak; Jones, Carolyn

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with pulmonary metastases (PM) from soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) have historically been treated with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Since 2001, we have treated PM with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We postulated that SBRT for PM from STS would yield excellent local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with PM from STS, diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 at University of Rochester, were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received multimodality treatment comprising of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation. SBRT used the Novalis ExacTrac patient positioning platform, vacuum bag immobilization, and relaxed end-expiratory breath hold techniques. Results: Leiomyosarcoma (23%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (19%), and synovial sarcoma (15%) were the most common histologies. Forty-eight percent initially presented with PM, whereas 52% developed PM at a median of 0.7 (0.3-7.3) years after initial diagnosis. Median follow-up from diagnosis of PM was 0.9 (0.3-7.3) years. Fifteen patients underwent SBRT to 74 lesions. Median number of lesions treated was 4 (1-16) per patient and 3.5 (1-6) per session. Preferred dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 Gy fractions. Three-year LC was 82%. No patients experienced Grade {>=}3 toxicity. Median OS was 2.1 (0.8-11.5) years for patients treated with SBRT, and 0.6 (0.1-7.8) years for those who never received SBRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: SBRT provides excellent LC of PM and may extend OS. SBRT should be considered for all patients with PM from STS, particularly those who are not surgical candidates. Further investigation is warranted to establish criteria for the use of SBRT for STS patients with PM.

  13. {sup 18}Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Is Prognostic of Progression-Free and Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreas Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Quon, Andy; Minn, A. Yuriko; Graves, Edward E.; Kunz, Pamela; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) for locally advanced pancreas cancer patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Patients and Methods: Fifty-five previously untreated, unresectable pancreas cancer patients received a single fraction of 25-Gy SBRT sequentially with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. On the preradiation PET-CT, the tumor was contoured and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and metabolic tumor burden (MTB) were calculated using an in-house software application. High-SUVmax and low-SUVmax subgroups were created by categorizing patients above or below the median SUVmax. The analysis was repeated to form high-MTB and low-MTB subgroups as well as clinically relevant subgroups with SUVmax values of <5, 5-10, or >10. Multivariate analysis analyzing SUVmax, MTB, age, chemotherapy cycles, and pretreatment carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 was performed. Results: For the entire population, median survival was 12.7 months. Median survival was 9.8 vs.15.3 months for the high- and low- SUVmax subgroups (p <0.01). Similarly, median survival was 10.1 vs. 18.0 months for the high MTB and low MTB subgroups (p <0.01). When clinical SUVmax cutoffs were used, median survival was 6.4 months in those with SUVmax >10, 9.5 months with SUVmax 5.0-10.0, and 17.7 months in those with SUVmax <5 (p <0.01). On multivariate analysis, clinical SUVmax was an independent predictor for overall survival (p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (p = 0.03). Conclusion: PET scan parameters can predict for length of survival in locally advanced pancreas cancer patients.

  14. Definitive surgery and intraoperative photodynamic therapy: a prospective study of local control and survival for patients with pleural dissemination of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Charles B.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pleural dissemination have very limited survivals often of just 6–9 months. Prior reports of aggressive surgical resection of pleural metastases have shown no consistent improvements in overall survival and very high rates of local recurrences. Based on this and the generally very diffuse pleural dissemination seen in patients, chemotherapy and palliative interventions are standard of care. By attempting to sterile microscopic residual disease after surgical resection, intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) could improve local pleural control and overall survival compared with surgery alone for patients with NSCLC with pleural metastasis. Prior attempts to demonstrate an improvement in clinical outcomes with PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant combined with definitive surgery to treat pleural malignancies have not been successful, perhaps due, in part, to limited ability to perform real-time dosimetry and ensure adequate and even light distribution throughout the chest cavity. A stratified phase II trial assessed the efficacy of definitive surgery and intraoperative PDT with real-time dosimetry in patients with NSCLC with pleural dissemination demonstrated prolonged local control and a higher than expected 21.7-month median survival from the time of surgery and PDT among 22 enrolled patients. This is the first ever report describing optimal methods, techniques, and dosimetry that could be used to safely and reproducibly deliver intraoperative PDT to the chest cavity as part of multimodality therapy for NSCLC with pleural metastasis.

  15. Survival of women with clear cell and papillary serous endometrial cancer after adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II (papillary serous and clear cell) endometrial carcinoma (EC) is a rare subgroup and is considered to have an unfavorable prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to elucidate the meaning of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for clinical outcome and to define prognostic factors in these patients (pts). Methods From 2004-2012 forty-two pts with type II EC underwent surgery followed by adjuvant RT at our department. Median age was 72 years. The majority were early stage carcinomas (FIGO I n = 27 [64.3%], FIGO II n = 4 [9.5%], FIGO III n = 11 [26.2%]. Seven pts (16.7%) received adjuvant chemotherapy (ChT). Pts were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (IVB) boost. Results Five-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS), distant metastases free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.4%, 78%, and 64.5% respectively. LRFS was better with lower pT stage, without lymphangiosis (L0), without haemangiosis (V0) and negative resection margins (R0). DMFS was prolonged in lymph node negatives (N0), L0, V0 and R0. OS was improved in younger pts, N0, L0, V0 and after lymphadenectomy (LNE). Multivariate analysis revealed haemangiosis (V1) as the only independent prognostic factor for OS (p = .014) and DMFS (p = .008). For LRFS pT stage remained as an independent prognostic factor (p = .028). Conclusions Adjuvant RT with EBRT/IVB ensures adequate local control in type II EC, but control rates remain lower than in type I EC. A benefit of additional adjuvant ChT could not be demonstrated and a general omission of EBRT cannot be recommended at this point. Lymphovascular infiltration and pT stage might be the best predictive factors for a benefit from combined local and systemic treatment. PMID:24941899

  16. WE-E-17A-03: FDG-PET-Based Radiomics to Predict Local Control and Survival Following Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J; Apte, A; Folkerts, M; Kohutek, Z; Wu, A; Rimmer, A; Lee, N; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An exploding field in cancer research is “radiomics,” based on the hypothesis that there is statistical (hidden) information in medical images that is prognostic or predictive of outcomes. Our group has developed an efficient pipeline to extract and analyze quantitative image features from medical images as related to outcomes or diagnosis. In this work, we summarize our previous studies with positron emission tomography (PET) images and show the potential of the use of radiomics for outcomes research. Methods: We analyzed two cancer datasets, each consisting of pre-radiotherapy-treatment PET scans: 163 T1-2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and 174 head and neck (H and N) cancer patients with stage III–IV. The PET scans were converted to Computational Environment for Radiological Research (CERR) format, and CERR was used to generate 24 shape, texture, and intensity-histogram based image features. Data-mining and logistic regression methods were then used to model local failure (LF) and overall survival (OS). Unbiased estimates of performance were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). Results: For predicting LF, the models with biologically equivalent dose (BED) and TLG (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) x SUVmean) in NSCLC, and skewness and MTV in H and N, achieved the best performance with AUC=0.818 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.826 (p=0.0002), respectively. For predicting OS, the models with kurtosis and volume in NSCLC and SUVmax and homogeneity in H and N achieved the best performance with AUC=0.706 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.656 (p=0.0003), respectively. On LOOCV, all these models retained significant predictive power. Interestingly, MTV was highly correlated with LF in both sites. Conclusion: PET-based imaged features are promising tools for improving treatment management decision making. Much more research is needed to identify optimal radiomics metrics and to correlate imaging phenotype with other clinical or genomic information.

  17. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  18. Effect of the local microenvironment on survival and thermal inactivation of Salmonella in low- and intermediate-moisture multi-ingredient foods.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiping; Fu, Xiaowen; Bima, Yige; Koontz, John; Megalis, Christina; Yang, Fei; Fleischman, Gregory; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Multi-ingredient foods having low- or intermediate-moisture characteristics may pose a special challenge to process design and validation. Ingredients of these foods can create local microenvironments that may have a distinct impact on pathogen survival and processing requirements. In this study, two model systems, each consisting of 80% commercial peanut butter (P) and 20% nonfat dry milk powder (M), were formulated to be identical in composition, but different in the source of the Salmonella contamination as originating in either the ingredient P or M. Immediately after inoculation, Salmonella showed a 2.0-log reduction when M was the contaminated ingredient compared with a 0.6-log reduction when P was the contaminated ingredient. This pattern of survival was consistent with the single-ingredient control containing only M (2.5-log reduction) or only P (0.7-log reduction), suggesting that the immediate proximity of cells is determined by the contaminated ingredient in the model system. After 5 weeks of storage, the survival rates of Salmonella in the two systems remained different, i.e.a 4- and 2-log reduction resulted in the system with M or P as the contaminated ingredient, respectively. Furthermore, thermal inactivation efficacies also differed significantly between the two systems. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the nonhomogeneous distribution of water, lipid, and protein, indicating that varied local microenvironments were present and likely affected the behavior of the pathogen. The impact of the microenvironment on inactivation and survival of Salmonella was further confirmed in a butter cookie formulation in which Salmonella was inoculated via four different ingredients. This study shows that the local microenvironment in low- and intermediate-moisture foods affects Salmonella survival and thermal inactivation. The ingredient source of the contamination should be taken into account for process design and validation to ensure the

  19. Perioperative Blood Transfusion as a Significant Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence and Survival after Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Kwon; Kim, Hyung Suk; Park, Juhyun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Hyun Hoe; Kwak, Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There have been conflicting reports regarding the association of perioperative blood transfusion (PBT) with oncologic outcomes including recurrence rates and survival outcomes in prostate cancer. We aimed to evaluate whether perioperative blood transfusion (PBT) affects biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) following radical prostatectomy (RP) for patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 2,713 patients who underwent RP for clinically localized prostate cancer between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. We performed a comparative analysis based on receipt of transfusion (PBT group vs. no-PBT group) and transfusion type (autologous PBT vs. allogeneic PBT). Univariate and multivariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to evaluate variables associated with BRFS, CSS, and OS. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival estimates for BRFS, CSS, and OS, and log-rank test was used to conduct comparisons between the groups. Results The number of patients who received PBT was 440 (16.5%). Among these patients, 350 (79.5%) received allogeneic transfusion and the other 90 (20.5%) received autologous transfusion. In a multivariate analysis, allogeneic PBT was found to be statistically significant predictors of BRFS, CSS, and OS; conversely, autologous PBT was not. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly decreased 5-year BRFS (79.2% vs. 70.1%, log-rank, p = 0.001), CSS (98.5% vs. 96.7%, log-rank, p = 0.012), and OS (95.5% vs. 90.6%, log-rank, p < 0.001) in the allogeneic PBT group compared to the no-allogeneic PBT group. In the autologous PBT group, however, none of these were statistically significant compared to the no-autologous PBT group. Conclusions We found that allogeneic PBT was significantly associated with decreased BRFS, CSS, and OS. This provides further support for the immunomodulation hypothesis for allogeneic

  20. Analysing the effect of movement on local survival: a new method with an application to a spatially structured population of the arboreal gecko Gehyra variegata.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Bernd; Henle, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Mortality during movement between habitat patches is the most obvious cost of dispersal, but rarely it has been demonstrated empirically. An approach is presented, which uses capture-mark-recapture data of an arboreal gecko species to determine the effect of individual movement on local survival in a spatially structured population. Because capture-mark-recapture data are widely available for a range of animal species, it should be possible to extend their application to other species. The method is based on the assumption that the tendency to be a territorial animal or to be a floating animal is fixed during the study period. The advantage of our approach is that only one additional parameter has to be estimated for describing movement risks. We further tested the power of our approach to detect an association of movement and mortality with simulated capture histories. The study revealed a strong negative effect of movement on local survival. Hence, animals that moved more often between trees had a lower survival rate. Interestingly, the mean movement rate for males was significantly higher than for females, which should lead to a biased sex ratio towards females in the population. As there was an even sex ratio in the population, we discuss not mutually exclusive explanations for this finding like differences in emigration rates between sexes, differences in survival rates between sexes, or a skewed sex ratio in offspring. PMID:17938971

  1. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Improves Local Control After Surgical Resection in Patients With Localized Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Else, Tobias; Griffith, Kent A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Williams, Andrew; Miller, Barbra S.; Worden, Francis; Jolly, Shruti

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy known for high rates of local recurrence, though the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) has not been established. In this study of grossly resected ACC, we compare local control of patients treated with surgery followed by adjuvant RT to a matched cohort treated with surgery alone. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients with localized disease who underwent R0 or R1 resection followed by adjuvant RT. Only patients treated with RT at our institution were included. Matching to surgical controls was on the basis of stage, surgical margin status, tumor grade, and adjuvant mitotane. Results: From 1991 to 2011, 360 ACC patients were evaluated for ACC at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Twenty patients with localized disease received postoperative adjuvant RT. These were matched to 20 controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to stage, margins, grade, or mitotane. Median RT dose was 55 Gy (range, 45-60 Gy). Median follow-up was 34 months. Local recurrence occurred in 1 patient treated with RT, compared with 12 patients not treated with RT (P=.0005; hazard ratio [HR] 12.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.62-97.88). However, recurrence-free survival was no different between the groups (P=.17; HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.67-3.45). Overall survival was also not significantly different (P=.13; HR 1.97; 95% CI 0.57-6.77), with 4 deaths in the RT group compared with 9 in the control group. Conclusions: Postoperative RT significantly improved local control compared with the use of surgery alone in this case-matched cohort analysis of grossly resected ACC patients. Although this retrospective series represents the largest study to date on adjuvant RT for ACC, its findings need to be prospectively confirmed.

  2. Assessing the relative importance of local and regional processes on the survival of a threatened salmon population.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica A; Teel, David J; Peterson, William T; Baptista, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    Research on regulatory mechanisms in biological populations often focuses on environmental covariates. An integrated approach that combines environmental indices with organismal-level information can provide additional insight on regulatory mechanisms. Survival of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is consistently low whereas some adjacent populations with similar life histories experience greater survival. It is not known if populations with differential survival respond similarly during early marine residence, a critical period in the life history. Ocean collections, genetic stock identification, and otolith analyses were combined to evaluate the growth-mortality and match-mismatch hypotheses during early marine residence of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon. Interannual variation in juvenile attributes, including size at marine entry and marine growth rate, was compared with estimates of survival and physical and biological metrics. Multiple linear regression and multi-model inference were used to evaluate the relative importance of biological and physical metrics in explaining interannual variation in survival. There was relatively weak support for the match-mismatch hypothesis and stronger evidence for the growth-mortality hypothesis. Marine growth and size at capture were strongly, positively related to survival, a finding similar to spring Chinook salmon from the Mid-Upper Columbia River. In hindcast models, basin-scale indices (Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO)) and biological indices (juvenile salmon catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and a copepod community index (CCI)) accounted for substantial and similar portions of variation in survival for juvenile emigration years 1998-2008 (R2>0.70). However, in forecast models for emigration years 2009-2011, there was an increasing discrepancy between predictions based on the PDO (50-448% of observed value) compared with those based on

  3. Assessing the Relative Importance of Local and Regional Processes on the Survival of a Threatened Salmon Population

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica A.; Teel, David J.; Peterson, William T.; Baptista, Antonio M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on regulatory mechanisms in biological populations often focuses on environmental covariates. An integrated approach that combines environmental indices with organismal-level information can provide additional insight on regulatory mechanisms. Survival of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is consistently low whereas some adjacent populations with similar life histories experience greater survival. It is not known if populations with differential survival respond similarly during early marine residence, a critical period in the life history. Ocean collections, genetic stock identification, and otolith analyses were combined to evaluate the growth-mortality and match-mismatch hypotheses during early marine residence of spring/summer Snake River Chinook salmon. Interannual variation in juvenile attributes, including size at marine entry and marine growth rate, was compared with estimates of survival and physical and biological metrics. Multiple linear regression and multi-model inference were used to evaluate the relative importance of biological and physical metrics in explaining interannual variation in survival. There was relatively weak support for the match-mismatch hypothesis and stronger evidence for the growth-mortality hypothesis. Marine growth and size at capture were strongly, positively related to survival, a finding similar to spring Chinook salmon from the Mid-Upper Columbia River. In hindcast models, basin-scale indices (Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO)) and biological indices (juvenile salmon catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and a copepod community index (CCI)) accounted for substantial and similar portions of variation in survival for juvenile emigration years 1998–2008 (R2>0.70). However, in forecast models for emigration years 2009–2011, there was an increasing discrepancy between predictions based on the PDO (50–448% of observed value) compared with those

  4. Survival prognostic factors for patients with synchronous brain oligometastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma receiving local therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hao; Xu, Jianlin; Yang, Haitang; Jin, Bo; Lou, Yuqing; Wu, Dan; Han, Baohui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical evidence for patients with synchronous brain oligometastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma is limited. We aimed to summarize the clinical data of these patients to explore the survival prognostic factors for this population. Methods From September 1995 to July 2011, patients with 1–3 synchronous brain oligometastases, who were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or surgical resection as the primary treatment, were identified at Shanghai Chest Hospital. Results A total of 76 patients (22 patients underwent brain surgery as primary treatment and 54 patients received SRS) were available for survival analysis. The overall survival (OS) for patients treated with SRS and brain surgery as the primary treatment were 12.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.3–14.9) and 16.4 months (95% CI 8.8–24.1), respectively (adjusted hazard ratio =0.59, 95% CI 0.33–1.07, P=0.08). Among 76 patients treated with SRS or brain surgery, 21 patients who underwent primary tumor resection did not experience a significantly improved OS (16.4 months, 95% CI 9.6–23.2), compared with those who did not undergo resection (11.9 months, 95% CI 9.7–14.0; adjusted hazard ratio =0.81, 95% CI 0.46–1.44, P=0.46). Factors associated with survival benefits included stage I–II of primary lung tumor and solitary brain metastasis. Conclusion There was no significant difference in OS for patients with synchronous brain oligometastasis receiving SRS or surgical resection. Among this population, the number of brain metastases and stage of primary lung disease were the factors associated with a survival benefit. PMID:27471395

  5. Genomic profiling in locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer and its link to DCE-MRI and overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Owzar, Kouros; Jiang, Chen; Scarbrough, Peter M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Horton, Janet K.; Dressman, Holly K.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that DCE-MRI perfusion patterns, obtained from LABC patients prior to neoadjuvant therapy, predicted pathologic clinical response. Genomic analyses were also independently conducted on the same patient population. This retrospective study was performed to test two hypotheses: i) gene expression profiles are associated with DCE-MRI perfusion patterns; ii) association between long term overall survival data and gene expression profiles can lead to identification of novel predictive biomarkers. Methods We utilized RNA microarray and DCE-MRI data from 47 LABC patients, including 13 IBC patients. Association between gene expression profile and DCE-MRI perfusion patterns (centrifugal and centripetal) was determined by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Association between gene expression level and survival was assessed using a Cox rank score test. Additional genomic analysis of the IBC subset, with up to an 11-year period of follow-up, was conducted. Associations between gene expression and overall survival were further assessed in TCGA database. Results Differences in gene expression profiles were seen between centrifugal and centripetal perfusion patterns in the: sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1A, phenol-preferring, member 1 and 2 (SULT1A1, SULT1A2), poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, member 6 (PARP6), and metastasis tumor antigen1 (MTA1). In the IBC subset, our analyses demonstrated that differential expression of 45 genes was associated with long term survival. Conclusions Here we have demonstrated an association between DCE-MRI perfusion patterns and gene expression profiles. In addition we have reported on candidate prognostic biomarkers in IBC patients, with some of the genes being significantly associated with survival in IBC and LABC. PMID:25811737

  6. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ (2) test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13-123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13-89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  7. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ2 test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13–123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13–89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  8. Potential for local adaptation in response to an anthropogenic agent of selection: effects of road deicing salts on amphibian embryonic survival and development.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Gareth R; French, Susannah S; Brodie, Edmund D

    2013-02-01

    The application of millions of tons of road deicing salts every winter in North America presents significant survival challenges to amphibians inhabiting roadside habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl on anuran tadpoles, less is known of effects on amphibian eggs, or any caudate life stage. In addition, little is known of the effects of MgCl2, which is now the 2nd most commonly used road deicer. Most studies have considered amphibians to be helpless victims of deicing salts, and ignore the possibility of the evolution of local adaptation to this stressor. We attempt to address these knowledge gaps and explore this evolutionary potential by examining the effects of NaCl and MgCl2 on the survival and development of eggs from different female rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) from the same population. We demonstrate that both salts, at environmentally relevant concentrations, severely affect the embryonic survival and development of this amphibian, but that the effects of the salt are dependent on the identity of the mother. This female × treatment interaction results in substantial variation in tolerance to road deicing salts among newt families, providing the raw material necessary for natural selection and the evolution of local adaptation in this amphibian. PMID:23467723

  9. Potential for local adaptation in response to an anthropogenic agent of selection: effects of road deicing salts on amphibian embryonic survival and development

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Gareth R; French, Susannah S; Brodie, Edmund D

    2013-01-01

    The application of millions of tons of road deicing salts every winter in North America presents significant survival challenges to amphibians inhabiting roadside habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl on anuran tadpoles, less is known of effects on amphibian eggs, or any caudate life stage. In addition, little is known of the effects of MgCl2, which is now the 2nd most commonly used road deicer. Most studies have considered amphibians to be helpless victims of deicing salts, and ignore the possibility of the evolution of local adaptation to this stressor. We attempt to address these knowledge gaps and explore this evolutionary potential by examining the effects of NaCl and MgCl2 on the survival and development of eggs from different female rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) from the same population. We demonstrate that both salts, at environmentally relevant concentrations, severely affect the embryonic survival and development of this amphibian, but that the effects of the salt are dependent on the identity of the mother. This female × treatment interaction results in substantial variation in tolerance to road deicing salts among newt families, providing the raw material necessary for natural selection and the evolution of local adaptation in this amphibian. PMID:23467723

  10. Adjuvant Brachytherapy Removes Survival Disadvantage of Local Disease Extension in Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer: A SEER Registry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Peter J. Jani, Ashesh B.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p <0.001). In patients with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 50% for NAT, 64% for EBRT, and 67% for EBRT/BT. Again, adjuvant RT contributed to improved survival compared with NAT (p = 0.02). In patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and direct tumor extension, the 5-year OS rate was 34% for NAT, 47% for EBRT, and 63% for EBRT/BT. RT improved OS compared with NAT (p <0.001). Also, in this high-risk subgroup, adding BT to EBRT was superior to EBRT alone (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant EBRT and EBRT/BT had improved OS compared with patients receiving NAT. When direct extension of the primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  11. Effect of radiotherapy on survival of women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guo-Wei; Ni, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Yu, Ke-Da; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Although it has been previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) effectively reduced the incidence of local recurrence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS), little is known about the effect of RT on survival of patients with locally excised DCIS. Patients and methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data, we selected 56,968 female DCIS patients treated with BCS between 1998 and 2007. Overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) were compared among patients who received RT or no RT using the Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results Median follow-up was 91 months. In the multivariable model, patients receiving postoperative RT had better OS than those undergoing BCS alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53–0.67, P<0.001). This pattern remained after stratification by estrogen receptor (ER) status and age. In contrast, RT delivery was not significantly associated with improved BCSS (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48–1.03, P=0.073). However, after stratifying by the above two variables, RT contributed to better BCSS in ER-negative/borderline patients (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19–0.88, P=0.023) and younger patients (≤50 years old; HR 0.37, 95% CI 0.15–0.91, P=0.030). Conclusion Our analysis confirms the beneficial effect of RT on OS in women with locally excised DCIS and reveals the specific protective effect of RT on BCSS in ER-negative/borderline and younger patients. PMID:26089689

  12. Is Ki-67 Expression Prognostic for Local Relapse in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)?

    SciTech Connect

    Hafeez, Farhaan; Neboori, Hanmanth J.; Harigopal, Malini; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yang, Qifeng; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein whose expression is strongly up-regulated in proliferating cells and can be used to determine the growth fraction in clonal cell populations. Although there are some data to suggest that Ki-67 overexpression may be prognostic for endpoints such as survival or postmastectomy recurrence, further elucidation of its prognostic significance is warranted. Specifically after breast conservation therapy (BCT) (defined in this setting as breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy), whether Ki-67 predicts for locoregional recurrence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess Ki-67 expression in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients to determine whether a significant independent association between Ki-67 and locoregional relapse exists. Methods and Materials: Ki-67 staining was conducted on a tissue microarray of 438 patients previously treated with BCT, and expression was analyzed with clinicopathologic features and outcomes from our database. Results: Ki-67 expression was more prevalent in black patients (37% of black patients vs 17% of white patients, P<.01), younger patients (27% of patients aged ≤50 years vs 15% of patients aged >50 years, P<.01), estrogen receptor (ER)–negative tumors (25% of ER-negative tumors vs 17% of ER-positive tumors, P=.04), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu–positive tumors (35% of HER2-positive tumors vs 18% of HER2-negative tumors, P=.01), and larger tumors (26% of T2 tumors vs 16% of T1 tumors, P=.03). On univariate/multivariate analysis, Ki-67 did not predict for overall survival (74.4% vs 72.6%), cause-specific survival (82.9% vs 82.1%), local relapse-free survival (83.6% vs 88.5%), distant metastasis-free survival (76.1% vs 81.4%), recurrence-free survival (65.5% vs 74.6%), and locoregional recurrence-free survival (81.6% vs 84.7%): P>.05 for all. Conclusions: Ki-67 appears to be a surrogate marker for aggressive disease and

  13. Long-term results of a randomized phase III trial of TPF induction chemotherapy followed by surgery and radiation in locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lai-ping; Zhang, Chen-ping; Ren, Guo-xin; Guo, Wei; William, William N; Hong, Christopher S; Sun, Jian; Zhu, Han-guang; Tu, Wen-yong; Li, Jiang; Cai, Yi-li; Yin, Qiu-ming; Wang, Li-zhen; Wang, Zhong-he; Hu, Yong-jie; Ji, Tong; Yang, Wen-jun; Ye, Wei-min; Li, Jun; He, Yue; Wang, Yan-an; Xu, Li-qun; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lee, J Jack; Myers, Jeffrey N; Zhang, Zhi-yuan

    2015-07-30

    Previously, we conducted a randomized phase III trial of TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) induction chemotherapy in surgically managed locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and found no improvement in overall survival. This study reports long-term follow-up results from our initial trial. All patients had clinical stage III or IVA locally advanced OSCC. In the experimental group, patients received two cycles of TPF induction chemotherapy (75mg/m2 docetaxel d1, 75mg/m2 cisplatin d1, and 750mg/m2/day 5-fluorouracil d1-5) followed by radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy; in the control group, patients received upfront radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Among 256 enrolled patients with a median follow-up of 70 months, estimated 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 61.1%, 52.7%, 55.2%, and 60.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in survival rates between experimental and control groups. However, patients with favorable pathologic responses had improved outcomes compared to those with unfavorable pathologic responses and to those in the control group. Although TPF induction chemotherapy did not improve long-term survival compared to surgery upfront in patients with stage III and IVA OSCC, a favorable pathologic response after induction chemotherapy may be used as a major endpoint and prognosticator in future studies. Furthermore, the negative results observed in this trial may be represent type II error from an underpowered study. Future larger scale phase III trials are warranted to investigate whether a significant benefit exists for TPF induction chemotherapy in surgically managed OSCC. PMID:26124084

  14. Identification of Palmitoyltransferase and Thioesterase Enzymes That Control the Subcellular Localization of Axon Survival Factor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2)*

    PubMed Central

    Milde, Stefan; Coleman, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The NAD-synthesizing enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) is a critical survival factor for axons and its constant supply from neuronal cell bodies into axons is required for axon survival in primary culture neurites and axon extension in vivo. Recently, we showed that palmitoylation is necessary to target NMNAT2 to post-Golgi vesicles, thereby influencing its protein turnover and axon protective capacity. Here we find that NMNAT2 is a substrate for cytosolic thioesterases APT1 and APT2 and that palmitoylation/depalmitoylation dynamics are on a time scale similar to its short half-life. Interestingly, however, depalmitoylation does not release NMNAT2 from membranes. The mechanism of palmitoylation-independent membrane attachment appears to be mediated by the same minimal domain required for palmitoylation itself. Furthermore, we identify several zDHHC palmitoyltransferases that influence NMNAT2 palmitoylation and subcellular localization, among which a role for zDHHC17 (HIP14) in neuronal NMNAT2 palmitoylation is best supported by our data. These findings shed light on the enzymatic regulation of NMNAT2 palmitoylation and highlight individual thioesterases and palmitoyltransferases as potential targets to modulate NMNAT2-dependent axon survival. PMID:25271157

  15. Sequencing of Local Therapy Affects the Pattern of Treatment Failure and Survival in Children With Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Beltran, Chris; Wu, Shengjie; Sharma, Shelly; Boop, Frederick A.; Jenkins, Jesse J.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Wright, Karen D.; Broniscer, Alberto; Kun, Larry E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the pattern of treatment failure associated with current therapeutic paradigms for childhood atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT). Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with AT/RT of the central nervous system treated at our institution between 1987 and 2007 were retrospectively evaluated. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and cumulative incidence of local failure were correlated with age, sex, tumor location, extent of disease, and extent of surgical resection. Radiotherapy (RT) sequencing, chemotherapy, dose, timing, and volume administered after resection were also evaluated. Results: Thirty-one patients at a median age of 2.3 years at diagnosis (range, 0.45-16.87 years) were enrolled into protocols that included risk- and age-stratified RT. Craniospinal irradiation with focal tumor bed boost (median dose, 54 Gy) was administered to 18 patients. Gross total resection was achieved in 16. Ten patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. RT was delayed more than 3 months in 20 patients and between 1 and 3 months in 4; 7 patients received immediate postoperative irradiation preceding high-dose alkylator-based chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 48 months, the cumulative incidence of local treatment failure was 37.5% {+-} 9%; progression-free survival was 33.2% {+-} 10%; and OS was 53.5% {+-} 10%. Children receiving delayed RT ({>=}1 month postoperatively) were more likely to experience local failure (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, p = 0.007); the development of distant metastases before RT increased the risk of progression (HR 3.49, p = 0.006); and any evidence of disease progressionbefore RT decreased OS (HR 20.78, p = 0.004). Disease progression occurred in 52% (11/21) of children with initially localized tumors who underwent gross total resection, and the progression rate increased proportionally with increasing delay from surgery to RT. Conclusions: Delayed RT is associated with a higher rate of local and metastatic

  16. Local Control Over Formal Education in Two American-Indian Communities: A Preliminary Step Toward Cultural Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinman, Janice J.

    The possible causes underlying the differential response to local control over education in the American Indian Ccommunities of San Juan and Santa Clara, both of the Tewa branch of the Pueblo Tribe, are reported in this paper. Results are described for the 10-week study (summer 1969) that consisted of observations of community reactions to…

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Do Heui; Cho, Young Hyun; Roh, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer) patients are rare, and the efficacy of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) to treat these had not been evaluated. We assessed the efficacy of GKRS and prognostic factors for tumor control and survival in brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. From May 1995 to October 2012, 26 women (mean age 51.3 years, range 27–70 years) with metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer were treated with GKRS. We reviewed their outcomes, radiological responses, and clinical status. Results In total 24 patients (59 lesions) were available for follow-up imaging. The median follow-up time was 9 months. The mean treated tumor volume at the time of GKRS was 8185 mm3 (range 10–19500 mm3), and the median dose delivered to the tumor margin was 25 Gy (range, 10–30 Gy). A local tumor control rate was 89.8% (53 of 59 tumors). The median overall survival was 9.5 months after GKRS (range, 1–102 months). Age-associated multivariate analysis indicated that the Karnofsky performance status (KPS), the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification, and the number of treated lesions were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (HR=0.162, p=0.008, HR=0.107, p=0.038, and HR=2.897, p=0.045, respectively). Conclusion GKRS is safe and effective for the management of brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. The clinical status of the patient is important in determining the overall survival time. PMID:27446522

  18. Effect of Facilitation of Local Stakeholder Groups on Equity in Neonatal Survival; Results from the NeoKIP Trial in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Målqvist, Mats; Hoa, Dinh Phuong Thi; Persson, Lars-Åke; Ekholm Selling, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background To operationalize the post-MDG agenda, there is a need to evaluate the effects of health interventions on equity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect on equity in neonatal survival of the NeoKIP trial (ISRCTN44599712), a population-based, cluster-randomized intervention trial with facilitated local stakeholder groups for improved neonatal survival in Quang Ninh province in northern Vietnam. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with all mothers experiencing neonatal mortality and a random sample of 6% of all mothers with a live birth in the study area during the study period (July 2008-June 2011). Multilevel regression analyses were performed, stratifying mothers according to household wealth, maternal education and mother’s ethnicity in order to assess impact on equity in neonatal survival. Findings In the last year of study the risk of neonatal death was reduced by 69% among poor mothers in the intervention area as compared to poor mothers in the control area (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.15–0.66). This pattern was not evident among mothers from non-poor households. Mothers with higher education had a 50% lower risk of neonatal mortality if living in the intervention area during the same time period (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.28–0.90), whereas no significant effect was detected among mothers with low education. Interpretation The NeoKIP intervention promoted equity in neonatal survival based on wealth but increased inequity based on maternal education. PMID:26713871

  19. Trastuzumab use during pregnancy: long-term survival after locally advanced breast cancer and long-term infant follow-up.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Jurandyr M de; Brito, Luiz G O; Moises, Elaine C D; Amorim, Andréa C; Rapatoni, Liane; Carrara, Hélio H A; Tiezzi, Daniel G

    2016-04-01

    Here, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer 8 years ago. Her treatment course was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by mastectomy and then adjuvant radiotherapy and trastuzumab (TTZ). During the use of adjuvant targeted therapy, an incidental pregnancy was diagnosed. Four years later, she developed bone and cerebral metastases, and since then, she has received courses of TTZ, capecitabine, lapatinib, and radiotherapy with intermittent control of the disease. Her 7-year-old son presents a normal physical and long-term neurological developmental curve according to specialized evaluation. This case is unique for several reasons: the patient received the highest dose of TTZ yet described during pregnancy (4400 mg); there has been a long period of disease-free survival after treatment for locally advanced breast cancer and long overall survival despite successive disease progressions during the metastatic phase of the disease (97 months), and there was a monitored pediatric follow-up period (7 years). PMID:26825868

  20. Blood-Based Biomarkers Are Associated with Disease Recurrence and Survival in Gastrointestinal Stroma Tumor Patients after Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Michael; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Posch, Florian; Mrsic, Edvin; Thalhammer, Michael; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Bezan, Angelika; Pichler, Martin; Gerger, Armin; Szkandera, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory blood count biomarkers may improve recurrence risk stratification and inform long-term prognosis of cancer patients. Here, we quantify the prognostic impact of blood-based biomarkers on recurrence risk and long-term survival in a large cohort of gastrointestinal stroma tumor (GIST) patients after curative surgery. Methods One-hundred-forty-nine consecutive GIST patients were followed-up for a median period of 4.8 years. Local recurrence, distant metastasis, and death occurred in 9, 21, and 31 patients, respectively. Time-to-event and competing risk analysis were applied to study the association between haemoglobin (Hb) level, white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived NLR (dNLR), lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR), and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with risk of local or distant recurrence (RR), recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results A low Hb (p = 0.029), and elevations in the parameters WBC (p = 0.004), NLR (p = 0.015) and dNLR (p = 0.037) were associated with a poor OS in GIST patients in multivariate analysis. Moreover, a low Hb (p = 0.049) and an elevated WBC (p = 0.001), NLR (p = 0.007), dNLR (p = 0.043) and PLR (p = 0.024) were independently associated with decreased RFS after adjusting for Miettinen score. However, only an increase of dNLR/NLR showed a significant association to higher RR (p = 0.048). Inclusion of NLR or PLR to Miettinen risk score did not reasonably improve the clinical risk prediction of 2-year RFS. Conclusion Low Hb, elevated WBC, elevated dNLR, and elevated PLR are independent prognostic factors for a worse clinical outcome in GIST patients after curative resection. PMID:27454486

  1. Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2009-10-15

    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation. PMID:19582880

  2. The outer membrane localization of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrA/B is involved in survival against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Eric P.; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Quick, J.; Judd, Ralph C.; Weissbach, Herbert; Etienne, Frantzy; Brot, Nathan; Seifert, H. Steven

    2002-01-01

    The PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been reported to be involved in the regulation of pilin gene transcription, but it also possesses significant homology to the peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase family of enzymes, specifically MsrA and MsrB from Escherichia coli. MsrA and MsrB in E. coli are able to reduce methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins to methionines. In addition, the gonococcal PilB protein encodes for both MsrA and MsrB activity associated with the repair of oxidative damage to proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that the PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is not involved in pilus expression. Additionally, we show that wild-type N. gonorrhoeae produces two forms of this polypeptide, one of which contains a signal sequence and is secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm to the outer membrane; the other lacks a signal sequence and is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that the secreted form of the PilB protein is involved in survival in the presence of oxidative damage. PMID:12096194

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  4. The role of surgery in locally advanced carcinoma of cervix after sub-optimal chemoradiation: Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Kundargi, Rajshekar S.; Guruprasad, B.; Hanumantappa, Nikesh; Rathod, Praveen Shankar; Devi, Uma K.; Bafna, U. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of advanced cervical cancer is concurrent chemoradiation. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix includes pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with the concomitant platinum based chemotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to boost central disease. Management of patients who are suboptimally treated, especially, after unsuccessful ICBT insertion is not well-defined. This study explores the role of hysterectomy in these patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2006 to December 2011, 38 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, in whom ICBT insertion was unsuccessful, were analyzed retrospectively. Operable patients with no parametrial involvement underwent hysterectomy and outcomes (recurrence free and overall survival) were noted. Results: The major complications in post operative period were wound infection, paralytic ileus and bladder atony all of which were conservatively managed with no mortality. At median follow-up of 36 months (range 12-60 months) there was no recurrence in patients with stage 1B2 and stage IIA, 25 out of 38 (65.8%) were event free and the overall survival was 71%. Conclusion: Many patients in Indian scenario receive suboptimal therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. EBRT with chemotherapy followed by type 1 extra-fascial hysterectomy can be a good alternative for these patients. PMID:24455590

  5. Effect of particle beam radiotherapy on locally recurrent rectal cancer: Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    MOKUTANI, YUKAKO; YAMAMOTO, HIROFUMI; UEMURA, MAMORU; HARAGUCHI, NAOTSUGU; TAKAHASHI, HIDEKAZU; NISHIMURA, JUNICHI; HATA, TAISHI; TAKEMASA, ICHIRO; MIZUSHIMA, TSUNEKAZU; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection is the most effective therapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC); however, it often necessitates invasive procedures that may lead to major complications. Particle beam radiotherapy (RT), including carbon ion RT (C-ion RT) and proton beam RT, is a promising new modality that exhibits considerable efficacy against various types of human cancer. C-ion RT reportedly offers a therapeutic alternative for LRRC. In the present study, we describe three cases of LRRC treated by particle beam RT. In all the cases, LRRC was diagnosed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography imaging. No serious adverse effects were observed during RT. One patient experienced re-recurrence of LRRC, but survived for 6 years following particle beam RT; the second patient remains recurrence-free after a 2-year follow-up; and the third patient has developed recurrence at different sites in the pelvis but, to date, has survived for 4 years following particle beam RT. Therefore, LRRC was controlled by particle beam RT in two of the three cases, suggesting that particle beam RT is a safe alternative treatment for patients with LRRC. PMID:26171176

  6. High-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy with chemotherapy for surgically staged localized uterine serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Susan A.; Ratner, Elena; De Leon, Maria C.; Mani, Sheida; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Santin, Alessandro; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate our institutional experience combining carboplatin-paclitaxel (C/T) chemotherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) intra-vaginal brachytherapy (IVB) following comprehensive surgical staging in localized uterine serous carcinoma (USC). Material and methods Institutional chart review identified 56 patients with FIGO 2009 stage I-II USC treated between 2000-2010. Patients underwent total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy, and comprehensive surgical staging including pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection, omentectomy, and peritoneal cytology. Chemotherapy was 6 cycles of C/T, and the IVB dose was 14 Gy in 2 fractions, prescribed to 0.5 cm from the cylinder surface. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up time was 49 months (range: 9-145). The 5-yr RFS and OS were 85% and 93%, respectively. In all cases of recurrence (n = 8), the first site of failure was extra-pelvic. There were no isolated vaginal recurrences, however, there was one vaginal apex recurrence recorded at 19 months in a patient with simultaneous lung metastases. Thus, the 2-year vaginal RFS was 98%. Conclusions Excellent vaginal/pelvic control rates were observed. Further study of HDR brachytherapy dose and fractionation in combination with chemotherapy is worthwhile. PMID:25829935

  7. Stage-specific survival and recurrence in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma in Europe – a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Svedman, Fernanda Costa; Pillas, Demetris; Taylor, Aliki; Kaur, Moninder; Linder, Ragnar; Hansson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the increasing incidence in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and the recent changes in the treatment landscape, it is important to understand stage-specific overall and recurrence-free survival patterns in Europe. Despite publications such as EUROCARE-5, there is limited information on stage-specific survival for CMM in Europe. Method We carried out a systematic literature review to provide an up-to-date summary of stage-specific survival and recurrence-free survival patterns in patients with CMM in Europe. Studies were included if they were published in Medline during the past 12 years and included information on stage-specific survival and/or recurrence in CMM. Results Of the 8,749 studies identified, 26 studies were included, representing nine countries. Collectively, the studies covered a population of 152,422 patients and included data from 1978 to 2011. Randomized clinical trials and single-center observational studies comprised the most common study designs, including five large registry-based studies. Stage-specific information for survival and recurrence varied: 5-year overall survival: 95%–100% (stage I), 65%–92.8% (stage II), 41%–71% (stage III), and 9%–28% (stage IV); 5-year relapse-free survival was reported less frequently: 56% (stage II), and 28%–44% (stage III). Studies reporting survival by sentinel node (SN) status reported 5-year overall survival as 80%–95% for negative SN (stage I/II) and 35%–75% for positive SN (stage III) status; recurrence-free survival at 5 years: 76%–90% for negative and 35%–58% for positive SN status. Some studies included comparisons of survival by key patient sociodemographic characteristics, suggesting that these have a substantial influence on survival and recurrence estimates. Conclusion The studies identified in this review show large variations in stage-specific overall and recurrence-free survival by study type and by country. Owing to differing study designs and populations, it

  8. Expression and Subcellular Localization of Retinoic Acid Receptor-α (RARα) in Healthy and Varicocele Human Spermatozoa: Its Possible Regulatory Role in Capacitation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Ida; Perri, Mariarita; Santoro, Marta; Panza, Salvatore; Caroleo, Maria C; Guido, Carmela; Mete, Annamaria; Cione, Erika; Aquila, Saveria

    2015-01-01

    Varicocele, an abnormal tortuosity and dilation of veins of the pampiniform plexus, is the most common identifiable and correctable cause of male infertility. It is now becoming apparent that signaling through vitamin A metabolites, such as all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), is indispensable for spermatogenesis and disruption of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) function may result in male sterility and aberrant spermatogenesis. Herein, we investigated by Western blot and immunogold electron microscopy the expression profiles and subcellular localization of RARα in healthy and varicocele human sperm; in addition, we analyzed the effects of ATRA on cholesterol efflux and sperm survival utilizing enzymatic colorimetric CHOD-PAP method and Eosin Y technique, respectively. In varicocele samples, a strong reduction of RARα expression was observed. Immunogold labeling evidenced cellular location of RARα also confirming its reduced expression in "varicocele" samples. Sperm responsiveness to ATRA treatment was reduced in varicocele sperm. Our study showed that RARα is expressed in human sperm probably with a dual role in promoting both cholesterol efflux and survival. RARα might be involved in the pathogenesis of varicocele as its expression is reduced in pathologic samples. Thus, ATRA administration in procedures for artificial insemination or dietary vitamin A supplementation might represent a promising therapeutic approach for the management of male infertility. PMID:24992177

  9. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, A. William . E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R.; Lovato, James; Mishra, Girish; Melin, Susan A.; Oaks, Timothy; Aklilu, Mabea; Clark, Paige B.; Levine, Edward A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

  10. Factors associated with local recurrence and cause-specific survival in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast treated with breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry; Go, Nel; Krauss, Daniel; Chen, Peter; Goldstein, Neal; Martinez, Alvaro; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast to determine risk factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and cause-specific survival (CSS) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) or mastectomy. Materials and Methods: Between 1981 and 1999, 410 cases of DCIS (405 patients) were treated at our institution; 367 were managed with breast-conserving surgery (54 with lumpectomy alone and 313 with adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) [median dose, 45 Gy]). Of these 313 patients, 298 received also a supplemental boost of RT to the lumpectomy cavity (median dose, 16 Gy). Forty-three patients underwent mastectomy; 2 (5%) received adjuvant RT to the chest wall. A true recurrence/marginal miss (TR/MM) IBTR was defined as failure within or adjacent to the tumor bed in patients undergoing BCT. Median follow-up for all patients was 7 years (mean: 6.1 years). Results: Thirty patients (8.2%) experienced an IBTR after BCT (25 [8%] after RT, 5 [9.3%] after no RT), and 2 patients (4.7%) developed a chest wall recurrence after mastectomy. Of the 32 local failures, 20 (63%) were invasive (18/30 [60%] after BCT and 2/2 [100%] after mastectomy), and 37% were DCIS alone. Twenty-four (80%) of the IBTRs were classified as TR/MM. The 10-year freedom from local failure, CSS, and overall survival after BCT or mastectomy were 89% vs. 90% (p = 0.4), 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.7), and 89% vs. 100% (p = 0.3), respectively. Factors associated with IBTR on Cox multivariate analysis were younger age (p = 0.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.06 per year), electron boost energy {<=}9 MeV (p = 0.03, HR 1.41), final margins {<=}2 mm (p = 0.007; HR, 3.65), and no breast radiation (p = 0.002, HR 5.56). On Cox univariate analysis for BCT patients, IBTR, TR/MM failures, and predominant nuclear Grade 3 were associated with an increased risk of distant metastases and a reduced CSS. Conclusions: After treatment for DCIS, 10-year rates of local control

  11. Identification of a DNA methylation signature to predict disease-free survival in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Rainer; Weichenhan, Dieter; Jung, Klaus; Kitz, Julia; Grade, Marian; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Jo, Peter; Doyen, Jérôme; Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Johnsen, Steven A.; Plass, Christoph; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer a preoperative predictive biomarker is necessary to adjust treatment specifically for those patients expected to suffer relapse. We applied whole genome methylation CpG island array analyses to an initial set of patients (n=11) to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that separate a good from a bad prognosis group. Using a quantitative high-resolution approach, candidate DMRs were first validated in a set of 61 patients (test set) and then confirmed DMRs were further validated in additional independent patient cohorts (n=71, n=42). We identified twenty highly discriminative DMRs and validated them in the test set using the MassARRAY technique. Ten DMRs could be confirmed which allowed separation into prognosis groups (p=0.0207, HR=4.09). The classifier was validated in two additional cohorts (n=71, p=0.0345, HR=3.57 and n=42, p=0.0113, HR=3.78). Interestingly, six of the ten DMRs represented regions close to the transcriptional start sites of genes which are also marked by the Polycomb Repressor Complex component EZH2. In conclusion we present a classifier comprising 10 DMRs which predicts patient prognosis with a high degree of accuracy. These data may now help to discriminate between patients that may respond better to standard treatments from those that may require alternative modalities. PMID:25261372

  12. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Al Abri, Rashid; Kolethekkat, Arif Ali; Kelleher, Michael O.; Myles, Lynn M.; Glasby, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group). In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired nerve for 28 days under local anesthesia. In the CNTF group, the sheep were again anesthetized after nine months and the site of facial nerve repair was exposed. Detailed electrophysiological, tension experiments and morphometric studies were carried out and then analyzed statistically. Results The skin CV min, refractory period, Jitter and tension parameters were marginally raised in the CNTF group than the control but the difference was statistically insignificant between the two groups. Morphometric indices also did not show any significant changes in the CNTF group. Conclusion CNTF has no profound effect on neuronal regeneration of adult sheep animal model. Keywords CNTF; Neurtrophic factors; Sheep; Facial nerve; Regeneration. PMID:24936272

  13. PTH1-34 alleviates radiotherapy-induced local bone loss by improving osteoblast and osteocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Tribble, Mary Beth; Zhu, Ji; Altman, Allison R; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Zhang, Yejia; Akintoye, Sunday O; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Cancer radiotherapy is often complicated by a spectrum of changes in the neighboring bone from mild osteopenia to osteoradionecrosis. We previously reported that parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1-34), an anabolic agent for osteoporosis, reversed bone structural deterioration caused by multiple microcomputed tomography (microCT) scans in adolescent rats. To simulate clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients and to search for remedies, we focally irradiated the tibial metaphyseal region of adult rats with a newly available small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) and treated these rats with intermittent injections of PTH1-34. Using a unique 3D image registration method that we recently developed, we traced the local changes of the same trabecular bone before and after treatments, and observed that, while radiation caused a loss of small trabecular elements leading to significant decreases in bone mass and strength, PTH1-34 preserved all trabecular elements in irradiated bone with remarkable increases in bone mass and strength. Histomorphometry demonstrated that SARRP radiation severely reduced osteoblast number and activity, which were impressively reversed by PTH treatment. In contrast, suppressing bone resorption by alendronate failed to rescue radiation-induced bone loss and to block the rescue effect of PTH1-34. Furthermore, histological analyses revealed that PTH1-34 protected osteoblasts and osteocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis and attenuated radiation-induced bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, our data strongly support a robust radioprotective effect of PTH on trabecular bone integrity through preserving bone formation and shed light on further investigations of an anabolic therapy for radiation-induced bone damage. PMID:24998454

  14. PTH1-34 Alleviates Radiotherapy-induced Local Bone Loss by Improving Osteoblast and Osteocyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lin, Tiao; Tribble, Mary Beth; Zhu, Ji; Altman, Allison R.; Tseng, Weiju; Zhang, Yejia; Akintoye, Sunday O.; Cengel, Keith; Liu, X. Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Cancer radiotherapy is often complicated by a spectrum of changes in the neighboring bone from mild osteopenia to osteoradionecrosis. We previously reported that parathyroid hormone (PTH, 1–34), an anabolic agent for osteoporosis, reversed bone structural deterioration caused by multiple microcomputed tomography (microCT) scans in adolescent rats. To simulate clinical radiotherapy for cancer patients and to search for remedies, we focally irradiated the tibial metaphyseal region of adult rats with a newly available small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) and treated these rats with intermittent injections of PTH1–34. Using a unique 3D image registration method that we recently developed, we traced the local changes of the same trabecular bone before and after treatments, and observed that, while radiation caused a loss of small trabecular elements leading to significant decreases in bone mass and strength, PTH1–34 preserved all trabecular elements in irradiated bone with remarkable increases in bone mass and strength. Histomorphometry demonstrated that SARRP radiation severely reduced osteoblast number and activity, which were impressively reversed by PTH treatment. In contrast, suppressing bone resorption by alendronate failed to rescue radiation-induced bone loss and to block the rescue effect of PTH1–34. Furthermore, histological analyses revealed that PTH1–34 protected osteoblasts and osteocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis and attenuated radiation-induced bone marrow adiposity. Taken together, our data strongly support a robust radioprotective effect of PTH on trabecular bone integrity through preserving bone formation and shed light on further investigations of an anabolic therapy for radiation-induced bone damage. PMID:24998454

  15. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  16. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVpeak) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Livermean + [2 × Liversd]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n = 19, 59%), 65 years or older (n = 21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n = 27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7–22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64–5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR3.08,95%CI 1.18–8.02,P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19–22.21, P = .029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07–10.48, P = .038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy. PMID

  17. The Effect of Induction Chemotherapy Using Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Fluorouracil on Survival in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryul; Hahn, Seokyung; Shin, Junghoon; Ock, Chan-Young; Kim, Miso; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the survival of patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LA-HNSCC) undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) alone with that of patients undergoing induction chemotherapy (IC) using docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) followed by CRT. Materials and Methods A search of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases was performed in April 2015 and abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings (2008-2014) were reviewed. Summaries of the results were pooled using a fixed-effect model, and the risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane tool. Results A total of six relevant trials comprising 1,280 patients were identified. There was no statistically significant overall survival (OS) advantage for TPF prior to CRT (TPF/CRT) over CRT alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.09; p=0.339). Progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly longer in the TPF/CRT arms (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70 to 0.95; p=0.009). Patients with non-oropharyngeal LA-HNSCC obtained the greatest OS and PFS benefits from TPF (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.99; p=0.043 and HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.94; p=0.022, respectively). The complete response rate was significantly increased (risk ratio [RR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.56; p < 0.001), and the distant metastasis rate tended to decrease (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.04; p=0.071) in the TPF/CRT arms. Conclusion IC with TPF followed by CRT is not superior to CRT alone for OS. However, PFS and the complete response rate were significantly improved in the TPF/CRT arms. TPF/CRT for patients with nonoropharyngeal LA-HNSCC provided clear survival advantages. PMID:26582394

  18. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  19. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  20. Galectin-1 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Local Recurrence and Survival After Definitive Radiation Therapy for Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao; Wang, Chung-Chi; Wang, Chong-Jong; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of galectin-1 in patients with cervical cancer after definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 154 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma. Patients underwent curative-intent radiation therapy. Paraffin-embedded tissues were analyzed using immunohistochemistry staining for galectin-1. The rates of cancer-specific survival (CSS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis were compared among patient tissue samples with no, weak, and strong galectin-1 expression. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazard model with hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively. Results: The areas under the curve for the intracellular expression scores of galectin-1 for both LR and CSS were significantly higher than those for stromal expression. There were no significant differences in the demographic data, such as stage and serum tumor markers, between patients with and without intracellular expression of galectin-1 in cancer tissue samples. Using multivariate analyses, the hazard ratios of LR and CSS were 2.60 (95% CI 1.50-4.52) (P=.001) and 1.94 (95% CI 1.18-3.19) (P=.010), respectively. Conclusion: Galectin-1 is an independent prognostic factor associated with LR and CSS in stage I-II cervical cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. Further studies targeting galectin-1 may improve the local control of cervical cancer.

  1. High RAB25 expression is associated with good clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Gabriel, Marta; Arroyo-Solera, Irene; León, Xavier; Gallardo, Alberto; López, Montserrat; Céspedes, Maria V; Casanova, Isolda; López-Pousa, Antonio; Quer, Miquel; Mangues, Maria A; Barnadas, Agustí; Mangues, Ramón; Pavón, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are no molecular markers able to predict clinical outcome in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In a previous microarray study, RAB25 was identified as a potential prognostic marker. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between RAB25 expression and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced HNSCC treated with standard therapy. In a retrospective immunohistochemical study (n = 97), we observed that RAB25-negative tumors had lower survival (log-rank, P = 0.01) than patients bearing positive tumors. In an independent prospective mRNA study (n = 117), low RAB25 mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis. Using classification and regression tree analysis (CART) we established two groups of patients according to their RAB25 mRNA level and their risk of death. Low mRNA level was associated with poor local recurrence-free (log-rank, P = 0.005), progression-free (log-rank, P = 0.002) and cancer-specific (log-rank, P < 0.001) survival. Multivariate Cox model analysis showed that low expression of RAB25 was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio: 3.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.93–7.62, P < 0.001). Patients whose tumors showed high RAB25 expression had a low probability of death after treatment. We also found lower RAB25 expression in tumors than in normal tissue (Mann–Whitney U, P < 0.001). Moreover, overexpression of RAB25 in the UM-SCC-74B HNSCC cell line increased cisplatin sensitivity, and reduced cell migration and invasion. Our findings support a tumor suppressor role for RAB25 in HNSCC and its potential use to identify locally advanced patients with a high probability of survival after genotoxic treatment. PMID:24403269

  2. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Donna D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer. PMID:26596768

  3. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Donna D; Garcia, Joe G N; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer. PMID:26596768

  4. Comparison of long-term survival and toxicity of simultaneous integrated boost vs conventional fractionation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hengmin; Wei, Yumei; Huang, Wei; Gai, Xiujuan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim In recent years, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy with conventional fractionation (IMRT-CF) have been involved in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the potential clinical effects and toxicities are still controversial. Methods Here, 107 patients with biopsy-proven locally advanced NPC between March 2004 and January 2011 were enrolled in the retrospective study. Among them, 54 patients received IMRT-SIB, and 53 patients received IMRT-CF. Subsequently, overall survival (OS), 5-year progression-free survival (PFS), 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and relevant toxicities were analyzed. Results In the present study, all patients completed the treatment, and the overall median follow-up time was 80 months (range: 8–126 months). The 5-year OS analysis revealed no significant difference between the IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF groups (80.9% vs 80.5%, P=0.568). In addition, there were also no significant between-group differences in 5-year PFS (73.3% vs 74.4%, P=0.773) and 5-year LRFS (88.1% vs 90.8%, P=0.903). Notably, the dose to critical organs (spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland) in patients treated by IMRT-CF was significantly lower than that in patients treated by IMRT-SIB (all P<0.05). Conclusion Both IMRT-SIB and IMRT-CF techniques are effective in treating locally advanced NPC, with similar OS, PFS, and LRFS. However, IMRT-CF has more advantages than IMRT-SIB in protecting spinal cord, brainstem, and parotid gland from acute and late toxicities, such as xerostomia. Further prospective study is warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27099518

  5. Relationship Between Radiation Treatment Time and Overall Survival After Induction Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Carcinoma: A Subset Analysis of TAX 324

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Posner, Marshall R.; Sarlis, Nicholas J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Holupka, Edward J.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between overall survival (OS) and radiation treatment time (RTT) and overall treatment time (OTT) in a well-described sequential therapy paradigm for locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma (LAHNC). Methods and Materials: TAX 324 is a Phase III study comparing TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil) with PF (cisplatin and fluorouracil) induction chemotherapy (IC) in LAHNC patients; both arms were followed by carboplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Prospective radiotherapy quality assurance was performed. This analysis includes all patients who received three cycles of IC and a radiation dose of {>=} 70 Gy. Radiotherapy treatment time was analyzed as binary ({<=} 8 weeks vs. longer) and continuous (number of days beyond 8 weeks) functions. The primary analysis assessed the relationship between RTT, OTT, and OS, and the secondary analysis explored the association between treatment times and locoregional recurrence (LRR). Results: A total of 333 (of 501) TAX 324 patients met the criteria for inclusion in this analysis. There were no significant differences between the treatment arms in baseline or treatment characteristics. On multivariable analysis, PF IC, World Health Organization performance status of 1, non-oropharynx site, T3/4 stage, N3 status, and prolonged RTT (hazard ratio 1.63, p = 0.006) were associated with significantly inferior survival. Performance status, T3/4 disease, and prolonged RTT (odds ratio 1.68, p = 0.047) were independently and negatively related to LRR on multivariable analysis, whereas PF was not. Overall treatment time was not independently associated with either OS or LRR. Conclusions: In this secondary analysis of the TAX 324 trial, TPF IC remains superior to PF IC after controlling for radiotherapy delivery time. Even with optimal IC and concurrent chemotherapy, a non-prolonged RTT is a crucial determinant of treatment success. Appropriate delivery of radiotherapy after IC remains essential

  6. Graft-infiltrating cells expressing a CD200 transgene prolong allogeneic skin graft survival in association with local increases in Foxp3(+)Treg and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Yu, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Expression of the molecule CD200 has been reported to increase allograft survival by suppression of inflammation and acquired immunity. In previous studies we have shown that increased skin and cardiac allograft survival in transgenic mice over-expressing CD200 (CD200(tg)) occurs in association with increased intra-graft expression of mRNAs for genes associated with altered T cell subset differentiation. We investigated changes in graft-infiltrating cells, Treg and mast cells in skin grafts post transplantation into control or CD200(tg) mice, using focused gene array and real-time PCR to assess altered gene expression, and FACS, immunohistology and MLC to determine numbers/function of those cells. Graft-infiltrating cells isolated from CD200(tg) recipients suppressed induction of CTL from control lymph node cells in vitro, and contained increased numbers of infiltrating, non-degranulating, mast cells and Foxp3(+)Treg. Mast cells were also evident in graft tissue of control animals, but there these cells showed evidence for degranulation, and fewer Foxp3(+)Treg were present than was the case of CD200(tg) mice. The infusion of a competitive inhibitor of CD200:CD200R interactions, CD200(tr), at high concentrations (50μg/mouse iv) caused rapid rejection of grafts in CD200(tg) mice, mast cell degranulation within graft tissue, and a decrease in Treg infiltrates. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous infusion of the mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate. We conclude that CD200 expression contributes to graft prolongation through local suppression of mast cell degranulation, attraction/expansion of Treg, and attenuation of T cell effector activation. PMID:21801836

  7. Does Response to Induction Chemotherapy Predict Survival for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Secondary Analysis of RTOG 8804/8808

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Moughan, Jennifer M.S.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Cox, James D.; Sause, William T.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) improves survival compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC) patients with good prognostic factors. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to ICT followed by RT. The question arises whether ICT response predicts the outcome of patients subsequently treated with CCRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1992, 194 LANSCLC patients were treated prospectively with ICT (two cycles of vinblastine and cisplatin) and then CCRT (cisplatin plus 63 Gy for 7 weeks) in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8804 trial (n = 30) or ICT and then RT (60 Gy/6 wk) on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8808 trial (n = 164). Of the 194 patients, 183 were evaluable and 141 had undergone a postinduction assessment. The overall survival (OS) of those with complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR) was compared with that of patients with stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD) after ICT. Results: Of the 141 patients, 6, 30, 99, and 6 had CR, PR, SD, and PD, respectively. The log-rank test showed a significant difference (p <0.0001) in OS when the response groups were compared (CR/PR vs. SD/PD). On univariate and multivariate analyses, a trend was seen toward a response to ICT with OS (p = 0.097 and p = 0.06, respectively). A squamous histologic type was associated with worse OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.031 and p = 0.018, respectively). SD/PD plus a squamous histologic type had a hazard ratio of 2.25 vs. CR/PR plus a nonsquamous histologic type (p = 0.007) on covariate analysis. Conclusion: The response to ICT was associated with a significant survival difference when the response groups were compared. A response to ICT showed a trend toward, but was not predictive of, improved OS in LANSCLC patients. Patients with SD/PD after ICT and a squamous histologic type had the poorest OS. These data suggest that patients with squamous LANSCLC might benefit

  8. Prevalence and associated survival of high-risk HPV-related adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Chen, Chao; Tzamalis, Georgios; Hofmann, Veit M; Keilholz, Ulrich; Hummel, Michael; Albers, Andreas E

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is a rare malignancy, but a frequent subtype in minor and major salivary glands. The molecular alterations or biomarkers that underlie its development and progression as well as therapy outcomes are poorly characterized. The main study goal was to investigate reliable biomarkers and patient-related factors that may have impact on recurrence and long-term survival of SACC. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in SACC was determined by HPV-DNA genotyping and p16 immunostaining. Epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53 and Ki-67 expression were also evaluated. Twenty-eight (42%) of 67 patients were HPV-DNA positive. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that SACC patients with metastases (P=0.03) had a poor overall survival (OS) and a shorter recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Positive resection margins significantly predicted shorter recurrence-free survival (P=0.01). In the multivariate analysis, non-metastatic disease (P=0.033) and p16 positivity (P=0.005) have shown their prediction value for OS while non-metastatic disease (P=0.002), HPV positivity (P=0.041) and negative resection margin predicted a better recurrence-free survival. The present study documents for the first time the positivity for HPV infection and overexpression of certain markers (p16, Ki-67, EGFR and p53) used in diagnostics in SACC as well as characterizes clinical entities. These factors might be exploited in the future as biomarkers for its prognostic value. Using the clinical and pathological basis for predicting different outcomes could significantly facilitate SACC stratification and potentially directing treatment. PMID:27279281

  9. Local Tumor Control, Visual Acuity, and Survival After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman; Dieckmann, Karin; Gleiss, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael; Georg, Dietmar; Zehetmayer, Martin; Poetter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term local tumor control, visual acuity, and survival after hypofractionated linear accelerator-based stereotactic photon radiotherapy in patients with choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2007, 212 patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at a linear accelerator with 6-MV photon beams at the Medical University of Vienna in five fractions over 7 days. Twenty-four patients received a total dose of 70 Gy (five fractions of 14 Gy), 158 a total dose of 60 Gy (five fractions of 12 Gy) and 30 patients a total dose of 50 Gy (five fractions of 10 Gy) applied on the 80% isodose. Ophthalmologic examinations were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, every 6 months until 5 years, and once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Assessment of visual acuity, routine ophthalmologic examinations, and measurement of tumor base dimension and height using standardized A-scan and B-scan echography were done at each visit. Funduscopy and fluorescein angiography were done when necessary to document tumor response. Results: Median tumor height and volume decreased from 4.8 mm and 270.7 mm{sup 3} at baseline to 2.6 mm and 86.6 mm{sup 3} at the last individual follow-up, respectively (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Median visual acuity decreased from 0.55 at baseline to hand motion at the last individual follow-up (p < 0.001). Local tumor control was 95.9% after 5 years and 92.6% after 10 years. Thirty-two patients developed metastatic disease, and 22 of these patients died during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy with 70 to 50 Gy delivered in five fractions in 7 days is sufficient to achieve excellent local tumor control in patients with malignant melanoma of the choroid. Disease outcome and vision are comparable to those achieved with proton beam radiotherapy. Decreasing the

  10. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. PMID:26270488

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in AREG and EREG are prognostic biomarkers in locally advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients after surgery with curative intent

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Takeru; Stintzing, Sebastian; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Azuma, Mizutomo; Ning, Yan; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Volz, Nico B.; Sunakawa, Yu; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Barzi, Afsaneh; El Khoueiry, Anthony B; Shah, Manish A; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Objective Amphiregulin (AREG) and epiregulin (EREG) are important ligands to the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) which is involved in the regulation of progression and stemness in gastric cancer (GC). This study investigated whether frequent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of AREG and EREG are associated with recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (GC). Methods SNPs with a minor allele frequency of ≥10% were analyzed using direct DNA sequencing in two independent study populations. Results The minor allele of AREG rs1615111 was associated with a significant higher 3-year recurrence rate and lower 3-year survival rate (HR= 2.21 and 2.35 respectively) when compared to patients homozygous for the dominant allele G. The value for overall survival could be validated with a HR of 2.54 (P= 0.018) in an independent cohort. Patients homozygous for the minor allele A of EREG rs12641042 had a significant higher 3-year survival rate than patients having allele C (HR 0.48; P=0.034), but significance was lost in multivariable analysis (P=0.066). Value of rs12641042 could not be validated (P=0.98). Exploratory multivariable subgroup analysis revealed the strongest prognostic value for rs1615111 in tumors with a diffuse histology (Pfor interaction = 0.004). Conclusions AREG rs1615111, located in the AREG genomic region is able to significantly define different prognostic cohorts in locally advanced GC. This value is most evident in GC patients with diffuse histology which might be relevant as none of the trials testing EGFR-inhibitors has been enriched for diffuse histology or a molecularly defined population. PMID:25203737

  12. Phase III Randomized Trial of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With N2 or N3 Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Agulnik, Mark B.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E.; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. Conclusion IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:25049329

  13. Scedosporium apiospermum and S. prolificans mixed disseminated infection in a lung transplant recipient: An unusual case of long-term survival with combined systemic and local antifungal therapy in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Balandin, Bárbara; Aguilar, Miriam; Sánchez, Isabel; Monzón, Araceli; Rivera, Isabel; Salas, Clara; Valdivia, Miguel; Alcántara, Sara; Pérez, Aris; Ussetti, Piedad

    2016-01-01

    Infections due Scedosporium spp. in lung transplant recipients are associated with disseminated disease with high mortality rates. The adjunctive local antifungal therapy may be a useful option when systemic treatment is insufficient and/or surgery is not feasible. We present a case of mixed disseminated infection due Scedosporium apiospermum and S. prolificans in a lung transplant recipient. Combined local and systemic antifungal therapy provided an unusual long-term survival in the intensive care unit. PMID:27222774

  14. Scedosporium apiospermum and S. prolificans mixed disseminated infection in a lung transplant recipient: An unusual case of long-term survival with combined systemic and local antifungal therapy in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Balandin, Bárbara; Aguilar, Miriam; Sánchez, Isabel; Monzón, Araceli; Rivera, Isabel; Salas, Clara; Valdivia, Miguel; Alcántara, Sara; Pérez, Aris; Ussetti, Piedad

    2016-03-01

    Infections due Scedosporium spp. in lung transplant recipients are associated with disseminated disease with high mortality rates. The adjunctive local antifungal therapy may be a useful option when systemic treatment is insufficient and/or surgery is not feasible. We present a case of mixed disseminated infection due Scedosporium apiospermum and S. prolificans in a lung transplant recipient. Combined local and systemic antifungal therapy provided an unusual long-term survival in the intensive care unit. PMID:27222774

  15. Curative-Intent Aggressive Treatment Improves Survival in Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma and High Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), therapeutic decisions depend on comorbidity or age. We estimated the treatment outcomes of patients with different Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and ages to determine whether aggressive treatment improves survival. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases were analyzed, and we included >20-year-old patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III or IV HNSCC (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9) undergoing surgery, chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), sequential CT and RT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. The exclusion criteria were a past cancer history, distant metastasis, AJCC stage I or II, missing sex data, an age < 20 years, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and HNSCC recurrence. The index date was the date of first HNSCC diagnosis, and comorbidities were scored using the CCI. The enrolled patients were categorized into Group 1 (curative-intent aggressive treatments) and Group 2 (best supportive care or palliative treatments). We enrolled 21,174 stage III or IV HNSCC patients without distant metastasis (median follow-up, 3.25 years). Groups 1 and 2 comprised 18,584 and 2232 patients, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and clinical stage, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of overall death in Group 1 were 0.33 (0.31–0.35), 0.34 (0.31–0.36), and 0.37 (0.28–0.49), and those of all-cause death among patients undergoing curative surgical aggressive treatments were 1.13 (0.82–1.55), 0.67 (0.62–0.73), and 0.49 (0.46–0.53) for CCI scores of ≥10, 5 to 9, and <5, respectively. Aggressive treatments improve survival in elderly (≥65 years) and critically ill HNSCC patients. Curative nonsurgical aggressive treatments including definitive RT or CCRT might be suitable for

  16. Pretreatment platelet count as a predictor for survival and distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YU-PEI; CHEN, CHEN; MAI, ZHUO-YAO; GAO, JIN; SHEN, LU-JUN; ZHAO, BING-CHENG; CHEN, MENG-KUN; CHEN, GANG; YAN, FANG; HUANG, TONG-YI; XIA, YUN-FEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of different pretreatment platelet (PLT) counts on the treatment outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone. A total of 1,501 NPC patients, including 412 receiving CCRT and 1,089 receiving RT, were enrolled in the present study. The PLT count cut-off points for the CCRT and RT groups were 150 and 300×109/l, respectively, and the PLT counts were categorized it into three groups: Low (PLT≤150×109/l), moderate (150×109/l300×109/l). To identify independent predictors of overall survival (OS), the Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine local-regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates in the CCRT and RT patients. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that compared with a moderate PLT count, a low PLT count was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for OS rate in CCRT patients [hazard ratio (HR), 2.024; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.165–3.516], and a high PLT count was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for OS and DMFS rates in CCRT (OS: HR, 1.742; 95% CI, 1.090–2.786; DFMS: HR, 2.110; 95%CI, 1.084–4.108) and RT (OS: HR, 1.740; 95%CI, 1.283–2.362; DMFS: HR, 2.819; 95% CI, 1.766–4.497) patients. Compared with a low PLT count, a high PLT count was significantly and independently associated with a poor DMFS rate in the RT patients (P=0.025; HR, 2.454; 95% CI, 1.121–5.372). Therefore, the present study indicates that low and high PLT counts may be useful indicators of survival and distant metastasis in NPC patients who have undergone radiation treatment. PMID:25663931

  17. CD44 variant 9 is a potential biomarker of tumor initiating cells predicting survival outcome in hepatitis C virus-positive patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Ishii, Naomi; Sugihara, Eiji; Gi, Min; Saya, Hideyuki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether the expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) might be a functional marker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) patients and provide an indicator of patient survival, as well as associated mechanisms. A total of 90 HCV(+) HCC patients who underwent surgery from 2006 to 2011 were enrolled and monitored for 2-8 years. Expression of CD44v9 was validated immunohistochemically in all HCCs, followed by comparative proteome, survival, and clinicopathological analyses. CD44 variant 8--10 was further evaluated in diethylnitrosamine-induced HCCs of C57Bl/6J mice. Focally localized CD44v(+) cells with a membranous staining pattern were detected in human HCV(+) and mouse HCCs. CD44v9(+) cells of HCCs were predominantly negative for Ki67 and P-p38, indicating decrease of cell proliferation in the CD44v9(+) tumor cell population, likely to be related to suppression of intracellular oxidative stress due to activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling, DNA repair, and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolism. CD44v9 IHC evaluation in 90 HCV(+) HCC cases revealed that positive expression was significantly associated with poor overall and recurrence-free survival, a younger age, poor histological differentiation of HCCs, and high alkaline phosphatase levels compared with patients with negative expression. CD44v9 is concluded to be a potential biomarker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells and a prognostic marker in HCV(+) HCC patients associated with Nrf2-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26882440

  18. Retrospective Analysis of Local Control and Cosmetic Outcome of 147 Periorificial Carcinomas of the Face Treated With Low-Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ducassou, Anne; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Rives, Michel; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in white populations. We evaluated the local cure rate and cosmetic outcome of patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the face treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between February 1990 and May 2000, 147 facial carcinomas in 132 patients were treated by {sup 192}Ir wire implantation. Side effects of brachytherapy were noted. Follow-up was 2 years or more. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival were recorded. Group A included patients treated by primary brachytherapy, and Group B included those treated after recurrence. Results: A total of 121 carcinomas were BCCs (82.3%) and 26 were SCCs (17.7%); the median tumor size was 10 mm. Of the tumors, 86 (58.5%) were in men and 61 (41.5%) were in women; the median age was 71 years. Group A comprised 116 lesions (78.9%), and Group B, 31 (21.1%). There were 17 relapses (11.6%) after a median follow-up of 72 months: 12 local, 4 nodal, and 1 local and nodal. Locoregional-free survival was 96.6% at 2 years and 87.3% at 5 years. Five-year LRFS was 82.6% in men and 93.3% in women (p = 0.027). After adjustment for gender, LRFS was better after primary treatment than after recurrence (hasard ratio HR, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.03; p = 0.039). Five-year LRFS was 90.4% for BCC and 70.8% for SCC (p = 0.03). There were no Grade 3 complications. Conclusions: Low-dose rate brachytherapy offers good local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with periorificial skin carcinomas, with no Grade 3 complications. Brchytherapy is more efficient when used as primary treatment.

  19. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-01

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate® (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate® 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate® 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate® 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate® 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of ⩽7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  20. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate registered (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate registered 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate registered 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate registered 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate registered 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of <=7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  1. Is It Possible to Shorten the Duration of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    You, Kai-Yun; Huang, Rong; Yu, Xin; Liu, Yi-Min; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The long duration of 4 months of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is currently recommended for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery. Whether a short duration could be applied in these patients is unknown. So, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects on prognosis based on different durations of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer. We performed a retrospective study of 200 rectal cancer patients who were treated with preoperative chemoradiation and were pathologically graded as ypII and ypIII stages between March 2003 and May 2012. All patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median duration of adjuvant chemotherapy of 2 months. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between patients with duration shorter and longer than 2 months in the whole group and subgroups of ypII and ypIII. Recurrence patterns were also analyzed in all subgroups. Multivariate analysis was performed to explore clinical factors that were significantly associated with DFS, local recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival. In subgroup of ypII stage, the 5-year OS and DFS were similar between patients in long and short durations of adjuvant chemotherapy. For patients of ypIII stage, although no significant difference was found in OS between patients in short and long durations, DFS was showed to be higher in the group of long duration. Further analysis showed that longer duration of adjuvant chemotherapy could lead to improved control of distant metastasis and no impact on local control. Multivariable analysis indicated that long duration of adjuvant chemotherapy is significantly associated with longer distant metastasis-free survival in patients with ypIII stage, but not in those with ypII stage. A long duration of at least 2 months of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for patients with ypIII stage, whereas it may not be absolutely appropriate for those

  2. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. Sadetsky, Natalia; Chen, M.-H.; Carroll, Peter R.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  3. Effects of local biotic neighbors and habitat heterogeneity on tree and shrub seedling survival in an old-growth temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuejiao; Queenborough, Simon A; Wang, Xugao; Zhang, Jian; Li, Buhang; Yuan, Zuoqiang; Xing, Dingliang; Lin, Fei; Ye, Ji; Hao, Zhanqing

    2012-11-01

    Seedling dynamics play a crucial role in determining species distributions and coexistence. Exploring causes of variation in seedling dynamics can therefore provide key insights into the factors affecting these phenomena. We examined the relative importance of biotic neighborhood processes and habitat heterogeneity using survival data for 5,827 seedlings in 39 tree and shrub species over 2 years from an old-growth temperate forest in northeastern China. We found significant negative density-dependence effects on survival of tree seedlings, and limited effects of habitat heterogeneity (edaphic and topographic variables) on survival of shrub seedlings. The importance of negative density dependence on young tree seedling survival was replaced by habitat in tree seedlings ≥ 4 years old. As expected, negative density dependence was more apparent in gravity-dispersed species compared to wind-dispersed and animal-dispersed species. Moreover, we found that a community compensatory trend existed for trees. Therefore, although negative density dependence was not as pervasive as in other forest communities, it is an important mechanism for the maintenance of community diversity in this temperate forest. We conclude that both negative density dependence and habitat heterogeneity drive seedling survival, but their relative importance varies with seedling age classes and species traits. PMID:22644047

  4. Excellent survival following two courses of COPAD chemotherapy in children and adolescents with resected localized B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of the FAB/LMB 96 international study.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Mary; Cairo, Mitchell S; Weston, Claire; Auperin, Anne; Pinkerton, Ross; Lambilliote, Anne; Sposto, Richard; McCarthy, Keith; Lacombe, Marie-José T; Perkins, Sherrie L; Patte, Catherine

    2008-06-01

    High cure rates are possible in children with localized mature B-cell lymphoma (B NHL) using a variety of chemotherapeutic strategies. To reduce late sequelae, the duration and intensity of chemotherapy has been progressively reduced. The Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (LMB) 89 study reported long-term survival in almost all children with localized resected disease treated with two courses of COPAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone and doxorubicin). This study was designed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach in a larger number of patients in a multinational co-operative study. The patient cohort was part of an international study (French-American-British LMB 96), which included all disease stages and involved three national groups. Patients in this part of the study had resected stage I or completely resected abdominal stage II disease. Following surgery, two courses of COPAD were given, without intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-two children were evaluable. Two of 264 (0.9%) courses were associated with grade IV toxicity (one stomatitis and one infection). With a median follow up of 50.5 months, the 4 year event-free survival is 98.3% and overall survival is 99.2%. Children with resected localized B-NHL can be cured with minimal toxicity following two courses of low intensity treatment without IT chemotherapy. PMID:18371107

  5. Potential of Baseline Computed Tomography to Predict Long-Term Survival of Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Long; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Ke-Neng; Sun, Ying-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of baseline computed tomography (CT) signs and postoperative TN stages on survival of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with preoperative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients (n = 130) with preoperative chemotherapy and radical esophagectomy from January 2006 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Pathological T and N stages were confirmed by surgery. Baseline CT signs of tumor length, tumor thickness, outer membrane features, total number of lymph node (tLN), short diameter of the largest lymph node (SDL), and clinical T and N stages were measured. Eight-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to determine associations between baseline CT signs and survival outcomes. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that tLN number, largest LN short axis diameter, pT, and pN stages all correlated with OS significantly. And the total tLN number, SDL and pN stages significantly correlated with DFS. In Cox analyses, total tLN number (>6) and pN stage were significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.55 [95% CI, 1.13–2.11, P = 0.006] and HR: 1.49 [95% CI, 1.17–1.90, P = 0.001], respectively). Cox regression analysis showed that OS index was predictive of 1- to 3-year survival. Total number of lymph node in baseline CT provides equal efficiency compared to pN stages in the prediction of 8-year long-term survival outcomes for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with preoperative chemotherapy. PMID:27149488

  6. Potential of Baseline Computed Tomography to Predict Long-Term Survival of Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Long; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Ke-Neng; Sun, Ying-Shi

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of baseline computed tomography (CT) signs and postoperative TN stages on survival of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with preoperative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients (n = 130) with preoperative chemotherapy and radical esophagectomy from January 2006 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study retrospectively. Pathological T and N stages were confirmed by surgery. Baseline CT signs of tumor length, tumor thickness, outer membrane features, total number of lymph node (tLN), short diameter of the largest lymph node (SDL), and clinical T and N stages were measured. Eight-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to determine associations between baseline CT signs and survival outcomes. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that tLN number, largest LN short axis diameter, pT, and pN stages all correlated with OS significantly. And the total tLN number, SDL and pN stages significantly correlated with DFS. In Cox analyses, total tLN number (>6) and pN stage were significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.55 [95% CI, 1.13-2.11, P = 0.006] and HR: 1.49 [95% CI, 1.17-1.90, P = 0.001], respectively). Cox regression analysis showed that OS index was predictive of 1- to 3-year survival. Total number of lymph node in baseline CT provides equal efficiency compared to pN stages in the prediction of 8-year long-term survival outcomes for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with preoperative chemotherapy. PMID:27149488

  7. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  8. GRP78 Protein Expression as Prognostic Values in Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy and Laparoscopic Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Yeon; Jung, Ji-Han; Cho, Hyun-Min; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kang-Moon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Jong Hoon; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the relationships between biomarkers related to endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins (glucose-regulated protein of molecular mass 78 [GRP78] and Cripto-1 [teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 protein]), pathologic response, and prognosis in locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and Methods All clinical stage II and III rectal cancer patients received 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks, plus 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m2/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m2/day) bolus on days 1 to 5 and 29 to 33, and surgery was performed at 7 to 10 weeks after completion of all therapies. Expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry and was assessed in 101 patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Results High expression of GRP78 and Cripto-1 proteins was observed in 86 patients (85.1%) and 49 patients (48.5%), respectively. Low expression of GRP78 protein was associated with a significantly high rate of down staging (80.0% vs. 52.3%, respectively; p=0.046) and a significantly low rate of recurrence (0% vs. 33.7%, respectively; p=0.008) compared with high expression of GRP78 protein. Mean recurrence-free survival according to GRP78 expression could not be estimated because the low expression group did not develop recurrence events but showed a significant correlation with time to recurrence, based on the log rank method (p=0.007). GRP78 also showed correlation with overall survival, based on the log rank method (p=0.045). Conclusion GRP78 expression is a predictive and prognostic factor for down staging, recurrence, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin neoadjuvant CRT. PMID:25687871

  9. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  10. Higher FOXP3-TSDR demethylation rates in adjacent normal tissues in patients with colon cancer were associated with worse survival

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The influence of natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) on the patients with colon cancer is unclear. Demethylated status of the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) of the FOXP3 gene was reported to be a potential biomarker for the identification of nTregs. Methods The demethylation rate of the TSDR (TSDR-DMR) was calculated by using methylation-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (MS-qPCR) assay. The expression of TSDR-DMR and FOXP3 mRNA was investigated in various colorectal cancer cell lines. A total of 130 colon carcinoma samples were utilized to study the DMR at tumor sites (DMRT) and adjacent normal tissue (DMRN). The correlations between DMRs and clinicopathological variables of patients with colon cancer were studied. Results The TSDR-DMRs varied dramatically among nTregs (97.920 ± 0.466%) and iTregs (3.917 ± 0.750%). Significantly, DMRT (3.296 ± 0.213%) was higher than DMRN (1.605 ± 0.146%) (n = 130, p = 0.000). Higher DMRN levels were found in female patients (p = 0.001) and those with distant metastases (p = 0.017), and were also associated with worse recurrence-free survival in non-stage IV patients (low vs. high, p = 0.022). However, further Cox multivariate analysis revealed that the FOXP3-TSDR status does not have prognostic value. Conclusion MS-qPCR assays of FOXP3-TSDR can efficiently distinguish nTregs from non-nTregs. Abnormal recruitment of nTregs occurs in the local tumor microenvironment. Infiltration of tissue-resident nTregs may have a negative role in anti-tumor effects in patients with colon cancer; however, this role is limited and complicated. PMID:24938080

  11. Surrogate endpoints for overall survival in chemotherapy and radiotherapy trials in operable and locally advanced lung cancer: a re-analysis of meta-analyses of individual patients' data

    PubMed Central

    Mauguen, Audrey; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Burdett, Sarah; Domerg, Caroline; Fisher, David; Paulus, Rebecca; Mandrekar, Samithra J; Belani, Chandra P; Shepherd, Frances A; Eisen, Tim; Pang, Herbert; Collette, Laurence; Sause, William T; Dahlberg, Suzanne E; Crawford, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Mary; Schild, Steven E; Parmar, Mahesh; Tierney, Jayne F; Pechoux, Cécile Le; Michiels, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The gold standard endpoint in clinical trials of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for lung cancer is overall survival. Although reliable and simple to measure, this endpoint takes years to observe. Surrogate endpoints that would enable earlier assessments of treatment effects would be useful. We assessed the correlations between potential surrogate endpoints and overall survival at individual and trial levels. Methods We analysed individual patients' data from 15 071 patients involved in 60 randomised clinical trials that were assessed in six meta-analyses. Two meta-analyses were of adjuvant chemotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, three were of sequential or concurrent chemotherapy, and one was of modified radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer. We investigated disease-free survival (DFS) or progression-free survival (PFS), defined as the time from randomisation to local or distant relapse or death, and locoregional control, defined as the time to the first local event, as potential surrogate endpoints. At the individual level we calculated the squared correlations between distributions of these three endpoints and overall survival, and at the trial level we calculated the squared correlation between treatment effects for endpoints. Findings In trials of adjuvant chemotherapy, correlations between DFS and overall survival were very good at the individual level (ρ2=0·83, 95% CI 0·83–0·83 in trials without radiotherapy, and 0·87, 0·87–0·87 in trials with radiotherapy) and excellent at trial level (R2=0·92, 95% CI 0·88–0·95 in trials without radiotherapy and 0·99, 0·98–1·00 in trials with radiotherapy). In studies of locally advanced disease, correlations between PFS and overall survival were very good at the individual level (ρ2 range 0·77–0·85, dependent on the regimen being assessed) and trial level (R2 range 0·89–0·97). In studies with data on locoregional control, individual-level correlations were good (

  12. Early initiation of salvage hormone therapy influences survival in patients who failed initial radiation for locally advanced prostate cancer: A secondary analysis of RTOG protocol 86-10

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, William U. . E-mail: wshipley@partners.org; DeSilvio, Michelle; Pilepich, Michael V.; Roach, Mack; Wolkov, Harvey B.; Sause, William T.; Rubin, Philip; Lawton, Colleen A.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: We examined overall and disease-specific survival outcomes both from the time of initial treatment and from the start of salvage hormone therapy (HT), by the extent of disease progression at the time salvage HT was started in patients treated on RTOG Protocol 86-10. Methods and Materials: With a median follow-up of 9.0 years, 247 patients (54%) had received subsequent salvage HT. The overall survival (OVS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were compared by the extent of disease progression at the time salvage HT was started. Results: For those patients with distant metastases (DM) present at the start of salvage HT, the OVS and DSS were significantly reduced when compared with those with DM absent at the time salvage HT was started (OVS at 8 years, 31% vs. 58%; DSS at 8 years, 38% vs. 65%). A statistically significant increase in DSS was observed among the 143 patients with DM absent when patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) less than 20 were compared with those with PSA greater than 20 at the time salvage HT was started. Conclusions: The DSS and the OVS of the relapsed patient are decreased in those with more extensive disease at the time of salvage HT. However, because this protocol could not evaluate the effect of posttreatment PSA velocity on outcomes, which is likely a better predictor of long-term success with salvage HT, these results cannot be taken to demonstrate that early salvage HT in patients with long posttreatment PSA doubling times is necessary for longer survival.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken Yamamoto, Akira Okuma, Tomohisa Hamamoto, Shinichi Takeshita, Toru Sakai, Yukimasa Nishida, Norifumi Matsuoka, Toshiyuki Miki, Yukio

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  14. Surviving Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch the video to learn more about these breast cancer survivors. To enlarge the video, click the brackets in the lower right-hand corner. To reduce the video, press the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Age and Health May Affect Survival A person's age, and more importantly his or ...

  15. Beyond Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffenson, Dave

    1975-01-01

    The author argues that environmentalists need to realize that the present ecological crisis is essentially a value crisis, not merely a fight for survival alone. He envisions a complete value change for the human population and advocates the incorporation of value strategies into all environmental education programs immediately. (MA)

  16. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  17. Growth, survival, longevity, and population size of the Big Mouth Cave salamander (Gyrinophilus palleucus necturoides) from the type locality in Grundy County, Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niemiller, Matthew L.; Glorioso, Brad M.; Fenolio, Dante B.; Reynolds, R. Graham; Taylor, Steven J.; Miller, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Salamander species that live entirely in subterranean habitats have evolved adaptations that allow them to cope with perpetual darkness and limited energy resources. We conducted a 26-month mark–recapture study to better understand the individual growth and demography of a population of the Big Mouth Cave Salamander (Gyrinophilus palleucus necturoides). We employed a growth model to estimate growth rates, age at sexual maturity, and longevity, and an open population model to estimate population size, density, detectability, and survival rates. Furthermore, we examined cover use and evidence of potential predation. Individuals probably reach sexual maturity in 3–5 years and live at least nine years. Survival rates were generally high (>75%) but declined during the study. More than 30% of captured salamanders had regenerating tails or tail damage, which presumably represent predation attempts by conspecifics or crayfishes. Most salamanders (>90%) were found under cover (e.g., rocks, trash, decaying plant material). Based on 11 surveys during the study, population size estimates ranged from 21 to 104 individuals in the ca. 710 m2 study area. Previous surveys indicated that this population experienced a significant decline from the early 1970s through the 1990s, perhaps related to silvicultural and agricultural practices. However, our data suggest that this population has either recovered or stabilized during the past 20 years. Differences in relative abundance between early surveys and our survey could be associated with differences in survey methods or sampling conditions rather than an increase in population size. Regardless, our study demonstrates that this population is larger than previously thought and is in no immediate risk of extirpation, though it does appear to exhibit higher rates of predation than expected for a species believed to be an apex predator of subterranean food webs.

  18. Rituximab plus a CHOP-like regimen, central nervous system prophylaxis, and contralateral testicular irradiation for localized primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lead to prolonged progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Noguchi, Masaaki; Koike, Michiaki; Aritaka, Nanae; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Tsutsui, Miyuki; Hosone, Masaru; Hirano, Takao; Gotoh, Akihiko; Komatsu, Norio

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features, management, and survival of 12 patients (age 51-84 years) with localized primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PTL). All 12 PTL patients underwent orchiectomy. Seven of the 12 patients were treated with strategy A, which consisted of at least six cycles of rituximab (R) plus a CHOP-like regimen, central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis involving intrathecal chemotherapy (IT) and/or high-dose intravenous methotrexate, and contralateral scrotal irradiation (cRT). The other five patients were treated with strategy B, which included three regimens: orchiectomy alone, orchiectomy plus cRT and IT, and orchiectomy plus 3-4 cycles of R-CHOP plus cRT with or without IT. The median follow-up period was 48 months (range 19-123 months). The 4-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate for the seven patients treated with strategy A was 85.7 %, whereas that for the five patients treated with strategy B was 20 %. The patients treated with strategy A exhibited a significantly higher 4-year PFS rate than those treated with strategy B (P = 0.017). These results confirmed that the administration of a sufficient number of cycles of an R-containing chemotherapy regimen plus cRT plus CNS prophylaxis should be considered as a treatment for localized PTL. PMID:25085255

  19. Pretreatment serum lactate dehydrogenase is an independent prognostic factor for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Miao-Fang; Lu, Huai-Wu; Chen, Qing; Lin, Zhong-Qiu; Wang, Li-Juan

    2016-08-01

    For locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC), hypoxia is a characteristic property. This study aimed to investigate whether baseline lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level, which is a marker of hypoxia, had clinical value in determining neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) response and prognosis for LACC patients. The study cohort included 418 patients with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the prognostic value of baseline LDH levels. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of complete response after NACT. Backward stepwise selection with the Akaike information criterion was used to identify factors that could be entered into the multivariate regression model. Compared with patients with LDH levels <252.0 μ/L, patients with LDH levels ≥252.0 μ/L were more likely to have an elevated level of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, lymphatic vascular space involvement, lymph node metastasis, and positive parametrium and achieved lower complete remission rates. Baseline LDH levels ≥252.0 μ/L was an independent prognosticator for recurrence-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.22-5.69; P < 0.0001) and cancer-specific survival (adjusted HR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.89-5.01; P < 0.0001). The predictive value of baseline LDH value remained significant in the subgroup analysis. LDH level ≥252.0 μ/L was identified as an independent predictor of complete remission after NACT (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.29; 95% CI, 0.15-0.58; P < 0.0001). Baseline LDH ≥252.0 μ/L is an independent prognostic predictor for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for LACC. It helps distinguish patients with different prognosis and select patients who are more likely to benefit from NACT. PMID:27350066

  20. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients.

  1. Lymphovascular space invasion and lack of downstaging after neoadjuvant chemotherapy are strong predictors of adverse outcome in young women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Shariq S; Ivanovich, Jennifer; DeWees, Todd A; Ochoa, Laura; Mullen, Daniel F; Thomas, Maria; Margenthaler, Julie A; Cyr, Amy; Naughton, Michael; Sanati, Souzan; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca L; Zoberi, Jacqueline E; Zoberi, Imran

    2016-02-01

    Younger age diagnosis of breast cancer is a predictor of adverse outcome. Here, we evaluate prognostic factors in young women with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). We present a retrospective review of 104 patients younger than 40 years with LABC treated with surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy from 2003 to 2014. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors important for overall survival (OS), local/regional recurrence (LRR), distant metastasis (DM), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were evaluated. Mean age at diagnosis was 34 years (23-39 years) with a median follow-up of 47 months (8-138 months). Breast-conserving surgery was performed in 27%. Axillary lymph node dissection was performed in 85%. Sixty percent of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 19% achieving pathologic complete response (pCR), and 61% downstaged. Lymph node positivity was present in 91% and lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in 35%. Thirty-two percent of patients had triple negative tumors (TN, ER-/PR-/HER2 nonamplified). Four-year OS and RFS was 84% and 71%, respectively. Factors associated with worse OS on multivariate analysis include TN status, LVSI, and number of positive lymph nodes. LVSI was also associated with DM and LRR, as well as worse RFS. Downstaging was associated with improved 4 year RFS in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (74% vs. 38%, P = 0.002). With high risks of recurrence and inferior OS compared to older women, breast cancer in young women can be difficult to treat. Among additional factors, presence of LVSI and lack of downstaging portends a particularly worse prognosis. PMID:26687192

  2. Prognostic Value of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Localized and Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guoxiong; Gu, Liangyou; Chen, Luyao; Liu, Kan; Gao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective and Background Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays an essential role in cancer development and progression. The inflammation marker neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is correlated with prognosis across a wide variety of tumor types, but its prognostic value in prostate cancer (PCa) remains controversial. In the present meta-analysis, the prognostic value of NLR in PCa patients is investigated. Methods We performed a meta-analysis to determine the predictive value of NLR for overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and clinical features in patients with PCa. We systematically searched PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Embase for relevant studies published up to October 2015. Results A total of 9418 patients from 18 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Elevated pretreatment NLR predicted poor OS (HR 1.628, 95% CI 1.410–1.879) and RFS (HR 1.357, 95% CI 1.126–1.636) in all patients with PCa. However, NLR was insignificantly associated with OS in the subgroup of patients with localized PCa (HR 1.439, 95% CI 0.753–2.75). Increased NLR was also significantly correlated with lymph node involvement (OR 1.616, 95% CI 1.167–2.239) but not with pathological stage (OR 0.827, 95% CI 0.637–1.074) or Gleason score (OR 0.761, 95% CI 0.555–1.044). Conclusions The present meta-analysis indicated that NLR could predict the prognosis for patients with locally advanced or castration-resistant PCa. Patients with higher NLR are more likely to have poorer prognosis than those with lower NLR. PMID:27096158

  3. Association of Family History with Cancer Recurrence and Survival Among Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    Context A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. Objective To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective observational study of 1,087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MLH1 and MSH2, in tumor specimens. Main Outcome Measure Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Results Among 1,087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57/195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343/892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared to patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among those with ≥1 affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival (DFS), 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival (OS). This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared to participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1

  4. Simple models based on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and platelets for predicting survival in hepatitis B-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing; Bi, Jian-Bin; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Xu, Xin-Sen; Qu, Kai; Miao, Run-Chen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Several hepatic cirrhosis-derived noninvasive models have been developed to predict the incidence and outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of the two novel established cirrhosis-associated models based on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and platelets in hepatitis B-associated HCC. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 182 HCC patients with positive hepatitis B surface antigen who received radical therapy at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Laboratory data prior to operation were collected to calculate the GGT to platelets ratio (GPR) and the S-index. Predictive factors associated with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using log-rank test and multivariate Cox analysis. Additional analyses were performed after patients were stratified based on cirrhosis status, tumor size, therapy methods, and so forth, to investigate the prognostic significance in different subgroups. Results During a median follow-up time of 45.0 months, a total of 88 (48.4%) patients died and 79 (43.4%) patients recurred. The cut-off points for GPR and S-index in predicting death were determined to be 0.76 and 0.56, respectively. Compared with patients with a lower GPR, those with GPR ≥0.76 had a higher probability of cirrhosis and a larger tumor (both P<0.05). GPR and S-index were both found to be significantly associated with survival by univariate log-rank test. Multivariate analysis identified tumor size ≥5 and high level of GPR, but not high Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage or S-index, as independent factors for predicting poor overall survival and recurrence-free survival. Conclusion The GPR is an effective preoperative predictor for outcomes in hepatitis B-associated HCC. PMID:27110127

  5. A case of long-term survival after multimodal local treatments of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Minomo, Shojiro; Tokoro, Akihiro; Utsumi, Tomoki; Ishihara, Masahiro; Akira, Masanori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer is rare, and it has a short prognosis. We report a 53-year-old man diagnosed with cT4N0M0, stage IIIA squamous cell lung cancer. Ten months after left pneumonectomy (pT4N0M0), an intramedullary spinal cord tumor developed at the axis level. The intramedullary spinal cord tumor was resected, and he was diagnosed with metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Radiotherapies and another tumor resection were conducted, as he had a good performance status and the discrete lesion was associated with the risk of brain stem compression. Multimodal local treatments for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis caused the tumor to shrink, and he lived for 25 months after the spinal metastasis occurred. PMID:27621899

  6. A case of long-term survival after multimodal local treatments of intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Akihiro; Utsumi, Tomoki; Ishihara, Masahiro; Akira, Masanori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer is rare, and it has a short prognosis. We report a 53-year-old man diagnosed with cT4N0M0, stage IIIA squamous cell lung cancer. Ten months after left pneumonectomy (pT4N0M0), an intramedullary spinal cord tumor developed at the axis level. The intramedullary spinal cord tumor was resected, and he was diagnosed with metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Radiotherapies and another tumor resection were conducted, as he had a good performance status and the discrete lesion was associated with the risk of brain stem compression. Multimodal local treatments for intramedullary spinal cord metastasis caused the tumor to shrink, and he lived for 25 months after the spinal metastasis occurred. PMID:27621899

  7. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations. PMID:26907655

  8. Telomere length variation in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor: potential biomarker for breast cancer local recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Meeker, Alan K.; Makambi, Kepher H.; Kosti, Ourania; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.S.; Sidawy, Mary K.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Zheng, Yun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    A better understanding of the risk of local recurrence (LR) will facilitate therapeutic decision making in the management of early breast cancers. In the present study, we investigated whether telomere length in the normal breast epithelial cells surrounding the tumor is predictive of breast cancer LR; 152 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center were included in this nested case–control study. Cases (patients had LR) and controls (patients had no LR) were matched on year of surgery, age at diagnosis and type of surgery. Telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to determine the telomere length using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded breast tissues. Small telomere length variation (TLV), defined as the coefficient variation of telomere lengths among examined cells, in normal epithelial cells adjacent to the tumor was significantly associated with a 5-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.2–22.2) increased risk of breast cancer LR. When the subjects were categorized into quartiles, a significant inverse dose–response relationship was observed with lowest versus highest quartile odds ratio of 15.3 (Ptrend = 0.012). Patients who had large TLV had significantly better 10 year recurrence free survival rate compared with patients who had small TLV (80 versus 33%). The present study revealed that TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor is a strong predictor of breast cancer LR. If confirmed by future studies, TLV in normal epithelial cells adjacent to tumor has the potential to become a promising biomarker for predicting breast cancer LR after breast conserving surgery. PMID:22072619

  9. Downstaging of TURBT-Based Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer by Radical Cystectomy Predicts Better Survival

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, P. R.; Ploeg, M.; Aben, K. K. H.; Weijerman, P. C.; Karthaus, H. F. M.; van Berkel, J. Th. H.; Viddeleer, A. C.; Geboers, A.; van Boven, E.; Witjes, J. A.; Kiemeney, L. A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Differences between clinical (cT) and pathological tumor (pT) stage occur often after radical cystectomy (RC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In order to evaluate the impact of downstaging on recurrence and survival, we selected patients from a large, contemporary, population-based series of 1,409 patients with MIBC. We included all patients who underwent RC (N=643) and excluded patients who received (neo)adjuvant therapy, those with known metastasis at time of diagnosis, and those with nonurothelial cell tumors. Disease outcomes were defined as recurrence-free survival (RFS) and relative survival (RS), as a good approximation of bladder cancer-specific survival. After applying the exclusion criteria, 375 patients were eligible for analysis. Tumor downstaging was found to be common after RC; in 99 patients (26.4%), tumor downstaging to non-muscle-invasive stages at RC occurred. Hydronephrosis at baseline and positive lymph nodes at RC occurred significantly less often in these patients. In 62 patients, no tumor was left in the cystectomy specimen. pT stage was pT1 in 20 patients and pTis in 17 patients. Patients with tumor downstaging have about a 30% higher RFS and RS compared to those without. Consequently, tumor downstaging is a favorable marker for prognosis after RC. PMID:22084800

  10. Nutritional status and feeding-tube placement in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Ettaiche, Marc; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Hebert, Christophe; Falewee, Marie-Noelle; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional status and determine its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program without prophylactic feeding-tube placement. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngolaryngectomy, treated by docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF)-ICT for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Patients' nutritional status was closely monitored. Enteral nutrition was used if and when a patient was unable to sustain per-oral nutrition and hydration. The impact of nutritional status on clinical outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age = 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Six (11.3 %) patients had lost more than 10 % of their usual body weight before therapy. Compared with patients' usual weight, the mean maximum patient weight loss during therapeutic management was 8.7 ± 4.5 kg. Enteral nutrition was required in 17 patients (32 %). We found no influence of the tested nutritional status-related factors on response to ICT, toxicity of ICT, overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival, and on post-therapeutic swallowing outcome. Maximum weight loss was significantly associated with a higher risk of enteral tube feeding during therapy (p = 0.03) and of complications (grade ≥3, p = 0.006) during RT. Without prophylactic feeding-tube placement, approximately one-third of the patients required enteral nutrition. There was no significant impact of nutritional status on oncologic or functional outcomes. PMID:26395117

  11. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Interstitial Implants: Risk Factors Associated With Increased Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Oliver J.; Hildebrandt, Guido; Poetter, Richard; Hammer, Josef; Hindemith, Marion; Resch, Alexandra; Spiegl, Kurt; Lotter, Michael; Uter, Wolfgang; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Schrauder, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze patient, disease, and treatment-related factors regarding their impact on local control after interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Between November 2000 and April 2005, 274 patients with early breast cancer were recruited for the German-Austrian APBI Phase II trial ( (ClinicalTrials.gov) identifier: NCT00392184). In all, 64% (175/274) of the patients received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy and 36% (99/274) received high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy each hour. Total treatment time was 3 to 4 days. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 9-110). The actuarial 5-year local recurrence free survival rate (5-year LRFS) was 97.7%. Comparing patients with an age <50 years (49/274) vs. {>=}50 years (225/274), the 5-year LRFS resulted in 92.5% and 98.9% (exact p = 0.030; 99% confidence interval, 0.029-0.032), respectively. Antihormonal treatment (AHT) was not applied in 9% (24/274) of the study population. The 5-year LRFS was 99% and 84.9% (exact p = 0.0087; 99% confidence interval, 0.0079-0.0094) in favor of the patients who received AHT. Lobular histology (45/274) was not associated with worse local control compared with all other histologies (229/274). The 5-year LRFS rates were 97.6% and 97.8%, respectively. Conclusions: Local control at 5 years is excellent and comparable to therapeutic successes reported from corresponding whole-breast irradiation trials. Our data indicate that patients <50 years of age ought to be excluded from APBI protocols, and that patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer should definitely receive adjuvant AHT when interstitial multicatheter APBI is performed. Lobular histology need not be an exclusion criterion for future APBI trials.

  12. Survival gains needed to offset persistent adverse treatment effects in localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    King, M T; Viney, R; Smith, D P; Hossain, I; Street, D; Savage, E; Fowler, S; Berry, M P; Stockler, M; Cozzi, P; Stricker, P; Ward, J; Armstrong, B K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Men diagnosed with localised prostate cancer (LPC) face difficult choices between treatment options that can cause persistent problems with sexual, urinary and bowel function. Controlled trial evidence about the survival benefits of the full range of treatment alternatives is limited, and patients' views on the survival gains that might justify these problems have not been quantified. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was administered in a random subsample (n=357, stratified by treatment) of a population-based sample (n=1381) of men, recurrence-free 3 years after diagnosis of LPC, and 65 age-matched controls (without prostate cancer). Survival gains needed to justify persistent problems were estimated by substituting side effect and survival parameters from the DCE into an equation for compensating variation (adapted from welfare economics). Results: Median (2.5, 97.5 centiles) survival benefits needed to justify severe erectile dysfunction and severe loss of libido were 4.0 (3.4, 4.6) and 5.0 (4.9, 5.2) months. These problems were common, particularly after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT): 40 and 41% overall (n=1381) and 88 and 78% in the ADT group (n=33). Urinary leakage (most prevalent after radical prostatectomy (n=839, mild 41%, severe 18%)) needed 4.2 (4.1, 4.3) and 27.7 (26.9, 28.5) months survival benefit, respectively. Mild bowel problems (most prevalent (30%) after external beam radiotherapy (n=106)) needed 6.2 (6.1, 6.4) months survival benefit. Conclusion: Emerging evidence about survival benefits can be assessed against these patient-based benchmarks. Considerable variation in trade-offs among individuals underlines the need to inform patients of long-term consequences and incorporate patient preferences into treatment decisions. PMID:22274410

  13. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Powell, Simon N.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Freer, Phoebe; Lawenda, Brian; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival

  14. Development of ProCaRS Clinical Nomograms for Biochemical Failure-free Survival Following Either Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy or Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Andrew; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Souhami, Luis; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although several clinical nomograms predictive of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) for localized prostate cancer exist in the medical literature, making valid comparisons can be challenging due to variable definitions of biochemical failure, the disparate distribution of prognostic factors, and received treatments in patient populations. The aim of this investigation was to develop and validate clinically-based nomograms for 5-year BFFS using the ASTRO II “Phoenix” definition for two patient cohorts receiving low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from a large Canadian multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from the GUROC (Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada) Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification (ProCaRS) database if they received (1) LDR brachytherapy ≥ 144 Gy (n=4208) or (2) EBRT ≥ 70 Gy  (n=822). Multivariable Cox regression analysis for BFFS was performed separately for each cohort and used to generate clinical nomograms predictive of 5-year BFFS. Nomograms were validated using calibration plots of nomogram predicted probability versus observed probability via Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Patients receiving LDR brachytherapy had a mean age of 64 ± 7 years, a mean baseline PSA of 6.3 ± 3.0 ng/mL, 75% had a Gleason 6, and 15% had a Gleason 7, whereas patients receiving EBRT had a mean age of 70 ± 6 years, a mean baseline PSA of 11.6 ± 10.7 ng/mL, 30% had a Gleason 6, 55% had a Gleason 7, and 14% had a Gleason 8-10. Nomograms for 5-year BFFS included age, use and duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), baseline PSA, T stage, and Gleason score for LDR brachytherapy and an ADT (months), baseline PSA, Gleason score, and biological effective dose (Gy) for EBRT. Conclusions: Clinical nomograms examining 5-year BFFS were developed for patients receiving either LDR brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated EBRT and

  15. Improving survival rates in two models of spontaneous postoperative metastasis in mice by combined administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist and a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Ariella; Avraham, Roi; Rosenne, Ella; Benish, Marganit; Zmora, Oded; Shemer, Shaily; Meiboom, Hadas; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2010-03-01

    Clinical practice does not consider perioperative paracrine and neuroendocrine stress responses as risk factors for cancer recurrence, although recent animal studies provided supportive evidence. Suggested mechanisms include the effects of stress-hormones on tumor cells and on host physiology. In this study, in mice undergoing primary tumor excision, we tested the survival-enhancing potential of perioperative blockade of catecholamines and prostaglandins, and studied potential mediating mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were inoculated intrafootpad with syngeneic B16F10.9-melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma, and the paw was amputated when a developing tumor exceeded 100 microl. The clinically used beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, and/or the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor etodolac, were administered once before amputation, and recurrence-free survival was monitored. In different studies, NK cytotoxicity, leukocytes' molecular functional markers, and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by tumor cells were studied in the context of surgery and drug treatments. The findings indicated that the combination of propranolol and etodolac, but neither drug alone, significantly and markedly improved survival rates in both tumor models, and was as effective as established immunostimulatory agents (IL-12 and polyinosinic-polycytiylic acid). Surgery markedly reduced NK cytotoxicity and NK cell expression of Fas ligand and CD11a, reduced all circulating lymphocyte-subtype concentrations, and increased corticosterone levels. Propranolol and etodolac administration counteracted these perturbations. B16 and 3LL secreted vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro, but secretion was not affected by catecholamine agonists, prostaglandins, corticosterone, propranolol, or etodolac. Overall, propranolol and etodolac administration, which could be applied perioperatively in most cancer patients with minimal risk and low cost, has counteracted several immunologic and endocrinologic

  16. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    PubMed Central

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  17. Results of brachytherapy for cancer of the tongue with special emphasis on local prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, J.; Okuyama, T.; Shibuya, H.; Takeda, M.

    1982-05-01

    One hundred and sixty-six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were treated with radiation. Treatment modalities were mainly interstitial implant with or without external beam irradiation, except for early lesions, which were treated with intraoral electron beam therapy. Analysis was made on the local prognosis of the lesion to clarify the indications for interstitial therapy, especially the combined program with external beam therapy, and the time-dose relationship of the brachytherapy. Local recurrence-free rates (two years) were 94% in T1, 77% in T2 and 32% in T3 lesions, respectively. For T1 and surperficial or exophytic T2 lesions, the local recurrence-free rate was excellent with the interstitial therapy alone using either permanent implants of gold grain or radium implants. Therefore, prior external beam therapy seemed to be unnecessary for these lesions. When the treated area was less than 10 cm/sup 2/, subsequent complications were not likely even if the TDF (time-dose factor) value was high. Most of the patients who received combined external beam and interstitial therapy showed infiltrative T2 and a majority of the T3 lesions. In these patients, it was apparent that most of the total dose should be given from the interstitial implant after a small prior dose with external irradiation, because these lesions could not be cured even if the external dose was increased.

  18. Impact of adjuvant treatment modalities on survival outcomes in curatively resected pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benekli, Mustafa; Unal, Olcun Umit; Unek, İlkay Tugba; Tastekin, Didem; Dane, Faysal; Algın, Efnan; Ulger, Sukran; Eren, Tulay; Topcu, Turkan Ozturk; Turkmen, Esma; Babacan, Nalan Akgül; Tufan, Gulnihal; Urakci, Zuhat; Ustaalioglu, Basak Oven; Uysal, Ozlem Sonmez; Ercelep, Ozlem Balvan; Taskoylu, Burcu Yapar; Aksoy, Asude; Canhoroz, Mustafa; Demirci, Umut; Dogan, Erkan; Berk, Veli; Balakan, Ozan; Ekinci, Ahmet Şiyar; Uysal, Mukremin; Petekkaya, İbrahim; Ozturk, Selçuk Cemil; Tonyalı, Önder; Çetin, Bülent; Aldemir, Mehmet Naci; Helvacı, Kaan; Ozdemir, Nuriye; Oztop, İlhan; Coskun, Ugur; Uner, Aytug; Ozet, Ahmet; Buyukberber, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the impact of adjuvant modalities on resected pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma (PAC). Methods A total of 563 patients who were curatively resected for PAC were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Results Of 563 patients, 472 received adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) alone, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) alone, and chemoradiotherapy plus chemotherapy (CRT-CT) were analyzed. Of the 472 patients, 231 were given CRT-CT, 26 were given CRT, and 215 were given CT. The median recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 and 19 months, respectively. When CT and CRT-CT groups were compared, there was no significant difference with respect to both RFS and OS, and also there was no difference in RFS and OS among CRT-CT, CT and CRT groups. To further investigate the impact of radiation on subgroups, patients were stratified according to lymph node status and resection margins. In node-positive patients, both RFS and OS were significantly longer in CRT-CT than CT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between groups when patients with node-negative disease or patients with or without positive surgical margins were considered. Conclusions Addition of radiation to CT has a survival benefit in patients with node-positive disease following pancreatic resection. PMID:26361410

  19. Influence of Interfraction Interval on Local Tumor Control in Patients With Limited-Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav . E-mail: b.jeremic@iaea.org; Milicic, Biljana

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of interfraction interval (IFI) on local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) in patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD SCLC) treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (Acc Hfx RT) and concurrent cisplatin and etoposide (PE). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 patients were treated with either 'early' (Cycle 1) or 'late' (Cycle 4) concurrent Acc Hfx RT/PE. Two daily fractions were nonrandomly given using an IFI of either 4.5-5.0 h ('shorter') (n = 52) or 5.5-6.0 h ('longer') (n = 51). Results: The median LRFS and 5-year LRFS rate for all 103 patients were 52 months and 48%, respectively. Besides gender, Karnofsky performance status, and treatment group, IFI also influenced LRFS, whereas age and weight loss did not. When a multivariate model was used, IFI was marginally insignificant (p = 0.0770) as a predictor of LRFS. In terms of individual treatment groups, IFI was not significant in 'early' Acc Hfx RT/PE but showed a strong trend in a 'late' Acc Hfx RT/PE regimen. Although a shorter IFI led to a higher incidence of high-grade ({>=}3) esophagitis, leukopenia, and infection, a correlation analysis of toxicities with all potential prognostic factors showed that a shorter IFI was not an independent predictor of any acute high-grade toxicity. Conclusion: 'Shorter' IFI had a marginally insignificant influence on LRFS. A strong trend favoring it was observed in patients treated with 'late' concurrent Acc Hfx RT/PE. This may be of interest because it could contribute to further understanding of potential biologic parameters influencing treatment outcome.

  20. Defensive platform size and survivability. [Platform survivability

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H.

    1988-06-01

    This report discusses the survivability of space platforms, concentrating on space based kinetic energy interceptors. It evaluates the efficacy of hardening, maneuver, self-defense, and deception in extending the survivability of platforms of varying sizes to expected threats, concluding that they should be adequate in the near and mid terms.

  1. A Novel and Validated Inflammation-Based Score (IBS) Predicts Survival in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Following Curative Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Peng; Ni, Xiao-Chun; Yi, Yong; Cai, Xiao-Yan; He, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jia-Xing; Lu, Zhu-Feng; Han, Xu; Cao, Ya; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Qiu, Shuang-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we investigated the prognostic accuracy of a cluster of inflammatory scores, including the Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, platelet to lymphocyte ratio, Prognostic Nutritional Index, Prognostic Index, and a novel Inflammation-Based Score (IBS) integrated preoperative and postoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in 2 independent cohorts. Further, we aimed to formulate an effective prognostic nomogram for HCC after hepatectomy. Prognostic value of inflammatory scores and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage were studied in a training cohort of 772 patients with HCC underwent hepatectomy. Independent predictors of survival identified in multivariate analysis were validated in an independent set of 349 patients with an overall similar clinical feature. In both training and validation cohorts, IBS, microscopic vascular invasion, and BCLC stage emerged as independent factors of overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The predictive capacity of the IBS in both OS and RFS appeared superior to that of the other inflammatory scores in terms of C-index. Additionally, the formulated nomogram comprised IBS resulted in more accurate prognostic prediction compared with BCLC stage alone. IBS is a novel and validated prognostic indicator of HCC after curative resection, and a robust HCC nomogram including IBS was developed to predict survival for patients after hepatectomy. PMID:26886627

  2. The Relation between Obesity and Survival after Surgical Resection of Hepatitis C Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Arimoto, Akira; Wakasa, Tomoko; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Osaki, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims. We aimed to investigate the relationship between obesity and survival in hepatitis C virus-(HCV-) related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who underwent curative surgical resection (SR). Methods. A total of 233 patients with HCV-related HCC who underwent curative SR were included. They included 60 patients (25.8%) with a body mass index (BMI) of > 25 kg/m2 (obesity group) and 173 patients with a BMI of < 25 kg/m2 (control group). Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were compared. Results. The median follow-up periods were 3.6 years in the obesity group and 3.1 years in the control group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cumulative OS rates were 98.3%, 81.0%, and 63.9% in the obesity group and 90.0%, 70.5%, and 50.3% in the control group (P = 0.818). The corresponding RFS rates were 70.1%, 27.0%, and 12.0% in the obesity group and 70.1%, 39.0%, and 21.7% in the control group (P = 0.124). There were no significant differences between the obesity group and the control group in terms of blood loss during surgery (P = 0.899) and surgery-related serious adverse events (P = 0.813). Conclusions. Obesity itself did not affect survival in patients with HCV-related HCC after curative SR. PMID:23710167

  3. Recurrence and survival following resection of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of the lung--The Lung Cancer Study Group experience.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, F L; Piantadosi, S

    1989-01-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) of the lung is a controversial form of adenocarcinoma with varying presentations. The 1977 to 1988 Lung Study Group experience with this tumor was reviewed to more precisely define the incidence of recurrence and survival of surgically resected and staged patients, to determine the incidence of BAC in the adenocarcinoma population, and to evaluate the impact of age, sex, smoking, and chronic lung-disease history on the incidence of BAC. Of 1635 patients reviewed, 235 patients had pure BAC. It was found that resectable BAC presents at an earlier disease stage than does adenocarcinoma; BAC occurs more frequently in older patients and in those without smoking history or chronic lung disease than adenocarcinoma; BAC patients have less weight loss, brain recurrences, and recurrences without second primaries than adenocarcinoma; survival and recurrence-free survival are better for BAC than for non-BAC adenocarcinoma and large-cell carcinoma; early BAC survival is better than squamous-cell survival but after 2 years is equivalent; T1-N0 BAC patients have recurrence and survival rates similar to squamous-cell survival rates and better than non-BAC adeno survival rates; T1-N1/T2-N0 and Stage 2 and 3 BAC recurs more frequently than either squamous-cell or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; stage 2 and 3 BAC has a higher mortality rate than does squamous-cell carcinoma or non-BAC adenocarcinoma; BAC is a favorable prognostic factor when adjusted for extent of disease and age; and BAC's better prognosis is a result of presenting at an earlier stage of disease and because it appears to be less aggressive than other adenocarcinomas even after adjustment for extent of disease and other known prognostic factors. It is concluded that early diagnosis and resection are particularly important for patients with BAC. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Figs. 7A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:2543339

  4. Improved Survival Endpoints With Adjuvant Radiation Treatment in Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Vance, Sean; Suri, Jaipreet S.; Mahan, Meredith; Munkarah, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the impact of adjuvant radiation treatment (RT) on recurrence-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with high-risk 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I-II endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We identified 382 patients with high-risk EC who underwent hysterectomy. RFS, DSS, and OS were calculated from the date of hysterectomy by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression modeling was used to explore the risks associated with various factors on survival endpoints. Results: The median follow-up time for the study cohort was 5.4 years. The median age was 71 years. All patients underwent hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy, 93% had peritoneal cytology, and 85% underwent lymphadenectomy. Patients with endometrioid histology constituted 72% of the study cohort, serous in 16%, clear cell in 7%, and mixed histology in 4%. Twenty-three percent of patients had stage II disease. Adjuvant management included RT alone in 220 patients (57%), chemotherapy alone in 25 patients (7%), and chemoradiation therapy in 27 patients (7%); 110 patients (29%) were treated with close surveillance. The 5-year RFS, DSS, and OS were 76%, 88%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was a significant predictor of RFS (P<.001) DSS (P<.001), and OS (P=.017). Lymphovascular space involvement was a significant predictor of RFS and DSS (P<.001). High tumor grade was a significant predictor for RFS (P=.038) and DSS (P=.025). Involvement of the lower uterine segment was also a predictor of RFS (P=.049). Age at diagnosis and lymphovascular space involvement were significant predictors of OS: P<.001 and P=.002, respectively. Conclusion: In the treatment of patients with high-risk features, our study suggests that adjuvant RT significantly improves recurrence-free, disease-specific, and overall survival in patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma

  5. Variants on the promoter region of PTEN affect breast cancer progression and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The PTEN gene, a regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt oncogenic pathway, is mutated in various cancers and its expression has been associated with tumor progression in a dose-dependent fashion. We investigated the effect of germline variation in the promoter region of the PTEN gene on clinical characteristics and survival in breast cancer. Methods We screened the promoter region of the PTEN gene for germline variation in 330 familial breast cancer cases and further determined the genotypes of three detected PTEN promoter polymorphisms -903GA, -975GC, and -1026CA in a total of 2,412 breast cancer patients to evaluate the effects of the variants on tumor characteristics and disease outcome. We compared the gene expression profiles in breast cancers of 10 variant carriers and 10 matched non-carriers and performed further survival analyses based on the differentially expressed genes. Results All three promoter variants associated with worse prognosis. The Cox's regression hazard ratio for 10-year breast cancer specific survival in multivariate analysis was 2.01 (95% CI 1.17 to 3.46) P = 0.0119, and for 5-year breast cancer death or distant metastasis free survival 1.79 (95% CI 1.03 to 3.11) P = 0.0381 for the variant carriers, indicating PTEN promoter variants as an independent prognostic factor. The breast tumors from the promoter variant carriers exhibited a similar gene expression signature of 160 differentially expressed genes compared to matched non-carrier tumors. The signature further stratified patients into two groups with different recurrence free survival in independent breast cancer gene expression data sets. Conclusions Inherited variation in the PTEN promoter region affects the tumor progression and gene expression profile in breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to establish PTEN promoter variants as clinical markers for prognosis in breast cancer. PMID:22171747

  6. Leukocyte Complexity Predicts Breast Cancer Survival and Functionally Regulates Response to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    DeNardo, David G.; Brennan, Donal J.; Rexhepaj, Elton; Ruffell, Brian; Shiao, Stephen L.; Madden, Stephen F.; Gallagher, William M.; Wadhwani, Nikhil; Keil, Scott D.; Junaid, Sharfaa A.; Rugo, Hope S.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Jirström, Karin; West, Brian L.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Immune-regulated pathways influence multiple aspects of cancer development. In this article we demonstrate that both macrophage abundance and T-cell abundance in breast cancer represent prognostic indicators for recurrence-free and overall survival. We provide evidence that response to chemotherapy is in part regulated by these leukocytes; cytotoxic therapies induce mammary epithelial cells to produce monocyte/macrophage recruitment factors, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and interleukin-34, which together enhance CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)–dependent macrophage infiltration. Blockade of macrophage recruitment with CSF1R-signaling antagonists, in combination with paclitaxel, improved survival of mammary tumor–bearing mice by slowing primary tumor development and reducing pulmonary metastasis. These improved aspects of mammary carcinogenesis were accompanied by decreased vessel density and appearance of antitumor immune programs fostering tumor suppression in a CD8+ T-cell–dependent manner. These data provide a rationale for targeting macrophage recruitment/ response pathways, notably CSF1R, in combination with cytotoxic therapy, and identification of a breast cancer population likely to benefit from this novel therapeutic approach. PMID:22039576

  7. Survivability Versus Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2014-01-01

    Develop Survivability vs Time Model as a decision-evaluation tool to assess various emergency egress methods used at Launch Complex 39B (LC 39B) and in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) on NASAs Kennedy Space Center. For each hazard scenario, develop probability distributions to address statistical uncertainty resulting in survivability plots over time and composite survivability plots encompassing multiple hazard scenarios.

  8. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  9. Postoperative dendritic cell vaccine plus activated T-cell transfer improves the survival of patients with invasive hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Koichi; Kotera, Yoshihito; Aruga, Atsushi; Takeshita, Nobuhiro; Katagiri, Satoshi; Ariizumi, Shun-ichi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshitoshi, Kenji; Takasaki, Ken; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The recurrence rate after surgery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is very high, while prognosis is quite poor. However, there is no standard treatment to prevent recurrence of HCC after a curative operation. In this study, we investigated the clinical utilization of an autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccine plus ex vivo activated T cell transfer (ATVAC) in an adjuvant setting for postoperative HCC as a non-randomized controlled trial. Ninety-four patients with invasive HCC received informed consent information regarding the study, and 42 opted to have the ATVAC after surgery. Their recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were measured after 5 years and compared with those of 52 patients who selected to have the curative operation alone. The median RFS and OS were 24.5 months and 97.7 months in the patients receiving adjuvant ATVAC and 12.6 months and 41.0 months in the group receiving surgery alone (P = 0.011 and 0.029). In the treated group, patients with positive delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) had a better prognosis (RFS P = 0.019, OS P = 0.025). No adverse events of grade 3 or more were observed. A postoperative dendritic cell vaccine plus activated T cell transfer would be a feasible and effective treatment for preventing recurrence in HCC patients and achieving long-term survival especially in DTH positive patients. PMID:24419174

  10. Occupational Survival Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.; Nelson, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    The author describes a set of twelve curriculum modules called "Occupational Survival Skills" relating to the "human" aspects of work organizations. The modules were based on information from opinion surveys of workers, students, parents, and teachers on what occupational survival skills are and how to teach them. (MF)

  11. Impact of Screening and Risk Factors for Local Recurrence and Survival After Conservative Surgery and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Results From a Large Series With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkler, Ian H.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Thomas, Jeremy S.; Jack, Wilma J.L.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Pedersen, Hans C.; Cameron, David A.; Dixon, J. Michael; Chetty, Udi

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate conventional prognostic factors for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM), and survival after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) in screen-detected and symptomatic cases on surveillance up to 25 years. Patients and Methods: A total of 1812 consecutive patients in three cohorts (1981-1989, 1990-1992, and 1993-1998) with T12N01M0 invasive breast cancer were treated with BCT (median follow-up, 14 years). Tumor type and grade were reviewed by a single pathologist. Hormone receptor status was measured by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess independent prognostic variables for relapse and survival. Results: A total of 205 IBTR occurred, with 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year actuarial relapse rates of 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.35-5.5%), 8.4% (95% CI 7.1-9.8%), 14.1% (95% CI 12.0-16%), and 17.4% (95% CI 14.5-20.2%). Number of nodes, young age, pathologic tumor size, and multifocality were significant factors for IBTR. Three hundred seventy-eight patients developed DM. The actuarial metastatic rate was 12% at 5 years and 17.9% at 10 years. Young age, number of positive nodes, pathologic tumor size, and tumor grade were significant factors for DM relapse. When conventional prognostic indices were taken into account screen-detected cancers showed no improvement in overall relapse or survival rate compared with symptomatic cases but did show a reduced risk of DM after IBTR. After 10 years IBTR relapse continued at a constant rate of 0.87% per annum. Conclusions: The Edinburgh BCT series has shown that screen-detected invasive breast cancers do not have significantly different clinical outcomes compared with symptomatic cases when pathologic risk factors are taken into account. This suggests that these patients be managed in a similar way.

  12. Nomograms for predicting survival and recurrence in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma. An international collaborative study

    PubMed Central

    Ganly, Ian; Amit, Moran; Kou, Lei; Palmer, Frank L.; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Katabi, Nora; Yu, Changhong; Kattan, Michael W.; Binenbaum, Yoav; Sharma, Kanika; Naomi, Ramer; Abib, Agbetoba; Miles, Brett; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fliss, Dan; Eckardt, André M.; Chiara, Copelli; Sesenna, Enrico; Ali, Safina; Czerwonka, Lukas; Goldstein, David P.; Gil, Ziv; Patel, Snehal G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the rarity of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), information on outcome is based upon small retrospective case series. The aim of our study was to create a large multiinstitutional international dataset of patients with ACC in order to design predictive nomograms for outcome. Methods ACC patients managed at 10 international centers were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded and an international collaborative dataset created. Multivariable competing risk models were then built to predict the 10 year recurrence free probability (RFP), distant recurrence free probability (DRFP), overall survival (OS) and cancer specific mortality (CSM). All predictors of interest were added in the starting full models before selection, including age, gender, tumor site, clinical T stage, perineural invasion, margin status, pathologic N-status, and M-status. Stepdown method was used in model selection to choose predictive variables. An external dataset of 99 patients from 2 other institutions was used to validate the nomograms. Findings Of 438 ACC patients, 27.2% (119/438) died from ACC and 38.8% (170/438) died of other causes. Median follow-up was 56 months (range 1–306). The nomogram for OS had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N-status and M-status) with a concordance index (CI) of 0.71. The nomogram for CSM had the same variables, except margin status, with a concordance index (CI) of 0.70. The nomogram for RFP had 7 variables (age, gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, margin status, pathologic N status and perineural invasion) (CI 0.66). The nomogram for DRFP had 6 variables (gender, clinical T stage, tumor site, pathologic N-status, perineural invasion and margin status) (CI 0.64). Concordance index for the external validation set were 0.76, 0.72, 0.67 and 0.70 respectively. Interpretation Using an international collaborative database we have created the first nomograms which

  13. A Novel and Validated Inflammation-Based Score (IBS) Predicts Survival in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Following Curative Surgical Resection: A STROBE-Compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi-Peng; Ni, Xiao-Chun; Yi, Yong; Cai, Xiao-Yan; He, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jia-Xing; Lu, Zhu-Feng; Han, Xu; Cao, Ya; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Qiu, Shuang-Jian

    2016-02-01

    As chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we investigated the prognostic accuracy of a cluster of inflammatory scores, including the Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, platelet to lymphocyte ratio, Prognostic Nutritional Index, Prognostic Index, and a novel Inflammation-Based Score (IBS) integrated preoperative and postoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in 2 independent cohorts. Further, we aimed to formulate an effective prognostic nomogram for HCC after hepatectomy.Prognostic value of inflammatory scores and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage were studied in a training cohort of 772 patients with HCC underwent hepatectomy. Independent predictors of survival identified in multivariate analysis were validated in an independent set of 349 patients with an overall similar clinical feature.In both training and validation cohorts, IBS, microscopic vascular invasion, and BCLC stage emerged as independent factors of overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The predictive capacity of the IBS in both OS and RFS appeared superior to that of the other inflammatory scores in terms of C-index. Additionally, the formulated nomogram comprised IBS resulted in more accurate prognostic prediction compared with BCLC stage alone.IBS is a novel and validated prognostic indicator of HCC after curative resection, and a robust HCC nomogram including IBS was developed to predict survival for patients after hepatectomy. PMID:26886627

  14. High-dose radiation improved local tumor control and overall survival in patients with inoperable/unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: Long-term results of a radiation dose escalation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu; Haken, Randall K. ten; Schipper, Matthew J.; Sullivan, Molly A.; Chen, Ming; Lopez, Carlos; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether high-dose radiation leads to improved outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included 106 patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent Stages I-III NSCLC, treated with 63-103 Gy in 2.1-Gy fractions, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) per a dose escalation trial. Targets included the primary tumor and any lymph nodes {>=}1 cm, without intentionally including negative nodal regions. Nineteen percent of patients (20/106) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment factors were evaluated for association with outcomes. Estimated median follow-up was 8.5 years. Results: Median survival was 19 months, and 5-year overall survival (OS) was 13%. Multivariate analysis revealed weight loss (p = 0.011) and radiation dose (p = 0.0006) were significant predictors for OS. The 5-year OS was 4%, 22%, and 28% for patients receiving 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Although presence of nodal disease was negatively associated with locoregional control under univariate analysis, radiation dose was the only significant predictor when multiple variables were included (p = 0.015). The 5-year control rate was 12%, 35%, and 49% for 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Higher dose radiation is associated with improved outcomes in patients with NSCLC treated in the range of 63-103 Gy.

  15. Intraoperative Blood Loss Independently Predicts Survival and Recurrence after Resection of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Fu-Long; Lu, Zhen-Hai; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Ding, Pei-Rong; Fan, Wen-Hua; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; De-Sen Wan

    2013-01-01

    Background Although numerous prognostic factors have been reported for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRLM), few studies have reported intraoperative blood loss (IBL) effects on clinical outcome after CRLM resection. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and histopathological characteristics of 139 patients who underwent liver resection for CRLM. The IBL cutoff volume was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curves. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) were assessed using the Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression methods. Results All patients underwent curative resection. The median follow up period was 25.0 months (range, 2.1–88.8). Body mass index (BMI) and CRLM number and tumor size were associated with increased IBL. BMI (P=0.01; 95% CI = 1.3–8.5) and IBL (P<0.01; 95% CI = 1.6–12.5) were independent OSOs predictors. Five factors, including IBL (P=0.02; 95% CI = 1.1–4.1), were significantly related to RFS via multivariate Cox regression analysis. In addition, OSOs and RFS significantly decreased with increasing IBL volumes. The 5-year OSOs of patients with IBL≤250, 250–500, and >500mL were 71%, 33%, and 0%, respectively (P<0.01). RFS of patients within three IBL volumes at the end of the first year were 67%, 38%, and 18%, respectively (P<0.01). Conclusions IBL during CRLM resection is an independent predictor of long term survival and tumor recurrence, and its prognostic value was confirmed by a dose–response relationship. PMID:24098431

  16. Timing of High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy With External Beam Radiotherapy in Intermediate and High-Risk Localized Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) Patients and Its Effects on Toxicity and Quality of Life: Protocol of a Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Palvai, Sreekanth; Harrison, Michael; Shibu Thomas, Sharon; Hayden, Karen; Green, James; Anderson, Oliver; Romero, Lavinia; Lodge, Richard; Burns, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    and the secondary endpoints will be all other grades of genitourinary toxicities (grades 1 and 2), gastrointestinal toxicities (grades 1 to 4), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life. Results Results from this feasibility trial will be available in mid-2016. Conclusions If the results from this feasibility trial show evidence that the sequence of treatment modality does affect the patients’ toxicity profiles, then funding would be sought to conduct a large, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 15835424; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN15835424 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Xz7jfg1u). PMID:25926023

  17. Somatic Copy Number Abnormalities and Mutations in PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway Have Prognostic Significance for Overall Survival in Platinum Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Werner, Lillian; Leow, Jeffrey J.; Mullane, Stephanie A.; Fay, André P.; Riester, Markus; Van Hummelen, Paul; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Choueiri, Toni K.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrative analysis was conducted to identify genomic alterations at a pathway level that could predict overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients and Methods DNA and RNA were extracted from 103 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) invasive high-grade UC samples and were screened for mutations, copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression analysis. Clinical data were available from 85 cases. Mutations were analyzed by mass-spectrometry based on genotyping platform (Oncomap 3) and genomic imbalances were detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis. Regions with threshold of log2 ratio ≥0.4, or ≤0.6 were defined as either having copy number gain or loss and significantly recurrent CNV across the set of samples were determined using a GISTIC analysis. Expression analysis on selected relevant UC genes was conducted using Nanostring. To define the co-occurrence pattern of mutations and CNV, we grouped genomic events into 5 core signal transduction pathways: 1) TP53 pathway, 2) RTK/RAS/RAF pathway, 3) PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, 4) WNT/CTNNB1, 5) RB1 pathway. Cox regression was used to assess pathways abnormalities with survival outcomes. Results 35 samples (41%) harbored mutations on at least one gene: TP53 (16%), PIK3CA (9%), FGFR3 (2%), HRAS/KRAS (5%), and CTNNB1 (1%). 66% of patients had some sort of CNV. PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR pathway alteration (mutations+CNV) had the greatest impact on OS (p=0.055). At a gene level, overexpression of CTNNB1 (p=0.0008) and PIK3CA (p=0.02) were associated with shorter OS. Mutational status on PIK3CA was not associated with survival. Among other individually found genomic alterations, TP53 mutations (p=0.07), mTOR gain (p=0.07) and PTEN overexpression (p=0.08) have a marginally significant negative impact on OS. Conclusions Our study suggests that targeted therapies focusing on the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR pathway genomic

  18. The effect of neuraxial anesthesia on cancer recurrence and survival after cancer surgery: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Meilin; Chen, Wankun; Hou, Wenting; Li, Lihong; Ding, Ming; Miao, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Several animal and observational studies have evaluated the effects of neuraxial anesthesia on the recurrence and survival of cancer surgery; studies reported benefit, whereas others did not. To provide further evidence that neuraxial anesthesia(combined with or without general anesthesia (GA))may be associated with reduced cancer recurrence and long-term survival after cancer surgery, we conducted this meta-analysis. A total of 21 studies were identified and analyzed, based on searches conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. After data abstraction, adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the impact of neuraxial anesthesia (combined with or without GA) and GA on oncological outcomes after cancer surgery. For overall survival (OS), a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS (HR 0.853, CI 0.741-0.981, P = 0.026, the random-effects model) was observed compared with GA. Specifically, we found a positive association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved OS in colorectal cancer (HR 0.653, CI 0.430-0.991, P = 0.045, the random-effects model). For recurrence-free survival (RFS), a significant association between neuraxial anesthesia and improved RFS (HR 0.846, CI 0.718-0.998, P = 0.047, the random-effects model) was detected compared with GA. Our meta-analysis suggests that neuraxial anesthesia may be associated with improved OS in patients with cancer surgery, especially for those patients with colorectal cancer. It also supports a potential association between neuraxial anesthesia and a reduced risk of cancer recurrence. More prospective studies are needed to elucidate whether the association between neuraxial use and survival is causative. PMID:26918830

  19. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  20. Survival Skills: Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Reviewed are five programs (textbooks, audiovisual materials, workbooks, video-cassettes) designed to improve academic survival skills in secondary students. Content emphasis, reading level, rationale, objectives, organization, instructional method, student evaluation, physical features, and recommendations are listed for each. (KC)

  1. Survival at Isle Royale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballone, Lena M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a simulation based on the popular television show "Survivor" in which students work in groups and study physiological needs for human survival. Focuses on communication skills, problem solving, and cooperative learning. (YDS)

  2. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-02-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  3. Surviving at extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougan, Lorna

    2015-11-01

    Wherever we look on Earth - even in the most inhospitable places - we find life. But how do organisms manage to survive such difficult conditions? Lorna Dougan explains how physicists are helping to unravel the properties of “extremophile” life.

  4. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect

    Vice, J. )

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  5. Survival Rates for Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... staged? Next Topic How is thymus cancer treated? Survival rates for thymus cancer Survival rates are often ... into account. Stage of thymoma 5-year observed survival rate I 74% II 73% III 64% IV ...

  6. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  7. Laparoscopic surgery for patients with colorectal cancer produces better short-term outcomes with similar survival outcomes in elderly patients compared to open surgery.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo Yun; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Soo Young; Han, Eon Chul; Kang, Sung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The number of operations on elderly colorectal cancer (CRC) patients has increased with the aging of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical outcomes in elderly patients who underwent laparoscopic or open surgery for CRC. We analyzed the data of 280 patients aged 80 or over who underwent surgery for CRC between January 2001 and December 2010. Seventy-one pairs were selected after propensity score matching for laparoscopic or open surgery. Operative time, return to normal bowel function, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and prognostic factors affecting survival were investigated. In matched cohorts, operative time in the laparoscopic group was longer than in the open group (P < 0.001). In the laparoscopic group, time to flatus passage (P < 0.001) and length of postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.037) were shorter than in the open group. The rate of operation-related morbidity was higher in the open group (P = 0.019). There was no difference in OS and RFS between two groups. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery for CRC in elderly patients may be safe and feasible, with better short-term outcomes. OS and RFS, however, were not different in both groups. PMID:26923309

  8. Long-term survival in laparoscopic vs open resection for colorectal liver metastases: inverse probability of treatment weighting using propensity scores

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Joel W.; O'Rourke, Nicholas A.; Chiow, Adrian K.H.; Bryant, Richard; Martin, Ian; Nathanson, Leslie K.; Cavallucci, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study compares long-term outcomes between intention-to-treat laparoscopic and open approaches to colorectal liver metastases (CLM), using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) based on propensity scores to control for selection bias. Method Patients undergoing liver resection for CLM by 5 surgeons at 3 institutions from 2000 to early 2014 were analysed. IPTW based on propensity scores were generated and used to assess the marginal treatment effect of the laparoscopic approach via a weighted Cox proportional hazards model. Results A total of 298 operations were performed in 256 patients. 7 patients with planned two-stage resections were excluded leaving 284 operations in 249 patients for analysis. After IPTW, the population was well balanced. With a median follow up of 36 months, 5-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) for the cohort were 59% and 38%. 146 laparoscopic procedures were performed in 140 patients, with weighted 5-year OS and RFS of 54% and 36% respectively. In the open group, 138 procedures were performed in 122 patients, with a weighted 5-year OS and RFS of 63% and 38% respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of OS or RFS. Conclusion In the Brisbane experience, after accounting for bias in treatment assignment, long term survival after LLR for CLM is equivalent to outcomes in open surgery. PMID:26902138

  9. Survival after judicial hanging.

    PubMed

    Sabermoghaddam, Mohsen; Abad, Mohsen; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Mozaffari, Nasrollah

    2015-06-01

    Hanging is known not only as a common method of suicide but also as a capital punishment method in some countries. Although several cases have been reported to survive after the attempted suicidal/accidental hanging, to the extent of our knowledge, no modern case of survival after judicial hanging exists. We reported a case of an individual who revived after modern judicial hanging despite being declared dead. The case was admitted with poor clinical presentations and the Glasgow Coma Scale of 6/15. The victim received all the standard supportive intensive care and gained complete clinical recovery. PMID:25747958

  10. Survival following accidental scarf strangulation.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ullasa; Deepak, M; Hussain, Syed Ather; Usmani, Hadi; Osama, Muhammad; Pereira, Kiran Godwin; Menezes, Ritesh George

    2016-09-01

    Injury or death by strangulation, unless otherwise explained, is almost always homicidal. Accidental strangulation may occur but only very rarely. We present such a case of accidental strangulation and survival in a motorbike pillion rider. A long scarf (dupatta) clad woman, sitting at the back of a two wheeler motorbike, fell after her long scarf got caught in the back wheel. The lady was first taken to a local clinic and then later was referred to a hospital for a suspected spine injury where she made an uneventful recovery. This case report exposes the precarious position of women pillion riders wearing a long scarf and emphasizes the need for extra caution and the need for wheel guards on spoked wheels in particular. PMID:27048761

  11. The Option for Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, R. Stephen

    1971-01-01

    Suggests formula for survival that takes a thermodynamic view which holds that we must recycle waste while the thermodynamic potential still is moderately high. Otherwise they are lost, as helium is lost when it leaves Earth's atmosphere and goes into space. The idea that the Earth is a closed system is a myth; it collapses each time we put our…

  12. Independence and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, H. Thomas

    Independent schools that are of viable size, well managed, and strategically located to meet competition will survive and prosper past the current financial crisis. We live in a complex technological society with insatiable demands for knowledgeable people to keep it running. The future will be marked by the orderly selection of qualified people,…

  13. A Profile of Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimrin, Hanita

    1986-01-01

    Abused children who survived the trauma of their childhood and grew up to be well-adjusted were compared with a matched group who showed a high degree of psychosocial pathology. The variables which distinguished the two groups were fatalism, self-esteem, cognitive abilities, self-destructiveness, hope and fantasy, behavior patterns and external…

  14. Survivability via Control Objectives

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  15. Education for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, James E., Jr.

    In this address, James E. Allen, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education, discusses the relationship of education to the problem of ecological destruction. He states that the solutions to the problems of air, water, and soil pollution may be found in redirected education. This "education for survival" can serve to…

  16. Survival Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert M.; Barnes, Marcia M.

    This booklet is designed to provide some starter ideas for teachers to use in developing their own packet of learning materials. The procedures suggested and the examples included are literally starters. "Introduction to Survival Learning Materials" presents some procedures to help teachers get started in developing materials. "Following…

  17. Genetic evidence that intratumoral T-cell proliferation and activation are associated with recurrence and survival in patients with resected colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Maker, Ajay V; Ito, Hiromichi; Mo, Qianxing; Weisenberg, Elliot; Qin, Li-Xuan; Turcotte, Simon; Maithel, Shishir; Shia, Jinru; Blumgart, Leslie; Fong, Yuman; Jarnagin, William R; DeMatteo, Ronald P; D'Angelica, Michael I

    2015-04-01

    Though immune responses correlate with prognosis in primary colorectal cancer, the role of tumor immunity in metastatic disease is less clear. We hypothesized that patient survival and tumor recurrence correlate with transcriptional evidence of lymphocyte proliferation/activation in resected colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM). Microarray gene analysis was performed on liver tumor specimens from 96 patients who underwent resection for CRLM. A Cox proportional hazards model identified genes associated with overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Conventional gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis ranked biologically relevant processes. Survival probabilities of prioritized processes were assessed. Protein expression was validated with immunohistochemistry in an independent set of patients. GO analysis identified and ranked unique biologic processes that correlated with survival. Genes that specifically functioned in the biologic process of "T-cell proliferation" were significant predictors of OS (P = 0.01), and both "T-cell proliferation" and "activation" were highly associated with RFS (P ≤ 0.01). Analysis of genes in these GO categories identified increased TNFSF14/LIGHT expression to be most associated with improved OS and RFS (P ≤ 0.0006). Immunohistochemistry of an independent validation set of CRLM confirmed that both increased tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and higher LIGHT expression on TILs were associated with improved OS and RFS. Differential expression of genes involved in T-cell proliferation/activation was associated with survival outcomes in a large number of surgical patients who underwent resection of CRLM. These biologic functions determined by GO analysis of the tumor microenvironment have identified specific immune-related genes that may be involved in an antitumor immune response. PMID:25600439

  18. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  19. Doubly robust survival trees.

    PubMed

    Steingrimsson, Jon Arni; Diao, Liqun; Molinaro, Annette M; Strawderman, Robert L

    2016-09-10

    Estimating a patient's mortality risk is important in making treatment decisions. Survival trees are a useful tool and employ recursive partitioning to separate patients into different risk groups. Existing 'loss based' recursive partitioning procedures that would be used in the absence of censoring have previously been extended to the setting of right censored outcomes using inverse probability censoring weighted estimators of loss functions. In this paper, we propose new 'doubly robust' extensions of these loss estimators motivated by semiparametric efficiency theory for missing data that better utilize available data. Simulations and a data analysis demonstrate strong performance of the doubly robust survival trees compared with previously used methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27037609

  20. How worms survive desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Cihan; Penkov, Sider; Fahmy, Karim; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2012-01-01

    While life requires water, many organisms, known as anhydrobiotes, can survive in the absence of water for extended periods of time. Although discovered 300 years ago, we know very little about the fascinating phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. In this paper, we summarize our previous findings on the desiccation tolerance of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larva. A special emphasis is given to the role of trehalose in protecting membranes against desiccation. We also propose a simple mechanism for this process. PMID:24058825

  1. Cracking the survival code

    PubMed Central

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the “apoptotic histone code” came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging “autophagic histone code” and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision. PMID:24429873

  2. Survivable Optical WDM Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Canhui (Sam); Mukherjee, Biswanath

    Survivable Optical WDM Networks investigates different approaches for designing and operating an optical network with the objectives that (1) more connections can be carried by a given network, leading to more revenue, and (2) connections can recover faster in case of failures, leading to better services. Different networks - wavelength-routed WDM networks, wavelength-routed WDM networks with sub-wavelength granularity grooming, and data over next-generation SONET/SDH over WDM networks - are covered.

  3. Carbonaceous Survivability on Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to gain knowledge about the potential contributions of comets and cosmic dust to the origin of life on Earth, we need to explore the survivability of their potential organic compounds on impact and the formation of secondary products that may have arisen from the chaotic events sustained by the carriers as they fell to Earth. We have performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, kerogens, PAH crystals, and Murchison and Nogoya meteorites) into Al plate targets at velocities - 6 km/s. Estimated peak shock pressures probably did not exceed 120 GPa and peak shock temperatures were probably less than 4000 K for times of nano- to microsecs. Nominal crater dia. are less than one mm. The most significant results of these experiments are the preservation of the higher mass PAHs (e. g., pyrene relative to napthalene) and the formation of additional alkylated PAHs. We have also examined the residues of polystyrene projectiles impacted by a microparticle accelerator into targets at velocities up to 15 km/s. This talk will discuss the results of these experiments and their implications with respect to the survival of carbonaceous deliverables to early Earth. The prospects of survivability of organic molecules on "intact" capture of cosmic dust in space via soft: and hard cosmic dust collectors will also be discussed.

  4. Altruism: A natural strategy for enhancing survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenfeld, Alejandro F.; Luis Gruver, José; Albano, Ezequiel V.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2006-09-01

    We study the influence of altruistic behavior in a prey-predator model permitting the preys to commit suicide by confronting the predators instead of escaping. Surprising, altruistic behavior at microscopic (local) scale, leads to the emergence of new complex macroscopic (global) phenomena characterized by dramatic changes in the dynamic topology of the prey-predator spatiotemporal distribution, yielding spiral patterns. We show that such dynamics enhances the prey's survivability.

  5. Neutrophil-Lymphocyte and Platelet-Lymphocyte Ratio as Predictors of Disease Specific Survival After Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    BAGANTE, FABIO; TRAN, THUY B.; POSTLEWAIT, LAUREN M.; MAITHEL, SHISHIR K.; WANG, TRACY S.; EVANS, DOUGLAS B.; HATZARAS, IOANNIS; SHENOY, RIVFKA; PHAY, JOHN E.; KEPLINGER, KARA; FIELDS, RYAN C.; JIN, LINDA X.; WEBER, SHARON M.; SALEM, AHMED; SICKLICK, JASON K.; GAD, SHADY; YOPP, ADAM C.; MANSOUR, JOHN C.; DUH, QUAN-YANG; SEISER, NATALIE; SOLORZANO, CARMEN C.; KIERNAN, COLLEEN M.; VOTANOPOULOS, KONSTANTINOS I.; LEVINE, EDWARD A.; POULTSIDES, GEORGE A.; PAWLIK, TIMOTHY M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response may be associated with tumor progression. We sought to analyze the impact of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) on recurrence-free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) among patients who underwent surgery for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Methods Patients undergoing surgery for ACC were identified from a multi-center database. Cut-off values of 5 and 190 were defined as elevated NLR and PLR, respectively, and long-term outcome was assessed. Results Among 84 patients with ACC, 29 (34.%) had NLR >5 while 32 (40.5%) had PLR >190. NLR and PLR were associated with larger tumors (NLR >5: ≤ 5 cm, 0% vs. >5 cm, 39.7%; PLR >190: ≤ 5cm, 0% vs. >5 cm, 45.7%), as well as need to resect of other organs (NLR >5: other organ resected 48.8% vs. not resected 20.9%; PLR >190: other organ resected 25.0% vs. not resected 56.4%)(all P <0.05). Five-year RFS was associated with an elevated NLR (NLR ≤ 5, 14.2% vs. NLR>5, 10.5%) and PLR (PLR ≤190: 19.4% vs. PLR >190: 5.2%) (both P <0.05). On multivariate survival analyses, PLR remained a predictor of RFS (HR 1.72), while NLR was associated with both DSS (HR 2.21) and RFS (HR 1.99) (both P <0.05). Conclusions Immune markers such as NLR and PLR may be useful to stratify patients with regards to prognosis following surgery for ACC. PMID:26234285

  6. Pulmonary Intravascular Lymphomatosis: Clinical, CT, and PET Findings, Correlation of CT and Pathologic Results, and Survival Outcome.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min Jae; Lee, Kyung Soo; Hwang, Hye Sun; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Byung-Tae; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To describe clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and positron emission tomographic (PET) features, correlation of CT and pathologic results, and survival of patients with pulmonary intravascular lymphomatosis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study with waiver of patient consent. Forty-two patients with pulmonary intravascular lymphomatosis were identified, 11 (26%) of whom showed lung involvement. CT features were correlated with histopathologic results. Clinical and survival outcomes were compared between patients with and those without pulmonary involvement by adopting the χ(2), Student t, or Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank tests. Results At clinical presentation, all 11 patients showed B symptoms (systemic symptoms of fever, night sweats, and weight loss), 10 had respiratory and four had neurologic symptoms, and two had skin lesions. Patients received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) rituximab, and seven (64%) patients died. Patients with lung involvement showed reduced overall and recurrence-free survival (median; 10.8 and 18.9 months, respectively) compared with those without lung involvement (median, 18.4 and 31.0 months, respectively) (P = .338 and .065, respectively). The most common CT abnormality was bilateral ground-glass opacity (GGO, n = 10), with increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake at PET/CT (seven of seven patients). GGO correlated histopathologically with the expanded alveolar septal vasculatures and perivascular spaces filled with neoplastic lymphoid cells. Conclusion Pulmonary intravascular lymphomatosis appeared as bilateral GGO on CT images, with increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake on PET/CT images. GGO on CT images correlated with the area of expanded alveolar septae because of distended vessels filled with neoplastic lymphoid cells. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID

  7. Understanding Cancer: Survivability and Hope

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Survivability and Hope Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... More "Understanding Cancer" Articles Understanding Cancer / Cancer Today / Survivability and Hope / Sam Donaldson: Tips From a Cancer ...

  8. Classification Schemes: Developments and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocock, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the growth, survival and future of library classification schemes. Concludes that to survive, a scheme must constantly update its policies, and readily adapt itself to accommodate growing disciplines and changing terminology. (AEF)

  9. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio could be a promising prognostic biomarker for survival of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong-Xin; Lin, Kang; He, Bang-Shun; Pan, Yu-Qin; Ying, Hou-Qun; Hu, Xiu-Xiu; Xu, Tao; Wang, Shu-Kui

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important causes leading to colorectal carcinogenesis, and inflammatory biomarkers such as the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) might predict survival in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the prognostic value of PLR in CRC patients remains controversial. The prognostic value of PLR was comprehensively analyzed in 12 articles including 3541 CRC patients (10 for overall survival (OS), seven for disease-free survival (DFS), three for recurrence-free survival (RFS), and three for cancer-specific survival (CSS)) in this study. The overall pooled hazard ratios (HRs) of PLR for OS, DFS, and CSS were significant at 1.29 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.13-1.47, P H = 0.149), 1.43 (95% CI = 1.03-1.97, P H = 0.025), and 1.26 (95% CI = 1.04-1.52, P H = 0.223), respectively. However, there was no evidence of significance for RFS (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 0.98-1.70, P H = 0.231) in our study. Stratified analyses indicated elevated PLR was a predictor of poor OS (metastatic patients) and DFS (Caucasian population) and was also significantly associated with OS in univariate analysis (HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.14-1.60, P H = 0.532) and those only treated surgically (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.10-1.70, P H = 1.080). However, our findings indicated that elevated PLR is a promising prognostic biomarker for colorectal cancer, especially in metastatic Caucasian CRC patients. PMID:27398314

  10. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts survival after radiofrequency ablation for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Del Prete, Valentina; Crucinio, Nicola; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the correlation between lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) and survival after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for colorectal liver metastasis (CLMs). METHODS: From July 2003 to Feb 2012, 127 consecutive patients with 193 histologically-proven unresectable CLMs were treated with percutaneous RFA at the University of Foggia. All patients had undergone primary colorectal tumor resection before RFA and received systemic chemotherapy. LMR was calculated by dividing lymphocyte count by monocyte count assessed at baseline. Treatment-related toxicity was defined as any adverse events occurred within 4 wk after the procedure. Overall survival (OS) and time to recurrence (TTR) were estimated from the date of RFA by Kaplan-Meier with plots and median (95%CI). The inferential analysis for time to event data was conducted using the Cox univariate and multivariate regression model to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95%CI. Statistically significant variables from the univariate Cox analysis were considered for the multivariate models. RESULTS: Median age was 66 years (range 38-88) and patients were prevalently male (69.2%). Median LMR was 4.38% (0.79-88) whereas median number of nodules was 2 (1-3) with a median maximum diameter of 27 mm (10-45). Median OS was 38 mo (34-53) and survival rate (SR) was 89.4%, 40.4% and 33.3% at 1, 4 and 5 years respectively in the whole cohort. Running log-rank test analysis found 3.96% as the most significant prognostic cut-off point for LMR and stratifying the study population by this LMR value median OS resulted 55 mo (37-69) in patients with LMR > 3.96% and 34 (26-39) mo in patients with LMR ≤ 3.96% (HR = 0.53, 0.34-0.85, P = 0.007). Nodule size and LMR were the only significant predictors for OS in multivariate analysis. Median TTR was 29 mo (22-35) with a recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate of 72.6%, 32.1% and 21.8% at 1, 4 and 5 years, respectively in the whole study group. Nodule size and LMR were confirmed as significant

  11. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    SciTech Connect

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  12. Survival in MS

    PubMed Central

    Reder, A.T.; Ebers, G.C.; Cutter, G.; Kremenchutzky, M.; Oger, J.; Langdon, D.; Rametta, M.; Beckmann, K.; DeSimone, T.M.; Knappertz, V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of interferon beta (IFNβ)-1b on all-cause mortality over 21 years in the cohort of 372 patients who participated in the pivotal randomized clinical trial (RCT), retaining (in the analysis) the original randomized treatment-assignments. Methods: For this randomized long-term cohort study, the primary outcome, defined before data collection, was the comparison of all-cause mortality between the IFNβ-1b 250 μg and placebo groups from the time of randomization through the entire 21-year follow-up interval (intention-to-treat, log-rank test for Kaplan-Meier survival curves). All other survival outcomes were secondary. Results: After a median of 21.1 years from RCT enrollment, 98.4%(366 of 372) of patients were identified, and, of these, 81 deaths were recorded (22.1% [81 of 366]). Patients originally randomly assigned to IFNβ-1b 250 μg showed a significant reduction in all-cause mortality over the 21-year period compared with placebo (p = 0.0173), with a hazard ratio of 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.314–0.902). The hazard rate of death at long-term follow-up by Kaplan-Meier estimates was reduced by 46.8% among IFNβ-1b 250 μg–treated patients (46.0% among IFNβ-1b 50 μg–treated patients) compared with placebo. Baseline variables did not influence the observed treatment effect. Conclusions: There was a significant survival advantage in this cohort of patients receiving early IFNβ-1b treatment at either dose compared with placebo. Near-complete ascertainment, together with confirmatory findings from both active treatment groups, strengthens the evidence for an IFNβ-1b benefit on all-cause mortality. Classification of Evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that early treatment with IFNβ-1b is associated with prolonged survival in initially treatment-naive patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. PMID:22496198

  13. Nocturnality and species survival.

    PubMed Central

    Daily, G C; Ehrlich, P R

    1996-01-01

    Surveys of butterfly and moth diversity in tropical forest fragments suggest that nocturnality confers a dispersal, and possibly a survival, advantage. The butterfly faunas of smaller fragments were depauperate; in contrast, the species richness of nocturnal moths was similar in all fragments and even in pasture. The lack of correlation between butterfly and moth species richness among fragments (r2 = 0.005) is best explained by movements of moths at night when ambient conditions in forest and pasture are most similar; butterflies face substantial daytime temperature, humidity, and solar radiation barriers. This interpretation is supported by information on birds, beetles, and bats. PMID:8876201

  14. Perceptions Concerning Occupational Survival Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Robert E.

    This volume presents the reports of a series of interrelated studies which were part of a study that developed curriculum materials for teaching occupational survival skills. The first of six sections, Need for Teaching Occupational Survival Skills and Attitudes, discusses the importance of survival skills and describes twelve general topics which…

  15. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  16. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  17. Growth and survival of Mountain Plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Brian J.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1993-01-01

    Growth and survival rates of Mountain Plovers (Charadrius montanus) were monitored using radiotelemetry from hatching until birds left the breeding grounds on the Pawnee National Grassland, Weld County, Colorado. Chick weights increased logarithmically (r) = 0.961) and tarsus length linearly (r = 0.948) with age. Using the average fledgling weight of 69.8 g and an age/weight regression we predicted that the average age at fledging was 36 d. Fourteen Mountain Plover nests each had three effs; an average of 2.6 eggs hatched in seven nests, whereas remaining nests were lost to predation, storms, or trampling by a cow. Twenty-four adult Mountain Plovers were monitored for 275 telemetry days with no mortalities. Twenty flightless chicks had a calculated daily survival rate of 0.979 for 233 telemetry-days. Mortalities of flightless chicks were due to predation or unknown causes. The daily survival rate predicted that 1.2 of the 2.6 chicks hatched per nest lived to fly. Eight fledged chicks were monitored for 74 telemetry-days, with a daily survival rate of 0.974. Mortalities of fledglings were all attributed to predation. The combined survival rates predicted that 0.7 or the 2.6 hatched chicks lived to leave the nesting area. Survival rates of flightless chicks were similar to those reported 20 yr ago, implying that recent declines in Mountain Plover numbers on the continent are not attributable to either longer-term declines in nesting productivity or phenomena occurring at non-breeding locales.

  18. Improvement in High-Grade Osteosarcoma Survival

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Giun-Yi; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Wu, Po-Kuei; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Paul C-H; Wu, Hung-Ta H.; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare survival before and after 2004 and define the prognostic factors for high-grade osteosarcomas beyond those of typical young patients with localized extremity disease. Few studies have reported the long-term treatment outcomes of high-grade osteosarcoma in Taiwan. A total of 202 patients with primary high-grade osteosarcoma who received primary chemotherapy at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between January 1995 and December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated and compared by period (1995–2003 vs 2004–2011). Patients of all ages and tumor sites and those following or not following controlled protocols were included in analysis of demographic, tumor-related, and treatment-related variables and survival. Overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years were, respectively, 67.7% and 48% for all patients (n = 202), 77.3% and 57.1% for patients without metastasis (n = 157), and 33.9% and 14.8% for patients with metastasis (n = 45). The survival rates of patients treated after 2004 were significantly higher (by 13%–16%) compared with those of patients treated before 2004, with an accompanying 30% increase in histological good response rate (P = .002). Factors significantly contributing to inferior survival in univariate and multivariate analyses were diagnosis before 2004, metastasis at diagnosis, and being a noncandidate for a controlled treatment protocol. By comparison with the regimens used at our institution before 2004, the current results support the effectiveness of the post-2004 regimens, which consisted of substantially reduced cycles of high-dose methotrexate and a higher dosage of ifosfamide per cycle, cisplatin, and doxorubicin, for treating high-grade osteosarcoma in Asian patients. PMID:27082623

  19. Postfledging survival of European starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that mass at fledging and fledge date within the breeding season affect postfledging survival in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Nestlings were weighed on day 18 after hatch and tagged with individually identifiable patagial tags. Fledge date was recorded. Marked fledglings were resighted during weekly two-day intensive observation periods for 9 weeks postfledging. Post-fledging survival and sighting probabilities were estimated for each of four groups (early or late fledging by heavy or light fledging mass). Body mass was related to post-fledging survival for birds that fledged early. Results were not clear-cut for relative fledge date, although there was weak evidence that this also influenced survival. Highest survival probability estimates occurred in the EARLY-HEAVY group, while the lowest survival estimate occurred in the LATE-LIGHT group. Sighting probabilities differed significantly among groups, emphasizing the need to estimate and compare survival using models which explicitly incorporate sighting probabilities.

  20. Process control for survival

    SciTech Connect

    Yocom, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Increasing competition for a decreasing market mandates that the success of a company be determined by the manner in which it embraces quality. Statistical Process Control (SPC) is the most efficient means of dramatically improving quality and is essential to survival in the emerging electronic marketplace. During the three years that industry practitioners assembled to write IPC-PC-90, General Requirements for the Implementation of statistical Process Control, many heated discussions ensued about the actual definition of SPC. Some people view SPC as the application of Control Chart methods, others view it as the use of Statistical Experimental Design. Both are in some ways wrong and are limiting the scope of application. Those companies that have successfully applied SPC view it as a philosophy of statistical principles that will reduce variation in every phase of their business. 2 figs.

  1. Survive or Thrive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2011-01-01

    With local lumber mills shutting down, Robert Kenning, an instructor at Salish Kootenai College in western Montana, and the tribe's forestry director, came up with an idea. Kenning landed a $200,000 Department of Agriculture grant in 2010 to explore the possibility of turning logging scraps and smaller trees into chips or pellets that could be…

  2. A Retrospective Analysis of the Impact of Myomectomy on Survival in Uterine Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenzhen; Li, Li'an; Meng, Yuanguang

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic myomectomy is a minimally invasive, conservative surgical approach commonly used for the treatment of uterine fibroids. However, there is a lack of effective means to distinguish the nature of uterine tumors prior to surgery. The impact of fibroid morcellation during laparoscopic surgery on the dissemination of cancerous uterine fibroids and long-term survival of patients has gained increasing attention. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to analyze the impact of different surgical approaches on recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with a postoperative pathological diagnosis of uterine sarcoma at a single medical center. Patients who underwent the first surgery for uterine fibroids (confined to the uterus) and had a postoperative pathological diagnosis of uterine sarcoma were selected in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from January 2005 to January 2014. Based on the use of fibroid morcellation, the subjects were divided into fibroid morcellation (FM) and total hysterectomy (TH, non-morcellation) groups. Follow-up outcomes, including RFS and OS times, were observed. In total, 59 patients were included, with 30 cases in the FM group and 29 cases in the TH group. There were no significant differences in RFS and OS time between the two groups (RFS: P = 0.16, OS: P = 0.09). Multivariate correlation analysis showed that the impact of a higher grade level on RFS and OS was nearly 2-fold the impact of a lower grade level (RFS: P = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.97; OS: P = 0.03, OR = 2.29). Intraoperative morcellation, postoperative adjuvant therapy, age, tumor size, FIGO stage, and surgical approach were not risk factors affecting RFS and OS. Fibroid morcellation during laparoscopic surgery (including laparoscopic, transvaginal and transabdominal approaches) had no significant impact on RFS and OS time in patients. However, the 5-year RFS and OS rates were both lower in the FM group than in the TH group. Grade level was a

  3. Effects of propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia on recurrence and overall survival in patients after modified radical mastectomy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Hee; Kim, Yunkwang; Kim, Hyun Ah; Kim, Bong Seog

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal combination of anesthetic agent and technique may have an influence on long-term outcomes in cancer surgery. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that propofol independently reduces migration of cancer cells and metastasis. Thus, the authors retrospectively examined the link between propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) and recurrence or overall survival in patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods A retrospective analysis of the electronic database of all patients undergoing MRM for breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2008 was undertaken. Patients received either propofol-based TIVA (propofol group) or sevoflurane-based anesthesia (sevoflurane group). We analyzed prognostic factors of breast cancer and perioperative factors and compared recurrence-free survival and overall survival between propofol and sevoflurane groups. Results A total of 363 MRMs were carried out during the period of the trial; 325 cases were suitable for analysis (173 cases of propofol group, and 152 cases of sevoflurane group). There were insignificant differences between the groups in age, weight, height, histopathologic results, surgical time, or postoperative treatment (chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiotherapy). The use of opioids during the perioperative period was greater in propofol group than in sevoflurane group. Overall survival was no difference between the two groups. Propofol group showed a lower rate of cancer recurrence (P = 0.037), with an estimated hazard ratio of 0.550 (95% CI 0.311–0.973). Conclusions This retrospective study provides the possibility that propofol-based TIVA for breast cancer surgery can reduce the risk of recurrence during the initial 5 years after MRM. PMID:27066202

  4. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Improves Disease-Free Survival of High Risk of Locoregional Recurrence Breast Cancer Patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 Positive Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients). Results The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) (P = 0.010). Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005), but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P = 0.494), disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.215), and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.645). For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0–1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence) of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence) (80.9%, P < 0.001). PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001) and DFS (P = 0.027) in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients. Conclusions PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes. PMID:25781605

  5. Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic How are soft tissue sarcomas treated? Survival by stage of soft tissue sarcoma Survival rates ... observed, not relative survival): Stage 5-year observed survival rate I 90% II 81% III 56% IV ...

  6. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor. PMID:27602193

  7. Determination of Survivable Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Niehaus, J. E.; Ruff, G. A.; Urban, D. L.; Takahashi, F.; Easton, J. W.; Abbott, A. A.; Graf, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    At NASA, there exists no standardized design or testing protocol for spacecraft fire suppression systems (either handheld or total flooding designs). An extinguisher's efficacy in safely suppressing any reasonable or conceivable fire is the primary benchmark. That concept, however, leads to the question of what a reasonable or conceivable fire is. While there exists the temptation to over-size' the fire extinguisher, weight and volume considerations on spacecraft will always (justifiably) push for the minimum size extinguisher required. This paper attempts to address the question of extinguisher size by examining how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or other accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). Estimates of these quantities are determined as a function of fire size and mass of material burned. This then becomes the basis for determining the maximum size of a target fire for future fire extinguisher testing.

  8. Surviving a Suicide Attempt.

    PubMed

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor. PMID:27602193

  9. Melanoma survival in the United States, 1992 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Lori A.; Li, Jun; Berkowitz, Zahava; Weir, Hannah K.; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Ajani, Umed A.; Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Li, Chunyu; Pollack, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Population-based data on melanoma survival are important for understanding the impact of demographic and clinical factors on prognosis. Objective We describe melanoma survival by age, sex, race/ethnicity, stage, depth, histology, and site. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, we calculated unadjusted cause-specific survival up to 10 years from diagnosis for 68,495 first primary cases of melanoma diagnosed from 1992 to 2005. Cox multivariate analysis was performed for 5-year survival. Data from 1992 to 2001 were divided into 3 time periods to compare stage distribution and differences in stage-specific 5-year survival over time. Results Melanomas that had metastasized (distant stage) or were thicker than 4.00 mm had a poor prognosis (5-year survival: 15.7% and 56.6%). The 5-year survival for men was 86.8% and for persons given the diagnosis at age 65 years or older was 83.2%, varying by stage at diagnosis. Scalp/neck melanoma had lower 5-year survival (82.6%) than other anatomic sites; unspecified/overlapping lesions had the least favorable prognosis (41.5%). Nodular and acral lentiginous melanomas had the poorest 5-year survival among histologic subtypes (69.4% and 81.2%, respectively). Survival differences by race/ethnicity were observed in the unadjusted survival, but nonsignificant in the multivariate analysis. Overall 5-year melanoma survival increased from 87.7% to 90.1% for melanomas diagnosed in 1992 through 1995 compared with 1999 through 2001, and this change was not clearly associated with a shift toward localized diagnosis. Limitations Prognostic factors included in revised melanoma staging guidelines were not available for all study years and were not examined. Conclusions Poorer survival from melanoma was observed among those given the diagnosis at late stage and older age. Improvements in survival over time have been minimal. Although newly available therapies may impact survival, prevention and early detection

  10. Survival of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, William R.

    1996-06-01

    Recent low frequency results from attempts to detect Jupiter-sized planets around nearby stars have raised a question as to whether such objects are all that common. In the over 200 stars observed so far, the yield has been 3%. And, the close orbit (0.05 AU) of the nearly Jupiter-sized object around Peg 51 places the object in an environment where the current paradigm of planetary formation would not predict planets to form at all. Other newly discovered candidates, such a Vir 70 and HR3522, also have suspiciously small semi-major axes for gas giants. Of course, the low yield may be strongly influenced by selection effects since massive planets close to their primaries are more easily detected. Nevertheless, given the results to date, it is natural to wonder whether a planetary system like ours is such a natural outgrowth of a circumplantary disk. In particular, could there be forces absent from the existing paradigm that tend to destroy a planetary system once formed? We point out that strong gravitational interactions (i.e., disk tides) between a newly formed protoplanet and its precursor disk give rise to a net torque that drains angular momentum from the protoplanet's orbit. As a result, protoplanetary objects suffer orbital decay as the disk attempts to destroy the very system it spawns. Strong interaction (type I) leads to gap formation and co-evolution with the disk; weak inter- action (type II) leads to drift relative to the disk and in some cases, a much more rapid decay. Survival of a planetary system may be a comparatively uncommon outcome. Newly discovered planets such as Peg 51b may be evidence of such large-scale orbit migration due to disk tidal torques (i.e., Lin et al., 1996).

  11. Predicting Survival in ARDS.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Niteen D; Gupta, Anish V

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a fulminant clinical disorder of varied etiology, characterized by diffuse lung injury and severe hypoxemia. It is a leading cause of ICU admission and the associated high mortality has sparked a lot of research on etiology, outcome, scoring systems, mortality predictors, biomarkers including inflammatory cytokines and even genomics in ARDS. The previously used AECC (American European Consensus Conference) definition (1994) of ARDS was replaced by the recent Berlin definition (2012) so as to improve its validity and reliability.1,2 This would not only standardize patient enrollment into clinical trials but also help implement the results of these trials into clinical practice. Although various studies have shown a reduction in mortality due to ARDS, it has been largely attributed to the general improvement in critical care and the use of lung protection ventilation strategies.3-6 Hence focus on the etiology, co-morbidities, risk factors, complications and mortality predictors, is the need of the hour so as to improve survival. ARDS can occur secondary to multiple causes i.e. either due to direct lung involvement (pneumonia, lung contusion etc) or indirect alveolar damage by inflammatory cytokines (sepsis, trauma, burns, pancreatitis etc.). The causes of ARDS in tropical countries are varied with seasonal variation. Acute febrile illnesses (AFI) like malaria, leptospirosis and dengue usually predominate in the monsoons while H1N1 infection and pneumonias typically peak in the colder winter months. However, malaria, dengue and H1N1 have a potential to be perennial. PMID:27608777

  12. Strategies for surviving a shakeout.

    PubMed

    Day, G S

    1997-01-01

    Shakeouts are a fact of life in almost every industry-witness the shrinking number of players in areas as diverse as banking, software, and hospital supply distribution. The key to survival is sensing your industry's shakeout before the competition does. And the first hurdle for managers to overcome is the belief that it can't happen to them. It can and it probably will. George Day describes two shakeout syndromes that affect different types of industries. A boom-and-bust shakeout afflicts hot emerging markets or highly cyclical businesses. A glut of competitors enter the market during boom times, but many of them fail when growth slows or a dominant design emerges. A seismic-shift shakeout strikes mature industries that have enjoyed years of protected prosperity as a result of, for example, local regulations or import barriers. But deregulation, globalization, or technological change can pull the rug out from under them. Day outlines how companies can detect the early warning signs of a shakeout. He explains how adaptive survivors, such as Dell Computer, successfully adjust their businesses in the midst of a bust, and how aggressive amalgamators, such as Arrow Electronics, cut costs and acquire smaller rivals in order to remain standing after a seismic shift. But the fact remains that most companies will get squeezed out during a consolidation. Although it is enormously difficult for executives to come to terms with the grim news, the sooner they do so, the better. And, as Day points out, all is not necessarily lost: with the right timing, also-rans can make a profitable exit from an industry. PMID:10165451

  13. Validation of survivability validation protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, T.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Issues associated with the validation of survivability protocols are discussed. Both empirical and analytical approaches to protocol validation are included. The use of hybrid simulations (hardware-in-the-loop, scene generators, software generators, man-in-the-loop, etc.) for the validation of survivability protocols is discussed.

  14. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paximadis, Peter; Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John; Sukari, Ammar; Dyson, Greg; Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p <.01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors. PMID:21658855

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Paximadis, Peter; Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John; Sukari, Ammar; Dyson, Greg; Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p < .01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions: Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors.

  16. Satellite Survivability Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, P.; Smith, J.

    The Satellite Survivability Module (SSM) is an end-to-end, physics-based, performance prediction model for directed energy engagement of orbiting spacecraft. SSM was created as an add-on module for the Satellite Tool Kit (STK). Two engagement types are currently supported: laser engagement of the focal plane array of an imaging spacecraft; and Radio Frequency (RF) engagement of spacecraft components. This paper will focus on the laser engagement scenario, the process by which it is defined, and how we use this tool to support a future laser threat detection system experiment. For a laser engagement, the user creates a spacecraft, defines its optical system, adds any protection techniques used by the optical system, introduces a laser threat, and then defines the atmosphere through which the laser will pass. SSM models the laser engagement and its impact on the spacecraft's optical system using four impact levels: degradation, saturation, damage, and destruction. Protection techniques, if employed, will mitigate engagement effects. SSM currently supports two laser protection techniques. SSM allows the user to create and implement a variety of "what if" scenarios. Satellites can be placed in a variety of orbits. Threats can be placed anywhere on the Earth or, for version 2.0, on other satellites. Satellites and threats can be mixed and matched to examine possibilities. Protection techniques for a particular spacecraft can be turned on or off individually; and can be arranged in any order to simulate more complicated protection schemes. Results can be displayed as 2-D or 3-D visualizations, or as textual reports. A new report feature available in version 2.0 will allow laser effects data to be displayed dynamically during scenario execution. In order to test SSM capabilities, the Ball team used SSM to model several engagement scenarios for our future laser threat detection system experiment. Actual test sites, along with actual laser, optics, and detector

  17. Marketing child survival.

    PubMed

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  18. Multiple Weather Factors Affect Apparent Survival of European Passerine Birds

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  19. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  20. Longer waiting times for early stage cervical cancer patients undergoing radical hysterectomy are associated with diminished long-term overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Nanthamongkolkul, Kulisara

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of surgical waiting time on clinical outcome in early stage cervical cancer. Methods The cohort consisted of 441 patients diagnosed with stages IA2-IB1cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic node dissection. The patients were divided into two groups based on surgical waiting time. The associations between waiting time and other potential prognostic factors with clinical outcome were evaluated. Results The median surgical waiting time was 43 days. Deep stromal invasion (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 4.6; p=0.003) and lymph node metastasis (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.7; p=0.026) were identified as independent prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival while no prognostic significance of surgical waiting time was found (p=0.677). On multivariate analysis of overall survival (OS), only deep stromal invasion (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.0; p=0.009) and lymph node metastasis (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.5 to 8.6; p=0.009) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. Although OS showed no significant difference between short (≤8 weeks) and long (>8 weeks) waiting times, multivariate analysis of OS with time-varying effects revealed that a waiting time longer than 8 weeks was associated with poorer long-term survival (after 5 years; HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 9.2; p=0.021). Conclusion A longer surgical waiting time was associated with diminished long-term OS of early stage cervical cancer patients. PMID:26404122

  1. Evolutionary history and distance dependence control survival of dipterocarp seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Robert; Press, Malcolm C; Scholes, Julie D

    2010-01-01

    One important hypothesis to explain tree-species coexistence in tropical forests suggests that increased attack by natural enemies near conspecific trees gives locally rare species a competitive advantage. Host ranges of natural enemies generally encompass several closely related plant taxa suggesting that seedlings should also do poorly around adults of closely related species. We investigated the effects of adult Parashorea malaanonan on seedling survival in a Bornean rain forest. Survival of P. malaanonan seedlings was highest at intermediate distances from parent trees while heterospecific seedlings were unaffected by distance. Leaf herbivores did not drive this relationship. Survival of seedlings was lowest for P. malaanonan, and increased with phylogenetic dissimilarity from this species, suggesting that survival of close relatives of common species is reduced. This study suggests that distance dependence contributes to species coexistence and highlights the need for further investigation into the role of shared plant enemies in community dynamics. PMID:19849708

  2. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  3. Surviving Small-Town Practice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Merv

    1987-01-01

    To cope and to survive family medicine in a small town has been, and continues to be, a problem. This article presents one physician's means and methods of staying in a difficult, but extremely exciting, profession. PMID:21263791

  4. Secretarial Administration: Secretarial Survival Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Jane M.

    1978-01-01

    Secretarial survival skills of communication, organization, and decision making should be incorporated into the secretarial training program, according to the author. She discusses these skills in relation to career mobility. (MF)

  5. SURVIVAL OF BACTERIA DURING AEROSOLIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One form of commercial application of microorganisms, including genetically engineered microorganisms is as an aerosol. To study the effect of aerosol-induced stress on bacterial survival, nonrecombinant spontaneous antibiotic-resistant mutants of four organisms, Enterobacter clo...

  6. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures. PMID:27405955

  7. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures.

  8. The Survival of the Wisest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salk, Jonas

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that humans differ from other living organisms in the ability to exercise learned behavior and the individual will, which may allow people to make the changes in values necessary to survive on this planet. (DW)

  9. Survivability of Deterministic Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Frank; Schultz, Paul; Grabow, Carsten; Heitzig, Jobst; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The notion of a part of phase space containing desired (or allowed) states of a dynamical system is important in a wide range of complex systems research. It has been called the safe operating space, the viability kernel or the sunny region. In this paper we define the notion of survivability: Given a random initial condition, what is the likelihood that the transient behaviour of a deterministic system does not leave a region of desirable states. We demonstrate the utility of this novel stability measure by considering models from climate science, neuronal networks and power grids. We also show that a semi-analytic lower bound for the survivability of linear systems allows a numerically very efficient survivability analysis in realistic models of power grids. Our numerical and semi-analytic work underlines that the type of stability measured by survivability is not captured by common asymptotic stability measures. PMID:27405955

  10. Customer service skills for survival.

    PubMed

    McAtee, L F

    1999-11-01

    As APICS practitioners, we all must share a common goal. How can we contribute to our company's success? Success can be measured in positive terms of market share, growth, profitability, return on investment, or some combination thereof. Each company must establish its own definition of success. For the purposes of this article, success will be equated to one word that we can all readily identify with: survival. What skills do we need to survive in the marketplace of the next millennium? PMID:10623133

  11. Cholecystectomy is associated with higher risk of early recurrence and poorer survival after curative resection for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Wang, Shu-Kang; Zhi, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Zhao-Ru; Zhang, Zong-Li; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Ye, Qing-Hai; Fan, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Although cholecystectomy has been reported to be associated with increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the association between cholecystectomy and prognosis of HCC patients underwent curative resection has never been examined. Through retrospective analysis of the data of 3933 patients underwent curative resection for HCC, we found that cholecystectomy was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival (RFS) of patients at early stage (BCLC stage 0/A) (p = 0.020, HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.04–1.59), and the 1-, 3-, 5-year RFS rates for patients at early stage were significantly worse in cholecystectomy group than in non-cholecystectomy group (80.5%, 61.8%, 52.0% vs 88.2%, 68.8%, 56.8%, p = 0.033). The early recurrence rate of cholecystectomy group was significantly higher than that of non-cholecystectomy group for patients at early stage (59/47 vs 236/333, p = 0.007), but not for patients at advanced stage (BCLC stage C) (p = 0.194). Multivariate analyses showed that cholecystectomy was an independent risk factor for early recurrence (p = 0.005, HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.13–2.03) of early stage HCC, but not for late recurrence (p = 0.959). In conclusion, cholecystectomy is an independent predictor for early recurrence and is associated with poorer RFS of early stage HCC. Removal of normal gallbladder during HCC resection may be avoided for early stage patients. PMID:27320390

  12. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  13. Effect of lead poisoning on spectacled elder survival rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grand, J.B.; Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Moran, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) populations on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta), Alaska, declined rapidly through the 1980s, and low adult female survival was suggested as the likely cause of the decline. We used mark-resighting techniques to study annual survival rates of adult female spectacled eiders at 2 sites on the Y-K Delta during 1993-96. Our data suggest survival rates may differ among sites. However, a model fit to a subset of data on females for which we knew lead levels in blood suggests lead exposure influences survival. Adult females exposed to lead prior to hatching their eggs survived at a much lower rate (0.44 ?? 0.10) each year than females not exposed to lead before hatch (0.78 ?? 0.05). We suggest most mortality from lead exposure occurs over winter, and the related reduction in adult survival may be impeding recovery of local populations. We encourage managers to curtail input of lead shot into the environment.

  14. Surviving cancer without compromising aspirations.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    This short paper is a reflection of how one person coped, survived and grew following numerous metastatic incidences over a 20 year period. Surviving cancer is a complex process but coping with the threat of regular recurrence has required a coping strategy that embraced the disease, set it aside and refused to compromise hopes, dreams and future life. Central to this personal journey has been the need to redefine normality, live with and set aside the fear of future metastases and death and find an answer and meaning in a changing biology, increased morbidity and possible mortality. This paper contends that not compromising the direction of travel and being able to focus on a career has ensured that survival was valuable and valued. A working environment in which students' problems have been immediate has produced different stressors. These have ultimately forced personal worries to be set aside, while living with cancer has become normal and accepted. PMID:21514884

  15. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland. PMID:22765936

  16. Survival Benefits of Small Anatomical Resection of the Liver for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Impaired Liver Function, Based on New-Era Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Masahiko; Ueno, Shinichi; Iino, Satoshi; Hiwatashi, Kiyokazu; Minami, Koji; Kawasaki, Yota; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Mataki, Yuko; Maemura, Kosei; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that anatomical resection of the liver may be preferred for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and is at least recommended for systematic removal of a segment confined by tumor-bearing portal tributaries. However, nonanatomical resection (NAR) is often selected because of the patient's background, impairment of liver function, and tumor factors. The aims of the present study were to retrospectively compare the recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates for cases of partial resection (PR) and for small anatomical resection (SAR), which is regarded as NAR for primary HCC with impaired liver function. Patients and Methods: So-called NAR was performed for a primary and solitary (≤ 5cm) HCC in 47 patients; the patients were classified into PR (n=25) and SAR (n=22) groups. Clinicopathological factors, survival data, and recurrence patterns were compared between groups. Results: There were no significant differences in the preoperative characteristics between the two groups. Operative time was significantly longer in the SAR group than in the PR group. There was no significant difference in the postoperative morbidity and tumor pathological characteristics between the two groups. The RFS of the SAR group was significantly better than those of the PR group. Although there was no significant difference in the pattern of recurrence between the two groups, the rate of intrahepatic recurrence in the same segment as the initial tumor tended to be higher in the PR group than in the SAR group. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the PR operative procedure was significant independent risk factor for poorer RFS. Conclusion: Compared with PR, SAR effectively improves the rate of RFS after surgery for a primary and solitary HCC with impaired liver function. PMID:27326244

  17. Implications of age and conditional survival estimates for patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Lao, Christopher D.; Wancata, Lauren M.; Muenz, Daniel G.; Haymart, Megan R.; Wong, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Overall cancer incidence is decreasing while melanoma cases increase. Conditional survival estimates offer a more accurate prognosis for patients as they survive past diagnosis. It is unknown the effect age and stage has on a melanoma patient’s conditional survival estimate. Methods Surveillance, Epidemiology, End Results (SEER) data was utilized, identifying new diagnosis cutaneous melanoma patients (N=95,041), from 1998–2005, with up to 12 year follow up. Estimates of disease-specific survival by stage and age were determined by Cox regression and transformed to estimate conditional five-year survival. Results Localized melanoma patients have an excellent five-year survival at diagnosis and subsequent years. For patients with localized and regional disease, an age effect is present for disease-specific mortality when comparing older patients (70–79 years) to younger patients (<30 years): hazard ratio (HR) for mortality 3.79 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01–4.84) and HR 2.36 (95% CI 1.93–2.91), respectively. No age effect difference is observed in disease-specific survival for advanced disease: HR 1.14 (95% CI 0.87–1.53). Over time conditional survival estimates improve for older patients with localized and regional disease. This improvement is not seen in distant disease nor is the age gradient. Conclusions Disease-specific mortality and conditional survival for patients with localized and regional melanoma is initially impacted by older age with effects dissipating over time. Age does not affect survival in patients with advanced disease. Understanding the conditional five-year disease-specific survival of melanoma based on age and stage can help patients and physicians, informing decision making about treatment and surveillance. PMID:26479218

  18. Local Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-31

    The LOCAL Toolkit contains tools and libraries developed under the LLNL LOCAL LDRD project for managing and processing large unstructured data sets primrily from parallel numerical simulations, such as triangular, tetrahedral, and hexahedral meshes, point sets, and graphs. The tools have three main functionalities: cache-coherent, linear ordering of multidimensional data; lossy and lossless data compression optimized for different data types; and an out-of-core streaming I/O library with simple processing modules for unstructed data.

  19. Medieval Sport: Quest for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Douglas C.

    Since the Middle Ages, sport has survived because of its masochistic and sadistic components. The Greeks, who organized athletic contests into the Olympic Games in 776 B.C., emphasized the relationship between the mind and the body and fair competition, rather than putting emphasis on winning or losing. The Romans preferred the spectacle of…

  20. Cool echidnas survive the fire.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Julia; Cooper, Christine Elizabeth; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-04-13

    Fires have occurred throughout history, including those associated with the meteoroid impact at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary that eliminated many vertebrate species. To evaluate the recent hypothesis that the survival of the K-Pg fires by ancestral mammals was dependent on their ability to use energy-conserving torpor, we studied body temperature fluctuations and activity of an egg-laying mammal, the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), often considered to be a 'living fossil', before, during and after a prescribed burn. All but one study animal survived the fire in the prescribed burn area and echidnas remained inactive during the day(s) following the fire and substantially reduced body temperature during bouts of torpor. For weeks after the fire, all individuals remained in their original territories and compensated for changes in their habitat with a decrease in mean body temperature and activity. Our data suggest that heterothermy enables mammals to outlast the conditions during and after a fire by reducing energy expenditure, permitting periods of extended inactivity. Therefore, torpor facilitates survival in a fire-scorched landscape and consequently may have been of functional significance for mammalian survival at the K-Pg boundary. PMID:27075255

  1. GPS survivability - A military overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alan

    The major features contributing to the military survivability of GPS during war are discussed. Possible threats to the various segments of GPS are examined, including the effects of attack, sabotage, and nuclear war. Consideration is given to applicable countermeasures to enable GPS to provide continuous service during war.

  2. Tale of survival tails off.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1991-02-25

    When Reader's Digest wove the tale of a scrappy rural hospital in Montana that raised enough in donations to keep from going under, it looked like a happy ending. But the last chapter on Sweet Grass Community Hospital's fight to survive is still being written, and it's a cliffhanger. PMID:10109267

  3. Top 10 Staff Survival Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Laurie

    1995-01-01

    Tips for camp staff on how to survive summer camp include not giving campers sugary drinks before bedtime, setting behavior limits with campers, setting an example by following camp rules, getting enough rest, being fair and consistent, controlling anger, being accountable for actions, asking questions, and being flexible. (LP)

  4. Wilderness Emergency: Surviving the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fear, Gene

    In any unexpected survival experience, one must accept the situation with just what one has at the moment it happens, where it happens, and how it happens. Problem solving must be based on known body enemies that threaten life, their priority of influence, and their severity of threat to life. Solutions will depend on the body's energy supply,…

  5. Wilderness Survival and Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Matt

    Outdoor education is often delivered through games and activities such as nature hikes or observing an ecosystem within a 1-foot circle on the ground. Often, participants look closely at the earth only for that brief moment. Wilderness survival is another way to teach about the outdoors. It offers skills that encourage participants to become more…

  6. Corticosteroids compromise survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pitter, Kenneth L; Tamagno, Ilaria; Alikhanyan, Kristina; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Donnola, Shannon; Dai, Charles; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Chang, Maria; Chan, Timothy A; Beal, Kathryn; Bishop, Andrew J; Barker, Christopher A; Jones, Terreia S; Hentschel, Bettina; Gorlia, Thierry; Schlegel, Uwe; Stupp, Roger; Weller, Michael; Holland, Eric C; Hambardzumyan, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumour. Standard of care consists of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (temozolomide/radiotherapy→temozolomide). Corticosteroids are commonly used perioperatively to control cerebral oedema and are frequently continued throughout subsequent treatment, notably radiotherapy, for amelioration of side effects. The effects of corticosteroids such as dexamethasone on cell growth in glioma models and on patient survival have remained controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of glioblastoma patient cohorts to determine the prognostic role of steroid administration. A disease-relevant mouse model of glioblastoma was used to characterize the effects of dexamethasone on tumour cell proliferation and death, and to identify gene signatures associated with these effects. A murine anti-VEGFA antibody was used in parallel as an alternative for oedema control. We applied the dexamethasone-induced gene signature to The Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma dataset to explore the association of dexamethasone exposure with outcome. Mouse experiments were used to validate the effects of dexamethasone on survival in vivo Retrospective clinical analyses identified corticosteroid use during radiotherapy as an independent indicator of shorter survival in three independent patient cohorts. A dexamethasone-associated gene expression signature correlated with shorter survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas patient dataset. In glioma-bearing mice, dexamethasone pretreatment decreased tumour cell proliferation without affecting tumour cell viability, but reduced survival when combined with radiotherapy. Conversely, anti-VEGFA antibody decreased proliferation and increased tumour cell death, but did not affect survival when combined with radiotherapy. Clinical and mouse experimental data suggest that corticosteroids may decrease the effectiveness of treatment and shorten

  7. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-01-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals. PMID:22355622

  8. AIAA Survivability Technical Committee Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Jim; Williamson, Joel

    1997-01-01

    A relatively new area of interest in aerospace systems survivability is the growing threat of spacecraft penetration by orbital debris. Orbital debris, or "space junk", is composed of the man-made remnants of non-functioning spacecraft still orbiting the Earth. NASA estimates that there are currently over 100,000 orbital debris particles 1 centimeter in diameter or larger that cannot be tracked by existing radar, with the population growing at approximately 4% per year in low earth orbits. With an average velocity of over 8.7 km/sec, these projectiles can penetrate and disable many vulnerable spacecraft systems. Since the likelihood of spacecraft penetration increases with spacecraft surface area, large spacecraft (such as the International Space Station) and communication satellite fleets (such as Iridium) have begun to adopt survivability enhancement strategies similar to those employed by combat aircraft. Collision avoidance maneuvers are commonly practiced by the Space Shuttle and are planned by the International Space Station to decrease their susceptibility to impact by trackable orbital debris; likewise, improved shielding, internal equipment placement, and improved crew operations following penetration can reduce the vulnerability of spacecraft to loss following orbital debris impact. Computer simulations such as the Manned Spacecraft and Crew Survivability (MSCSurv) program at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center have recently been developed to quantify and reduce the likelihood of crew or spacecraft loss following orbital debris penetration. The AIAA Survivability Technical Committee is working to enable the transfer of military-developed survivability technologies to help the aerospace industry cope with this growing threat.

  9. Climate and density influence annual survival and movement in a migratory songbird.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Ann E; Reudink, Matthew W; Marra, Peter P; Ratcliffe, Laurene M; Wilson, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Assessing the drivers of survival across the annual cycle is important for understanding when and how population limitation occurs in migratory animals. Density-dependent population regulation can occur during breeding and nonbreeding periods, and large-scale climate cycles can also affect survival throughout the annual cycle via their effects on local weather and vegetation productivity. Most studies of survival use mark-recapture techniques to estimate apparent survival, but true survival rates remain obscured due to unknown rates of permanent emigration. This is especially problematic when assessing annual survival of migratory birds, whose movement between breeding attempts, or breeding dispersal, can be substantial. We used a multistate approach to examine drivers of annual survival and one component of breeding dispersal (habitat-specific movements) in a population of American redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla) over 11 years in two adjacent habitat types. Annual survival displayed a curvilinear relation to the Southern Oscillation Index, with lower survival during La Niña and El Niño conditions. Although redstart density had no impact on survival, habitat-specific density influenced local movements between habitat types, with redstarts being less likely to disperse from their previous year's breeding habitat as density within that habitat increased. This finding was strongest in males and may be explained by conspecific attraction influencing settlement decisions. Survival was lowest in young males, but movement was highest in this group, indicating that apparent survival rates were likely biased low due to permanent emigration. Our findings demonstrate the utility of examining breeding dispersal in mark-recapture studies and complement recent work using spatially explicit models of dispersal probability to obtain greater accuracy in survival estimates. PMID:26811763

  10. The role of maternal behavior and offspring development in the survival of mountain goat kids.

    PubMed

    Théoret-Gosselin, Rachel; Hamel, Sandra; Côté, Steeve D

    2015-05-01

    Studies on juvenile survival have mainly focused on the effects of environmental conditions and maternal traits. However, growing evidence indicates that the ability of parents to care for their young and the offspring developmental behaviors could be key determinants of their survival. We examined the relative influence of (1) environmental conditions, (2) offspring traits, (3) maternal traits, (4) maternal care behaviors, and (5) offspring developmental behaviors on kid survival to weaning and to 1 year old in mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus). Offspring development and maternal care directly affected offspring survival, and this more importantly than did environmental conditions and maternal traits. Frequency of play strongly increased survival before weaning. Greater maternal care increased offspring survival during winter, directly and indirectly through kid mass. Kid mass was also a major determinant of both summer and winter survival. Environmental conditions mainly influenced summer survival while maternal characteristics indirectly affected winter survival through an effect on kid mass. Behavioral adaptations of maternal care and offspring development to local selective pressures can lead to local adaptations and have greater implications in population dynamic studies than previously believed. PMID:25556294

  11. Personality drives physiological adjustments and is not related to survival

    PubMed Central

    Bijleveld, Allert I.; Massourakis, Georgina; van der Marel, Annemarie; Dekinga, Anne; Spaans, Bernard; van Gils, Jan A.; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary function and maintenance of variation in animal personality is still under debate. Variation in the size of metabolic organs has recently been suggested to cause and maintain variation in personality. Here, we examine two main underlying notions: (i) that organ sizes vary consistently between individuals and cause consistent behavioural patterns, and (ii) that a more exploratory personality is associated with reduced survival. Exploratory behaviour of captive red knots (Calidris canutus, a migrant shorebird) was negatively rather than positively correlated with digestive organ (gizzard) mass, as well as with body mass. In an experiment, we reciprocally reduced and increased individual gizzard masses and found that exploration scores were unaffected. Whether or not these birds were resighted locally over the 19 months after release was negatively correlated with their exploration scores. Moreover, a long-term mark–recapture effort on free-living red knots with known gizzard masses at capture confirmed that local resighting probability (an inverse measure of exploratory behaviour) was correlated with gizzard mass without detrimental effects on survival. We conclude that personality drives physiological adjustments, rather than the other way around, and suggest that physiological adjustments mitigate the survival costs of exploratory behaviour. Our results show that we need to reconsider hypotheses explaining personality variation based on organ sizes and differential survival. PMID:24671971

  12. Survival of auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michelle L; Pereira, Fred A

    2015-07-01

    The inability of mammals to regenerate auditory hair cells creates a pressing need to understand the means of enhancing hair cell survival following insult or injury. Hair cells are easily damaged by noise exposure, by ototoxic medications and as a consequence of aging processes, all of which lead to progressive and permanent hearing impairment as hair cells are lost. Significant efforts have been invested in designing strategies to prevent this damage from occurring since permanent hearing loss has a profound impact on communication and quality of life for patients. In this mini-review, we discuss recent progress in the use of antioxidants, anti-inflammatories and apoptosis inhibitors to enhance hair cell survival. We conclude by clarifying the distinction between protection and rescue strategies and by highlighting important areas of future research. PMID:25743696

  13. Implications of age and conditional survival estimates for patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Lao, Christopher D; Wancata, Lauren M; Muenz, Daniel G; Haymart, Megan R; Wong, Sandra L

    2016-02-01

    Overall cancer incidence is decreasing, whereas melanoma cases are increasing. Conditional survival estimates offer a more accurate prognosis for patients the farther they are from time of diagnosis. The effect of age and stage on a melanoma patient's conditional survival estimate is unknown. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data were utilized to identify newly diagnosed cutaneous melanoma patients (N=95 041), from 1998 to 2005, with up to 12 years of follow-up. Estimates of disease-specific survival by stage and age were determined by Cox regression analysis and transformed to estimated conditional 5-year survival. Localized melanoma patients have an excellent 5-year survival at diagnosis and over subsequent years. For patients with localized and regional disease, an age effect is present for disease-specific mortality when comparing older patients (70-79 years) with younger patients (<30 years): hazard ratio (HR) for mortality 3.79 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-4.84] and HR 2.36 (95% CI 1.93-2.91), respectively. No age effect difference is observed in disease-specific survival for advanced disease: HR 1.14 (95% CI 0.87-1.53). Over time, conditional survival estimates improve for older patients with localized and regional disease. This improvement is not seen in distant disease, neither is the age gradient. Disease-specific mortality and conditional survival for patients with localized and regional melanomas are initially impacted by older age, with effects dissipating over time. Age does not affect survival in patients with advanced disease. Understanding the conditional 5-year disease-specific survival of melanoma based on age and stage can help patients and physicians, informing decision-making about treatment and surveillance. PMID:26479218

  14. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  15. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  16. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  17. Surviving gas expulsion with substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paweł L.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the reaction of clumpy stellar distributions to gas expulsion. We show that regions containing highly unbound substructures/subclusters after gas expulsion can produce a significant final bound cluster. The key quantity in determining if a region is able to form a bound cluster is the global virial ratio, and so regions must be looked at as a whole rather than by an individual substructure/subclusters, when determining if they might survive as a bound cluster.

  18. Proline Mechanisms of Stress Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinwen; Zhang, Lu; Natarajan, Sathish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The imino acid proline is utilized by different organisms to offset cellular imbalances caused by environmental stress. The wide use in nature of proline as a stress adaptor molecule indicates that proline has a fundamental biological role in stress response. Understanding the mechanisms by which proline enhances abiotic/biotic stress response will facilitate agricultural crop research and improve human health. Recent Advances: It is now recognized that proline metabolism propels cellular signaling processes that promote cellular apoptosis or survival. Studies have shown that proline metabolism influences signaling pathways by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the mitochondria via the electron transport chain. Enhanced ROS production due to proline metabolism has been implicated in the hypersensitive response in plants, lifespan extension in worms, and apoptosis, tumor suppression, and cell survival in animals. Critical Issues: The ability of proline to influence disparate cellular outcomes may be governed by ROS levels generated in the mitochondria. Defining the threshold at which proline metabolic enzyme expression switches from inducing survival pathways to cellular apoptosis would provide molecular insights into cellular redox regulation by proline. Are ROS the only mediators of proline metabolic signaling or are other factors involved? Future Directions: New evidence suggests that proline biosynthesis enzymes interact with redox proteins such as thioredoxin. An important future pursuit will be to identify other interacting partners of proline metabolic enzymes to uncover novel regulatory and signaling networks of cellular stress response. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 998–1011. PMID:23581681

  19. Demonstration of survivable space penetrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Philip; Huntington-Thresher, William; Bruce, Alan; Penny, Nick; Smith, Alan; Gowan, Rob

    2012-03-01

    This work was performed in support of MoonLITE which is a proposed UK space mission to the moon. The basic premise is to deploy 4 instrumented penetrators, one each on the near-side, farside and at the poles of the moon, with an impact velocity of approximately 300m/s. The primary science aims are to set up a passive seismometer network, investigate the presence of water and volatiles and determine thermal gradients in the lunar soil (i.e. regolith). A key requirement is that the penetrator shell survives the impact together with the instrument payload and supporting subsystems. The material chosen for the penetrator shell was 7075 aluminium alloy, which is a good compromise between high compressive strength and low mass. The baseline penetrator design was evaluated and refined using the DYNA3D hydrocode to determine the survivability of the penetrator in sand at an impact velocity of 300m/s and an attack angle of 8°. The simulations predicted that the penetrator design would survive this severe impact condition which was confirmed by experiments on the Pendine rocket test track.

  20. Racial Differences in the Impact of Comorbidities on Survival Among Elderly Men With Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Putt, Mary; Long, Judith A.; Montagnet, Chantal; Silber, Jeffrey H.; Chang, Virginia W.; Liao, Kaijun; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Pollack, Craig Evan; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates differences in the effects of comorbidities on survival in Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer. Medicare data were used to assemble a cohort of 65- to 76-year-old Black (n = 6,402) and White (n = 47,458) men with incident localized prostate cancer in 1999 who survived ≥1 year postdiagnosis. Comorbidities were more prevalent among Blacks than among Whites. For both races, greater comorbidity was associated with decreasing survival rates; however, the effect among Blacks was smaller than in Whites. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, and community characteristics, the association between increasing comorbidities and survival remained weaker for Blacks than for Whites, and racial disparity in survival decreased with increasing number of comorbidities. Differential effects of comorbidities on survival were also evident when examining different classes of comorbid conditions. Adjusting for treatment had little impact on these results, despite variation in the racial difference in receipt of prostatectomy with differing comorbidity levels. PMID:19357389

  1. Local Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uehling, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    As critics complain about higher education's shortcomings, trustees may need to communicate their institution's economic, cultural, and intellectual contributions to the local community. The most obvious and easily understood benefit is purchasing power, but it also contributes to small business growth, individual quality of life, the social,…

  2. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (also called morphea) is a term encompassing a spectrum of sclerotic autoimmune diseases that primarily affect the skin, but also might involve underlying structures such as the fat, fascia, muscle, and bones. Its exact pathogenesis is still unknown, but several trigger factors in genetically predisposed individuals might initially lead to an immunologically triggered release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, resulting in a profound dysregulation of the connective tissue metabolism and ultimately to induction of fibrosis. To date, there are no specific serological markers available for localized scleroderma. Within the last years, several validated clinical scores have been introduced as potential outcome measures for the disease. Given the rarity of localized scleroderma, only few evidence-based therapeutical treatment options exist. So far, the most robust data is available for ultraviolet A1 phototherapy in disease that is restricted to the skin, and methotrexate alone or in combination with systemic corticosteroids in more severe disease that additionally affects extracutaneous structures. This practical review summarizes relevant information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical subtypes and classifications, differential diagnoses, clinical scores and outcome measures, and current treatment strategies of localized scleroderma. PMID:22741933

  3. Local Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the value of setting-specific research for action research in social psychology. Discusses the following concepts: (1) local variation; (2) seeing the general in the specific; (3) connectedness as the fundamental law of ecology; and (4) the value of field stations for community research. (JS)

  4. Local hyperdynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F

    2013-10-14

    We present a new formulation of the hyperdynamics method in which the biasing effect is local, making it suitable for large systems. In standard hyperdynamics, the requirement that the bias potential be zero everywhere on the dividing surface bounding the state has the consequence that as the system size increases the boost factor decays to unity, regardless of the form of the bias potential. In the new method, the bias force on each atom is obtained by differentiating a local bias energy that depends only on the coordinates of atoms within a finite range of this atom. This bias force is thus independent of the bias force in distant parts of the system, providing a method that gives a constant boost factor, independent of the system size. We demonstrate for some realistic atomistic systems that the method gives escape rates in excellent agreement with direct molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24116606

  5. Regular Exercise May Boost Prostate Cancer Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158374.html Regular Exercise May Boost Prostate Cancer Survival Study found that ... HealthDay News) -- Sticking to a moderate or intense exercise regimen may improve a man's odds of surviving ...

  6. Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funds Request Information Get Involved Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby Home Grieving Families Surviving the ... Candle on For Families Who Have Experienced the Death of a Baby The numbers are staggering. Every ...

  7. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  8. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  9. 46 CFR 199.261 - Survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Survival craft. 199.261 Section 199.261 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LIFESAVING APPLIANCES AND ARRANGEMENTS LIFESAVING SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.261 Survival craft. (a) Each survival craft must be approved...

  10. Combat survivability - A look at the fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.E.; Caravasos, N. Boeing Defense and Space Group, Philadelphia, PA )

    1992-08-01

    Survivability enhancement is discussed in the light of its increased priority with special attention given to survivability modeling and battle-damage repair. Survivability-enhancement concepts - which include signature reduction, active damage suppression, and component redundancy/separation - can be supplemented by measures for vulnerability prediction.

  11. Systematic review: does endocrine therapy prolong survival in patients with prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, John Thomas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Lippert, Solvej; Brasso, Klaus; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Objective Primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the gold standard in the management of patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). ADT relieves symptoms and reduces tumor burden, but it has never been demonstrated to increase either PCa-specific or overall survival per se. Several trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized and locally advanced non-metastatic PCa, neoadjuvant ET before radical prostatectomy has no effect on survival. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant ET in combination with curatively intended radiotherapy results in PCa-specific and overall survival benefit, although the duration of ET remains under debate. In N + disease, the timing of ET is under debate, although data suggest that early ET is associated with decreased PCa-specific and overall mortality. In M + disease, no proper randomized trials have been performed in patients with newly diagnosed M1 disease. In metastatic castration-resistant PCa, two novel endocrine agents have been proven to increase overall survival significantly compared to placebo. Conclusions ET has never been proven to increase survival in newly diagnosed metastatic PCa in a randomized clinical trial. Nonetheless, a number of trials supports that ET with proper timing, sequencing and in combination with other therapeutic modalities increases survival in several stages of PCa. PMID:26907159

  12. Crossover studies with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buyze, Jozefien; Goetghebeur, Els

    2013-12-01

    Crossover designs are well known to have major advantages when comparing the effect of two treatments which do not interact. With a right-censored survival endpoint, however, this design is quickly abandoned in favour of the more costly parallel design. Motivated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention studies which lacked power, we evaluate what may be gained in this setting and compare parallel with crossover designs. In a heterogeneous population, we find and explain a substantial increase in power for the crossover study using a non-parametric logrank test. With frailties in a proportional hazards model, crossover designs equally lead to substantially smaller variance for the subject-specific hazard ratio (HR), while the population-averaged HR sees negligible gain. Its efficiency benefit is recovered when the population-averaged HR is reconstructed from estimated subject-specific hazard rates. We derive the time point for treatment crossover that optimizes efficiency and end with the analysis of two recent HIV prevention trials. We find that a Cellulose sulphate trial could have hardly gained efficiency from a crossover design, while a Nonoxynol-9 trial stood to gain substantial power. We conclude that there is a role for effective crossover designs in important classes of survival problems. PMID:21715438

  13. Survival analysis of aging aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Samuel

    This study pushes systems engineering of aging aircraft beyond the boundaries of empirical and deterministic modeling by making a sharp break with the traditional laboratory-derived corrosion prediction algorithms that have shrouded real-world failures of aircraft structure. At the heart of this problem is the aeronautical industry's inability to be forthcoming in an accurate model that predicts corrosion failures in aircraft in spite of advances in corrosion algorithms or improvements in simulation and modeling. The struggle to develop accurate corrosion probabilistic models stems from a multitude of real-world interacting variables that synergistically influence corrosion in convoluted and complex ways. This dissertation, in essence, offers a statistical framework for the analysis of structural airframe corrosion failure by utilizing real-world data while considering the effects of interacting corrosion variables. This study injects realism into corrosion failures of aging aircraft systems by accomplishing four major goals related to the conceptual and methodological framework of corrosion modeling. First, this work connects corrosion modeling from the traditional, laboratory derived algorithms to corrosion failures in actual operating aircraft. This work augments physics-based modeling by examining the many confounding and interacting variables, such as environmental, geographical and operational, that impact failure of airframe structure. Examined through the lens of censored failure data from aircraft flying in a maritime environment, this study enhances the understanding between the triad of the theoretical, laboratory and real-world corrosion. Secondly, this study explores the importation and successful application of an advanced biomedical statistical tool---survival analysis---to model censored corrosion failure data. This well-grounded statistical methodology is inverted from a methodology that analyzes survival to one that examines failures. Third, this

  14. Local excision for selected colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M A; Goldberg, S M

    1989-07-01

    In summary, local excision is a useful tool in the management of selected colorectal carcinomas. The advent of the fibreoptic colonoscope has revised the concept of local excision when dealing with carcinoma-containing polyps of the colon. The clinician now has the means of locally excising certain carcinomas which would have required laparotomy in the not so distant past. In dealing with carcinoma of the rectum, local excision is not advocated for all rectal carcinomas. In fact, when the previously discussed tumour related factors are considered, local excision should be the ultimate procedure in less than 5% of operations performed for rectal carcinomas. However, when appropriately used, local excision provides a less morbid alternative to more radical procedures without compromising patient survival rates or local recurrence rates. PMID:2692739

  15. ClearCode34: A Prognostic Risk Predictor for Localized Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samira A.; Brannon, A. Rose; Parker, Joel S.; Fisher, Jennifer C.; Sen, Oishee; Kattan, Michael W.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Hsieh, James J.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Tamboli, Pheroze; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Hinds, Peter; Miller, C. Ryan; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene expression signatures have proven to be useful tools in many cancers to identify distinct subtypes of disease based on molecular features that drive pathogenesis, and to aid in predicting clinical outcomes. However, there are no current signatures for kidney cancer that are applicable in a clinical setting. Objective To generate a signature biomarker for the clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) good risk (ccA) and poor risk (ccB) subtype classification that could be readily applied to clinical samples to develop an integrated model for biologically defined risk stratification. Design, setting, and participants A set of 72 ccRCC sample standards was used to develop a 34-gene classifier (ClearCode34) for assigning ccRCC tumors to subtypes. The classifier was applied to RNA-sequencing data from 380 nonmetastatic ccRCC samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and to 157 formalin-fixed clinical samples collected at the University of North Carolina. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed on the individual cohorts to calculate recurrence-free survival (RFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Training and test sets were randomly selected from the combined cohorts to assemble a risk prediction model for disease recurrence. Results and limitations The subtypes were significantly associated with RFS (p < 0.01), CSS (p < 0.01), and OS (p < 0.01). Hazard ratios for subtype classification were similar to those of stage and grade in association with recurrence risk, and remained significant in multivariate analyses. An integrated molecular/clinical model for RFS to assign patients to risk groups was able to accurately predict CSS above established, clinical risk-prediction algorithms. Conclusions The ClearCode34-based model provides prognostic stratification that improves upon established algorithms to assess risk for recurrence and death for nonmetastatic ccRCC patients. Patient summary

  16. Multimodality Local Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paryani, Nitesh N.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Hochwald, Steven N.; Marcus, Robert B.; Indelicato, Daniel J.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum are rare tumors comprising less than 1% of all malignancies. Although surgery continues as the mainstay of treatment, the large size of these tumors coupled with their proximity to critical structures make resection with wide margins difficult to achieve. The role and timing of radiotherapy are controversial. This study updates our institutional experience using multimodality local therapy for resectable retroperitoneal sarcoma and identifies prognostic factors impacting disease control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 2007, 58 patients with nonmetastatic retroperitoneal sarcoma were treated with surgery and radiation at University of Florida. The median age at radiotherapy was 57 years old (range, 18-80 years). Forty-two patients received preoperative radiotherapy and 16 received postoperative radiotherapy. Nineteen patients received 1.8 Gy once daily and 39 patients received 1.2 Gy twice daily. Variables analyzed for prognostic value included age, grade, kidney involvement, histology, de novo versus recurrent presentation, tumor diameter, margin status, radiotherapy sequencing (preoperative vs. postoperative), total radiation dose, fractionation scheme, and treatment era. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rates were 49%, 58%, and 62%, respectively. Nearly two-thirds of disease failures involved a component of local progression. On multivariate analysis, only margin status was significantly associated with improved 5-year local control (85%, negative margins; 63%, microscopic positive margins; 0%, gross positive margins; p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival (64%, negative margins; 56%, microscopic positive margins; 13%, gross positive margins; p = 0.0012). Thirty-one Grade 3 or greater toxicities were observed in 22 patients, including two treatment-related deaths (3%). Conclusion: For retroperitoneal sarcoma, local control remains a

  17. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  18. Survival and Growth of Epiphytic Ferns Depend on Resource Sharing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Xing-Liang; Hu, Yue-Hua; Shi, Xian-Meng; Li, Su; Ma, Wen-Zhang; Chang, Yan-Fen; Fan, Ze-Xin; Lu, Shu-Gang; Wu, Yi; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing) on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets) and another on groups (several ramets within a plot), with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration) on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium) in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time. PMID:27066052

  19. Survival and Growth of Epiphytic Ferns Depend on Resource Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Song, Liang; Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Xing-Liang; Hu, Yue-Hua; Shi, Xian-Meng; Li, Su; Ma, Wen-Zhang; Chang, Yan-Fen; Fan, Ze-Xin; Lu, Shu-Gang; Wu, Yi; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing) on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets) and another on groups (several ramets within a plot), with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration) on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium) in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration) significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time. PMID:27066052

  20. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  1. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    PubMed Central

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a ‘preservation motif’, and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival. PMID:21687667

  2. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    SciTech Connect

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  3. Cerebellar medulloblastoma: the importance of posterior fossa dose to survival and patterns of failure

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.L.; Simpson, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    Fifty patients with biopsy-proven cerebellar medulloblastoma were retrospectively analyzed for prognostic factors, survival and patterns of failure. Five- and ten-year actuarial survivals for the entire group were 51% and 42%. Survival and local control were significantly better for the 21 patients who received doses greater than 5000 rad to the posterior fossa (85% and 80% respectively) than for the remaining patients (38% and 38%, respectively). Significant prognostic factors included achievement of local control in the posterior fossa (p = .0001) and dose to the posterior fossa (p = .0005). Sex, age, duration of symptoms, extent of surgery and initial T-stage of disease were not significant. Posterior fossa was the predominant site of failure (71% of failures), but 10% of patients failed in the cerebrum and 12% outside the CNS. This experience confirms that survival rates of 70-80% are achievable with current treatment policies but accurate and consistent dose delivery to the posterior fossa is essential.

  4. Cerebellar medulloblastoma: the importance of posterior fossa dose to survival and patterns of failure

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.L.; Simpson, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    Fifty patients with biopsy-proven cerebellar medulloblastoma were retrospectively analyzed for prognostic factors, survival and patterns of failure. Five- and ten-year actuarial survivals for the entire group were 51% and 42%. Survival and local control were significantly better for the 21 patients who received doses greater that 5000 rad to the posterior fossa (85% and 80% respectively) than for the remaining patients (38% and 38%, respectively). Significant prognostic factors included achievement of local control in the posterior fossa (p = .0001) and dose to the posterior fossa (p = .0005). Sex, age, duration of symptoms, extent of surgery and initial T-stage of disease were not significant. Posterior fossa was the predominant site of failure (71% of failures), but 10% of patients failed in the cerebrum and 12% outside the CNS. This experience confirms that survival rates of 70-80% are achievable with current treatment policies but accurate and consistent dose delivery to the posterior fossa is essential.

  5. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  6. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  7. Genitourinary mast cells and survival.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Stewart, Julia M

    2015-10-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are ubiquitous in the body, but they have historically been associated with allergies, and most recently with regulation of immunity and inflammation. However, it remains a puzzle why so many MCs are located in the diencephalon, which regulates emotions and in the genitourinary tract, including the bladder, prostate, penis, vagina and uterus that hardly ever get allergic reactions. A number of papers have reported that MCs have estrogen, gonadotropin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors. Moreover, animal experiments have shown that diencephalic MCs increase in number during courting in doves. We had reported that allergic stimulation of nasal MCs leads to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) activation. Interestingly, anecdotal information indicates that female patients with mastocytosis or mast cell activation syndrome may have increased libido. Preliminary evidence also suggests that MCs may have olfactory receptors. MCs may, therefore, have been retained phylogenetically not only to "smell danger", but to promote survival and procreation. PMID:26813805

  8. Optics survivability support, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, N.; Simpson, T.; Busdeker, A.; Doft, F.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of the Optics Survivability Support Final Report contains plots of all the data contained in the computerized Optical Glasses Database. All of these plots are accessible through the Database, but are included here as a convenient reference. The first three pages summarize the types of glass included with a description of the radiation source, test date, and the original data reference. This information is included in the database as a macro button labeled 'LLNL DATABASE'. Following this summary is an Abbe chart showing which glasses are included and where they lie as a function of nu(sub d) and n(sub d). This chart is also callable through the database as a macro button labeled 'ABBEC'.

  9. [Circulatory survival of irreversible comas].

    PubMed

    Cartier, F; Chevet, D; Garré, M; Launois, B; Thomas, R; Le Pollès, R

    1975-01-18

    On the basis of a series of 53 cases of irreversible coma maintained in circulatory survival with the aim of removing the kidneys, the authors discuss the mode of treatment, with particular reference to the intravenous fluids used and the use of medications influencing the circulation. Fluid and electrolytes given must be adjusted hourly to ensure the exact replacement of urinary losses. Isoprotenerol is the only medication usually necessary. In the event of circulatory insufficiency, which is difficult to foresee and hence prevent, immediate volume expansion in a short a time as possible and isoprotenerol most frequently correct the situation (14 out of 17 cases). Thus effective circulation may be maintained until the kidneys are removed (48 out of 53 cases). 92 p.cent of the grafted kidneys functioned from the first day onwards. PMID:1093120

  10. Bacterial Survival in Laundered Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Walter, William G.; Schillinger, John E.

    1975-01-01

    Bacterial survival was determined in linens (i) inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (ii), taken from hospital isolation patients' beds, and (iii) used by students in their homes. Two different washers using temperatures of 38, 49, 54 and 60 C, respectively, for different times were employed along with a commercial tumbler dryer. Findings, after macerating the linens in a Waring blender and enumerating on nonselective media, indicate that acceptable levels of survivors can be achieved in motel and hotel linens by an 8- to 10-min wash cycle at 54 C followed by adequate drying. However, it is recommended that a wash cycle with 60 C for 10 to 13 min be employed for linens in health care factilities. The microbial significance of various laundering practices is discussed. PMID:1090256

  11. Survival Data and Regression Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    We start this chapter by introducing some basic elements for the analysis of censored survival data. Then we focus on right censored data and develop two types of regression models. The first one concerns the so-called accelerated failure time models (AFT), which are parametric models where a function of a parameter depends linearly on the covariables. The second one is a semiparametric model, where the covariables enter in a multiplicative form in the expression of the hazard rate function. The main statistical tool for analysing these regression models is the maximum likelihood methodology and, in spite we recall some essential results about the ML theory, we refer to the chapter "Logistic Regression" for a more detailed presentation.

  12. Genitourinary mast cells and survival

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Julia M.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are ubiquitous in the body, but they have historically been associated with allergies, and most recently with regulation of immunity and inflammation. However, it remains a puzzle why so many MCs are located in the diencephalon, which regulates emotions and in the genitourinary tract, including the bladder, prostate, penis, vagina and uterus that hardly ever get allergic reactions. A number of papers have reported that MCs have estrogen, gonadotropin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors. Moreover, animal experiments have shown that diencephalic MCs increase in number during courting in doves. We had reported that allergic stimulation of nasal MCs leads to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) activation. Interestingly, anecdotal information indicates that female patients with mastocytosis or mast cell activation syndrome may have increased libido. Preliminary evidence also suggests that MCs may have olfactory receptors. MCs may, therefore, have been retained phylogenetically not only to “smell danger”, but to promote survival and procreation. PMID:26813805

  13. Optics survivability support, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, N.; Simpson, T.; Busdeker, A.; Doft, F.

    1993-03-01

    This final report is a documentation of the activities and work performed by JAYCOR during the period from June 11, 1992 through March 10, 1993 to support Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the development of radiation tolerant optical subsystems and components for use under the Advanced Implementation Technology (AIT) effort. The work is primarily directed towards: performance of above-ground testing and analysis of the LLNL space-based LIDAR (Laser Illuminated Detection and Ranging) system and components, and compilation of a radiation effects data base for bulk optical materials, i.e., glasses. The objective is to support LLNL activities in the area of optics survivability and in engineering a radiation hardened LIDAR that can survive and operate through natural, as well as hostile, space environments (primary emphasis is on operation in electron, proton, and total dose environment). An analysis of the LIDAR design as developed by Kigre, Inc. for LLNL shows that the most susceptible components in terms of radiation susceptibility are the doubling crystal and laser rod materials. The radiation susceptibility analysis of the Kigre design (pulsed Q-switch mode) is performed using data obtained from above-ground testing of each individual component material. A passive Q-switch material is evaluated and found to degrade via a decrease in the amount of saturable absorption relative to an un-irradiated sample. Several different doubling crystal types (LBO, KTP, KD*P) are also evaluated for both total dose and high energy proton susceptibility. LBO is the least susceptible and KTP is the most affected by exposure to ionizing radiation. An analysis of the Kigre system response as a function of total dose is made, including the effects on thin film anti-reflection and band-pass filter coatings.

  14. Maternal nutrition, health, and survival.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul

    2002-05-01

    The burden of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries is high. Each year, 600,000 women die from pregnancy-related causes and 62 million women suffer from morbidity and complications of pregnancy. The extent to which maternal nutrition can improve maternal health and survival is not well understood. Excluding deaths due to induced abortions, the other four main causes of maternal mortality (preeclampsia, hemorrhage, obstructed labor, and infection) may be amenable to nutrition interventions. The role of calcium in reducing the incidence of preeclampsia and hypertension is promising, but more research in deficient populations is urgently needed. Antenatal iron supplementation, although frequently recommended to prevent anemia during pregnancy, has had little program success. Severe anemia may be an important cause of maternal mortality, but convincing evidence is lacking on the health consequences of mild-to-moderate maternal anemia. Knowledge of the etiology of anemia is important in identifying effective strategies for combating it. Other vitamins such as folate, B12, and vitamin A may enhance the effect of iron supplementation in populations where multiple nutrition deficiencies exist. Maternal night blindness is widespread in South Asian women. In Nepal, this condition is associated with markedly increased risks of vitamin A deficiency, anemia, morbidity, and maternal and infant mortality. These findings need to be replicated elsewhere in South Asia. One study has shown vitamin A and beta carotene supplementation to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity. These findings need testing in different settings with emphasis on investigating the mechanisms of the effect. The area of prepregnancy nutrition and its influence on prolonged and obstructed labor is wide open for investigation. The scope for research in the area of maternal nutrition and health is large and the onus is on nutritionists to bring to the forefront the role of nutrition in

  15. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  16. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  17. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  18. Interplay of Race, Socioeconomic Status and Treatment on Survival of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Kendra; Powell, Isaac J.; Underwood, Willie; George, Julie; Yee, Cecilia; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We compared overall and prostate cancer-specific survival, using Detroit SEER registry data, among 8,679 Detroit-area black and white men with localized or regional stage prostate cancer diagnosed 1988-1992 to determine if racial disparities in survival remained after adjusting for treatment type and socioeconomic status (SES). Methods Cases were geocoded to census block-group and SES data obtained from the 1990 U.S. Census. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio of death from any cause. Median follow-up was 16.5 years. Results Among 7770 localized stage cases (22% black, 78% white), and 909 regional cases (24% black, 76% white), black men were more likely to receive non-surgical treatment (p <0.001), and to be of low SES (p<0.0001). Survival analyses were stratified by stage; for both stages, black men had poorer survival than white men in the unadjusted model. Adjustment for age and tumor grade had little effect on survival differences, while adjustment for SES and treatment erased the survival differences. Conclusions Low SES and non-surgical treatment were associated with higher risk of death among men with prostate cancer, which explains much of the survival disadvantage for black men with prostate cancer. PMID:19962532

  19. Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival

    PubMed Central

    Gosden, Thomas P.; Waller, John T.; Svensson, Erik I.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source–sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in longevity between males from the different environments suggesting that the observed differences in male survival are environment-dependent and probably caused by local adaptation. Furthermore, the coastal environment was found to be warmer and drier than the inland environment, further suggesting local adaptation to microclimatic factors has lead to differential survival of resident and immigrant males. Our results suggest that low survival of immigrant males mediates isolation between closely located populations inhabiting different microclimatic environments. PMID:25631994

  20. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  1. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    , in response to Griffiths' challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has described is flawed.

  2. Multivariate piecewise exponential survival modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Panagiotou, Orestis A; Black, Amanda; Liao, Dandan; Wacholder, Sholom

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we develop a piecewise Poisson regression method to analyze survival data from complex sample surveys involving cluster-correlated, differential selection probabilities, and longitudinal responses, to conveniently draw inference on absolute risks in time intervals that are prespecified by investigators. Extensive simulations evaluate the developed methods with extensions to multiple covariates under various complex sample designs, including stratified sampling, sampling with selection probability proportional to a measure of size (PPS), and a multi-stage cluster sampling. We applied our methods to a study of mortality in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to investigate whether a biomarker available from biospecimens collected near time of diagnosis stratifies subsequent risk of death. Poisson regression coefficients and absolute risks of mortality (and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals) for prespecified age intervals by biomarker levels are estimated. We conclude with a brief discussion of the motivation, methods, and findings of the study. PMID:26583951

  3. Multivariate Piecewise Exponential Survival Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Black, Amanda; Liao, Dandan; Wacholder, Sholom

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this article, we develop a piecewise Poisson regression method to analyze survival data from complex sample surveys involving cluster-correlated, differential selection probabilities, and longitudinal responses, to conveniently draw inference on absolute risks in time intervals that are prespecified by investigators. Extensive simulations evaluate the developed methods with extensions to multiple covariates under various complex sample designs, including stratified sampling, sampling with selection probability proportional to a measure of size (PPS), and a multi-stage cluster sampling. We applied our methods to a study of mortality in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to investigate whether a biomarker available from biospecimens collected near time of diagnosis stratifies subsequent risk of death. Poisson regression coefficients and absolute risks of mortality (and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals) for prespecified age intervals by biomarker levels are estimated. We conclude with a brief discussion of the motivation, methods, and findings of the study. PMID:26583951

  4. Correlated growth and survival of juvenile spectacled eiders: Evidence of habitat limitation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Morse, J.A.; Grand, J.B.; Moran, C.L.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the growth and survival of Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) ducklings to 30 days of age along the lower Kashunuk River on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta from 1995 to 2000. We replicated this study at a second site, Kigigak Island, in 1999 and 2000. Age-adjusted estimates of duckling mass and survival at 30 days posthatching were highly variable. Duckling survival was consistently higher on Kigigak Island in 1999 and 2000, averaging 67%, while survival on the Kashunuk River averaged 45% during the same time period. Duckling survival was negatively related to hatching date. At the Kashunuk River site our data supported models that indicated age-adjusted mass varied with habitat type and declined with hatching date. Ducklings from Kashunuk River were heavier in 1999, while ducklings from Kigigak Island were heavier in 2000. However, we found a positive correlation between 30-day duckling survival and age-adjusted mass, suggesting a localized environmental effect on both parameters. We conclude that predation may be the proximate mechanism of mortality, but habitat conditions are likely the ultimate factors influencing duckling survival. Geographic variation in rates of duckling survival and apparent growth suggest that spatial heterogeneity in population vital rates is occurring at multiple levels. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  5. Differential Survival in Europe and the United States: Estimates Based on Subjective Probabilities of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Rohwedder, Susann

    2013-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons of differential survival by socioeconomic status (SES) are useful in many domains. Yet, to date, such studies have been rare. Reliably estimating differential survival in a single country has been challenging because it requires rich panel data with a large sample size. Cross-country estimates have proven even more difficult because the measures of SES need to be comparable internationally. We present an alternative method for acquiring information on differential survival by SES. Rather than using observations of actual survival, we relate individuals’ subjective probabilities of survival to SES variables in cross section. To show that subjective survival probabilities are informative proxies for actual survival when estimating differential survival, we compare estimates of differential survival based on actual survival with estimates based on subjective probabilities of survival for the same sample. The results are remarkably similar. We then use this approach to compare differential survival by SES for 10 European countries and the United States. Wealthier people have higher survival probabilities than those who are less wealthy, but the strength of the association differs across countries. Nations with a smaller gradient appear to be Belgium, France, and Italy, while the United States, England, and Sweden appear to have a larger gradient. PMID:22042664

  6. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  7. Multimodal therapy in locally advanced breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, M.J.; Andriole, D.P.; Kraybill, W.G.; Khojasteh, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Among 879 patients treated for breast cancer between 1975 and 1984, advanced disease was found in 125 (14%). A subgroup of 34 (4%) presented with untreated locally advanced disease without demonstrable distant metastases at the time of diagnosis (stage IIIB = T4abed, NX-2,MO). During the first 5 years (1975 through 1979), 17 patients were treated primarily with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy (Group A). From 1980 to 1984 (Group B), the management consisted of four courses of induction multi-drug chemotherapy followed primarily by mastectomy and additional chemotherapy. The mean follow-up for the most recent group (Group B) is 48 months. Follow-up was complete. While the local disease control rate was the same for both groups (76%), the survival was remarkably different. Group A patients experienced a median survival of 15 months, and only one survived 5 years. In Group B, the median survival was 56 months with nine patients (53%) alive between 40 and 76 months, seven (41%) of whom are 5-year survivors. While the overall mortality of patients with inflammatory breast cancer was greater in both groups when compared with the group with noninflammatory disease, the survival of patients in Group B was better than in Group A for both inflammatory and noninflammatory cancers (p less than 0.01). Estrogen receptor, nodal, and menopausal status did not influence survival. These data suggest that neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with stage IIIB breast carcinoma and delays the establishment or progression of distant metastases. Mastectomy is an important component in the treatment of this disease.

  8. Familiarity with breeding habitat improves daily survival in colonial cliff swallows

    PubMed Central

    BROWN, CHARLES R.; BROWN, MARY BOMBERGER; BRAZEAL, KATHLEEN R.

    2008-01-01

    One probable cost of dispersing to a new breeding habitat is unfamiliarity with local conditions such as the whereabouts of food or the habits of local predators, and consequently immigrants may have lower probabilities of survival than more experienced residents. Within a breeding season, estimated daily survival probabilities of cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) at colonies in southwestern Nebraska were highest for birds that had always nested at the same site, followed by those for birds that had nested there in some (but not all) past years. Daily survival probabilities were lowest for birds that were naïve immigrants to a colony site and for yearling birds that were nesting for the first time. Birds with past experience at a colony site had monthly survival 8.6% greater than that of naïve immigrants. All colonies where experienced residents did better than immigrants were smaller than 750 nests in size, and in colonies greater than 750 nests, naïve immigrants paid no survival costs relative to experienced residents. Removal of nest ectoparasites by fumigation resulted in higher survival probabilities for all birds, on average, and diminished the differences between immigrants and past residents, probably by improving bird condition to the extent that effects of past experience were relatively less important and harder to detect. The greater survival of experienced residents could not be explained by condition or territory quality, suggesting that familiarity with a local area confers survival advantages during the breeding season for cliff swallows. Colonial nesting may help to moderate the cost of unfamiliarity with an area, likely through social transfer of information about food sources and enhanced vigilance in large groups. PMID:19802326

  9. Behavioural perspectives on piglet survival.

    PubMed

    Fraser, D

    1990-01-01

    Litters of domestic piglets show strong sibling competition, large differences among litter-mates in birth weight and rate of growth, and, in the absence of human intervention, a high mortality rate. This combination of traits suggests that pigs are using a reproductive strategy similar to that of certain bird species which produce one or more small 'spare' young whose death or survival is determined by sibling competition. Death through competition is natural in such species. Prevention of death requires the early identification and separate rearing of unsuccessful competitors. The major behavioural pathways leading to piglet deaths are considered to be malnutrition through unsuccessful suckling behaviour, and crushing of piglets by the sow. Crushing involves two distinct behavioural sequences: posterior crushing (beneath the sow's hind quarters) and ventral crushing (beneath the udder and rib cage). Farrowing crates are designed to prevent posterior but not ventral crushing. Malnourished piglets appear to be more vulnerable to crushing, perhaps because persistent suckling attempts cause them to spend more time near the sow. Prevention of crushing thus requires a reduction in malnutrition, not merely restriction of the sow's movements. Under certain conditions, dehydration may be an important but neglected aspect of malnutrition. Some litters of piglets have much higher death losses than others, presumably because of risk factors that apply to the litter as a whole. Early malnutrition, resulting from hypogalactia in the sow in the first days after farrowing, appears to be an important risk factor. Farrowing difficulties leading to piglet hypoxia during the birth process may be another. Risk factors that affect whole litters deserve greater emphasis in future research. PMID:2192051

  10. Remote Control of Gene Function by Local Translation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  11. Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Enhances Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Thompson, Sarah R.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the idea that memory systems might have evolved to help us remember fitness-relevant information--specifically, information relevant to survival. In 4 incidental learning experiments, people were asked to rate common nouns for their survival relevance (e.g., in securing food, water, or protection from predators); in…

  12. Temperature mediated moose survival in Northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenarz, M.S.; Nelson, M.E.; Schrage, M.W.; Edwards, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The earth is in the midst of a pronounced warming trend and temperatures in Minnesota, USA, as elsewhere, are projected to increase. Northern Minnesota represents the southern edge to the circumpolar distribution of moose (Alces alces), a species intolerant of heat. Moose increase their metabolic rate to regulate their core body temperature as temperatures rise. We hypothesized that moose survival rates would be a function of the frequency and magnitude that ambient temperatures exceeded the upper critical temperature of moose. We compared annual and seasonal moose survival in northeastern Minnesota between 2002 and 2008 with a temperature metric. We found that models based on January temperatures above the critical threshold were inversely correlated with subsequent survival and explained >78 of variability in spring, fall, and annual survival. Models based on late-spring temperatures also explained a high proportion of survival during the subsequent fall. A model based on warm-season temperatures was important in explaining survival during the subsequent winter. Our analyses suggest that temperatures may have a cumulative influence on survival. We expect that continuation or acceleration of current climate trends will result in decreased survival, a decrease in moose density, and ultimately, a retreat of moose northward from their current distribution.

  13. Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis ... Threatening Bacterial Infection Remains Mysterious This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  14. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  15. Analysis of survival data from telemetry projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Telemetry is an increasingly popular method for studying animal movements and habitat use. Telemetry provides a means for studying survival and causes of mortality. This paper describes some statistical techniques which can provide valid estimates of survival rates based on data from telemetry studies.

  16. The Colgate University Winter Wilderness Survival Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Peter C.; Milner, Robert

    In January 1976, Colgate University offered its first Winter Wilderness Survival Program in conjunction with the North American Wilderness Survival School (NAWSS). This post-program evaluation summarizes background of the three-week program, with attention to the leadership, program aims, how the course was publicized, and how it developed month…

  17. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  18. Adaptive Memory: Is Survival Processing Special?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2008-01-01

    Do the operating characteristics of memory continue to bear the imprints of ancestral selection pressures? Previous work in our laboratory has shown that human memory may be specially tuned to retain information processed in terms of its survival relevance. A few seconds of survival processing in an incidental learning context can produce recall…

  19. Congruity Effects in the Survival Processing Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2011-01-01

    Five experiments were conducted to investigate a proposal by Butler, Kang, and Roediger (2009) that congruity (or fit) between target items and processing tasks might contribute, at least partly, to the mnemonic advantages typically produced by survival processing. In their research, no significant survival advantages were found when words were…

  20. Factors predictive of survival in ampullary carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Howe, J R; Klimstra, D S; Moccia, R D; Conlon, K C; Brennan, M F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recent Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience with adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and to identify clinicopathologic factors that have an impact on patient survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The prognosis for patients with tumors of the ampulla of Vater is improved relative to other periampullary neoplasms. Identification of independent prognostic factors in ampullary tumors has been limited by small numbers of tumors and a lack of pathologic review. METHODS: Data were collected prospectively for patients presenting with periampullary carcinomas to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between October 15, 1983 and June 30, 1995. The correlation between clinicopathologic variables and survival of ampullary carcinoma was tested by the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Survival of patients with periampullary adenocarcinomas was compared by the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: In 123 patients presenting with ampullary carcinoma, 101 tumors (82.1%) were resected. Factors significantly correlated with improved survival were resection (p < 0.01), and in resected tumors, negative nodes (p = 0.04) and margins (p = 0.02) independently predicted for improved survival. In periampullary tumors, the highest rates of resection and overall survival (median, 43.6 months) were found in ampullary carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: Factors predictive of improved survival in ampullary carcinoma include resection, negative margins, and negative nodes. Improved overall survival in ampullary relative to periampullary adenocarcinoma is due in part to a significantly higher rate of resection. Images Figure 1. PMID:9671071

  1. Behavioral Procedures in Community Survival Skills Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, R. Wayne; Shook, Gerry L.

    1983-01-01

    The article reviews strategies for selecting and prioritizing community survival skills for mentally retarded persons and tactics for performing a behavioral task analysis of the identified skill. The behavioral procedures common to community survival skills training programs are described and representative research is reviewed. (Author/CL)

  2. 46 CFR 172.110 - Survival conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Survival conditions. 172.110 Section 172.110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES... is presumed to survive assumed damage if it meets the following conditions in the final stage...

  3. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  4. Survival of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae outside the pig.

    PubMed

    Assavacheep, P; Rycroft, A N

    2013-02-01

    Transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is primarily thought to be via direct transfer of mucus from pig to pig. For transfer between farms, the organism may need to persist in the wet or dried state to be carried on an inanimate surface. The survival of A. pleuropneumoniae was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. In aqueous suspension, survival was improved by the presence of NaCl and mucin; it was prolonged at lower temperature. In dry state, it survived best on a hydrophobic surface either under desiccated conditions or saturated humidity. Detectable viability was maintained for 3-4 days. When frozen, A. pleuropneumoniae survived for more than 17 weeks at -20 °C, but the viability declined to 0.01% during that time. Survival at -70 °C was effective for long term storage. Results obtained from this investigation would be applicable for sampling method, transport techniques, epidemiological study, and biosecurity implementation. PMID:22892250

  5. Prognostic Indicators for Ebola Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kuah, Solomon; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Coffee, Megan; Knust, Barbara; Klena, John; Foday, Joyce; Hertz, Darren; Hermans, Veerle; Achar, Jay; Caleo, Grazia M.; Van Herp, Michel; Albariño, César G.; Amman, Brian; Basile, Alison Jane; Bearden, Scott; Belser, Jessica A.; Bergeron, Eric; Blau, Dianna; Brault, Aaron C.; Campbell, Shelley; Flint, Mike; Gibbons, Aridth; Goodman, Christin; McMullan, Laura; Paddock, Christopher; Russell, Brandy; Salzer, Johanna S.; Sanchez, Angela; Sealy, Tara; Wang, David; Saffa, Gbessay; Turay, Alhajie; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether 2 readily available indicators predicted survival among patients with Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone, we evaluated information for 216 of the 227 patients in Bo District during a 4-month period. The indicators were time from symptom onset to healthcare facility admission and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR cycle threshold (Ct), a surrogate for viral load, in first Ebola virus–positive blood sample tested. Of these patients, 151 were alive when detected and had reported healthcare facility admission dates and Ct values available. Time from symptom onset to healthcare facility admission was not associated with survival, but viral load in the first Ebola virus–positive blood sample was inversely associated with survival: 52 (87%) of 60 patients with a Ct of >24 survived and 20 (22%) of 91 with a Ct of <24 survived. Ct values may be useful for clinicians making treatment decisions or managing patient or family expectations. PMID:26812579

  6. Prognostic Indicators for Ebola Patient Survival.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Samuel J; Maenner, Matthew J; Kuah, Solomon; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Coffee, Megan; Knust, Barbara; Klena, John; Foday, Joyce; Hertz, Darren; Hermans, Veerle; Achar, Jay; Caleo, Grazia M; Van Herp, Michel; Albariño, César G; Amman, Brian; Basile, Alison Jane; Bearden, Scott; Belser, Jessica A; Bergeron, Eric; Blau, Dianna; Brault, Aaron C; Campbell, Shelley; Flint, Mike; Gibbons, Aridth; Goodman, Christin; McMullan, Laura; Paddock, Christopher; Russell, Brandy; Salzer, Johanna S; Sanchez, Angela; Sealy, Tara; Wang, David; Saffa, Gbessay; Turay, Alhajie; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether 2 readily available indicators predicted survival among patients with Ebola virus disease in Sierra Leone, we evaluated information for 216 of the 227 patients in Bo District during a 4-month period. The indicators were time from symptom onset to healthcare facility admission and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR cycle threshold (Ct), a surrogate for viral load, in first Ebola virus-positive blood sample tested. Of these patients, 151 were alive when detected and had reported healthcare facility admission dates and Ct values available. Time from symptom onset to healthcare facility admission was not associated with survival, but viral load in the first Ebola virus-positive blood sample was inversely associated with survival: 52 (87%) of 60 patients with a Ct of >24 survived and 20 (22%) of 91 with a Ct of <24 survived. Ct values may be useful for clinicians making treatment decisions or managing patient or family expectations. PMID:26812579

  7. Localized Pancreatic Cancer: Multidisciplinary Management.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Herman, Joseph M; Simeone, Diane M; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer that continues to have single-digit 5-year mortality rates despite advancements in the field. Surgery remains the only curative treatment; however, most patients present with late-stage disease deemed unresectable, either due to extensive local vascular involvement or the presence of distant metastasis. Resection guidelines that include a borderline resectable group, as well as advancements in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation that improve resectability of locally advanced disease, may improve outcomes for patients with more invasive disease. Multi-agent chemotherapy regimens fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine improved response rates and survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer and are now being used in earlier stages for patients with localized potentially resectable and unresectable disease, with goals of downstaging tumors to allow margin-negative resection and reducing systemic recurrence. Chemoradiotherapy, although still controversial for both resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer, is being used in the context of contemporary chemotherapy backbone regimens, and novel radiation techniques such as stereotactic body frame radiation therapy (SBRT) are studied on the premise of maintaining or improving efficacy and reducing treatment duration. Patient selection for optimal treatment designation is currently provided by multidisciplinary tumor boards, but biomarker discovery, in blood, tumors, or through novel imaging, is an area of intense research. Results to date suggest that some patients with unresectable disease at the outset have survival rates as good as those with initially resectable disease if able to undergo surgical resection. Long-term follow-up and improved clinical trials options are needed to determine optimal treatment modalities for patients with localized pancreatic cancer. PMID:27249726

  8. Racial disparities in survival among injured drivers.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Amy E; Clark, David E; Travis, Lori L

    2013-03-01

    Prior studies on racial and ethnic disparities in survival after motor vehicle crashes have examined only population-based death rates or have been restricted to hospitalized patients. In the current study, we examined 3 components of crash survival by race/ethnicity: survival overall, survival to reach a hospital, and survival among those hospitalized. Nine years of data (from 2000 through 2008) from the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System were used to examine white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, and Hispanic drivers aged ≥ 15 years with serious injuries (injury severity scores of ≥ 9). By using multivariable logistic regression, we found that a driver's race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with overall survival after being injured in a crash (for blacks, odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36, 1.32; for Hispanics, OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.72), and blacks and Hispanics were equally likely to survive to be treated at a hospital compared with whites (for blacks, OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.93; for Hispanics, OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.71, 1.79). However, among patients who were treated at a hospital, blacks were 50% less likely to survive 30 days compared with whites (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33, 0.76). The disparity in survival after serious traffic injuries among blacks appears to occur after hospitalization, not in prehospital survival. PMID:23371352

  9. Hepatic Angiosarcoma May Have Fair Survival Nowadays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Neng-Chyan; Kuo, Yau-Chang; Chiang, Jui-Chin; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Huay-Min; Hung, Yao-Min; Chang, Yun-Te; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chang, Hong-Tai; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS) is rare but often fatal. A review of literature in 1979 found that only 3% of the 70 patients lived for more than 2 years, but the survival might have been improved over the years. We conducted a retrospective study and reviewed the medical records of patients who visited a teaching hospital in Taiwan from January 2000 to August 2010 and had pathological proof of HAS. In addition, we conducted a review of literature and compared those who survived for 2 years or more to those who did not. Of the 3503 patients with primary liver cancer we identified, 9 had HAS, of whom 3 (33.3%) survived for 2 years or more. One survived for 24 months without surgical resection, and the other two received surgery with postoperative chemotherapy and were still alive 32 and 37 months later, respectively. Through reviewing literature, we identified 3 more patients in Taiwan who had survived for 2 years or more. One survived for 42 months without surgical resection, the other two received segmentectomy with postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. We also identified 8 such cases outside Taiwan, including 1 who received chemotherapy without surgery and survived for 53 months. None of the differences in the clinical characteristics between those who had and had not survived for 2 years or more reached statistical significance. In conclusion, we believe the combination of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy may be able to achieve long-term survival in some HAS patients nowadays, and it is even possible to achieve fair survival using chemotherapy alone. PMID:25984668

  10. Racial Disparities in Survival Among Injured Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Amy E.; Clark, David E.; Travis, Lori L.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies on racial and ethnic disparities in survival after motor vehicle crashes have examined only population-based death rates or have been restricted to hospitalized patients. In the current study, we examined 3 components of crash survival by race/ethnicity: survival overall, survival to reach a hospital, and survival among those hospitalized. Nine years of data (from 2000 through 2008) from the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System were used to examine white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, and Hispanic drivers aged ≥15 years with serious injuries (injury severity scores of ≥9). By using multivariable logistic regression, we found that a driver's race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with overall survival after being injured in a crash (for blacks, odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36, 1.32; for Hispanics, OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.72), and blacks and Hispanics were equally likely to survive to be treated at a hospital compared with whites (for blacks, OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.93; for Hispanics, OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.71, 1.79). However, among patients who were treated at a hospital, blacks were 50% less likely to survive 30 days compared with whites (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33, 0.76). The disparity in survival after serious traffic injuries among blacks appears to occur after hospitalization, not in prehospital survival. PMID:23371352

  11. Can Dugongs Survive in Palau?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, H.; Rathbun, G.B.; O'Shea, T.J.; Preen, A.R.

    1995-01-01

    In August 1991 we surveyed dugongs Dugong dugon in the coastal waters of Palau using methods similar to aerial surveys conducted in 1977, 1978 and 1983. Twenty-six dugongs (including four calves) were seen, a count within the range obtained previously. The rate at which dugongs were seen per unit flight-time was lower than for any of the other surveys, despite the observers being more experienced than those used in the past. More than 20 knowledgeable Palauan residents (including five dugong hunters) were interviewed about dugong abundance, mortality and natural history. They told us that the illegal killing of dugongs occurs openly. We found locally crafted jewellery made from dugong ribs for sale illegally at four stores. Unless poaching is stopped, we believe that dugongs will become extinct in Palau as they have in several other archipelagoes.

  12. A rapid, reproducible, noninvasive predictor of liver graft survival

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinpar, Ali; Lee, Coney; Noguchi, Emily; Yersiz, Hasan; Agopian, Vatche G.; Kaldas, Fady M.; Farmer, Douglas G.; Busuttil, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical and laboratory criteria are not reliable predictors of deceased donor liver graft quality. Intraoperative assessment of experienced surgeons is the gold standard. Standardizing and quantifying this assessment is especially needed now that regional sharing is the rule. We prospectively evaluated a novel, simple, rapid, noninvasive, quantitative measure of liver function performed before graft procurement. Materials and methods Using a portable, finger-probe–based device, indocyanine green plasma disappearance rates (ICG-PDR) were measured in adult brain-dead donors in the local donor service area before organ procurement. Results were compared with graft function and outcomes. Both donor and recipient teams were blinded to ICG-PDR measurements. Results Measurements were performed on 53 consecutive donors. Eleven liver grafts were declined by all centers because of quality; the other 42 grafts were transplanted. Logistic regression analysis showed ICG-PDR to be the only donor variable to be significantly associated with 7-d graft survival. Donor risk index, donor age, and transaminase levels at peak or procurement were not significantly associated with 7-d graft survival. Conclusions We report the successful use of a portable quantitative means of measuring liver function and its association with graft survival. These data warrant further exploration in a variety of settings to evaluate acceptable values for donated liver grafts. PMID:25940156

  13. Coupling spatial segregation with synthetic circuits to control bacterial survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Lee, Anna Jisu; Tsoi, Ryan; Wu, Feilun; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W; You, Lingchong

    2016-02-01

    Engineered bacteria have great potential for medical and environmental applications. Fulfilling this potential requires controllability over engineered behaviors and scalability of the engineered systems. Here, we present a platform technology, microbial swarmbot, which employs spatial arrangement to control the growth dynamics of engineered bacteria. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated a safeguard strategy to prevent unintended bacterial proliferation. In particular, we adopted several synthetic gene circuits to program collective survival in Escherichia coli: the engineered bacteria could only survive when present at sufficiently high population densities. When encapsulated by permeable membranes, these bacteria can sense the local environment and respond accordingly. The cells inside the microbial swarmbot capsules will survive due to their high densities. Those escaping from a capsule, however, will be killed due to a decrease in their densities. We demonstrate that this design concept is modular and readily generalizable. Our work lays the foundation for engineering integrated and programmable control of hybrid biological-material systems for diverse applications. PMID:26925805

  14. Survival Strategies for Michigan's Health Care Safety Net Providers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Peter D; Dalton, Vanessa K; Berson-Grand, Julie; Weisman, Carol S

    2005-01-01

    Objective To understand key adaptive strategies considered by health care safety net organizations serving uninsured and underinsured populations in Michigan. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected through interviews at community-based free clinics, family planning clinics, local public health departments, and Federally Qualified Health Centers from 2002 to 2003. Research Design In each of six service areas in Michigan, we conducted a multiple-site case study of the four organizations noted above. We conducted interviews with the administrator, the medical or clinical director, the financial or marketing director, and a member of the board of directors. We interviewed 74 respondents at 20 organizations. Principal Findings Organizations perceive that unmet need is expanding faster than organizational capacity; organizations are unable to keep up with demand. Other threats to survival include a sicker patient population and difficulty in retaining staff (particularly nurses). Most clinics are adopting explicit business strategies to survive. To maintain financial viability, clinics are: considering or implementing fees; recruiting insured patients; expanding fundraising activities; reducing services; or turning away patients. Collaborative strategies, such as partnerships with hospitals, have been difficult to implement. Clinics are struggling with how to define their mission given the environment and threats to survival. Conclusions Adaptive strategies remain a work in progress, but will not be sufficient to respond to increasing service demands. Increased federal funding, or, ideally, a national health insurance program, may be the only viable option for expanding organizational capacity. PMID:15960698

  15. Survival rates in a small hibernator, the edible dormouse: a comparison across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Bieber, Claudia; Adamík, Peter; Fietz, Joanna; Morris, Pat; Pilastro, Andrea; Ruf, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how local environmental factors lead to temporal variability of vital rates and to plasticity of life history tactics is one of the central questions in population ecology. We used long-term capture-recapture data from five populations of a small hibernating rodent, the edible dormouse Glis glis, collected over a large geographical range across Europe, to determine and analyze both seasonal patterns of local survival and their relation to reproductive activity. In all populations studied, survival was lowest in early summer, higher in late summer and highest during hibernation in winter. In reproductive years survival was always lower than in non-reproductive years, and females had higher survival rates than males. Very high survival rates during winter indicate that edible dormice rarely die from starvation due to insufficient energy reserves during the hibernation period. Increased mortality in early summer was most likely caused by high predation risk and unmet energy demands. Those effects have probably an even stronger impact in reproductive years, in which dormice were more active. Although these patterns could be found in all areas, there were also considerable differences in average survival rates, with resulting differences in mean lifetime reproductive success between populations. Our results suggest that edible dormice have adapted their life history strategies to maximize lifetime reproductive success depending on the area specific frequency of seeding events of trees producing energy-rich seeds. PMID:23447711

  16. Comparing net survival estimators of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Seppä, Karri; Hakulinen, Timo; Läärä, Esa; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-05-20

    The net survival of a patient diagnosed with a given disease is a quantity often interpreted as the hypothetical survival probability in the absence of causes of death other than the disease. In a relative survival framework, net survival summarises the excess mortality that patients experience compared with their relevant reference population. Based on follow-up data from the Finnish Cancer Registry, we derived simulation scenarios that describe survival of patients in eight cancer sites reflecting different excess mortality patterns in order to compare the performance of the classical Ederer II estimator and the new estimator proposed by Pohar Perme et al. At 5 years, the age-standardised Ederer II estimator performed equally well as the Pohar Perme estimator with the exception of melanoma in which the Pohar Perme estimator had a smaller mean squared error (MSE). At 10 and 15 years, the age-standardised Ederer II performed most often better than the Pohar Perme estimator. The unstandardised Ederer II estimator had the largest MSE at 5 years. However, its MSE was often superior to those of the other estimators at 10 and 15 years, especially in sparse data. Both the Pohar Perme and the age-standardised Ederer II estimator are valid for 5-year net survival of cancer patients. For longer-term net survival, our simulation results support the use of the age-standardised Ederer II estimator. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26707551

  17. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  18. Influence of Radiotherapy Treatment Concept on the Outcome of Patients With Localized Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. Kelter, Verena; Welzel, Thomas; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Bischof, Marc; Hof, Holger; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the outcome of 57 patients with localized ependymomas treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-seven patients with localized ependymomas were treated with RT. Histology was myxopapillary ependymoma (n = 4), ependymoma (n = 23), and anaplastic ependymoma (n = 30). In 16 patients, irradiation of the craniospinal axis (CSI) was performed with a median dose of 20 Gy. Forty-one patients were treated with local RT, with a local dose of 45 Gy to the posterior fossa, including a boost to the tumor bed of 9 Gy. In 19 patients, the tumor bed was irradiated with a median dose of 54 Gy. Results: Overall survival after primary diagnosis was 83% and 71% at 3 and 5 years. Five-year overall survival was 80% in low-grade and 79% in high-grade tumors. Survival from RT was 79% at 3 and 64% at 5 years. We could not show a significant difference in overall survival between CSI and local RT only. Freedom of local failure was 67% at 5 years in patients treated with CSI and 60% at 5 years after local RT. A rate of 83% for distant failure-free survival could be observed in the CSI group as opposed to 93% in the group receiving local RT only. Conclusion: Local RT in patients with localized tumors is equieffective to CSI. The radiation oncologist must keep in mind that patients with localized ependymomas benefit from local doses {>=}45 Gy.

  19. Impacts of Bokashi on survival and growth rates of Pinus pseudostrobus in community reforestation projects.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-López, P F; Ramírez, M I; Pérez-Salicrup, D R

    2015-03-01

    Community-based small-scale reforestation practices have been proposed as an alternative to low-efficiency massive reforestations conducted by external agents. These latter conventional reforestations are often carried out in soils that have been seriously degraded and this has indirectly contributed to the introduction of non-native species and/or acceptance of very low seedling survival rates. Bokashi is a fermented soil organic amendment that can be made from almost any available agricultural byproduct, and its beneficial effects in agriculture have been reported in various contexts. Here, we report the results of a community-based small-scale experimental reforestation where the provenance of pine seedlings (local and commercial) and the use of Bokashi as a soil amendment were evaluated. Bokashi was prepared locally by members of a small rural community in central Mexico. Almost two years after the establishment of the trial, survival rates for the unamended and amended local trees were 97-100% while survival of the commercial trees from unamended and amended treatments were 87-93%. Consistently through time, local and commercial seedlings planted in Bokashi-amended soils were significantly taller (x̅ = 152 cm) than those planted in unamended soils (̅x = 86 cm). An unplanned infection by Cronartium quercuum in the first year of the experiment was considered as a covariable. Infected seedlings showed malformations but this did not affect survival and growth rates. Bokashi amendment seems as an inexpensive, locally viable technology to increase seedling survival and growth and to help recover deforested areas where soils have been degraded. This allows local stakeholders to see more rapid results while helping them to maintain their interest in conservation activities. PMID:25460423

  20. Rectal cancer. Treatment advances that reduce recurrence rates and lengthen survival.

    PubMed

    Sexe, R; Miedema, B W

    1993-07-01

    The risk of malignant disease arising in rectal mucosa is high. Surgery is the most effective form of treatment but results in cure in only 50% of patients. Adjuvant preoperative radiation therapy reduces the likelihood of local recurrence but does not improve survival rates. Fluorouracil is the most effective agent for adjuvant chemotherapy and slightly improves survival when given after surgery. Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy appears to have a synergistic effect, and recent studies show that providing this combination after surgery improves survival. Future trends in the treatment of rectal cancer are expected to include expanded use of local excision to preserve anal sphincter function, preoperative use of a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy, perioperative use of chemotherapy combined with immunostimulating therapy, and use of tumor antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:8321771

  1. Population-based survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients in Singapore, 1968-1992.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Bo; Chia, Kee-Seng; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Sankila, Risto; Seow, Adeline; Lee, Hin-Peng

    2002-05-20

    Since the 1980s, colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore has ranked second to lung in males and females. We describe a population-based analysis of survival of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed from 1968 to 1992 in Singapore. Data of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during 1968-1992 were retrieved from the Singapore Cancer Registry. Patients were passively followed up for death to the end of 1997. The final dataset consisted of 10,114 subjects. Observed and relative survival rates were calculated by stage (localized, regional metastases and distant metastases), age, ethnicity and calendar period for both genders. Over the study period, a significant progress in survival of colorectal cancer patients was observed. For localized cancer of the colon, the 5-year age-standardized relative survival (ASRS) increased from 36% in 1968-1972 to 66% in 1988-1992 for males and from 32 to 71% for females. For localized rectal cancer, the 5-year ASRS improved from 25 to 66% for males and from 23 to 66% in females. Similarly, improvement was observed in colorectal cancer patients with regional metastases, but not in those with distant metastases. Calendar year period and clinical stage of disease were identified as major significant prognostic factors of survival for colorectal cancer. The substantially improved colorectal cancer survival rates reflected the interplay of cancer control activities in various areas, such as health promotion, early diagnosis and treatment. Our study shows a unique changing pattern of survival experience for colorectal patients from a country undergoing rapid economic development. PMID:11992418

  2. Prolongation of experimental islet transplant survival by fractionated splenic irradiation. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.; Casanova, M.; Largiader, F.

    1980-12-01

    Experiments designed to delay the rejection of intrasplenic pancreatic fragment allotransplants in dogs showed increased transplant survival times from 3.1 days (controls) to 5.5 days with fractionated splenic irradiation and to 7.5 days with combined local irradiation and immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Drug treatment alone had no beneficial effect.

  3. Oligometastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Lung: A Therapeutic Opportunity for Long-Term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Michael; Brahmer, Julie R; Ettinger, David

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a 60-year-old male that was treated with both local and systemic therapies with an exceptional response to therapy. This case provides evidence that oligometastatic lung cancer, when treated with curative intent, may be an opportunity for long-term survival in select patients. PMID:26824009

  4. Treatment outcomes and late toxicities of 869 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy: new insight into the value of total dose of cisplatin and radiation boost

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xin; Shi, Qi; Xing, Xing; Yang, Youqi; Xu, Tingting; Shen, Chunying; Wang, Xiaoshen; He, Xiayun; Kong, Lin; Ying, Hongmei; Hu, Chaosu

    2015-01-01

    This study was to report the long-term outcomes and toxicities of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). From 2009 to 2010, 869 non-metastatic NPC patients treated with IMRT were retrospectively enrolled. With a median follow-up of 54.3 months, the 5-year estimated local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 89.7%, 94.5%, 85.6%, 76.3%, 84.0%, respectively. In locally advanced NPC, gender, T, N, total dose of cisplatin more than 300 mg/m2 and radiation boost were independent prognostic factors for DMFS and DFS. Age, T, N and total dose of cisplatin were independent prognostic factors for OS. Radiation boost was an adverse factor for LRFS, RRFS, DMFS and DFS. Concurrent chemotherapy was not an independent prognostic factor for survival, despite marginally significant for DMFS in univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy increased xerostomia and trismus, while higher total dose of cisplatin increased xerostomia and otologic toxicities. In conclusion, IMRT provided satisfactory long-term outcome for NPC, with acceptable late toxicities. Total dose of cisplatin was a prognostic factor for distant metastasis and overall survival. The role of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation boost in the setting of IMRT warrants further investigation. PMID:26485757

  5. Survival of asbestos insulation workers with mesothelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Ribak, J; Selikoff, I J

    1992-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a lethal disease. It is rare in the general population; however, workers exposed to asbestos suffer significant burdens of the neoplasm. The survival time of 457 consecutive fatal cases of pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma that occurred among 17,800 asbestos insulation workers observed prospectively from 1 January 1967 to 1 January 1987 was studied. Mean survival time from initial presentation of the disease to death was 11.4 months for the pleural mesothelioma patients compared with 7.4 months for the peritoneal group. This difference was statistically significant. Mean survival time from diagnosis to death was shorter for both groups of patients: 8.4 months for pleural mesothelioma v 5.8 months for the peritoneal cases. In conclusion, survival time in mesothelioma patients is short; most die within a year from the onset of the initial symptoms. No effective therapy is yet available. PMID:1419863

  6. Survivable authentication for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Kemal; Baykal, Nazife

    2003-01-01

    Possible solutions to establish a survivable authentication framework in a health information system including the one based on one-time passwords (OTPs) are discussed. A new convenient method to generate OTPs is proposed. PMID:14728296

  7. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response Many people have never heard of sepsis, or ... tract infection) and then a powerful and harmful response by your body’s own immune system . “With sepsis, ...

  8. Improved Survival of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50 years. What were the limitations of the study? It is not possible to know whether current estimates of survival will continue to be valid. In addition, the results reported are estimates for ...

  9. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  10. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored using culturing techniques, direct counts, whole cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytrometry. Plate counts of...

  11. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA SPECIES IN RIVER WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of four Salmonella strains in river water microcosms was monitored by culturing techniques, direct counts, whole-cell hybridization, scanning electron microscopy, and resuscitation techniques via the direct viable count method and flow cytometry. Plate counts of bact...

  12. Survivable Authentication for Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bicakci, Kemal; Baykal, Nazife

    2003-01-01

    Possible solutions to establish a survivable authentication framework in a health information system including the one based on one-time passwords (OTPs) are discussed. A new convenient method to generate OTPs is proposed. PMID:14728296

  13. Retrofiting survivability of military vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    .5. Over the range from 0.5 to 4.5 cm the shock KE is attenuated by a factor of {approx}70, while its momentum is changed little. The shock and particle velocity falls by a factor of 200 while the mass increases by a factor of 730. In the limit of very porous media u {approx} 1/M, so KE {approx} 1/M, which falls by a factor of {approx}600, while momentum Mu does not change at all. Figure 2 shows the KE, Mu, u, and M for a material with a porosity of 1.05, for which the KE changes little. In the limit of media of very low porosity, u {approx} 1/{radical}M, so KE is constant while Mu {approx} {radical}M, which increases by a factor of 15. Thus, if the goal is to reduce the peak pressure from strong explosions below, very porous materials, which strongly reduce pressure but do not increase momentum, are preferred to non-porous materials, which amplify momentum but do not decrease pressure. These predictions are in qualitative accord with the results of experiments at Los Alamos in which projectiles from high velocity, large caliber cannons were stopped by one to two sandbags. The studies were performed primarily to determine the effectiveness of sand in stopping fragments of various sizes, but could be extended to study sand's effectiveness in attenuating blast pressure. It would also be useful to test the above predictions on the effectiveness of media with higher porosity. Water barriers have been discussed but not deployed in previous retrofit survivability studies for overseas embassies. They would detect the flash from the mine detonation below, trigger a thin layer of explosive above a layer of water, and drive water droplets into the approaching blast wave. The blast loses energy in evaporating the droplets and loses momentum in slowing them. Under favorable conditions that could attenuate the pressure in the blast enough to prevent the penetration or disruption of the vehicle. However, such barriers would depend on prompt and reliable detonation detection and water

  14. Innovative estimation of survival using log-normal survival modelling on ACCENT database

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J W; O'Callaghan, C J; Hu, N; Ding, K; Yothers, G A; Catalano, P J; Shi, Q; Gray, R G; O'Connell, M J; Sargent, D J

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ACCENT database, with individual patient data for 20 898 patients from 18 colon cancer clinical trials, was used to support Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of 3-year disease-free survival as a surrogate for 5-year overall survival. We hypothesised substantive differences in survival estimation with log-normal modelling rather than standard Kaplan–Meier or Cox approaches. Methods: Time to relapse, disease-free survival, and overall survival were estimated using Kaplan–Meier, Cox, and log-normal approaches for male subjects aged 60–65 years, with stage III colon cancer, treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimens (with 5FU), or with surgery alone (without 5FU). Results: Absolute differences between Cox and log-normal estimates with (without) 5FU varied by end point. The log-normal model had 5.8 (6.3)% higher estimated 3-year time to relapse than the Cox model; 4.8 (5.1)% higher 3-year disease-free survival; and 3.2 (2.2)% higher 5-year overall survival. Model checking indicated greater data support for the log-normal than the Cox model, with Cox and Kaplan–Meier estimates being more similar. All three model types indicate consistent evidence of treatment benefit on both 3-year disease-free survival and 5-year overall survival; patients allocated to 5FU had 5.0–6.7% higher 3-year disease-free survival and 5.3–6.8% higher 5-year overall survival. Conclusion: Substantive absolute differences between estimates of 3-year disease-free survival and 5-year overall survival with log-normal and Cox models were large enough to be clinically relevant, and warrant further consideration. PMID:23385733

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of Alaska wolf survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, S. J.

    1996-02-01

    Alaskan wolves live in a harsh climate and are hunted intensively. Penna's biological aging code, using Monte Carlo methods, has been adapted to simulate wolf survival. It was run on the case in which hunting causes the disruption of wolves' social structure. Social disruption was shown to increase the number of deaths occurring at a given level of hunting. For high levels of social disruption, the population did not survive.

  16. Survival probability in patients with liver trauma.

    PubMed

    Buci, Skender; Kukeli, Agim

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to assess the survival probability among patients with liver trauma injury using the anatomical and psychological scores of conditions, characteristics and treatment modes. Design/methodology/approach - A logistic model is used to estimate 173 patients' survival probability. Data are taken from patient records. Only emergency room patients admitted to University Hospital of Trauma (former Military Hospital) in Tirana are included. Data are recorded anonymously, preserving the patients' privacy. Findings - When correctly predicted, the logistic models show that survival probability varies from 70.5 percent up to 95.4 percent. The degree of trauma injury, trauma with liver and other organs, total days the patient was hospitalized, and treatment method (conservative vs intervention) are statistically important in explaining survival probability. Practical implications - The study gives patients, their relatives and physicians ample and sound information they can use to predict survival chances, the best treatment and resource management. Originality/value - This study, which has not been done previously, explores survival probability, success probability for conservative and non-conservative treatment, and success probability for single vs multiple injuries from liver trauma. PMID:27477933

  17. The survival of Coxiella burnetii in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneeva, A. S.; Ul'Yanova, T. Yu.; Tarasevich, I. V.

    2007-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a pathogen of Q-fever—a widespread zoonosis. The effective adaptation of C. burnetii to intracellular existence is in contrast with its ability to survive in the environment outside the host cells and its resistance to chemical and physical agents. Its mechanism of survival remains unknown. However, its survival appears to be related to the developmental cycle of the microorganism itself, i.e., to the formation of its dormant forms. The survival of Coxiella burnetii was studied for the first time. The pathogenic microorganism was inoculated into different types of soil and cultivated under different temperatures. The survival of the pathogen was verified using a model with laboratory animals (mice). Viable C. burnetii were found in the soil even 20 days after their inoculation. The relationship between the organic carbon content in the soils and the survival of C. burnetii was revealed. Thus, the results obtained were the first to demonstrate that the soil may serve as a reservoir for the preservation and further spreading of the Q-fever pathogen in the environment, on the one hand, and reduce the risk of epidemics, on the other.

  18. The impact of method of distal ureter management during radical nephroureterectomy on tumour recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anil; Dason, Shawn; Allard, Christopher B.; Shayegan, Bobby; Lacombe, Louis; Rendon, Ricardo; Jacobsen, Niels-Erik; Fairey, Adrian; Izawa, Jonathan; Black, Peter; Tanguay, Simon; Chin, Joseph; So, Alan; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Bell, David; Saad, Fred; Drachenberg, Darrell; Cagiannos, Ilias; Fradet, Yves; Alamri, Abdulaziz; Kassouf, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Introducton: Radical nephroureterectomy for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) must include some form of distal ureter management to avoid high rates of tumour recurrence. It is uncertain which distal ureter management technique has the best oncologic outcomes. To determine which distal ureter management technique resulted in the lowest tumour recurrence rate, we analyzed a multi-institutional Canadian radical nephroureterectomy database. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent radical nephroureterectomy with distal ureter management for UTUC between January 1990 and June 2010 at 10 Canadian tertiary hospitals. Distal ureter management approaches were divided into 3 categories: (1) extravesical tenting for ureteric excision without cystotomy (EXTRAVESICAL); (2) open cystotomy with intravesical bladder cuff excision (INTRAVESICAL); and (3) extravesical excision with endoscopic management of ureteric orifice (ENDOSCOPIC). Data available for each patient included demographic details, distal ureter management approach, pathology and operative details, as well as the presence and location of local or distant recurrence. Clinical outcomes included overall recurrence-free survival and intravesical recurrence-free survival. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was also performed. Results: A total of 820 patients underwent radical nephroureterectomy with a specified distal ureter management approach at 10 Canadian academic institutions. The mean patient age was 69.6 years and the median follow-up was 24.6 months. Of the 820 patients, 406 (49.5%) underwent INTRAVESICAL, 316 (38.5%) underwent EXTRAVESICAL, and 98 (11.9%) underwent ENDOSOPIC distal ureter management. Groups differed significantly in their proportion of females, proportion of laparoscopic cases, presence of carcinoma in situ and pathological tumour stage (p < 0.05). Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 46.3%, 35.6%, and

  19. A TRPV Channel Modulates C. elegans Neurosecretion, Larval Starvation Survival, and Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian H.; Ashrafi, Kaveh

    2008-01-01

    For most organisms, food is only intermittently available; therefore, molecular mechanisms that couple sensation of nutrient availability to growth and development are critical for survival. These mechanisms, however, remain poorly defined. In the absence of nutrients, newly hatched first larval (L1) stage Caenorhabditis elegans halt development and survive in this state for several weeks. We isolated mutations in unc-31, encoding a calcium-activated regulator of neural dense-core vesicle release, which conferred enhanced starvation survival. This extended survival was reminiscent of that seen in daf-2 insulin-signaling deficient mutants and was ultimately dependent on daf-16, which encodes a FOXO transcription factor whose activity is inhibited by insulin signaling. While insulin signaling modulates metabolism, adult lifespan, and dauer formation, insulin-independent mechanisms that also regulate these processes did not promote starvation survival, indicating that regulation of starvation survival is a distinct program. Cell-specific rescue experiments identified a small subset of primary sensory neurons where unc-31 reconstitution modulated starvation survival, suggesting that these neurons mediate perception of food availability. We found that OCR-2, a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channel that localizes to the cilia of this subset of neurons, regulates peptide-hormone secretion and L1 starvation survival. Moreover, inactivation of ocr-2 caused a significant extension in adult lifespan. These findings indicate that TRPV channels, which mediate sensation of diverse noxious, thermal, osmotic, and mechanical stimuli, couple nutrient availability to larval starvation survival and adult lifespan through modulation of neural dense-core vesicle secretion. PMID:18846209

  20. Results of vascular resections during pancreatectomy from two European centres: an analysis of survival and disease-free survival explicative factors1

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, D. F.; Chapuis, F.; Mayer, A. D.; Bramhall, S. R.; Coldham, C.; Baulieux, J.; Buckels, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The object of our study was to report on the experience with vascular resections at pancreatectomy in two European specialist hepatopancreatobiliary centres and evaluate outcome and prognostic factors. Patients and methods From 1989 to 2002, 45 patients (21 men, 24 women) underwent pancreatectomy for a pancreatic mass: Whipple's procedure (n=33), total pancreatectomy (n=10) or left splenopancreatectomy (n=2), along with a vascular resection, i.e. venous (n=39), arterial (n=1) or venous + arterial (n=5). Results Operative mortality was nil, postoperative mortality was 2.2% (n=1); 34 patients had an uneventful postoperative course. Reoperations were performed for portal vein thromobosis (n=1), pancreatic leak (n=1), gastric outlet syndrome (n=1) and gastrointestinal bleeding (n=1). In all, 43 patients had cancer on pathology examination, with retropancreatic invasion in 72% and lymph node extension in 62.8%. Resection was R0 in 21 cases. Vessel wall invasion was present in 13 cases and 19 had perivascular invasion. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1, 2 and 3 years was 36.0%, 15.0% and 12.0%, respectively. Median DFS length was 8.7 months (95% CI: 7.2; 10.2). Overall survival rates were 56.6%, 28.9% and 19.2%, respectively. Median survival length was 14.2 months (95% CI: 9.8; 18.6). A multivariate analysis of prognostic variables identified tumour location (other than head of pancreas), neoadjuvant chemotherapy and advanced disease stage as adverse factors for DFS. Conclusion Survival and DFS rates of these patients are comparable to those without vascular resection. Tumour localization, tumour stage, neoadjuvant treatment and tumour recurrence are explanatory variables of survival. Tumour localization, tumour stage and neoadjuvant treatment were explanatory variables for DFS. However, the type and extent of vascular resections as well as vessel wall invasion does not affect survival and DFS. PMID:18333103

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. Survivability Is More Fundamental Than Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Michael E.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2012-01-01

    For a lineage to survive over long time periods, it must sometimes change. This has given rise to the term evolvability, meaning the tendency to produce adaptive variation. One lineage may be superior to another in terms of its current standing variation, or it may tend to produce more adaptive variation. However, evolutionary outcomes depend on more than standing variation and produced adaptive variation: deleterious variation also matters. Evolvability, as most commonly interpreted, is not predictive of evolutionary outcomes. Here, we define a predictive measure of the evolutionary success of a lineage that we call the k-survivability, defined as the probability that the lineage avoids extinction for k generations. We estimate the k-survivability using multiple experimental replicates. Because we measure evolutionary outcomes, the initial standing variation, the full spectrum of generated variation, and the heritability of that variation are all incorporated. Survivability also accounts for the decreased joint likelihood of extinction of sub-lineages when they 1) disperse in space, or 2) diversify in lifestyle. We illustrate measurement of survivability with in silico models, and suggest that it may also be measured in vivo using multiple longitudinal replicates. The k-survivability is a metric that enables the quantitative study of, for example, the evolution of 1) mutation rates, 2) dispersal mechanisms, 3) the genotype-phenotype map, and 4) sexual reproduction, in temporally and spatially fluctuating environments. Although these disparate phenomena evolve by well-understood microevolutionary rules, they are also subject to the macroevolutionary constraint of long-term survivability. PMID:22723844

  3. Survival of breast cancer patients. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Marrazzoa, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Catalano, Filippo; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with breast carcinoma has changed in Europe over the last two decades. In Italy, the overall survival rate is about 77% at 5 years. When considering the situation in Sicily, the EUROCARE 2 study examined survival data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry, showing that the curves are worse than in other regions of Italy. Starting from these considerations we decide to evaluate whether these data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry corresponded to Palermo data. So we analysed data from 575 consecutive patients with breast cancer, treated in our Breast Unit from 1990 to 2003 according to the St. Gallen Recommendations and followed for a median period of 5 years. The prognostic role of age, tumour size, nodal status, TNM, stage, grading and hormonal receptors (OR, PR) were analysed and survival curves at 5 and 10 years were produced using the actuarial survival methods. All causes of death were considered. The median follow-up was 33 months. The Log rank test and univariate cox proportional model were used to demonstrate the association between prognostic factors and outcome. When considering T and N status, the curves showed an inverse correlation between survival and increases in these parameters. Overall survival was 92.9% at 5 years and 81.4% at 10 years for T1, 78.4% at 5 years and 61.4% at 10 years for T2 and 40.8% for T3-T4 at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival for NO was 92.1% and 78.2%, respectively, at 5 and 10 years, but decreased to 72.0% and 59.9% at 5 and 10 years for N1. In N2 patients we found that only about 50% of patients were still alive at 5 and 10 years, while for N3 patients the figures were 57.2% and 40%, respectively. PMID:17663369

  4. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    PubMed

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter. PMID:26875008

  5. Survivability analysis for continuous data protection system based on SMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qi; Liu, Hui; Liu, Lin; Wu, Shizhong

    2011-10-01

    As a Novel Disaster surviving technology, Continuous Data Protection(CDP) can restore the protected system to the state of any time point in the past. Until now, no efficient survivability evaluation method for CDP system is developed. Regarding this problem, a semi-markov process(SMP) is applied to survivability of CDP, SMP model for CDP survivability analysis is established, quantitative survivability metric is calculated and some survivability enhancing strategies are proposed accordingly.

  6. Longterm effects of palliative local treatment of incurable metastatic lesions in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Chang; Liu, Shousheng; He, Wenzhuo; Kong, Pengfei; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Liangping

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the value of palliative local treatment of incurable metastatic lesions in colorectal cancer patients. Consecutive patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Propensity score matching was used to create comparable palliative local treatment and chemotherapy alone groups (n = 272 in each group). The primary endpoint was overall survival, which was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Factors possibly influencing survival were evaluated by univariate and subsequently by multivariate analyses. Palliative local treatment prolonged survival as compared with chemotherapy alone (38.73 vs. 19.8 months, p < 0.01). Univariate and subsequent multivariate analyses showed that primary stage IV at initial diagnosis; high CA199 level and LDH at the time of diagnosis were independent factors for a poor prognosis. Palliative local treatment improved survival better than chemotherapy alone in patients with 0, 1, 2, or 3 of the prognostic factors (p < 0.01). Patients administered treatment for pulmonary metastases survived longer than those treated for metastases elsewhere (56.77 vs. 35.43 months, p = 0.01). Surgical treatment provided marginally longer survival than non-surgical treatment (44.87 vs. 35.43 months, p = 0.05). These findings suggest palliative local treatment has survival benefit for selected patients with incurable metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26992234

  7. Monitoring survival rates of landbirds at varying spatial scales: An application of the MAPS Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberg, D.K.; DeSante, D.F.; Hines, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Survivorship is a primary demographic parameter affecting population dynamics, and thus trends in species abundance. The Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program is a cooperative effort designed to monitor landbird demographic parameters. A principle goal of MAPS is to estimate annual survivorship and identify spatial patterns and temporal trends in these rates. We evaluated hypotheses of spatial patterns in survival rates among a collection of neighboring sampling sites, such as within national forests, among biogeographic provinces, and between breeding populations that winter in either Central or South America, and compared these geographic-specific models to a model of a common survival rate among all sampling sites. We used data collected during 1992-1995 from Swainson's Thrush (Cathorus ustulatus) populations in the western region of the United States. We evaluated the ability to detect spatial and temporal patterns of survivorship with simulated data. We found weak evidence of spatial differences in survival rates at the local scale of 'location,' which typically contained 3 mist-netting stations. There was little evidence of differences in survival rates among biogeographic provinces or between populations that winter in either Central or South America. When data were pooled for a regional estimate of survivorship, the percent relative bias due to pooling 'locations' was 12 years of monitoring. Detection of spatial patterns and temporal trends in survival rates from local to regional scales will provide important information for management and future research directed toward conservation of landbirds.

  8. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  9. Are cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency prognostic factors for local recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast?

    PubMed

    Idvall, I; Anderson, H; Ringberg, A; Fernö, M

    2003-08-01

    There is still no generally accepted histopathological classification system for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Nuclear grade, with or without other histopathological parameters (i.e. comedo-type necrosis and cellular polarisation), has been demonstrated to yield prognostic information. A detailed method for the evaluation of the mitotic frequency in DCIS, based on an approach by Contesso, was used in this study. We also investigated if cellular polarisation and mitotic frequency were important for the ipsilateral local recurrence-free interval (IL-RFI) in 121 DCIS patients who had been operated upon with breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without radiotherapy. Both cellular polarisation and the mitotic frequency were associated with histopathological and cellular biological factors (in previous evaluations), and were of borderline significance for IL-RFI in the univariate analyses. However, when nuclear grade was included in the multivariate analyses (with or without the growth pattern), neither cellular polarisation nor the mitotic frequency were of any independent prognostic value. PMID:12888365

  10. Bacteria survival probability in bactericidal filter paper.

    PubMed

    Mansur-Azzam, Nura; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Woo, Su Gyeong; Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2014-05-01

    Bactericidal filter papers offer the simplicity of gravity filtration to simultaneously eradicate microbial contaminants and particulates. We previously detailed the development of biocidal block copolymer micelles that could be immobilized on a filter paper to actively eradicate bacteria. Despite the many advantages offered by this system, its widespread use is hindered by its unknown mechanism of action which can result in non-reproducible outcomes. In this work, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which a certain percentage of Escherichia coli cells survived when passing through the bactericidal filter paper. Through the process of elimination, the possibility that the bacterial survival probability was controlled by the initial bacterial load or the existence of resistant sub-populations of E. coli was dismissed. It was observed that increasing the thickness or the number of layers of the filter significantly decreased bacterial survival probability for the biocidal filter paper but did not affect the efficiency of the blank filter paper (no biocide). The survival probability of bacteria passing through the antibacterial filter paper appeared to depend strongly on the number of collision between each bacterium and the biocide-loaded micelles. It was thus hypothesized that during each collision a certain number of biocide molecules were directly transferred from the hydrophobic core of the micelle to the bacterial lipid bilayer membrane. Therefore, each bacterium must encounter a certain number of collisions to take up enough biocide to kill the cell and cells that do not undergo the threshold number of collisions are expected to survive. PMID:24681395

  11. Analysis of reentry survivability of UARS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Marichalar, J. J.; Johnson, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of reentry survivability of the NASA Goddard space flight center (GSFC) upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) was performed by Lockheed Martin space operations (LMSO), Houston, TX. The objective of this study was to use the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson space center (JSC)/LMSO object reentry survival analysis tool (ORSAT) to investigate reentry, breakup, demise, and impact of approximately 160 specific components of the UARS. This paper contains descriptions of the UARS spacecraft as modeled by ORSAT, method of approach (including assumptions), and results obtained. The analysis showed that about 150 component types, including the parent body, will demise, and 12 types (26 counting multiple components) will survive. The components that survive produce a debris casualty area of 22 m 2, a surviving mass of 532 kg, a casualty risk of 1:2800, and a debris footprint length of nearly 800 km. The 22 m 2 debris casualty area reflects the results of a parametric assessment; otherwise the casualty area would have been larger.

  12. Multidimensional Poverty and Child Survival in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Though the concept of multidimensional poverty has been acknowledged cutting across the disciplines (among economists, public health professionals, development thinkers, social scientists, policy makers and international organizations) and included in the development agenda, its measurement and application are still limited. Objectives and Methodology Using unit data from the National Family and Health Survey 3, India, this paper measures poverty in multidimensional space and examine the linkages of multidimensional poverty with child survival. The multidimensional poverty is measured in the dimension of knowledge, health and wealth and the child survival is measured with respect to infant mortality and under-five mortality. Descriptive statistics, principal component analyses and the life table methods are used in the analyses. Results The estimates of multidimensional poverty are robust and the inter-state differentials are large. While infant mortality rate and under-five mortality rate are disproportionately higher among the abject poor compared to the non-poor, there are no significant differences in child survival among educationally, economically and health poor at the national level. State pattern in child survival among the education, economical and health poor are mixed. Conclusion Use of multidimensional poverty measures help to identify abject poor who are unlikely to come out of poverty trap. The child survival is significantly lower among abject poor compared to moderate poor and non-poor. We urge to popularize the concept of multiple deprivations in research and program so as to reduce poverty and inequality in the population. PMID:22046384

  13. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  14. Association of Prion Protein Expression with Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Survival in the SEER Residual Tissue Repository

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Man-Sun; Altekruse, Sean F.; Li, Chaoyang; Lynch, Charles F.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Huang, Xiaoran; Saber, Maria Sibug; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Xin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an important cause of cancer death with no clear prognostic biomarker. Expression of prion (PrP) has been reported to be a marker of poor prognosis in a series of Caucasian PDAC cases. We determined the prognostic value of PrP in a racially and geographically diverse population-based series of PDAC cases. PrP expression was examined in 142 PDAC cases from three cancer registries. Cases included 71 Caucasian, 54 Asian/Pacific Islanders and 17 Blacks diagnosed from 1983–2000, and followed through 2008. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of PrP expression with survival were computed after adjustment for case attributes. The risk of death was about four times higher (HR=3.8; 95% CI: 2.2, 6.5) among 108 PDAC cases with PrP+ tumors (median survival 5 months) compared to the 34 cases with PrP− tumors (median survival 20 months). Of 51 cases with resected, localized PDAC median survival was 74 months for 17 cases with PrP− tumors versus 14 months for 34 cases with PrP+ tumors (HR=6.7; 95% CI: 2.6, 17.4). All 6 surviving cases had PrP− negative tumors (median survival, >10 years). PrP may have potential as a prognostic biomarker in PDAC patient management. PMID:22820080

  15. Association between well-known histopathological criteria and overall survival in invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Aysenur; Ozyigit, Filiz; Arik, Ozlem; Ekici, Fatih; Cinkaya, Ahmet; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Hakki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of clinical features and well-known histomorphological parameters on survival of breast cancer. Material and methods: 44 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were included in this study. We investigated the effect of age, breast cancer location (right/left), histological grade, largest diameter of the tumor, lymphovascular and perineural invasion on patient survival. IBM SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) 20 program was used for statistics. Cox proportional hazard regression model for survival analysis, log-log plot, life function graphs were used. Results were 95% confidence interval, significance (P < 0.05). Results: In univariate analysis, the left breast localization, high histological grade, large tumor size, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion has been shown that reduced the overall survival (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, only high histological grade, large tumor size and perineural invasion were identified as parameters negatively associated with patient survival (P < 0.05). On univariate and multivariate analysis, age was not associated with survival. Conclusion: The above results should be considered in the follow-up and treatment planning of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. PMID:26617687

  16. Low temperature survival in different life stages of the Iberian slug, Arion lusitanicus.

    PubMed

    Slotsbo, Stine; Hansen, Lars Monrad; Holmstrup, Martin

    2011-02-01

    The slug Arion lusitanicus Mabille (Gastropoda: Pulmonata: Arionidae) is an invasive species which has spread to most parts of Europe. The area of origin is unknown, but A. lusitanicus seems to cope well with the local conditions in the countries to which it has migrated. It spreads rapidly, occurs often in high densities and has become a serious pest in most European countries. Therefore there is an urgent need for better knowledge of the ecophysiology of A. lusitanicus, such as the influence of climatic conditions, in order to develop prognostic models and strategies for novel pest management practises. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of subzero temperatures in relation to winter survival. A. lusitanicus is shown to be freeze-tolerant in some life stages. Most juveniles and some adult slugs survived being frozen at -1.3°C for 3days, but none of the slugs survived freezing at -3°C. The eggs survived subzero temperatures (down to -2°C) probably by supercooling. Juveniles and adults may also survive in a supercooled state (down to -3°C) but are generally poor supercoolers. Therefore, the winter survival of A. lusitanicus depends to a high degree on migration to habitats protected from low winter temperatures, e.g. under plant litter, buried in the soil or in compost heaps. PMID:21168402

  17. Effect of Interval to Definitive Breast Surgery on Clinical Presentation and Survival in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vujovic, Olga; Yu, Edward; Cherian, Anil; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Stitt, Larry; Hammond, A.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of clinical presentation and interval to breast surgery on local recurrence and survival in early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 397 patients with Stage T1-T2N0 breast carcinoma treated with conservative surgery and breast radiotherapy between 1985 and 1992 were reviewed at the London Regional Cancer Program. The clinical presentation consisted of a mammogram finding or a palpable lump. The intervals from clinical presentation to definitive breast surgery used for analysis were 0-4, >4-12, and >12 weeks. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the time to local recurrence, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival were determined for the three groups. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical presentation and interval to definitive surgery on survival. Results: The median follow-up was 11.2 years. No statistically significant difference was found in local recurrence as a function of the interval to definitive surgery (p = .424). A significant difference was noted in disease-free survival (p = .040) and cause-specific survival (p = .006) with an interval of >12 weeks to definitive breast surgery. However, the interval to definitive surgery was dependent on the presentation for cause-specific survival, with a substantial effect for patients with a mammographic presentation and a negligible effect for patients with a lump presentation (interaction p = .041). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that an interval of >12 weeks to breast surgery might be associated with decreased survival for patients with a mammographic presentation, but it appeared to have no effect on survival for patients presenting with a palpable breast lump.

  18. Survival Outcomes in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Effect of Adjuvant Radiotherapy in a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Shivnani, Anand T.; Chen, Ke; Lee, Christopher M.; Tward, Jonathan D.; MacDonald, O. Kenneth; Crane, Christopher H.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Munoz, Louis L.; Small, William

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma has not been clearly established. We analyzed survival outcomes of patients with resected extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and examined the effect of adjuvant RT. Methods and Materials: Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2003. The primary endpoint was the overall survival time. Cox regression analysis was used to perform univariate and multivariate analyses of the following clinical variables: age, year of diagnosis, histologic grade, localized (Stage T1-T2) vs. regional (Stage T3 or greater and/or node positive) stage, gender, race, and the use of adjuvant RT after surgical resection. Results: The records for 2,332 patients were obtained. Patients with previous malignancy, distant disease, incomplete or conflicting records, atypical histologic features, and those treated with preoperative/intraoperative RT were excluded. Of the remaining 1,491 patients eligible for analysis, 473 (32%) had undergone adjuvant RT. After a median follow-up of 27 months (among surviving patients), the median overall survival time for the entire cohort was 20 months. Patients with localized and regional disease had a median survival time of 33 and 18 months, respectively (p < .001). The addition of adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in overall or cause-specific survival for patients with local or regional disease. Conclusion: Patients with localized disease had significantly better overall survival than those with regional disease. Adjuvant RT was not associated with an improvement in long-term overall survival in patients with resected extrahepatic bile duct cancer. Key data, including margin status and the use of combined chemotherapy, was not available through the SEER database.

  19. Seniors' survival trajectories and the illness connection.

    PubMed

    Montbriand, Muriel J

    2004-04-01

    In a recent life history research, 100 out of 190 randomly selected seniors from a Canadian prairie city determined that their lives were survival trajectories, many with connections to their present illnesses. Seniors told of surviving the Great Depression and World War II, making hard decisions, and experiencing adversities that changed their life courses and perceptions. Completed in 2003, this 5-year study consisted of two phases. The first phase, an ethnomethod, sought the meaning seniors ascribe to illness and healing. The second phase was a reentry of the initial data. Highlighting seniors' stories shows how hard decisions evolved and contrasts can be made in seniors' narratives. Through seniors' analyses of their own lives, findings in this inquiry demonstrate how the price of survival is embedded in ways of perceiving adverse experiences. Those who avoided facing adversities in making difficult decisions were those who now blame illnesses on life experiences. PMID:15068573

  20. Analysis of survival data from telemetry projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Winterstein, S.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Telemetry techniques can be used to study the survival rates of animal populations and are particularly suitable for species or settings for which band recovery models are not. Statistical methods for estimating survival rates and parameters of survival distributions from observations of radio-tagged animals will be described. These methods have been applied to medical and engineering studies and to the study of nest success. Estimates and tests based on discrete models, originally introduced by Mayfield, and on continuous models, both parametric and nonparametric, will be described. Generalizations, including staggered entry of subjects into the study and identification of mortality factors will be considered. Additional discussion topics will include sample size considerations, relocation frequency for subjects, and use of covariates.

  1. [Survival time without food and drink].

    PubMed

    Kottusch, Pia; Tillmann, Miriam; Püschel, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    After accidents, in which victims were trapped or buried alive, the question how long one can survive without eating and drinking often becomes a subject of public interest. Experiments with humans are ethically unacceptable. As an approach to the issue, this article also takes reports from the popular press into account. Altogether, it seems possible to survive without food and drink within a time span of 8 to 21 days. If a person is only deprived of food, the survival time may even go up to about two months, although this is influenced by many factors. The article describes the impressive case of a handcuffed 81-year-old man, in which the external circumstances are known. PMID:20069776

  2. Survival regulation of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiguo; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are a subpopulation cells at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for disease continuous propagation. In this article, we discuss some cellular and molecular components, which are critical for LSC survival. These components include intrinsic signaling pathways and extrinsic microenvironments. The intrinsic signaling pathways to be discussed include Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hox genes, Hh pathway, Alox5, and some miRNAs, which have been shown to play important roles in regulating LSC survival and proliferation. The extrinsic components to be discussed include selectins, CXCL12/CXCR4, and CD44, which involve in LSC homing, survival, and proliferation by affecting bone marrow microenvironment. Potential strategies for eradicating LSCs will also discuss. PMID:26686687

  3. Panspermia Survival Scenarios for Organisms that Survive Typical Hypervelocity Solar System Impact Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.

    2014-04-01

    Previous experimental studies have demonstrated the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events, testing the panspermia and litho-panspermia hypotheses [1]. It has been demonstrated by the authors that Nannochloropsis Oculata Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone' (sunlit surface layers of oceans [2]), survive impacts up to 6.93 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 40 GPa) [3, 4]. Also shown to survive impacts up to 5.49 km s-1 is the tardigrade species Hypsibius dujardini (a complex micro-animal consisting of 40,000 cells) [5, 6]. It has also been shown that they can survive sustained pressures up to 600 MPa using a water filled pressure capsule [7]. Additionally bacteria can survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1], and the survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 (~30 GPa) has also recently been demonstrated [8]. Other groups have also reported that the lichen Xanthoria elegans is able to survive shocks in similar pressure ranges (~40 GPa) [9]. Here we present various simulated impact regimes to show which scenarios are condusive to the panspermia hypothesis of the natural transfer of life (via an icy body) through space to an extraterrestrial environment.

  4. Hypervelocity impact survivability experiments for carbonaceous impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Bada, Jeffrey; Macklin, John; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Fleming, R. H.; Erlichman, Jozef

    1993-01-01

    We performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, fullerenes, phthalic acid crystals, and Murchison meteorite) into Al plate at velocities between 4.2 and 6.1 km/s. These tests were made to do the following: (1) determine the survivability of carbon forms and organize molecules in low hypervelocity impact; (2) characterize carbonaceous impactor residues; and (3) determine whether or not fullerenes could form from carbonaceous impactors, under our experimental conditions, or survive as impactors. An analytical protocol of field emission SEM imagery, SEM-EDX, laser Raman spectroscopy, single and 2-stage laser mass spectrometry, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) found the following: (1) diamonds did not survive impact at 4.8 km/s, but were transformed into various forms of disordered graphite; (2) intact, well-ordered graphite impactors did survive impact at 5.9 km/sec, but were only found in the crater bottom centers; the degree of impact-induced disorder in the graphite increases outward (walls, rims, ejecta); (3) phthalic acid crystals were destroyed on impact (at 4.2 km/s, although a large proportion of phthalic acid molecules did survive impact); (4) fullerenes did not form as products of carbonaceous impactors (5.9 - 6.1 km/s, fullerene impactor molecules mostly survived impact at 5.9 km/s; and (5) two Murchison meteorite samples (launched at 4.8 and 5.9 km/s) show preservation of some higher mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compared with the non-impacted sample. Each impactor type shows unique impactor residue morphologies produced at a given impact velocity. An expanded methodology is presented to announce relatively new analytical techniques together with innovative modifications to other methods that can be used to characterize small impact residues in LDEF craters, in addition to other acquired extraterrestrial samples.

  5. Dispersal and survival of a polygynandrous passerine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Heather R.; Kendall, Steve J.; Wild, Teri C.; Powell, Abby N.

    2015-01-01

    Although sex biases in survival and dispersal are thought to be linked to avian mating systems, little is known about these demographic patterns in less common mating strategies such as polygynandry. We investigated breeding-site fidelity, natal philopatry, and apparent survival of the polygynandrous Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) over a 7-yr period at 2 areas in Alaska's Brooks Range. We used capture–recapture histories of 243 color-banded adults and 431 juveniles to estimate annual survival and determined dispersal patterns from 34 adults that were found breeding within the study areas over multiple years. Most adults (88%) returned to nest in the same breeding neighborhood as in previous years; mean dispersal distance was 300.9 ± 74.2 m and did not differ between sexes. Juveniles exhibited low natal philopatry; only 4% of banded hatch-year birds were resighted as adults during subsequent years. Those that did return dispersed, on average, 1,674.4 ± 465.8 m from their natal nests (n = 6). Model-averaged survival estimates indicated that annual survival of adult females (50–58%) was only slightly lower than that of males (60–63%); juvenile survival was 41% but was paired with a low (13%) encounter probability. We attribute the lack of sex bias in adult dispersal to this species' polygynandrous mating strategy. Within this system, there are multiple mates within a breeding neighborhood. We argue that natural selection may favor females that remain on the same, familiar breeding site, because they do not have to disperse to a new area to find a suitable mate. Dispersal among breeding populations most likely occurs by juveniles returning as adults. Our findings support hypotheses that suggest a relationship between dispersal and mating strategy and provide some of the first insight into the demographic patterns of a polygynandrous passerine.

  6. Methods for developing and validating survivability distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    A previous report explored and discussed statistical methods and procedures that may be applied to validate the survivability of a complex system of systems that cannot be tested as an entity. It described a methodology where Monte Carlo simulation was used to develop the system survivability distribution from the component distributions using a system model that registers the logical interactions of the components to perform system functions. This paper discusses methods that can be used to develop the required survivability distributions based upon three sources of knowledge. These are (1) available test results; (2) little or no available test data, but a good understanding of the physical laws and phenomena which can be applied by computer simulation; and (3) neither test data nor adequate knowledge of the physics are known, in which case, one must rely upon, and quantify, the judgement of experts. This paper describes the relationship between the confidence bounds that can be placed on survivability and the number of tests conducted. It discusses the procedure for developing system level survivability distributions from the distributions for lower levels of integration. It demonstrates application of these techniques by defining a communications network for a Hypothetical System Architecture. A logic model for the performance of this communications network is developed, as well as the survivability distributions for the nodes and links based on two alternate data sets, reflecting the effects of increased testing of all elements. It then shows how this additional testing could be optimized by concentrating only on those elements contained in the low-order fault sets which the methodology identifies.

  7. Survival of variola virus in raw cotton

    PubMed Central

    MacCallum, F. O.; McDonald, J. R.

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to establish the survival period of variola virus in relation to its importation into Great Britain in raw cotton. Under the conditions of the experiments described here, variola virus in scabs from a single patient survived for a maximum of three to four months at a relative humidity of 58, and for only two to four months at 30°C and humidities of 73 and 84. Exposed virus in the form of vesicle fluid in capillaries did not survive for three months at this temperature in any of these humidities. These results suggest that variola virus in scabs or seeds in tropical climates—i.e., at temperatures of from 30°C to 40°C or higher—is unlikely to survive for as long as six months. Thus, if the period of storage of cotton were at least six months after ginning and before shipment from cotton-producing countries in the tropics where smallpox is endemic, the chances of importation of viable variola virus on raw cotton into areas free from infection would be very small. However, if cotton can become contaminated with smallpox scabs in temperate climates (20°-25°C) or is already contaminated when imported at this temperature, the experiments indicate that a few particles of virus may survive for as long as 18 months. The virus can, of course, survive for many years, ten or more, at from 4°C to 5°C in closed tubes or bottles, with little decrease in titre. PMID:13426756

  8. Pathologic factors affecting postsplenectomy survival in dogs.

    PubMed

    Spangler, W L; Kass, P H

    1997-01-01

    The apparently high prevalence of splenomegaly in dogs, along with the surgical accessibility of the spleen, results in a relatively large number of splenectomies in dogs in clinical veterinary practice. Splenic nodular lesions are widely considered to be indicative of hemangiosarcoma and thus a disease that is ultimately fatal. This study correlates the results of complete pathologic evaluation and classification of 500 spleens obtained by splenectomy with survival information for each dog. Among the spleens examined, 257 of 500 (51.4%) were classified nonneoplastic and 241 (48.2%) were neoplastic; 2 (0.4%) were unclassified. Miscellaneous non-nodular splenomegaly accounted for 46 of 257 (18%) of the nonneoplastic lesions; nodular splenomegaly accounted for 206 of 257 (79%) of nonneoplastic splenic lesions and was composed of lymphoid hyperplastic nodules and associated hematomas, hyperplastic lymphoid nodules alone, or hematomas with no apparent underlying cause. Nodular neoplastic diseases of the spleen were divided among benign tumors (11.5%) and a variety of primary sarcomas. Hemangiosarcoma made up 51% of splenic malignancies but accounted for less than 25% of the spleens evaluated. Survival of dogs with hematomas associated with nonneoplastic conditions of the spleen was markedly different from that in dogs with hemangiosarcoma-associated hematomas, even though most could not be effectively differentiated on gross inspection. Two month postoperative survival was 83% for dogs with nonneoplastic-related hematomas, whereas only 31% of dogs with hemangiosarcoma, with or without associated hematomas, were alive after 2 months. Twelve-month survival times were 64% and 7%, respectively. An overall postsplenectomy survival rate of 52% was based on the number of dogs surviving for a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. PMID:9183768

  9. Modeling survival at multi-population scales using mark-recapture data.

    PubMed

    Grosbois, V; Harris, M P; Anker-Nilssen, T; McCleery, R H; Shaw, D N; Morgan, B J T; Gimenez, O

    2009-10-01

    The demography of vertebrate populations is governed in part by processes operating at large spatial scales that have synchronizing effects on demographic parameters over large geographic areas, and in part, by local processes that generate fluctuations that are independent across populations. We describe a statistical model for the analysis of individual monitoring data at the multi-population scale that allows us to (1) split up temporal variation in survival into two components that account for these two types of processes and (2) evaluate the role of environmental factors in generating these two components. We derive from this model an index of synchrony among populations in the pattern of temporal variation in survival, and we evaluate the extent to which environmental factors contribute to synchronize or desynchronize survival variation among populations. When applied to individual monitoring data from four colonies of the Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica), 67% of between-year variance in adult survival was accounted for by a global spatial-scale component, indicating substantial synchrony among colonies. Local sea surface temperature (SST) accounted for 40% of the global spatial-scale component but also for an equally large fraction of the local-scale component. SST thus acted at the same time as both a synchronizing and a desynchronizing agent. Between-year variation in adult survival not explained by the effect of local SST was as synchronized as total between-year variation, suggesting that other unknown environmental factors acted as synchronizing agents. Our approach, which focuses on demographic mechanisms at the multi-population scale, ideally should be combined with investigations of population size time series in order to characterize thoroughly the processes that underlie patterns of multi-population dynamics and, ultimately, range dynamics. PMID:19886500

  10. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p{sub 2} = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  11. A stochastic evolutionary model for survival dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, Trevor; Levene, Mark; Loizou, George

    2014-09-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in different contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the essential dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. In our model, the only implicit assumption made is that the longer an actor has been in the system, the more likely it is to have failed. We derive a power-law distribution for the process and provide preliminary empirical evidence for the validity of the model from two well-known survival analysis data sets.

  12. Sin Nombre hantavirus decreases survival of male deer mice.

    PubMed

    Luis, Angela D; Douglass, Richard J; Hudson, Peter J; Mills, James N; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2012-06-01

    How pathogens affect their hosts is a key question in infectious disease ecology, and it can have important influences on the spread and persistence of the pathogen. Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is the etiological agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans. A better understanding of SNV in its reservoir host, the deer mouse, could lead to improved predictions of the circulation and persistence of the virus in the mouse reservoir, and could help identify the factors that lead to increased human risk of HPS. Using mark-recapture statistical modeling on longitudinal data collected over 15 years, we found a 13.4% decrease in the survival of male deer mice with antibodies to SNV compared to uninfected mice (both male and female). There was also an additive effect of breeding condition, with a 21.3% decrease in survival for infected mice in breeding condition compared to uninfected, non-breeding mice. The data identified that transmission was consistent with density-dependent transmission, implying that there may be a critical host density below which SNV cannot persist. The notion of a critical host density coupled with the previously overlooked disease-induced mortality reported here contribute to a better understanding of why SNV often goes extinct locally and only seems to persist at the metapopulation scale, and why human spillover is episodic and hard to predict. PMID:22218940

  13. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  14. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Improves Survival and Reduces Inflammation in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Piliponsky, Adrian M; Lahiri, Asha; Truong, Phuong; Clauson, Morgan; Shubin, Nicholas J; Han, Hongwei; Ziegler, Steven F

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to homeostasis of the immune system in sepsis are largely unknown. One study suggests a potential detrimental role for thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in sepsis; however, the immune-regulatory effects of TSLP on myeloid cells within the intestinal microenvironment suggest the contrary. Our objective was to clarify TSLP's role in sepsis. Cecal ligation and puncture was performed in mice with total or myeloid-specific deficiency in the TSLP receptor (TSLPR). Survival was monitored closely, peritoneal fluids and plasma were analyzed for markers of inflammation, and myeloid cell numbers and their ability to produce inflammatory mediators was determined. The interaction of TSLP with TSLPR in myeloid cells contributed to mouse survival after septic peritonitis. Mice with TSLPR deficiency in myeloid cells displayed excessive local and systemic inflammation levels (e.g., increased inflammatory cell and cytokine levels) relative to control mice. Moreover, hepatic injury was exacerbated in mice with TSLPR deficiency in their myeloid cells. However, the enhanced inflammatory response did not affect the ability of these mice to clear bacteria. Resident neutrophils and macrophages from septic mice with TSLPR deficiency exhibited an increased ability to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our findings suggest that the effects of TSLP on myeloid cells are crucial in reducing the multiple organ failure that is associated with systemic inflammation, which highlights the significance of this cytokine in modulating the host response to infection and in reducing the risks of sepsis development. PMID:26934097

  15. Survival during the Breeding Season: Nest Stage, Parental Sex, and Season Advancement Affect Reed Warbler Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wierucka, Kaja; Halupka, Lucyna; Klimczuk, Ewelina; Sztwiertnia, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Avian annual survival has received much attention, yet little is known about seasonal patterns in survival, especially of migratory passerines. In order to evaluate survival rates and timing of mortality within the breeding season of adult reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus), mark-recapture data were collected in southwest Poland, between 2006 and 2012. A total of 612 individuals (304 females and 308 males) were monitored throughout the entire breeding season, and their capture-recapture histories were used to model survival rates. Males showed higher survival during the breeding season (0.985, 95% CI: 0.941–0.996) than females (0.869, 95% CI: 0.727–0.937). Survival rates of females declined with the progression of the breeding season (from May to August), while males showed constant survival during this period. We also found a clear pattern within the female (but not male) nesting cycle: survival was significantly lower during the laying, incubation, and nestling periods (0.934, 95% CI: 0.898–0.958), when birds spent much time on the nest, compared to the nest building and fledgling periods (1.000, 95% CI: 1.00–1.000), when we did not record any female mortality. These data (coupled with some direct evidence, like bird corpses or blood remains found next to/on the nest) may suggest that the main cause of adult mortality was on-nest predation. The calculated survival rates for both sexes during the breeding season were high compared to annual rates reported for this species, suggesting that a majority of mortality occurs at other times of the year, during migration or wintering. These results have implications for understanding survival variation within the reproductive period as well as general trends of avian mortality. PMID:26934086

  16. Do ducks and songbirds initiate more nests when the probability of survival is greater?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Todd A.; Shaffer, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Nesting chronology in grassland birds can vary by species, locality, and year. The date a nest is initiated can influence the subsequent probability of its survival in some grassland bird species. Because predation is the most significant cause of nest loss in grassland birds, we examined the relation between timing of nesting and nest survival. Periods of high nest survival that correspond with the peak of nesting activity might reflect long-term adaptations to specific predation pressures commonly recurring during certain periods of the nesting cycle. We evaluated this theory by comparing timing of nesting with date-specific nest survival rates for several duck and passerine species breeding in north-central North Dakota during 1998–2003. Nest survival decreased seasonally with date for five of the seven species we studied. We found little evidence to support consistent relations between timing of nesting, the number of nest initiations, and nest survival for any species we studied, suggesting that factors other than nest predation may better explain nesting chronology for these species. The apparent mismatch between date-specific patterns of nest survival and nest initiation underscores uncertainty about the process of avian nest site selection driven mainly by predation. Although timing of nesting differed among species, the general nesting period was fairly predictable across all years of study, suggesting the potential for research activities or management actions to be timed to take advantage of known periods when nests are active (or inactive). However, our results do not support the notion that biologists can take advantage of periods when many nests are active and survival is also high.

  17. 46 CFR 180.130 - Stowage of survival craft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of survival craft. 180.130 Section 180.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 180.130 Stowage of survival craft. (a) Each survival...

  18. 38 CFR 3.257 - Children; no surviving spouse entitled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Children; no surviving... and Estate § 3.257 Children; no surviving spouse entitled. Where pension is not payable to a surviving... worth, payments will be made to or for the child or children as if there were no surviving spouse....

  19. 38 CFR 3.257 - Children; no surviving spouse entitled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Children; no surviving... and Estate § 3.257 Children; no surviving spouse entitled. Where pension is not payable to a surviving... worth, payments will be made to or for the child or children as if there were no surviving spouse....

  20. 38 CFR 3.257 - Children; no surviving spouse entitled.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Children; no surviving... and Estate § 3.257 Children; no surviving spouse entitled. Where pension is not payable to a surviving... worth, payments will be made to or for the child or children as if there were no surviving spouse....

  1. Loss of aquaporin 3 protein expression constitutes an independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival: an immunohistochemical study on stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of patients with stage pT1 urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) continues to be a challenge due to its unpredictable clinical course. Reliable molecular markers that help to determine appropriate individual treatment are still lacking. Loss of aquaporin (AQP) 3 protein expression has previously been shown in muscle-invasive UBC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of AQP3 protein expression with regard to the prognosis of stage pT1 UBC. Method AQP 3 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in specimens of 87 stage T1 UBC patients, who were diagnosed by transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) and subsequent second resection at a high-volume urological centre between 2002 and 2009. Patients underwent adjuvant instillation therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Loss of AQP3 protein expression was defined as complete absence of the protein within the whole tumour. Expression status was correlated retrospectively with clinicopathological and follow-up data (median: 31 months). Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the value of AQP3 tumour expression with regard to recurrence-free (RFS), progression-free (PFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). RFS, PFS and CSS were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log rank test. Results 59% of patients were shown to exhibit AQP3-positive tumours, whereas 41% of tumours did not express the marker. Loss of AQP3 protein expression was associated with a statistically significantly worse PFS (20% vs. 72%, p=0.020). This finding was confirmed by multivariate Cox regression analysis (HR 7.58, CI 1.29 – 44.68; p=0.025). Conclusions Loss of AQP3 protein expression in pT1 UBC appears to play a key role in disease progression and is associated with worse PFS. Considering its potential prognostic value, assessment of AQP3 protein expression could be used to help stratify the behavior of patients with pT1 UBC. PMID:23043286

  2. Diffuse myogenin expression by immunohistochemistry is an independent marker of poor survival in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma: a tissue microarray study of 71 primary tumors including correlation with molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heerema-McKenney, Amy; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Pulliam, Joseph F; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; McKenney, Jesse K; Zhu, Shirley; Montgomery, Kelli; Mitchell, Janet; Marinelli, Robert J; Hart, Augustinus A M; van de Rijn, Matt; Linn, Sabine C

    2008-10-01

    The pathologic classification of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) into embryonal or alveolar subtype is an important prognostic factor guiding the therapeutic protocol chosen for an individual patient. Unfortunately, this classification is not always straightforward, and the diagnostic criteria are controversial in a subset of cases. Ancillary studies are used to aid in the classification, but their potential use as independent prognostic factors is rarely studied. The aim of this study is to identify immunohistochemical markers of potential prognostic significance in pediatric RMS and to correlate their expression with PAX-3/FKHR and PAX-7/FKHR fusion status. A single tissue microarray containing 71 paraffin-embedded pediatric RMSs was immunostained with antibodies against p53, bcl-2, Ki-67, CD44, myogenin, and MyoD1. The tissue microarray and whole paraffin blocks were studied for PAX-3/FKHR and PAX-7/FKHR gene fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Clinical follow-up data were available for each patient. Immunohistochemical staining results and translocation status were correlated with recurrence-free interval (RFI) and overall survival (OS) using the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazard regression. The minimum clinical follow-up interval was 24 months (median follow-up=57 mo). On univariable analysis, immunohistochemical expression of myogenin, bcl-2, and identification of a gene fusion were associated with decreased 5-year RFI and 10-year OS (myogenin RFI P=0.0028, OS P=0.0021; bcl-2 RFI P=0.037, OS P=0.032; gene fusion RFI P=0.0001, OS P=0.0058). After adjustment for Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study-TNM stage, tumor site, age, tumor histology, and translocation status by multivariable analysis, only myogenin retained an independent association with RFI (P=0.034) and OS (P=0.0069). In this retrospective analysis, diffuse immunohistochemical reactivity for myogenin in RMS

  3. Calcineurin Targets Involved in Stress Survival and Fungal Virulence.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Chow, Eve W L; Fu, Ci; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-09-01

    Calcineurin governs stress survival, sexual differentiation, and virulence of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Calcineurin is activated by increased Ca2+ levels caused by stress, and transduces signals by dephosphorylating protein substrates. Herein, we identified and characterized calcineurin substrates in C. neoformans by employing phosphoproteomic TiO2 enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified targets include the transactivator Crz1 as well as novel substrates whose functions are linked to P-bodies/stress granules (PBs/SGs) and mRNA translation and decay, such as Pbp1 and Puf4. We show that Crz1 is a bona fide calcineurin substrate, and Crz1 localization and transcriptional activity are controlled by calcineurin. We previously demonstrated that thermal and other stresses trigger calcineurin localization to PBs/SGs. Several calcineurin targets localized to PBs/SGs, including Puf4 and Pbp1, contribute to stress resistance and virulence individually or in conjunction with Crz1. Moreover, Pbp1 is also required for sexual development. Genetic epistasis analysis revealed that Crz1 and the novel targets Lhp1, Puf4, and Pbp1 function in a branched calcineurin pathway that orchestrates stress survival and virulence. These findings support a model whereby calcineurin controls stress and virulence, at the transcriptional level via Crz1, and post-transcriptionally by localizing to PBs/SGs and acting on targets involved in mRNA metabolism. The calcineurin targets identified in this study share little overlap with known calcineurin substrates, with the exception of Crz1. In particular, the mRNA binding proteins and PBs/SGs residents comprise a cohort of novel calcineurin targets that have not been previously linked to calcineurin in mammals or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study suggests either extensive evolutionary rewiring of the calcineurin pathway, or alternatively that these novel calcineurin targets have yet to be characterized

  4. Survival Skills for the Principalship CD Companion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaydes, John

    2004-01-01

    Today's principals face unique challenges--demands of time, knowledge, and organization, which take their toll on even the most flexible leader. A complement to the insightful "Survival Skills for the Principalship: A Treasure Chest of Time-Savers, Short-Cuts, and Strategies to Help You Keep a Balance in Your Life" (ED495598), this ready-to-edit…

  5. How to Survive in Consumer Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolius, Sidney

    If consumer educators are going to survive in their field, they're going to have to be (1) selective, (2) very knowledgeable of their specialization, (3) and willing to use both traditional classroom educational methods and some of the newer techniques. Because consumer problems have become so pervasive and complex, it becomes necessary to…

  6. Metastatic Sites Predict Prostate Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    A new meta-analysis of clinical trial data from patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer indicates that overall survival is strongly influenced by where the disease spreads. Men with visceral disease-liver or lung metastases-fare worse than those with bone or lymph node involvement. PMID:27001152

  7. Survival Skills for the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marian; And Others

    Designed to serve as a tool in presenting activities to help students develop survival skills, this teaching guide contains teaching suggestions and activity sheets in 10 areas of personal and family management. These areas are locating available jobs, job application, job interviews, choosing a job, skills employers look for, investigating job…

  8. Survival by Dialysis Modality-Who Cares?

    PubMed

    Lee, Martin B; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    In light of the recent emphasis on patient-centered outcomes and quality of life for patients with kidney disease, we contend that the nephrology community should no longer fund, perform, or publish studies that compare survival by dialysis modality. These studies have become redundant; they are methodologically limited, unhelpful in practice, and therefore a waste of resources. More than two decades of these publications show similar survival between patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis and those receiving thrice-weekly conventional hemodialysis, with differences only for specific subgroups. In clinical practice, modality choice should be individualized with the aim of maximizing quality of life, patient-reported outcomes, and achieving patient-centered goals. Expected survival is often irrelevant to modality choice. Even for the younger and fitter home hemodialysis population, quality of life, not just duration of survival, is a major priority. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that patients with ESRD continue to experience poor quality of life because of high symptom burden, unsolved clinical problems, and unmet needs. Patients care more about how they will live instead of how long. It is our responsibility to align our research with their needs. Only by doing so can we meet the challenges of ESRD patient care in the coming decades. PMID:26912541

  9. A Child Survival and Development Revolution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the problems of child survival and development in developing countries by discussing the biomedical causes and the concomitant social determinants of high infant mortality rates. Describes four intervention strategies recommended by UNICEF: growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast feeding, and immunization. (HOD)

  10. Surviving the War--And the Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Surviving the War: A College Counselor's Journal" by Philip Clinton. He argues that Clinton's engrossing account of the 1990-91 school year at Cairo American College (CAC) gives individuals wonderful insights into the unusual challenges occasionally encountered by an international counselor. The year…

  11. Advanced wing design survivability testing and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, J.; Tobias, M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite wings on current operational aircraft are conservatively designed to account for stress/strain concentrations, and to assure specified damage tolerance. The technology that can lead to improved composite wing structures and associated structural efficiency is to increase design ultimate strain levels beyond their current limit of 3500 to 4000 micro-in/in to 6000 micro-in/in without sacrificing structural integrity, durability, damage tolerance, or survivability. Grumman, under the sponsorship of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC), has developed a high-strain composite wing design for a subsonic aircraft wing using novel and innovative design concepts and manufacturing methods, while maintaining a state-of-the-art fiber/resin system. The current advanced wing design effort addressed a tactical subsonic aircraft wing using previously developed, high-strain wing design concepts in conjunction with newer/emerging fiber and polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials to achieve the same goals, while reducing complexity. Two categories of advanced PMC materials were evaluated: toughened thermosets; and engineered thermoplastics. Advanced PMC materials offer the technological opportunity to take maximum advantage of improved material properties, physical characteristics, and tailorability to increase performance and survivability over current composite structure. Damage tolerance and survivability to various threats, in addition to structural integrity and durability, were key technical issues addressed during this study, and evaluated through test. This paper focuses on the live-fire testing, and the results performed to experimentally evaluate the survivability of the advanced wing design.

  12. Black Colleges: An Alternative Strategy for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Albert N.

    1988-01-01

    Joseph Perkins argued in the "Wall Street Journal" that one-third of the 100 traditionally Black colleges should become two-year institutions. This rebuttal suggests that Black institutions' survival involves planning for new and broader missions in an unsheltered, integrated, competitive environment. (MLW)

  13. Basic & Survival Consumer Economics for Adult Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlston, Peter G.

    Prepared to help teachers address the basic and survival level consumer needs of adult Vietnamese and Laotian refugees, this instructional guide consists of five units of instructional materials. Topics of the individual units are (1) how the monetary system works (cash, checks, postal money orders, banking); (2) the family consumer (personal and…

  14. Surviving (Even Thriving?) in a Toxic Workplace.

    PubMed

    White, Paul E; Schoonover-Shoffner, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Anything toxic is poisonous and harmful-including a toxic workplace. Surveys of hundreds of individuals and organizations reveal three primary areas that are common in unhealthy work environments: sick systems, toxic leaders, and dysfunctional colleagues. This article draws from research and offers practical steps on how to survive, if not change and thrive, in toxic workplaces. PMID:27295230

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Survival Increases with Chemo Combo.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    For patients able to have surgery for pancreatic cancer, the adjuvant use of gemcitabine plus capecitabine, instead of gemcitabine alone, leads to a significant improvement in 5-year survival, according to results of the ESPAC-4 trial. The finding will likely change the standard of care for these patients. PMID:27363975

  16. Efficient algorithms for survivable virtual network embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Yu, Hongfang; Li, Lemin; Anand, Vishal; di, Hao; Gao, Xiujiao

    2010-12-01

    Network Virtualization Technology is serving as an effective method for providing a flexible and highly adaptable shared substrate network to satisfy the diversity of demands. But the problem of efficiently embedding Virtual Network (VN) onto substrate network is intractable since it is NP-hard. How to guarantee survivability of the embedding efficiently is another great challenge. In this paper, we investigate the Survivable Virtual Network Embedding (SVNE) problem and propose two efficient algorithms for solving this problem efficiently. Firstly, we formulate the model with minimum-cost objective of survivable network virtualization problem by Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP). We then devise two efficient relaxation-based algorithms for solving survivable virtual network embedding problem: (1) Lagrangian Relaxation based algorithm, called LR-SVNE in this paper; (2) Decomposition based algorithm called DSVNE in this paper. The results of simulation experiments show that these two algorithms both have good performance on time efficiency but LR-SVNE can guarantee the solution converge to optimal one under small scale substrate network.

  17. The Jicarilla Apaches. A Study in Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnerson, Dolores A.

    Focusing on the ultimate fate of the Cuartelejo and/or Paloma Apaches known in archaeological terms as the Dismal River people of the Central Plains, this book is divided into 2 parts. The early Apache (1525-1700) and the Jicarilla Apache (1700-1800) tribes are studied in terms of their: persistent cultural survival, social/political adaptability,…

  18. Node Survival in Networks under Correlated Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yan; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We study the interplay between correlations, dynamics, and networks for repeated attacks on a socio-economic network. As a model system we consider an insurance scheme against disasters that randomly hit nodes, where a node in need receives support from its network neighbors. The model is motivated by gift giving among the Maasai called Osotua. Survival of nodes under different disaster scenarios (uncorrelated, spatially, temporally and spatio-temporally correlated) and for different network architectures are studied with agent-based numerical simulations. We find that the survival rate of a node depends dramatically on the type of correlation of the disasters: Spatially and spatio-temporally correlated disasters increase the survival rate; purely temporally correlated disasters decrease it. The type of correlation also leads to strong inequality among the surviving nodes. We introduce the concept of disaster masking to explain some of the results of our simulations. We also analyze the subsets of the networks that were activated to provide support after fifty years of random disasters. They show qualitative differences for the different disaster scenarios measured by path length, degree, clustering coefficient, and number of cycles. PMID:25932635

  19. Cancer survival in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriamporn, S; Black, R J; Sankaranarayanan, R; Kamsa-ad, S; Parkin, D M; Vatanasapt, V

    1995-05-01

    Thailand is one of the few developing countries for which population-based cancer survival data are available. Using clinical follow-up information and reply-paid postal enquiries, 10,333 residents of Khon Kaen province registered with cancer in the period 1985-1992 were followed-up to the end of 1993. The sites of the most common cancers in the province were liver (5-year relative survival rate 9.2%), cervix (60.1%), lung (15.4%), breast (48.1%) and large bowel (41.9%). Results for Khon Kaen were compared with age-standardized survival data for the US and Scotland. Survival was consistently higher for US whites compared to Khon Kaen residents for those cancers whose prognosis is associated with early diagnosis (breast, cervix and large bowel) or the availability of intensive therapy (leukaemia and lymphoma). The main implication of these results for cancer control in Thailand is that the interventions of greatest potential benefit are those designed to promote early detection. More than one-third of all cancers in Thailand are liver tumours: primary prevention through control of hepatitis-B infection and liver fluke infestation is the only effective strategy for their control. PMID:7729937

  20. Counseling Survival in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Susanne S.

    1984-01-01

    Identifies a number of problem areas in school counseling and suggests a variety of survival skills for counselors. Suggests that counselors identify and strengthen their special skills to make it evident to school systems that they fill a critical need. (JAC)

  1. Survival Skills: A Basic Skills Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Don

    The guide describes an approach designed to promote the basic skills of hearing impaired students Basic or survival skills are identified which cover the student's daily functioning at home, school, and in the community. The guide is aimed at the 10-15 year old hearing impaired student, but techniques are expected to be applicable to both…

  2. Protein Markers Predict Survival in Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Stetson, Lindsay C; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a genomically complex and aggressive primary adult brain tumor, with a median survival time of 12-14 months. The heterogeneous nature of this disease has made the identification and validation of prognostic biomarkers difficult. Using reverse phase protein array data from 203 primary untreated GBM patients, we have identified a set of 13 proteins with prognostic significance. Our protein signature predictive of glioblastoma (PROTGLIO) patient survival model was constructed and validated on independent data sets and was shown to significantly predict survival in GBM patients (log-rank test: p = 0.0009). Using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards, we have shown that our PROTGLIO model is distinct from other known GBM prognostic factors (age at diagnosis, extent of surgical resection, postoperative Karnofsky performance score (KPS), treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) chemoradiation, and methylation of the MGMT gene). Tenfold cross-validation repetition of our model generation procedure confirmed validation of PROTGLIO. The model was further validated on an independent set of isocitrate dehydrogenase wild-type (IDHwt) lower grade gliomas (LGG)-a portion of these tumors progress rapidly to GBM. The PROTGLIO model contains proteins, such as Cox-2 and Annexin 1, involved in inflammatory response, pointing to potential therapeutic interventions. The PROTGLIO model is a simple and effective predictor of overall survival in glioblastoma patients, making it potentially useful in clinical practice of glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:27143410

  3. Survival Skills for the Real W