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Sample records for local strain distribution

  1. Visualising the strain distribution in suspended two-dimensional materials under local deformation

    PubMed Central

    Elibol, Kenan; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hummel, Stefan; Kotakoski, Jani; Argentero, Giacomo; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of combined simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laterally resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the strain distribution around highly localised deformations in suspended two-dimensional materials. Using the AFM tip as a nanoindentation probe, we induce localised strain in suspended few-layer graphene, which we adopt as a two-dimensional membrane model system. Concurrently, we visualise the strain distribution under and around the AFM tip in situ using hyperspectral Raman mapping via the strain-dependent frequency shifts of the few-layer graphene’s G and 2D Raman bands. Thereby we show how the contact of the nm-sized scanning probe tip results in a two-dimensional strain field with μm dimensions in the suspended membrane. Our combined AFM/Raman approach thus adds to the critically required instrumental toolbox towards nanoscale strain engineering of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27346485

  2. Visualising the strain distribution in suspended two-dimensional materials under local deformation.

    PubMed

    Elibol, Kenan; Bayer, Bernhard C; Hummel, Stefan; Kotakoski, Jani; Argentero, Giacomo; Meyer, Jannik C

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of combined simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laterally resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the strain distribution around highly localised deformations in suspended two-dimensional materials. Using the AFM tip as a nanoindentation probe, we induce localised strain in suspended few-layer graphene, which we adopt as a two-dimensional membrane model system. Concurrently, we visualise the strain distribution under and around the AFM tip in situ using hyperspectral Raman mapping via the strain-dependent frequency shifts of the few-layer graphene's G and 2D Raman bands. Thereby we show how the contact of the nm-sized scanning probe tip results in a two-dimensional strain field with μm dimensions in the suspended membrane. Our combined AFM/Raman approach thus adds to the critically required instrumental toolbox towards nanoscale strain engineering of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27346485

  3. Visualising the strain distribution in suspended two-dimensional materials under local deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elibol, Kenan; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hummel, Stefan; Kotakoski, Jani; Argentero, Giacomo; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the use of combined simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laterally resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the strain distribution around highly localised deformations in suspended two-dimensional materials. Using the AFM tip as a nanoindentation probe, we induce localised strain in suspended few-layer graphene, which we adopt as a two-dimensional membrane model system. Concurrently, we visualise the strain distribution under and around the AFM tip in situ using hyperspectral Raman mapping via the strain-dependent frequency shifts of the few-layer graphene’s G and 2D Raman bands. Thereby we show how the contact of the nm-sized scanning probe tip results in a two-dimensional strain field with μm dimensions in the suspended membrane. Our combined AFM/Raman approach thus adds to the critically required instrumental toolbox towards nanoscale strain engineering of two-dimensional materials.

  4. Three-Dimensional pore space and strain localization distribution in Majella limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuntao; Hall, Stephen; Baud, Patrick; Wond, Teng-fong

    2015-04-01

    Warp code to perform 3D volumetric DIC on the pairs of images to derive the permanent displacement field and the full 3D strain tensor field of each sample. Our DIC analysis has revealed the structure of high-angle compacting shear bands in the transitional regime in Majella limestone. Our DIC data also indicate an increase of geometric complexity with increasing confinement - from a planar shear band, to a curvilinear band, and ultimately a diffuse multiplicity of bands, before shear localization is inhibited as the failure mode completes the transition to delocalized cataclastic flow.

  5. Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

  6. The influence of phase and grain size distribution on the dynamics of strain localization in polymineralic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplińska, Daria; Piazolo, Sandra; Zibra, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Deformation microstructures of a quartzo-feldspathic pegmatite deformed at mid-crustal levels allow the study of the dynamics of strain localization in polymineralic rocks. Strain localization results from (i) difference in grain sizes between phases, both original and obtained during fluid present reactions and (ii) initial compositional banding. Due to original difference in grain size stress concentrates in the initially finer-grained phases resulting in their intense grain size reduction via subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). When the grain size is sufficiently reduced through either deformation or interphase coupled dissolution-precipitation replacement of the coarse grained feldspar, aggregates start to deform by dominantly diffusion accommodated grain boundary sliding (GBS). Phase mixing inhibits grain growth and sustains a grain size allowing GBS. Consequently, discontinuous microscale shear zones form locally within initially coarse grained areas. At the same time difference in strain rate between feldspar-rich and quartz-rich domains needs to be accommodated at domain boundaries. This results in the formation of continuous mesoscale shear zones deformed by GBS. Once these are formed, deformation in the coarse grained parts is arrested and strain is mainly accommodated in the mesoscale shear zones resulting in "superplastic" behaviour consistent with diffusion creep.

  7. Subcellular Localization and Clues for the Function of the HetN Factor Influencing Heterocyst Distribution in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J.; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Flores, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  8. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  9. Measuring strain distributions in amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Henning F.; Wert, John A.; Neuefeind, Jörg; Honkimäki, Veijo; Daymond, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A number of properties of amorphous materials including fatigue, fracture and component performance are governed by the magnitude of strain fields around inhomogeneities such as inclusions, voids and cracks. At present, localized strain information is only available from surface probes such as optical or electron microscopy. This is unfortunate because surface and bulk characteristics in general differ. Hence, to a large extent, the assessment of strain distributions relies on untested models. Here we present a universal diffraction method for characterizing bulk stress and strain fields in amorphous materials and demonstrate its efficacy by work on a material of current interest in materials engineering: a bulk metallic glass. The macroscopic response is shown to be less stiff than the atomic next-neighbour bonds because of structural rearrangements at the scale of 4-10 Å. The method is also applicable to composites comprising an amorphous matrix and crystalline inclusions.

  10. Local Strain Evaluation of Strained-SOI Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuda, Koji; Mizuno, Tomohisa; Numata, Toshinori; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Nakaharai, Shu; Takagi, Shin-Ichi

    The strain relaxation within a strained-Si on SiGe on insulator (SGOI) structure might be one of the key issues in development of strained-Si MOSFET devices for high-performance ULSIs. In order to investigate the strain relaxation within the thin strained-Si layers, a new characterization technique to directly evaluate a local strain variation in the layers is required. Hence, we have developed the nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD) method which has a lateral resolution of 10 nm and a strain resolution of 0.1%. In this paper, we discuss a detailed investigation of whether the NBD method could be utilized to clarify a strain in a strained-Si layer on the SGOI structures.

  11. Distributions of energy storage rate and microstructural evolution in the area of plastic strain localization during uniaxial tension of austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliferuk, W.; Maj, M.

    2015-08-01

    The presented work is devoted to an experimental determination of the energy storage rate in the area of strain localization. The experimental procedure involves two complementary techniques: i.e. infrared thermography (IRT) and visible light imaging. The results of experiments have shown that during the evolution of plastic strain localization the energy storage rate in some areas of the deformed specimen drops to zero. To interpret the decrease of the energy storage rate in terms of micro-mechanisms, microstructural observations using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSC) were performed. On the basis of microstructural studies it is believed that a 0 value of energy storage rate corresponds to the state in which only two dominant components of the texture appear, creating conditions for crystallographic shear banding.

  12. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  13. Strain localization and damage development in 2060 alloy during bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao; Fu, Bao-qin; Zhang, Cheng-lu; Liu, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The microstructure evolution and damage development of the third-generation Al-Li alloy 2060 (T8) were studied using in situ bending tests. Specimens were loaded with a series of punches of different radii, and the microstructure evolution was studied by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation (DIC) methods. The evolution of the microscopic fracture strain distribution and microstructure in 2060 alloy during bending was characterized, where the dispersion distribution of precipitates was recorded by backscattered electron imaging and later inputted into a DIC system for strain calculations. The experimental results showed that strain localization in the free surface of bent specimens induced damage to the microstructure. The region of crack initiation lies on the free surface with maximum strain, and the shear crack propagates along the macro-shear band in the early stages of bending. Crack propagation in the later stages was interpreted on the basis of the conventional mechanism of ductile fracture.

  14. Heterogeneous material distribution, an important reason for generation of strain-localized mylonite and frictional slip zones in the Hidaka metamorphic belt, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Shimada, Koji; Toyoshima, Tsuyoshi; Obara, Tomohiro; Niizato, Tadafumi

    2004-12-01

    Lithological heterogeneity of low P/T metamorphic rocks in southern area of Hidaka metamorphic belt (HMB) was formed through historical development of HMB while these rocks had been laid in ductile lower crust. Many strain-localized mylonite zones (<100 m in thickness) are preferentially developed within S-type tonalite and pelitic gneiss, which are characterized by a large modal amount of phyllosilicates (biotite+muscovite+chlorite) and quartz, compared to other lithofacies in HMB. Mylonitic foliations are more conspicuous with close to the center of the shear zone associated with increase in amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, indicating fluidenhanced weakening mechanisms were operated in plastic shear zones. Pseudotachylyte veins are observed exclusively in these mylonite zones, which were generated during exhumation stage of HMB. We conclude the seismic slip zones in southern HMB had been initiated in the ductile lower crust by concentration of localized plastic shear zones within the phyllosilicate- and quartz-rich lithofacies, which were heterogeneously formed by old metamorphic and magmatic events. Then these zones were further weakened by fluid-enhanced plastic deformation, and finally seismic slips occurred at the bottom of seismogenic upper crust, during exhumation of HMB.

  15. Gurson's Model: ALE Formulation and Strain Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Cunda, Luiz A. B. da; Creus, Guillermo J.

    2007-05-17

    This paper presents a brief review of Gurson's damage model, employed to describes the strength degradation in ductile metals submitted to large plastic deformations. The damage model is applied using finite elements and an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE), to ensure a better quality to the finite elements mesh. The study of the combined application of ALE and Gurson approach to damage modeling and strain localization is the object of this paper.

  16. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, O; Aksoy, B; Akalin, O B; Bayraktar, H; Alaca, B E

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads. PMID:26931864

  17. Distributed strain monitoring for bridges: temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.

    2014-03-01

    To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic strain sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for strain to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional strain sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed strain sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. Strain data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the strain measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The strain measurements due to temperature are compared to strain measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and strain changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  18. Transient dynamic distributed strain sensing using photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Shafeek A.; Hegde, G. M.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Hanagud, S.

    2014-02-01

    A technique to determine the strain field in one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) involving high strain rate, high temperature around shock or ballistic impact is proposed. Transient strain sensing is important in aerospace and other structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. We consider a MEMS based smart sensor design with photonic crystal integrated on a silicon substrate for dynamic strain correlation. Deeply etched silicon rib waveguides with distributed Bragg reflectors are suitable candidates for miniaturization of sensing elements, replacing the conventional FBG. Main objective here is to investigate the effect of non-uniform strain localization on the sensor output. Computational analysis is done to determine the static and dynamic strain sensing characteristics of the 1D photonic crystal based sensor. The structure is designed and modeled using Finite Element Method. Dynamic localization of strain field is observed. The distributed strain field is used to calculated the PC waveguide response. The sensitivity of the proposed sensor is estimated to be 0.6 pm/μɛ.

  19. Strain localization along micro-boudinage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, Eleftheria; Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Habler, Gerlinde; Soukis, Konstantinos; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    The progressive development of boudinage strongly depends on the kinematic framework and the mechanical properties of the boudinaged layer and host rock. A common type of boudin, which can often be observed in natural examples, is the domino boudinage. This boudin type typically reflects a strong competency contrast of the interlayered rock sequences. Numerical models have shown that a relatively high amount of strain is necessary in order to develop separated boudin segments. With ongoing deformation and consequent rotation of the individual segments into the shear direction, the terminal sectors tend to experience a higher rotation rate, progressively resulting in isoclinal folding. Whereas most investigations of domino boudinage are cm- to dm-scale examples, we examined one order of magnitude smaller examples, where the deformation mechanism between the segments and the matrix could be directly investigated. The samples are from Kalymnos Island located in the southeastern Aegean Sea (Dodecanese islands-Greece). The analysed sample belongs to the upper unit of the pre-Alpidic basement, which consists of a succession of marbles, which were deformed under lower-greenschist facies conditions during the Variscan orogeny. 40Ar/39Ar geochronological dating on white micas in the adjacent upper quartz-mica schists unit yielded deformation ages between 240 and 334 Ma. The calcitic marble comprises boudinaged dolomite layers with thickness varying between 1 and 20 mm. Progressive deformation of the boudinaged layers resulted in the development of ptygmatic folds with fold axes parallel to the stretching lineation. The grain size from the host rock marbles (10 μm) decreases towards the boudinaged dolomite layer (5 μm) indicating strain localization adjacent to the dolomite layers. Furthermore, strain is localized within micro shear zones which nucleate in the necks of rotated boudin segments. Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) derived from electron backscatter

  20. Strain localization driven by co-seismic pore fluid pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, James; Platt, John; Brantut, Nicolas; Rudnicki, John

    2015-04-01

    The absence of a thermal anomaly associated with the San Andreas fault, and low driving stress resolved on it, suggest that such mature faults weaken dramatically during seismic slip. Thermal pressurization (TP) and thermal decomposition (TD) are two mechanisms to explain this co-seismic weakening. Both rely on elevated pore pressures in a fluid-saturated gouge, with TP achieving this through thermal expansion of native pore fluid and TD by releasing additional pore fluid (e.g., H2O or CO2) during a reaction. We use a one-dimensional model for a fluid-saturated gouge layer sheared between two undeforming half-spaces to study how TP (Rice et al., Platt et al., JGR-B, 2014) and TD (Platt et al., submitted JGR-B) drive seismic strain localization. A linear stability analysis is first used to predict the localized zone thickness for each of the weakening mechanisms. Using representative parameters for fault gouge we predict localized zone thicknesses of a few tens of microns, in line with laboratory (Kitajima et al., 2010) and field (Chester and Chester, 1998) observations. Next we use numerical simulations to study how the localized zone develops once nonlinear effects become important. These show that the final localized zone thickness is very similar to the linear stability prediction. In the simulations, the onset of localization accelerates fault weakening, making co-seismic strain localization an important consideration, apparently neglected in all current earthquake simulations. Finally we show how a secondary instability can lead to migration of the deforming zone across the gouge layer. This instability is driven by hydrothermal diffusion for TP, and by reactant depletion for TD. Our results show that migration must be taken into account when inferring the width of the deforming zone from field observations. Even when the zone of localized straining is only a few tens of microns wide, migration can lead to a final strain profile with a zone of roughly uniform

  1. Strain localization driven by co-seismic pore fluid pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Brantut, N.; Rice, J. R.; Rudnicki, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The absence of a thermal anomaly associated with the San Andreas fault, and low driving stress resolved on it, suggest that such mature faults weaken dramatically during seismic slip. Thermal pressurization (TP) and thermal decomposition (TD) are two mechanisms to explain this co-seismic weakening. Both rely on elevated pore pressures in a fluid-saturated gouge, with TP achieving this through thermal expansion of native pore fluid and TD by releasing additional pore fluid (e.g., H2O or CO2) during a reaction. We use a one-dimensional model for a fluid-saturated gouge layer sheared between two undeforming half-spaces to study how TP (Rice et al., Platt et al., JGR-B, 2014) and TD (Platt et al., submitted JGR-B) drive seismic strain localization. A linear stability analysis is first used to predict the localized zone thickness for each of the weakening mechanisms. Using representative parameters for fault gouge we predict localized zone thicknesses of a few tens of microns, in line with laboratory (Kitajima et al., 2010) and field (Chester and Chester, 1998) observations. Next we use numerical simulations to study how the localized zone develops once nonlinear effects become important. These show that the final localized zone thickness is very similar to the linear stability prediction. In the simulations, the onset of localization accelerates fault weakening, making co-seismic strain localization an important consideration, apparently neglected in all current earthquake simulations. Finally we show how a secondary instability can lead to migration of the deforming zone across the gouge layer. This instability is driven by hydrothermal diffusion for TP, and by reactant depletion for TD. Our results show that migration must be taken into account when inferring the width of the deforming zone from field observations. Even when the zone of localized straining is only a few tens of microns wide, migration can lead to a final strain profile with a zone of roughly uniform

  2. Phase-based Bragg intragrating distributed strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Ohn, M. M.; Measures, R. M.

    1996-03-01

    A strain-distribution sensing technique based on the measurement of the phase spectrum of the reflected light from a fiber-optic Bragg grating is described. When a grating is subject to a strain gradient, the grating will experience a chirp and therefore the resonant wavelength will vary along the grating, causing wavelength-dependent penetration depth. Because the group delay for each wavelength component is related to its penetration depth and the resonant wavelength is determined by strain, a measured phase spectrum can then indicate the local strain as a function of location within the grating. This phase-based Bragg grating sensing technique offers a powerful new means for studying some important effects over a few millimeters or centimeters in smart structures.

  3. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It is found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.

  4. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It ismore » found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.« less

  5. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite and strain localization during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, B.; Hirth, G.

    2012-12-01

    Antigorite, the high temperature and pressure serpentine polytype, is thought to exist along subduction zones between the mantle wedge and the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Wada et al., 2008). Understanding how the rheology of antigorite changes with depth along the slab may be key to understanding seismicity along the upper plate boundary (e.g., Hacker et al., 2003). To explore this phenomenon we are conducting constant strain rate general shear experiments on antigorite-rich serpentinite at shear strain rates of 5*10^-7/s to 10^-5/s, confining pressures from 1-2 GPa and temperatures from 400-700°C. We are using microstructural observations to constrain deformation mechanisms and investigate conditions where strain localization occurs. In some experiments we employ either strain rate stepping or temperature ramping to examine the stress dependence of viscosity (i.e., determine stress exponent) and syntectonic reaction during heating. The results of our general shear experiments suggest the rheologic behavior of antigorite varies significantly with changes in temperature and pressure, similar to previous work in axial compression (e.g., Chernak and Hirth, 2010). At 400°C and 1GPa confining pressure antigorite deforms initially via steady-state ductile flow with strengths as high as 1.4 GPa at a strain rate of 10^-5/s. With increasing strain we observe weakening events that correlate with the development of shear fractures within the sample. At 2GPa pressure, the flow strength of antigorite increases to ~1.8 GPa at 10^-6/s and deformation is distributed at low strain. Strain rate stepping at these conditions suggests a very weak strain rate dependence on strength with a 5-10% change in stress for an order of magnitude strain rate step. At 700C and 1 GPa, above the thermal stability of antigorite, the steady-state strength is ~120 MPa at 10^-5/s. In these samples olivine becomes the dominant phase as antigorite progressively reacts to olivine and pyroxene. At the

  6. EVALUATION OF LOCAL STRAIN EVOLUTION FROM METALLIC WHISKER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Lam, P.

    2011-05-11

    Evolution of local strain on electrodeposited tin films upon aging has been monitored by digital image correlation (DIC) for the first time. Maps of principal strains adjacent to whisker locations were constructed via comparing pre- and post-growth scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Results showed that the magnitude of the strain gradient plays an important role in whisker growth. DIC visualized the dynamic growth process in which the alteration of strain field has been identified to cause growth of subsequent whiskers.

  7. Formability Evaluation of Sheet Metals Based on Global Strain Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Lin, Jianping; Min, Junying; Ye, You; Kang, Liugen

    2016-04-01

    According to the conventional methods for formability evaluation, e.g., forming limit curve (FLC), limit dome height, and total elongation, inconsistent results are observed when comparing the formability of four advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) with an ultimate tensile strength grade of 1000 MPa. The strain distribution analysis with the aid of digital image correlation technique shows that different uniform deformation capabilities of sheet metals under the same loading conditions are responsible for this inconsistency. In addition, metallurgical analysis suggests that inhomogeneous microstructure distribution and phase transformation during deformation in some materials play important roles in the uniform deformation capability of sheet metal. Limit strains on the commonly used FLC only relate to the major and minor strains of local deforming elements associated with the onset of necking. However, the formability of a sheet metal component is determined by the strain magnitudes of all deforming elements involved during the forming process. Hence, the formability evaluation of sheet metals from a global aspect is more applicable for practical engineering. A new method based on two indices (i.e., which represent global formability and uniform deformation capability, respectively) is proposed to evaluate the formability of sheet metals based on global strain distribution. The formability and evolution of deformation uniformity of the investigated AHSS at different stress states are studied with this new method. Compared with other formability evaluation methods, the new method is demonstrated to be more appropriate for practical engineering, and it is applicable to both in-plane and out-of-plane deformation. Additionally, the global formability of sheet metals can be more comprehensively understood with this new method.

  8. Formability Evaluation of Sheet Metals Based on Global Strain Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Lin, Jianping; Min, Junying; Ye, You; Kang, Liugen

    2016-06-01

    According to the conventional methods for formability evaluation, e.g., forming limit curve (FLC), limit dome height, and total elongation, inconsistent results are observed when comparing the formability of four advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) with an ultimate tensile strength grade of 1000 MPa. The strain distribution analysis with the aid of digital image correlation technique shows that different uniform deformation capabilities of sheet metals under the same loading conditions are responsible for this inconsistency. In addition, metallurgical analysis suggests that inhomogeneous microstructure distribution and phase transformation during deformation in some materials play important roles in the uniform deformation capability of sheet metal. Limit strains on the commonly used FLC only relate to the major and minor strains of local deforming elements associated with the onset of necking. However, the formability of a sheet metal component is determined by the strain magnitudes of all deforming elements involved during the forming process. Hence, the formability evaluation of sheet metals from a global aspect is more applicable for practical engineering. A new method based on two indices (i.e., which represent global formability and uniform deformation capability, respectively) is proposed to evaluate the formability of sheet metals based on global strain distribution. The formability and evolution of deformation uniformity of the investigated AHSS at different stress states are studied with this new method. Compared with other formability evaluation methods, the new method is demonstrated to be more appropriate for practical engineering, and it is applicable to both in-plane and out-of-plane deformation. Additionally, the global formability of sheet metals can be more comprehensively understood with this new method.

  9. Content Locality in Distributed Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viles, Charles L.; French, James C.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces content locality--the degree to which content-similar documents are colocated in a distributed collection--in distributed digital libraries. Proposes two metrics for measurement of content locality, one based on topic signatures and the other based on collection statistics. Provides derivations and analysis of both metrics and uses them…

  10. Ultrasound Strain Measurements for Evaluating Local Pulmonary Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Jonathan M.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Kim, Kang; Ortiz, Luis A.; Hamilton, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Local lung function is difficult to evaluate, because most lung function estimates are either global in nature, e.g. pulmonary function tests, or require equipment that cannot be used at a patient's bedside, such as computed tomograms. Yet, local function measurements would be highly desirable for many reasons. In a recent publication [1], we were able to track displacements of the lung surface during breathing. We have now extended these results to measuring lung strains during respiration as a means of assessing local lung ventilation. We studied two normal human volunteers and 12 mice with either normal lung function or experimentally induced pulmonary fibrosis. The difference in strains between the control, normal mice and those with pulmonary fibrosis was significant (p < 0.02), while the strains measured in the human volunteers closely matched linear strains predicted from the literature. Ultrasonography may be able to assess local lung ventilation. PMID:26635917

  11. Microstructural evolution during strain localization in dolomite aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holyoke, Caleb W.; Kronenberg, Andreas K.; Newman, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dolomite aggregates deformed by dislocation creep over a wide range of conditions (T = 700-1000 °C, effective pressure of 900 MPa, strain rates of 10-7 - 10-4/s) strain weaken by up to 75% of the peak differential stress. Microstructural study of samples shortened to different finite strains beyond the peak differential stress shows that strain becomes highly localized within shear zones by high-temperature creep processes, with no contribution of brittle cracking. At low strains (8%), dolomite deforms homogeneously by recrystallization-accommodated dislocation creep. At progressively higher sample strains, deformation is localized into narrow shear zones made up of very fine (˜3 μm) recrystallized grains and relict porphyroclasts (20-100 μm). Finely-recrystallized dolomite grains in the shear zones are largely dislocation free and localized shear is facilitated by diffusion creep. In contrast, original dolomite grains and porphyroclasts in shear zones have high dislocation densities and do not deform after shear zone formation. Calculated strain rates in the shear zones are two to three orders of magnitude faster than the imposed bulk strain rate of the samples and these strain rates are consistent with predictions of the diffusion creep flow law for fine-grained dolomite.

  12. Shear Weakening and Strain Localization in the Deeper Mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernlund, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shear weakening and strain localization is an essential component of plate tectonics on Earth, and is ubiquitously observed in both crustal and mantle rocks exposed at Earth's surface at a variety of scales. However, it is commonly assumed that this process is only important in the lithosphere (because it would otherwise be strong and inhibit plate-like behavior), and that at greater depths the mantle's style of deformation is inherently diffuse and broadly distributed. This assumption strongly influences our view of processes in Earth's deep interior, such as styles of mantle mixing, and is the basis for the rheological formulation implemented in most mantle convection models. However, there are many possibilities that would permit shear localization at large scales, in a way that could alter our view of internal mantle deformation in important ways. One example is the possible presence of very weak rocks (e.g., owing to localized volatile enrichment) that may become sheared and stretched in flows to create effective weak zones between stronger bodies of rock. Another example is the possibility that weaker mineral phases in a rock can become sheared between stronger grains such that the weakest phase dominates the long-term dynamic processes operating in the mantle. Simple modeling of various scenarios reveals that differences in long-term behavior for shear localized mantle convection largely depend upon the scale of the shear zone. If the weak zones are large in scale, they acan persist over long time scales, and may be advected laterally away from the buoyancy centers where they are produced (giving rise to toroidal motion). On the other hand, if the weakening fabric occurs at the grain-scale, then the fabric can be healed by processes such as Ostwald ripening that operate on shorter time scales at higher temperatures. Regardless of the scale of shear zones, subduction of slabs through the lower mantle can occur relatively rapidly when accommodated by localized

  13. Local, submicron, strain gradients as the cause of Sn whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiech, M.; Wohlschlögel, M.; Welzel, U.; Mittemeijer, E. J.; Hügel, W.; Seekamp, A.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown experimentally that local in-plane residual strain gradients occur around the root of spontaneously growing Sn whiskers on the surface of Sn coatings deposited on Cu. The strain distribution has been determined with synchrotron white beam micro Laue diffraction measurements. The observed in-plane residual strain gradients in combination with recently revealed out-of-plane residual strain-depth gradients [M. Sobiech et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011906 (2008)] provide the driving forces for whisker growth.

  14. In vivo Measurement of Localized Tibiofemoral Cartilage Strains in Response to Dynamic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, E. Grant; Widmyer, Margaret R.; Utturkar, Gangadhar M.; Spritzer, Charles E.; Garrett, William E.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Altered local mechanical loading may disrupt normal cartilage homeostasis and play a role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Currently, there is limited data quantifying local cartilage strains in response to dynamic activity in normal or injured knees. Purpose The purpose of this study was to directly measure local tibiofemoral cartilage strains in response to a dynamic hopping activity in normal healthy knees. We hypothesize that local regions of cartilage will exhibit significant compressive strains in response to hopping, while overall compartmental averages may not. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Both knees of eight healthy subjects were MR imaged before and immediately after a dynamic hopping activity. Images were segmented and then used to create 3D surface models of bone and cartilage. These pre- and post-activity models were then registered using an iterative closest point technique to enable site-specific measurements of cartilage strain (defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity) on the femur and tibia. Results Significant strains were observed in both the medial and lateral tibial cartilage, with each compartment averaging a decrease of 5%. However, these strains varied with location within each compartment, reaching a maximum compressive strain of 8% on the medial plateau and 7% on the lateral plateau. No significant averaged compartmental strains were observed in the medial or lateral femoral cartilage. However, local regions of the medial and lateral femoral cartilage experienced significant compressive strains, reaching maximums of 6% and 3% respectively. Conclusion Local regions of both the femur and tibia experienced significant cartilage strains as a result of dynamic activity. An understanding of changes in cartilage strain distributions may help to elucidate the biomechanical factors contributing to cartilage degeneration after joint injury. PMID:25504809

  15. Discrete distributed strain sensing of intelligent structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques are developed for the design of discrete highly distributed sensor systems for use in intelligent structures. First the functional requirements for such a system are presented. Discrete spatially averaging strain sensors are then identified as satisfying the functional requirements. A variety of spatial weightings for spatially averaging sensors are examined, and their wave number characteristics are determined. Preferable spatial weightings are identified. Several numerical integration rules used to integrate such sensors in order to determine the global deflection of the structure are discussed. A numerical simulation is conducted using point and rectangular sensors mounted on a cantilevered beam under static loading. Gage factor and sensor position uncertainties are incorporated to assess the absolute error and standard deviation of the error in the estimated tip displacement found by numerically integrating the sensor outputs. An experiment is carried out using a statically loaded cantilevered beam with five point sensors. It is found that in most cases the actual experimental error is within one standard deviation of the absolute error as found in the numerical simulation.

  16. Strain localization during deformation of Westerly granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, N. S.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A specimen of Westerly granite was cyclically loaded to near failure at 50 MPa confining pressure. Holographic interferometry provided detailed measurements of localized surface deformations during loading and unloading. The data are consistent with deformation occurring primarily elastically at low differential stress; in conjunction with one incipient fault zone between approximately 350 and 520 MPa differential stress; and in conjunction with a second incipient fault zone above 580 MPa and/or during creep. During unloading only one fault zone, that which is active at the intermediate stress levels during loading, is seen to recede.

  17. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan Newman, Roger C.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  18. Electronic properties of polycrystalline graphene under large local strain

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn Duan, Junxi; Mei, Fuhong; Meng, Hu; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Ge, Weikun E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-06-16

    To explore the transport properties of polycrystalline graphene under large tensile strain, a strain device has been fabricated using piezocrystal to load local strain onto graphene, up to 22.5%. Ionic liquid gate whose capability of tuning carrier density being much higher than that of a solid gate is used to survey the transfer characteristics of the deformed graphene. The conductance of the Dirac point and field effect mobility of electrons and holes is found to decrease with increasing strain, which is attributed to the scattering of the graphene grain boundaries, the strain induced change of band structure, and defects. However, the transport gap is still not opened. Our study is helpful to evaluate the application of graphene in stretchable electronics.

  19. Distributed fiber strain sensor based on Brillouin scattering for inspection of pipeline buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Ravet, Fabien; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Joe; Zimmerman, Tom E.

    2005-05-01

    A distributed strain sensor based on Brillouin scattering has been employed to inspect localized pipe-wall buckling on a length of 2.58 m and diameter of 0.75 m steel pipe by measuring the axial strain distributions along the outer surface of the pipe. An optical fiber with 10 sections was laid along the longitudinal direction of the pipe. Both compressive load and bending load were applied on both end of tested pipe up to 2,013 and 300 kIPS respectively, to induce the localized pipe-wall buckling. The buckling locations comprising tension and compression of the pipe wall are found and distinguished using their corresponding strain distribution data. The compressive strains of - 4330 and - 6856 μɛ measured by our distributed strain sensor on the bending load of 220 and 300 kIPS, respectively, at one location near buckling point, match the readings from strain gauge at the same location where the strain gauge attached. The tensile strain happened at different sides of the pipe are found too.

  20. Strain localization driven by thermal decomposition during seismic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John D.; Brantut, Nicolas; Rice, James R.

    2015-06-01

    Field and laboratory observations show that shear deformation is often extremely localized at seismic slip rates, with a typical deforming zone width on the order of a few tens of microns. This extreme localization can be understood in terms of thermally driven weakening mechanisms. A zone of initially high strain rate will experience more shear heating and thus weaken faster, making it more likely to accommodate subsequent deformation. Fault zones often contain thermally unstable minerals such as clays or carbonates, which devolatilize at the high temperatures attained during seismic slip. In this paper, we investigate how these thermal decomposition reactions drive strain localization when coupled to a model for thermal pressurization of in situ groundwater. Building on Rice et al. (2014), we use a linear stability analysis to predict a localized zone thickness that depends on a combination of hydraulic, frictional, and thermochemical properties of the deforming fault rock. Numerical simulations show that the onset of thermal decomposition drives additional strain localization when compared with thermal pressurization alone and predict localized zone thicknesses of ˜7 and ˜13 μm for lizardite and calcite, respectively. Finally we show how thermal diffusion and the endothermic reaction combine to limit the peak temperature of the fault and that the pore fluid released by the reaction provides additional weakening of ˜20-40% of the initial strength.

  1. Measurement of local values of strains of the briquette by means of special resistance strain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysz, Jozef

    1997-02-01

    Local measurement of the coal briquette strains during its destruction caused by sudden decrease of pressure of gas filling pores is difficult, because of high strain of coal (exceeds 16%), which results in bursting. A special type of an resistance-strain gauge, which is pressed into a defined position during briquette preparation was elaborated. This gauge is deformed just as the surrounding coal. The strain is measured as a difference in resistance of a mixture of coal grains (briquette material) and short, 8 micrometers dia. graphite fibers. A ca. 0.5 mm thick and ca. 1 mm long gauge was prepared. Its initial resistance constituted several hundreds ohms. The resistance vs. strain dependence is not linear but stable enough in time and does not depend on the type of gas filling briquette pores (e.g. CO2 and He).

  2. Distribution of critical temperature at Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammag, Rayda; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2016-05-01

    Based on a local mean-field theory approach at Anderson localization, we find a distribution function of critical temperature from that of disorder. An essential point of this local mean-field theory approach is that the information of the wave-function multifractality is introduced. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature (TK) shows a power-law tail in the limit of TK→0 regardless of the Kondo coupling constant. We also find that the distribution function of the ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) gives a power-law behavior in the limit of Tc→0 when an interaction parameter for ferromagnetic instability lies below a critical value. However, the Tc distribution function stops the power-law increasing behavior in the Tc→0 limit and vanishes beyond the critical interaction parameter inside the ferromagnetic phase. These results imply that the typical Kondo temperature given by a geometric average always vanishes due to finite density of the distribution function in the TK→0 limit while the typical ferromagnetic transition temperature shows a phase transition at the critical interaction parameter. We propose that the typical transition temperature serves a criterion for quantum Griffiths phenomena vs smeared transitions: Quantum Griffiths phenomena occur above the typical value of the critical temperature while smeared phase transitions result at low temperatures below the typical transition temperature. We speculate that the ferromagnetic transition at Anderson localization shows the evolution from quantum Griffiths phenomena to smeared transitions around the critical interaction parameter at low temperatures.

  3. Exploration of Local Strain Accumulation in Nickel-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jennifer Lynn Walley

    Deformation in polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys is a complex process dependent on the interaction of dislocations with both the intra-granular γ'' particles and the grain boundaries. An extensive body of work exists on understanding the interaction between dislocations and the γ'' particles, but understanding the interaction between dislocations and grain boundaries has been historically hindered by the experimental techniques. In this work a full field strain mapping technique was developed and utilized to explore surface strain accumulation at grain boundaries of René 104 samples with different microstructures. The full field strain mapping technique utilized Correlated Solutions VIC-2D software for digital image correlation to measure strain accumulation from secondary electron images taken during constant load tests at elevated temperature. This technique indicated that the two different microstructures of René 104, one with microscopically flat grain boundaries and the other with serrated grain boundaries, accumulate strain by different methods. Analysis of discrete offsets in grid lines placed prior to deformation indicate that grain boundary sliding (GBS) is an active deformation mechanism at these temperature and strain rate regimes, and that the development of serrated high angle grain boundaries can decrease the activity of this mechanism by 30%. Slip transmission parameters, which mathematically assess the ease of slip transmission across a grain boundary, were calculated based on grain boundary misorientation and grain boundary trace. These parameters proved unsuccessful at predicting strain localization sites in these materials, indicating that slip transmission is not the only factor dictating strain localization sites. AAA Full field strain maps were used to site-specifically extract grain boundaries of interest to study dislocation interaction and sub-surface grain boundary neighborhood. Representative from each of four types of

  4. Inverse Analysis of Distributed Load Using Strain Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshiya; Igawa, Hirotaka

    The operational stress data is quite useful in managing the structural integrity and airworthiness of an aircraft. Since the aerodynamic load (pressure) distributes continuously on the structure surface, identifying the load from finite number of measured strain data is not easy. Although this is an inverse problem, usually used is an empirical correlation between load and strain obtained through expensive ground tests. Some analytical studies have been conducted but simple mathematical expressions were assumed to approximate the pressure distribution. In the present study a more flexible approximation of continuous load distribution is proposed. The pressure distribution is identified based on finite number of strain data with using the conventional finite element method and pseudo-inverse matrix. Also an extension is made by coupling an aerodynamical restriction with the elastic equation. Numerical examples show that this extension improves the precision of the inverse analysis with very small number of strain data.

  5. A MODEST MODEL EXPLAINS THE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI STRAINS

    PubMed Central

    BRISSON, DUSTIN; DYKHUIZEN, DANIEL E.

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of Borrelia burgdorferi, including human Lyme disease strains, is a function of its interactions with vertebrate species. We present a mathematical model describing important ecologic interactions affecting the distribution and abundance of B. burgdorferi strains, marked by the allele at the outer surface protein C locus, in Ixodes scapularis ticks, the principal vector. The frequency of each strain in ticks can be explained by the vertebrate species composition, the density of each vertebrate species, the number of ticks that feed on individuals of each species, and the rate at which those ticks acquire different strain. The model results are consistent with empirical data collected in a major Lyme disease focus in New England. An applicable extension of these results would be to predict the proportion of ticks carrying human infectious strains of B. burgdorferi from disease host densities and thus predict the local risk of contracting Lyme disease. PMID:16606995

  6. A polycrystal plasticity model of strain localization in irradiated iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Nathan R.; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Marian, Jaime

    2013-02-01

    At low to intermediate homologous temperatures, the degradation of structural materials performance in nuclear environments is associated with high number densities of nanometric defects produced in irradiation cascades. In polycrystalline ferritic materials, self-interstitial dislocations loops are a principal signature of irradiation damage, leading to a mechanical response characterized by increased yield strengths, decreased total strain to failure, and decreased work hardening as compared to the unirradiated behavior. Above a critical defect concentration, the material deforms by plastic flow localization, giving rise to strain softening in terms of the engineering stress-strain response. Flow localization manifests itself in the form of defect-depleted crystallographic channels, through which all dislocation activity is concentrated. In this paper, we describe the formulation of a crystal plasticity model for pure Fe embedded in a finite element polycrystal simulator and present results of uniaxial tensile deformation tests up to 10% strain. We use a tensorial damage descriptor variable to capture the evolution of the irradiation damage loop subpopulation during deformation. The model is parameterized with detailed dislocation dynamics simulations of tensile tests up to 1.5% deformation of systems containing various initial densities of irradiation defects. The coarse-grained simulations are shown to capture the essential details of the experimental stress response observed in ferritic alloys and steels. Our methodology provides an effective linkage between the defect scale, of the order of one nanometer, and the continuum scale involving multiple grain orientations.

  7. Influence of vein fabric on strain distribution and fold kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torremans, Koen; Muchez, Philippe; Sintubin, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Abundant pre-folding, bedding-parallel fibrous dolomite veins in shale are found associated with the Nkana-Mindola stratiform Cu-Co deposit in the Central African Copperbelt, Zambia. These monomineralic veins extend for several meters along strike, with a fibrous infill orthogonal to low-tortuosity vein walls. Growth morphologies vary from antitaxial with a pronounced median surface to asymmetric syntaxial, always with small but quantifiable growth competition. Subsequently, these veins were folded. In this study, we aim to constrain the kinematic fold mechanism by which strain is accommodated in these veins, estimate paleorheology at time of deformation and investigate the influence of vein fabric on deformation during folding. Finally, the influence of the deformation on known metallogenetic stages is assessed. Various deformation styles are observed, ultimately related to vein attitude across tight to close lower-order, hectometre-scale folds. In fold hinges, at low to average dips, veins are (poly-)harmonically to disharmonically folded as parasitic folds in single or multilayer systems. With increasing distance from the fold hinge, parasitic fold amplitude decreases and asymmetry increases. At high dips in the limbs, low-displacement duplication thrusts of veins at low angles to bedding are abundant. Slickenfibres and slickenlines are sub-perpendicular to fold hinges and shallow-dipping slickenfibre-step lineations are parallel to local fold hinge lines. A dip isogon analysis of reconstructed fold geometries prior to homogeneous shortening reveals type 1B parallel folds for the veins and type 1C for the matrix. Two main deformation mechanisms are identified in folded veins. Firstly, undulatory extinction, subgrains and fluid inclusions planes parallel the fibre long axis, with deformation intensity increasing away from the fold hinges, indicate intracrystalline strain accumulation. Secondly, intergranular deformation through bookshelf rotation of fibres, via

  8. Local multipoint distribution services: deployment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Narisa N.

    1999-01-01

    A process to estimate LMDS (Local Multipoint Distribution Service) equipment costs is provided for deployment planning purposes. Crucial LMDS network design parameters are reviewed. The composite effects of the LMDS cell propagation are investigated by taking into account the rainfall level, size of the area, business density, antenna height, and foliage. A composite multiplier is derived for a few example cities. The derivation needs to be verified with field measurements.

  9. Correlations between local strains and tissue phenotypes in an experimental model of skeletal healing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Elise F; Salisbury Palomares, Kristy T; Gleason, Ryan E; Bellin, Daniel L; Chien, Karen B; Unnikrishnan, Ginu U; Leong, Pui L

    2010-08-26

    Defining how mechanical cues regulate tissue differentiation during skeletal healing can benefit treatment of orthopaedic injuries and may also provide insight into the influence of the mechanical environment on skeletal development. Different global (i.e., organ-level) mechanical loads applied to bone fractures or osteotomies are known to result in different healing outcomes. However, the local stimuli that promote formation of different skeletal tissues have yet to be established. Finite element analyses can estimate local stresses and strains but require many assumptions regarding tissue material properties and boundary conditions. This study used an experimental approach to investigate relationships between the strains experienced by tissues in a mechanically stimulated osteotomy gap and the patterns of tissue differentiation that occur during healing. Strains induced by the applied, global mechanical loads were quantified on the mid-sagittal plane of the callus using digital image correlation. Strain fields were then compared to the distribution of tissue phenotypes, as quantified by histomorphometry, using logistic regression. Significant and consistent associations were found between the strains experienced by a region of the callus and the tissue type present in that region. Specifically, the probability of encountering cartilage increased, and that of encountering woven bone decreased, with increasing octahedral shear strain and, to a lesser extent, maximum principal strain. Volumetric strain was the least consistent predictor of tissue type, although towards the end of the four-week stimulation timecourse, cartilage was associated with increasingly negative volumetric strains. These results indicate that shear strain may be an important regulator of tissue fate during skeletal healing. PMID:20546756

  10. Local distribution of old neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frei, Szolt; Huang, Xiaolan; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1992-01-01

    The local distribution of old disk neutron stars is approximated with a 1D model, in which the steady state distribution in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic plane is calculated, assuming a variety of the initial radio pulsar positions and velocities, and various Galactic potentials. It is found that the local distribution of old neutron stars is dominated by those that were born with very low velocities. The high-velocity neutron stars spend most of their lifetime far in the Galactic halo and do not contribute much to the local density. Therefore, the rms velocity at birth is not a good indicator of the scale height of the old population. The most likely half-density scale height for the old disk neutron stars is approximately 350 pc, the same as for the old disk G, K, and M stars. If gamma-ray bursts originate on old disk neutron stars, then 350 pc should also be the scale height for the bursters.

  11. Reaction-induced strain localization: Torsion experiments on dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Burlini, Luigi; Grobety, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical behaviour and microstructural evolution of a dolomite marble from Mt. Frerone (Adamello, N-Italy) during decarbonation to calcite and periclase in torsion experiments. Tests were performed in a Paterson gas-medium apparatus on cylindrical samples of 10 mm diameter and 10 mm length. Experiments were conducted at 800 °C, 300 MPa confining pressure under both vented and non-vented conditions, up to a maximum bulk shear strain of about γ = 1.8, at different strain rates (3 × 10 - 5 s - 1 up to 3 × 10 - 4 s - 1 ). Under hydrostatic conditions the nominal equilibrium P(CO 2) should be around 100 MPa, but in the vented experiments the CO 2 was free to escape, causing the breakdown of dolomite. During the decomposition, deformation was systematically localized at the ends of the specimens, near the porous spacers into a fine-grained mixture of calcite and periclase. Due to the low permeability of the marble, pore fluid could not escape from the central part of the sample building up CO 2 pressure which suppressed the decarbonation reaction. The fluid pressure embrittled the material and caused the development of en-echelon tension fractures, inclined opposite to the sense of shear. We conclude that decarbonation produced a weak polyphase matrix composed of submicron sized reaction products. Such a small grain size induced strain localization which was probably promoted by a switch from grain-size insensitive to grain-size sensitive deformation mechanism.

  12. Local oscillator distribution using a geostationary satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardin, Joseph; Weinreb, Sander; Bagri, Durga

    2004-01-01

    A satellite communication system suitable for distribution of local oscillator reference signals for a widely spaced microwave array has been developed and tested experimentally. The system uses a round-trip correction method of the satellite This experiment was carried out using Telstar-5, a commercial Ku-band geostationary satellite. For this initial experiment, both earth stations were located at the same site to facilitate direct comparison of the received signals. The local oscillator reference frequency was chosen to be 300MHz and was sent as the difference between two Ku-band tones. The residual error after applying the round trip correction has been measured to be better than 3psec for integration times ranging from 1 to 2000 seconds. For integration times greater then 500 seconds, the system outperforms a pair of hydrogen masers with the limitation believed to be ground-based equipment phase stability. The idea of distributing local oscillators using a geostationary satellite is not new; several researchers experimented with this technique in the eighties, but the achieved accuracy was 3 to 100 times worse than the present results. Since substantially and the performance of various components has improved. An important factor is the leasing of small amounts of satellite communication bandwidth. We lease three 100kHz bands at approximately one hundredth the cost of a full 36 MHz transponder. Further tests of the system using terminal separated by large distances and comparison tests with two hydrogen masers and radio interferometry is needed.

  13. Localized strain field measurement on laminography data with mechanical regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Hild, François

    2014-04-01

    For an in-depth understanding of the failure of structural materials the study of deformation mechanisms in the material bulk is fundamental. In situ synchrotron computed laminography provides 3D images of sheet samples and digital volume correlation yields the displacement and strain fields between each step of experimental loading by using the natural contrast of the material. Difficulties arise from the lack of data, which is intrinsic to laminography and leads to several artifacts, and the little absorption contrast in the 3D image texture of the studied aluminum alloy. To lower the uncertainty level and to have a better mechanical admissibility of the measured displacement field, a regularized digital volume correlation procedure is introduced and applied to measure localized displacement and strain fields.

  14. Experimental study on structural defect detection by monitoring distributed dynamic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. M.; Babanajad, S. K.; Taylor, T.; Ansari, F.

    2015-11-01

    A defect detection method of civil structures is studied. In order to complete the task, the proposed detection method is based on the analysis of distributed dynamic strains using Brillouin scattering based fiber optic sensors along large span structures. The current challenges in the detection of localized damage fundamentally include monitoring the dynamic strain as well as eliminating the system noise and the distortion of the changing distributed strain. Due to the capability of Brillouin scattering based methods in distributed monitoring of large structures, Brillouin optical time-domain analysis approach is implemented for assessing damage. In order to highlight the singularity at the damage location, Fourier as well as dual tree complex wavelet transform approaches were conducted. During the processing, the dynamic distributed strain in the time domain was transformed into the frequency domain for extraction of natural and forced frequencies. Then, the data was decomposed, filtered for extraction of crack features and reconstructed. The feasibility of the proposed method is evaluated through an experimental program involving the use of pulse-pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis for the distributed measurement of dynamic strain with 13 Hz sampling speed and detection of simulated cracks in a 15 m long steel beam. The beam mimics a bridge girder with two artificial cracks along its length subjected to free and forced vibrations. The results indicate that the method based on the discontinuities in the strain distribution is applicable in the detection of very small damage as small as 40 micro strains. A crack gauge independently monitored the crack opening displacements during the experiments, and the limit of detected crack openings based on the first appearance of strain singularities was 30 μm.

  15. Development of distributed strain and temperature sensing cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko

    2005-05-01

    Distributed fiber optic sensing presents unique features that have no match in conventional sensing techniques. The ability to measure temperatures and strain at thousands of points along a single fiber is particularly interesting for the monitoring of large structures such as pipelines, flow lines, oil wells, dams and dikes. Sensing systems based on Brillouin and Raman scattering have been used for example to detect pipeline leakages, verify pipeline operational parameters, prevent failure of pipelines installed in landslide areas, optimize oil production from wells and detect hot-spots in high-power cables. The measurement instruments have been vastly improved in terms of spatial, temperature and strain resolution, distance range, measurement time, data processing and system cost. Analyzers for Brillouin and Raman scattering are now commercially available and offer reliable operation in field conditions. New application opportunities have however demonstrated that the design and production of sensing cables is a critical element for the success of any distributed sensing instrumentation project. Although standard telecommunication cables can be effectively used for sensing ordinary temperatures, monitoring high and low temperatures or distributed strain present unique challenges that require specific cable designs. This contribution presents three cable designs for high-temperature sensing, strain sensing and combined strain and temperature monitoring.

  16. Reliability and field testing of distributed strain and temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko

    2006-03-01

    Distributed fiber optic sensing presents unique features that have no match in conventional sensing techniques. The ability to measure temperatures and strain at thousands of points along a single fiber is particularly interesting for the monitoring of large structures such as pipelines, flow lines, oil wells, dams and dikes. Sensing systems based on Brillouin and Raman scattering have been used for example to detect pipeline leakages, verify pipeline operational parameters, prevent failure of pipelines installed in landslide areas, optimize oil production from wells and detect hot-spots in high-power cables. The measurement instruments have been vastly improved in terms of spatial, temperature and strain resolution, distance range, measurement time, data processing and system cost. Analyzers for Brillouin and Raman scattering are now commercially available and offer reliable operation in field conditions. New application opportunities have however demonstrated that the design and production of sensing cables is a critical element for the success of any distributed sensing instrumentation project. Although standard telecommunication cables can be effectively used for sensing ordinary temperatures, monitoring high and low temperatures or distributed strain present unique challenges that require specific cable designs. This contribution presents three cable designs for high-temperature sensing, strain sensing and combined strain and temperature monitoring as well as the respective testing procedures during production and in the field.

  17. Geographical distributions of lake trout strains stocked in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Schaner, Ted

    1996-01-01

    Geographical distributions of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) stocked at seven locations in U.S. waters and at four locations in Canadian waters of Lake Ontario were determined from fish caught with gill nets in September in 17 areas of U.S. waters and at 10 fixed locations in Canadian waters in 1986-95. For fish of a given strain stocked at a given location, geographical distributions were not different for immature males and immature females or for mature males and mature females. The proportion of total catch at the three locations nearest the stocking location was higher for mature fish than for immature fish in all 24 available comparisons (sexes combined) and was greater for fish stocked as yearlings than for those stocked as fingerlings in all eight comparisons. Mature fish were relatively widely dispersed from stocking locations indicating that their tendency to return to stocking locations for spawning was weak, and there was no appreciable difference in this tendency among strains. Mature lake trout were uniformly distributed among sampling locations, and the strain composition at stocking locations generally reflected the stocking history 5 to 6 years earlier. Few lake trout moved across Lake Ontario between the north and south shores or between the eastern outlet basin and the main lake basin. Limited dispersal from stocking sites supports the concept of stocking different genetic strains in various parts of the lake with the attributes of each strain selected to match environmental conditions in the portion of the lake where it is stocked.

  18. Direct observation of strain localization along the differentially exhumed SEMP fault system, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, E.; Dolan, J. F.; Hacker, B. R.; Ratschbacher, L.; Sammis, C. G.; Seward, G.; Cole, J.

    2009-12-01

    Structural analysis of key outcrops from ~5 to ~25 km exhumation depth along the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault-zone in Austria reveal highly localized deformation in the seismogenic crust down through the brittle-ductile transition (BDT), widening into a 2-km-wide mylonite at mid-crustal levels. Specifically, grain-size distribution analysis of brittley-deformed dolomite exhumed from the seismogenic crust reveals that strain progressively localized into a 10-m-wide fault core. Microstructural analysis of marbles and greywackes exhumed from the BDT shows off-fault ductile deformation only accommodated a minor portion of the displacement along the SEMP, with most of the strain localized along the contact between these two units. Similar analysis of gneisses and amphibolite-facies metasediments exhumed from just below the BDT shows that at this depth, the majority of displacement is focused into a 100-m-wide ductile shear zone, with further evidence for strain localization along grain boundaries, creating throughgoing shear zones at the grain-scale. At deeper exhumation levels (Rosenberg and Schneider, 2008), the SEMP is a 1-2-km-wide mylonite zone that extends to depths of at least 25 km. Collectively, these data indicate that slip along the SEMP was highly localized from throughout the seismogenic crust downward into at least the mid-crust.

  19. Non-destructive and three-dimensional measurement of local strain development during tensile deformation in an aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Miura, H.; Toda, H.

    2015-08-01

    Anisotropy of mechanical responses depending on crystallographic orientation causes inhomogeneous deformation on the mesoscopic scale (grain size scale). Investigation of the local plastic strain development is important for discussing recrystallization mechanisms, because the sites with higher local plastic strain may act as potential nucleation sites for recrystallization. Recently, high-resolution X-ray tomography, which is non-destructive inspection method, has been utilized for observation of the materials structure. In synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography, more than 10,000 microstructural features, like precipitates, dispersions, compounds and hydrogen pores, can be observed in aluminium alloys. We have proposed employing these microstructural features as marker gauges to measure local strains, and then have developed a method to calculate the three-dimensional strain distribution by tracking the microstructural features. In this study, we report the development of local plastic strain as a function of the grain microstructure in an aluminium alloy by means of this three-dimensional strain measurement technique. Strongly heterogeneous strain development was observed during tensile loading to 30%. In other words, some parts of the sample deform little whereas another deforms a lot. However, strain in the whole specimen was keeping harmony. Comparing the microstructure with the strain concentration that is obtained by this method has a potential to reveal potential nucleation sites of recrystallization.

  20. Micromechanical stimulator for localized cell loading: fabrication and strain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli regulate cell structure and function during physiological processes. To understand the role of mechanical stimuli, engineered devices are developed to deliver controllable mechanical signals to cells cultured in vitro. Localized mechanical loading on selected cells are preferred when investigating intercellular communication. In this work, we fabricated and characterized a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-device for applying controlled compressive/tensile loads to selected live cells. The device consists of nine circular PDMS membranes serving as the loading sites; the loading parameters at each site are individually controllable. The in-plane strain upon PDMS membrane deflection was experimentally characterized. The result showed that for a circular membrane with 500 µm in diameter and 60 µm thick, the radial strain from -6% (compressive) to 25% (tensile) can be achieved at the membrane center. This device allows localized cell loading with minimal fabrication/operation complexity and ease of scaling-up. It is expected to foster the development of high throughput mechanical loading systems for a broad array of cellular mechanobiological studies.

  1. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  2. Simulation of cemented granular materials. I. Macroscopic stress-strain response and strain localization.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Nicolas; Lizcano, Arcesio; Taboada, Alfredo

    2010-07-01

    This is the first of two papers investigating the mechanical response of cemented granular materials by means of contact dynamics simulations. In this paper, a two-dimensional polydisperse sample with high-void ratio is constructed and then sheared in a simple shear numerical device at different confinement levels. We study the macroscopic response of the material in terms of mean and deviatoric stresses and strains. We show that the introduction of a local force scale, i.e., the tensile strength of the cemented bonds, causes the material to behave in a rigid-plastic fashion, so that a yield surface can be easily determined. This yield surface has a concave-down shape in the mean:deviatoric stress plane and it approaches a straight line, i.e., a Coulomb strength envelope, in the limit of a very dense granular material. Beyond yielding, the cemented structure gradually degrades until the material eventually behaves as a cohesionless granular material. Strain localization is also investigated, showing that the strains concentrate in a shear band whose thickness increases with the confining stress. The void ratio inside the shear band at the steady state is shown to be a material property that depends only on contact parameters. PMID:20866607

  3. Strain localization in usnaturated soils with large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Borja, R. I.

    2014-12-01

    Strain localization is a ubiquitous feature of granular materials undergoing nonhomogeneous deformation. In unsaturated porous media, how the localized deformation band is formed depends crucially on the degree of saturation, since fluid in the pores of a solid imposes a volume constraint on the deformation of the solid. When fluid flow is involved, the inception of the localized deformation band also depends on the heterogeneity of a material, which is quantified in terms of the spatial variation of density, the degree of saturation, and matric suction. We present a mathematical framework for coupled solid-deformation/fluid-diffusion in unsaturated porous media that takes into account material and geometric nonlinearities [1, 2]. The framework relies on the continuum principle of thermodynamics to identify an effective, or constitutive, stress for the solid matrix, and a water retention law that highlights the interdependence of degree of saturation, suction, and porosity of the material. We discuss the role of heterogeneity, quantified either deterministically or stochastically, on the development of a persistent shear band. We derive bifurcation conditions [3] governing the initiation of such a shear band. This research is inspired by current testing techniques that allow nondestructive and non-invasive measurement of density and the degree of saturation through high-resolution imaging [4]. The numerical simulations under plane strain condition demonstrate that the bifurcation not only manifests itself on the loading response curve and but also in the space of the degree of saturation, specific volume and suction stress. References[1] Song X, Borja RI, Mathematical framework for unsaturated flow in the finite deformation range. Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng 2014; 97: 658-686. [2] Song X, Borja RI, Finite deformation and fluid flow in unsaturated soils with random heterogeneity. Vadose Zone Journal 2014; doi:10.2136/vzj2013.07.0131. [3] Song X, Borja RI, Instability

  4. Mineralogically triggered strain localization: inferences from ductile paired shear zones (Tauern Window, Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Grasemann, Bernhard; Huet, Benjamin; Yamato, Philippe; Habler, Gerlinde

    2016-04-01

    Lithosphere is mainly constituted by polyphase rocks whose mineralogical, structural and textural characteristics control the spatial distribution of strain, and so, its effective mechanical strength. Variations in local mineralogical compositions may lead to drastic changes in the local microstructures and texture leading, by mechanical feedback processes, to strain hardening or weakening. Understanding these small-scale relations between the petrological characteristics, the rheological properties and the development of progressive deformation is thus of fundamental importance for understanding the strength of rocks at large-scale, especially the mechanical behavior of plates boundaries. We acknowledge the importance of brittle precursors for the localization of strain in the viscous deforming part of the crust. In this study, we focus in centimeter-wide paired ductile shear zones shaped nearby along on both sides of ep-grt-qtz veins within a late Variscan metagranodiorite of the "Zentralgneis" in the Tauern Window (Berlinerhütte, Zillertal, Austria). The paired shear zones, underlined by biotite bands, localized at some centimeters away from the veins associated with a metasomatic domain, within the relatively undeformed host rock. According to their spatial orientations, they exhibit different intensities of shearing (from incipient linking of biotites to anastomosing ultra-mylonitic bands) and thus can be explored as successive strain domains of a shear zone developing in space and time. Here, we present a combination of high-resolution petro-chemical section across the paired shear zones with microstructural and textural measurements in order to constrain mineral reactions and deformation processes associated with the development of localized shear zones. Whole rock chemical analyzes combined with continuous mineralogical mapping revealed small chemical variations induced by fluid-rock interactions in the vicinity of the veins. Although macroscopically

  5. A strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method for the regularized particle simulation of elastic-damage induced strain localization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Wu, Youcai; Koishi, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method is developed to overcome the computational challenges for the simulation of elastic-damage induced strain localization problem when the spatial domain integration is performed based on the background cells and Gaussian quadrature rule. The new method is established by introducing the decomposed strain fields from a meshfree strain smoothing to the penalized variational formulation. While the stabilization strain field circumvents the onerous zero-energy modes inherent in the direct nodal integration scheme, the regularization strain field aims to avoid the pathological localization of deformation in Galerkin meshfree solution using the weak-discontinuity approach. A strain morphing algorithm is introduced to couple the locality and non-locality of the decomposed strain approximations such that the continuity condition in the coupled strain field is met under the Galerkin meshfree framework using the direct nodal integration scheme. Three numerical benchmarks are examined to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method for the regularization of elastic-damage induced strain localization problems.

  6. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  7. Application of advanced reliability methods to local strain fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.; Wirsching, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    When design factors are considered as random variables and the failure condition cannot be expressed by a closed form algebraic inequality, computations of risk (or probability of failure) might become extremely difficult or very inefficient. This study suggests using a simple, and easily constructed, second degree polynomial to approximate the complicated limit state in the neighborhood of the design point; a computer analysis relates the design variables at selected points. Then a fast probability integration technique (i.e., the Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm) can be used to estimate risk. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated in an example of a low cycle fatigue problem for which a computer analysis is required to perform local strain analysis to relate the design variables. A comparison of the performance of this method is made with a far more costly Monte Carlo solution. Agreement of the proposed method with Monte Carlo is considered to be good.

  8. Distributed fibre optic strain measurements on a driven pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woschitz, Helmut; Monsberger, Christoph; Hayden, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In civil engineering pile systems are used in unstable areas as a foundation of buildings or other structures. Among other parameters, the load capacity of the piles depends on their length. A better understanding of the mechanism of load-transfer to the soil would allow selective optimisation of the system. Thereby, the strain variations along the loaded pile are of major interest. In this paper, we report about a field trial using an optical backscatter reflectometer for distributed fibre-optic strain measurements along a driven pile. The most significant results gathered in a field trial with artificial pile loadings are presented. Calibration results show the performance of the fibre-optic system with variations in the strain-optic coefficient.

  9. Distributed birefringence, strain and temperature measurement by homodyne BOTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuangang; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    A novel distributed fiber birefringence, strain and temperature measurement based on homodyne Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is proposed. Birefringence measurement is based on the beat period detection of Brillouin beat of the same acoustic mode. Strain and temperature are obtained by measuring the power changes of Brillouin beat spectrum (BBS), which corresponds to the optical interaction of different acoustic modes in a complex profile fiber. The birefringence of a 4.3 km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) was measured with 0.6-m spatial resolution, and strain and temperature at the end of a 4.5 km LEAF were measured at 1.5-m resolution in 140s.

  10. Strain localization and the onset of dynamic weakening in calcite fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Nielsen, S.; Di Toro, G.

    2015-03-01

    To determine the role of strain localization during dynamic weakening of calcite gouge at seismic slip rates, single-slide and slide-hold-slide experiments were conducted on 2-3-mm thick layers of calcite gouge at normal stresses up to 26 MPa and slip rates up to 1 m s-1. Microstructures were analyzed from short displacement (< 35 cm) experiments stopped prior to and during the transition to dynamic weakening. In fresh calcite gouge layers, dynamic weakening occurs after a prolonged strengthening phase that becomes shorter with increasing normal stress and decreasing layer thickness. Strain is initially distributed across the full thickness of the gouge layer, but within a few millimeters displacement the strain becomes localized to a boundary-parallel, high-strain shear band c. 20 μm wide. During the strengthening phase, which lasts between 3 and 30 cm under the investigated conditions, the shear band broadens to become c. 100 μm wide at peak stress. The transition to dynamic weakening in calcite gouges is associated with the nucleation of micro-slip surfaces dispersed throughout the c. 100 μm wide shear band. Each slip surface is surrounded by aggregates of extremely fine grained and tightly packed calcite, interpreted to result from grain welding driven by local frictional heating in the shear band. By the end of dynamic weakening strain is localized to a single 2- 3-μm wide principal slip surface, flanked by layers of recrystallized gouge. Calcite gouge layers re-sheared following a hold period weaken nearly instantaneously, much like solid cylinders of calcite marble deformed under the same experimental conditions. This is due to reactivation of the recrystallized and cohesive principal slip surface that formed during the first slide, reducing the effective gouge layer thickness to a few microns. Our results suggest that formation of a high-strain shear band is a critical precursor to dynamic weakening in calcite gouges. Microstructures are most compatible

  11. Contributed Review: Distributed optical fibre dynamic strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research on Brillouin- and Raman-based distributed optical fibre sensors over the past two decades has resulted in the commercialization of distributed sensors capable of measuring static and quasi-static phenomena such as temperature and strain. Recently, the focus has been shifted towards developing distributed sensors for measurement of dynamic phenomena such as dynamic strain and sound waves. This article reviews the current state of the art distributed optical fibre sensors capable of quantifying dynamic vibrations. The most important aspect of Rayleigh and Brillouin scattering processes which have been used for distributed dynamic measurement are studied. The principle of the sensing techniques used to measure dynamic perturbations are analyzed followed by a case study of the most recent advances in this field. It is shown that the Rayleigh-based sensors have longer sensing range and higher frequency range, but their spatial resolution is limited to 1 m. On the other hand, the Brillouin-based sensors have shown a higher spatial resolution, but relatively lower frequency and sensing ranges.

  12. Contributed Review: Distributed optical fibre dynamic strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Ali; Newson, Trevor P

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research on Brillouin- and Raman-based distributed optical fibre sensors over the past two decades has resulted in the commercialization of distributed sensors capable of measuring static and quasi-static phenomena such as temperature and strain. Recently, the focus has been shifted towards developing distributed sensors for measurement of dynamic phenomena such as dynamic strain and sound waves. This article reviews the current state of the art distributed optical fibre sensors capable of quantifying dynamic vibrations. The most important aspect of Rayleigh and Brillouin scattering processes which have been used for distributed dynamic measurement are studied. The principle of the sensing techniques used to measure dynamic perturbations are analyzed followed by a case study of the most recent advances in this field. It is shown that the Rayleigh-based sensors have longer sensing range and higher frequency range, but their spatial resolution is limited to 1 m. On the other hand, the Brillouin-based sensors have shown a higher spatial resolution, but relatively lower frequency and sensing ranges. PMID:26827302

  13. Strain distribution in the ligament using photoelasticity. A direct application to the human ACL.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Hirokawa, S; Kawada, T

    1998-04-01

    Large and highly variable deformations of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the human knee cannot be adequately quantified by one-dimensional and/or localized measurements. In order to measure strains in the entire area of the ACL, we employed the photoelastic coating method to analyze stress on the basis of the strains. A specific kind of polyurethane possessing optically high fringe-sensitivity was found to be most suitable for the measurement purposes. Although the photoelastic method has been successfully applied in various fields for stress analyses, its use in studying large deformations of biological tissues has not been reported. Therefore, before proceeding with our main study, we first examined the effects of polyurethane film on the mechanical properties of the ligament. We found that the film had a negligible effect on the tissues' properties, and closely reflected the strain behavior of the tissues. We then applied the method to measure strains on an actual ACL during free flexion-extension of the knee. A specially designed apparatus was used to allow a natural motion of the knee. A portion of the femoral bone was removed to expose the ACL to view. Measurement and analysis gave continuous information about strain distribution, including the variations of strain along the principal strain directions in the ACL. PMID:9690485

  14. Distributed thin film sensor array for damage detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The authors have developed a capacitive-based thin film sensor for monitoring strain on mesosurfaces. Arranged in a network configuration, the sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. The measurement principle is based on a measurable change in capacitance provoked by strain. In the case of bidirectional in-plane strain, the sensor output contains the additive measurement of both principal strain components. In this paper, we present an algorithm for retrieving unidirectional strain from the bidirectional measurements of the capacitive-based thin film sensor when place in a hybrid dense sensor network with state-of-the-art unidirectional strain sensors. The algorithm leverages the advantages of a hybrid dense network for application of the thin film sensor to reconstruct the surface strain maps. A bidirectional shape function is assumed, and it is differentiated to obtain expressions for planar strain. A least squares estimator (LSE) is used to reconstruct the planar strain map from the networks measurements, after the system's boundary conditions have been enforced in the model. The coefficients obtained by the LSE can be used to reconstruct the estimated strain map. Results from numerical simulations and experimental investigations show good performance of the algorithm.

  15. Experimental deformation of partially molten granite and implications for strain localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, L.; Hirth, G.; Alkmim, F.; Pedrosa-Soares, A.; Goncalves, C.

    2011-12-01

    To improve our understanding of partially molten systems we conducted a set of hydrostatic, general shear and axial compression experiments on sintered aggregates composed of equal amounts by weight of quartz, albite and microcline (grain size of 37-53μm). All experiments were conducted using a Griggs solid medium apparatus at T=900°C, P=1.5GPa and strain rates from 10-4/s to 10-6/s. Previous hydrostatic and axial compression experiments conducted on partial molten granitic rocks have shown that the initial grain size, amount of melt and strain rate are important parameters for the development of distinct microstructures, LPO, and melt distribution. In addition, some of these studies demonstrated that the strength of granite and aplite decrease significantly for melt contents up to 15%, when compared to similar melt-free rocks. The rock's strength deep within the Earth decreases owing to partial melting which brings up some questions: would strain localization take place when partial melt affects rheology? Would brittle and/or ductile shear zones act as potential regions for concentration of partial melt? Is there a critical fraction of melt responsible for strain localization? How is melt distribution influenced by deformation? How does the kinematics of deformation (i.e., axial compression versus general shear) affect melt distribution? The purpose of our experiments is to investigate the role of melting on the rheological properties of crustal rocks. In addition, we seek to provide new constraints on the grain scale processes that control the properties of partially molten rocks and the importance of these processes in understanding shear localization in the lithosphere. Samples were made from crushed Amelia albite (Ab97Or2An1), Hugo Microcline (Or90) and Black Hills quartzite, which have all been used in previous experimental deformation studies. The albite is essentially pure; the microcline contains ~ 1% of muscovite. The Black Hills quartzite contains < 1

  16. Mechanical anisotropy control on strain localization in upper mantle shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwegh, Marco; Mercolli, Ivan; Linckens, Jolien; Müntener, Othmar

    2016-05-01

    Mantle rocks at oceanic spreading centers reveal dramatic rheological changes from partially molten to solid-state ductile to brittle deformation with progressive cooling. Using the crustal-scale Wadi al Wasit mantle shear zone (SZ, Semail ophiolite, Oman), we monitor such changes based on quantitative field and microstructural investigations combined with petrological and geochemical analyses. The spatial distribution of magmatic dikes and high strain zones gives important information on the location of magmatic and tectonic activity. In the SZ, dikes derived from primitive melts (websterites) are distributed over the entire SZ but are more abundant in the center; dikes from more evolved, plagioclase saturated melts (gabbronorites) are restricted to the SZ center. Accordingly, harzburgite deformation fabrics show a transition from protomylonite (1100°C), mylonite (900-800°C) to ultramylonite (<700°C) and a serpentine foliation (<500°C) from the SZ rim to the center. The spatial correlation between solid-state deformation fabrics and magmatic features indicates progressive strain localization in the SZ on the cooling path. Three stages can be discriminated: (i) Cycles of melt injection (dunite channels and websterite dikes) and solid-state deformation (protomylonites-mylonites; 1100-900°C), (ii) dominant solid-state deformation in harzburgite mylonites (900-800°C) with some last melt injections (gabbronorites) and ultramylonites (<700°C), and (iii) infiltration of seawater inducing a serpentine foliation (<500°C) followed by cataclasis during obduction. The change of these processes in space and time indicates that early dike-related ridge-parallel deformation controls the onset of the entire strain localization history promoting nucleation sites for different strain weakening processes as a consequence of changing physicochemical conditions.

  17. Strain localization in ultramylonitic calcite marbles by dislocation creep-accommodated grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard; Clancy White, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Strain localization in monomineralic rocks is often associated with brittle precursors, resulting in stress and strain concentration, followed by grain size reduction and activation of grain-size-sensitive deformation mechanisms such as diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding and cataclastic flow. The aforementioned mechanisms typically tend to produce a random crystallographic orientation or a decrease in intensity of a pre-existing texture. However, reports of fine grained polycrystalline materials showing a preferred crystallographic orientation indicate a need for subsequent grain re-organization by either static annealing or the activation of additional deformation mechanisms in conjunction with grain boundary sliding. We present observations from an almost pure calcite marble layer from Syros Island (Cyclades, Greece) deformed in lower greenschist facies conditions. The presence of a crack (i.e. cross-cutting element) that rotated during shear resulted in the formation of a flanking structure. At the location of maximum displacement (120 cm) along the cross-cutting element, the marble is extremely fine grained (3 µm) leading to anticipation of deformation by grain-size-sensitive mechanisms. Detailed microstructural analysis of the highly strained (80 < gamma < 1000) calcite ultramylonite by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy show that recrystallization by bulging results in small, strain-free grains. The change in grain size appears to be concomitant with increased activity of independent grain boundary sliding as indicated by a random misorientation angle distribution. At the same time, dislocation multiplication through Frank-Read sources produces high mean dislocation density (~ 5x10^13 m^-2) as well as a weak primary CPO; the latter all argue that grain boundary sliding was accommodated by dislocation activity. Theoretical and experimental determined relationships (paleowattmeter

  18. Multi-scale strain localization within orthogneiss during subduction and exhumation (Tenda unit, Alpine Corsica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Alexandre; Augier, Romain; Jolivet, Laurent; Raimbourg, Hugues; Jourdon, Anthony; Scaillet, Stéphane; Cardello, Giovanni Luca

    2016-04-01

    Strain localization depends upon scale-related factors resulting in a gap between small-scale studies of deformation mechanisms and large-scale numerical and tectonic models. The former often ignore the variations in composition and water content across tectonic units, while the latter oversimplify the role of the deformation mechanisms. This study aims to heal this gap, by considering microstructures and strain localization not only at a single shear zone-scale but across a 40km-wide tectonic unit and throughout its complex polyphased evolution. The Tenda unit (Alpine Corsica) is an external continental unit mainly composed of granites, bounded by the East Tenda Shear Zone (ETSZ) that separates it from the overlying oceanic-derived HP tectonic units. Previous studies substantially agreed on (1) the burial of the Tenda unit down to blueschist-facies conditions associated with top-to-the-west shearing (D1) and (2) subsequent exhumation accommodated by a localized top-to-the-east shear zone (D2). Reaction-softening is the main localizing mechanism proposed in the literature, being associated with the transformation of K-feldspar into white-mica. In this work, the Tenda unit is reviewed through (1) the construction of a new field-based strain map accompanied by cross-sections representing volumes of rock deformed at different grades related to large-scale factors of strain localization and (2) the structural study of hand-specimens and thin-sections coupled with EBSD analysis in order to target the deformation processes. We aim to find how softening and localization are in relation to the map-scale distribution of strain. The large-scale study shows that the whole Tenda unit is affected by the two successive stages of deformation. However, a more intense deformation is observed along the eastern margin, which originally led to the definition of the ETSZ, with a present-day anastomosed geometry of deformation. Strain localization is clearly linked to rheological

  19. PVDF piezo film as dynamic strain sensor for local damage detection of steel frame buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, M.; Li, X.; Fujita, K.; He, L.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2013-04-01

    A structural health monitoring system that aims to extract local damage information (i.e., existence, location and severity) in buildings may require a dense array of transducers due to the high complexity and high degree of statical indeterminacy of their structural system. While monitoring systems for building applications are mostly consisted of seismographs or tremor sensors, a technique to pragmatically and accurately capture strain information of structural members is efficacious for detecting damage in individual members. This paper presents the use of polyvinylidene fluoride piezoelectric films as dynamic strain sensors for detecting local damage in steel moment-resisting frames. First, a damage detection methodology that monitors the changes in the relative distribution of the bending moments in structural systems is presented. Next, an array of dynamic strain sensors networked by wireless sensing units is developed in consideration of its installation cost and efforts when it is applied to real buildings. Finally, the performances of the developed methodology and its sensing system are evaluated through a series of vibration testing using a 5-story steel testbed frame that can simulate seismic damage at beam-to-column connections.

  20. Strain localization in shear zones during exhumation: a graphical approach to facies interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Augier, Romain; Laurent, Valentin; Roche, Vincent; Jolivet, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Strain localization is a fundamental process determining plate tectonics. It is expressed in the ductile field by shear zones where strain concentrates. Despite their worldwide distribution in most metamorphic units, their detailed characterization and processes comprehension are far to be fully addressed. In this work, a graphic approach to tectono-metamorphic facies identification is applied to the Delfini Shear Zone in Syros (Cyclades, Greece), which is mostly characterized by metabasites displaying different degree of retrogression from fresh eclogite to prasinite. Several exhumation mechanisms brought them from the depths of the subduction zone to the surface, from syn-orogenic exhumation to post-orogenic backarc extension. Boudinage, grain-size reduction and metamorphic reactions determinate strain localization across well-deformed volumes of rocks organized in a hierarchic frame of smaller individual shear zones (10-25 meters thick). The most representative of them can be subdivided in 5 tectono-metamorphic (Tm) facies, TmA to E. TmA records HP witnesses and older folding stages preserved within large boudins as large as 1-2 m across. TmB is characterized by much smaller and progressively more asymmetric boudins and sigmoids. TmC is defined by well-transposed sub- to plane-parallel blueschist textures crossed by chlorite-shear bands bounding the newly formed boudins. When strain increases (facies TmD-E), the texture is progressively retrograded to LP-HT greenschist-facies conditions. Those observations allowed us to establish a sequence of stages of strain localization. The first stage (1) is determined by quite symmetric folding and boudinage. In a second stage (2), grain-size reduction is associated with dense shear bands formation along previously formed glaucophane and quartz-rich veins. With progressively more localized strain, mode-I veins may arrange as tension gashes that gradually evolve to blueschist shear bands. This process determinates the

  1. Strain distribution in the East African Rift from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, S. D.; Saria, E.; Calais, E.; Delvaux, D.; Ebinger, C.; Combrinck, L.

    2008-12-01

    Rifting of continental lithosphere is a fundamental process that controls the growth and evolution of continents and the birth of ocean basins. Most rifting models assume that stretching results from far-field lithospheric stresses from plate motions, but there is evidence that asthenospheric processes play an active role in rifting, possibly through viscous coupling and/or the added buoyancy and thermal weakening from melt intrusions. The distribution of strain during rifting is a key observable to constrain such models but is however poorly known. The East African Rift (EAR) offers a unique opportunity to quantify strain distribution along and across an active continental rift and to compare a volcanic (Eastern branch) and a non-volcanic (Western branch) segment. In 2006, we established and first surveyed a network of 35 points across Tanzania and installed one continuous station in Dar Es Salaam (TANZ), followed in 2008 by a second occupation campaign. We present a preliminary velocity field for the central part of the EAR, spanning both the Western and Eastern rift branches. We compare our results with a recent kinematic model of the EAR (Stamps et al., GRL, 2008) and discuss its significance for understanding rifting processes.

  2. Ultrastructure and cytochemical localization of laccase in two strains of Leptosphaerulina briosiana (Pollaci) Graham and Luttrell.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, L T; Bishop, D S; Hooper, G R

    1979-01-01

    Substrate specificity tests were used to identify the presence of laccase in two strains of Leptosphaerulina briosiana (Poll.) Graham and Luttrell, an ascomycete which causes leaf spot in alfalfa. Cytochemical localization of monophenol monooxygenase (laccase) as well as the ultrastructures of the two strains were investigated. Laccase was observed in the outer layers of the cell walls of both strains. The ultrastructures of vegetative hyphae of both strains were typical of those found in most ascomycetes. Images PMID:104971

  3. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water. PMID:26757724

  4. Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, Gui; Booske, John; Ma, Zhenqiang E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu; Morgan, Dane; Zhong, Jianxin E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu

    2015-02-02

    We have systematically investigated the effect of local strain on electronic properties of graphene by first-principles calculations. Two major types of local strain, oriented along the zigzag and the armchair directions, have been studied. We find that local strain with a proper range and strength along the zigzag direction results in opening of significant band gaps in graphene, on the order of 10{sup −1 }eV; whereas, local strain along the armchair direction cannot open a significant band gap in graphene. Our results show that appropriate local strain can effectively open and tune the band gap in graphene; therefore, the electronic and transport properties of graphene can also be modified.

  5. Local structure determination in strained-layer semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woicik, Joseph C.

    The theory of elasticity accurately describes the deformations of macroscopic bodies under the action of applied stress [1]. In this review, we examine the internal mechanisms of elasticity for strained-layer semiconductor heterostructures. In particular, we present extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to show how the bond lengths and bond angles in semiconductor thin-alloy films change with strain when they are grown coherently on substrates with different lattice constants. The structural distortions measured by experiment are compared to valence-force field (VFF) calculations and other theoretical models. Atomic switching and interfacial strain at buried interfaces are also discussed.

  6. Forming Ganymede’s grooves at smaller strain: Toward a self-consistent local and global strain history for Ganymede

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bland, Michael; McKinnon, W. B.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of tectonic features formed in extension, and the apparent absence of ones formed in contraction, has led to the hypothesis that Ganymede has undergone global expansion in its past. Determining the magnitude of such expansion is challenging however, and extrapolation of locally or regionally inferred strains to global scales often results in strain estimates that exceed those based on global constraints. Here we use numerical simulations of groove terrain formation to develop a strain history for Ganymede that is generally consistent at local, regional, and global scales. These simulations reproduce groove-like amplitudes, wavelengths, and average slopes at modest regional extensions (10–15%). The modest strains are more consistent with global constraints on Ganymede’s expansion. Yet locally, we also find that surface strains can be much larger (30–60%) in the same simulations, consistent with observations of highly-extended impact craters. Thus our simulations satisfy both the smallest-scale and largest-scale inferences of strain on Ganymede. The growth rate of the topography is consistent with (or exceeds) predictions of analytical models, and results from the use of a non-associated plastic rheology that naturally permits localization of brittle failure (plastic strain) into linear fault-like shear zones. These fault-like zones are organized into periodically-spaced graben-like structures with stepped, steeply-dipping faults. As in previous work, groove amplitudes and wavelengths depend on both the imposed heat flux and surface temperature, but because our brittle strength increases with depth, we find (for the parameters explored) that the growth rate of topography is initially faster for lower heat flows. We observe a transition to narrow rifting for higher heat flows and larger strains, which is a potential pathway for breakaway margin or band formation.

  7. Concrete deflection measurement using fiber optic distributed strain system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papes, Martin; Jaros, Jakub; Fajkus, Marcel; Hurta, Jan; Liner, Andrej; Hruby, David; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    The monitoring of building structures deformations and testing of construction materials resilience are very important processes in the development and production of given materials and structures. Undesirable or excessive deformations of materials are phenomena which are unacceptable in construction, especially in supporting structures. These issues are currently monitored by electromechanical sensor in most cases. It is a classic technique when the sensor measures the material stress at the point of its installation. This paper deals with the concrete deflection measurement using fiber optic distributed strain system. This system uses optical fiere as a sensor and operates at the principle of measurement of Brillouin frequencies. The mechanical stress on the optical fiber causes shift of these frequencies. This change is subsequently converted to stress unit micro-strain. In our experiments, the optical fiber was embedded in concrete along its whole length. The advantage of this system is that the measurement is carrying out along the entire fiber length with spatial resolution around 50 cm, so it is possible continuously measure several thousands of points at the distance of several kilometers.

  8. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-2 cladding under near plane strain and localized stress-strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The segmented expanding mandrel test (SEMT) method is generally regarded as a good laboratory simulator of pellet-cladding interactions (PCI) in LWR fuel rods. Yet it does not reproduce the low strain failures in Zircaloy cladding typical of PCI-failed fuel elements and commonly observed in other types of laboratory specimens. This investigation addressed this apparent inconsistency. Iodine-stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) of cold worked, unirradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding was induced in three different types of tubing specimens (known as regular, thin-wall, and chamfered) in a modified SEMT apparatus designed to test mechanical conditions that could lead to slow strain failures. Only the chamfered sample, which has been shown to be subjected to more nearly plane strain conditions than either of the other two specimen types, failed consistently at low (0.8%) total diametral strains in good agreement with in-reactor failure data. Such conditions were numerically and experimentally quantified by means of finite element calculational models and local strain measurements. The numerical analyses and strain measurements provide valuable insight into the PCI simulating power of the segmented expanding mandrel test and its experimental limitations. Failure-strain results for chamfered barrier claddings were obtained and compared with available literature data. The improved I-SCC resistance of this type of cladding was confirmed but the failure strains were significantly lower than reported for regular barrier tubes.

  9. Fatigue Life Prediction Based on Local Strain Energy for Healed Copper Film by Laser Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng-Zhu; Shang, De-Guang; Ren, Chong-Gang; Sun, Yu-Juan

    2016-04-01

    Changes of total cyclic strain energy at the notch for copper film specimen were analyzed before and after laser irradiation treatment. The results showed that laser irradiation can increase total cyclic strain energy and the effect of increase is more evident for the damaged copper specimen. Based on the damage-healing mechanism, an enhancement parameter and a healing parameter were defined by the local cyclic strain energy. A new model based on local strain energy was proposed to predict residual fatigue life for the damaged copper film specimen after laser irradiation. The predicted results by the proposed model agree well with the experimental lives.

  10. Strain localization at the margins of strong lithospheric domains: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frédéric; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-03-01

    The lateral variation of the mechanical properties of continental lithosphere is an important factor controlling the localization of deformation and thus the deformation history and geometry of intraplate mountain belts. A series of three-layer lithospheric-scale analog models, with a strong domain (SD) embedded at various depths, are presented to investigate the development of topography and deformation patterns by having lateral heterogeneities within a weak continental lithosphere. The experiments, performed at a constant velocity and under normal gravity, indicate that the presence or absence of the SD controls whether deformation is localized or distributed at a lithospheric scale. Deformation and topography localize above the edges of the SD, while the SD region itself is characterized by minor amounts of surficial deformation and topography. The depth of the SD (within the ductile crust, ductile mantle lithosphere, or both) controls the pattern of deformation and thus the topography. The presence of a SD in the ductile crust or in the mantle results in limited surficial topographic effects but large variations in the Moho topography. Strong Moho deflection occurs when the SD is in the ductile crust, while the Moho remains almost flat when the SD is in the mantle. When the SD occupies the ductile lithosphere, the SD is tilted. These analog experiments provide insights into intraplate strain localization and could in particular explain the topography around the Tarim Basin, a lithospheric-scale heterogeneity north of the India-Asia collision zone.

  11. Direct tabu search algorithm for the fiber Bragg grating distributed strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, F.; Seddiki, O.

    2010-09-01

    A direct tabu search (DTS) algorithm used for determining the strain profile along a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) from its reflection spectrum has been demonstrated. By combining the transfer matrix method (TMM) for calculating the reflection spectrum of an FBG and the DTS method, we obtain a new method for the distributed sensing. Direct search based strategies are used to direct a tabu search. These strategies are based on a new pattern search procedure called an adaptive pattern search (APS). In addition, the well-known Nelder-Mead (NME) algorithm is used as a local search method in the final stage of the optimization process. The numerical simulations show good agreement between the original and the reconstructed strain profiles.

  12. Effect of anharmonicity of interatomic potential on strain distribution in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarenkova, Olga L.; von Allmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Lee, Seungwoii; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and theory have shown that the energy spectrum of nanostructures is extremely sensitive to the built-in strain. Knowledge of the strain distribution is therefore Experiments and theory have shown that the energy spectrum of nanostructures is extremely sensitive to the built-in strain. Knowledge of the strain distribution is therefore of utmost importance for the design of optical devices with prescribed light emission spectrum.

  13. Application of a Fiber Optic Distributed Strain Sensor System to Woven E-Glass Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Lopatin, Craig

    2001-01-01

    A distributed strain sensing system utilizing a series of identically written Bragg gratings along an optical fiber is examined for potential application to Composite Armored Vehicle health monitoring. A vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process was used to fabricate a woven fabric E-glass/composite panel with an embedded fiber optic strain sensor. Test samples machined from the panel were mechanically tested in 4-point bending. Experimental results are presented that show the mechanical strain from foil strain gages comparing well to optical strain from the embedded sensors. Also, it was found that the distributed strain along the sample length was consistent with the loading configuration.

  14. Effect of inclusions on strain localization during high temperature creep of marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Naumann, M.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's lower crust is often localized in ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressures may be induced by various physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. Here, we studied the initiation and propagation of localized deformation in the ductile deformation regime by high temperature deformation experiments on marble with weak or strong inclusions. As starting material we used samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone or Arkansas novaculite, which act under the applied experimental conditions as soft or strong material heterogeneities, respectively. Samples were deformed in the dislocation creep regime using a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900°C temperature and confining pressures of 300-400 MPa. Torsion experiments were performed on hollow cylinder samples at a bulk shear strain rate of ≈1.9 x 10-4 s-1 to shear strains γ between 0.02 and 2.9. At low strain, twisted specimens with weak inclusions show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of ≈0.1- 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20MPa, which is ≈8% lower than the strength of inclusion-free samples. Strain progressively localized within the weak inclusions with increasing bulk strain, approaching at γ ≈ 1 a strain ratio of ≈24 with respect to the adjacent matrix strain. This ratio is about half of the strain ratio that is expected from the creep strength contrast between pure marble and limestone at the measured bulk stress. The localization of strain extended into narrow bands in front of the inclusions, where the degree of localization decays exponentially with increasing distance from the tip of the inclusion. Microstructural analysis shows twinning, recrystallization and the development of a strong crystallographic preferred

  15. Strain localization during high temperature creep of marble: The effect of inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Naumann, M.; Dresen, G.

    2014-11-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's middle and lower crust is often localized in ductile shear zones. To better understand the initiation and propagation of high-temperature shear zones induced by the presence of structural and material heterogeneities, we performed deformation experiments in the dislocation creep regime on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) or strong (novaculite) second phase inclusions. The samples were mostly deformed in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of ≈ 1.9 × 10- 4 s- 1 to bulk shear strains γ between 0.02 and 2.9 using a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. At low strain, twisted specimens with weak inclusions show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at γ > 0.1-0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed conditions is about 20 MPa, which is ≈ 8% lower than the strength of intact samples. Strain progressively localized within the matrix with increasing bulk strain, but decayed rapidly with increasing distance from the inclusion tip. Microstructural analysis shows twinning and recrystallization within this process zone, with a strong crystallographic preferred orientation, dominated by {r} and (c) slip in < a >. Recrystallization-induced weakening starts at local shear strain of about 1 in the process zone, corresponding to a bulk shear strain of about 0.1. In contrast, torsion of a sample containing strong inclusions deformed at similar stress as inclusion-free samples, but do not show localization. The experiments demonstrate that the presence of weak heterogeneities initiates localized creep at local stress concentrations around the inclusion tips. Recrystallization-induced grain size reduction may only locally promote grain boundary diffusion creep. Accordingly, the bulk strength of the twisted aggregate is close to or slightly below the lower (isostress) strength bound, determined from the flow strength and volume fraction of matrix

  16. Dramatic effect of elasticity on thermal softening and strain localization during lithospheric shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaquet, Yoann; Duretz, Thibault; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2016-02-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical simulations for shortening a viscoelastoplastic lithosphere to quantify the impact of elasticity on strain localization due to thermal softening. The model conserves energy and mechanical work is converted into heat or stored as elastic strain energy. For a shear modulus G = 1010 Pa, a prominent lithospheric shear zone forms and elastic energy release increases the localization intensity (strain rate amplification). For G = 5 × 1010 Pa shear zones still form but deformation is less localized. For G = 1012 Pa, the lithosphere behaves effectively viscoplastic and no shear zones form during homogeneous thickening. Maximal shearing-related increase of surface heat flux is 15-25 mW m-2 and of temperature at lower crustal depth is ˜150 °C, whereby these peak values are transient (0.1-1 My). Elasticity and related energy release can significantly contribute to strain localization and plate-like behaviour of the lithosphere required for plate tectonics.

  17. An explicit finite element formulation for dynamic strain localization and damage evolution in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Hashem M; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Addessio, Francis L

    2010-12-16

    An explicit finite element formulation, used to study the behavior and failure mechanisms of metallic materials under high strain rate loading, is presented. The formulation is based on the assumed-strain approach of Fish and Belytschko [1988], which allows localization bands to be embedded within an element, thereby alleviating mesh sensitivity and reducing the required computational effort. The behavior of the material outside localization bands (and of the virgin material prior to the onset of strain localization) is represented using a Gurson-type coupled plasticity-damage model based on the work of Johnson and Addessio [1988]. Assuming adiabatic conditions, the response of the localization band material is represented by a set of constitutive equations for large elasticviscoplastic deformations in metals at high strain rates and high homologous temperatures (see Brown et al. [1989]). Computational results are compared to experimental data for different metallic alloys to illustrate the advantages of the proposed modeling strategy.

  18. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates. PMID:25145810

  19. Strain distributions in a type 316/16-8-2 stainless steel weldment during cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.; Harper, M.D.

    1984-06-01

    Test specimens were cut from a 25-mm thick Type 316 stainless steel plate butt welded with 16-8-2 filler wire. The specimens were oriented transverse to the weld seam and contained base metal, heat-affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal in the gage section. Strain-controlled cyclic loading was imposed across the heterogeneous weldment while local strains at various points within the gage section were continuously monitored. Results show that strains at the local points can vary markedly from the average strain of the composite section. Strain concentrations occurred in the softer base metal which led to failure much sooner than the composite strain would indicate. However, when the maximum strain range from a local area was compared to baseline data, the life correlation was very good.

  20. Strain distributions in a Type 316/16-8-2 stainless steel weldment during cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.; Harper, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Test specimens were cut from a 25-mm thick Type 316 stainless steel plate butt welded with 16-8-2 filler wire. The specimens were oriented transverse to the weld seam and contained base metal, heat-affected zone (HAZ), and weld metal in the gage section. Strain-controlled cyclic loading was imposed across the heterogeneous weldment while local strains at various points within the gage section were continuously monitored. Results show that strains at the local points can vary markedly from the average strain of the composite section. Strain concentrations occurred in the softer base metal which led to failure much sooner than the composite strain would indicate. However, when the maximum strain range from a local area was compared to baseline data, the life correlation was very good.

  1. Indentation-induced localized deformation and elastic strain partitioning in composites at submicron length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R.I.; Bei, H.; Gao, Y.F.; Ice, G.E.

    2010-10-26

    Three-dimensional spatially resolved strains were mapped in a model NiAl/Mo composite after nanoindentation. The depth-dependent strain distributed in the two phases and partitioned across the composite interfaces is directly measured at submicron length scale using X-ray microdiffraction and compared with a detailed micromechanical stress analysis. It is shown that indentation-induced deformation in the composite material is distinct from deformation expected in a single-phase material. This difference arises in part from residual thermal strains in both phases of the composite in the as-grown state. Interplay between residual thermal strains and external mechanical strain results in a complex distribution of dilatational strain in the Mo fibers and NiAl matrix and is distinct in different locations within the indented area. Reversal of the strain sign (e.g., alternating tensile/compressive/tensile strain distribution) is observed in the NiAl matrix. Bending of the Mo fibers during indentation creates relatively large 1.5{sup o} misorientations between the different fibers and NiAl matrix. Compressive strain along the <0 0 1> direction reached -0.017 in the Mo fibers and -0.007 in the NiAl matrix.

  2. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  3. Longevity of strain localization associated with dynamic recrystallization of olivine in mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speciale, P. A.; Behr, W. M.; Hirth, G.; Tokle, L.

    2015-12-01

    The processes that cause strain localization in the lithosphere are fundamental to our understanding of plate tectonics. The relationship between localization and grain size reduction by dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is ubiquitous in natural shear zones, but whether localization by DRX persists to high strains is debated because of the potential role of grain growth. If DRX is associated with surface energy-driven grain boundary migration (γGBM), for example, grains will grow after recrystallization and localization will be cyclical or temporary. At high stress, low temperature conditions, however, migration is theoretically predicted to be driven by strain energy (ρGBM). At these conditions, grain growth may be suppressed even in monophase aggregates, and localization will persist over geologic timescales. Here we examine the conditions at which DRX leads to permanent, as opposed to transient, localization by evaluating the role of grain growth in olivine aggregates. We deformed as-is Balsam Gap dunite in axial compression using a Griggs rig and molten salt cell. We conducted 12 experiments at 1100 and 1200°C, a strain rate of 10-5 s-1, and a confining pressure of 1300 MPa. After samples reached strains of ~30%, we relaxed the stress, either with the motor off or at a strain rate of 10-6 s-1, for specific time increments before quenching. We perform detailed microstructural analyses to identify the transition from ρGBM to γGBM at these experimental conditions. We predict the microstructure (at time t1) will reflect ρGBM, with negligible net grain growth. After strain energy has been substantially reduced (time t1+n), evidence of γGBM will be observed in the microstructure as 120° triple junctions and increased grain sizes. By isolating the conditions at which γGBM becomes more important than ρGBM, we can infer the grainsize-stress conditions under which DRX may promote permanent strain localization in the lithosphere.

  4. Highly localized strain fields due to planar defects in epitaxial SrBi2Nb2O9 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulle, A.; Guinebretière, R.; Dauger, A.

    2005-04-01

    Thin films of (00l) oriented SrBi2Nb2O9 epitaxially grown on SrTiO3 by sol-gel spin coating have been studied by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping. It is shown that these materials contain highly localized heterogeneous strain fields due to imperfect stacking faults (i.e., faults that do not propagate throughout the crystallites building up the film). In the film plane, the strain fields are confined to 11 nm wide regions and characterized by a vertical displacement of 0.18c (where c is the cell parameter) showing that the stacking faults are mainly composed of one additional (or missing) perovskite layer. Prolonged thermal annealing at 700 °C strongly reduces the density of stacking faults and yields a more uniform strain distribution within the film volume without inducing significant grain growth.

  5. Probing local strain at MX(2)-metal boundaries with surface plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinghui; Liu, Kai; Hong, Xiaoping; Chen, Michelle; Kim, Jonghwan; Shi, Sufei; Wu, Junqiao; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-10

    Interactions between metal and atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials can exhibit interesting physical behaviors that are of both fundamental interests and technological importance. In addition to forming a metal–semiconductor Schottky junction that is critical for electrical transport, metal deposited on 2D layered materials can also generate a local mechanical strain. We investigate the local strain at the boundaries between metal (Ag, Au) nanoparticles and MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S) layers by exploiting the strong local field enhancement at the boundary in surface plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We show that the local mechanical strain splits both the in-plane vibration mode E2g(1) and the out-of-plane vibration mode A1g in monolayer MoS2, and activates the in-plane mode E1g that is normally forbidden in backscattering Raman process. In comparison, the effects of mechanical strain in thicker MoS2 layers are significantly weaker. We also observe that photoluminescence from the indirect bandgap transition (when the number of layers is ≥2) is quenched with the metal deposition, while a softened and broadened shoulder peak emerges close to the original direct-bandgap transition because of the mechanical strain. The strain at metal–MX2 boundaries, which locally modifies the electronic and phonon structures of MX2, can have important effects on electrical transport through the metal–MX2 contact. PMID:25133959

  6. FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS FOR LOCALIZED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS AT LOW TEMPERATURE AND IN HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalingam, Rajinikumar

    2010-04-09

    Study of magnetostrictive effects in the bulk superconductors is very essential and can give more knowledge about the effects like namely, flux pinning induced strain, pincushion distortions in the magnets and so on. Currently used electro mechanical sensors are magnetic field dependent and can only give the global stress/strain information but not the local stress/strains. But the information like radius position dependent strain and characterisation of shape distortion in non cylindrical magnets are interesting. Wavelength encoded multiplexed fiber Bragg Grating sensors inscribed in one fiber gives the possibility to measure magentostrictive effects spatially resolved in low temperature and high magnetic field. This paper specifies the design and technology requirements to adapt FBG sensors for such an application. Also reports the experiments demonstrate the properties of glass FBG at low temperature (4.2 K) and the results of strain measurement at 4.2 K/8 T. The sensor exhibits a linear wavelength change for the strain change.

  7. Strain distributions and electronic property modifications in Si/Ge axial nanowire heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, John Gregory; Picraux, Samuel T

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for Si/Ge axial nanowire heterostructures using modified effective atom method (MEAM) potentials. A Si-Ge MEAM interatomic cross potential was developed based on available experimental data and used for these studies. The atomic distortions and strain distributions near the Si/Ge interfaces are predicted for nanowires with their axes oriented along the [111] direction. The cases of 10 and 25 nm diameter SilGe biwires and of 25 nm diameter Si/Ge/Si axial heterostructures with the Ge disc 1 nm thick were studied. Substantial distortions in the height of the atoms adjacent to the interface were found for the biwires, but not for the Ge discs. Strains as high as 3.5% were found for the Ge disc and values of 2 to 2.5% were found at the Si and Ge interfacial layers in the biwires. Deformation potential theory was used to estimate the influence of the strains on the band gap, and reductions in band gap to as small as 40% of bulk values are predicted for the Ge discs. Localized regions of increased strain and resulting energy minima were also found within the Si/Ge biwire interfaces with the larger effects on the Ge side of the interface. The regions of strain maxima near and within the interfaces are anticipated to be useful for tailoring band gaps and producing quantum confinement of carriers. These results suggest nanowire heterostructures provide greater design flexibility in band structure modification than is possible with planar layer growth.

  8. Strain distribution in single, suspended germanium nanowires studied using nanofocused x-rays.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Mario; Grifone, Raphael; Greil, Johannes; Kriegner, Dominik; Persson, Johan; Lugstein, Alois; Schülli, Tobias; Stangl, Julian

    2016-02-01

    Within the quest for direct band-gap group IV materials, strain engineering in germanium is one promising route. We present a study of the strain distribution in single, suspended germanium nanowires using nanofocused synchrotron radiation. Evaluating the probed Bragg reflection for different illumination positions along the nanowire length results in corresponding strain components as well as the nanowire's tilting and bending. By using these findings we determined the complete strain state with the help of finite element modelling. The resulting information provides us with the possibility of evaluating the validity of the strain investigations following from Raman scattering experiments which are based on the assumption of purely uniaxial strain. PMID:26753909

  9. Bridge monitoring by Brillouin-based distributed strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, Aldo; Bernini, Romeo; Amato, Lucio; Zeni, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    We report the results of a load test performed on a road-bridge. In particular, the tests were performed by a portable prototype based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers. The optical fiber sensor was able to provide the strain profile along the beam, with a spatial resolution of three meters and a strain accuracy of +/- 20 ɛμ. Comparison with finite-elements-method simulations, as well as with data collected by vibrating wire strain gauges, permitted to confirm the validity of the SBS-based approach in monitoring the deformation of large structures.

  10. Slip distribution, strain accumulation and aseismic slip on the Chaman Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chaman fault system is a transcurrent fault system developed due to the oblique convergence of the India and Eurasia plates in the western boundary of the India plate. To evaluate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation along and across the Chaman Fault system, we use 2003-2011 Envisat SAR imagery and InSAR time-series methods to obtain a ground velocity field in radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. We correct the InSAR data for different sources of systematic biases including the phase unwrapping errors, local oscillator drift, topographic residuals and stratified tropospheric delay and evaluate the uncertainty due to the residual delay using time-series of MODIS observations of precipitable water vapor. The InSAR velocity field and modeling demonstrates the distribution of deformation across the Chaman fault system. In the central Chaman fault system, the InSAR velocity shows clear strain localization on the Chaman and Ghazaband faults and modeling suggests a total slip rate of ~24 mm/yr distributed on the two faults with rates of 8 and 16 mm/yr, respectively corresponding to the 80% of the total ~3 cm/yr plate motion between India and Eurasia at these latitudes and consistent with the kinematic models which have predicted a slip rate of ~17-24 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. In the northern Chaman fault system (north of 30.5N), ~6 mm/yr of the relative plate motion is accommodated across Chaman fault. North of 30.5 N where the topographic expression of the Ghazaband fault vanishes, its slip does not transfer to the Chaman fault but rather distributes among different faults in the Kirthar range and Sulaiman lobe. Observed surface creep on the southern Chaman fault between Nushki and north of City of Chaman, indicates that the fault is partially locked, consistent with the recorded M<7 earthquakes in last century on this segment. The Chaman fault between north of the City of Chaman to North of Kabul, does not show an increase in the rate of strain

  11. Distributed strain and temperature measurement of a beam using fiber optic BOTDA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Il-Bum; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Choi, Man-Yong

    2003-08-01

    In order to do continuous health monitoring of large structures, it is necessary that the distributed sensing of strain and temperature of the structures are to be measured. So, we present the strain and temperature measurement distributed on a beam using fiber optic BOTDA(Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis) sensor. Fiber optic BOTDA sensor has good performance of strain measurement. However, the signal of fiber optic BOTDA sensor is influenced by strain and temperature. Therefore, we applied an optical fiber on the beam as follows: one part of the fiber, which is sensitive the strain and the temperature, is bonded on the surface of the beam and another part of the fiber, which is only sensitive to the temperature, is located at the same position of the strain sensing fiber. Therefore, the strains can be determined from the strain sensing fiber with compensating the temperature from the temperature sensing fiber. These measured strains were compared with the strains from electrical strain gages. After temperature compensation, it was concluded that the strains from fiber optic BOTDA sensor had good agreements with those values of the conventional strain gages.

  12. Spatial Distributions of Red Blood Cells Significantly Alter Local Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics. PMID:24950214

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Deformation Localization at Small Strains in a Neutron Irradiated 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T

    2014-01-01

    Deformation localization and structure evolution were investigated in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel deformed to 0.8% strain. Using SEM-EBSD, it was shown local plastic deformation may reach significant levels even when the bulk averaged strain level remains below 1%. Local misorientation values up to 24 were observed in these regions of high local plastic deformation. EBSD analysis of FIB lift-out specimens demonstrated that local misorientation level was highest near the free surface and diminished with increasing depth. (S)TEM observations on the same specimen indicated the local density of dislocation channels may vary up to an order of magnitude depending on local grain configuration, distance to the surface and/or local grain boundary structure. It was found that in the case of RT deformation, dislocation defect-free channels may contain twin or may be twin-free with twinning occurring inside channels. Formation of BCC-phase colonies (martensite) was observed in near-surface layer whereas no transformation in the volume of the specimen was detected at this strain level. Martensite formation was associated with channel-grain boundary intersection points where high local misorientation was observed using EBSD.

  14. Distributed strain and temperature mapping in the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) thermal simulator using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the SAFE-100 non-nuclear core simulator. The purpose of the combined temperature and strain mapping was to obtain a correlation between power distribution and core shape within the simulator. In a nuclear reactor, core dimension affects local reactivity and therefore power distribution. 20 FBG temperature sensors were installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center in an interstitial location approximately 2.3mm in diameter. The simulator was heated during two separate experiments using graphite resistive heating elements. The first experiment reached a maximum temperature of approximately 800°C, while the second experiment reached 1150°C. A detailed profile of temperature vs. time and location within the simulator was generated. During a second test, highly distributed fiber Bragg grating strain sensors were arrayed about the circumference and along the length of the heated core region. The maximum temperature during this test was approximately 300°C. A radial and longitudinal strain distribution was obtained that correlated well with known power distribution. Work continues to increase the strain sensor operating temperature and sensor multiplexing to allow high-resolution mapping.

  15. Measles and Rubella: Scale Free Distribution of Local Infection Clusters.

    PubMed

    Yoshikura, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko

    2016-07-22

    This study examined the size distribution of local infection clusters (referred to as clusters hereafter) of measles and rubella from 2008-2013 in Japan. When the logarithm of the cluster sizes were plotted on the x-axis and the logarithm of their frequencies were plotted on the y-axis, the plots fell on a rightward descending straight line. The size distribution was observed to follow a power law. As the size distribution of the clusters could be equated with that of local secondary infections initiated by 1 patient, the size distribution of the clusters, in fact, represented the effective reproduction numbers at the local level. As the power law distribution has no typical sizes, it was suggested that measles or rubella epidemics in Japan had no typical reproduction number. Higher the population size and higher the total number of patients, flatter was the slope of the plots, thus larger was the proportion of larger clusters. An epidemic of measles or rubella in Japan could be represented more appropriately by the cluster size frequency distribution rather than by the reproduction number. PMID:26567836

  16. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  17. Local Probes of Strain Texture and Individual Atomic Dopant Sites in Monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragapane, Alex H.; Contryman, Alex W.; Li, Hong; Qian, Xiaofeng; Ardakani, Sina Moeini; Gong, Yongji; Wang, Xingli; Weisse, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Chi Hwan; Zhao, Jiheng; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Li, Ju; Zheng, Xiaolin; Manoharan, Hari C.

    The 2D semiconductor MoS2 is an optically active material uniquely responsive to local perturbations. As an atomically thin membrane with exceptional strength, it can embed wide band gap variations overlapping the visible light spectrum when subjected to biaxial strain, where the modified electronic potential emanating from point-induced tensile strain perturbations mimics the Coulomb potential in a mesoscopic atom. We have realized this ``artificial atom'' concept via monolayer nanoindentation, and demonstrate that a synthetic superlattice of these building blocks forms an optoelectronic crystal capable of broadband light absorption and efficient funneling of photogenerated excitons to points of maximum strain at the artificial-atom nuclei. We also investigate the effects of individual atomic dopant sites through STM/STS, and visualize the atomic-scale local band structure changes. The modification of 2D semiconductors through methods such as strain texturing and doping connects to applications in next generation optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  18. Distribution of elastic strains appearing in gallium arsenide as a result of doping with isovalent impurities of phosphorus and indium

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, D. A.; Bidus, N. V.; Bobrov, A. I.; Vikhrova, O. V.; Volkova, E. I.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Malekhonova, N. V.; Sorokin, D. S.

    2015-01-15

    The distribution of elastic strains in a system consisting of a quantum-dot layer and a buried GaAs{sub x}P{sub 1−x} layer is studied using geometric phase analysis. A hypothesis is offered concerning the possibility of controlling the process of the formation of InAs quantum dots in a GaAs matrix using a local isovalent phosphorus impurity.

  19. Plasmon localization and local field distribution in metal-dielectric films.

    PubMed

    Genov, Dentcho A; Sarychev, Andrey K; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2003-05-01

    An exact and very efficient numerical method for calculating the effective conductivity and local-field distributions in random R-L-C networks is developed. Using this method, the local-field properties of random metal-dielectric films are investigated in a wide spectral range and for a variety of metal concentrations p. It is shown that for metal concentrations close to the percolation threshold (p=p(c)) and frequencies close to the resonance, the local-field intensity is characterized by a non-Gaussian, exponentially broad distribution. For low and high metal concentrations a scaling region is formed that is due to the increasing number of noninteracting dipoles. The local electric fields are studied in terms of characteristic length parameters. The roles of both localized and extended eigenmodes in Kirchhoff's Hamiltonian are investigated. PMID:12786300

  20. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the center of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size (∼3 μm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J=1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy a deformation sequence is observed comprising, first recrystallization by bulging resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the evolution of a high dislocation density (∼1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine grain sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at high strain rate (10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  1. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the centre of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element, evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size ( ˜ 3 µm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J = 1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy, a deformation sequence is observed comprising recrystallization dominantly by bulging, resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the development of a high dislocation density ( ˜ 1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine-grain-sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at a high strain rate ( ˜ 10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  2. Microstructural characterization of deformation localization at small strains in a neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2014-09-01

    A specific phenomenon - highly localized regions of deformation - was found and investigated at the free surface and near-surface layer of a neutron irradiated AISI 304 stainless steel bend specimen deformed to a maximum surface strain of 0.8%. It was shown that local plastic deformation near the surface might reach significant levels being localized at specific spots even when the maximum free surface strain remains below 1%. The effect was not observed in non-irradiated steel of the same composition at similar strain levels. Cross-sectional EBSD analysis demonstrated that the local misorientation level was highest near the free surface and diminished with increasing depth in these regions. (S)TEM indicated that the local density of dislocation channels might vary up to an order of magnitude. These channels may contain twins or may be twin free depending on grain orientation and local strain levels. BCC-phase (α-martensite) formation associated with channel-grain boundary intersection points was observed using EBSD and STEM in the near-surface layer.

  3. Local theorems for nonidentically distributed lattice random variables.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Derivation of local limit theorems for a sequence X sub n of independent integral-valued lattice random variables involving only a finite number of distinct nondegenerate distributions. Given appropriate sequences A sub n and B sub n of constants such that 1/B sub n (X sub 1 +

  4. Plasticity in bulk metallic glasses investigated via the strain distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Mattern, Norbert; Eckert, Juergen; Bostroem, Magnus; Kvick, Aake; Yavari, Alain Reza; Greer, Alan Lindsay

    2007-09-01

    We measured the atomic-scale elastic strain in order to investigate the yielding of Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 20}Ni{sub 10}Al{sub 10}Ti{sub 5} and Cu{sub 47.5}Zr{sub 47.5}Al{sub 5} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by x-ray synchrotron radiation at room temperature. High resolution strain scanning reveals a deviation from the linear stress-strain relationship at the onset of macroplastic flow. Similar to polycrystalline metals, a saturation of the elastic strain components has been revealed in the case of the ''plastic'' Cu{sub 47.5}Zr{sub 47.5}Al{sub 5} BMG. The results show that the atomic-level elastic strains of the plastic Cu{sub 47.5}Zr{sub 47.5}Al{sub 5} BMG are more homogeneous compared to the 'brittle' Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 20}Ni{sub 10}Al{sub 10}Ti{sub 5} glass.

  5. Fault Location Methods for Ungrounded Distribution Systems Using Local Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Wanjing; Liao, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    This article presents novel fault location algorithms for ungrounded distribution systems. The proposed methods are capable of locating faults by using obtained voltage and current measurements at the local substation. Two types of fault location algorithms, using line to neutral and line to line measurements, are presented. The network structure and parameters are assumed to be known. The network structure needs to be updated based on information obtained from utility telemetry system. With the help of bus impedance matrix, local voltage changes due to the fault can be expressed as a function of fault currents. Since the bus impedance matrix contains information about fault location, superimposed voltages at local substation can be expressed as a function of fault location, through which fault location can be solved. Simulation studies have been carried out based on a sample distribution power system. From the evaluation study, it is evinced that very accurate fault location estimates are obtained from both types of methods.

  6. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ebner, C; Sarkar, R; Rajagopalan, J; Rentenberger, C

    2016-06-01

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti0.45Al0.55 thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson's ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10(-4) and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. PMID:27093600

  7. Long tail distributions near the many-body localization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, David J.

    2016-04-01

    The random field S =1/2 Heisenberg chain exhibits a dynamical many body localization transition at a critical disorder strength, which depends on the energy density. At weak disorder, the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) is fulfilled on average, making local observables smooth functions of energy, whose eigenstate-to-eigenstate fluctuations decrease exponentially with system size. We demonstrate the validity of ETH in the thermal phase as well as its breakdown in the localized phase and show that rare states exist which do not strictly follow ETH, becoming more frequent closer to the transition. Similarly, the probability distribution of the entanglement entropy at intermediate disorder develops long tails all the way down to zero entanglement. We propose that these low entanglement tails stem from localized regions at the subsystem boundaries which were recently discussed as a possible mechanism for subdiffusive transport in the ergodic phase.

  8. Strain localization parameters of AlCu4MgSi processed by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, A. G. Nadezhkin, M. V.; Konovalov, S. V.; Teresov, A. D.

    2015-10-27

    The influence of the electron beam surface treatment of AlCu4MgSi on the strain localization parameters and on the critical strain value of the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been considered. The strain localization parameters were measured using speckle imaging of the specimens subjected to the constant strain rate uniaxial tension at a room temperature. Impact of the surface treatment on the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been investigated.

  9. Colwellia psychrerythraea strains from distant deep sea basins show adaptation to local conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Techtmann, Stephen M.; Fitzgerald, Kathleen S.; Stelling, Savannah C.; Joyner, Dominique C.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Harris, Austin P.; Alshibli, Noor K.; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2016-05-09

    Many studies have shown that microbes, which share nearly identical 16S rRNA genes, can have highly divergent genomes. Microbes from distinct parts of the ocean also exhibit biogeographic patterning. Here in this study we seek to better understand how certain microbes from the same species have adapted for growth under local conditions. The phenotypic and genomic heterogeneity of three strains of Colwellia psychrerythraea was investigated in order to understand adaptions to local environments. Colwellia are psychrophilic heterotrophic marine bacteria ubiquitous in cold marine ecosystems. We have recently isolated two Colwellia strains: ND2E from the Eastern Mediterranean and GAB14E from themore » Great Australian Bight. The 16S rRNA sequence of these two strains were greater than 98.2% identical to the well-characterized C. psychrerythraea 34H, which was isolated from arctic sediments. Salt tolerance, and carbon source utilization profiles for these strains were determined using Biolog Phenotype MicoArrays. These strains exhibited distinct salt tolerance, which was not associated with the salinity of sites of isolation. The carbon source utilization profiles were distinct with less than half of the tested carbon sources being metabolized by all three strains. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the genomes of these three strains were quite diverse with some genomes having up to 1600 strain-specific genes. Many genes involved in degrading strain-specific carbon sources were identified. Finally, there appears to be a link between carbon source utilization and location of isolation with distinctions observed between the Colwellia isolate recovered from sediment compared to water column isolates.« less

  10. Brillouin distributed sensing using localized and stationary dynamic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primerov, Nikolay; Antman, Yair; Sancho, Juan; Zadok, Avi; Thevenaz, Luc

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we apply a recent technique for the generation of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) dynamic gratings that are both localized and stationary to realize high-resolution distributed temperature sensing. The gratings generation method relies on the phase modulation of two pump waves by a common pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS), with a symbol duration that is much shorter than the acoustic lifetime. This way the acoustic wave can efficiently build up in the medium at discrete locations only, where the phase difference between the two waves does not temporarily vary. The separation between neighboring correlation peaks can be made arbitrarily long. Using the proposed method, we experimentally demonstrate distributed temperature sensing with 5 cm resolution, based on modifications to both the local birefringence and the local Brillouin frequency shift in polarization maintaining fibers. The localization method does not require wideband detection and can generate the grating at any random position along the fiber, with complete flexibility. The phase-coding method is equally applicable to high-resolution SBS distributed sensing over standard fibers.

  11. Effect of grain size distribution on the development of compaction localization in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Cecilia S. N.; Baud, Patrick; Wong, Teng-fong

    2012-11-01

    Compaction bands are strain localization structures that are relatively impermeable and can act as barriers to fluid flow in reservoirs. Laboratory studies have shown that discrete compaction bands develop in several sandstones with porosities of 22-25%, at stress states in the transitional regime between brittle faulting and cataclastic flow. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, we conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (˜25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. Our results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies.

  12. An Efficient Algorithm for Stiffness Identification of Truss Structures Through Distributed Local Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Burgueño, R.; Elvin, N. G.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents an efficient stiffness identification technique for truss structures based on distributed local computation. Sensor nodes on each element are assumed to collect strain data and communicate only with sensors on neighboring elements. This can significantly reduce the energy demand for data transmission and the complexity of transmission protocols, thus enabling a simplified wireless implementation. Element stiffness parameters are identified by simple low order matrix inversion at a local level, which reduces the computational energy, allows for distributed computation and makes parallel data processing possible. The proposed method also permits addressing the problem of missing data or faulty sensors. Numerical examples, with and without missing data, are presented and the element stiffness parameters are accurately identified. The computation efficiency of the proposed method is n2 times higher than previously proposed global damage identification methods.

  13. Kinetics of vertical transport and localization of electrons in strained semiconductor supperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G. Mamaev, Yu. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.

    2015-08-15

    The kinetics of vertical electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice is considered taking into account partial localization of electrons. The time dependences of photoemission currents from samples based on a strained semiconductor superlattice calculated by numerically solving the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparison of the theory with experiment makes it possible to determine the characteristic electron localization and thermoactivation times, the diffusion length, and losses of photoelectrons in the superlattice.

  14. Distribution of strain rates in the Taiwan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Fillon, C.; Ma, K.-F.

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the way Eurasian crust is accreted to the Taiwan orogenic wedge we investigate the present-day 3D seismogenic deformation field using the summation of 1129 seismic moment tensors of events ( Mw > 4) covering a period of 11 years (1995 to 2005). Based on the analysis of the principal strain-rate field, including dilatation and maximum shear rates, we distinguish four domains. Domain I comprises the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills. It is mainly contractional in both the horizontal plane and in cross-section. Domain II comprises the eastern Western Foothills, the Hsuehshan Range and the Backbone Range. It is characterized by the highest contraction rates of 10 - 6 yr - 1 in association with area expansion in cross-section and area contraction in the horizontal plane. Domain III corresponds to the Central Range. It is characterized by area contraction in cross-section and area expansion in the horizontal plane. The maximum contractional axis is typically low and plunges ~ 30°E. Extension is larger, horizontal and strikes parallel to the axis of the mountain range. Domain IV corresponding to the Coastal Range and offshore Luzon Arc shows deformation patterns similar to domain II. This seismogenic strain-rate field, which is found in good agreement with the main features of the geodetic field, supports shortening within a thick wedge whose basal décollement is relatively flat and located in the middle-to-lower crust > 20 km. The east plunges of maximum strain-rate axes below the Central Range argue for the development of top-to-the-east transport of rocks resulting from the extrusion of the whole crust along west-dipping crustal-scale shear zones. The study of seismogenic strain rates argues that the initiation of subduction reversal has already started in the Taiwan collision domain.

  15. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling.

    PubMed

    Elsner, B A M; Müller, S

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. PMID:26219654

  16. Histochemical and biochemical urease localization in the periplasm and outer membrane of two Proteus mirabilis strains.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Cheng, K J; Gould, W D; Nickel, J C; Costerton, J W

    1986-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacillus, is often implicated in the formation of infectious kidney stones. As ureolytic activity of this organism is thought to play a major role in its pathogenesis, we adapted our recently described urease localization technique to visualize urease activity in vivo. Urease activity was ultrastructurally localized in two clinically isolated P. mirabilis strains by precipitating the enzymatic reaction product (ammonia) with sodium tetraphenylboron. Subsequent silver staining of the cells revealed urease activity to be predominantly associated with the periplasm and outer membranes of each strain. Biochemical measurements of urease activity in P. mirabilis cell fractions correlated well with histochemical observations in that the majority of urease activity was associated with the periplasm. Membrane-bound urease activity of these strains was associated mainly with the peptidoglycan in the detergent-insoluble (outer membrane) fraction. PMID:3539291

  17. A fiber optic strain measurement and quench localization system for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; Scanlan, R.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1994-10-17

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system or as an absolute strain detector. Combined, one can monitor the mechanical behaviour of the magnet system over time during construction, long time storage and operation. The sensing mechanism is described, together with various tests in laboratory environments. The test results of a multichannel test matrix to be incorporated first in the dummy coils and then in the final version of a 13T Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator dipole magnet are presented. Finally, the possible use of this system as a quench localization system is proposed.

  18. A fiber optic strain measurement and quench localization for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanoort, Johannes M.; Scanlan, Ronald M.; Tenkate, Herman H. J.

    1994-10-01

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system or as an absolute strain detector. Combined, one can monitor the mechanical behaviour of the magnet system over time during construction, long time storage and operation. The sensing mechanism is described, together with various tests in laboratory environments. The test results of a multichannel test matrix to be incorporated first in the dummy coils and then in the final version of a 13T Nb3Sn accelerator dipole magnet are presented. Finally, the possible use of this system as a quench localization system is proposed.

  19. Strain distribution and sensitivity in fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadpay, C.; Sivakumar, N. R.; Mrad, N.

    2008-06-01

    Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) sensors have seen significant development in recent years. Such sensor technology developed initially for the civil infrastructure is currently attracting the aerospace industry due to the potential versatility of this technology and its measurement capability. The structural health monitoring and the diagnostics and prognostics health management communities are excited about such development and ready to embrace such capability. Sensors reliability and accuracy, however, continue to be two parameters critical to the eventual implementation of the technology in high value targets. Such parameters can be improved by different manufacturing techniques as well as optimum grating's coating selection. This paper presents an evaluation of the mechanical behavior of the FBG strain sensors. A simulated analysis, using finite element modeling, revealed the impact of coating material selection, coating thickness selection, and bonding effect on the strain transfer loss. Results illustrate that metallic fiber coatings are more suitable for improved strain transfer than their polymeric counterparts and acrylic coatings are least effective with adhesive layer as small as possible.

  20. Strain analysis from objects with a random distribution: A generalized center-to-center method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yehua; Liang, Xinquan

    2014-03-01

    Existing methods of strain analysis such as the center-to-center method and the Fry method estimate strain from the spatial relationship between point objects in the deformed state. They assume a truncated Poisson distribution of point objects in the pre-deformed state. Significant deviations occur in nature and diffuse the central vacancy in a Fry plot, limiting the its effectiveness as a strain gauge. Therefore, a generalized center-to-center method is proposed to deal with point objects with the more general Poisson distribution, where the method outcomes do not depend on an analysis of a graphical central vacancy. This new method relies upon the probability mass function for the Poisson distribution, and adopts the maximum likelihood function method to solve for strain. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to artificial data sets generated for known strains. Further analysis of these sets by use of the bootstrap method shows that the accuracy of the strain estimate has a strong tendency to increase either with point number or with the inclusion of more pre-deformation nearest neighbors. A poorly sorted, well packed, deformed conglomerate is analyzed, yielding strain estimate similar to the vector mean of the major axis directions of pebbles and the harmonic mean of their axial ratios from a shape-based strain determination method. These outcomes support the applicability of the new method to the analysis of deformed rocks with appropriate strain markers.

  1. Nanoscale concentration and strain distribution in pseudomorphic films Si1-xGex/Si processed by pulsed laser induced epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, L.; Fossard, F.; Kociniewski, T.; Largeau, L.; Cherkashin, N.; Hÿtch, M. J.; Debarre, D.; Sauvage, T.; Claverie, A.; Boulmer, J.; Bouchier, D.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the structural analysis of Si1-xGex pseudomorphic layers synthesized by pulsed laser induced epitaxy (PLIE) using a nanosecond excimer laser. We focus here on the local determination of strain and related Ge concentration. First, a Ge amorphous layer is predeposited on a Si substrate. Successive laser pulses induce the incorporation of Ge atoms in the molten substrate layer and lead to the synthesis of a graded Si1-xGex alloy over a depth which depends on the laser fluence. The Si1-xGex layers are coherently strained and free of defects. The in-depth Ge concentration distribution is investigated by RBS and HAADF STEM. The strain fields are specifically explored using the new dark-field electron holography (Holodark) technique, offering mapping of the full strain tensor in two dimensions with a high precision. Independently determined strain and Ge concentration distributions over a distance of 150 nm from the surface are found to be well consistent. An unexpected but reproducible depletion of Ge is evidenced inside the SiGe layer. This feature is shown to be related to the shape of the temporal characteristics of laser pulses. In particular, the second contribution, which occurs 32 ns later, is involved in a two-stage solidification process.

  2. Modelling strain localization in granular materials using micropolar theory: mathematical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaleh, Mustafa I.; Voyiadjis, George Z.; Alshibli, Khalid A.

    2006-12-01

    It has been known that classical continuum mechanics laws fail to describe strain localization in granular materials due to the mathematical ill-posedness and mesh dependency. Therefore, a non-local theory with internal length scales is needed to overcome such problems. The micropolar and high-order gradient theories can be considered as good examples to characterize the strain localization in granular materials. The fact that internal length scales are needed requires micromechanical models or laws; however, the classical constitutive models can be enhanced through the stress invariants to incorporate the Micropolar effects. In this paper, Lade's single hardening model is enhanced to account for the couple stress and Cosserat rotation and the internal length scales are incorporated accordingly. The enhanced Lade's model and its material properties are discussed in detail; then the finite element formulations in the Updated Lagrangian Frame (UL) are used. The finite element formulations were implemented into a user element subroutine for ABAQUS (UEL) and the solution method is discussed in the companion paper. The model was found to predict the strain localization in granular materials with low dependency on the finite element mesh size. The shear band was found to reflect on a certain angle when it hit a rigid boundary. Applications for the model on plane strain specimens tested in the laboratory are discussed in the companion paper. Copyright

  3. Spatial Distributions of Local Elastic Moduli Near the Jamming Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress on studies of the nanoscale mechanical responses in disordered systems has highlighted a strong degree of heterogeneity in the elastic moduli. In this contribution, using computer simulations, we study the elastic heterogeneities in athermal amorphous solids—composed of isotropic static sphere packings—near the jamming transition. We employ techniques based on linear response methods that are amenable to experimentation. We find that the local elastic moduli are randomly distributed in space and are described by Gaussian probability distributions, thereby lacking any significant spatial correlations, that persist all the way down to the transition point. However, the shear modulus fluctuations grow as the jamming threshold is approached, which is characterized by a new power-law scaling. Through this diverging behavior we are able to identify a characteristic length scale, associated with shear modulus heterogeneities, that distinguishes between bulk and local elastic responses.

  4. Spatial Distributions of Local Elastic Moduli Near the Jamming Transition.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Silbert, Leonardo E; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-02-12

    Recent progress on studies of the nanoscale mechanical responses in disordered systems has highlighted a strong degree of heterogeneity in the elastic moduli. In this contribution, using computer simulations, we study the elastic heterogeneities in athermal amorphous solids--composed of isotropic static sphere packings--near the jamming transition. We employ techniques based on linear response methods that are amenable to experimentation. We find that the local elastic moduli are randomly distributed in space and are described by Gaussian probability distributions, thereby lacking any significant spatial correlations, that persist all the way down to the transition point. However, the shear modulus fluctuations grow as the jamming threshold is approached, which is characterized by a new power-law scaling. Through this diverging behavior we are able to identify a characteristic length scale, associated with shear modulus heterogeneities, that distinguishes between bulk and local elastic responses. PMID:26919018

  5. Distributed strain measurement of welded tubular joint with long gauge FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Ohara, K.; Uzawa, K.; Kanai, M.; Igawa, H.

    2008-04-01

    Strain along a welded joint submitted to a load can fluctuate because of inhomogeneity in thickness or residual stress distributions and defects. Inversely, strain fluctuation may represent such inhomogeneities or defects. We applied the distributed strain sensing technique with a long gauge FBG to monitoring strain distributions along a welded tubular joint of a steel pipe. By using this sensing technique, we can measure a strain distribution at an arbitrary position along a FBG with the high spatial resolution less than 1 mm. In the tensile test of the steel pipe, we could successfully measure the strain distribution along the weld line of about 100 mm in length. We also observed the strain fluctuating sharply in some areas and acoustic emissions were simultaneously detected by the other sensors. In some areas where sharp fluctuations occurred, defects were observed by also computer tomography carried out after the tensile test. Applications for the sensing technique include health monitoring for other joint configurations, such as fastening and bonding.

  6. In-situ strain localization analysis in low density transformation-twinning induced plasticity steel using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, M.; Yadegari-Dehnavi, M. R.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Basu, R.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of deformation temperature on the strain localization has been evaluated by an adapted digital image correlation (DIC) technique during tensile deformation. The progress of strain localization was traced by the corresponding strain maps. The electron backscatter diffraction analysis and tint etching technique were utilized to determine the impact of martensitic transformation and deformation twinning on the strain localization in both elastic and plastic regimes. In elastic regime the narrow strain bands which are aligned perpendicular to the tension direction were observed in temperature range of 25 to 180 °C due to the stress-assisted epsilon martensite. The strain bands were disappeared by increasing the temperature to 300 °C and reappeared at 400 °C due to the stress-assisted deformation twinning. In plastic regime strain localization continued at 25 °C and 180 °C due to the strain-induced alfa-martensite and deformation twinning, respectively. The intensity of plastic strain localization was increased by increasing the strain due to the enhancement of martensite and twin volume fraction. The plastic strain showed more homogeneity at 300 °C due to the lack of both strain-induced martensite and deformation twinning. Effect of deformation mechanism by changing temperature on strain localization is investigated by digital image correlation. EBSD technique is served to validate deformation mechanism as well as microstructural evolution. Strain induced martensite as well as deformation twinning is activated in the present steel affecting strain localization.

  7. α-Synuclein strains cause distinct synucleinopathies after local and systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Peelaerts, W; Bousset, L; Van der Perren, A; Moskalyuk, A; Pulizzi, R; Giugliano, M; Van den Haute, C; Melki, R; Baekelandt, V

    2015-06-18

    Misfolded protein aggregates represent a continuum with overlapping features in neurodegenerative diseases, but differences in protein components and affected brain regions. The molecular hallmark of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy are megadalton α-synuclein-rich deposits suggestive of one molecular event causing distinct disease phenotypes. Glial α-synuclein (α-SYN) filamentous deposits are prominent in multiple system atrophy and neuronal α-SYN inclusions are found in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The discovery of α-SYN assemblies with different structural characteristics or 'strains' has led to the hypothesis that strains could account for the different clinico-pathological traits within synucleinopathies. In this study we show that α-SYN strain conformation and seeding propensity lead to distinct histopathological and behavioural phenotypes. We assess the properties of structurally well-defined α-SYN assemblies (oligomers, ribbons and fibrils) after injection in rat brain. We prove that α-SYN strains amplify in vivo. Fibrils seem to be the major toxic strain, resulting in progressive motor impairment and cell death, whereas ribbons cause a distinct histopathological phenotype displaying Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy traits. Additionally, we show that α-SYN assemblies cross the blood-brain barrier and distribute to the central nervous system after intravenous injection. Our results demonstrate that distinct α-SYN strains display differential seeding capacities, inducing strain-specific pathology and neurotoxic phenotypes. PMID:26061766

  8. Residual Strain Distribution in Bent Composite Boiler Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Camden R; Gorti, Sarma B; Tang, Fei

    2006-01-01

    Kraft recovery boilers are typically constructed of carbon steel boiler tubes clad with a corrosion resistant layer, and these composite tubes are bent and welded together to form air port panels which enable the combustion air to enter the boiler. In this paper, the through-thickness residual strain in the carbon steel layer of non-heat-treated and heat-treated composite bent tubes were measured by neutron diffraction techniques and modeled by finite element modeling. The results can be used to optimize material selection and manufacturing processes to prevent stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking in the boiler tubes.

  9. Distributed fiber Brillouin strain sensing by correlation-based continuous-wave technique: cm-order spatial resolution and dynamic strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo; Ong, Sean S.

    2002-09-01

    This paper describes a novel correlation-based technique for fiber optic distributed strain sensors using Brillouin scattering. Conventional Brillouin-based sensors utilize a pulsed-pump similar to that of OTDR and are capable of distributed strain sensing over large distances, but suffer an inherent spatial resolution limit of around 1m. In addition, unlike FBG-based strain sensors which are competent of measuring dynamic strain, the pulse-based Brillouin sensors have large measurement times of several minutes, making them inadequate for dynamic strain measurements. On the other hand, using the correlation-based continuous-wave technique, we have achieved static distributed strain measurements of up to 1cm spatial resolution, and dynamic strain measurements of up to 8.8Hz from a 5cm strained section.

  10. Distribution of local elastic constants in nanofilms of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Dong-Yuan; Lin, Ping; Yan, Xue-Song; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The distribution of local elastic constants of nanofilms was studied by the stress-fluctuation approach. The Lennard-Jones (L-J) and the second-moment approximation of tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential are used as models to investigate the differences between the pair-wise and many-body atomic interaction. Firstly the configurations of the nanofilm are obtained by the simulations, and then with the configurations, elastic constants are calculated. The behaviors of C11(n) and C12(n) are different for L-J films. Inner layers have larger C11(n) and smaller C12(n). For TB-SMA films, the distributions are different from L-J films'. The outmost layers have the smallest value, while the secondary outer layers have the largest and the behaviors of C11(n) and C12(n) are similar. This distribution can be explained by the competition between electron redistribution and lower coordination near the free surfaces. Compared to L-J model TB-SMA is better to describe the system. Furthermore, as the temperature increases, the elastic constants get larger while the distributions of the local elastic constants almost remain the same.

  11. Strain and localization effects in InGaAs(N) quantum wells: Tuning the magnetic response

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Oliveira, V. Herval, L. K. S.; Orsi Gordo, V.; Cesar, D. F.; Godoy, M. P. F. de; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Henini, M.; Khatab, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Wang, S.; Schmidbauer, M.

    2014-12-21

    We investigated effects of localization and strain on the optical and magneto-optical properties of diluted nitrogen III–V quantum wells theoretically and experimentally. High-resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence (PL), and magneto-PL measurements under high magnetic fields up to 15 T were performed at low temperatures. Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian formalism was used to study the influence of strain, confinement, and localization effects. The circularly polarized magneto-PL was interpreted considering localization aspects in the valence band ground state. An anomalous behavior of the electron-hole pair magnetic shift was observed at low magnetic fields, ascribed to the increase in the exciton reduced mass due to the negative effective mass of the valence band ground state.

  12. On local total strain redistribution using a simplified cyclic inelastic analysis based on an elastic solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. Y.; Kaufman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Strain redistribution corrections were developed for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure to economically calculate material cyclic response at the critical location of a structure for life prediction purposes. The method was based on the assumption that the plastic region in the structure is local and the total strain history required for input can be defined from elastic finite element analyses. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was represented by a bilinear kinematic hardening model. The simplified procedure has been found to predict stress-strain response with reasonable accuracy for thermally cycled problems but needs improvement for mechanically load cycled problems. This study derived and incorporated Neuber type corrections in the simplified procedure to account for local total strain redistribution under cyclic mechanical loading. The corrected simplified method was exercised on a mechanically load cycled benchmark notched plate problem. Excellent agreement was found between the predicted material response and nonlinear finite element solutions for the problem. The simplified analysis computer program used 0.3 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  13. Strain distribution and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with fully distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the feasibility of strain measurement and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with pulse prepump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. Single-mode optical fibers with two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively, were applied as fully distributed sensors, their performances were compared with analytical predictions. They were successfully protected from damage during concrete casting of three full-scale concrete panels when 5 to 10-cm-thick protective mortar covers had been set for 2 h. Experimental results from three-point loading tests of the panels indicated that the strain distributions measured from the two types of sensors were in good agreement, and cracks can be detected at sharp peaks of the measured strain distributions. The two-layer and three-layer coated fibers can be used to measure strains up to 2.33% and 2.42% with a corresponding sensitivity of 5.43×10-5 and 4.66×10-5 GHz/μɛ, respectively. Two cracks as close as 7 to 9 cm can be clearly detected. The measured strains in optical fiber were lower than the analytical prediction by 10% to 25%. Their difference likely resulted from strain transfer through various coatings, idealized point loading, varying optical fiber embedment, and concrete heterogeneity.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene under local strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented to investigate the structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene (trans-PA) molecule under local strain. The influence of a local bending or compression of the space between neighboring carbon atoms on the band gap of the molecule was studied. Making use of an effective difference equation based on tight-binding procedure the band structure of trans-PA has been calculated. Our results indicate that the energy gap of the strained molecule modified significantly which affects the electronic properties of the molecule. We found that the size of the molecular gap is proportional to the bending angle so that for the bending perpendicular to π-orbitals plane the band gap reduced drastically and for the parallel one the band gap gradually increased. Furthermore, the current-voltage characteristics of the strained trans-PA molecule are studied. We found that under the local strain the threshold voltage for the current flow through the bent molecule decreased (increased) depending on the bending is perpendicular (parallel) to the molecule plane.

  15. Method for Estimating Operational Loads on Aerospace Structures Using Span-Wisely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a new method for estimating operational loads (bending moments, shear loads, and torques) acting on slender aerospace structures using distributed surface strains (unidirectional strains). The surface strain-sensing stations are to be evenly distributed along each span-wise strain-sensing line. A depth-wise cross section of the structure along each strain-sensing line can then be considered as an imaginary embedded beam. The embedded beam was first evenly divided into multiple small domains with domain junctures matching the strain-sensing stations. The new method is comprised of two steps. The first step is to determine the structure stiffness (bending or torsion) using surface strains obtained from a simple bending (or torsion) loading case, for which the applied bending moment (or torque) is known. The second step is to use the strain-determined structural stiffness (bending or torsion), and a new set of surface strains induced by any other loading case to calculate the associated operational loads (bending moments, shear loads, or torques). Performance of the new method for estimating operational loads was studied in light of finite-element analyses of several example structures subjected to different loading conditions. The new method for estimating operational loads was found to be fairly accurate, and is very promising for applications to the flight load monitoring of flying vehicles with slender wings.

  16. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  17. Strain-Induced Localized States Within the Matrix Continuum of Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dot-based infrared detectors often involve transitions from confined states of the dot to states above the minimum of the conduction band continuum of the matrix. We discuss the existence of two types of resonant states within this continuum in self-assembled dots: (i) virtual bound states, which characterize square wells even without strain and (ii) strain-induced localized states. The latter emerge due to the appearance of 'potential wings' near the dot, related to the curvature of the dots. While states (i) do couple to the continuum, states (ii) are sheltered by the wings, giving rise to sharp absorption peaks.

  18. Revealing ultralarge and localized elastic lattice strains in Nb nanowires embedded in NiTi matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Ketao; Mao, Shengcheng; Cai, Jixiang; Liu, Yinong; Li, Haixin; Hao, Shijie; Jiang, Daqiang; Cui, Lishan

    2015-01-01

    Freestanding nanowires have been found to exhibit ultra-large elastic strains (4 to 7%) and ultra-high strengths, but exploiting their intrinsic superior mechanical properties in bulk forms has proven to be difficult. A recent study has demonstrated that ultra-large elastic strains of ~6% can be achieved in Nb nanowires embedded in a NiTi matrix, on the principle of lattice strain matching. To verify this hypothesis, this study investigated the elastic deformation behavior of a Nb nanowire embedded in NiTi matrix by means of in situ transmission electron microscopic measurement during tensile deformation. The experimental work revealed that ultra-large local elastic lattice strains of up to 8% are induced in the Nb nanowire in regions adjacent to stress-induced martensite domains in the NiTi matrix, whilst other parts of the nanowires exhibit much reduced lattice strains when adjacent to the untransformed austenite in the NiTi matrix. These observations provide a direct evidence of the proposed mechanism of lattice strain matching, thus a novel approach to designing nanocomposites of superior mechanical properties. PMID:26625854

  19. Local analysis of strains and rotations for macromolecular electron microscopy maps.

    PubMed

    Sorzano, C O S; Martín-Ramos, A; Prieto, F; Melero, R; Martín-Benito, J; Jonic, S; Navas-Calvente, J; Vargas, J; Otón, J; Abrishami, V; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Gómez-Blanco, J; Vilas, J L; Marabini, R; Carazo, J M

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular complexes perform their physiological functions by local rearrangements of their constituents and biochemically interacting with their reaction partners. These rearrangements may involve local rotations and the induction of local strains causing different mechanical efforts and stretches at the different areas of the protein. The analysis of these local deformations may reveal important insight into the way proteins perform their tasks. In this paper we introduce a method to perform this kind of local analysis using Electron Microscopy volumes in a fully objective and automatic manner. For doing so, we exploit the continuous nature of the result of an elastic image registration using B-splines as its basis functions. We show that the results obtained by the new automatic method are consistent with previous observations on these macromolecules. PMID:27102900

  20. Pathogenicity and distribution of avian nephritis virus (G-4260 strain) in inoculated laying hens.

    PubMed

    Imada, T; Maeda, M; Furuta, K; Yamaguchi, S; Kawamura, H

    1983-01-01

    Specific-pathogen-free laying hens were inoculated intravenously with the G-4260 strain of avian nephritis virus (ANV). The distribution of the virus in organs, histological changes in main organs, the condition of laying, and egg transmission of the virus were examined in them. Over an experimental period of 27 days, no clinical sings were observed. In a chronological study on the distribution of the virus in organs, the virus was recovered from liver, kidney, jejunum, and rectum for 6 days postinoculation (PI). The virus titer in organ emulsion was the highest in the jejunum of all the main organs. The virus was recovered from the kidney for 8 days PI, although it was not so high in this organ. It was not recovered from the ovary or oviduct. Fluorescent antigens were not observed at all in any material. In a pathological examination, some local inflammatory changes were observed only in the kidney. There were no significant changes in the ovary, oviduct, or any other organ. Antibody appeared 10 days PI and was detectable even 27 days PI, although it was not so high in titer. There was no significant difference in the rate of egg-production between the infected and the sham inoculated groups. No virus was isolated from 111 fertile eggs laid by infected hens over a period from 2 to 27 days PI. PMID:6097821

  1. Distribution of Neuraminidase among Food-poisoning Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Moss, C. Wayne; Schekter, Marcia A.; Cherry, William B.

    1967-01-01

    A survey was made to determine the distribution of the enzyme neuraminidase among 76 strains of Clostridium perfringens. Representative strains from each toxigenic type (A to F) and atypical C. perfringens type A food-poisoning strains of both American and English (Hobbs types) origin were tested. Both the American food-poisoning and nonfood-poisoning associated cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative strains. Furthermore, American strains which could not be differentiated from the original Hobbs cultures consisted of both neuraminidase-positive and -negative representatives. In contrast, the English (Hobbs) strains uniformly failed to produce an active intracellular or extracellular neuraminidase. No enzyme activity was detected in these strains when cultures were grown in different growth media, when grown in the presence of substrate (neuraminlactose), or upon extended incubation of enzyme preparations with substrate. With the exception of a type F strain, representative strains of the other toxigenic types (A to F) produced neuraminidase; 85% of the typical type A strains contained the enzyme. PMID:4292823

  2. Impact comminution of solids due to local kinetic energy of high shear strain rate: I. Continuum theory and turbulence analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Caner, Ferhun C.

    2014-03-01

    The modeling of high velocity impact into brittle or quasibrittle solids is hampered by the unavailability of a constitutive model capturing the effects of material comminution into very fine particles. The present objective is to develop such a model, usable in finite element programs. The comminution at very high strain rates can dissipate a large portion of the kinetic energy of an impacting missile. The spatial derivative of the energy dissipated by comminution gives a force resisting the penetration, which is superposed on the nodal forces obtained from the static constitutive model in a finite element program. The present theory is inspired partly by Grady's model for expansive comminution due to explosion inside a hollow sphere, and partly by analogy with turbulence. In high velocity turbulent flow, the energy dissipation rate gets enhanced by the formation of micro-vortices (eddies) which dissipate energy by viscous shear stress. Similarly, here it is assumed that the energy dissipation at fast deformation of a confined solid gets enhanced by the release of kinetic energy of the motion associated with a high-rate shear strain of forming particles. For simplicity, the shape of these particles in the plane of maximum shear rate is considered to be regular hexagons. The particle sizes are assumed to be distributed according to the Schuhmann power law. The condition that the rate of release of the local kinetic energy must be equal to the interface fracture energy yields a relation between the particle size, the shear strain rate, the fracture energy and the mass density. As one experimental justification, the present theory agrees with Grady's empirical observation that, in impact events, the average particle size is proportional to the (-2/3) power of the shear strain rate. The main characteristic of the comminution process is a dimensionless number Ba (Eq. (37)) representing the ratio of the local kinetic energy of shear strain rate to the maximum possible

  3. Significance of locally intensified strain aging to the fracture toughness of welded steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    A review of past studies shows that tests on specimens notched after welding can give overestimates of the fracture toughness that occurs at the tips of flaws present during welding. This situation results from locally intensified straining and aging embrittlement (LISAE), which has been shown to trigger low stress brittle fractures in both notched and welded wide plate tension tests, and welded structures in service. Although the relative susceptibilities of steels to strain aging embrittlement are sometimes assessed by testing bulk strained and aged samples, the results of such tests may be optimistic. A summary is given of work to develop a fracture toughness test method for LISAE. The new test will give increased confidence and accuracy in fracture assessments, be of use in selecting tough materials, and aid the development of materials that are resistant to LISAE.

  4. Local fluid flow and borehole strain in the South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, S.; Segall, P.; Ágústsson, K.; Agnew, D.

    2003-12-01

    Installation of 175 borehole strainmeters is planned for PBO. It is therefore vital to understand the behavior of existing strainmeter installations. We investigate signals recorded by three borehole dilatometers in the south Iceland seismic zone following two Mw6.5 earthquakes in June 2000. Poroelastic relaxation has been documented following these events based on InSAR and water level data [Jónsson et al., 2003, Nature]. According to poroelastic theory for a homogeneous isotropic (unfractured) medium, the anticipated post-seismic volumetric strain has the same sign as the coseismic strain step. For example, coseismic compression results in pore-pressure increases; post-earthquake fluid drainage causes additional compression. However, we find that observed strain changes vary considerably between different instruments after the earthquakes. One instrument (HEL) behaves as expected with transient strain increasing with the same sign as the coseismic strain step. Another instrument (SAU) shows partial strain relaxation, opposite in sign to the coseismic signal. The third (BUR) exhibits complete strain relaxation by 3-4 days after the earthquakes (i.e., BUR does not record any permanent strain). BUR has responded in the same fashion to three different earthquakes and two volcanic eruptions, demonstrating conclusively that the transient response is due to processes local to the borehole. Fluid drainage from cracks can explain these observations. Rapid straining results in compression (extension) of the rock and strainmeter. Fluid filled fractures near the borehole transmit normal stress, due to the relative incompressibility of water. Thus, at short time scales the instrument records a coseismic strain step. With time, however, fluid flows out of (in to) the fractures, and the normal stress transmitted across the fractures decreases (increases). As the stress relaxes the strainmeter expands (contracts), reversing the coseismic strain. Barometric responses are

  5. Local tsunamis and distributed slip at the source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Dmowska, R.

    1999-01-01

    Variations in the local tsunami wave field are examined in relation to heterogeneous slip distributions that are characteristic of many shallow subduction zone earthquakes. Assumptions inherent in calculating the coseismic vertical displacement field that defines the initial condition for tsunami propagation are examined. By comparing the seafloor displacement from uniform slip to that from an ideal static crack, we demonstrate that dip-directed slip variations significantly affect the initial cross-sectional wave profile. Because of the hydrodynamic stability of tsunami wave forms, these effects directly impact estimates of maximum runup from the local tsunami. In most cases, an assumption of uniform slip in the dip direction significantly underestimates the maximum amplitude and leading wave steepness of the local tsunami. Whereas dip-directed slip variations affect the initial wave profile, strike-directed slip variations result in wavefront-parallel changes in amplitude that are largely preserved during propagation from the source region toward shore, owing to the effects of refraction. Tests of discretizing slip distributions indicate that small fault surface elements of dimensions similar to the source depth can acceptably approximate the vertical displacement field in comparison to continuous slip distributions. Crack models for tsunamis generated by shallow subduction zone earthquakes indicate that a rupture intersecting the free surface results in approximately twice the average slip. Therefore, the observation of higher slip associated with tsunami earthquakes relative to typical subduction zone earthquakes of the same magnitude suggests that tsunami earthquakes involve rupture of the seafloor, whereas rupture of deeper subduction zone earthquakes may be imbedded and not reach the seafloor.

  6. Sporadic Distribution and Distinctive Variations of Cylindrospermopsin Genes in Cyanobacterial Strains and Environmental Samples from Chinese Freshwater Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongguang; Xiao, Peng; Yu, Gongliang; Shao, Jihai; Liu, Deming; Azevedo, Sandra M. F. O.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing reports of cylindrospermopsins (CYNs) in freshwater ecosystems have promoted the demand for identifying all of the potential CYN-producing cyanobacterial species. The present study explored the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of cyr genes in cyanobacterial strains and water samples from China. Four Cylindrospermopsis strains and two Raphidiopsis strains were confirmed to produce CYNs. Mutant cyrI and cyrK genes were observed in these strains. Cloned cyr gene sequences from eight water bodies were clustered with cyr genes from Cylindrospermopsis and Raphidiopsis (C/R group) in the phylogenetic trees with high similarities (99%). Four cyrI sequence types and three cyrJ sequence types were observed to have different sequence insertions and repeats. Phylogenetic analysis of the rpoC1 sequences of the C/R group revealed four conserved clades, namely, clade I, clade II, clade III, and clade V. High sequence similarities (>97%) in each clade and a divergent clade IV were observed. Therefore, CYN producers were sporadically distributed in congeneric and paraphyletic C/R group species in Chinese freshwater ecosystems. In the evolution of cyr genes, intragenomic translocations and intergenomic transfer between local Cylindrospermopsis and Raphidiopsis were emphasized and probably mediated by transposases. This research confirms the existence of CYN-producing Cylindrospermopsis in China and reveals the distinctive variations of cyr genes. PMID:24928879

  7. Dynamic measurement of inside strain distributions in adhesively bonded joints by embedded fiber Bragg grating sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Ning, Xiaoguang; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-05-01

    Long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the length of about 100 mm was embedded onto the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) substrate and two CFRP adherends were joined by adhesive to form an adhesive bonded single-lap joint. The joint was subjected to 0.5 Hz cyclic tensile load and longitudinal strain distributions along FBG were measured at 5 Hz by the fiber-optic distributed sensing system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). We could successfully monitor the strain distributions accurately with high spatial resolution of around 1 mm.

  8. Deformation Along the Rio Grande Rift: Investigating the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Strain Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. D.; Murray, M. H.; Sheehan, A. F.; Nerem, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Low velocity (<1 mm/yr) extensional environments, such as the Rio Grande rift (RGR) in Colorado and New Mexico, are complex but can provide insights into continental dynamics, tectonic processes, and seismic hazards. We use eight years of measurements from 26 continuous GPS stations across the RGR installed as part of a collaborative EarthScope experiment. We combine this data with regional Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and National Geodetic Survey (NGS) CORS GPS stations, and survey-mode data collected on NGS benchmarks to investigate how deformation is distributed across a broad area from the Great Plains to the Colorado Plateau. The data from over 150 stations are processed using GAMIT/GLOBK, and time series, velocities, strain rates are estimated with respect to realizations of a stable North America reference frame, such as NA12. This study extends our previous analysis, based on 4 years of data, which found an approximately uniform 1.2 nanostrain/yr east-west extensional strain rate across the entire region that was not concentrated on the narrow surface expression of the rift. We expand on this previous work by using a denser network of GPS stations and analyzing longer time series, which reduce horizontal velocity uncertainties to approximately 0.15 mm/yr. We also improve the accuracy of the estimated velocity uncertainties by robustly characterizing time-correlated noise. The noise models indicate that both power-law and flicker noise are present in the time series along with white noise. On average, power law noise constitutes about 90% of the total noise in the vertical component and 60% in the horizontal components for the RGR sites. We use the time series, and velocity and strain-rate estimates to constrain spatial and temporal variations in the deformation field in order to locate possible regions of strain localization and detect transient deformation signals, and to address some of the kinematic and dynamic issues raised by the observation that a

  9. Local strain and damage mapping in single trabeculae during three-point bending tests.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, R; Szabo, M E; Schitter, G; Tang, Raymond Yue-Sing; Vashishth, D; Hansma, P K; Thurner, P J

    2011-05-01

    The use of bone mineral density as a surrogate to diagnose bone fracture risk in individuals is of limited value. However, there is growing evidence that information on trabecular microarchitecture can improve the assessment of fracture risk. One current strategy is to exploit finite element analysis (FEA) applied to 3D image data of several mm-sized trabecular bone structures obtained from non-invasive imaging modalities for the prediction of apparent mechanical properties. However, there is a lack of FE damage models, based on solid experimental facts, which are needed to validate such approaches and to provide criteria marking elastic-plastic deformation transitions as well as microdamage initiation and accumulation. In this communication, we present a strategy that could elegantly lead to future damage models for FEA: direct measurements of local strains involved in microdamage initiation and plastic deformation in single trabeculae. We use digital image correlation to link stress whitening in bone, reported to be correlated to microdamage, to quantitative local strain values. Our results show that the whitening zones, i.e. damage formation, in the presented loading case of a three-point bending test correlate best with areas of elevated tensile strains oriented parallel to the long axis of the samples. The average local strains along this axis were determined to be (1.6±0.9)% at whitening onset and (12±4)% just prior to failure. Overall, our data suggest that damage initiation in trabecular bone is asymmetric in tension and compression, with failure originating and propagating over a large range of tensile strains. PMID:21396601

  10. Strain localization in ductile rocks: A comparison of natural and simulated pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    We study pinch-and-swell structures in order to uncover the onset of strain localization and the change of deformation mechanisms in layered ductile rocks. To this end, boudinaged monomineralic veins embedded in an ultramylonitic matrix are analyzed quantitatively. The swells are built up by relatively undeformed original calcite grains, showing twinning and minor subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Combined with progressive formation of high-angle misorientations between grains, indicative of SGR, severe grain size reduction defines the transition to the pinches. Accordingly, dynamically recrystallized grains have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Toward the necks, further grain size reduction, increasingly random misorientations, nucleation of new grains, and a loss of the CPO occur. We postulate that this microstructure marks the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep induced by strain localization. We confirm that the development of boudins is insensitive to original grain sizes and single-crystal orientations. In order to test these microstructural interpretations, a self-consistent numerical grain size evolution is implemented, based on thermo-mechanical principles, end-member flow laws and microphysical processes. Applying constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions to a 3-layer finite element pure shear box, pinch-and-swell structures emerge out of the homogeneous layer through grain size softening at a critical state. Viscosity weakening due to elevated strain rates and dissipated heat from grain size reduction promotes strain rate weakening until a critical grain size is reached. At this point, a switch from dislocation to diffusion creep occurs. This state locks in at local steady states and is microstructurally expressed in pinches and swells, respectively. Thus, boudinage is identified as an energy attractor, identifying the high-energy steady state of an extending layered structure. We conclude from the

  11. Local strain and damage mapping in single trabeculae during three-point bending tests

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, R.; Szabo, M.E.; Schitter, G.; Tang, Raymond Yue-Sing; Vashishth, D.; Hansma, P.K.; Thurner, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of bone mineral density as a surrogate to diagnose bone fracture risk in individuals is of limited value. However, there is growing evidence that information on trabecular microarchitecture can improve the assessment of fracture risk. One current strategy is to exploit finite element analysis (FEA) applied to 3D image data of several mm-sized trabecular bone structures obtained from non-invasive imaging modalities for the prediction of apparent mechanical properties. However, there is a lack of FE damage models, based on solid experimental facts, which are needed to validate such approaches and to provide criteria marking elastic–plastic deformation transitions as well as microdamage initiation and accumulation. In this communication, we present a strategy that could elegantly lead to future damage models for FEA: direct measurements of local strains involved in microdamage initiation and plastic deformation in single trabeculae. We use digital image correlation to link stress whitening in bone, reported to be correlated to microdamage, to quantitative local strain values. Our results show that the whitening zones, i.e. damage formation, in the presented loading case of a three-point bending test correlate best with areas of elevated tensile strains oriented parallel to the long axis of the samples. The average local strains along this axis were determined to be (1.6 ± 0.9)% at whitening onset and (12 ± 4)% just prior to failure. Overall, our data suggest that damage initiation in trabecular bone is asymmetric in tension and compression, with failure originating and propagating over a large range of tensile strains. PMID:21396601

  12. Spatially Distributed Local Fields in the Hippocampus Encode Rat Position

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gautam; Stevenson, Ian H.; Berényi, Antal; Mizuseki, Kenji; Buzsáki, György; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2016-01-01

    Although neuronal spikes can be readily detected from extracellular recordings, synaptic and subthreshold activity remains undifferentiated within the local field potential (LFP). In the hippocampus, neurons discharge selectively when the rat is at certain locations, while LFPs at single anatomical sites exhibit no such place-tuning. Nonetheless, because the representation of position is sparse and distributed, we hypothesized that spatial information can be recovered from multiple-site LFP recordings. Using high-density sampling of LFP and computational methods, we show that the spatiotemporal structure of the theta rhythm can encode position as robustly as neuronal spiking populations. Because our approach exploits the rhythmicity and sparse structure of neural activity, features found in many brain regions, it is useful as a general tool for discovering distributed LFP codes. PMID:24812401

  13. On the Local-Field Distribution in Attractor Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korutcheva, E.; Koroutchev, K.

    In this paper a simple two-layer neural network's model, similar to that studied by D. Amit and N. Brunel,11 is investigated in the frames of the mean-field approximation. The distributions of the local fields are analytically derived and compared to those obtained in Ref. 11. The dynamic properties are discussed and the basin of attraction in some parametric space is found. A procedure for driving the system into a basin of attraction by using a regulation imposed on the network is proposed. The effect of outer stimulus is shown to have a destructive influence on the attractor, forcing the latter to disappear if the distribution of the stimulus has high enough variance or if the stimulus has a spatial structure with sufficient contrast. The techniques, used in this paper, for obtaining the analytical results can be applied to more complex topologies of linked recurrent neural networks.

  14. Structural health monitoring by using fiber-optic distributed strain sensors with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we review our researches on the topics of the structural health monitoring (SHM) with the fiber-optic distributed strain sensor. Highly-dense information on strains in a structure can be useful to identify some kind of existing damages or applied loads in implementation of SHM. The fiber-optic distributed sensors developed by the authors have been applied to the damage detection of a single-lap joint and load identification of a beam simply supported. We confirmed that the applicability of the distributed sensor to SHM could be improved as making the spatial resolution higher. In addition, we showed that the simulation technique considering both structural and optical effects seamlessly in strain measurement could be powerful tools to evaluate the performance of a sensing system and design it for SHM. Finally, the technique for simultaneous distributed strain and temperature measurement using the PANDA-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is shown in this paper, because problems caused by the cross-sensitivity toward strain and temperature would be always inevitable in strain measurement for SHM.

  15. Fault Diagnosis in a Fully Distributed Local Computer Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, Hye Keun

    Local computer networks are being installed in diverse application areas. Many of the networks employ a distributed control scheme, which has advantages in performance and reliability over a centralized one. However, distribution of control increases the difficulty in locating faulty hardware elements. Consequently, advantages may not be fully realized unless measures are taken to account for the difficulties of fault diagnosis; yet, not much work has been done in this area. A hardcore is defined as a node or a part of a node which is fault-free and which can diagnose other elements in a system. Faults are diagnosed in most existing distributed local computer networks by assuming that every node, or a part of every node, is a fixed hardcore: a fixed node or a part of a fixed node is always a hardcore. Maintaining such high reliability may not be possible or cost-effective for some systems. A distributed network contains dynamically redundant elements, and it is reasonable to assume that fewer nodes are simultaneously faulty than are fault-free at any point in the life cycle of the network. A diagnostic model is proposed herein which determines bindary evaluation results according to the status of the testing and tested nodes, and which leads the network to dynamically locate a fault-free node (a hardcore). This diagnostic model is, in most cases, simpler to implement and more cost-effective than the fixed hardcore. The selected hardcore can diagnose the other elements and can locate permanent faults. In a hop-by-hop test, the destination node and every intermediate node in a path test the transmitted data. This dissertation presents another method to locate an element with frequent transient faults; it checks data only at the destination, thereby, eliminating the need for a hop-by-hop test.

  16. Valorization of solid olive mill wastes by cultivation of a local strain of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Mansour-Benamar, Malika; Savoie, Jean-Michel; Chavant, Louis

    2013-08-01

    Olive oil industry generates huge quantities of solid olive mill wastes (SOMW), causing environmental damage. Cultivation of edible mushrooms, such as Pleurotus ostreatus is a valuable approach for SOMW valorization. A local strain mycelium (Tizi-Ouzou, Algeria) of P. ostreatus (LPO) was isolated from castor oil plants. Oyster mushroom spawn, produced on barley grains, was used to inoculate wet SOMW, steamed in a traditional steamer during 45 min. The mycelium growth rate on SOMW was first estimated in Petri dish by measuring the surface colonized by the mycelium. The fruit body yields were estimated on culture bags containing 2 kg each of SOMW inoculated at 7% (w/w). The local strain potential was compared with that of a commercial one. Both strains produced high-quality mushrooms, but with low yields. The supplementation of the SOMW with wheat straw at the rate of 10% and 2% of CaCO3 had significantly enhanced the productivity of the two strains, multiplying it by 3.2 for LPO and by 2.6 for CPO. PMID:24018198

  17. CHARACTERIZING LOCALIZED STRAIN OF IN0.83Al0.17As/In0.83Ga0.17As DETECTOR USING LOW FREQUENCY ATOMIC FORCE ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weitao; Dou, Honglei; Huo, Dexuan; Yu, Guolin; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Localized strain accumulation and related defects strongly affect the performance of optoelectronic detectors. However, characterizing distribution of the localized strain and defects still challenges usability and spatial resolution of many measurements. In current study, the defects and surface strain accumulation of In0.83Al0.17As/In0.83Ga0.17As multilayer detectors are investigated using low-frequency atomic force acoustic microscope (AFAM) and Raman spectroscopy. With AFAM, the strain accumulation and defects can be easily identified and measured with spatial resolution as good as that of atomic force microscope (AFM).

  18. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  19. Disruption of Thermally-Stable Nanoscale Grain Structures by Strain Localization

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals with average grain sizes of only a few nanometers have recently been observed to fail through the formation of shear bands. Here, we investigate this phenomenon in nanocrystalline Ni which has had its grain structure stabilized by doping with W, with a specific focus on understanding how strain localization drives evolution of the nanoscale grain structure. Shear banding was initiated with both microcompression and nanoindentation experiments, followed by site-specific transmission electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure. Grain growth and texture formation were observed inside the shear bands, which had a wide variety of thicknesses. These evolved regions have well-defined edges, which rules out local temperature rise as a possible formation mechanism. No structural evolution was found in areas away from the shear bands, even in locations where significant plastic deformation had occurred, showing that plastic strain alone is not enough to cause evolution. Rather, intense strain localization is needed to induce mechanically-driven grain growth in a thermally-stable nanocrystalline alloy. PMID:26030826

  20. Distributed and localized faulting in extensional settings: Insight from the North Ethiopian Rift-Afar transition area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliva, Roger; Schultz, Richard A.

    2008-04-01

    Extensional fault systems in the Earth's crust can exhibit two end-member geometries that we identify as distributed and localized faulting regimes. A satellite image analysis of fault populations from the Main Ethiopian Rift-Afar area reveals that the rift architecture contains these two faulting regimes. The occurrence of these regimes reveals a jump in the scale of fault segmentation and linkage. Strain localization at rift border zones exhibits particularly large-scale fault linkage and a power law size distribution. This regime replaces prior distributed fault systems, showing small-scale fault linkage and an exponential size distribution. The distributed faulting is interpreted as confined to the thick trap basalt carapace. We show that continental fault systems can develop by a combination of these two geometries, and we demonstrate how to quantitatively decipher the jump between them.

  1. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23886790

  2. Co-seismic Static Stress Drops for Earthquake Ruptures Nucleated on Faults After Progressive Strain Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Pollard, D. D.; Pennacchioni, G.

    2007-12-01

    We estimate the coseismic static stress drop on small exhumed strike-slip faults in the Mt. Abbot quadrangle of the central Sierra Nevada (California). The sub-vertical strike-slip faults cut ~85 Ma granodiorite, were exhumed from 7-10 km depth, and were chosen because they are exposed along their entire lengths, ranging from 8 to 13 m. Net slip is estimated using offset aplite dikes and shallowly plunging slickenlines on the fault surfaces. The faults show a record of progressive strain localization: slip initially nucleated on joints and accumulated from ductile shearing (quartz-bearing mylonites) to brittle slipping (epidote-bearing cataclasites). Thin (< 1 mm) pseudotachylytes associated with the cataclasites have been identified along some faults, suggesting that brittle slip may have been seismic. The brittle contribution to slip may be distinguished from the ductile shearing because epidote-filled, rhombohedral dilational jogs opened at bends and step-overs during brittle slip, are distributed periodically along the length of the faults. We argue that brittle slip occurred along the measured fault lengths in single slip events based on several pieces of evidence. 1) Epidote crystals are randomly oriented and undeformed within dilational jogs, indicating they did not grow during aseismic slip and were not broken after initial opening and precipitation. 2) Opening-mode splay cracks are concentrated near fault tips rather than the fault center, suggesting that the reactivated faults ruptured all at once rather than in smaller slip patches. 3) The fact that the opening lengths of the dilational jogs vary systematically along the fault traces suggests that brittle reactivation occurred in a single slip event along the entire fault rather than in multiple slip events. This unique combination of factors distinguishes this study from previous attempts to estimate stress drop from exhumed faults because we can constrain the coseismic rupture length and slip. The

  3. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  4. Strain Localization Within a Syn-Tectonic Pluton in a Back-Arc Extensional Context: the Naxos granodiorite (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessiere, Eloïse; Rabillard, Aurélien; Arbaret, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Augier, Romain; Menant, Armel

    2016-04-01

    Naxos Island is part of the central Cyclades (Aegean Sea, Greece) where a series of migmatite-cored metamorphic domes were exhumed below large-scale detachment systems during a Cenozoic back-arc extension. On Naxos, the Miocene exhumation history of the high-temperature metamorphic dome was notably achieved through two anastomosing and closely spaced top-to-the-north detachments belonging to the Naxos-Paros detachment system. According to previous contributions, the late exhumation stages were accompanied by the emplacement of a syn-kinematic I-type granodiorite that intruded a ductile-then-brittle detachment. Later the detachment migrated at the interface between the pluton and the metamorphic unit under ductile-to-brittle conditions. To clarify how extensional deformation was precisely distributed within the pluton, a multi-scale approach from field observations to laboratory investigations was undertaken. Through macro- to micro-structural observations, we show a continuous deformation history from magmatic to solid-state ductile/brittle conditions under an overall north-directed shearing deformation. The early magmatic or sub-solidus deformation is evidenced in a large part of the granodiorite, notably in its southern part where the original intrusive contact is still preserved. Solid-state deformation is recorded further north when approaching the detachment zone, highlighted by a thicker cataclastic zone and numerous pseudotachylite veins. From these field observations, we defined six strain facies, leading us to propose a qualitative strain map of the Naxos granodiorite. Based on field pictures and X-ray tomography of oriented samples collected along the strain gradient, we quantified the intensity of mineralogical fabrics in 2D and 3D. This step required the treatment of 600 rocks samples and pictures using SPO2003 (Shape Preferred Orientation) and Intercepts2003. Measured shape variations of the strain ellipsoid thus corroborate the large-scale strain

  5. A novel fiber optic distributed temperature and strain sensor for building applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregubov, A. V.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Berintsev, A. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    A novel fiber optic distributed sensor for temperature and strain measurements in building constructions has been developed and studied which is a composite optical element in the form of a reinforced single-mode optical fiber placed directly in the body of a fiberglass armature. The sensor has a reasonably high sensitivity to changes in external temperature and strain and a good spatial resolution. Besides, it is characterized by a high mechanical strength as compared to conventional fiber sensor elements. The experimental results obtained on a prototype show the value of the temperature sensitivity of 0.1 MHz/deg and the sensitivity to strain of 2.7 MHz/mm.

  6. Vibration monitoring of a helicopter blade model using the optical fiber distributed strain sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka; Kasai, Tokio

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a dynamic distributed monitoring technique using a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogated by optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) that measures strain at a speed of 150 Hz, spatial resolution of 1 mm, and measurement range of 20 m. A 5 m FBG is bonded to a 5.5 m helicopter blade model, and vibration is applied by the step relaxation method. The time domain responses of the strain distributions are measured, and the blade deflections are calculated based on the strain distributions. Frequency response functions are obtained using the time domain responses of the calculated deflection induced by the preload release, and the modal parameters are retrieved. Experimental results demonstrated the dynamic monitoring performances and the applicability to the modal analysis of the OFDR-FBG technique. PMID:27607270

  7. The distribution of parasite strains among hosts affects disease spread in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Yuko; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Social insects present highly interesting and experimentally amenable systems for the study of disease transmission because they naturally live in dense groups of frequently interacting individuals. Using experimental inoculations of five trypanosomatid strains into groups of its natural host, the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, we investigate the effects of the initial parasite strain distribution across group members on the establishment and transmission success of the different strains to new hosts. For a given number of parasite strains circulating within a host group, transmission to new hosts was increased when the strains were initially inoculated as mixed infections (as opposed to separate single infections), presumably because mixed infections generally favored fast replicating strains. In contrast, separate single infections reduced transmission at least in part through a precedence effect, whereby weak strains appeared to persist by making their host unavailable to superinfection. These results suggest that host groups could benefit from 'compartmentalizing' infections by different parasite strains across different group members, which might be achieved in social insects, for example, by division of labor. PMID:25858120

  8. Stiffening of Individual Fibrin Fibers Equitably Distributes Strain and Strengthens Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan E.; Houser, John R.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Taylor, Russell M.; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T.; Falvo, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract As the structural backbone of blood clots, fibrin networks carry out the mechanical task of stemming blood flow at sites of vascular injury. These networks exhibit a rich set of remarkable mechanical properties, but a detailed picture relating the microscopic mechanics of the individual fibers to the overall network properties has not been fully developed. In particular, how the high strain and failure characteristics of single fibers affect the overall strength of the network is not known. Using a combined fluorescence/atomic force microscope nanomanipulation system, we stretched 2-D fibrin networks to the point of failure, while recording the strain of individual fibers. Our results were compared to a pair of model networks: one composed of linearly responding elements and a second of nonlinear, strain-stiffening elements. We find that strain-stiffening of the individual fibers is necessary to explain the pattern of strain propagation throughout the network that we observe in our experiments. Fiber strain-stiffening acts to distribute strain more equitably within the network, reduce strain maxima, and increase network strength. Along with its physiological implications, a detailed understanding of this strengthening mechanism may lead to new design strategies for engineered polymeric materials. PMID:20409484

  9. Role of Prion Replication in the Strain-dependent Brain Regional Distribution of Prions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping Ping; Morales, Rodrigo; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; Khan, Uffaf; Soto, Claudio

    2016-06-10

    One intriguing feature of prion diseases is their strain variation. Prion strains are differentiated by the clinical consequences they generate in the host, their biochemical properties, and their potential to infect other animal species. The selective targeting of these agents to specific brain structures have been extensively used to characterize prion strains. However, the molecular basis dictating strain-specific neurotropism are still elusive. In this study, isolated brain structures from animals infected with four hamster prion strains (HY, DY, 139H, and SSLOW) were analyzed for their content of protease-resistant PrP(Sc) Our data show that these strains have different profiles of PrP deposition along the brain. These patterns of accumulation, which were independent of regional PrP(C) production, were not reproduced by in vitro replication when different brain regions were used as substrate for the misfolding-amplification reaction. On the contrary, our results show that in vitro replication efficiency depended exclusively on the amount of PrP(C) present in each part of the brain. Our results suggest that the variable regional distribution of PrP(Sc) in distinct strains is not determined by differences on prion formation, but on other factors or cellular pathways. Our findings may contribute to understand the molecular mechanisms of prion pathogenesis and strain diversity. PMID:27056328

  10. Imaging strain localization in porous limestone by X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Baud, P.; Hall, S.; Wong, T.-f.

    2012-04-01

    The brittle-ductile transition in porous sandstones has now been studied extensively. Microstructural studies combining various techniques on samples deformed in the laboratory documented the development of a wide variety on strain localization patterns and failure modes in overall agreement with the field observations in various sandstone formations. In contrast, there is a paucity of mechanical and microstructural laboratory data on the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonates, particularly for the high porosity end-members. The question of strain localization is in particular hard to tackle as conventional microstructural analyses cannot as in sandstone be guided by acoustic emission statistics. In this context, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) imaging provides a promising technique to accurately describe the various failure modes associated with the brittle-ductile transition in porous limestone. In this study, we focused on a grainstone from the Majella Mountain, central Italy. Detailed field observations performed in this formation by Tondi et al. (2006) have revealed some complex interplay between deformation/compaction bands and stylolites. Our samples of Majella grainstone had a nominal porosity of 31% and were primarily composed of calcite. A series of hydrostatic and conventional triaxial experiments were performed in dry conditions at room temperature, constant strain rate and at confining pressures ranging from 5 to 50 MPa. Several sets of CT images at a resolution of 25 microns were acquired before and after deformation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was performed on images of the intact and deformed samples. The full 3D strain tensor field was derived. Results for the two strain invariants corresponding to the volumetric and shear components were obtained for grid steps of 500 and 250 microns. Our new results showed that deformation was compactant in Majella grainstone over the wide range of pressures investigated. Strain localization was

  11. Investigation of thermomechanical couplings, strain localization and shape memory properties in a shape memory polymer subjected to loading at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczyska, E. A.; Staszczak, M.; Maj, M.; Kowalczyk-Gajewska, K.; Golasiński, K.; Cristea, M.; Tobushi, H.; Hayashi, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling results of the effects of thermomechanical couplings occurring in a polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) subjected to tension at various strain rates within large strains. The SMP mechanical curves, recorded using a testing machine, and the related temperature changes, measured in a contactless manner using an IR camera, were used to investigate the polymer deformation process at various loading stages. The effects of thermomechanical couplings allowed the determination of the material yield point in the initial loading stage, the investigation of nucleation and development of the strain localization at larger strains and the estimation of the effects of thermoelastic behavior during the unloading process. The obtained stress–strain and thermal characteristics, the results of the dynamic mechanical analysis and estimated values of the shape fixity and shape recovery parameters confirmed that the shape memory polymer (T g = 45 °C) is characterized by good mechanical and shape memory properties, as well as high sensitivity to the strain rate. The mechanical response of the SMP subjected to tension was simulated using the finite element method and applying the large strain, two-phase model. Strain localization observed in the experiment was well reproduced in simulations and the temperature spots were correlated with the accumulated viscoplastic deformation of the SMP glassy phase.

  12. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  13. Décollement controls on strain distribution in mountain belts: insights from numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grool, Arjan R.; Huismans, Ritske S.; Ford, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Pyrenees, the décollement is missing in the model's retro-wedge, the required convergence would be reduced to 180 km. Assuming deformation localizes along the path of least resistance, meaning a force balance exists between the pro- and retro-wedge, anything that changes the force required to deform one side of the orogen will have direct consequences for the other side as the strain distribution adjusts. In our models a viscous décollement enables the sedimentary cover of the pro-wedge to be transported into the pro-foredeep, increasing the force required for pro-wedge frontal accretion and thus promoting shortening in the retro-wedge. In models with no décollement in the retro-wedge, higher friction along existing crustal shear zones will accelerate formation of a new, more external shear zone. This mechanism alone cannot explain frontal accretion in the retro-wedge after only 145 km of convergence, meaning other factors such as more pre-existing extensional shear zones may also play a role in the Eastern Pyrenees.

  14. Local structure studies of materials using pair distribution function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joseph W.

    A collection of pair distribution function studies on various materials is presented in this dissertation. In each case, local structure information of interest pushes the current limits of what these studies can accomplish. The goal is to provide insight into the individual material behaviors as well as to investigate ways to expand the current limits of PDF analysis. Where possible, I provide a framework for how PDF analysis might be applied to a wider set of material phenomena. Throughout the dissertation, I discuss 0 the capabilities of the PDF method to provide information pertaining to a material's structure and properties, ii) current limitations in the conventional approach to PDF analysis, iii) possible solutions to overcome certain limitations in PDF analysis, and iv) suggestions for future work to expand and improve the capabilities PDF analysis.

  15. Localized bacterial infection in a distributed model for tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, D A; Kennedy, C R

    1983-01-01

    Phagocyte motility and chemotaxis are included in a distributed mathematical model for the inflammatory response to bacterial invasion of tissue. Both uniform and non-uniform steady state solutions may occur for the model equations governing bacteria and phagocyte densities in a macroscopic tissue region. The non-uniform states appear to be more dangerous because they allow large bacteria densities concentrated in local foci, and in some cases greater total bacteria and phagocyte populations. Using a linear stability analysis, it is shown that a phagocyte chemotactic response smaller than a critical value can lead to a non-uniform state, while a chemotactic response greater than this critical value stabilizes the uniform state. This result is the opposite of that found for the role of chemotaxis in aggregation of slimemold amoebae because, in the inflammatory response, the chemotactic population serves as an inhibitor rather than an activator. We speculate that these non-uniform steady states could be related to the localized cell aggregation seen in chronic granulomatous inflammation. The formation of non-uniform states is not necessarily a consequence of defective phagocyte chemotaxis, however. Rather, certain values of the kinetic parameters can yield values for the critical chemotactic response which are greater than the normal response. Numerical computations of the transient inflammatory response to bacterial challenge are presented, using parameter values estimated from the experimental literature wherever possible. PMID:6827185

  16. 3-D target-based distributed smart camera network localization.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, John; Bulusu, Nirupama; Feng, Wu-Chi

    2010-10-01

    For distributed smart camera networks to perform vision-based tasks such as subject recognition and tracking, every camera's position and orientation relative to a single 3-D coordinate frame must be accurately determined. In this paper, we present a new camera network localization solution that requires successively showing a 3-D feature point-rich target to all cameras, then using the known geometry of a 3-D target, cameras estimate and decompose projection matrices to compute their position and orientation relative to the coordinatization of the 3-D target's feature points. As each 3-D target position establishes a distinct coordinate frame, cameras that view more than one 3-D target position compute translations and rotations relating different positions' coordinate frames and share the transform data with neighbors to facilitate realignment of all cameras to a single coordinate frame. Compared to other localization solutions that use opportunistically found visual data, our solution is more suitable to battery-powered, processing-constrained camera networks because it requires communication only to determine simultaneous target viewings and for passing transform data. Additionally, our solution requires only pairwise view overlaps of sufficient size to see the 3-D target and detect its feature points, while also giving camera positions in meaningful units. We evaluate our algorithm in both real and simulated smart camera networks. In the real network, position error is less than 1 ('') when the 3-D target's feature points fill only 2.9% of the frame area. PMID:20679031

  17. Carbon nanotube sensor thread for distributed strain and damage monitoring on IM7/977-3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi; Hehr, Adam; Shanov, Vesselin; Alvarez, Noe; Kienzle, Nicholas; Cummins, Joshua; Koester, Dave; Schulz, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Laminated composite materials are used in applications where light weight is a key requirement. However, minor delamination damage in composites can propagate and lead to the failure of components. Failure occurs because delamination reduces the local bending stiffness and increases bending stress, which leads to the propagation of damage and eventual failure. These failures may be avoided if the damage could be detected early and repaired. Although many damage detection methods have been investigated, none are in widespread use today to prevent the failure of composites. This paper describes the use of carbon nanotube sensor thread to monitor strain and damage in composite materials. Sensor thread was bonded onto an IM7-laminated composite coupon to measure surface strain in a quasi-static uniaxial tensile test. The sensor thread was calibrated against a strain gage, which was also mounted to the coupon. The sensor thread measured the average strain over the length of the sample and indicated when the strain exceeded a nominal safe level. Sensor thread was also bonded to the surface of laminated composite panels in different patterns and detected, located and partially characterized the damage caused by multiple impacts to the panel. The new findings in this paper can be summarized as; (1) carbon nanotube sensor thread was tested as a distributed sensor for the first time on IM7/977-3 composites; (2) the sensor thread was found to monitor strain and detect damage in the composites with a potential sensitivity down to the micro-crack level; (3) the sensor thread was barely visible on the composite and did not add significant mass or affect the integrity of the composite; (4) the data acquisition system developed was simple and reliable.

  18. Distributed SLAM Using Improved Particle Filter for Mobile Robot Localization

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Fujun; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Simin

    2014-01-01

    The distributed SLAM system has a similar estimation performance and requires only one-fifth of the computation time compared with centralized particle filter. However, particle impoverishment is inevitably because of the random particles prediction and resampling applied in generic particle filter, especially in SLAM problem that involves a large number of dimensions. In this paper, particle filter use in distributed SLAM was improved in two aspects. First, we improved the important function of the local filters in particle filter. The adaptive values were used to replace a set of constants in the computational process of importance function, which improved the robustness of the particle filter. Second, an information fusion method was proposed by mixing the innovation method and the number of effective particles method, which combined the advantages of these two methods. And this paper extends the previously known convergence results for particle filter to prove that improved particle filter converges to the optimal filter in mean square as the number of particles goes to infinity. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm improved the virtue of the DPF-SLAM system in isolate faults and enabled the system to have a better tolerance and robustness. PMID:24883362

  19. Localization of methane distributions by spectrally tuned infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Werner; Hierl, Thomas; Scheuerpflug, H.; Schirl, U.; Schreer, Oliver; Schulz, Max J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a novel method, the Gas Imaging (GIm) method, developed for the localization of gas distributions in the atmosphere. The method is suitable for the detection of a gases which exhibit at least one absorption line in the IR spectral range. In this paper the GIm method is demonstrated for methane released into the atmosphere from leaks along natural gas pipelines. Methane distributions in the atmosphere around the leaky pipeline are detected and visualized by spectrally tuned IR imaging. In contrast to conventional techniques which utilize laser radiation sources or scanning, we irradiate the overall region under investigation by 1 kW halogen lamps. The scene background is subtracted by a real-time computer evaluation of the image. The methane gas emitted from the leak creates a flickering cloud in the image which is easily recognized. Methane concentrations as low as 0.03 percent by volume are visible. The method was successfully tested under realistic conditions on a buried pipeline by a natural gas provider.

  20. Distributed SLAM using improved particle filter for mobile robot localization.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fujun; Wu, Mei; Zhang, Simin

    2014-01-01

    The distributed SLAM system has a similar estimation performance and requires only one-fifth of the computation time compared with centralized particle filter. However, particle impoverishment is inevitably because of the random particles prediction and resampling applied in generic particle filter, especially in SLAM problem that involves a large number of dimensions. In this paper, particle filter use in distributed SLAM was improved in two aspects. First, we improved the important function of the local filters in particle filter. The adaptive values were used to replace a set of constants in the computational process of importance function, which improved the robustness of the particle filter. Second, an information fusion method was proposed by mixing the innovation method and the number of effective particles method, which combined the advantages of these two methods. And this paper extends the previously known convergence results for particle filter to prove that improved particle filter converges to the optimal filter in mean square as the number of particles goes to infinity. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm improved the virtue of the DPF-SLAM system in isolate faults and enabled the system to have a better tolerance and robustness. PMID:24883362

  1. Study of plastic strain localization mechanisms caused by nonequilibrium transitions in mesodefect ensembles under high-speed loading

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail Chudinov, Vasiliy; Bilalov, Dmitry; Oborin, Vladimir; Uvarov, Sergey; Plekhov, Oleg; Naimark, Oleg

    2015-10-27

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in-situ using a high-speed infrared camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time allowed one to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infrared camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profiler and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  2. Coupled deformation and metamorphism: Strain localization facilitated by solution mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, R. A.; Andronicos, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Vallecito Conglomerate of the Needle Mountains, Colorado, is a Paleoproterozoic conglomerate with interbedded layers of aluminous schist that experienced deformation and contact metamorphism associated with emplacement of a pluton with a U/Pb age of ~1.435 Ga. The well-defined contact aureole includes sillimanite close to the pluton, andalusite and sillimanite together in a diffuse zone ~2 km from the pluton, and andalusite alone at greater distance from the pluton. Samples bearing both andalusite and sillimanite show a high degree of strain partitioning along discrete shear zones. Samples of both high strain (N09-5A) and low strain (N09-5) regimes were collected. The high strain sample, N09-5A, is characterized by shear bands of sillimanite separated by lower strain regions of quartz and andalusite. Samples N09-5 and N09-5A contain identical mineral assemblages of muscovite, paragonite, chloritoid, quartz, andalusite, sillimanite, rutile and ilmenite and were collected from the same outcrop. Based on their mineral assemblages and proximity of the two samples, it was assumed that N09-5A and N09-5 initially had the same chemical composition. An isoconcentration diagram was created using whole rock chemical analyses. This diagram shows that N09-5A is enriched in Ti, Zr, Th and La - all high field strength elements (HFS) - when compared to N09-5. Under the assumption that HFS are immobile, we interpret this result as evidence for depletion of the major elements from N09-5A relative to N09-5. Electron microprobe X-ray element intensity maps support the interpretation of the isoconcentration diagram. X-ray maps of sample N09-5A cover high strain sillimanite shear bands and low strain regions of quartz and andalusite. Quantitative analysis of the abundance of elements in each region shows a significant depletion of K, Al, and Si in high strain regions relative to low strain regions. Textural observations made at the thin section scale suggest that strain localization

  3. Molecular polymorphism distribution in phenotypically distinct populations of wine yeast strains.

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, D; Colomer, B; Piña, B

    1996-01-01

    Electrophoretic karyotyping and mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis were used to analyze natural yeast populations from fermenting musts in El Penedès, Spain. Both analyses revealed a considerable degree of polymorphism, indicating heterogeneous natural populations. By specifically designed genetic selection protocols, strains showing potentially interesting phenotypes, such as high tolerance to ethanol and temperature or the ability to grow and to ferment in wine-water-sugar mixtures, were isolated from these natural populations. Genetic analysis showed a strong correlation between the selected phenotypes and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms. Karyotype analysis revealed several genetically similar yeast lineages in the natural yeast microflora, which we interpret as genetically isolated subpopulations of yeast strains with distinct genetic traits, which may correspond to specific microenvironments. Thus, molecular polymorphism analysis may be useful not only to study the geographical distribution of natural yeast strains but also to identify strains with specific phenotypic properties. PMID:8787392

  4. Distributed Temperature and Strain Discrimination with Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Rayleigh Backscatter in an Optical Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Da-Peng; Li, Wenhai; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-01

    A distributed optical fiber sensor with the capability of simultaneously measuring temperature and strain is proposed using a large effective area non-zero dispersion shifted fiber (LEAF) with sub-meter spatial resolution. The Brillouin frequency shift is measured using Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) with differential pulse-width pair technique, while the spectrum shift of the Rayleigh backscatter is measured using optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR). These shifts are the functions of both temperature and strain, and can be used as two independent parameters for the discrimination of temperature and strain. A 92 m measurable range with the spatial resolution of 50 cm is demonstrated experimentally, and accuracies of ±1.2 °C in temperature and ±15 με in strain could be achieved. PMID:23385406

  5. Feedback of fluids on ductile strain localization in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Károly; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa; Padrón Navarta, José Alberto; Mainprice, David; Vauchez, Alain; Marchesi, Claudio; Barou, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Here we report microstructural evidence for fluid-assisted ductile strain localization in mylonitic to ultramylonitic peridotite and pyroxenite shear zones that have been formed during exhumation of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (Ronda Peridotite massif, Betic Cordillera, S-Spain). Geothermobarometry and thermodynamic modeling indicate that strain localization took place at low pressure (<0.8 GPa) and moderate temperature (700-1000°C). Pyroxenite shear zones occur as thin (below 10 cm) and discontinuous bands, whereas the width of peridotite shear zones varies along their length from dozens of meters to a few cm. In either cases strain localization is associated with a marked decrease of grain size of both olivine and pyroxenes, but in the pyroxenite shear zones with increasing volume fractions of plagioclase and amphibole too, as a result of a spinel to plagioclase phase transformation reaction during decompression. This reaction fostered hydrogen extraction ('dehydroxylation') from clinopyroxene producing effective fluid saturation that catalyzed the synkinematic net-transfer reaction. As a result, fine-grained, wet olivine and plagioclase were produced, allowing the onset of grain-size sensitive creep and further strain localization in these pyroxenite bands, however it has led to a weak Crystal Preferred Orientation (CPO) and a nearly random fabric of the shear zone. Strain localization in peridotite shear zones is associated with redistribution of orthopyroxene in the finest grained microstructural domains (ultramylonites), where it forms trails of fine grains with interstitial shapes, perfectly intermixed with fine-grained olivine and, in many cases, still preserving a spatial relation to the coarse-grained porphyroclasts inherited from the protolith. In the mylonitic domains of the peridotite shear zones, olivine shows a CPO coherent with dominant (001)[100] glide, probably due to the presence of interstitial fluids during deformation. In the

  6. Critical length scales and strain localization govern the mechanical performance of multi-layer graphene assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenjie; Ruiz, Luis; Pugno, Nicola M.; Keten, Sinan

    2016-03-01

    Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale Lsc governs the strength of the assembly as predicted by the shear-lag model. The intermediate critical length Lpc is associated with a dynamic frictional process that governs the strain localization propensity of the assembly, and hence the failure strain. The largest critical length scale LTc corresponds to the overlap length necessary to achieve 90% of the maximum theoretical toughness of the material. Our analyses provide the general guidelines for tuning the constitutive properties and toughness of multilayer 2D nanomaterials using elasticity, interlayer adhesion energy and geometry as molecular design parameters.Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale

  7. Phase mixing induced by granular fluid pump during mantle strain localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, Jacques; Prigent, Cécile; Palasse, Laurie; Pochon, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Mantle viscous strain localization is often attributed to feedbacks between grain boundary sliding (GBS) and phase mixing, as GBS could promote mixing through grain switching, and phase mixing would enhance grain-size-sensitive granular flow through grain boundary pinning. However, although GBS and phase mixing are intimately related, recent data show that GBS alone cannot end-up with randomly mixed phases. Here we show natural observations of an ultramylonitic shear zone from the Ronda peridotite (Spain) where both GBS and phase mixing occur. Microprobe analyses and coupled EDX/EBSD data first document enrichment in pyroxenes and amphibole concomitant with both phase mixing and complete randomization of the olivine fabric in fine-grained layers (5-20 microns) where strain has been localized. Both the fabric randomization and some microstructural observations indicate that these layers mostly deformed by granular flow, i.e., by GBS. Based on petrological pseudo-sections, we also show that phase enrichment does not result from metamorphic reaction, but instead from dissolution-precipitation phenomena. Finally, we document in adjacent areas a change of olivine fabric geometry that highlights syn-tectonic water draining towards fine-grained layers. While olivine fabric switches from E-type (moderately hydrated fabric) to C-type (highly hydrated fabric) towards fine-grained layers, it changes from E-type to D-type (highly hydrated fabric) in coarse-grained bands between E/C-type layers. Altogether, our findings suggest that water converges as a result of GBS-induced creep cavitation and subsequent granular fluid pump in fine-grained layers. We propose that phase mixing originates here from such a creep cavitation through dissolution-precipitation of secondary phases in newly formed cavities, giving rise to a key process for the relationships between GBS and phase mixing, and hence, for the origin of viscous strain localization in the upper mantle.

  8. Generating the Local Oscillator "Locally" in Continuous-Variable Quantum Key Distribution Based on Coherent Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Lougovski, Pavel; Pooser, Raphael; Grice, Warren; Bobrek, Miljko

    2015-10-01

    Continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocols based on coherent detection have been studied extensively in both theory and experiment. In all the existing implementations of CV-QKD, both the quantum signal and the local oscillator (LO) are generated from the same laser and propagate through the insecure quantum channel. This arrangement may open security loopholes and limit the potential applications of CV-QKD. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a pilot-aided feedforward data recovery scheme that enables reliable coherent detection using a "locally" generated LO. Using two independent commercial laser sources and a spool of 25-km optical fiber, we construct a coherent communication system. The variance of the phase noise introduced by the proposed scheme is measured to be 0.04 (rad2 ), which is small enough to enable secure key distribution. This technology also opens the door for other quantum communication protocols, such as the recently proposed measurement-device-independent CV-QKD, where independent light sources are employed by different users.

  9. Rock mechanics observations pertinent to the rheology of the continental lithosphere and the localization of strain along shear zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    the general phenomenon of ductile faulting in which ductile strains are localized into shear zones. Ductile faults have been produced in experiments of five different rock types and is generally expressed as strain softening in constant-strain-rate tests or as an accelerating-creep-rate stage at constant differential stress. A number of physical mechanisms have been identified that may be responsible for ductile faulting, including the onset of dynamic recrystallization, phase changes, hydrothermal alteration and hydrolytic weakening. Microscopic evidence for these processes as well as larger-scale geological and geophysical observations suggest that ductile faulting in the middle to lower crust and upper mantle may greatly influence the distribution and magnitudes of differential stresses and the style of deformation in the overlying upper continental lithosphere. ?? 1985.

  10. Effect of hydrogen on plastic strain localization and fracture of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjozhkin, M. V.; Lunev, A. G.; Li, Yu V.; Barannikova, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested specimens of low-carbon steels have been studied using a double exposure speckle photography technique. It is found that the mechanical properties of low-carbon steels are affected adversely by hydrogen embrittlement. The deformation diagrams were examined for the deformed samples of low-carbon steels. These are found to show all the plastic flow stages: the linear, parabolic and pre-failure stages would occur for the respective values of the exponent n from the Ludwik-Holomon equation.

  11. Dynamic monitoring of compliant bodies impacting the water surface through local strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panciroli, Riccardo; Biscarini, Chiara; Jannelli, Elio; Ubertini, Filippo; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The understanding and the experimental characterization of the evolution of impulsive loading is crucial in several fields in structural, mechanical and ocean engineering, naval architecture and aerospace. In this regards, we developed an experimental methodology to reconstruct the deformed shape of compliant bodies subjected to impulsive loadings, as those encountered in water entry events, starting from a finite number of local strain measurements performed through Fiber Bragg Gratings. The paper discusses the potential applications of the proposed methodology for: i) real-time damage detection and structural health monitoring, ii) fatigue assessment and iii) impulsive load estimation.

  12. Hybrid Tip-Enhanced Nanospectroscopy and Nanoimaging of Monolayer WSe2 with Local Strain Control.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Khatib, Omar; Kravtsov, Vasily; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-04-13

    Many classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as potential platforms for novel electronic and optical devices. However, their physical properties are strongly influenced by nanoscale heterogeneities in the form of edges, twin boundaries, and nucleation sites. Using combined tip-enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) nanospectroscopy and nanoimaging, we study the associated effects on the excitonic properties in monolayer WSe2 grown by physical vapor deposition. With ∼15 nm spatial resolution, we resolve nanoscale correlations of PL spectral intensity and shifts with crystal edges and internal twin boundaries associated with the expected exciton diffusion length. Through an active atomic force tip interaction we can control the crystal strain on the nanoscale and tune the local bandgap in reversible (up to 24 meV shift) and irreversible (up to 48 meV shift) fashion. This allows us to distinguish the effect of strain from the dominant influence of defects on the PL modification at the different structural heterogeneities. Hybrid nano-optical spectroscopy and imaging with nanomechanical strain control thus enables the systematic study of the coupling of structural and mechanical degrees of freedom to the nanoscale electronic and optical properties in layered 2D materials. PMID:26937992

  13. Critical length scales and strain localization govern the mechanical performance of multi-layer graphene assemblies.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenjie; Ruiz, Luis; Pugno, Nicola M; Keten, Sinan

    2016-03-17

    Multi-layer graphene assemblies (MLGs) or fibers with a staggered architecture exhibit high toughness and failure strain that surpass those of the constituent single sheets. However, how the architectural parameters such as the sheet overlap length affect these mechanical properties remains unknown due in part to the limitations of mechanical continuum models. By exploring the mechanics of MLG assemblies under tensile deformation using our established coarse-grained molecular modeling framework, we have identified three different critical interlayer overlap lengths controlling the strength, plastic stress, and toughness of MLGs, respectively. The shortest critical length scale L governs the strength of the assembly as predicted by the shear-lag model. The intermediate critical length L is associated with a dynamic frictional process that governs the strain localization propensity of the assembly, and hence the failure strain. The largest critical length scale L corresponds to the overlap length necessary to achieve 90% of the maximum theoretical toughness of the material. Our analyses provide the general guidelines for tuning the constitutive properties and toughness of multilayer 2D nanomaterials using elasticity, interlayer adhesion energy and geometry as molecular design parameters. PMID:26935048

  14. Determination of Three-Dimensional Ventricular Strain Distributions in Gene-Targeted Mice Using Tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Joyce S.; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice; Ross, Robert S.; Frank, Lawrence R.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Omens, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    A model-based method for calculating three-dimensional (3D) cardiac wall strain distributions in the mouse has been developed and tested in a genetically engineered mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Data from MR tagging and harmonic phase (HARP) tracking were used to measure material point displacements, and 3D Lagrangian strains were calculated throughout the entire left ventricle (LV) with a deformable parametric model. A mouse model where cardiomyocytes are specifically made deficient in vinculin (VclKO) were compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. 3D strain analysis revealed differences in LV wall mechanics between WT and VclKO mice at 8 weeks of age when systolic function had just begun to decline. Most notably, end-systolic radial strain and torsional shear were reduced in VclKO hearts which contributed to regional mechanical dysfunction. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using MRI tagging methods to detect alterations in 3D myocardial strain distributions in genetically engineered mouse models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20981782

  15. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T.; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity. PMID:26197323

  16. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongbo; Thostenson, Erik T; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM). This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT) onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity. PMID:26197323

  17. Stress distributions and material properties determined in articular cartilage from MRI-based finite strains.

    PubMed

    Butz, Kent D; Chan, Deva D; Nauman, Eric A; Neu, Corey P

    2011-10-13

    The noninvasive measurement of finite strains in biomaterials and tissues by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables mathematical estimates of stress distributions and material properties. Such methods allow for non-contact and patient-specific modeling in a manner not possible with traditional mechanical testing or finite element techniques. Here, we employed three constitutive (i.e. linear Hookean, and nonlinear Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin) relations with known loading conditions and MRI-based finite strains to estimate stress patterns and material properties in the articular cartilage of tibiofemoral joints. Displacement-encoded MRI was used to determine two-dimensional finite strains in juvenile porcine joints, and an iterative technique estimated stress distributions and material properties with defined constitutive relations. Stress distributions were consistent across all relations, although the stress magnitudes varied. Material properties for femoral and tibial cartilage were found to be consistent with those reported in literature. Further, the stress estimates from Hookean and Neo-Hookean, but not Mooney-Rivlin, relations agreed with finite element-based simulations. A nonlinear Neo-Hookean relation provided the most appropriate model for the characterization of complex and spatially dependent stresses using two-dimensional MRI-based finite strain. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a new and computationally efficient technique incorporating MRI-based deformation with mathematical modeling to non-invasively evaluate the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and materials. PMID:21920526

  18. Distribution of molecules locally delivered from bone cement.

    PubMed

    Giers, Morgan B; McLaren, Alex C; Schmidt, Kenneth J; Caplan, Michael R; McLemore, Ryan

    2014-05-01

    Revision of infected orthopedic implants is successful in most cases when antimicrobials are delivered locally (mixed with bone cement or bone graft which is placed in the site from which the infected tissue was removed); however, there is still a substantial rate of recurrence most likely due to the antimicrobials not achieving a therapeutic dose at all locations in the tissue. To study transport within this environment, gadolinium chelated in diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), a MRI contrast agent with size and solubility similar to two common antimicrobials (gentamicin and vancomycin), was mixed with bone cement, implanted in vivo into two models of orthopedic surgical wounds, and imaged using MRI 5.5 h after implantation. Image thresholding was used to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations of areas/volumes containing detectable concentrations of Gd-DTPA. Distribution is found to be anisotropic with Gd-DTPA transporting preferentially anterior of the implant toward the skin. When fascia is not closed over the implant site, Gd-DTPA transports to the skin and along the subcutaneous plane. The distance transported indicates that transport is likely driven by convection. Finally, the tissue concentration of Gd-DTPA is much less than the concentration loaded into the bone cement. PMID:24155244

  19. Constraining particle dark matter using local galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Ishiwata, Koji

    2016-06-01

    It has been long discussed that cosmic rays may contain signals of dark matter. In the last couple of years an anomaly of cosmic-ray positrons has drawn a lot of attentions, and recently an excess in cosmic-ray anti-proton has been reported by AMS-02 collaboration. Both excesses may indicate towards decaying or annihilating dark matter with a mass of around 1–10 TeV . In this article we study the gamma rays from dark matter and constraints from cross correlations with distribution of galaxies, particularly in a local volume. We find that gamma rays due to inverse-Compton process have large intensity, and hence they give stringent constraints on dark matter scenarios in the TeV scale mass regime. Taking the recent developments in modeling astrophysical gamma-ray sources as well as comprehensive possibilities of the final state products of dark matter decay or annihilation into account, we show that the parameter regions of decaying dark matter that are suggested to explain the excesses are excluded. We also discuss the constrains on annihilating scenarios.

  20. Flutter of wings involving a locally distributed flexible control surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari-Jovin, S.; Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Roshanian, J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper undertakes to facilitate appraisal of aeroelastic interaction of a locally distributed, flap-type control surface with aircraft wings operating in a subsonic potential flow field. The extended Hamilton's principle serves as a framework to ascertain the Euler-Lagrange equations for coupled bending-torsional-flap vibration. An analytical solution to this boundary-value problem is then accomplished by assumed modes and the extended Galerkin's method. The developed aeroelastic model considers both the inherent flexibility of the control surface displaced on the wing and the inertial coupling between these two flexible bodies. The structural deformations also obey the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, along with the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic constitutive law. Meanwhile, the unsteady thin-airfoil and strip theories are the tools of producing the three-dimensional airloads. The origin of aerodynamic instability undergoes analysis in light of the oscillatory loads as well as the loads owing to arbitrary motions. After successful verification of the model, a systematic flutter survey was conducted on the theoretical effects of various control surface parameters. The results obtained demonstrate that the flapping modes and parameters of the control surface can significantly impact the flutter characteristics of the wings, which leads to a series of pertinent conclusions.

  1. Unsteady behavior of locally strained diffusion flames affected by curvature and preferential diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Takagi, Toshimi

    1999-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies are made of transient H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}--air counterflow diffusion flames unsteadily strained by an impinging micro jet. Two-dimensional temperature measurements by laser Rayleigh scattering method and numerical computations taking into account detailed chemical kinetics are conducted paying attention to transient local extinction and reignition in relation to the unsteadiness, flame curvature and preferential diffusion effects. The results are as follows. (1) Transient local flame extinction is observed where the micro jet impinges. But, the transient flame can survive instantaneously in spite of quite high stretch rate where the steady flame cannot exist. (2) Reignition is observed after the local extinction due to the micro air jet impingement. The temperature after reignition becomes significantly higher than that of the original flame. This high temperature is induced by the concentration of H{sub 2} species due to the preferential diffusion in relation to the concave curvature. The predicted behaviors of the local transient extinction and reignition are well confirmed by the experiments. (3) The reignition is induced after the formation of combustible premixed gas mixture and the consequent flame propagation. (4) The reignition is hardly observed after the extinction by micro fuel jet impingement. This is due to the dilution of H{sub 2} species induced by the preferential diffusion in relation to the convex curvature. (5) The maximum flame temperature cannot be rationalized by the stretch rate but changes widely depending on the unsteadiness and the flame curvature in relation with preferential diffusion.

  2. Strain distribution across the Greater Himalayan Sequence, Annapurna-Dhaulagiri, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Searle, M. P.; Law, R. D.; Ferre, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Himalaya provides a unique natural laboratory to observe orogenic processes at a variety of temporal and spatial scales. The potential for these observations to serve as kinematic and geodynamic analogues for past orogens relies on a robust understanding of the evolution of the Himalayan mountain belt. Field structural data, supported by thermobaromety, geochronology and thermodynamic modelling, generally support a channel flow model in which a partially molten middle crust layer, the Greater Himalaya Sequence (GHS), was extruded to the south during Miocene time bounded by high-strain ductile shears above and below. This model suggests that the GHS, the metamorphic core of the orogen, represents an exhumed, rheologically weak, mid-crustal channel. Lateral flow of the channel was driven southwards by the lithostatic pressure gradient between the 5 km high Tibetan plateau and the < 1 km elevation and average crustal thickness of the Indian plate. The vertical distribution of strain across the GHS is one element of the channel flow hypothesis that is yet to be fully investigated. This project considers this issue by examining specifically, the vertical distribution and evolution of strain across the GHS and bounding units. A variety of techniques, that include SEM electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) will be used to analyse samples collected during recent field work in the Annapurna-Dhaulagiri Himal, central Nepal. These samples were collected from two transects along the Modi Khola valley and the Kali Gandaki valley. EBSD will be used to measure the lattice preferred orientation of individual mineral phases of these samples, providing a proxy for strain and valuable information on deformation mechanisms. Given specific magnetic carriers, AMS will be used to provide a proxy for finite strain in samples that are too heterogeneous for EBSD. Combined EBSD and AMS data will be augmented by additional strain and

  3. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging local modulation of strain field in a hetero interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Oshima, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-13

    We present an innovative method for characterizing the strain field in three dimensions in a hetero interface. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy (LDP-STEM) was employed for imaging the inhomogeneous strain field in a germanium (Ge) layer deposited on a silicon (Si) substrate. In the LDP-STEM image, Ge-atomic columns that are relaxed or strained to the Si substrate in the Si/Ge hetero interface were observed to be distinguishable, allowing for the qualitative characterization of the coherency of the crystal growth. Our results revealed that the strain field is locally modulated along the in-plane direction in the Si/Ge hetero interface.

  4. Thermal strain along optical fiber in lightweight composite FOG : Brillouin-based distributed measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Sanada, Teruhisa; Takeda, Nobuo; Mitani, Shinji; Mizutani, Tadahito; Sasaki, Yoshinobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke

    2014-05-01

    Thermal strain significantly affects stability of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) performance. This study investigates thermal strain development in a lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) FOG under thermal vacuum condition simulating space environment. First, we measure thermal strain distribution along an optical fiber in a CFRP FOG using a Brillouin-based high-spatial resolution system. The key strain profile is clarified and the strain development is simulated using finite element analysis. Finally, several constituent materials for FOG are quantitatively compared from the aspect of the maximum thermal strain and the density, confirming the clear advantage of CFRP.

  5. A modified Weibull model for tensile strength distribution of carbon nanotube fibers with strain rate and size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Pang, John H. L.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhang, Yani; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zheng, Lianxi

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental studies on the effects of strain rate and size on the distribution of tensile strength of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are reported in this paper. Experimental data show that the mechanical strength of CNT fibers increases from 0.2 to 0.8 GPa as the strain rate increases from 0.00001 to 0.1 (1/s). In addition, the influence of fiber diameter at low and high strain rate conditions was investigated further with statistical analysis. A modified Weibull distribution model for characterizing the tensile strength distribution of CNT fibers taking into account the effect of strain rate and fiber diameter is proposed.

  6. Distributed and Localized Deformation Along the Lebanese Restraining Bend from Geomorphic Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, L.; Castelltort, S.; Klinger, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Fault System changes its orientation across Lebanon and forms a restraining bend. The oblique deformation along the Lebanese restraining bend is characterized by a complex suite of tectonic structures, among which, the Yammouneh Fault (YF), is believed to be the main strand that relays deformation from the southern section to the northern section of the Dead Sea Fault System. However, uncertainties regarding slip rates and strain partitioning in Lebanon still prevail. Here, we use morphometric analysis together with analytical and numerical models to constrain rates and modes of distributed and localized deformation along the Lebanese restraining bend.The rivers that drain the western flank of Mount Lebanon show a consistent counterclockwise rotation with respect to an expected orogen perpendicular orientation. Moreover, a pattern of divide disequilibrium in between these rivers emerges from an application of the χ mapping technique, which aims at estimating the degree of geometrical and topological disequilibrium in river networks. These geometrical patterns are compatible with simulation results using a landscape evolution model, which imposes a distributed velocity field along a domain that represents the western flank of Mount Lebanon. We further develop an analytical model that relates the river orientation to a set of kinematic parameters that represents a combined pure and simple shear strain field, and we find the parameters that best explain the present orientation of the western Lebanon rivers. Our results indicate that distributed deformation to the west of the YF takes as much as 30% of the relative Arabia-Sinai plate velocity since the late Miocene, and that the average slip rate along the YF during the same time interval has been 3.8-4.4 mm/yr. The theoretical model can further explain the inferred rotation from Paleomagnetic measurements.

  7. Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Piccart, Kristine; Verbeke, Joren; De Visscher, Anneleen; Piepers, Sofie; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Vliegher, Sarne

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a common cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle. The CNS inhabit various ecological habitats, ranging between the environment and the host. In order to obtain a better insight into the host response, an experimental infection was carried out in eight healthy heifers in mid-lactation with three different CNS strains: a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from sawdust bedding, an intramammary Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a persistent intramammary infection (S. chromogenes IM) and a S. chromogenes strain isolated from a heifer's teat apex (S. chromogenes TA). Each heifer was inoculated in the mammary gland with 1.0 × 10(6) colony forming units of each bacterial strain (one strain per udder quarter), whereas the remaining quarter was infused with phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, the CNS evoked a mild local host response. The somatic cell count increased in all S. fleurettii-inoculated quarters, although the strain was eliminated within 12 h. The two S. chromogenes strains were shed in larger numbers for a longer period. Bacterial and somatic cell counts, as well as neutrophil responses, were higher after inoculation with S. chromogenes IM than with S. chromogenes TA. In conclusion, these results suggest that S. chromogenes might be better adapted to the mammary gland than S. fleurettii. Furthermore, not all S. chromogenes strains induce the same local host response. PMID:27176792

  8. Residual thermal and moisture influences on the strain energy release rate analysis of local delaminations from matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis utilizing laminated plate theory is developed to calculate the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at off-axis, single ply, matrix cracks in laminates subjected to uniaxial loads. The analysis includes the contribution of residual thermal and moisture stresses to the strain energy released. Examples are calculated for the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at 90 degrees and angle-ply (non-90 degrees) matrix ply cracks in glass epoxy and graphite epoxy laminates. The solution developed may be used to assess the relative contribution of mechanical, residual thermal, and moisture stresses on the strain energy release rate for local delamination for a variety of layups and materials.

  9. Experimental study of steel welded joints localization with using fiber Bragg grating strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasim, Damian

    2015-12-01

    Optical sensing systems has a not weakening research and development in recent years. Because of its unique properties of being unsusceptible to electromagnetic interference, having wide range of operational temperature and having extreme small physical dimensions, optical fiber sensors has increasing acceptance. Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) is the most frequently used type of optical sensor types because of its huge multiplexing potential and potentiality of being embedded into composite material (e.g. in structural health monitoring) or attached into measured structure. Embedding or attaching FBG into an inhomogeneous environment, spectral characteristic of the sensing grating do not retain full symmetry, which is due to related differences in the distribution of the axial stress of the grating. When periodicity of the grating is constant, the peak of FBG reflection spectrum should be narrow and sharp. An inhomogeneous axial strain distribution will cause a distorsion in measured transmission or reflection spectrum. This paper shows an distorsions in FBG reflection spectrum measured from sensor attached on surface with welded joint. The sensor strain-to-wavelength shift processing characteristics obtained for homogeneous and welded steel samples were compared.

  10. Usage of Leptospira spp. local strains as antigens increases the sensitivity of the serodiagnosis of bovine leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Priscila S; Loureiro, Ana P; Penna, Bruno; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2015-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease that occurs worldwide, particularly in tropical countries. In livestock the agent is responsible for reproductive problems such as infertility and abortion. Serogroup Sejroe, particularly serovar Hardjo, prevails in cattle in several regions. The microscopic agglutination test (MAT) is the current method for diagnosing leptospirosis. It has been proposed that the inclusion of local strains could detect a larger set of seroreactive animals. In that context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if the usage of local strains as antigens increases the sensitivity of the serodiagnosis of bovine leptospirosis. Blood and urine samples were collected from 314 bovines from several herds randomly selected in a slaughterhouse in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Serological diagnosis was made with MAT using a 21 reference-strains panel (MAT21). Additionally, 12 local strains (MAT33) were included as antigens. PCR was performed with the urine samples and it was positive on 71 out of 222 samples (31.9%). MAT21 identified as seroreactive 173 (55.1%) out of the 314 animals studied, with Sejroe the most common (38.1%). In MAT33, 204 (65.0%) animals were seroreactive with a significant increase on seroreactivity (9.9%). In conclusion, MAT presented with a significant increase of sensitivity when local strains were used as antigens. Among the local strains, 2013_U152 (KP263062) (serogroup Shermani) and 2013_U280 (KP263069) (serogroup Grippotyphosa) showed to be more antigenic. PMID:25997883

  11. Parameters driving strain localization in the lithosphere are highly scale-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Modelling lithospheric deformation requires specifying mechanisms that promote strain localization. This can be done in different ways, such as the inclusion of weaker zones in the model setup (to initiate subduction or slab tearing, for instance) or using various sorts of weakening processes depending upon temperature, grain-size, fluid content or metamorphic reactions, among others. In most cases, this choice is ad hoc because the relevant parameters are largely unknown, especially at the scale of geodynamic models. Two lines of research have been developed, a traditional one which seeks to determine the rheological parameters of natural or synthetic rocks experimentally, and a more recent one, promoted by the development of fast computing, which aims at reproducing a natural tectonic or rheological evolution through time, not only geometries. The latter requires that the parameters allowing this reproduction are significant at the scale of the model, and which may be different from those obtained in the experimental lab, thus questioning the extrapolation through a wide range of scales of experimental parameters. This apparent discrepancy is due to the intrinsic complexity of the lithosphere, and even more so for the continental lithosphere with its highly heterogeneous crust and its long tectonic history, which implies the co-existence of many different parameters active in nature. In this presentation, we review the main localizing factors and look to the range of scales in which they are significant. Small-scale processes such as grain-size reduction, coexistence of several mineralogical phases with different strength and rheological behaviour, fluid-rock interactions and/or metamorphic reactions, often cannot initiate strain localization in nature but are all efficient to locally reduce the strength of rock material once localization has started. Some exceptions to this rule, however, exist, such as the mixing of ductile and brittle behaviour in the same

  12. Optical-fibre backscatter polarimetry for the distributed measurement of full strain fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. J.; Shatalin, S. V.; Kannellopoulos, S. E.

    2005-11-01

    Fully-distributed optical-fibre sensing (FDOFS) systems are developing rapidly and are offering significant advantages for measurement functions in a variety of structural applications, especially in the oil industry, the power supply industry, the aerospace industries and civil engineering construction. Polarization techniques are well established in FDOFS, and in the analysis of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) for optical-fibre telecommunications. However, a major problem has been that of determining, from one end of the fibre, the distribution of the full polarization properties of a monomode optical fibre, along its length, with some specific spatial resolution. This paper will present a new technique for providing this full information, and thus for measuring the distribution of any parameter, external to the fibre, which can modify its polarization behaviour. As a result, for example, it becomes possible to measure simultaneously the distribution of a strain field comprising the longitudinal and the two transverse components of direct strain, plus the transverse shear strain. The technique comprises an extension of polarization-optical time domain reflectometry (POTDR) [16], and necessitates on-line processing. Details of the physical principles, the algorithms and the polarimetry will be presented, together with some early results illustrating the measurement accuracies which can be achieved.

  13. Influence of Grain Size Distribution on the Mechanical Behavior of Light Alloys in Wide Range of Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Skripnyak, Natalia V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.

    2015-06-01

    Inelastic deformation and damage at the mesoscale level of ultrafine grained (UFG) Al 1560 aluminum and Ma2-1 magnesium alloys with distribution of grain size were investigated in wide loading conditions by experimental and computer simulation methods. The computational multiscale models of representative volume element (RVE) with the unimodal and bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure researches aluminum and magnesium UFG alloys. The critical fracture stress of UFG alloys on mesoscale level depends on relative volumes of coarse grains. Microcracks nucleation at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. Microcracks arise in the vicinity of coarse and ultrafine grains boundaries. It is revealed that the occurrence of bimodal grain size distributions causes the increasing of UFG alloys ductility, but decreasing of the tensile strength. The increasing of fine precipitations concentration not only causes the hardening but increasing of ductility of UFG alloys with bimodal grain size distribution. This research carried out in 2014-2015 was supported by grant from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program''.

  14. A distributed optical fibre dynamic strain sensor based on phase-OTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, A.; Belal, M.; Newson, T. P.

    2013-08-01

    A distributed optical fibre sensor is introduced which is capable of quantifying multiple dynamic strain perturbations along 1 km of a sensing fibre simultaneously using a standard telecommunication single-mode optical fibre. The technique is based on measuring the phase between the Rayleigh scattered light from two sections of the fibre which define the gauge length. The phase is spatially determined along the entire length of the fibre with a single pulse. This allows multiple moving strain perturbation to be tracked and quantified along the entire length of the fibre. The demonstrated setup has a spatial resolution of 2 m with a frequency range of 500-5000 Hz. The minimum detectable strain perturbation of the sensor was measured to be 80 nɛ.

  15. Cranial sutures work collectively to distribute strain throughout the reptile skull.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, M E H; Evans, S E; O'Higgins, P; Fagan, M J

    2013-09-01

    The skull is composed of many bones that come together at sutures. These sutures are important sites of growth, and as growth ceases some become fused while others remain patent. Their mechanical behaviour and how they interact with changing form and loadings to ensure balanced craniofacial development is still poorly understood. Early suture fusion often leads to disfiguring syndromes, thus is it imperative that we understand the function of sutures more clearly. By applying advanced engineering modelling techniques, we reveal for the first time that patent sutures generate a more widely distributed, high level of strain throughout the reptile skull. Without patent sutures, large regions of the skull are only subjected to infrequent low-level strains that could weaken the bone and result in abnormal development. Sutures are therefore not only sites of bone growth, but could also be essential for the modulation of strains necessary for normal growth and development in reptiles. PMID:23804444

  16. Cranial sutures work collectively to distribute strain throughout the reptile skull

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, M. E. H.; Evans, S. E.; O'Higgins, P.; Fagan, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The skull is composed of many bones that come together at sutures. These sutures are important sites of growth, and as growth ceases some become fused while others remain patent. Their mechanical behaviour and how they interact with changing form and loadings to ensure balanced craniofacial development is still poorly understood. Early suture fusion often leads to disfiguring syndromes, thus is it imperative that we understand the function of sutures more clearly. By applying advanced engineering modelling techniques, we reveal for the first time that patent sutures generate a more widely distributed, high level of strain throughout the reptile skull. Without patent sutures, large regions of the skull are only subjected to infrequent low-level strains that could weaken the bone and result in abnormal development. Sutures are therefore not only sites of bone growth, but could also be essential for the modulation of strains necessary for normal growth and development in reptiles. PMID:23804444

  17. Physics of friction and strain rate localization in synthetic fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Richardson, Eliza; Marone, Chris

    2000-11-01

    Data on synthetic fault gouge previously collected by Richardson and Marone [1999] were compared with the predictions of a unified theory for rate- and state-dependent friction compiled by Sleep [1997]. The theory treats the gouge as a continuum one-dimensional fluid sheared between parallel plates. It is predicted that the strain rate localized into a shear band of width called Wss during steady state sliding from the nominal width of the gouge zone Wnom. The critical displacement during velocity stepping tests is predicted to be Wss ɛint, where ɛint is the critical strain, an intrinsic material property. It is predicted that the strain rate for renewed sliding after holds delocalizes to a width Wnew which is greater than Wss and for long holds approaches the full gouge zone width Wnom. The displacement for recovery of the shear traction to its steady state value is predicted to be Wnewɛint, which for long holds is much greater than the critical displacement obtained by velocity stepping. Only the macroscopic effects of this process could be studied using the laboratory data in hand. Compaction during the hold and the difference between peak shear traction upon restart and the steady state shear traction during sliding (healing) were measured. To simulate more complex normal traction variations on real faults, the normal traction was varied sinusoidally about its previous value during some holds. The theory reasonably predicts the observed relationship between healing and compaction and healing versus hold time. It predicts the slip needed for recovery of shear traction following holds but poorly predicts the shear traction versus time during recovery. We attribute this failure to the fact that the laboratory gouge is a heterogeneous three-dimensional substance. Qualitatively, the delocalized width Wnew varies with position within the gouge plane, and slip is required for localized shear to organize in three dimensions. As strain rate was not observed as a

  18. Strain localization in the middle- to upper continental crust: examples from the Patos and Pernambuco shear zones (Borborema Province, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, G.; Archanjo, C. J.; Hollanda, M. H.; Vauchez, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The accommodation of deformation in the Earth's lithosphere typically results in a heterogeneous distribution of strain in the continental crust, which is a function of effective pressure, temperature and strain rate at different structural levels. In Northeast Brazil, the Borborema Province is characterized by an interconnected, crustal-scale shear zone system associated with a widespread granitic plutonism. Two of the most prominent structures of this system, the Patos and Pernambuco shear zones, are characterized by ~ 600 km long E-W striking mylonite belts in which strain localization processes are observed either in association with partial melting in the Patos strike-slip fault, or as zones of overprinting brittle-ductile deformation in the Pernambuco shear zone. Deformation mechanisms are distinct across the Patos shear zone, mainly marked by crystalline plasticity and diffusion creep in the high-temperature northern border, magmatic flow in the central region and dislocation creep coupled with microfracturing in the southern sector. The Espinho Branco migmatite (~ 565 Ma) acts as a weak rheological layer that accumulates strain in the northern portion of the fault. Alternatively, the absence of partial melting and the dominant cataclastic/plastic flow regime lead to grain-size sensitive strain localization at the southern border. The Pernambuco shear zone was nucleated at the vicinities of two granitoid batholiths at c.a. 588 Ma. Low-temperature mylonites adjacent to the batholiths show several microstructures indicating coeval activity of brittle-ductile deformation. Recent zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) data on these mylonites yielded mean ages of ~ 539 Ma, suggesting successive events of thermal input and shearing within the structure. These features suggest that strain localization processes exert an important control on the rheology of the continental lithosphere; the accommodation of deformation in the middle crust is mainly attained by the presence of weak

  19. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  20. Wide Distribution of Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Wild Strains of the Cultivated Basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, G.; Blesa, S.; Labarere, J.

    1995-01-01

    We used restriction fragment length polymorphisms to examine mitochondrial genome rearrangements in 36 wild strains of the cultivated basidiomycete Agrocybe aegerita, collected from widely distributed locations in Europe. We identified two polymorphic regions within the mitochondrial DNA which varied independently: one carrying the Cox II coding sequence and the other carrying the Cox I, ATP6, and ATP8 coding sequences. Two types of mutations were responsible for the restriction fragment length polymorphisms that we observed and, accordingly, were involved in the A. aegerita mitochondrial genome evolution: (i) point mutations, which resulted in strain-specific mitochondrial markers, and (ii) length mutations due to genome rearrangements, such as deletions, insertions, or duplications. Within each polymorphic region, the length differences defined only two mitochondrial types, suggesting that these length mutations were not randomly generated but resulted from a precise rearrangement mechanism. For each of the two polymorphic regions, the two molecular types were distributed among the 36 strains without obvious correlation with their geographic origin. On the basis of these two polymorphisms, it is possible to define four mitochondrial haplotypes. The four mitochondrial haplotypes could be the result of intermolecular recombination between allelic forms present in the population long enough to reach linkage equilibrium. All of the 36 dikaryotic strains contained only a single mitochondrial type, confirming the previously described mitochondrial sorting out after cytoplasmic mixing in basidiomycetes. PMID:16534984

  1. Distributed Brillouin fiber optic strain monitoring applications in advanced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianini, Filippo; Cargnelutti, Mario; Di Tommaso, Angelo; Toffanin, Massimo

    2003-08-01

    Composite materials based on glass, carbon and aramid fibers have many advantages such as fast application, lightweight and corrosion resistance, and are widely diffused for manufacturing of tanks, pipings and for restoration, upgrade and seismic retrofit of structures and historical heritage. As several questions regarding long term durability of composite strengthenings remains still unsolved, monitoring of strain and temperature is strongly recommended, respectively to assess proper load transfer and no glass phase transition of the polymeric matrix. In this research work strain and temperature distributed sensing trough Brillouin scattering in single-mode optical fibers was used in different tests in order to understand the influence of different fiber coatings and embedding techniques. Pressure tests were performed on a GFRP piping with inhomogeneous strengthening layout and Brillouin strain data were compared with conventional strain gages. A smart CFRP material has been also developed and evaluated in a seismic retrofit application on an historical building dated 1500 that was seriously damaged in the earthquake of 1997. The developed embedding technique has been demonstrated successful to obtain fiber-optic smart composites with low optical losses, and the data comparison between Brillouin and resistive strain gauges confirms Brillouin technique is very effective for composite monitoring.

  2. Hybrid Raman/fiber Bragg grating sensor for distributed temperature and discrete dynamic strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Taki, Mohammad; Signorini, Alessandro; Zaidi, Farhan; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Faralli, Stefano; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2012-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a hybrid fiber optic sensing technique that effectively combines Raman optical time domain reflectometry and in-line time-division-multiplexing for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) dynamic interrogation. The highly integrated proposed scheme employs broadband apodized low reflectivity FBGs with a single narrowband optical source and a shared receiver block, allowing for simultaneous measurements of distributed static temperature and discrete dynamic strain, over the same sensing fiber. PMID:23114320

  3. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  4. Autofrettage: Stress distribution under load and retained stresses after depressurization. A modified plane-strain case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avitzur, Boaz

    1993-04-01

    There is a long-standing interest in developing a capability to predict the distribution of retained stresses in thick-walled pressure vessels after the removal of an internal pressure--post autofrettage. The key to such a prediction is in the capacity to compute the stress distribution in a vessel while under externally imposed stress sufficient enough to cause at least partial plastic deformation. A good approximation of the stress distribution was developed by Mises in his 1913 plane-stress solution. The fact that such vessels are not representative of the plane-stress condition not withstanding, Mises recognized that his solution was mathematically restricted to a limited range of vessels' wall ratios. More recently, Avitzur offered a solution similar to that of Mises, but for a plane-strain condition. Depending on the material's Poisson's factor, Avitzur's solution is also mathematically applicable for a limited range of vessels' wall ratios only. The wall ratio, beyond which Avitzur's solution in plane-strain is not applicable, is a few times larger than that which limits Mises' solution in plane-stress. This work introduces a modification to Avitzur's solution in plane-strain, which makes its applicability unlimited.

  5. Melt Impregnation, Strain Localization, and Deformation Mechanisms in a Fossil Oceanic Fracture Zone (Ingalls Ophiolite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. B.; Gordon, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    A steep mantle shear zone that deforms ultramafic rocks of the Jurassic Ingalls ophiolite is inferred to preserve a record of the interplay of melt impregnation, strain localization, and switching deformation mechanisms in a fossil oceanic fracture zone. This ~2-km-wide, E-W-striking shear zone separates harzburgite and dunite on the south from lherzolite and cpx-rich harzburgite on the north. Geochemical data from the lherzolite, which contains veinlets of plagioclase and cpx, suggest impregnation by infiltrating basaltic melt. The shear zone reworks the lherzolite unit, but also contains widespread plagioclase peridotite and hornblende peridotite, and shear-zone mylonites are less depleted than the adjacent units. Olivine is reduced in average grain size from 1.5-3.0 mm in the lherzolites to 50 µm in some mylonites. In the mylonites, opx and cpx porphyroclasts are set in a mosaic of olivine, cpx, opx +/- hornblende +/- plagioclase. Lattice preferred orientations (LPO) determined by EBSD indicate that olivine in the dunite-harzburgite and lherzolite units deformed by glide on [100] (010), a common mechanism for dislocation creep in the upper mantle. In contrast, olivine in the mylonites has much weaker, poorly defined LPOs. This weakening of the LPO and the microstructures are compatible with dynamic recrystallization and grain-size reduction resulting from dislocation creep leading to a change to a grain-size-sensitive deformation mechanism. We suggest that impregnation by infiltrating melts may have helped localize strain, and the formation of multiple phases, in part as a result of impregnation, may have stabilized the small olivine grain size.

  6. Application of wMelPop Wolbachia Strain to Crash Local Populations of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Scott A.; Townsend, Michael; Paton, Chris J.; Callahan, Ashley G.; Hoffmann, Ary A.

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis (wMel strain) has been successfully established in several populations of Aedes aegypti, the primary dengue vector. The virulent Wolbachia strain wMelPop is known to cause several pathological impacts (increased egg mortality, life shortening, etc.) reducing overall fitness in the mosquito Ae. aegypti. Increased egg mortality could substantially reduce egg banks in areas with a lengthy monsoonal dry season, and be employed to eliminate local populations. We tested this application under semi-field cage conditions. First, we determined that wMelPop infection significantly reduced the survival of desiccation-resistant eggs of the dengue vector Ae. aegypti, with shade and temperature having a significant impact; nearly all wMelPop-infected eggs failed to hatch after 6 and 10 weeks in summer and winter conditions, respectively. In laboratory selection experiments we found that egg desiccation resistance can be increased by selection, and that this effect of wMelPop infection is due to the nuclear background of the host rather than Wolbachia. We then conducted an invasion of wMelPop within a semi-field cage using sustained weekly releases of wMelPop infected mosquitoes, with fixation achieved after 9 weeks. The egg populations wMelPop infected and an uninfected control were then subjected to a simulated prolonged monsoonal dry season (2.5 months) before flooding to induce hatching. The wMelPop infected eggs suffered significantly greater mortality than the controls, with only 0.67% and 4.35% of respective infected and uninfected eggs held in 99% shade hatching after 80 days. These studies suggest that wMelPop could be used to locally eliminate populations of Ae. aegypti that are exposed to prolonged dry conditions, particularly if combined with vector control. PMID:26204449

  7. Effects of local circulations on rainfall distributions during TAMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hsi-Chyi

    1999-11-01

    The orographic effects on the mesoscale flow and rainfall distributions over Taiwan are analyzed based on TAMEX (Taiwan Area Mesoscale Experiment) data and numerical experiments using MM5 (Pennsylvania State University (PSU)/NCAR mesoscale model version 5). The rainfall maxima during TAMEX occurred on the windward slopes of the mountains under the prevailing southwesterly monsoon flow. About fifty percent of the rainfalls there was observed during non-frontal periods as orographic rain showers. In the northwestern coastal region of Taiwan, the total rains were more pronounced than other windward coastal regions. More than eighty percent of the rains occurred during the passage of frontal systems. From a case study during TAMEX IOP 3, moderate rainfalls (~40 mm/6hr) were observed along the northwestern coast of Taiwan associated with the arrival of three successive rainbands, during 1000-1600 LST. This event occurred within the prevailing southwesterly monsoon flow regime ahead of the 850-hPa trough. These rainbands formed within the Taiwan Strait. The intensification of the rainband occurred off the northwestern coast of Taiwan where the deflected southerly flow converged with the prevailing southwesterlies modified by the storm- induced westerlies. From the numerical experiments, when uniform southwesterlies are specified to impinge on the island topography in the absence of synoptic-scale forcing, the MM5 simulates the orographically induced low-level strong winds. However, the offshore convergence zone and the significant rainfall along the northwestern coast are not simulated. For the experiment with synoptic-scale forcing but without the island topography over Taiwan, a large- scale cloud band is simulated within the Taiwan Strait without the localized rainfall maximum along the northwestern coast. The coastal rainfall maximum is simulated, only when the influences of the synoptic-scale forcing and the orographic effects are included. These results indicate

  8. Direct synchrotron x-ray measurements of local strain fields in elastically and plastically bent metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Ren, Yang; Ma, Dong; Gao, Yanfei F.; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-09-03

    In situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was conducted on elastically and plastically bent bulk metallic glass (BMG) thin plates, from which distinct local elastic strain fields were mapped spatially. These directly measured residual strain fields can be nicely interpreted by our stress analysis, and also validate a previously proposed indirect residual-stress-measurement method by relating nanoindentation hardness to residual stresses. Local shear strain variations on the cross sections of these thin plates were found in the plastically bent BMG, which however cannot be determined from the indirect indentation method. As a result, this study has important implications in designing and manipulating internal strain fields in BMGs for the purpose of ductility enhancement.

  9. Direct synchrotron x-ray measurements of local strain fields in elastically and plastically bent metallic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Yuan; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Ren, Yang; Ma, Dong; Gao, Yanfei F.; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-09-03

    In situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was conducted on elastically and plastically bent bulk metallic glass (BMG) thin plates, from which distinct local elastic strain fields were mapped spatially. These directly measured residual strain fields can be nicely interpreted by our stress analysis, and also validate a previously proposed indirect residual-stress-measurement method by relating nanoindentation hardness to residual stresses. Local shear strain variations on the cross sections of these thin plates were found in the plastically bent BMG, which however cannot be determined from the indirect indentation method. As a result, this study has important implications in designing and manipulatingmore » internal strain fields in BMGs for the purpose of ductility enhancement.« less

  10. Allometric ecological distributions in a local community of Hymenoptera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Werner

    2004-05-01

    The present paper describes basic ecological distributions in a community of beech forest Hymenoptera. It shows that the species diversity-body weight and the density-body weight distributions give rise to a new distribution that relates total community biomass to species diversity. For Hymenoptera this distribution follows a power function with a slope of 1.3. Combining this relation with the species-area and the individuals-area relations resulted in two other distributions that relate community biomass to area and individual numbers. It appeared that population densities decrease when computed over larger areas. The biomass-species diversity relation offers a new and simple way to estimate total community biomass from samples. The possible implications of this distribution to the productivity-diversity debate are discussed.

  11. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus clinical strains from Maryland (2012–2013) and comparisons to a locally and globally diverse V. parahaemolyticus strains by whole-genome sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haendiges, Julie; Timme, Ruth; Allard, Marc W.; Myers, Robert A.; Brown, Eric W.; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in the US associated with the consumption of raw shellfish. Previous population studies of V. parahaemolyticus have used Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) or Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) provides a much higher level of resolution, but has been used to characterize only a few United States (US) clinical isolates. Here we report the WGS characterization of 34 genomes of V. parahaemolyticus strains that were isolated from clinical cases in the state of Maryland (MD) during 2 years (2012–2013). These 2 years saw an increase of V. parahaemolyticus cases compared to previous years. Among these MD isolates, 28% were negative for tdh and trh, 8% were tdh positive only, 11% were trh positive only, and 53% contained both genes. We compared this set of V. parahaemolyticus genomes to those of a collection of 17 archival strains from the US (10 previously sequenced strains and 7 from NCBI, collected between 1988 and 2004) and 15 international strains, isolated from geographically-diverse environmental and clinical sources (collected between 1980 and 2010). A WGS phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed the regional outbreak strains from MD are highly diverse and yet genetically distinct from the international strains. Some MD strains caused outbreaks 2 years in a row, indicating a local source of contamination (e.g., ST631). Advances in WGS will enable this type of analysis to become routine, providing an excellent tool for improved surveillance. Databases built with phylogenetic data will help pinpoint sources of contamination in future outbreaks and contribute to faster outbreak control. PMID:25745421

  12. Influence of water on rheology and strain localization in the lower continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getsinger, A. J.; Hirth, G.; Stünitz, H.; Goergen, E. T.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated deformation processes within a lower crustal shear zone exposed in gabbros from Arnøya, Norway. Over a distance of ˜1 m, the gabbro progresses from nominally undeformed to highly sheared where it is adjacent to a hydrous pegmatite. With increasing proximity to the pegmatite, there is a significant increase in the abundance of amphibole and zoisite (which form at the expense of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase) and a slight increase in the strength of plagioclase lattice-preferred orientation, but there is little change in recrystallized plagioclase grain size. Phase diagrams, the presence of hydrous reaction products, and deformation mechanism maps all indicate that the water activity (aH2O) during deformation must have been high (˜1) in the sheared gabbro compared with the nonhydrated, surrounding host gabbro. These observations indicate that fluid intrusion into mafic lower crust initiates syn-deformational, water-consuming reactions, creating a rheological contrast between wet and dry lithologies that promote strain localization. Thus, deformation of lower continental crust can be accommodated in highly localized zones of enhanced fluid infiltration. These results provide an example of how fluid weakens lower continental crust lithologies at high pressures and temperatures.

  13. Self-induced uniaxial strain in MoS2 monolayers with local van der Waals-stacked interlayer interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenan; Hu, Shuhong; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Tianning; Zhou, Xiaohao; Sun, Yan; Li, Tian-Xin; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2015-03-24

    Strain engineering is an effective method to tune the properties of electrons and phonons in semiconductor materials, including two-dimensional (2D) layered materials (e.g., MoS2 or graphene). External artificial stress (ExAS) or heterostructure stacking is generally required to induce strains for modulating semiconductor bandgaps and optoelectronic functions. For layered materials, the van der Waals-stacked interlayer interaction (vdW-SI) has been considered to dominate the interlayer stacking and intralayer bonding. Here, we demonstrate self-induced uniaxial strain in the MoS2 monolayer without the assistance of ExAS or heterostructure stacking processes. The uniaxial strain occurring in local monolayer regions is manifested by the Raman split of the in-plane vibration modes E2g(1) and is essentially caused by local vdW-SI within the single layer MoS2 due to a unique symmetric bilayer stacking. The local stacked configuration and the self-induced uniaxial strain may provide improved understanding of the fundamental interlayer interactions and alternative routes for strain engineering of layered structures. PMID:25716291

  14. Measurement of distributed strain and temperature based on higher order and higher mode Bragg conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirkis, James S. (Inventor); Sivanesan, Ponniah (Inventor); Venkat, Venki S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bragg grating sensor for measuring distributed strain and temperature at the same time comprises an optical fiber having a single mode operating wavelength region and below a cutoff wavelength of the fiber having a multimode operating wavelength region. A saturated, higher order Bragg grating having first and second order Bragg conditions is fabricated in the optical fiber. The first order of Bragg resonance wavelength of the Bragg grating is within the single mode operating wavelength region of the optical fiber and the second order of Bragg resonance wavelength is below the cutoff wavelength of the fiber within the multimode operating wavelength region. The reflectivities of the saturated Bragg grating at the first and second order Bragg conditions are less than two orders of magnitude of one another. In use, the first and second order Bragg conditions are simultaneously created in the sensor at the respective wavelengths and a signal from the sensor is demodulated with respect to each of the wavelengths corresponding to the first and second order Bragg conditions. Two Bragg conditions have different responsivities to strain and temperature, thus allowing two equations for axial strain and temperature to be found in terms of the measure shifts in the primary and second order Bragg wavelengths. This system of equations can be solved for strain and temperature.

  15. Distribution of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains Virulent to Xa21 in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Choi, S H; Han, S S; Lee, D G; Lee, B Y

    1999-10-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae that are virulent to rice lines carrying the Xa21 resistance gene were widely distributed in Korea. A total of 105 strains collected during 1987 to 1996 in Korea was characterized by pathogenicity tests and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the XorII methyltransferase (xorIIM) and avrXa10 genes. Although the lesion lengths on rice line IRBB21, which carries Xa21, decreased as plant age increased, resistance and susceptibility of the plants to 31 strains were clearly differentiated at the seedling (14, 21, and 28 days old), maximum tillering, and flag leaf stages. The resistance or susceptibility of seedlings was correlated with bacterial populations within an inoculated leaf. There was a significant change in the population structure of X. oryzae pv. oryzae with regard to virulence to Xa21 over the last 10 years; this change in population was confirmed by genome analysis. Lineage I, which is avirulent to Xa21 and does not have a genomic xorIIM homolog, was the predominant lineage found between 1987 and 1989, while lineage II, which is virulent to Xa21 and contains the xorIIM homolog, was predominant in strains collected between 1994 and 1995. Our results demonstrate that introduction of Xa21 into commercial rice should be based on the regional structure of X. oryzae pv. oryzae populations and suggest that Xa21 will not be useful in Korea. PMID:18944737

  16. Strain localization in a fossilized subduction channel: Insights from the Cycladic Blueschist Unit (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Valentin; Jolivet, Laurent; Roche, Vincent; Augier, Romain; Scaillet, Stéphane; Cardello, Giovanni Luca

    2016-03-01

    Syros Island is worldwide known for its preservation of HP-LT parageneses in the Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) providing one of the best case-studies to understand the tectonometamorphic evolution of a subduction channel. Conflicting structural interpretations have been proposed to explain the geological architecture of Syros, in part reflecting a lack of consensus about the tectonic structure of the CBU. In this study, the geological and tectonometamorphic maps of Syros have been entirely redrawn in order to decipher the structure of a fossilized subduction channel. Based on structural and petrological observations, the CBU has been subdivided into three subunits separated by major ductile shear zones. New observations of the Vari Unit confirm that it rests on top of the CBU through a detachment or exhumation fault. While retrograde top-to-the E/NE shearing overprinting prograde deformation is widespread across the island, the prograde deformation has been only locally preserved within the less retrograded units. We show that after the prograde top-to-the S/SW shearing deformation, the CBU was exhumed by an overall top-to-the E/NE shearing from the depth of the eclogite-facies all the way to the depth of the greenschist-facies and finally, to the brittle crust. The exhumation process encompassed the syn-orogenic stage (contemporaneous of subduction, within the subduction channel - Eocene) to the post-orogenic stage (contemporaneous with the formation of the Aegean Sea - Oligocene to Miocene). From syn-orogenic to post-orogenic exhumation, deformation progressively localized toward the base of the CBU, along large-scale ductile shear zones, allowing the preservation of earlier HP-LT structures and HP-LT metamorphic parageneses. Finally, this study brings new insights on the tectonometamorphic evolution of a subduction channel showing how strain localizes during the history of an accretionary complex, both during the prograde and retrograde history.

  17. Impact of weightlessness on cardiac shape and left ventricular stress/strain distributions.

    PubMed

    Iskovitz, Ilana; Kassemi, Mohammad; Thomas, James D

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a finite element model of the heart is developed to investigate the impact of different gravitational loadings of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity on the cardiac shape and strain/stress distributions in the left ventricle. The finite element model is based on realistic 3D heart geometry, detailed fiber/sheet micro-architecture, and a validated orthotropic cardiac tissue model and constitutive relationship that capture the passive behavior of the heart at end-diastole. The model predicts the trend and magnitude of cardiac shape change at different gravitational levels with great fidelity in comparison to recent cardiac sphericity measurements performed during simulated reduced-gravity parabolic flight experiments. Moreover, the numerical predictions indicate that although the left ventricular strain distributions remain relatively unaltered across the gravitational fields and the strain extrema values occur at the same relative locations, their values change noticeably with decreasing gravity. As for the stress, however, both the magnitude and location of the extrema change with a decrease in the gravitational field. Consequently, tension regions of the heart on Earth can change into compression regions in space. PMID:24048335

  18. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  19. Modeling for IFOG Vibration Error Based on the Strain Distribution of Quadrupolar Fiber Coil.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxing; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yunhao

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environment, especially in vibrational environment, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents a mathematical model for IFOG to theoretically compute the short-term rate errors caused by mechanical vibration. The computational procedures are mainly based on the strain distribution of quadrupolar fiber coil measured by stress analyzer. The definition of asymmetry of strain distribution (ASD) is given in the paper to evaluate the winding quality of the coil. The established model reveals that the high ASD and the variable fiber elastic modulus in large strain situation are two dominant reasons that give rise to nonreciprocity phase shift in IFOG under vibration. Furthermore, theoretical analysis and computational results indicate that vibration errors of both open-loop and closed-loop IFOG increase with the raise of vibrational amplitude, vibrational frequency and ASD. Finally, an estimation of vibration-induced IFOG errors in aircraft is done according to the proposed model. Our work is meaningful in designing IFOG coils to achieve a better anti-vibration performance. PMID:27455257

  20. Differential Distribution and Expression of Panton-Valentine Leucocidin among Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Saïd-Salim, Battouli; Mathema, Barun; Braughton, Kevin; Davis, Stacy; Sinsimer, Daniel; Eisner, William; Likhoshvay, Yekaterina; DeLeo, Frank R.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2005-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging threat worldwide. CA-MRSA strains differ from hospital-acquired MRSA strains in their antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic backgrounds. Using several genotyping methods, we clearly define CA-MRSA at the genetic level and demonstrate that the prototypic CA-MRSA strain, MW2, has spread as a homogeneous clonal strain family that is distinct from other CA-MRSA strains. The Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-encoding genes, lukF and lukS, are prevalent among CA-MRSA strains and have previously been associated with CA-MRSA infections. To better elucidate the role of PVL in the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we first analyzed the distribution and expression of PVL among different CA-MRSA strains. Our data demonstrate that PVL genes are differentially distributed among CA-MRSA strains and, when they are present, are always transcribed, albeit with strain-to-strain variability of transcript levels. To directly test whether PVL is critical for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we evaluated the lysis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during phagocytic interaction with PVL-positive and PVL-negative CA-MRSA strains. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between PVL expression and PMN lysis, suggesting that additional virulence factors underlie leukotoxicity and, thus, the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA. PMID:16000462

  1. Long-gauge FBGs interrogated by DTR3 for dynamic distributed strain measurement of helicopter blade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, M.; Igawa, H.; Kasai, T.; Watanabe, N.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe characteristics of distributed strain sensing based on a Delayed Transmission/Reflection Ratiometric Reflectometry (DTR3) scheme with a long-gauge Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG), which is attractive to dynamic structural deformation monitoring such as a helicopter blade and an airplane wing. The DTR3 interrogator using the longgauge FBG has capability of detecting distributed strain with 50 cm spatial resolution in 100 Hz sampling rate. We evaluated distributed strain sensing characteristics of the long-gauge FBG attached on a 5.5 m helicopter blade model in static tests and free vibration dynamic tests.

  2. Impact of axial compression and torque on strain localization and fracture under complex cyclic loading of Plexiglas rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, E. V.; Larichkin, A. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies of deformation and fracture of rods made of Plexiglas (PMMA) under complex loading (quasi-static and cyclic torsion under axial compression) are performed. The existence of a range of critical values of axial stress, within which the rod is fractured by the torque, is established. The localization of "frozen" highly elastic strains in constrained cyclic torsion is revealed, and the conditions of its occurrence are determined. The effect of axial stress on strain localization and fracture and the influence of cyclic torsion on the loss of stability of a rod under axial compression are shown.

  3. Chord distribution along a line in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaninetti, L.

    2013-04-01

    A method is developed to compute the chord length distribution along a line which intersects a cellular universe. The cellular universe is here modeled by the Poissonian Voronoi Tessellation (PVT) and by a non-Poissonian Voronoi Tessellation (NPVT). The distribution of the spheres is obtained from common approximations used in modeling the volumes of Voronoi Diagrams. We give analytical formulas for the distributions of the lengths of chords in both the PVT and NPVT. The astrophysical applications are made to the real ESO Slice Project and to an artificial slice of galaxies which simulates the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey.

  4. Pressure, stress, and strain distribution in the double-stage diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Prescher, Clemens; Konôpková, Zuzana; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Crispin, Katherine L.; Zhang, Chi; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-07-21

    Double stage diamond anvil cells (DACs) of two designs have been assembled and tested. We used a standard symmetric DAC with flat or beveled culets as a primary stage and CVD microanvils machined by a focused ion beam as a second. We evaluated pressure, stress, and strain distributions in gold and a mixture of gold and iron as well as in secondary anvils using synchrotron x-ray diffraction with a micro-focused beam. A maximum pressure of 240 GPa was reached independent of the first stage anvil culet size. We found that the stress field generated by the second stage anvils is typical of conventional DAC experiments. The maximum pressures reached are limited by strains developing in the secondary anvil and by cupping of the first stage diamond anvil in the presented experimental designs. Also, our experiments show that pressures of several megabars may be reached without sacrificing the first stage diamond anvils.

  5. An efficient Mindlin finite strip plate element based on assumed strain distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A simple two node, linear, finite strip plate bending element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory for the analysis of very thin to thick bridges, plates, and axisymmetric shells is presented. The new transverse shear strains are assumed for constant distribution in the two node linear strip. The important aspect is the choice of the points that relate the nodal displacements and rotations through the locking transverse shear strains. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and ease in computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for analyzing plates with different supports, loading conditions, and a wide range of thicknesses are given. The results show no sign of the shear locking phenomenon.

  6. Widespread geographic distribution of oral Candida dubliniensis strains in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, D; Haynes, K; Bille, J; Boerlin, P; Rodero, L; Lloyd, S; Henman, M; Coleman, D

    1997-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently identified chlamydospore-positive yeast species associated with oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) patients and is closely related to Candida albicans. Several recent reports have described atypical oral Candida isolates with phenotypic and genetic properties similar to those of C. dubliniensis. In this study 10 atypical chlamydospore-positive oral isolates from HIV+ patients in Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Argentina and 1 isolate from an HIV-negative Irish subject were compared to reference strains of C. albicans and Candida stellatoidea and reference strains of C. dubliniensis recovered from Irish and Australian HIV+ individuals. All 11 isolates were phenotypically and genetically similar to and phylogenetically identical to C. dubliniensis. These findings demonstrate that the geographical distribution of C. dubliniensis is widespread, and it is likely that it is a significant constituent of the normal oral flora with the potential to cause oral candidiasis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. PMID:9157162

  7. Quantum localization of chaotic eigenstates and the level spacing distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistić, Benjamin; Robnik, Marko

    2013-11-01

    The phenomenon of quantum localization in classically chaotic eigenstates is one of the main issues in quantum chaos (or wave chaos), and thus plays an important role in general quantum mechanics or even in general wave mechanics. In this work we propose two different localization measures characterizing the degree of quantum localization, and study their relation to another fundamental aspect of quantum chaos, namely the (energy) spectral statistics. Our approach and method is quite general, and we apply it to billiard systems. One of the signatures of the localization of chaotic eigenstates is a fractional power-law repulsion between the nearest energy levels in the sense that the probability density to find successive levels on a distance S goes like ∝Sβ for small S, where 0≤β≤1, and β=1 corresponds to completely extended states. We show that there is a clear functional relation between the exponent β and the two different localization measures. One is based on the information entropy and the other one on the correlation properties of the Husimi functions. We show that the two definitions are surprisingly linearly equivalent. The approach is applied in the case of a mixed-type billiard system [M. Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen.JPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/16/17/014 16, 3971 (1983)], in which the separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates is performed.

  8. Quantum localization of chaotic eigenstates and the level spacing distribution.

    PubMed

    Batistić, Benjamin; Robnik, Marko

    2013-11-01

    The phenomenon of quantum localization in classically chaotic eigenstates is one of the main issues in quantum chaos (or wave chaos), and thus plays an important role in general quantum mechanics or even in general wave mechanics. In this work we propose two different localization measures characterizing the degree of quantum localization, and study their relation to another fundamental aspect of quantum chaos, namely the (energy) spectral statistics. Our approach and method is quite general, and we apply it to billiard systems. One of the signatures of the localization of chaotic eigenstates is a fractional power-law repulsion between the nearest energy levels in the sense that the probability density to find successive levels on a distance S goes like [proportionality]S(β) for small S, where 0≤β≤1, and β=1 corresponds to completely extended states. We show that there is a clear functional relation between the exponent β and the two different localization measures. One is based on the information entropy and the other one on the correlation properties of the Husimi functions. We show that the two definitions are surprisingly linearly equivalent. The approach is applied in the case of a mixed-type billiard system [M. Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16, 3971 (1983)], in which the separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates is performed. PMID:24329337

  9. Structural health monitoring of IACC yachts using fiber optic distributed strain sensors: a technical challenge for America's Cup 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Kimpara, Isao; Akiyoshi, Shimada; Naruse, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    In this study, we developed a health monitoring system using a fiber optic distributed strain sensor for International America's Cup Class (IACC) yachts. Most structural components of an IACC yacht consist of an aluminum honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates. In such structures, delamination, skin/core debonding and debonding between adhered members will be result in serious fracture of the structure. We equipped two IACC yachts with fiber optic strain sensors designed to measured the distributed strain using a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR) and to detect any deterioration or damage to the yacht's structures caused by such failures. And based on laboratory test results, we proposed a structural health monitoring technique for IACC yachts that involves analyzing their strain distribution. Some important information about structural conditions of the IACC yachts could be obtained from this system through the periodical strain measurements in the field.

  10. CNS Cell Distribution and Axon Orientation Determine Local Spinal Cord Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Koser, David E.; Moeendarbary, Emad; Hanne, Janina; Kuerten, Stefanie; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical signaling plays an important role in cell physiology and pathology. Many cell types, including neurons and glial cells, respond to the mechanical properties of their environment. Yet, for spinal cord tissue, data on tissue stiffness are sparse. To investigate the regional and direction-dependent mechanical properties of spinal cord tissue at a spatial resolution relevant to individual cells, we conducted atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation and tensile measurements on acutely isolated mouse spinal cord tissue sectioned along the three major anatomical planes, and correlated local mechanical properties with the underlying cellular structures. Stiffness maps revealed that gray matter is significantly stiffer than white matter irrespective of directionality (transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes) and force direction (compression or tension) (Kg= ∼130 Pa vs. Kw= ∼70 Pa); both matters stiffened with increasing strain. When all data were pooled for each plane, gray matter behaved like an isotropic material under compression; however, subregions of the gray matter were rather heterogeneous and anisotropic. For example, in sagittal sections the dorsal horn was significantly stiffer than the ventral horn. In contrast, white matter behaved transversely isotropic, with the elastic stiffness along the craniocaudal (i.e., longitudinal) axis being lower than perpendicular to it. The stiffness distributions we found under compression strongly correlated with the orientation of axons, the areas of cell nuclei, and cellular in plane proximity. Based on these morphological parameters, we developed a phenomenological model to estimate local mechanical properties of central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Our study may thus ultimately help predicting local tissue stiffness, and hence cell behavior in response to mechanical signaling under physiological and pathological conditions, purely based on histological data. PMID:25954872

  11. CNS cell distribution and axon orientation determine local spinal cord mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Koser, David E; Moeendarbary, Emad; Hanne, Janina; Kuerten, Stefanie; Franze, Kristian

    2015-05-01

    Mechanical signaling plays an important role in cell physiology and pathology. Many cell types, including neurons and glial cells, respond to the mechanical properties of their environment. Yet, for spinal cord tissue, data on tissue stiffness are sparse. To investigate the regional and direction-dependent mechanical properties of spinal cord tissue at a spatial resolution relevant to individual cells, we conducted atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation and tensile measurements on acutely isolated mouse spinal cord tissue sectioned along the three major anatomical planes, and correlated local mechanical properties with the underlying cellular structures. Stiffness maps revealed that gray matter is significantly stiffer than white matter irrespective of directionality (transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes) and force direction (compression or tension) (K(g) = ∼ 130 P(a) vs. K(w) = ∼ 70 Pa); both matters stiffened with increasing strain. When all data were pooled for each plane, gray matter behaved like an isotropic material under compression; however, subregions of the gray matter were rather heterogeneous and anisotropic. For example, in sagittal sections the dorsal horn was significantly stiffer than the ventral horn. In contrast, white matter behaved transversely isotropic, with the elastic stiffness along the craniocaudal (i.e., longitudinal) axis being lower than perpendicular to it. The stiffness distributions we found under compression strongly correlated with the orientation of axons, the areas of cell nuclei, and cellular in plane proximity. Based on these morphological parameters, we developed a phenomenological model to estimate local mechanical properties of central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Our study may thus ultimately help predicting local tissue stiffness, and hence cell behavior in response to mechanical signaling under physiological and pathological conditions, purely based on histological data. PMID:25954872

  12. Molecular markers for tracking the origin and worldwide distribution of invasive strains of Puccinia striiformis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Stephanie; Ali, Sajid; Kemen, Eric; Nazari, Kumarse; Bahri, Bochra A; Enjalbert, Jérôme; Hansen, Jens G; Brown, James K M; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Jones, Jonathan; de Vallavieille-Pope, Claude; Hovmøller, Mogens S; Justesen, Annemarie F

    2016-05-01

    Investigating the origin and dispersal pathways is instrumental to mitigate threats and economic and environmental consequences of invasive crop pathogens. In the case of Puccinia striiformis causing yellow rust on wheat, a number of economically important invasions have been reported, e.g., the spreading of two aggressive and high temperature adapted strains to three continents since 2000. The combination of sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which were developed from two specific AFLP fragments, differentiated the two invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2 from all other P. striiformis strains investigated at a worldwide level. The application of the SCAR markers on 566 isolates showed that PstS1 was present in East Africa in the early 1980s and then detected in the Americas in 2000 and in Australia in 2002. PstS2 which evolved from PstS1 became widespread in the Middle East and Central Asia. In 2000, PstS2 was detected in Europe, where it never became prevalent. Additional SSR genotyping and virulence phenotyping revealed 10 and six variants, respectively, within PstS1 and PstS2, demonstrating the evolutionary potential of the pathogen. Overall, the results suggested East Africa as the most plausible origin of the two invasive strains. The SCAR markers developed in the present study provide a rapid, inexpensive, and efficient tool to track the distribution of P. striiformis invasive strains, PstS1 and PstS2. PMID:27066253

  13. Draft Genome of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome of two Sphingopyxis spp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (in...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome of two Sphingopyxis spp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (in...

  15. Fully Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Sensor Based on the Kerr Nonlinear Optical Effect, the Photoelastic Effect, and Counterpropagating Optical Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapteyn, Kelvin Lloyd

    1995-01-01

    Since the first fiber optic strain gage was described in 1978, a lot of research effort has been applied to the development of various fiber optic strain measurement schemes. Most of the approaches that have been studied so far measure the total strain from one end of the fiber to the other. Other approaches make "quasi-distributed" measurements based on measuring the change in length of several segments of the fiber. The eventual goal of these quasi-distributed systems is to reduce the segment length or the gage length until a continuous strain distribution could be measured. In this dissertation, a fully distributed fiber optic strain and temperature sensor is developed. This sensor is based on a strong Kerr effect in combination with a greatly increased photoelastic response and short, counterpropagating optical pulses. In combination with much shorter optical pulses, this approach promises great improvements in strain sensitivity and resolution. In addition, this system is capable of separating out strain components in both transverse directions of a polarization maintaining fiber as well as the axial strain component and the temperature at every point along the fiber. The measurement of three dimensional strain data and temperature in a fully distributed sensor is a very significant improvement over any previous system. The sensor should provide a very powerful tool for crack and flaw detection as well as other applications that need a strain distribution. Primary applications are expected to be nondestructive testing and health monitoring of composite structures by embedding the fiber sensor into the composite during manufacture. Such a sensor would be protected from environmental damage and would provide data on the internal integrity of the structure.

  16. 18 CFR 284.268 - Local distribution company emergency transportation rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local distribution company emergency transportation rates. 284.268 Section 284.268 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... Exchange Transactions § 284.268 Local distribution company emergency transportation rates. (a) Rate on...

  17. Spatial distributions of local illumination color in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Sérgio M C; Amano, Kinjiro; Foster, David H

    2016-03-01

    In natural complex environments, the elevation of the sun and the presence of occluding objects and mutual reflections cause variations in the spectral composition of the local illumination across time and location. Unlike the changes in time and their consequences for color appearance and constancy, the spatial variations of local illumination color in natural scenes have received relatively little attention. The aim of the present work was to characterize these spatial variations by spectral imaging. Hyperspectral radiance images were obtained from 30 rural and urban scenes in which neutral probe spheres were embedded. The spectra of the local illumination at 17 sample points on each sphere in each scene were extracted and a total of 1904 chromaticity coordinates and correlated color temperatures (CCTs) derived. Maximum differences in chromaticities over spheres and over scenes were similar. When data were pooled over scenes, CCTs ranged from 3000 K to 20,000 K, a variation of the same order of magnitude as that occurring over the day. Any mechanisms that underlie stable surface color perception in natural scenes need to accommodate these large spatial variations in local illumination color. PMID:26291072

  18. Supervisor Localization: A Top-Down Approach to Distributed Control of Discrete-Event Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, K.; Wonham, W. M.

    2009-03-01

    A purely distributed control paradigm is proposed for discrete-event systems (DES). In contrast to control by one or more external supervisors, distributed control aims to design built-in strategies for individual agents. First a distributed optimal nonblocking control problem is formulated. To solve it, a top-down localization procedure is developed which systematically decomposes an external supervisor into local controllers while preserving optimality and nonblockingness. An efficient localization algorithm is provided to carry out the computation, and an automated guided vehicles (AGV) example presented for illustration. Finally, the 'easiest' and 'hardest' boundary cases of localization are discussed.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Progressive Failure and Strain Localization of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminates by ABAQUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. F.; Yang, Y. H.; Gu, Z. P.; Zheng, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction mechanism between the intralaminar damage and interlaminar delamination of composite laminates is always a challenging issue. It is important to consider the progressive failure and strain softening behaviors simultaneously during the damage modeling and numerical simulation of composites using FEA. This paper performs three-dimensional finite element analysis of the progressive failure and strain localization of composites using FEA. An intralaminar progressive failure model based on the strain components is proposed and the nonlinear cohesive model is used to predict the delamination growth. In particular, the nonlocal integral theory which introduces a length scale into the governing equations is used to regularize the strain localization problems of composite structures. Special finite element codes are developed using ABAQUS to predict the intralaminar and interlaminar damage evolution of composites simultaneously. The carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with a central hole demonstrates the developed theoretical models and numerical algorithm by discussing the effects of the mesh sizes and layups patterns. It is shown the strain localization problem can be well solved in the progressive failure analysis of composites when the energy dissipation due to the damage of the fiber, matrix and interface occurs at a relatively wide area.

  20. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual strain/stress distribution in the vicinity of high strength welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mráz, L.; Karlsson, L.; Hamák, I.; Vrána, M.; Mikula, P.

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses resulting from non homogeneous heat distribution during welding process belong to most significant factor influencing behavior of welded structures. These stresses are responsible for defect occurrence during welding and they are also responsible for crack initiation and propagation at the either static or dynamic load. The significant effect of weld metal chemical composition as well as the effect of fatigue load and local plastic deformation on residual stress distribution and fatigue life have been recognized for high strength steels welds. The changes in residual stress distribution have then positive effect on cold cracking behavior and also on fatigue properties of the welds [1-3]. Several experimental methods, both destructive and non-destructive, such as hole drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and others, have been used to examine residual stress distribution in all three significant orientations in the vicinity of the welds. The present contribution summarizes the results of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in the vicinity of single-pass high-strength-steel welds having different chemical composition as well as the influence of fatigue load and local plastic deformation. It has been observed that the chemical composition of the weld metal has a significant influence on the stress distribution around the weld. Similarly, by aplying both cyclic load or pre-stress load on the specimens, stress relaxation was observed even in the region of approximately 40 mm far from the weld toe.

  1. Reduction of the effect of temperature in a fiber optic distributed sensor used for strain measurements in civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hiroshige; Uchiyama, Yasuomi; Kurashima, Toshio

    1999-05-01

    We report on an approach for reducing the effects of temperature in a fiber optic distributed sensor. This technique employs a sensing fiber and a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR). The BOTDR has been proposed for measuring both strain and optical loss distribution along optical fibers by accessing only one end of the fiber. The BOTDR analyzes changes in the Brillouin frequency shift caused by strain. This device can measure distributed strain with an accuracy of better than plus or minus 60 X 10-6 and a high spatial resolution of up to 1 m over a 10 km long fiber. However, temperature fluctuations have an adverse effect on the accuracy with which the Brillouin frequency shift can be measured because the shift changes with temperature as well as with strain. This has meant that both spatial and temporal fluctuations in temperature must be compensated for when a fiber optic distributed sensor is used for continuous strain measurements in massive civil structures. We describe a method for the simultaneous determination of distributed strain and temperature which separates strain and temperature in a fiber optic sensor.

  2. Model study on the strain and stress distributions in the vicinity of an arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Sawada, T

    1988-01-01

    By the evaluation of the strain and stress distributions in the vicinity of a stenosis, it is suggested that the bending moment generated by the axial force acting on a stenosis is one of the causes of the post-stenotic dilatation. The conditions which enhance this bending moment are investigated and it is expected that the present mechanism is specially effective for the artery where the ratio of wall thickness to radius is very small. Lastly, the concrete numerical value of this bending moment is evaluated and it is shown that the bending moment generated by this mechanism is large enough to cause the post-stenotic dilatation. PMID:3252921

  3. Correlation-based continuous-wave technique for optical fiber distributed strain measurement using Brillouin scattering (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2005-05-01

    We have been developing "fiber optic nerve systems" for "smart structures and smart materials", in which an optical fiber acts as sensor to measure distribution of strain along it. The original technology, "Brillouin Optical Correlation Domain Analysis: BOCDA" has been proposed and developed to analyze the distributed strain along the fiber by use of synthesis of correlation characteristics of continuous lightwave. Adopting this technology, "fiber optic nerve systems" with quite a high spatial resolution and measurement speed, have been established.

  4. New applications of computer-based section construction: strain analysis, local balancing, and subsurface fault prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Geiser, J.; Geiser, P.A.; Kligfield, R.; Ratliff, R.; Rowan, M.

    1988-04-01

    An increase in the use of computers in structural geology now encourages practical investigation of several topics which are of considerable importance to the explorationist. Computer-based cross section construction and analysis is one such application. Algorithms based on the geometry of flexural slip or flow deformation styles permit rapid construction restoration, and balancing of geological cross sections, which in turn allow evaluation of multiple working hypotheses in a time frame previously unattainable. These same techniques also simplify the application of several analytical methods which have tended to be restricted to structural geologists: predicted finite and incremental strain patterns within folds can be utilized in studies of porosity and permeability variation; the detailed geometry of fold can be evaluated and modified using local balancing methods when constraints provided by well, seismic, and surface data leave room for differing interpretations; and subsurface fault trajectories can be quickly and accurately predicted from knowledge or near-surface fold geometry. These and other methods discussed in the text permit the non-specialist to apply complex structural concepts of exploration in a practical and timely manner.

  5. Mycelium-bound lipase from a locally isolated strain of Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Loo, Joo Ling; Khoramnia, Anahita; Lai, Oi Ming; Long, Kamariah; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Mycelium-bound lipase (MBL), from a locally isolated Geotrichum candidum strain, was produced and characterized as a natural immobilized lipase. A time course study of its lipolytic activity in 1 L liquid broth revealed the maximum MBL activity at 4 h for mycelium cells harvested after 54 h. The yield and specific activity of MBL were 3.87 g/L dry weight and 508.33 U/g protein, respectively, while less than 0.2 U/mL lipase activity was detected in the culture supernatant. Prolonged incubation caused release of the bound lipase into the growth medium. The growth pattern of G. candidum, and production and properties of MBL were not affected by the scale. The stability of mycelia harboring lipase (MBL), harvested and lyophilized after 54 h, studied at 4 °C depicted a loss of 4.3% and 30% in MBL activity after 1 and 8 months, while the activity of free lipase was totally lost after 14 days of storage. The MBL from G. candidum displayed high substrate selectivity for unsaturated fatty acids containing a cis-9 double bond, even in crude form. This unique specificity of MBL could be a direct, simple and inexpensive way in the fats and oil industry for the selective hydrolysis or transesterification of cis-9 fatty acid residues in natural triacylglycerols. PMID:24959682

  6. Cones of localized shear strain in incompressible elasticity with prestress: Green's function and integral representations.

    PubMed

    Argani, L P; Bigoni, D; Capuani, D; Movchan, N V

    2014-09-01

    The infinite-body three-dimensional Green's function set (for incremental displacement and mean stress) is derived for the incremental deformation of a uniformly strained incompressible, nonlinear elastic body. Particular cases of the developed formulation are the Mooney-Rivlin elasticity and the J2-deformation theory of plasticity. These Green's functions are used to develop a boundary integral equation framework, by introducing an ad hoc potential, which paves the way for a boundary element formulation of three-dimensional problems of incremental elasticity. Results are used to investigate the behaviour of a material deformed near the limit of ellipticity and to reveal patterns of shear failure. In fact, within the investigated three-dimensional framework, localized deformations emanating from a perturbation are shown to be organized in conical geometries rather than in planar bands, so that failure is predicted to develop through curved and thin surfaces of intense shearing, as can for instance be observed in the cup-cone rupture of ductile metal bars. PMID:25197258

  7. [Serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella strains recovered from environmental samples between 2008-2014].

    PubMed

    Güleşen, Revasiye; Levent, Belkıs; Üvey, Mehmet; Bayrak, Hasan; Akgeyik, Mesut

    2016-07-01

    Despite the measures taken and control applications worldwide, Salmonella infections continue to threat the public health. Since these infections also cause significant economical loss, the salmonellas continue to be forefront globally. The determination of Salmonella serotypes and their sources is important for epidemiological point of view. In this study, serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of environmental isolates of Salmonella spp. recovered from the poultry farms, that were send for confirmation and serotyping between seven years period, 2008-2014, were evaluated. Strains isolated from environmental samples that were sent to Public Health Institute, Department of Microbiology Reference Laboratory, National Reference Laboratory for Enteric Pathogens, were inoculated onto Salmonella-Shigella and Xylose Lysine Desoxycholate agar and evaluated after 18-24 hours of incubation at 37°C. The identification of the strains was performed by using standard biochemical tests from the suspected colonies. Strains compatible with Salmonella spp. were serotyped using polyvalent and monovalent Salmonella O and H antisera by slide agglutination method. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed and evaluated according to CLSI recommendation using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. In our study, a total of 2011 Salmonella strains were evaluated and 15 different serogroups and 75 different serotypes were identified. The most common Salmonella serotypes were S.Infantis (30.6%), followed by S.Enteritidis (21.8%), S.Typhimurium (6.5%), S.Kottbus (5.2%), S.Tennessee (4.3%), S.Mbandaka (4.1%), S.Indiana (3.9%), S.Kentucky (3%), S.Corvallis (2.5%), S.Paratyphi B (1.9%) and S.Hadar (1.7%). Among the isolates, 50.1% (1008/2011) were found susceptible to all of the tested antimicrobials. The rate of isolates that were resistant to only one drug was found to be 15.6%, whereas 30.9% of the strains showed multi-drug resistance (resistant to ≥ 3 antimicrobial drugs

  8. Strain localization in the lower crust: brittle precursors versus lithological heterogeneities (Musgrave Ranges, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Wex, Sebastian; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The Davenport shear zone in Central Australia is a strike-slip ductile shear zone developed during the Petermann Orogeny (~ 550 Ma). The conditions of shearing are estimated to be amphibolite-eclogite facies (650 °C, 1.2 GPa). The up to seven kilometre thick mylonite zone encloses several large low strain domains with excellent exposure, thus allowing a thorough study of the initiation of shear zones. Quartzo-feldspathic gneisses and granitoids inherit a suite of lithological heterogeneities such as quartz-rich pegmatites, mafic layers and dykes. When in a favourable orientation to the shortening direction, these rheologically different pre-existing layers might be expected to localize deformation. However, with the singular exception of long, continuous and fine-grained dolerite dykes, this is not observed. Quartz-rich pegmatites are mostly unsheared, even if in a favourable orientation, and sometimes boudinaged or folded. There are instead many shear zones only a few mm to cm in width, extending up to tens of metres, which are in fact oriented at a very high angle to the shortening direction. Parallel to these, a network of little to moderately overprinted brittle fractures are observed, commonly marked by pseudotachylyte (pst) and sometimes new biotite. Shear reactivation of these precursor fractures is generally limited to the length of the initial fracture and typically re-uses and shears the pst. The recrystallized mineral assemblage in the sheared pst consists of Cpx+Grt+Fsp±Ky and is the same to that in the adjacent sheared gneiss, with the same PT estimates (650 °C, 1.2 GPa). In some cases, multiple generations of cross-cutting and sheared pst demonstrate alternating fracture and flow during progressive shear zone development and a clear tendency for subsequent pst formation to also localize in the existing shear zone. The latest pst may be both unsheared and unrecrystallized (no grt) and is probably related to a late stage, still localized within the

  9. HPV strain distribution in patients with genital warts in a female population sample

    PubMed Central

    Boda, Daniel; Neagu, Monica; Constantin, Carolina; Voinescu, Razvan Nicolae; Caruntu, Constantin; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Drakoulis, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Dimitrios; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the human cancer domain is still a subject of intensive study. In this study, we examined cervical swab samples from 713 females with genital warts, and tested the samples for high- and low-risk genital HPV. HPV genotyping was assessed using a Genotyping test that detects HPV by the amplification of target DNA using polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid hybridization. In total, we detected 37 anogenital HPV DNA genotypes [6, 11, 16, 18, 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 40, 42, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73 (MM9), 81, 82 (MM4), 83 (MM7), 84 (MM8), IS39 and CP6108] and investigated the incidence of these genotypes in the patients with genital warts. We found differences in the distribution of high-/low-risk strains and the incidence of high-risk strains was found to occur mainly in females under 35 years of age. The data from our study suggest that a detailed oral, rectal and genital identification of high-risk strains should be performed to visualize the entire pattern of possible triggers of carcinogenesis. PMID:27602111

  10. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  11. The role of silicon, vacancies, and strain in carbon distribution for low temperature bainite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sampath, S.; Rementeria, R.; Huang, X.; Caballero, Francesca G.; Janisch, R.; Poplawsky, J. D.; Garcia-Mateo, C.

    2016-02-19

    Here, we investigated the phenomenon of carbon supersaturation and carbon clustering in bainitic ferrite with atom probe tomography (APT) and ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show a homogeneous distribution of silicon in the microstructure, which contains both ferrite and retained austenite. This distribution is mimicked well by the computational approach. In addition, an accumulation of C in certain regions of the bainitic ferrite with C concentrations up to 13 at % is observed. Based on the DFT results, these clusters are explained as strained, tetragonal regions in the ferritic bainite, in which the solution enthalpy ofmore » C can reach large, negative values. It seems that Si itself only has a minor influence on this phenomenon.« less

  12. Bayesian localization microscopy based on intensity distribution of fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhang, Mingshu; Liu, Zhiyong; Xu, Pingyong; Zhang, Fa

    2015-03-01

    Super-resolution microscopy techniques have overcome the limit of optical diffraction. Recently, the Bayesian analysis of Bleaching and Blinking data (3B) method has emerged as an important tool to obtain super-resolution fluorescence images. 3B uses the change in information caused by adding or removing fluorophores in the cell to fit the data. When adding a new fluorophore, 3B selects a random initial position, optimizes this position and then determines its reliability. However, the fluorophores are not evenly distributed in the entire image region, and the fluorescence intensity at a given position positively correlates with the probability of observing a fluorophore at this position. In this paper, we present a Bayesian analysis of Bleaching and Blinking microscopy method based on fluorescence intensity distribution (FID3B). We utilize the intensity distribution to select more reliable positions as the initial positions of fluorophores. This approach can improve the reconstruction results and significantly reduce the computational time. We validate the performance of our method using both simulated data and experimental data from cellular structures. The results confirm the effectiveness of our method. PMID:25672498

  13. Local distribution and toxicity of prolonged hippocampal infusion of muscimol

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Walbridge, Stuart; Morrison, Paul; Hampton, Robert R.; Sato, Susumu; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Butman, John A.; O’Malley, James; Vidwan, Param; Dedrick, Robert L.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, is reduced in the hippocampus in patients with complex partial seizures from mesial temporal sclerosis. To provide preliminary safety and distribution data on using convection-enhanced delivery of agents to treat complex partial seizures and to test the efficacy and safety of regional selective neuronal suppression, the authors infused muscimol, a GABA-A receptor agonist, directly into the hippocampus of nonhuman primates using an integrated catheter electrode. Methods Ten rhesus monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) use of catheter electrode alone (four monkeys); 2) infusion of escalating concentrations of muscimol followed by vehicle (three monkeys); and 3) infusion of vehicle and subsequent muscimol mixed with muscimol tracer (three monkeys). Infusions were begun 5 days after catheter electrode placement and continued for 5.6 days before switching to the other agent. Head magnetic resonance (MR) images and electroencephalography recordings were obtained before and during the infusions. Brain histological studies and quantitative autoradiography were performed. Neurological function was normal in controls and when muscimol concentrations were 0.125 mM or less, whereas higher concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) produced reversible apathy and somnolence. Fluid distribution was demonstrated on MR images and muscimol distribution was demonstrated on autoradiographs throughout the hippocampus and adjacent white matter. Conclusions Targeted modulation of neuronal activity is a reasonable research strategy for the investigation and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy. PMID:16381190

  14. Time-evolution and strain distribution of a major shear zone (SASZ, Brittany, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augier, Romain; Raimbourg, Hugues; Bellanger, Mathieu; Turrillot, Paul; Monié, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    support a new model of crustal-scale shear zone activity, where the whole body of the shear zone is active throughout its history, i.e. the actively deforming zone does not get progressively narrower. The strain distribution nevertheless evolves with time, with an increasingly larger fraction partitioned in the ultramylonitic core. Besides, combination of the finite strain estimations and the Ar/Ar ages enables us to assess the range of strain rates associated with mylonitization.

  15. The rabies virus glycoprotein determines the distribution of different rabies virus strains in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuzhen; Mohankumar, Puliyur S; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthies J; Fu, Zhen F

    2002-08-01

    The contribution of rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) in viral distribution in the brain was examined by immunohistochemistry following stereotaxic inoculation into the rat hippocampus. Viruses used in this study include the highly neuroinvasive challenge virus standard strains (CVS-N2C and CVS-B2C) and the nonneuroinvasive attenuated SN-10 strain, as well as SN-10-derived recombinant viruses expressing the G gene from CVS-N2C (RN2C) or CVS-B2C (RB2C). The distribution of recombinant viruses in the brain was similar to those of the parental viruses from which the G was derived. For example, while CVS-B2C- and RB2C-infected neurons were seen preferentially in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus, CVS-N2C- and RN2C-infected neurons were preferentially found in the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus. SN-10 infected efficiently almost all the brain regions. To further study the role of the RV G in virus spreading, we examined the distribution of RV antigen in brains infected with a recombinant RV in which the SN-10 G was replaced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G (SN-10-VG) was examined. The spreading of SN-10-VG to the cortex and the thalamus was drastically reduced, but the number of infected neurons in hippocampus and hypothalamus, particularly the paraventricular nucleus, was similar to the SN-10 virus. This pattern of spreading resembles that of VSV. Together, our data demonstrate that it is the G protein that determines the distribution pattern of RV in the brain. PMID:12161819

  16. Evolution of Residual-Strain Distribution through an Overload-Induced Retardation Period during Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Sun, Yinan; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was employed to investigate the crack-growth retardation phenomenon after a single tensile overload by mapping both one-dimensional and two-dimensional residual-strain distributions around the crack tip in a series of compact-tension specimens representing various crack-growth stages through an overload-induced retardation period. The results clearly show a large compressive residual-strain field near the crack tip immediately after the overload. As the fatigue crack propagates through the overload-induced plastic zone, the compressive residual strains are gradually relaxed, and a new compressive residual-strain field is developed around the propagating crack tip, illustrating that the subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone grows out of the large plastic zone caused by the overloading. The relationship between the overload-induced plastic zone and subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone, and its influence on the residual-strain distributions in the perturbed plastic zone are discussed.

  17. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  18. Local or distributed activation? The view from biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Mark

    2011-06-01

    There is considerable disagreement among connectionist modellers over whether to represent distinct properties by distinct nodes of a network or whether properties should be represented by patterns of activity across all nodes. This paper draws on the literature of neuroscience to say that a more subtle way of describing how different brain regions contribute to a behaviour, in terms of individual learning and in terms of degrees of importance, may render the current debate moot: both sides of the 'localist' versus 'distributed' debate emphasise different aspects of biology.

  19. The influence of metasomatic reactions on distributed vs. localized slip in ultramafic shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarling, Matthew S.; Tulley, Chris J.; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Livingstone Fault is a >1000 km long terrane boundary in New Zealand that juxtaposes ultramafic rocks of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt against quartzofeldspathic rocks of the continental Caples Terrane. The fault is characterized by a zone of sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide with a generally well-defined scaly fabric, containing entrained pods of massive serpentinite, volcanic rocks and quartzofeldspathic rocks. Talc- and tremolite- forming metasomatic reactions occurred frequently within the mélange zone, along the margins of the mélange and at the edges of entrained pods. These reactions were the result of the interaction between the serpentine minerals and silica bearing fluids derived from the quartzofeldspathic Caples Terrane. In the bulk of the mélange, structures such as distributed scaly fabrics, S-C fabrics, and networks of fibrous serpentine veins suggest a broad delocalization of strain, likely accommodated by pressure-solution mechanisms along the serpentinite- and talc-bearing fabrics. However, at the margins of the mélange zone and the edges of pods, layers of tremolite tens of centimeters thick are characterized by a highly indurated microstructure consisting of networks of tightly interwoven, acicular tremolite crystals forming a semi-nephritic to nephritic texture. In these metasomatic regions, discrete cataclastic slip zones associated with well-polished slickenlined surfaces are observed at the interfaces of the serpentinite and Caples Terrane quartzofeldspathics. In the Livingstone Fault, this style of highly-localized slip is uniquely associated withthe development of the indurated nephritic textures. Because tremolite is a frictionally-strong and generally velocity-weakening calc-silicate, we speculate that the tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions may have promoted localized and unstable fault slip within a shear zone that was otherwise deforming by creep. Employing scanning and transmission

  20. Characterization of locally strained Ge1-xSnx/Ge fine structures by synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ike, Shinichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Kurosawa, Masashi; Taoka, Noriyuki; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the formation of the locally strained Ge nanostructure with epitaxial Ge1-xSnx stressors and characterized the microscopic strain field in the Ge1-xSnx/Ge fine-heterostructures by synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction and finite element method (FEM) calculations. We achieved local epitaxial growth of Ge1-xSnx with Sn contents of 2.9% and 6.5%, sandwiching the 25 nm-wide Ge fine line structure. Microdiffraction measurements revealed that out-of-plane tensile strain induced in the Ge line effectively increased with decreasing Ge width and increasing Sn content of Ge1-xSnx stressors, which is in good agreement with FEM calculations. An out-of-plane tensile strain of 0.8% along the Ge[001] direction is induced in a 25 nm-wide Ge line, which corresponds to an in-plane uniaxial compressive strain of 1.4% in the Ge line sandwiched between Ge0.935Sn0.065 stressors.

  1. Local strain redistribution corrections for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure based on an elastic finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hwang, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Strain redistribution corrections were developed for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure to economically calculate material cyclic response at the critical location of a structure for life prediction proposes. The method was based on the assumption that the plastic region in the structure is local and the total strain history required for input can be defined from elastic finite-element analyses. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was represented by a bilinear kinematic hardening model. The simplified procedure predicts stress-strain response with reasonable accuracy for thermally cycled problems but needs improvement for mechanically load-cycled problems. Neuber-type corrections were derived and incorporated in the simplified procedure to account for local total strain redistribution under cyclic mechanical loading. The corrected simplified method was used on a mechanically load-cycled benchmark notched-plate problem. The predicted material response agrees well with the nonlinear finite-element solutions for the problem. The simplified analysis computer program was 0.3% of the central processor unit time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  2. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  3. Distribution of body fluids: local mechanisms guarding interstitial fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Aukland, K

    1984-01-01

    The plasma volume is determined by fluid influx through drinking and outflux by renal excretion. Both fluxes are regulated according to plasma volume and composition through arterial pressure, osmoreceptors and vascular stretch receptors. As to the remaining part of the extracellular volume, the interstitial space, there is no evidence that its volume (IFV), pressure or composition are sensed in such a way as to influence water intake or excretion. Nevertheless, IFV is clearly regulated, often pari passu with the regulation of plasma volume. However, there are many exceptions to parallel changes of the two compartments, indicating the existence of automatic, local mechanisms guarding the net transfer of fluid between plasma and interstitium. Thus, a rise in arterial and/or venous pressure, tending to increase capillary pressure and net filtration, is counteracted by changes in the "Starling forces": hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures of capillary blood and interstitial fluid. These "oedemapreventing mechanisms" (A. C. Guyton) may be listed as follows: Vascular mechanisms, modifying capillary pressure or interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Increased transmural vascular pressure elicits precapillary constriction and thereby reduces the rise in capillary pressure. Counteracts formation of leg oedema in orthostasis. Venous expansion transmits pressure to the interstitium in encapsulated organs (brain, bone marrow, rat tail). Mechanisms secondary to increased net filtration, A rise in IFV will increase IFP, and thereby oppose further filtration. Favoured by lowcompliant interstitium. Reduction of interstitial COP through dilution and/or washout of interstitial proteins. A new steady state depends on increased lymph flow. Increased lymph flow permits a rise in net capillary filtration pressure. Low blood flow and high filtration fraction will increase local capillary COP. PMID:6399307

  4. Final Report: Hardening and Strain Localization in Single and Polycrystalline Materials Under Cyclic and Monotonic Deformation, January 11, 1985 - July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, Campbell; Bassani, John L.

    2000-03-03

    The subject program on substructure evolution initially focused on strain localization produced by fatigue cycling and especially how such localization affects the cyclic response of polycrystalline pure metal. The latter stages have dealt with strain localization in the heavy monotonic deformation of alloys, which eventually produces forms of localized deformation that include coarse slip bands (CSB's), which are aligned to slip planes and macroscopic shear bands (MSB's), which are not aligned to slip planes. These forms of strain localization are important in that they limit the usable ductility of the material in forming processes.

  5. Localization of shear strain and shear band formation induced by deformation in semi-solid Al-Cu alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagira, T.; Morita, S.; Yasuda, H.; Gourlay, C. M.; Yoshiya, M.; Sugiyama, A.; Uesugi, K.

    2015-06-01

    In situ observation of deformation in globular Al-Cu samples at a solid fraction of ∼⃒50% and a global shear strain rate of 10-1 s-1 was performed using time-resolved X-ray imaging. The solid particle motion during shear was quantitatively analysed. The force was transmitted though the contacts between solid particles over a long distance parallel to the shear plane (18 mean grain size, d) after only a 1d increment of the Al2O3 push-plate motion. On the other hand, the distance of transmitted force in the perpendicular direction to the shear plane was restricted to approximately 11d even for a high displacement of the Al2O3 push-plate. A relatively high shear strain rate became localized at the shear domain after a small amount of deformation (a 1d increment). The solid fraction decreased in the region of localized shear strain rate. The shear band width, where the shear strain was localized and the solid fraction decreased, remained mostly unchanged over a 4 d increment of Al2O3 push-plate motion.

  6. Microstructure from ferroelastic transitions using strain pseudospin clock models in two and three dimensions: A local mean-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Lookman, Turab; Shenoy, Subodh R.

    2010-09-01

    We show how microstructure can arise in first-order ferroelastic structural transitions, in two and three spatial dimensions, through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include anisotropic elastic interactions. Such transitions have symmetry-selected physical strains as their NOP -component order parameters, with Landau free energies that have a single zero-strain “austenite” minimum at high temperatures, and spontaneous-strain “martensite” minima of NV structural variants at low temperatures. The total free energy also has gradient terms, and power-law anisotropic effective interactions, induced by “no-dislocation” St Venant compatibility constraints. In a reduced description, the strains at Landau minima induce temperature dependent, clocklike ZNV+1 Hamiltonians, with NOP -component strain-pseudospin vectors S⃗ pointing to NV+1 discrete values (including zero). We study elastic texturing in five such first-order structural transitions through a local mean-field approximation of their pseudospin Hamiltonians, that include the power-law interactions. As a prototype, we consider the two-variant square/rectangle transition, with a one-component pseudospin taking NV+1=3 values of S=0,±1 , as in a generalized Blume-Capel model. We then consider transitions with two-component (NOP=2) pseudospins: the equilateral to centered rectangle (NV=3) ; the square to oblique polygon (NV=4) ; the triangle to oblique (NV=6) transitions; and finally the three-dimensional (3D) cubic to tetragonal transition (NV=3) . The local mean-field solutions in two-dimensional and 3D yield oriented domain-wall patterns as from continuous-variable strain dynamics, showing the discrete-variable models capture the essential ferroelastic texturings. Other related Hamiltonians illustrate that structural transitions in materials science can be the source of interesting spin models in statistical mechanics.

  7. Creating periodic local strain in monolayer graphene with nanopillars patterned by self-assembled block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Gui, Gui; Ma, Alice L.; Ma, Zhenqiang E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu; Liu, Chi-Chun; Nealey, Paul F. E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu

    2015-10-05

    A simple and viable method was developed to produce biaxial strain in monolayer graphene on an array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars. The array of SiO{sub 2} nanopillars (1 cm{sup 2} in area, 80 nm in height, and 40 nm in pitch) was fabricated by employing self-assembled block copolymer through simple dry etching and deposition processes. According to high resolution micro-Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analyses, 0.9% of maximum biaxial tensile strain and 0.17% of averaged biaxial tensile strain in graphene were created. This technique provides a simple and viable method to form biaxial tensile strain in graphene and offers a practical platform for future studies in graphene strain engineering.

  8. The Distribution of 18 Enterotoxin and Enterotoxin-Like Genes in Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Different Sources in East China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinghua; Wang, Yan; Cao, Yongzhong; Yan, Wenguang; Niu, Xiaosai; Zhou, Liping; Chen, Jianhao; Sun, Ying; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Xiaorong; Wu, Yantao

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of 18 staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) or SE-like (SEl) genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains from different sources in east China was investigated. Among all 496 S. aureus strains, 291 strains carried one or more SE genes. The more frequently occurred genes were sea, seb, seg, selk, sell, selm, selo, and seq; the less frequent occurred genes were sec, selj, and ser. The classic SE genes and the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) (seg, sei, selm, seln, selo, and/or selu) accounted for 25.67% and 61.68% of all detected genes, respectively. There were three gene clusters (egc, sea-sek-seq, and sed-sej-ser), of which the egc cluster was the important one that could generate novel complexes, and the sea-sek-seq cluster was a close relative to the hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The SE gene distributions were different among strains of different sources and formed diverse toxin gene profiles. The human- and foodborne-origin strains harbored classic and novel SE and SEl genes, whereas animal-origin strains harbored egc and other novel SE and SEl genes mainly. The foodborne- and human-origin strains were the main dangerous factors of classic staphylococcal foodborne poisoning, whereas the strains (especially from animals) that carried egc and other novel genes mainly should be new potential dangerous factors for food safety. PMID:27074376

  9. Characterization of pore structure and strain localization in Majella limestone by X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Hall, S.; Baud, P.; Wong, T.

    2013-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) have been widely used for characterizing the pore structure and damage evolution in porous clastic rocks. In comparison, these 3D imaging techniques have not been used as widely in carbonate rocks. This paucity of 3D imaging arises primarily because carbonates have pore geometry that is significantly more complex than siliciclastics and consequently microCT imaging of the pore space is not straightforward. Hence most investigations of the pore structure and damage development in porous carbonate rocks have been done on 2D thin-sections, synthesizing observations on different scales using the optical microscope and SEM. In this study, we used two techniques for characterizing the pore structure and development of strain localization in Majella limestone of 31% porosity. The first technique allows us to extract 3D information from microCT data on the partitioning of porosity and pore size statistics in this limestone. Specifically the microCT image was partitioned into three distinct domains separated by two thresholds in the global histogram: macropores, solid grains and an intermediate domain (made up of voxels of solid embedded with micropores). Our morphological analysis of the microCT images shows that both the solid and intermediate domains are basically interconnected. Our new data underscore some of the 3D complexities of the macropores and implies that a dual porosity model is necessary for analyzing the mechanical behavior of porous carbonate rock. The second technique undertaken in this study is DIC analysis of the failure mode in relation to the brittle-ductile transition. With decrease in confinement, the failure mode of a porous rock undergoes a transition from delocalized compaction to brittle faulting. The damage associated with strain localization in Majella limestone is subtle and not easily resolvable under optical microscope or SEM. Our first application of 3D-volumetric DIC to a

  10. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is

  11. The effects of perturbations on the strain distribution in numerical simulations - elasto-viscoplastic modeling of boudinage as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Karrech, Ali; Poulet, Thomas; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    During necking of a mechanically stiffer layer embedded in a weaker matrix, relatively large amounts of strain localize in small areas. As this deformation style appears under distinct geological conditions, necking phenomena, e.g. boudinaged veins, are associated with a variety of deformation modes. So far, there exists rather limited knowledge about the origin of instabilities and their role as precursory structures, i.e. strong localization of elastic energy affecting further plastic deformation (e.g. Regenauer-Lieb & Yuen, 1998; 2004; Karrech et al., 2011a). We applied the finite element solver ABAQUS in order to investigate the 2-D strain distribution in layers including different mechanical material properties during plane strain co-axial deformation. First, linear perturbation analyses were performed in order to evaluate the imperfection sensitivity in the elastic and viscous regimes. We perform a classical modal analysis to determine the natural mode shapes and frequencies of our geological structure during arbitrary vibrations. This analysis aims at detecting the eigenmodes of the geological structure, which are sinusoidal vibrations with geometry specific natural modal shapes and frequencies. The eigenvalues represent the nodal points where the onset of (visco)-elasto-plastic localization can initiate in the structure (Rice, 1977). The eigenmodes, eigenvalues and eigenvectors are highly sensitive to the layer-box' aspect ratio and differences in Young's moduli, or effective viscosity, respectively. Boundary effect-free strain propagation occurs for layer-box aspect ratios smaller than 1:10. Second, these preloading structures were used as seeds for imperfections in elasto-viscoplastic numerical modeling of continuous necking of a coarse-grained mineral layer embedded in a finer-grained matrix (pinch-and-swell type of boudinage), following the thermo-mechanical coupling of grain size evolutions by Herwegh et al. (in press). The evolution of symmetric necks

  12. Strain distribution in an Si single crystal measured by interference fringes of X-ray mirage diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Jongsukswat, Sukswat; Fukamachi, Tomoe; Ju, Dongying; Negishi, Riichirou; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    In X-ray interference fringes accompanied by mirage diffraction, variations have been observed in the spacing and position of the fringes from a plane-parallel Si single crystal fixed at one end as a function of distance from the incident plane of the X-rays to the free crystal end. The variations can be explained by distortion of the sample crystal due to gravity. From the variations and positions of the fringes, the strain gradient of the crystal has been determined. The distribution of the observed strain agrees with that expected from rod theory except for residual strain. When the distortion is large, the observed strain distribution does not agree with that expected from rod theory. PMID:24068841

  13. Strain distribution in an Si single crystal measured by interference fringes of X-ray mirage diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jongsukswat, Sukswat; Fukamachi, Tomoe; Ju, Dongying; Negishi, Riichirou; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2013-10-01

    In X-ray interference fringes accompanied by mirage diffraction, variations have been observed in the spacing and position of the fringes from a plane-parallel Si single crystal fixed at one end as a function of distance from the incident plane of the X-rays to the free crystal end. The variations can be explained by distortion of the sample crystal due to gravity. From the variations and positions of the fringes, the strain gradient of the crystal has been determined. The distribution of the observed strain agrees with that expected from rod theory except for residual strain. When the distortion is large, the observed strain distribution does not agree with that expected from rod theory. PMID:24068841

  14. Effect of temperature and strain distribution on martensitic transformation during uniaxial testing of AISI-304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Singhal, L. K.

    1988-04-01

    A coupled finite element method has been used to determine the true plastic strain, effective strain, and temperature distribution inside the tensile specimen of AISI-304 austenitic stainless steel during uniaxial testing at low and high strain rates. The volume fraction of martensite has been computed along the gage length by employing Olson-Cohen analysis and using the value of a and β parameters from Heckers curve at the temperatures which were obtained by FEM analysis in different elements of the specimen. The results reveal that due to nonhomogeneous distribution of plastic strain and variation in temperature along the gage length, the volume fraction of martensite would be different near the end of gage length and the center of the specimen.

  15. Measurement of local strain and heat propagation during high-temperature testing in a split-Hopkinson tension bar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilamosa, V.; Clausen, A. H.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Børvik, T.; Skjervold, S.

    2012-08-01

    Aluminium alloys are commonly used by the industry due to their good mechanical properties and their relatively low density. An accurate prediction of the behaviour of aluminium alloys under a wide range of temperatures and strain rates is important in numerical simulations of forming processes or applications involving adiabatic heating like penetration and crash situations. Several tests are needed at low, medium and high strain rates to study this behaviour. This paper will focus on the high strain rate test rig, which is a split- Hopkinson tension bar system (SHTB), the acquisition system for strain measurements, and a thermal analysis of the bars due to heating of the sample. A new way of doing local measurements with a high-speed camera will be presented. The thermal boundary conditions of the tests have been measured and simulated, and the results indicate that the stress wave propagation in the bars is not significantly affected by a local heating of the part of the bars which is closest to the sample.

  16. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region. PMID:24718863

  17. Strain distribution of confined Ge/GeO2 core/shell nanoparticles engineered by growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenyan; Yuan, Cailei; Luo, Xingfang; Yu, Ting; Wang, Gongping

    2016-02-01

    The strain distributions of Ge/GeO2 core/shell nanoparticles confined in different host matrix grown by surface oxidation are investigated. The simulated results by finite element method demonstrated that the strains of the Ge core and the GeO2 shell strongly depend on the growth environments of the nanoparticles. Moreover, it can be found that there is a transformation of the strain on Ge core from tensile to compressive strain during the growth of Ge/GeO2 core/shell nanoparticles. And, the transformation of the strain is closely related with the Young's modulus of surrounding materials of Ge/GeO2 core/shell nanoparticles.

  18. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  19. Social wasp intestines host the local phenotypic variability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Dapporto, Leonardo; Stefanini, Irene; Rivero, Damariz; Polsinelli, Mario; Capretti, Paolo; De Marchi, Paolo; Viola, Roberto; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been assessed in both wild and human-related environments. Social wasps have been shown to maintain and vector S. cerevisiae among different environments. The availability of strains isolated from wasp intestines represents a striking opportunity to assess whether the strains found in wasp intestines are characterized by peculiar traits. We analysed strains isolated from the intestines of social wasps and compared them with strains isolated from other sources, all collected in a restricted geographic area. We evaluated the production of volatile metabolites during grape must fermentation, the resistance to different stresses and the ability to exploit various carbon sources. Wasp strains, in addition to representing a wide range of S. cerevisiae genotypes, also represent large part of the phenotypes characterizing the sympatric set of yeast strains; their higher production of acetic acid and ethyl acetate could reflect improved ability to attract insects. Our findings suggest that the relationship between yeasts and wasps should be preserved, to safeguard not only the natural variance of this microorganism but also the interests of wine-makers, who could take advantage from the exploitation of their phenotypic variability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27168222

  20. Regional Distribution Shifts Help Explain Local Changes in Wintering Raptor Abundance: Implications for Interpreting Population Trends

    PubMed Central

    Paprocki, Neil; Heath, Julie A.; Novak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of multiple taxa across broad-scales suggest that species distributions are shifting poleward in response to global climate change. Recognizing the influence of distribution shifts on population indices will be an important part of interpreting trends within management units because current practice often assumes that changes in local populations reflect local habitat conditions. However, the individual- and population-level processes that drive distribution shifts may occur across a large, regional scale and have little to do with the habitats within the management unit. We examined the latitudinal center of abundance for the winter distributions of six western North America raptor species using Christmas Bird Counts from 1975–2011. Also, we considered whether population indices within western North America Bird Conservation Regions (BCRs) were explained by distribution shifts. All six raptors had significant poleward shifts in their wintering distributions over time. Rough-legged Hawks (Buteo lagopus) and Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) showed the fastest rate of change, with 8.41 km yr−1 and 7.74 km yr−1 shifts, respectively. Raptors may be particularly responsive to warming winters because of variable migration tendencies, intraspecific competition for nesting sites that drives males to winter farther north, or both. Overall, 40% of BCR population trend models were improved by incorporating information about wintering distributions; however, support for the effect of distribution on BCR indices varied by species with Rough-legged Hawks showing the most evidence. These results emphasize the importance of understanding how regional distribution shifts influence local-scale population indices. If global climate change is altering distribution patterns, then trends within some management units may not reflect changes in local habitat conditions. The methods used to monitor and manage bird populations within local BCRs will fundamentally change as

  1. Combining micro computed tomography and three-dimensional registration to evaluate local strains in shape memory scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Therese; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; de Wild, Michael; Küffer, Jürg; Münch, Christoph; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Müller, Bert

    2014-02-01

    Appropriate mechanical stimulation of bony tissue enhances osseointegration of load-bearing implants. Uniaxial compression of porous implants locally results in tensile and compressive strains. Their experimental determination is the objective of this study. Selective laser melting is applied to produce open-porous NiTi scaffolds of cubic units. To measure displacement and strain fields within the compressed scaffold, the authors took advantage of synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography during temperature increase and non-rigid three-dimensional data registration. Uniaxial scaffold compression of 6% led to local compressive and tensile strains of up to 15%. The experiments validate modeling by means of the finite element method. Increasing the temperature during the tomography experiment from 15 to 37°C at a rate of 4 K h(-1), one can locally identify the phase transition from martensite to austenite. It starts at ≈ 24°C on the scaffolds bottom, proceeds up towards the top and terminates at ≈ 34°C on the periphery of the scaffold. The results allow not only design optimization of the scaffold architecture, but also estimation of maximal displacements before cracks are initiated and of optimized mechanical stimuli around porous metallic load-bearing implants within the physiological temperature range. PMID:24257506

  2. Shape index distribution based local surface complexity applied to the human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Fonov, Vladimir; Collins, D. Louis; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of local surface complexity in the human cortex has shown to be of interest in investigating population differences as well as developmental changes in neurodegenerative or neurodevelopment diseases. We propose a novel assessment method that represents local complexity as the difference between the observed distributions of local surface topology to its best-fit basic topology model within a given local neighborhood. This distribution difference is estimated via Earth Move Distance (EMD) over the histogram within the local neighborhood of the surface topology quantified via the Shape Index (SI) measure. The EMD scores have a range from simple complexity (0.0), which indicates a consistent local surface topology, up to high complexity (1.0), which indicates a highly variable local surface topology. The basic topology models are categorized as 9 geometric situation modeling situations such as crowns, ridges and fundi of cortical gyro and sulci. We apply a geodesic kernel to calculate the local SI histrogram distribution within a given region. In our experiments, we obtained the results of local complexity that shows generally higher complexity in the gyral/sulcal wall regions and lower complexity in some gyral ridges and lowest complexity in sulcal fundus areas. In addition, we show expected, preliminary results of increased surface complexity across most of the cortical surface within the first years of postnatal life, hypothesized to be due to the changes such as development of sulcal pits. PMID:26028803

  3. A novel application of speckle interferometry for the measurement of strain distributions in semi-sweet biscuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Q.; Wildman, R. D.; Huntley, J. M.; Whitworth, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    The spontaneous formation of cracks in biscuits following baking, also known as checking, is an issue that manufacturers would like to be able to predict and avoid. Unfortunately the mechanisms driving this phenomenon are not well understood. Speckle interferometry was used to study moisture-induced in-plane strain development in biscuits. This sensitive and non-contacting technique for measuring surface displacements has two major advantages over more commonly used methods; firstly, strains can be detected at a far higher sensitivity (down to 2 × 10-6) than previously accessible and secondly the method is a whole-field technique, enabling observation of the development of strain distributions during moisture migration. For biscuits exposed to step changes in humidity, initial strain rates of up to 10-5min-1 were measured, which decreased as the moisture content approached equilibrium, leading to an accumulated strain of ~10-2 after 48 h. Under these conditions, a homogeneous, uniform strain distribution was observed. The data were used to calculate the hygroscopic expansion coefficient, which was linearly related to moisture content and provides the necessary constitutive link between strain and biscuit moisture content needed to model biscuit checking.

  4. Distribution of Antimicrobial Resistance in Campylobacter Strains Isolated from Poultry at a Slaughterhouse and Supermarkets in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Chiaki; Kishimoto, Michiru; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Fifty strains of Campylobacter jejuni/coli were detected in 108 specimens of chicken meat and organs sampled at six supermarkets and one poultry slaughterhouse (large scale) between April and October 2013 (isolation rates: 84.8% from the slaughterhouse, 29.3% from the supermarkets). 46/50 strains were successfully recovered and subjected to the E-test to examine their susceptibility to three fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents authorized for use in poultry in Japan: enrofloxacin (ERFX), ofloxacin (OFLX), and norfloxacin (NLFX). 29 isolates (63%) were resistant to all three agents and 2 isolates (4.3%) were resistant to two agents (ERFX and OFLX). The resistance rates of strains isolated fom the supermarkets and slaughterhouse were 61.9% and 72.0%, respectively. Because the chickens processed at the slaughterhouse were raised without the use of fluoroquinolone, the results did not suggest a positive relationship between the use of these agents and the distribution of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin [EM]) was also tested in 42 strains, and one strain (2.4%), C. coli from a retailer sample, showed resistance. Previous studies have detected high rates of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains, suggesting an expanding distribution of resistant bacteria. The detection of EM-resistant bacteria downstream in the food distribution chain (i.e., closer to consumers) is a concern for human health. PMID:26412697

  5. XRD measurement of mean thickness, thickness distribution and strain for illite and illite-smectite crystallites by the Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drits, V.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    A modified version of the Bertaut-Warren-Averbach (BWA) technique (Bertaut 1949, 1950; Warren and Averbach 1950) has been developed to measure coherent scattering domain (CSD) sizes and strains in minerals by analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. This method is used to measure CSD thickness distributions for calculated and experimental XRD patterns of illites and illite-smectites (I-S). The method almost exactly recovers CSD thickness distributions for calculated illite XRD patterns. Natural I-S samples contain swelling layers that lead to nonperiodic structures in the c* direction and to XRD peaks that are broadened and made asymmetric by mixed layering. Therefore, these peaks cannot be analyzed by the BWA method. These difficulties are overcome by K-saturation and heating prior to X-ray analysis in order to form 10-A?? periodic structures. BWA analysis yields the thickness distribution of mixed-layer crystals (coherently diffracting stacks of fundamental illite particles). For most I-S samples, CSD thickness distributions can be approximated by lognormal functions. Mixed-layer crystal mean thickness and expandability then can be used to calculate fundamental illite particle mean thickness. Analyses of the dehydrated, K-saturated samples indicate that basal XRD reflections are broadened by symmetrical strain that may be related to local variations in smectite interlayers caused by dehydration, and that the standard deviation of the strain increases regularly with expandability. The 001 and 002 reflections are affected only slightly by this strain and therefore are suited for CSD thickness analysis. Mean mixed-layer crystal thicknesses for dehydrated I-S measured by the BWA method are very close to those measured by an integral peak width method.

  6. Giant strain-sensitivity of local acoustic dissipation near inner wavy contacts in dry and fluid-saturated cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. Yu.; Matveev, L. A.

    2012-05-01

    Presently, experimental evidence for extremely high strain-sensitivity of dissipation in rocks and similar microstructured materials is obtained both in laboratory and field conditions, in particular observations of pronounced amplitude modulation of the radiation of high-stability seismo-acoustic sources by tidal deformations of rocks with typical strains ~ 10-8. Such data indicate the presence of some thresholdless in amplitude and very efficient mechanism of strain-dependent dissipation. Conventionally, its origin is discussed in the context of frictional or adhesion-hysteretic loss at cracks in rocks. However, such dissipation mechanisms are not relevant to weak perturbations with displacements smaller than atomic size. Here, we revise thresholdless thermoelastic loss in dry cracks and viscous loss in saturated cracks taking into account wavy asperities typical of real cracks, which can create elongated (strip-like) contacts or almost closed "waists" in cracks. Thermoelastic loss at these contacts can be very efficient. Besides, the state of such contacts can already be strongly perturbed by the average strain which yet practically does not change the mean opening of the entire crack. Thus the dissipation localized at such contacts can be significantly affected by quite small average strain (e.g., 10-8), which is usually believed to be unable to produce any appreciable effect on the dissipation. Next, for liquid-saturated cracks, the presence of inner elongated asperities also drastically changes the character of squirt-type viscous dissipation. Velocity gradients and consequently the dissipation are localized in the vicinity of the nearly-closed waists which almost harness the liquid flow in the crack. This dissipation can be comparable in magnitude with viscous dissipation at the entire crack with smooth interface, but the decrement maximum is strongly shifted downwards on the frequency axis. Since near the waist the gap is much smaller than the average crack

  7. Local Biogeopysical Climate Effects Largely Independent of Geographical Land Cover Change Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, Johannes; Reick, Christian; Pongratz, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Land cover change (LCC) happens locally. However, in almost all simulation studies assessing biogeophysical climate effects of LCC, local effects (due to alterations in a model grid box) are mingled with non-local effects (due to alteration in wide-ranging climate circulation). This study presents a method to separate local and non-local effects. The presented method is applicable to any land surface process that is acting locally but capable of influencing wide-ranging climate when applied on a larger scale. Concerning LCC, this method is more widely applicable than methods used in earlier studies, and it derives local and non-local effects from the same pair of simulations. The study illustrates the possibility of validating simulated local effects by comparison to observations on a global scale, and contrasts the underlying mechanisms of local and non-local effects. The simulation results show that local effects within a grid box are largely independent of the worldwide distribution of LCC. Accordingly, by the identification of local effects, an essential part of the climate consequences of LCC can be studied independently of the considered LCC scenarios, which differ strongly in climate modelling studies.

  8. Local and Global Stress-Strain Behaviors of Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel Using the Combined Nanoindentation and Finite Element Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Lim, Nam Suk; Lee, Bong Ho; Park, Chan Gyung; Lee, Sunghak; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-12-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels have excellent strain hardening exponents and resistibility against tensile necking using the strain-induced martensite formation that occurs as a result of the plastic deformation and strain on the retained austenite phase. Detailed studies on the microstructures and local mechanical properties, as well as global mechanical properties, are necessary in order to thoroughly understand the properties of TRIP steels with multiple phases of ferrite, bainite, retained austenite, and martensite. However, methods for investigating the local properties of the various phases of the TRIP steel are limited due to the very complicated and fine microstructures present in TRIP steel. In this study, the experimental and numerical methods, i.e., the experimental nanoindenting results and the theoretical finite element analyses, were combined in order to extract the local stress-strain curves of each phase. The local stress-strain curves were in good agreement with the values presented in the literature. In particular, the global plastic stress-strain behavior of the TRIP steel was predicted using the multiple phase unit cell finite element analysis, and this demonstrated the validity of the obtained properties of each local phase. The method of extracting the local stress-strain curves from the nanoindenting curves and predicting the global stress-strain behavior assists in clarifying the smart design of multi-phase steels.

  9. Local and Global Stress-Strain Behaviors of Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel Using the Combined Nanoindentation and Finite Element Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Lim, Nam Suk; Lee, Bong Ho; Park, Chan Gyung; Lee, Sunghak; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-09-01

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels have excellent strain hardening exponents and resistibility against tensile necking using the strain-induced martensite formation that occurs as a result of the plastic deformation and strain on the retained austenite phase. Detailed studies on the microstructures and local mechanical properties, as well as global mechanical properties, are necessary in order to thoroughly understand the properties of TRIP steels with multiple phases of ferrite, bainite, retained austenite, and martensite. However, methods for investigating the local properties of the various phases of the TRIP steel are limited due to the very complicated and fine microstructures present in TRIP steel. In this study, the experimental and numerical methods, i.e., the experimental nanoindenting results and the theoretical finite element analyses, were combined in order to extract the local stress-strain curves of each phase. The local stress-strain curves were in good agreement with the values presented in the literature. In particular, the global plastic stress-strain behavior of the TRIP steel was predicted using the multiple phase unit cell finite element analysis, and this demonstrated the validity of the obtained properties of each local phase. The method of extracting the local stress-strain curves from the nanoindenting curves and predicting the global stress-strain behavior assists in clarifying the smart design of multi-phase steels.

  10. Genetic diversity and geographical distribution of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from the wine-producing area of Charentes, France.

    PubMed Central

    Versavaud, A; Courcoux, P; Roulland, C; Dulau, L; Hallet, J N

    1995-01-01

    Electrophoretic karyotyping, mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and PCR amplification of interspersed repeats were used to study the variability, phylogenetic affinities, and biogeographic distribution of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae enological yeasts. The survey concentrated on 42 individual wine cellars in the Charentes area (Cognac region, France). A limited number (35) of predominant S. cerevisiae strains responsible for the fermentation process have been identified by the above molecular methods of differentiation. One strain (ACI) was found to be distributed over the entire area surveyed. There seemed to be little correlation between geographic location and genetic affinity. PMID:7486988

  11. Measurements of Local Strain Variation in Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si Heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.; Manion, S. J.; Milliken, S. J.; Pike, W. T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The energy splitting of the conduction-band minimum of Si(1-x), Ge(x), due to strain has been directly measured by the application of ballistic-electron-emission microscope (BEEM) spectroscopy to Ag/Si(1-x), Ge(x) structures. Experimental values for this conduction-band splitting agree well with calculations. For Au/Si(1-x), Ge(x), however, heterogeneity in the strain of the Si(1-x), Ge(x) layer is introduced by deposition of the Au. This variation is attributed to species interdiffusion, which produces a rough Si(1-x)Ge(x) surface. Preliminary modeling indicates that the observed roughness is consistent with the strain variation measured by BEEM.

  12. Distribution, persistence and interchange of Epstein-Barr virus strains among PBMC, plasma and saliva of primary infection subjects.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Hin; Chan, Koon Wing; Chan, Kwok Hung; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed at investigating the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), plasma and saliva of primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection subjects. Twelve infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients and eight asymptomatic individuals (AS) with primary EBV infection were followed longitudinally at several time points for one year from the time of diagnosis, when blood and saliva samples were collected and separated into PBMC, plasma and saliva, representing circulating B cell, plasma and epithelial cell compartments, respectively. To survey the viral strains, genotyping assays for the natural polymorphisms in two latent EBV genes, EBNA2 and LMP1, were performed and consisted of real-time PCR on EBNA2 to distinguish type 1 and 2 viruses, fluorescent-based 30-bp typing assay on LMP1 to distinguish deletion and wild type LMP1, and fluorescent-based heteroduplex tracking assays on both EBNA2 and LMP1 to distinguish defined polymorphic variants. No discernible differences were observed between IM patients and AS. Multiple viral strains were acquired early at the start of infection. Stable persistence of dominant EBV strains in the same tissue compartment was observed throughout the longitudinal samples. LMP1-defined strains, China 1, China 2 and Mediterranean+, were the most common strains observed. EBNA2-defined groups 1 and 3e predominated the PBMC and saliva compartments. Concordance of EBNA2 and LMP1 strains between PBMC and saliva suggested ready interchange of viruses between circulating B cell and epithelial cell pools, whilst discordance of viral strains observed between plasma and PBMC/saliva indicated presence of viral pools in other undetermined tissue compartments. Taken together, the results indicated that the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among the tissue compartments are more complex than those proposed by the current model of EBV life cycle. PMID:25807555

  13. Stress and strain distribution in demineralized enamel: A micro-CT based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aline Almeida; Coutinho, Eduardo; Alves, Haimon Diniz Lopes; de Assis, Joaquim Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Physiological oral mechanical forces may play a role on the progression of enamel carious lesions to cavitation. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe, by 3D finite element analysis, stress, and strain patterns in sound and carious enamel after a simulated occlusal load. Micro-CT based models were created and meshed with tetrahedral elements (based on an extracted third molar), namely: a sound (ST) and a carious tooth (CT). For the CT, enamel material properties were assigned according to the micro-CT gray values. Below the threshold corresponding to the enamel lesion (2.5 g/cm(3) ) lower and isotropic elastic modulus was assigned (E = 18 GPa against E1  = 80 GPa, E2  = E3  = 20 GPa for sound enamel). Both models were imported into a FE solver where boundary conditions were assigned and a pressure load (500 MPa) was applied at the occlusal surface. A linear static analysis was performed, considering anisotropy in sound enamel. ST showed a more efficient transfer of maximum principal stress from enamel to the dentin layer, while for the CT, enamel layer was subjected to higher and concentrated loads. Maximum principal strain distributions were seen at the carious enamel surface, especially at the central fossa, correlating to the enamel cavity seen at the original micro-CT model. It is possible to conclude that demineralized enamel compromises appropriate stress transfer from enamel to dentin, contributing to the odds of fracture and cavitation. Enamel fracture over a dentin lesion may happen as one of the normal pathways to caries progression and may act as a confounding factor during clinical diagnostic decisions. PMID:26240030

  14. The Cora Lake Shear Zone: Strain Localization in an Ultramylonitic, Deep Crustal Shear Zone, Athabasca Granulite Terrain, Western Churchill Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.; Mahan, K. H.; Orlandini, O. F.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Leslie, S. R.; Holland, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ultramylonitic shear zones typically involve intense strain localization, and when developed over large regions can introduce considerable heterogeneity into the crust. The Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) displays several 10's to 100's of meters-wide zones of ultramylonite distributed throughout its full 3-5 km mylonitized width. Detailed mapping, petrography, thermobarometry, and in-situ monazite geochronology suggest that it formed during the waning phases of granulite grade metamorphism and deformation, within one of North America's largest exposures of polydeformed lower continental crust. Anastomosing zones of ultramylonite contain recrystallized grain-sizes approaching the micron scale and might appear to suggest lower temperature mylonitization. However, feldspar and even clinopyroxene are dynamically recrystallized, and quantitative thermobarometry of syn-deformational assemblages indicate high P and T conditions ranging from 0.9 -10.6 GPa and 775-850 °C. Even at these high T's, dynamic recovery and recrystallization were extremely limited. Rocks with low modal quartz have extremely small equilibrium volumes. This is likely the result of inefficient diffusion, which is further supported by the unannealed nature of the crystals. Local carbonate veins suggests that H2O poor, CO2 rich conditions may have aided in the preservation of fine grain sizes, and may have inhibited dynamic recovery and recrystallization. The Cora Lake shear zone is interpreted to have been relatively strong and to have hardened during progressive deformation. Garnet is commonly fractured perpendicular to host rock fabric, and statically replaced by both biotite and muscovite. Pseudotachylite, with the same sense of shear, occurs in several ultramylonitized mafic granulites. Thus, cataclasis and frictional melt are interpreted to have been produced in the lower continental crust, not during later reactivation. We suggest that strengthening of rheologically stiffer lithologies led to

  15. Basin evolution and the distribution of strain within the Gulf of Corinth rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; McNeill, Lisa; Nixon, Casey; Henstock, Timothy; Bull, Jonathan; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Papatheodorou, George; Taylor, Brian; Ferentinos, George; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Lykousis, Vasilis; Sachpazi, Maria; Ford, Mary; Goodliffe, Andrew; Leeder, Mike; Gawthorpe, Robert; Collier, Richard; Clements, Benjamin

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth is a classic young active continental rift initiating <5 Ma and with current extension rates up to 15 mm/yr. The modern rift (ca. 1-2 Myr old) has been studied extensively both onshore and offshore. In this paper we bring together the results of study of the offshore rift with existing onshore data to generate a model for how the modern rift has tectonically evolved, how strain is distributed across and along the rift, how slip on individual major faults controlling rift basin subsidence has changed over relatively short timescales (e.g. <0.5 Myr) and how extension in the upper crust through fault displacement compares with whole crustal extension over the history of the rift. The results indicate that the rift stratigraphy is divided into two units (pre- and post- ca. 0.5Ma). The two units indicate markedly different rift basin geometry during these two time periods. Two separated depocentres 20-50 km long were created controlled by N- and S-dipping faults before ca. 0.5 Ma, while since ca. 0.5 Ma a single depocentre (80 km long) has been controlled by several connected N-dipping faults, with maximum subsidence focused between the two older depocentres. Thus isolated but nearby faults can persist for timescales ca. 1 Ma and form major basins before becoming linked. There is a general evolution towards a dominance of N-dipping faults; however, in the western Gulf strain is distributed across several active N- and S-dipping faults throughout rift history, producing a more complex basin geometry. Examination of extension at a larger spatial and temporal scale suggests that uniform pure shear extension without the need for a significant N-S dipping detachment fault is a viable extension mechanism for at least the western rift where constraints are greater. These results also indicate that the present day strain distribution indicated by GPS data cannot have persisted over the lifetime of the modern rift. We are now building on these studies by

  16. Intragranular strain field in columnar ice during elasto-viscoplatic transient creep regime, and relation with the local microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grennerat, F.; Montagnat, M.; Duval, P.; Vacher, P.; Castelnau, O.

    2009-12-01

    The viscoplastic behaviour of polycrystalline ice is strongly affected by the very strong anisotropy of ice crystals. Indeed, in the dislocations creep regime relevant e.g. for ice sheet flow, dislocation glide on the basal plane of ice single crystals leads to strain-rates ˜6 order of magnitude larger than strain-rates that might be obtain if only non-basal glide is activated. At the polycrystal scale, this behaviour is responsible for a strong mechanical interaction between grains in the secondary (stationary) creep regime, and strain-rate is essentially partitioned between soft grains well-oriented for basal glide and hard grains exhibiting an unfavourable orientation for basal slip. As a consequence, the macroscopic flow stress at the polycrystal scale essentially depends on the resistance of the hardest slip systems or on the associated accommodation processes such as climb of basal dislocation on non-basal planes. One therefore expects very strong strain localization in polycrystalline ice in this viscoplastic regime. On the other hand, during transient effects, elasticity comes in plays. But since elasticity of ice single crystal is almost isotropic, very different strain localizations are expected in purely elastic and purely viscoplastic deformation regimes. Consequently, strain-rate decreases by several orders of magnitude during the transient creep of polycrystalline ice. This effect is associated to stress redistribution between hard and soft grains, and is probably of great importance e.g. to understand transient regimes such as tide effects on ice shelves or on icy planets. It can be described by the coupling between elastic and viscoplastic responses, and the associated long-term memory effect. In view of a better understanding of such effects, and development of adapted micromechanical models, we are engaged in the measurement of intragranular strain field and field heterogeneities is columnar ices deformed under loading involving stress increments

  17. Local Plastic-Strain Heterogeneities and Their Impact on the Ductility of Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Guilhem; Sinclair, Chad W.; Poole, Warren J.; Azizi-Alizamini, Hamid

    2015-08-01

    Microscale plastic strain heterogeneity can arise in polycrystalline Mg and its alloys in a variety of different ways. In this article, we illustrate how microscale digital image correction based on scanning electron microscope images can reveal this plastic heterogeneity in commercially pure polycrystalline Mg and how such observations provide insight into plasticity, damage, and ductility.

  18. Local magnetic fields, uplift, gravity, and dilational strain changes in Southern California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of regional magnetic field near the San Andreas fault at Cajon, Palmdale and Tejon are strongly correlated with changes in gravity, areal strain, and uplift in these regions during the period 1977-1984. Because the inferred relationships between these parameters are in approximate agreement with those obtained from simple deformation models, the preferred explanation appeals to short-term strain episodes independently detected in each data set. Transfer functions from magnetic to strain, gravity, and uplift perturbations, obtained by least-square linear fits to the data, are -0.98 nT/ppm, -0.03 nT/mu Gal, and 9.1 nT/m respectively. Tectonomagnetic model calculations underestimate the observed changes and those reported previously for dam loading and volcano-magnetic observations. A less likely alternative explanation of the observed data appeals to a common source of meteorologically generated crustal or instrumental noise in the strain, gravity, magnetic, and uplift data.-from Author

  19. Proton irradiation effect on microstructure, strain localization and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, L.; Serres, A.; Auzoux, Q.; Leboulch, D.; Was, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation-induced microstructure, strain localization, and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) behaviour of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 °C was examined. type dislocation loops having 1/3<1 1 2¯ 0> Burgers vector and a mean diameter and density of, respectively, 10 nm and 17 × 10 21 m -3 were observed while no Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 precipitates amorphization or Fe redistribution were detected after irradiation. After transverse tensile testing to 0.5% macroscopic plastic strain at room temperature, almost exclusively basal channels were imaged. Statistical Schmid factor analysis shows that irradiation leads to a change in slip system activation from prismatic to basal due to a higher increase of critical resolved shear stresses for prismatic slip systems than for basal slip system. Finite element calculations suggest that dislocation channeling occurs in the irradiated proton layer at an equivalent stress close to 70% of the yield stress of the irradiated material, i.e. while the irradiated layer is still in the elastic regime for a 0.5% applied macroscopic plastic strain. Comparative constant elongation rate tensile tests performed at a strain rate of 10 -5 s -1 in iodized methanol solutions at room temperature on specimens both unirradiated and proton-irradiated to 2 dpa demonstrated a detrimental effect of irradiation on I-SCC.

  20. Feasibility Study on Neutron Diffraction Method for Evaluation of Residual Strain Distribution of Regenerative Cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masaki; Yoshida, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    The regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine is exposed to a large temperature difference between the hot gas (about 3500K) and the liquid hydrogen (about 20K). This induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated in the chamber wall throughout the cyclic firing tests. Evaluation of the stress and the strain distribution in a chamber wall is essential since chamber life is usually related to such stress and strain. In this study, the residual strain in a regenerative cooled combustion chamber wall was measured by applying the neutron diffraction method and the X-ray diffraction method. The measured data were compared with the numerical data by finite element analysis, and the feasibility of the neutron diffraction method for the regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine was evaluated.

  1. Strain distribution of thin InN epilayers grown on (0001) GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delimitis, A.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Kehagias, Th.; Kioseoglou, J.; Karakostas, Th.; Nouet, G.

    2007-02-01

    A structural characterization of thin InN films is performed to determine the post-growth strain distribution, using electron microscopy techniques. A 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN /GaN interface effectively accommodates the lattice mismatch. The InN in-plane lattice parameter, which remained practically constant throughout the epilayer thickness, was precisely determined by electron diffraction analysis, and cross-section and plan-view lattice images. Image analysis using the geometric phase and projection methods revealed a uniform distribution of the residual tensile strain along the growth and lateral directions. The in-plane strain is primarily attributed to InN island coalescence during the initial stages of growth.

  2. Temporal and Spatial Strain Distribution Derived from GNSS Network in Volcanic Area, the Case Study of Piton De La Fournaise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, A.; Got, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic volcanoes are amongst the largest volcanic edifices on Earth. These huge volcanoes exhibit large deformation areas such as rift zones, and strong ground displacements with more or less mobile flanks, which respond to long-lasting stress field conditions (gravitational stress, magmatic processes and/or regional tectonics...). Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion, Indian ocean) is one of the most active basaltic volcano in the world and displays all of these features. We study the dynamics and the origin of Piton de la Fournaise deformation through the observation of temporal and spatial strain distribution. With the densification of the volcano observatory permanent GNSS network in 2009 and thanks to their high sampling rates, for the first time we have calculated strain maps derived from GNSS displacements on this volcano. We present temporal and spatial distribution of strain on Piton de la Fournaise, on the whole edifice from the summit to the coastline, during both eruptive and rest periods. Main deformation allows us to distinguish four main sectors displaying distinct behaviors in response to volcanic and rest activities: (1) the summit, (2) the terminal cone, (3) the base of the cone, and (4) the eastern flank. Principal strains are maximal on the terminal cone -with an antagonist pattern between the summit and the slope of the terminal cone where the strains are one order of magnitude lower than on the summit-, while decay rates of compressive strain is observed in the eastern flank up to the coastline. Even if the strains are low in the eastern flank, we evidence compressive strain there, whereas the coastline appears to be more stable. The eastern flank sliding damps with the distance, suggesting stress accumulates in the slopes of the Grandes Pentes/Grand Brûlé areas. This evaluation provides new insights for the assessment of potential hazards associated with edifice instabilities, and especially the generation of future flank destabilizations

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Revetta, Randy P

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium previously reported to be the cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis from contaminated metalworking fluid aerosols, is becoming a public health concern. PMID:26744376

  4. Generation of localized strain in a thin film piezoelectric to control individual magnetoelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jizhai; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Sepulveda, Abdon; Carman, Gregory P.; Lynch, Christopher S.; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.

    2015-08-31

    Experimental results demonstrate the ability of a surface electrode pattern to produce sufficient in-plane strain in a PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin film clamped by a Si substrate to control magnetism in a 1000 nm diameter Ni ring. The electrode pattern and the Ni ring/PZT thin film heterostructure were designed using a finite element based micromagnetics code. The magnetoelectric heterostructures were fabricated on the PZT film using e-beam lithography and characterized using magnetic force microscopy. Application of voltage to the electrodes moved one of the “onion” state domain walls. This method enables the development of complex architectures incorporating strain-mediated multiferroic devices.

  5. Generation of localized strain in a thin film piezoelectric to control individual magnetoelectric heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jizhai; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Sepulveda, Abdon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Carman, Gregory P.; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Experimental results demonstrate the ability of a surface electrode pattern to produce sufficient in-plane strain in a PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) thin film clamped by a Si substrate to control magnetism in a 1000 nm diameter Ni ring. The electrode pattern and the Ni ring/PZT thin film heterostructure were designed using a finite element based micromagnetics code. The magnetoelectric heterostructures were fabricated on the PZT film using e-beam lithography and characterized using magnetic force microscopy. Application of voltage to the electrodes moved one of the "onion" state domain walls. This method enables the development of complex architectures incorporating strain-mediated multiferroic devices.

  6. Strain distribution in the proximal Human femur during in vitro simulated sideways fall.

    PubMed

    Zani, Lorenzo; Erani, Paolo; Grassi, Lorenzo; Taddei, Fulvia; Cristofolini, Luca

    2015-07-16

    This study assessed: (i) how the magnitude and direction of principal strains vary for different sideways fall loading directions; (ii) how the principal strains for a sideways fall differ from physiological loading directions; (iii) the fracture mechanism during a sideways fall. Eleven human femurs were instrumented with 16 triaxial strain gauges each. The femurs were non-destructively subjected to: (a) six loading configurations covering the range of physiological loading directions; (b) 12 configurations simulating sideways falls. The femurs were eventually fractured in a sideways fall configuration while high-speed cameras recorded the event. When the same force magnitude was applied, strains were significantly larger in a sideways fall than for physiological loading directions (principal compressive strain was 70% larger in a sideways fall). Also the compressive-to-tensile strain ratio was different: for physiological loading the largest compressive strain was only 30% larger than the largest tensile strain; but for the sideways fall, compressive strains were twice as large as the tensile strains. Principal strains during a sideways fall were nearly perpendicular to the direction of principal strains for physiological loading. In the most critical regions (medial part of the head-neck) the direction of principal strain varied by less than 9° between the different physiological loading conditions, whereas it varied by up to 17° between the sideways fall loading conditions. This was associated with a specific fracture mechanism during sideways fall, where failure initiated on the superior-lateral side (compression) followed by later failure of the medially (tension), often exhibiting a two-peak force-displacement curve. PMID:25843261

  7. Shear-enhanced compaction and strain localization in porous limestone: a study based on X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Baud, P.; Hall, S.; Wong, T.

    2011-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition in porous sandstones has now been studied extensively. Microstructural studies combining various techniques on samples deformed in the laboratory documented the development of a wide variety on strain localization patterns and failure modes in overall agreement with the field observations in various sandstone formations. In contrast, there is a paucity of mechanical and microstructural laboratory data on the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonates, particularly for the high porosity end-members. This lack of data is related to various specific difficulties associated with the study of inelastic deformation in high porosity limestones: the interplay between microcracking and crystal plasticity even at room temperature, dissolution of calcite in presence of water, etc... The question of strain localization is in particular hard to tackle as conventional microstructural analyses cannot as in sandstone be guided by acoustic emission statistics. In this context, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) imaging provides a promising technique to accurately describe the various failure modes associated with the brittle-ductile transition in porous limestone. In this study, we focused on a grainstone from the Majella Mountain, central Italy. Detailed field observations performed in this formation by Tondi et al. (2006) have revealed some complex interplay between deformation/compaction bands and stylolites. Our samples of Majella grainstone had a nominal porosity of 31% and were primarily composed of calcite. A series of hydrostatic and conventional triaxial experiments were performed at room temperature, constant strain rate and at confining pressures ranging from 5 to 50 MPa. Several sets of CT images at resolutions between 4 and 40 microns were acquired before and after deformation. Statistics on the macropores and spatial distribution of microporosity were characterized. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was performed on images of the intact

  8. Fundamental limitations of the local approximation for electron distribution function and fluid model in bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, M. B. Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Kapustin, K. D.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the local approximation for computing the electron distribution function depends both on the ratio between the energy relaxation length and a characteristic plasma length and on the ratio between heating and ambipolar electric fields. In particular, the local approximation is not valid at the discharge periphery even at high pressure due to the fact that the ambipolar electric field practically always is larger than the heating electric field.

  9. Monitoring Local Strain in a Thermal Barrier Coating System Under Thermal Mechanical Gas Turbine Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manero, Albert; Sofronsky, Stephen; Knipe, Kevin; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M.; Raghavan, Seetha; Bartsch, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Advances in aircraft and land-based turbine engines have been increasing the extreme loading conditions on traditional engine components and have incited the need for improved performance with the use of protective coatings. These protective coatings shield the load-bearing super alloy blades from the high-temperature combustion gases by creating a thermal gradient over their thickness. This addition extends the life and performance of blades. A more complete understanding of the behavior, failure mechanics, and life expectancy for turbine blades and their coatings is needed to enhance and validate simulation models. As new thermal-barrier-coated materials and deposition methods are developed, strides to effectively test, evaluate, and prepare the technology for industry deployment are of paramount interest. Coupling the experience and expertise of researchers at the University of Central Florida, The German Aerospace Center, and Cleveland State University with the world-class synchrotron x-ray beam at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory, the synergistic collaboration has yielded previously unseen measurements to look inside the coating layer system for in situ strain measurements during representative service loading. These findings quantify the in situ strain response on multilayer thermal barrier coatings and shed light on the elastic and nonelastic properties of the layers and the role of mechanical load and internal cooling variations on the response. The article discusses the experimental configuration and development of equipment to perform in situ strain measurements on multilayer thin coatings and provides an overview of the achievements thus far.

  10. Localized versus generalist phenotypes in a broadly distributed tropical mammal: how is intraspecific variation distributed across disparate environments?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The extent of phenotypic differentiation in response to local environmental conditions is a key component of species adaptation and persistence. Understanding the structuring of phenotypic diversity in response to local environmental pressures can provide important insights into species evolutionary dynamics and responses to environmental change. This work examines the influence of steep environmental gradients on intraspecific phenotypic variation and tests two hypotheses about how the tropical soft grass mouse, Akodon mollis (Cricetidae, Rodentia), contends with the disparate environmental conditions encompassed by its broad distribution. Specifically, we test if the species expresses a geographically unstructured, or generalist, phenotype throughout its range or if it shows geographically localized morphological differentiation across disparate environments. Results Using geometric morphometric and ecomorphological analyses of skull shape variation we found that despite distinct environmental conditions, geographically structured morphological variation is limited, with the notable exception of a distinct morphological disjunction at the high-elevation forest-grassland transition in the southern portion of A. mollis distribution. Based on genetic analyses, geographic isolation alone does not explain this localized phenotype, given that similar levels of genetic differentiation were also observed among individuals inhabiting other ecosystems that are nonetheless not distinct morphologically. Conclusions Instead of phenotypic specialization across environments in these tropical mountains, there was limited differentiation of skull shape and size across the broad range of A. mollis, with the exception of individuals from the puna, the highest-elevation ecosystem. The high morphological variance among individuals, together with a weak association with local environmental conditions, not only highlights the flexibility of A. mollis’ skull, but also

  11. Using Local Second Gradient Model and Shear Strain Localisation to Model the Excavation Damaged Zone in Unsaturated Claystone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Benoît; Levasseur, Séverine; Collin, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    The drilling of galleries induces damage propagation in the surrounding medium and creates, around them, the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The prediction of the extension and fracture structure of this zone remains a major issue, especially in the context of underground nuclear waste storage. Experimental studies on geomaterials indicate that localised deformation in shear band mode usually appears prior to fractures. Thus, the excavation damaged zone can be modelled by considering the development of shear strain localisation bands. In the classical finite element framework, strain localisation suffers a mesh-dependency problem. Therefore, an enhanced model with a regularisation method is required to correctly model the strain localisation behaviour. Among the existing methods, we choose the coupled local second gradient model. We extend it to unsaturated conditions and we include the solid grain compressibility. Furthermore, air ventilation inside underground galleries engenders a rock-atmosphere interaction that could influence the damaged zone. This interaction has to be investigated in order to predict the damaged zone behaviour. Finally, a hydro-mechanical modelling of a gallery excavation in claystone is presented and leads to a fairly good representation of the EDZ. The main objectives of this study are to model the fractures by considering shear strain localisation bands, and to investigate if an isotropic model accurately reproduces the in situ measurements. The numerical results provide information about the damaged zone extension, structure and behaviour that are in very good agreement with in situ measurements and observations. For instance, the strain localisation bands that develop in chevron pattern during the excavation and rock desaturation, due to air ventilation, are observed close to the gallery.

  12. Whole genome sequencing of a natural recombinant Toxoplasma gondii strain reveals chromosome sorting and local allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Bontell, Irene Lindström; Hall, Neil; Ashelford, Kevin E; Dubey, JP; Boyle, Jon P; Lindh, Johan; Smith, Judith E

    2009-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite of global importance. In common with many protozoan parasites it has the capacity for sexual recombination, but current evidence suggests this is rarely employed. The global population structure is dominated by a small number of clonal genotypes, which exhibit biallelic variation and limited intralineage divergence. Little is known of the genotypes present in Africa despite the importance of AIDS-associated toxoplasmosis. Results We here present extensive sequence analysis of eight isolates from Uganda, including the whole genome sequencing of a type II/III recombinant isolate, TgCkUg2. 454 sequencing gave 84% coverage across the approximate 61 Mb genome and over 70,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were mapped against reference strains. TgCkUg2 was shown to contain entire chromosomes of either type II or type III origin, demonstrating chromosome sorting rather than intrachromosomal recombination. We mapped 1,252 novel polymorphisms and clusters of new SNPs within coding sequence implied selective pressure on a number of genes, including surface antigens and rhoptry proteins. Further sequencing of the remaining isolates, six type II and one type III strain, confirmed the presence of novel SNPs, suggesting these are local allelic variants within Ugandan type II strains. In mice, the type III isolate had parasite burdens at least 30-fold higher than type II isolates, while the recombinant strain had an intermediate burden. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that recombination between clonal lineages does occur in nature but there is nevertheless close homology between African and North American isolates. The quantity of high confidence SNP data generated in this study and the availability of the putative parental strains to this natural recombinant provide an excellent basis for future studies of the genetic divergence and of genotype-phenotype relationships. PMID:19457243

  13. Connecting global and local energy distributions in quantum spin models on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arad, Itai; Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Landau, Zeph

    2016-03-01

    Local interactions in many-body quantum systems are generally non-commuting and consequently the Hamiltonian of a local region cannot be measured simultaneously with the global Hamiltonian. The connection between the probability distributions of measurement outcomes of the local and global Hamiltonians will depend on the angles between the diagonalizing bases of these two Hamiltonians. In this paper we characterize the relation between these two distributions. On one hand, we upperbound the probability of measuring an energy τ in a local region, if the global system is in a superposition of eigenstates with energies ε <τ . On the other hand, we bound the probability of measuring a global energy ɛ in a bipartite system that is in a tensor product of eigenstates of its two subsystems. Very roughly, we show that due to the local nature of the governing interactions, these distributions are identical to what one encounters in the commuting cases, up to exponentially small corrections. Finally, we use these bounds to study the spectrum of a locally truncated Hamiltonian, in which the energies of a contiguous region have been truncated above some threshold energy. We show that the lower part of the spectrum of this Hamiltonian is exponentially close to that of the original Hamiltonian. A restricted version of this result in 1D was a central building block in a recent improvement of the 1D area-law.

  14. Local influence in comparative calibration models under elliptical t-distributions.

    PubMed

    Galea, Manuel; Bolfarine, Heleno; Vilca, Filidor

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we consider applications of local influence (Cook, 1986) to evaluate small perturbations in the model or data set in the context of structural comparative calibration (Bolfarine and Galea, 1995) assuming that the measurements obtained follow a multivariate elliptical distribution. Different perturbation schemes are investigated and an application is considered to a real data set, using the elliptical t-distribution. PMID:16385910

  15. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W.; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges. PMID:27275822

  16. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges. PMID:27275822

  17. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  18. Strain, curvature, and twist measurements in digital holographic interferometry using pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajshekhar, G.; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Rastogi, Pramod

    2009-09-15

    Measurement of strain, curvature, and twist of a deformed object play an important role in deformation analysis. Strain depends on the first order displacement derivative, whereas curvature and twist are determined by second order displacement derivatives. This paper proposes a pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution based method for measurement of strain, curvature, and twist in digital holographic interferometry where the object deformation or displacement is encoded as interference phase. In the proposed method, the phase derivative is estimated by peak detection of pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution evaluated along each row/column of the reconstructed interference field. A complex exponential signal with unit amplitude and the phase derivative estimate as the argument is then generated and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution along each row/column of this signal is evaluated. The curvature is estimated by using peak tracking strategy for the new distribution. For estimation of twist, the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution is evaluated along each column/row (i.e., in alternate direction with respect to the previous one) for the generated complex exponential signal and the corresponding peak detection gives the twist estimate.

  19. Study on grain boundary character and strain distribution of intergranular cracking in the CGHAZ of T23 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.J.; Lu, H. Yu, C.; Xu, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Intergranular reheat cracking in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of T23 steel was produced by strain to fracture tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermal–mechanical simulator. Then the grain boundary character, as well as the strain distribution after reheat crack propagation, was studied by electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that incoherent Σ3 boundaries were seldom found on the prior austenite grain boundaries. Therefore, only the type of random high-angle boundaries played a crucial role in the intergranular cracking. Microstructurally cavities and small cracks were preferentially initiated from high-angle grain boundaries. Low-angle grain boundaries and high-angle ones with misorientation angles less than 15° were more resistant to the cracking. More importantly, the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries increased with the plastic strain induced by both temperature gradient and stress in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone, which contributed to the crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, the strain distributions in the vicinity of cavities and cracks revealed the accommodation processes of plastic deformation during stress relaxation. It also reflected the strength differences between grain interior and grain boundary at different heat-treated temperatures, which had a large influence on the cracking mechanism. - Highlights: • The coincidence site lattice boundaries play little role in the reheat cracking. • Cavity and crack occur at high-angle grain boundaries rather than low-angle ones. • The strain leads low-angle grain boundaries to transform to high-angle ones. • Strain distribution differs for cavity and crack zones at different temperatures.

  20. Localized-state distributions in molecularly doped polymers determined from time-of-flight transient photocurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2000-07-01

    Localized-state distributions have been studied in a molecularly doped polymer (MDP) system of a polymer binder (polycarbonate) doped with charge-transporting [N, N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD)] and trap-forming molecules [1-phenyl-3-(p-diethylaminostyryl)-5-(p-diethylaminophenyl)pyrazoline (PRA)] simultaneously by means of the conventional time-of-flight (TOF) transient photocurrent measurements. The existence of a transport energy in the MDP system is experimentally shown by comparing Gaussian distributions of localized states deduced by the Gaussian disorder model, due to Bässler and co-workers [H. Bässler, Phys. Status Solidi B 175, 15 (1993)], with localized-state distributions determined from the analysis of the TOF transient photocurrent data, based on the trap-controlled band transport [H. Naito, J. Ding, and M. Okuda, Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 1830 (1994)]. The transport energy is found to be located at the center of the Gaussian distribution due to the host TPD molecules. It is also found that at 0.1 mol % PRA addition, the Gaussian distribution of localized states due to TPD molecules is broadened through the random electrostatic potential generated by dipoles of PRA, and at 1 mol % PRA addition, the localized-state structure due to PRA molecules, as well as the further broadening of the Gaussian distribution, are observed. The energy level of the structure is determined to be 0.54 eV above the transport energy, which is almost equal to the difference in the ionization potential between PRA and TPD.

  1. Bayesian Combination of Regional and Local Information Using Some Common Distributions in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidou, O.; Ouarda, T. B.

    2007-05-01

    The main challenge in flood frequency analysis is to find relevant and sufficient information to fit a local distribution with an acceptable precision to the variable of interest. This precision impacts the cost and reliability of hydraulic structures as well as the safety of downstream communities. If the site of interest has been monitored for a sufficiently long period (more than 30-40 years), at-site frequency analysis can be used to estimate flood quantiles with a fair precision. Otherwise, regional estimation may be used to mitigate the lack of data, but local information is then ignored. The authors propose a Bayesian method in this paper that uses both sources of information for even more precise quantile estimation. The proposed method uses the classical log- linear regression as regional model and assumes that the local flood peaks are GEV, Gamma, Weibull, Log- Normal or exponentially distributed. The method works even with a single local observation besides relaxing the hypothesis of normality of the quantiles probability distribution that is used in the empirical Bayes approach. A thorough performance assessment was made with the GEV distribution and it was shown that a) when the regional model is unbiased, the proposed method gives better estimation of the GEV quantiles and parameters than the local, regional and empirical Bayes estimators; b) even when the regional model displays a severe relative bias when estimating the quantiles, the proposed method still gives the best estimation of the GEV shape parameter and outperforms the other approaches on higher quantiles provided that the relative bias is the same for all quantiles; c) the gain in performance with the new approach is considerable for sites with very short records. Theoretical developments and some preliminary results are presented for the other distributions. Keywords: regionalization, probability distribution, linear regression, empirical Bayesian method, flood frequency analysis

  2. [Distribution of blaOXA genes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Ihsan Hakkı; Aşık, Gülşah; Karakeçe, Engin; Oksüz, Lütfiye; Yağcı, Server; Sesli Çetin, Emel; Ozdemir, Mehmet; Atasoy, Ali Rıza; Koçoğlu, Esra; Gül, Mustafa; Kurtoğlu, Muhammet Güzel; Köksal Çakırlar, Fatma; Seyrek, Adnan; Berktaş, Mustafa; Gültepe, Bilge; Ayyildiz, Ahmet

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the most important agent of nosocomial infections within the Acinetobacter genus. This gram-negative coccobacillus is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics used in antimicrobial therapy, and capable of developing resistance including carbapenems. The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) kit for OXA subgroups in A.baumannii, and to investigate the distribution of OXA subgroups in A.baumannii strains isolated from geographically different regions of Turkey. A total of 834 A.baumannii clinical isolates collected from different state and university medical centers in 13 provinces (Afyonkarahisar, Ankara, Bolu, Elazig, Erzurum, Isparta, Istanbul, Kahramanmaras, Konya, Sakarya, Van) between 2008-2011, were included in the study. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and automated systems [Vitek2 (bioMerieux, ABD) and Phoenix (BD Diagnostic, MD)]. The susceptibility profiles of the isolates were studied with automated systems and standard disc diffusion method. All samples were subjected to qPCR to detect blaOXA-51-like, blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-58-like genes. A conventional PCR method was also used to detect blaOXA-24-like gene. The resistance rates observed during the study period were as follows: 96.8% for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 86.8% for ciprofloxacin, 74.7% for gentamicin, 71.7% for amikacin, 73.5% for cefaperozone-sulbactam, 72.1% for imipenem and 73% for meropenem. Six hundred and two (72.2 %) isolates were resistant to both imipenem and meropenem. Colistin was found to be the most effective antibiotic against A.baumannii isolates with 100% susceptibility rate. All isolates were positive for blaOXA-51-like, however blaOXA-24-like gene could not be demonstrated in any isolate. Total positivity rates of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-58-like genes were found as 53.7% and 12.5%, respectively, while these rates were 74.4% and 17.3% in carbapenem-resistant isolates

  3. How breadth of degree distribution influences network robustness: Comparing localized and random attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-09-01

    The stability of networks is greatly influenced by their degree distributions and in particular by their breadth. Networks with broader degree distributions are usually more robust to random failures but less robust to localized attacks. To better understand the effect of the breadth of the degree distribution we study two models in which the breadth is controlled and compare their robustness against localized attacks (LA) and random attacks (RA). We study analytically and by numerical simulations the cases where the degrees in the networks follow a bi-Poisson distribution, P (k ) =α e-λ1λ/1kk ! +(1 -α ) e-λ2λ/2kk ! ,α ∈[0 ,1 ] , and a Gaussian distribution, P (k ) =A exp(-(k/-μ) 22 σ2 ), with a normalization constant A where k ≥0 . In the bi-Poisson distribution the breadth is controlled by the values of α , λ1, and λ2, while in the Gaussian distribution it is controlled by the standard deviation, σ . We find that only when α =0 or α =1 , i.e., degrees obeying a pure Poisson distribution, are LA and RA the same. In all other cases networks are more vulnerable under LA than under RA. For a Gaussian distribution with an average degree μ fixed, we find that when σ2 is smaller than μ the network is more vulnerable against random attack. When σ2 is larger than μ , however, the network becomes more vulnerable against localized attack. Similar qualitative results are also shown for interdependent networks.

  4. Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Metzger, Zvi; Brosh, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Aim To precisely quantify the circumferential strains created along the radicular dentin of maxillary incisors during a simulated clinical procedure of lateral compaction. Methods Six miniature strain gauges were bonded on the roots of fourteen recently extracted maxillary central incisors that were subjected to root canal instrumentation. The strain gauges were bonded at three levels (apical, middle, and coronal) and four aspects (buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal) of the roots. Each tooth was embedded in a PVC cylinder containing polyvinyl-siloxane impression material. Root filling was then performed by simulating the clinical procedure of lateral compaction using nickel-titanium finger spreaders. The force applied to the spreader and the strains developing in the surface root dentin were continuously recorded at a frequency of 10 Hz. Results The highest strains that developed during lateral compaction were in the mesial and distal aspects at the apical level of the root. The magnitudes of the maximal mesial/distal strains at the apical as well as the mid-root levels were approximately 2.5–3 times higher than those at the buccal/lingual aspects (p = 0.041). The strains decreased significantly (p<0.04) from the apical through the mid-root levels to the coronal level, yielding gradients of 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively. The mesial and distal strains were consistently tensile and did not differ significantly; however, the buccal strains were generally 35–65% higher than the lingual strains (p = 0.078). Lateral compaction resulted in the gradual build-up of residual strains, resulting in generation of a 'stair-step' curve. These strains declined gradually and almost completely disappeared after 1000 sec. Conclusions With proper mounting of several miniature strain gauges at various levels and aspects of the root, significant circumferential strains can be monitored under clinically relevant compaction forces. The residual strains at the end of lateral

  5. Bathythermal distribution, maturity, and growth of lake trout strains stocked in U.S. waters of Lake Ontario, 1978-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.

    1996-01-01

    Bathythermal distributions, sexual maturity, and growth of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) strains stocked in Lake Ontario were determined for fish collected with trawls and gill nets in 1978-93. The purpose was to augment the basis for deciding which strains to continue stocking in an effort to reestablish a self-sustaining population. The Clearwater Lake (CWL) strain was found in shallower, warmer water than all other strains; the Seneca Lake (SEN) strain was usually shallower than the Jenny Lake (JEN) and Lake Superior (SUP) strains at ages 1 and 2 but was usually deeper at age 3 and older. Depth distribution of the 'Ontario strain'--from gametes of several strains that survived to maturity in Lake Ontario-- was similar to that of the SEN and SUP strains. About half the males matured at age 4 and half the females at age 5; males < 500 mm and females < 600 mm long were rarely mature. Least-sqaures mean lengths and weights of the CWL strain were greater than those of all other strains through age 4. At age 7 and older, CWL and JEN fish were generally smaller than all other strains. Means lengths and weights of males and females of the same age and strain frequently differed at age 4 and older. Growth in weight at age 4 and older was not associated with biomass indices of prey fishes. Differences in growth rates among strains were associated with bathythermal distribution which is a heritable trait. Weight-length regressions differed by year, sex, and stage of maturity but were rarely different among strains. Competition for space appeared to affect condition of large lake trout. Growth rates and maturity schedules provide little basis for recommending stocking one strain in preference to another. Depth ranges of strains overlapped widely, but lake trout occupied only about one-fourth of available bottom habitat. Stocking several strains should be continued to maximize use of sustainable habitat.

  6. Local scattering stress distribution on surface of a spherical cell in optical stretcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareil, Paul B.; Sheng, Yunlong; Chiou, Arthur

    2006-12-01

    We calculate stress distribution on the surface of a spherical cell trapped by two counter propagating beams in the optical stretcher in the ray optics regime. We demonstrate that the local scattering stress is perpendicular to the spherical refractive surface regardless of incident angle, polarization and the reflectance and transmittance at the surface. We explain the apparition of peaks in the stress distribution, which were not revealed in the existing theory. We consider the divergence of the incident beams from the fibers, and express the stress distribution as a function of fiber-to-cell distance. The new theory can predict the cell’s deformation more precisely.

  7. Measurement of strain distribution in cortical bone around miniscrew implants used for orthodontic anchorage using digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Rupali; Bhutani, Ravi; Shakher, Chandra

    2016-05-01

    An application of digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) for the measurement of deformations and strain-field distributions developed in cortical bone around orthodontic miniscrew implants inserted into the human maxilla is presented. The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the strain distribution in cortical bone/miniscrew interface of human maxilla around miniscrew implants of different diameters, different implant lengths, and implants of different commercially available companies. The technique is also used to measure tilt/rotation of canine caused due to the application of retraction springs. The proposed technique has high sensitivity and enables the observation of deformation/strain distribution. In DSPI, two specklegrams are recorded corresponding to pre- and postloading of the retraction spring. The DSPI fringe pattern is observed by subtracting these two specklegrams. Optical phase was extracted using Riesz transform and the monogenic signal from a single DSPI fringe pattern. The obtained phase is used to calculate the parameters of interest such as displacement/deformation and strain/stress. The experiment was conducted on a dry human skull fulfilling the criteria of intact dental arches and all teeth present. Eight different miniscrew implants were loaded with an insertion angulation of 45 deg in the inter-radicular region of the maxillary second premolar and molar region. The loading of miniscrew implants was done with force level (150 gf) by nickel-titanium closed-coil springs (9 mm). The obtained results from DSPI reveal that implant diameter and implant length affect the displacement and strain distribution in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant.

  8. Wide Distribution of Closely Related, Antibiotic-Producing Arthrobacter Strains throughout the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Wietz, Matthias; Månsson, Maria; Bowman, Jeff S.; Blom, Nikolaj; Ng, Yin

    2012-01-01

    We isolated 16 antibiotic-producing bacterial strains throughout the central Arctic Ocean, including seven Arthrobacter spp. with almost identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. These strains were numerically rare, as revealed using 454 pyrosequencing libraries. Arthrobacter spp. produced arthrobacilins A to C under different culture conditions, but other, unidentified compounds likely contributed to their antibiotic activity. PMID:22247128

  9. Distribution and diversity of cry genes in native strains of Bacillus thuringiensis obtained from different ecosystems from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Uribe, D; Martinez, W; Cerón, J

    2003-02-01

    Colombia is a tropical country located at the north of South America. It is considered to be one of the most important countries in terms of its biodiversity worldwide. One hundred and eight soil samples obtained from agricultural crops and wild ecosystems were evaluated in terms of the presence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) native strains. One hundred and eight different Bt strains were isolated and characterized by the presence of crystal proteins by SDS-PAGE and a multiplex PCR with general and specific primers for cry1 and cry3, cry7, and cry8 gene detection. Most of the Bt strains (73%) reacted with the cry1 general primers; 27.8% of the Bt strains reacted with cry3, cry7, and cry8 general primers and 17.8% of strains did not react with any of these two sets of primers. Thirty different PCR profiles were found in the strains with cry1 genes when they were analyzed with specific primers (cry1A to cry1F). A high frequency of joint occurrence was observed for cry1Aa/cry1Ab, cry1Aa/cry1Ac, cry1Ab/cry1Ac, and cry1C/cry1D genes with a Pearson coefficient of 0.88, 0.74, 0.76, and 0.87, respectively. Other distinctive characteristics were found in the Colombian collection as the presence of 22.2% of native strains which presented, at the same time, lepidopteran and coleopteran active genes. Interesting relations were found as well between the cry gene distribution and the geographical areas sampled. Finally, some strains with moderate to high biopesticide activity against Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera) and Premnotrypes vorax (Coleoptera) insects were identified, this being important to explore future microbial strategies for the control of these crop pests in the region. PMID:12623312

  10. Prediction of Local Ultimate Strain and Toughness of Trabecular Bone Tissue by Raman Material Composition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stüssi, Edgar; Müller, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that bone mineral density correlates with fracture risk at the population level but does not correlate with individual fracture risk well. Current research aims to better understand the failure mechanism of bone and to identify key determinants of bone quality, thus improving fracture risk prediction. To get a better understanding of bone strength, it is important to analyze tissue-level properties not influenced by macro- or microarchitectural factors. The aim of this pilot study was to identify whether and to what extent material properties are correlated with mechanical properties at the tissue level. The influence of macro- or microarchitectural factors was excluded by testing individual trabeculae. Previously reported data of mechanical parameters measured in single trabeculae under tension and bending and its compositional properties measured by Raman spectroscopy was evaluated. Linear and multivariate regressions show that bone matrix quality but not quantity was significantly and independently correlated with the tissue-level ultimate strain and postyield work (r = 0.65–0.94). Principal component analysis extracted three independent components explaining 86% of the total variance, representing elastic, yield, and ultimate components according to the included mechanical parameters. Some matrix parameters were both included in the ultimate component, indicating that the variation in ultimate strain and postyield work could be largely explained by Raman-derived compositional parameters. PMID:25695083

  11. 18 CFR 284.269 - Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company emergency sales rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978 AND RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978 AND RELATED AUTHORITIES Emergency Natural Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.269 Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company...

  12. 18 CFR 284.269 - Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company emergency sales rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978 AND RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978 AND RELATED AUTHORITIES Emergency Natural Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.269 Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company...

  13. LandScape Command Set: Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Burchard, R.L.; Small, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment (LandScape) commands set that provides a Generic Device Subsystem Application Programmers Interface (API). These commands are implemented using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification with Orbix from Iona Technologies.

  14. Schools, Choice and Reputation: Local School Markets and the Distribution of Symbolic Capital in Segregated Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunar, Nihad; Ambrose, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An exploration is presented of how urban spaces, polarized by class and ethnicity, structure the basic conditions of emerging local school markets. The authors investigate how the distribution of symbolic capital, or "hot knowledge" of the market, affects schools, the market, and the urban spaces themselves. The study is guided by…

  15. 18 CFR 284.269 - Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company emergency sales rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intrastate pipeline and local distribution company emergency sales rates. 284.269 Section 284.269 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OTHER REGULATIONS UNDER...

  16. Service Delivery Rules and the Distribution of Local Government Services: Three Detroit Bureaucracies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bryan D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Argues that the routinized procedures governing delivery of local public services influence distribution of services to citizens by three municipal agencies in Detroit. Agencies are the Department of Parks and Recreation, the Sanitation Division, and the Environmental Enforcement Division of the Environmental Protection and Maintenance Department.…

  17. Speciation And Distribution Of Arsenic And Localization Of Nutrients In Rice Grains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice grains and the generally low concentration of micronutrients in rice have been recognized as a major concern for human health. Here, we investigated the speciation and localization of As and the distribution of (micro)nutrients in rice grains b...

  18. Impact of Higher Natural Gas Prices on Local Distribution Companies and Residential Customers

    EIA Publications

    2007-01-01

    This report examines some of the problems faced by natural gas consumers as a result of increasing heating bills in recent years and problems associated with larger amounts of uncollectible revenue and lower throughput for the local distribution companies (LDCs) supplying the natural gas.

  19. Local host specialization, host-switching, and dispersal shape the regional distributions of avian haemosporidian parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Vincenzo A.; Collins, Michael D.; Medeiros, Matthew C. I.; Sari, Eloisa H. R.; Coffey, Elyse D.; Dickerson, Rebecca C.; Lugarini, Camile; Stratford, Jeffrey A.; Henry, Donata R.; Merrill, Loren; Matthews, Alix E.; Hanson, Alison A.; Roberts, Jackson R.; Joyce, Michael; Kunkel, Melanie R.; Ricklefs, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The drivers of regional parasite distributions are poorly understood, especially in comparison with those of free-living species. For vector-transmitted parasites, in particular, distributions might be influenced by host-switching and by parasite dispersal with primary hosts and vectors. We surveyed haemosporidian blood parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) of small land birds in eastern North America to characterize a regional parasite community. Distributions of parasite populations generally reflected distributions of their hosts across the region. However, when the interdependence between hosts and parasites was controlled statistically, local host assemblages were related to regional climatic gradients, but parasite assemblages were not. Moreover, because parasite assemblage similarity does not decrease with distance when controlling for host assemblages and climate, parasites evidently disperse readily within the distributions of their hosts. The degree of specialization on hosts varied in some parasite lineages over short periods and small geographic distances independently of the diversity of available hosts and potentially competing parasite lineages. Nonrandom spatial turnover was apparent in parasite lineages infecting one host species that was well-sampled within a single year across its range, plausibly reflecting localized adaptations of hosts and parasites. Overall, populations of avian hosts generally determine the geographic distributions of haemosporidian parasites. However, parasites are not dispersal-limited within their host distributions, and they may switch hosts readily. PMID:26305975

  20. Effects of local field and inherent strain in reflectance anisotropy spectra of AIIIBV semiconductors with naturally oxidized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, V. L.; Kosobukin, V. A.; Gordeeva, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Reflectance anisotropy (RA) spectra of naturally oxidized (001) surfaces of GaAs and InAs crystals are measured for photon energies from 1.5 up to 5.5 eV. The differential high-accuracy RA spectra reveal features substantially different from those caused by either a reconstruction of clean surface or a built-in near-surface electric field. Models of atomic structure with anisotropic transition layers of excess arsenic atoms specific for GaAs(001)/oxide and InAs(001)/oxide interfaces are proposed. In conformity with these models, a general theory of reflectance anisotropy is developed for semiconductor/oxide interfaces within the Green's function technique. The theory takes into account the combined effect of local field due to interface dipoles and of intrinsic near-surface strain of the crystal. Measured RA spectra are analyzed in the model of valence-bond dipoles occupying a rectangular lattice in a multilayer medium. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, we conclude that RA spectra of oxidized GaAs(001) and InAs(001) surfaces are simultaneously influenced by interface and near-surface anisotropies. The former is responsible for the broad-band spectral features which are associated with polarizability of the valence bonds attached to As atoms at the crystal/oxide interface. The near-surface anisotropy is due to inherent uniaxial straining the near-surface region of crystal. The effect of strain on RA spectra is experimentally and theoretically substantiated for GaAs crystal wafers undergone a uniaxial applied stress. Basically, this work results in the following. It establishes the physical nature of different levels of RA spectra observed in a majority of papers, but never analyzed. It demonstrates how the studied features of RA spectra could be applied for optical characterization of strained interfaces and atomic layers.

  1. On the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    The vertical distribution of local and remote sources of water for precipitation and total column water over the United States are evaluated in a general circulation model simulation. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) general circulation model (GCM) includes passive constituent tracers to determine the geographical sources of the water in the column. Results show that the local percentage of precipitable water and local percentage of precipitation can be very different. The transport of water vapor from remote oceanic sources at mid and upper levels is important to the total water in the column over the central United States, while the access of locally evaporated water in convective precipitation processes is important to the local precipitation ratio. This result resembles the conceptual formulation of the convective parameterization. However, the formulations of simple models of precipitation recycling include the assumption that the ratio of the local water in the column is equal to the ratio of the local precipitation. The present results demonstrate the uncertainty in that assumption, as locally evaporated water is more concentrated near the surface.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Pfaller, Stacy; Revetta, Randy P

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of twoSphingopyxissp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (intI1) gene associated with sulfonamide (sul1) and puromycin (pac) antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27034493

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Stacy; Revetta, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of two Sphingopyxis sp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (intI1) gene associated with sulfonamide (sul1) and puromycin (pac) antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27034493

  4. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Measurement of the Strain Distribution in Si Die for the Embedded Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsueh Hsien; Chen, Hao; Ouyang, Yao Tsung; Chiu, Tz Cheng; Chang, Tao Chih; Lee, Hsin Yi; Ku, Chin Shun; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional packaging provides an acceptable solution for miniaturized integrated circuits. Because of the technological flexibility required for combining various modules to form a functional system, miniaturization can be achieved by using embedded techniques that could enhance the reliability of assembled systems. Because the mismatch of the thermal expansion coefficient among the materials has been an emerging issue when embedded components are subjected to thermal cycles, this study adopted the in situ synchrotron x-ray method to measure the strain distribution of a Si die in embedded substrates at various temperatures ranging from 25°C to 150°C. The out-of-plane strain of the Si die became less compressive when the temperature was increased. The numerical simulation of the finite elements software ANSYS also indicated the similar consequence of the strain behavior.

  5. Measuring strain and stress distributions along rebar embedded in concrete using time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Kusunoki, K.; Hatanaka, Y.; Mukai, T.; Tasai, A.; Kanematsu, M.; Kabayama, K.; Harjo, S.

    2014-02-01

    In modern society, architectural and civil engineering structures such as reinforced concrete buildings require high seismic performance to minimize the ‘megarisk’ exposed from urban earthquake hazards. In the reinforced concrete structures, the bond resistance between rebar and concrete is one important parameter for discussing its performance and it has been typically evaluated by measuring the strain distribution along the embedded rebar. Here, we present in-situ strain and stress measurements for the rebar in reinforced concrete using time-of-flight neutron diffraction as a novel alternative technique to typical strain gauges. It was demonstrated in this study that the three-dimensional deformation behavior of the embedded rebar in normal-strength concrete, cured in air, can be accurately measured under pull-out loading using time-of-flight neutron diffraction. Wider applications of neutron diffraction in the structural engineering field are expected for advanced understanding of actual phenomena on reinforced concrete structures.

  6. Real-time observation of local strain effects on nonvolatile ferroelectric memory storage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Christopher R; Jablonski, Michael L; Ashraf, Khalid; Damodaran, Anoop R; Jambunathan, Karthik; Hart, James L; Wen, Jianguo G; Miller, Dean J; Martin, Lane W; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Taheri, Mitra L

    2014-06-11

    We use in situ transmission electron microscopy to directly observe, at high temporal and spatial resolution, the interaction of ferroelectric domains and dislocation networks within BiFeO3 thin films. The experimental observations are compared with a phase field model constructed to simulate the dynamics of domains in the presence of dislocations and their resulting strain fields. We demonstrate that a global network of misfit dislocations at the film-substrate interface can act as nucleation sites and slow down domain propagation in the vicinity of the dislocations. Networks of individual threading dislocations emanating from the film-electrode interface play a more dramatic role in pinning domain motion. These dislocations may be responsible for the domain behavior in ferroelectric thin-film devices deviating from conventional Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi dynamics toward a Nucleation Limited Switching model. PMID:24801618

  7. Secondary osteon size and collagen/lamellar organization ("osteon morphotypes") are not coupled, but potentially adapt independently for local strain mode or magnitude.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Williams, Tyler J; Kiser, Casey J

    2013-02-01

    In bone, matrix slippage that occurs at cement lines of secondary osteons during loading is an important toughening mechanism. Toughness can also be enhanced by modifications in osteon cross-sectional size (diameter) for specific load environments; for example, smaller osteons in more highly strained "compression" regions vs. larger osteons in less strained "tension" regions. Additional osteon characteristics that enhance toughness are distinctive variations in collagen/lamellar organization (i.e., "osteon morphotypes"). Interactions might exist between osteon diameter and morphotype that represent adaptations for resisting deleterious shear stresses that occur at the cement line. This may be why osteons often have a peripheral ring (or "hoop") of highly oblique/transverse collagen. We hypothesized that well developed/distinct "hoops" are compensatory adaptations in cases where increased osteon diameter is mechanically advantageous (e.g., larger osteons in "tension" regions would have well developed/distinct "hoops" in order to resist deleterious consequences of co-existing localized shear stresses). We tested this hypothesis by determining if there are correlations between osteon diameters and strongly hooped morphotypes in "tension", "compression", and "neutral axis" regions of femora (chimpanzees, humans), radii (horse, sheep) and calcanei (horse, deer). The results reject the hypothesis-larger osteons are not associated with well developed/distinct "hoops", even in "tension regions" where the effect was expected to be obvious. Although osteon diameter and morphotype are not coupled, osteon diameters seem to be associated with increased strain magnitudes in some cases, but this is inconsistent. By contrast, osteon morphotypes are more strongly correlated with the distribution of tension and compression. PMID:23123271

  8. Strain localization on different scales and the importance of brittle precursors during deformation in the lower crust (Davenport Shear Zone, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    High strain rocks in the Musgrave Ranges (Central Australia) provide a rather unique insight into the development of lower crustal shear zones during the 550 Ma Petermann Orogeny, allowing common models for lower crustal deformation to be critically evaluated. The observed structures in the study area are, from south to north: (1) The Mann Fault, which is poorly exposed but evident on airborne geomagnetic maps. This regional scale fault with a component of dextral shear shows a step-over resulting in the formation of a pull-apart basin. (2) The Davenport Shear Zone, accommodating the horizontal extension in a 7 km wide WNW-ESE-trending mylonitic zone developed under subeclogitic, lower crustal conditions. This high strain zone is bounded to the north by a more than 50 km long, continuous, sheared dolerite dyke. North of this dyke, the ~1200 Ma Musgravian fabric is still preserved, only slightly rotated and typically N-S trending. (3) The Woodroffe Thrust, marking the northern boundary of the Musgrave Ranges, brings these lower crustal rocks on top of amphibolite facies units, with a top-to-north sense of movement. Strain in the Davenport Shear Zone is very heterogeneously distributed, with localization and partitioning from the kilometre down to the millimetre scale. Pseudotachylyte is commonly associated with dykes, especially on the boundaries, and is often sheared. The orientation of sheared dykes and localized shear zones is typically at a high angle to either side of the shortening direction, resulting in a variable sense of shear and a major component of flattening, with a nearly horizontal extension direction. Detailed outcrop-scale mapping shows that compositional inhomogeneities, such as quartz veins, are generally not exploited, even when favourably oriented for shear reactivation. Ultramylonitic shear zones are sometimes only a few millimetres wide but extend for several metres and are generally oblique to the background foliation. Pseudotachylyte often

  9. Barely visible impact damage detection for composite sandwich structures by optical-fiber-based distributed strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, S.; Okabe, Y.; Mizutani, T.; Takeda, N.

    2009-08-01

    The authors developed an impact damage-detection system for large-scale composite sandwich structures using an optical fiber network running throughout the structure. A Brillouin-based sensing system with high spatial resolution (pre-pump pulse Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (PPP-BOTDA)) was utilized for distributed strain measurement. The PPP-BOTDA sensing system can measure axial strain along the optical fiber by employing stimulated Brillouin scattering. The system realizes a spatial resolution of 10 cm, a sampling interval of 5 cm, and a sensing range of more than 1 km. Our previous study revealed that a non-uniform axial strain within centimeter spatial resolution broadens the width of the Brillouin gain spectrum, which is the output of the PPP-BOTDA. The specific response of the PPP-BOTDA was employed to detect non-uniform strain distribution along a residual facesheet dent in a damaged area. First, the response of the optical fiber sensor network, formed in the adhesive layer, was simulated to clarify the effectiveness and limitations of the proposed damage-detection technique. The system was then validated by an experiment. As the damage became larger, the width of the Brillouin gain spectra became broader. Consequently, the location and size of barely visible damage could be estimated. The system developed is quite useful for a first inspection of large-scale sandwich structures in aerospace and marine applications.

  10. Numerical and Experimental Studies on Strain Distribution and Weld Line Movement in Stretch Forming of Tailor Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kumar, D. Ravi

    2007-05-17

    Use of laser welded blanks of multiple sheets of material which are referred to as Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) is one of the current interests for automotive industries as it reduces manufacturing cost, weight of the vehicle and also improves the quality of the component. As the varieties of TWB applications are increasing, the effects of the difference in material properties, surface properties, weld and its orientation on blank formability have become important both in deep-drawing and stretch forming. In this work, formability of two types of TWBs has been studied experimentally by performing out-of-plane stretch forming tests using a 101.6 mm diameter hemispherical punch. The materials used in this study were Interstitial-Free (IF) steel sheet samples of different thickness (1.0mm and 1.5 mm) and samples of same thickness (1.5 mm) but with different surface characteristics (galvanized and ungalvanized). In the stretch forming experiments, the limiting dome height (LDH) and strain distribution were measured. The influence of weld orientation with respect to major surface strain on formability was studied by conducting experiments in or close to plane strain condition. It has been found that thickness ratio and difference in properties have significant influence on major and minor strain distributions and weld line movement, but the difference in surface characteristics has a minor effect. The simulations results agreed well with the observations from the experimental work conducted on stretch forming of TWBs.

  11. Through-silicon via-induced strain distribution in silicon interposer

    SciTech Connect

    Vianne, B.; Richard, M.-I.; Escoubas, S.; Labat, S.; Thomas, O.; Schülli, T.; Chahine, G.; Fiori, V.

    2015-04-06

    Strain in silicon induced by Through-Silicon Via (TSV) integration is of particular interest in the frame of the integration of active devices in silicon interposer. Nano-focused X-ray beam diffraction experiments were conducted using synchrotron radiation to investigate the thermally induced strain field in silicon around copper filled TSVs. Measurements were performed on thinned samples at room temperature and during in situ annealing at 400 °C. In order to correlate the 2D strain maps with finite elements analysis, an analytical model was developed, which takes into account beam absorption in the sample for a given diffraction geometry. The strain field along the [335] direction is found to be in the 10{sup −5} range at room temperature and around 10{sup −4} at 400 °C. Simulations support the expected plastification in some regions of the TSV during the annealing step.

  12. Magnetic fabric and modeled strain distribution in the head of a nested granite diapir, the Melechov pluton, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubač, Jakub; Žák, Jiří; Chlupáčová, Marta; Janoušek, Vojtěch

    2014-09-01

    The Melechov pluton, Bohemian Massif, is interpreted as a mid-crustal nested granitic diapir with an apical part exposed at the present-day erosion level. The diapir head exhibits a concentric structure defined by lithologic zoning and by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). In concert with theoretical models, outward-dipping margin-parallel magnetic foliations are associated with oblate shapes of the susceptibility ellipsoids and higher degree of anisotropy, passing inward into weaker triaxial to prolate fabric. By contrast, magnetic fabric in an inner granite unit is in places oriented at a high angle to internal contacts and is interpreted as recording an internal diapir circulation. We use inverse modeling to calculate strain variations across the diapir from the AMS data. The magnetic fabric parameters and calculated strains are in agreement with strain distribution in heads of model Newtonian diapirs traveling a distance of two body radii and suggest granitic magma ascent as a crystal-poor suspension followed by crystallization of fabric markers and their response to strain near the final emplacement level. The intrusive fabric thus formed late but, though generally weak, was still capable of recording incremental strain gradient in the granite diapir.

  13. Geodynamic Mechanisms of plateau uplift and strain distribution in Eastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner Memiş, Ömer; Hakan Göğüş, Oğuz; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Keskin, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    The Eastern Anatolia region (with an average ~2 km elevation) is dominated by N-S shortening and it represents one of the best examples for active/young continental collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Studies suggest that the entire plateau began to rise since the plate collision (about 13 Ma) along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone and this collision follows the accretion of the units of the Neotethyan ocean where oceanic lithosphere fragments (e.g., ophiolites) underlies the younger units across most of the plateau at present. Seismic imaging of the deep lithosphere in the region suggests that most of the plateau is underlain by 65 km thick total lithosphere and 45 km thick crust. Corroborating the seismological work, petrological interpretations of younger volcanic rocks from the central part of the plateau (e.g., Erzurum-Kars plateau) suggest an asthenospheric source, therefore the mantle lithosphere most likely have been removed form beneath the plateau in the last 10-13 Myr. Proposed geodynamic models that accounts for the observed tectonic anomalies and inferred lithospheric removal in the east Anatolia include: (1) slab steepening/ and break off under the subduction-accretion complex in the south; and (2) mantle lithosphere delamination in the north. A series of numerical geodynamic experiments are carried out to explain the near-surface characteristics (crustal thickness, surface strain rate and heat flow) of the each hypothesis, including combined styles of break-off and delamination. We investigate the role of various controlling parameters in these experiments (e.g., plate convergence velocity, mantle lithosphere density, and crustal density) and relate the model predictions against observed geological, geophysical, and petrological anomalies for Eastern Anatolia. Model results are also considered in the context of the last 30 Myrs geodynamic evolution of the Tibetan plateau (with an elevation average of 5 km), where both Eastern Anatolia and

  14. Nanosecond Motions in Proteins Impose Bounds on the Timescale Distributions of Local Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Okan, Osman Burak; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We elucidate the physics of protein dynamical transition via 10–100-ns molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures spanning 160–300 K. By tracking the energy fluctuations, we show that the protein dynamical transition is marked by a crossover from nonstationary to stationary processes that underlie the dynamics of protein motions. A two-timescale function captures the nonexponential character of backbone structural relaxations. One timescale is attributed to the collective segmental motions and the other to local relaxations. The former is well defined by a single-exponential, nanosecond decay, operative at all temperatures. The latter is described by a set of processes that display a distribution of timescales. Although their average remains on the picosecond timescale, the distribution is markedly contracted at the onset of the transition. It is shown that the collective motions impose bounds on timescales spanned by local dynamical processes. The nonstationary character below the transition implicates the presence of a collection of substates whose interactions are restricted. At these temperatures, a wide distribution of local-motion timescales, extending beyond that of nanoseconds, is observed. At physiological temperatures, local motions are confined to timescales faster than nanoseconds. This relatively narrow window makes possible the appearance of multiple channels for the backbone dynamics to operate. PMID:19804740

  15. Relativistic distribution function for particles with spin at local thermodynamical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; Del Zanna, L.; Grossi, E.

    2013-11-15

    We present an extension of relativistic single-particle distribution function for weakly interacting particles at local thermodynamical equilibrium including spin degrees of freedom, for massive spin 1/2 particles. We infer, on the basis of the global equilibrium case, that at local thermodynamical equilibrium particles acquire a net polarization proportional to the vorticity of the inverse temperature four-vector field. The obtained formula for polarization also implies that a steady gradient of temperature entails a polarization orthogonal to particle momentum. The single-particle distribution function in momentum space extends the so-called Cooper–Frye formula to particles with spin 1/2 and allows us to predict their polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the freeze-out. -- Highlights: •Single-particle distribution function in local thermodynamical equilibrium with spin. •Polarization of spin 1/2 particles in a fluid at local thermodynamical equilibrium. •Prediction of a new effect: a steady gradient of temperature induces a polarization. •Application to the calculation of polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  16. Localization and Characterization of the Carbon Tetrachloride Transformation Activity of Pseudomonas sp. Strain KC

    PubMed Central

    Dybas, M. J.; Tatara, G. M.; Criddle, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Previous research has established that Pseudomonas sp. strain KC rapidly transforms carbon tetrachloride (CT) to carbon dioxide (45 to 55%), a nonvolatile fraction (45 to 55%), and a cell-associated fraction ((equiv)5%) under denitrifying, iron-limited conditions. The present study provides additional characterization of the nonvolatile fraction, demonstrates that electron transfer plays a role in the transformation, and establishes the importance of both extracellular and intracellular factors. Experiments with (sup14)C-labeled CT indicate that more than one nonvolatile product is produced during CT transformation by strain KC. One of these products, accounting for about 20% of the [(sup14)C]CT transformed, was identified as formate on the basis of its elution time from an ion-exchange column, its boiling point, and its conversion to (sup14)CO(inf2) when incubated with formate dehydrogenase. Production of formate requires transfer of two electrons to the CT molecule. The role of electron transfer was also supported by experiments demonstrating that stationary-phase cells that do not transform CT can be stimulated to transform CT when supplemented with acetate (electron donor), nitrate (electron acceptor), or a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). The location of transformation activity was also evaluated. By themselves, washed cells did not transform CT to a significant degree. Occasionally, CT transformation was observed by cell-free culture supernatant, but this activity was not reliable. Rapid and reliable CT transformation was only obtained when washed whole cells were reconstituted with culture supernatant, indicating that both extracellular and intracellular factors are normally required for CT transformation. Fractionation of culture supernatant by ultrafiltration established that the extracellular factor or factors are small, with an apparent molecular mass of less than 500 Da. The extracellular factor or factors were stable after

  17. Grainsize evolution in ductile shear zones: Implications for strain localization and the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Behr, W. M.

    2011-04-01

    At high stresses and low temperatures, grainsize reduction by dynamic recrystallization profoundly modifies rock rheology. Strain energy driven grain-boundary migration (ρGBM) is involved both in the nucleation of new grains by the grain-boundary bulging mechanism (BLG), and in the subsequent evolution of the microstructure. Above the Dmin line, which is a line in stress/grainsize space that defines the minimum size of nucleus that can form by BLG, ρGBM dominates the microstructure, and grain growth by surface energy driven grain-boundary migration (γGBM) is inhibited. The recrystallized grainsize is therefore dominated by the nucleation process, possibly controlled by the size of subgrains or dislocation cells within the old grains. This provides a first-order explanation for the experimentally observed grainsize-stress relationship. ρGBM is an important agent of recovery in rocks deformed by dislocation creep, sweeping out dislocations and counteracting work-hardening. We have derived a new flow law (DRX-assisted dislocation creep) based on this process, which exhibits grainsize sensitivity as a result of the role of ρGBM. If grainsize obeys the empirically-determined grainsize-stress relationship, DRX creep has an effective stress exponent of a little over 4, consistent with experimental observations and inferences from naturally deformed rocks. DRX creep may be an important agent in weakening quartz at low temperatures, whereas current flow law data suggest it may not be important in olivine. Rocks deformed and dynamically recrystallized above the Dmin line may switch from climb-assisted dislocation creep to grainsize-sensitive creep (Coble creep, DRX creep, or creep dominated by grain-boundary sliding), resulting in weakening. Lithospheric-scale shear zones are likely to evolve at approximately constant stress; under these conditions weakening results in an increase in strain rate, not a stress drop. The rate of dislocation motion, the dislocation density

  18. Strain properties analysis and wireless collection system of PVDF for structural local health monitoring of civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Wang, Yang; Dong, Weijie; Jin, Yajing; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    For large civil engineering structures and base establishments, for example, bridges, super-high buildings, long-span space structures, offshore platforms and pipe systems of water & gas supply, their lives are up to a few decades or centuries. Damaged by environmental loads, fatigue effects, corrosion effects and material aging, these structures experience inevitably such side effects as damage accumulation, resistance reduction and even accidents. The traditional civil structure is a kind of passive one, whose performance and status are unpredictable to a great extent, but the informatics' introduction breaks a new path to obtain the status of the structure, thus it is an important research direction to evaluate and improve reliability of civil structures by the use of monitoring and health diagnosis technique, and this also assures the security of service for civil engineering structures. Smart material structure, originated from the aerospace sector, has been a research hotspot in civil engineering, medicine, shipping, and so on. For structural health monitoring of civil engineering, the research about high-performance sensing unit of smart material structure is very important, and this will possibly push further the development and application of monitoring and health diagnosis techniques. At present, piezoelectric materials are one of the most widely used sensing materials among the research of smart material structures. As one of the piezoelectric materials, PVDF(Polyvinylidene Fluoride)film is widely considered for the advantages of low cost, good mechanical ability, high sensibility, the ability of being easily placed and resistance of corrosion. However, only a few studies exit about building a mature monitoring system using PVDF. In this paper, for the sake of using PVDF for sensing unit for structural local monitoring of civil engineering, the strain sensing properties of PVDF are studied in detail. Firstly, the operating mechanism of PVDF is analyzed

  19. Strain Distribution in a Kennedy Class I Implant Assisted Removable Partial Denture under Various Loading Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shahmiri, Reza; Aarts, John M.; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This in vitro study investigates how unilateral and bilateral occlusal loads are transferred to an implant assisted removable partial denture (IARPD). Materials and Methods. A duplicate model of a Kennedy class I edentulous mandibular arch was made and then a conventional removable partial denture (RPD) fabricated. Two Straumann implants were placed in the second molar region, and the prosthesis was modified to accommodate implant retained ball attachments. Strain gages were incorporated into the fitting surface of both the framework and acrylic to measure microstrain (μStrain). The IARPD was loaded to 120Ns unilaterally and bilaterally in three different loading positions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) with an alpha level of 0.05 to compare the maximum μStrain values of the different loading conditions. Results. During unilateral and bilateral loading the maximum μStrain was predominantly observed in a buccal direction. As the load was moved anteriorly the μStrain increased in the mesial area. Unilateral loading resulted in a twisting of the structure and generated a strain mismatch between the metal and acrylic surfaces. Conclusions. Unilateral loading created lateral and vertical displacement of the IARPD. The curvature of the dental arch resulted in a twisting action which intensified as the unilateral load was moved anteriorly. PMID:23737788

  20. Ti distribution in quartz across a heterogeneous shear zone within a granodiorite: The effect of deformation mechanism and strain on Ti resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    The study of a heterogeneous ductile shear zone that developed at ~ 500 °C and 0.2 GPa during post-magmatic cooling of a granodiorite has allowed the effect of strain and recrystallization on Ti re-equilibration of quartz to be assessed. Understanding this effect is critical for applying Ti-in-quartz thermobarometry to mylonites. Differently strained quartz across the shear zone shows a heterogeneous distribution of Ti concentrations ([Ti]) (measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS) ranging between 2 and 45 ppm. Quartz cathodoluminescence (CL) is proven by spectral analysis to be correlated with [Ti], allowing CL images to be calibrated as Ti maps using SIMS measurements. Coarse-grained weakly deformed domains consist of magmatic quartz extensively recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM) and mostly (65-75% area) contain 20-38 ppm Ti. Resetting to lower [Ti] occurred locally: (i) in haloes surrounding titanite and biotite inclusions ([Ti] as low as 6 ppm); (ii) along grain boundaries; and (iii) towards the interface of quartz domains with other mineral domains. With increasing strain, quartz underwent progressive grain size reduction and developed a bimodal microstructure with elongate grains (> 100's μm long) surrounded by mantles of new grains (10-30 μm in size) recrystallized by subgrain rotation (SGR). Dynamic recrystallization by SGR, associated with prism < a > slip, became increasingly dominant over GBM as strain increased towards the shear zone core. Significant resetting of Ti in quartz only occurred in high strain domains (at shear strain γ probably >> 10) in the shear zone core where fine recrystallization amounts to 50-60% by area and coarser cores are strongly sub-structured. These domains are not compositionally homogeneous and still show a range of [Ti] mostly between 2 and 10 ppm. In all strain facies of the shear zone quartz-filled pressure shadows associated with feldspar show an almost constant [Ti] of ~ 2 ppm. The pristine

  1. Ti distribution in quartz across a heterogeneous shear zone within a granodiorite: the effect of deformation mechanism and strain on Ti resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestmann, Michel; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The study of a heterogeneous ductile shear zone developed at ca. 500 °C and 0.2 GPa during post-magmatic cooling of a granodiorite allows the effect of strain and recrystallization on Ti re-equilibration of quartz to be assessed. Understanding this effect is critical for applying Ti-in-quartz (TitaniQ) thermobarometry to mylonites. Differently strained quartz across the shear zone shows a heterogeneous distribution of Ti (measured by SIMS) with overall Ti range between 2 and 45 ppm. Quartz cathodoluminescence (CL) is proved by spectral analysis to be univocally correlated to Ti content and CL images were calibrated as Ti maps using SIMS measurements. Coarse grained weakly deformed domains consist of magmatic quartz extensively recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM) and mostly (65-75% area) contain 20-38 ppm Ti. Ti resetting to lower amounts occurred locally: (i) in haloes surrounding titanite and biotite inclusions (Ti as low as 6 ppm); (ii) along grain boundaries and healed microfractures; and (iii) towards the quartz domain boundary. With increasing strain quartz underwent progressive grainsize reduction and developed a bimodal microstructure with elongate grains (>100's µm long) surrounded by mantles of new grains (10-30 µm in size) recrystallized by subgrain rotation (SR). Dynamic recrystallization by SGR, associated with prism slip, became increasingly important over GBM as strain increased towards the shear zone core. Relevant resetting of Ti in quartz only occurred in high strain domains (shear strain gamma ≥ 10) in the shear zone core where fine recrystallization amounts at 50-60% area and coarser cores are strongly substructured. These domains are not compositionally homogeneous and still show a range of Ti content between 2 and 10 ppm. In all strain facies of the shear zone quartz-filled pressure shadows associated with feldspar show an almost constant Ti of ~ 2ppm. Therefore the pristine Ti content of the magmatic quartz mylonitized in

  2. Architecture of a dolostone-hosted brittle-ductile fault: effects of the interplay between weakening and strain localization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torgersen, Espen; Viola, Giulio

    2014-05-01

    Carbonates can remain mechanically strong under most upper crustal conditions, which is testified by the considerable number of moderate to large earthquakes associated with slip on carbonate-hosted faults. Yet, under certain environmental conditions carbonates decompose into mechanically weak minerals, with major consequences for a fault's rheological behavior. We combine structural analysis with petrography, geochemistry and K-Ar dating of synkinematic illite to investigate the processes that control the initial weakening of dolostone and the subsequent strain localization within brittle-ductile faults, aiming at better understanding why some faults remain strong and seismogenic, while others evolve into weak, creeping systems. The Kvenklubben fault (KF) is exposed in the Repparfjord Tectonic Window, northern Norway and is part of a compressional imbricate stack formed during Caledonian SE-directed nappe emplacement. It dips c. 40° to the NW and juxtaposes greenschist facies metabasalts in the hanging wall against chert-bearing meta-dolostones. The fault core is about 2.5 m thick and is composed of talc-bearing calc-phyllonites at the base and chlorite phyllonites at the top. Kinematic indicators show top-to-the SE thrusting, but also late localized top-to-the NNW extensional reactivation. The complex internal architecture of the fault results from multiple faulting episodes. K-Ar ages document that slip initiated in the lower part of the fault core and propagated upwards. The uppermost part of the fault was reactivated as a normal fault in the Mesozoic. Chlorite geothermometery shows that initial localization at the base of the fault core took place at 180-250 °C, whereas later peak Caledonian deformation occurred under higher temperatures (300-350 °C). This is also supported by sub-grain rotation recrystallization of quartz. Within the footwall dolostones an intraformational thrust fault developed sub-parallel to the main KF strand. Its fault core is

  3. Monitoring S phase progression globally and locally using BrdU incorporation in TK+ yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe; Bensimon, Aaron; Schwob, Etienne

    2001-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosome replication is initiated from numerous origins and its activation is temporally controlled by cell cycle and checkpoint mechanisms. Yeast has been very useful in defining the genetic elements required for initiation of DNA replication, but simple and precise tools to monitor S phase progression are lacking in this model organism. Here we describe a TK+ yeast strain and conditions that allow incorporation of exogenous BrdU into genomic DNA, along with protocols to detect the sites of DNA synthesis in yeast nuclei or on combed DNA molecules. S phase progression is monitored by quantification of BrdU in total yeast DNA or on individual chromosomes. Using these tools we show that yeast chromosomes replicate synchronously and that DNA synthesis occurs at discrete subnuclear foci. Analysis of BrdU signals along single DNA molecules from hydroxyurea-arrested cells reveals that replication forks stall 8–9 kb from origins that are placed 46 kb apart on average. Quantification of total BrdU incorporation suggests that 190 ‘early’ origins have fired in these cells and that late replicating territories might represent up to 40% of the yeast genome. More generally, the methods outlined here will help understand the kinetics of DNA replication in wild-type yeast and refine the phenotypes of several mutants. PMID:11266543

  4. Controlling the cation distribution and electric polarization with epitaxial strain in Aurivillius-phase Bi5FeTi3O15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birenbaum, Axiel Yaël; Ederer, Claude

    2016-02-01

    This work explores the impact of in-plane bi-axial (epitaxial) strain on the cation distribution and electric polarization of the Aurivillius-phase compound Bi5FeTi3O15 using first-principles electronic structure calculations. Our calculations indicate that the site preference of the Fe3+ cation can be controlled via epitaxial strain. Tensile strain enhances the preference for the inner sites within the perovskite-like layers of the Aurivillius-phase structure, whereas compressive strain favors occupation of the outer sites, i.e., the sites close to the Bi2O2 layer. Controlling the distribution of the magnetic cations offers the possibility to control magnetic order in this magnetically dilute system. Furthermore, the magnitude of the electric polarization is strongly strain-dependent, increasing under tensile strain and decreasing under compressive strain. We find strongly anomalous Born effective charges, both of the Bi3+ and the Ti4+ cations.

  5. Strain and lattice orientation distribution in SiN/Ge complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible light emitting microstructures by quick x-ray nano-diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G. A.; Schülli, T. U.; Zoellner, M. H.; Guha, S.; Reich, C.; Zaumseil, P.; Capellini, G.; Richard, M.-I.; Schroeder, T.

    2015-02-16

    This paper presents a study of the spatial distribution of strain and lattice orientation in CMOS-fabricated strained Ge microstripes using high resolution x-ray micro-diffraction. The recently developed model-free characterization tool, based on a quick scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy technique can image strain down to levels of 10{sup −5} (Δa/a) with a spatial resolution of ∼0.5 μm. Strain and lattice tilt are extracted using the strain and orientation calculation software package X-SOCS. The obtained results are compared with the biaxial strain distribution obtained by lattice parameter-sensitive μ-Raman and μ-photoluminescence measurements. The experimental data are interpreted with the help of finite element modeling of the strain relaxation dynamics in the investigated structures.

  6. Local Atomic Structure of Semiconductor Alloys Using Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Thorpe, M.F.

    2002-06-24

    We have been taking advantage of recent experimental developments, which involve utilizing diffraction data from x-rays or neutrons out to very large wave-vectors, to obtain a detailed structural characterization of semiconductor alloys. This approach allows an accurate Pair Distribution Function (PDF) to be obtained to 20A and beyond and reveals the local structure of the alloy directly. These data can be modeled explicitly to learn about local correlations and short-range order in materials. We are combining theory, modeling and experiments to study a range of materials from semiconductors to thermoelectrics and proton conductors.

  7. Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the denitrification enzymes in two strains of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Schwintner, C; Sabaty, M; Berna, B; Cahors, S; Richaud, P

    1998-08-15

    Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the reductases of the denitrification pathway were determined in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides forma sp. denitrificans by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis (TAFE) and hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled homologous probes. Two large plasmids of 102 and 115 kb were found. The genes encoding the various reductases are not clustered on a single genetic unit. The nap locus (localized with a napA probe), the nirK gene and the norCB genes encoding the nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, respectively, were found on different AseI and SnaBI digested chromosomal DNA fragments, whereas the nos locus (localized with a nosZ probe), encoding the nitrous oxide reductase, was identified on the 115-kb plasmid. Furthermore, the genes encoding two proteins of unknown function, one periplasmic and the other cytoplasmic, but whose synthesis is highly induced by nitrate, were found on a different chromosomal fragment. For comparison, the same experiments were carried out on the well-characterized strain Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. PMID:9742704

  8. Strained local and state government finances among current realities that threaten public hospitals' profitability.

    PubMed

    Kane, Nancy M; Singer, Sara J; Clark, Jonathan R; Eeckloo, Kristof; Valentine, Melissa

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates that some safety-net hospitals--those that provide a large share of the care to low-income, uninsured, and Medicaid populations--survived and even thrived before the recent recession. We analyzed the financial performance and governance of 150 hospitals during 2003-07. We found, counterintuitively, that those directly governed by elected officials and in highly competitive markets were more profitable than other safety-net hospitals. They were financially healthy primarily because they obtained subsidies from state and local governments, such as property tax transfers or supplemental Medicaid payments, including disproportionate share payments. However, safety-net hospitals now face a new market reality. The economic downturn, slow recovery, and politics of deficit reduction have eroded the ability of local governments to support the safety net. Many safety-net hospitals have not focused on effective management, cost control, quality improvement, or services that attract insured patients. As a result, and coupled with new uncertainties regarding Medicaid expansion stemming from the recent Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act, many are likely to face increasing financial and competitive pressures that may threaten their survival. PMID:22869645

  9. Phonon probe of local strains in SnSxSe2-x mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; De, D.; Peng, H. B.; Manongdo, J.; Guloy, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a combined Raman spectroscopy and density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) study of phonon variation with composition x in the mixed crystals SnSxSe2-x. The experimentally observed two-mode behavior of the A1g and Eg vibrations involving Se(S) atoms is shown to arise from the lack of overlapping of the corresponding phonon dispersion bands in SnS2 and SnSe2. This offers a unique opportunity to assess local distortions of the trigonal Sn3Se pyramids in SnSxSe2-x as no Se and S mode mixing is involved. The dependence of local height and base length of Sn3Se pyramids with x is derived by a procedure that uses the measured A1g (Se) and Eg (Se) phonons in SnSxSe2-x, those calculated by DFPT for SnSe2 at different hydrostatic pressure, DFPT phonon dispersion, and the contribution from mass-disorder induced phonon self-energy.

  10. Speciation and distribution of arsenic and localization of nutrients in rice grains

    SciTech Connect

    Lombi, E.; Scheckel, K.G.; Pallon, J.; Carey, A.M.; Zhu, Y.G.; Meharg, A.A.

    2012-09-05

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice grains and the generally low concentration of micronutrients in rice have been recognized as a major concern for human health. Here, we investigated the speciation and localization of As and the distribution of (micro)nutrients in rice grains because these are key factors controlling bioavailability of nutrients and contaminants. Bulk total and speciation analyses using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was complemented by spatially resolved microspectroscopic techniques ({mu}-XANES, {mu}-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) and particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)) to investigate both speciation and distribution of As and localization of nutrients in situ. The distribution of As and micronutrients varied between the various parts of the grains (husk, bran and endosperm) and was characterized by element-specific distribution patterns. The speciation of As in bran and endosperm was dominated by As(III)-thiol complexes. The results indicate that the translocation from the maternal to filial tissues may be a bottleneck for As accumulation in the grain. Strong similarities between the distribution of iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and phosphorus (P) and between zinc (Zn) and sulphur (S) may be indicative of complexation mechanisms in rice grains.

  11. Research on distributed strain separation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing system combining an electric power optical fiber cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuqing; Chen, Xi; Li, Jihui; Tong, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin-based optical fiber sensing system has been taken more and more attentions in power transmission line in recent years. However, there exists a temperature cross sensitivity problem in sensing system. Hence, researching on strain separation technology of fiber brillouin sensing system is an urgent requirement in its practical area. In this paper, a real-time online distributed strain separation calculation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing combining an electric power optical fiber cable is proposed. The technology is mainly composed of the Brillouin temperature-strain distributed measurement system and the Raman temperature distributed measurement system. In this technology, the electric power optical fiber cable is a special optical phase conductor (OPPC); the Brillouin sensing system uses the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) method. The optical unit of the OPPC includes single-mode and multimode fibers which can be used as sensing channel for Brillouin sensing system and Raman sensing system respectively. In the system networking aspect, the data processor of fiber Brillouin sensing system works as the host processor and the data processor of fiber Raman sensing system works as the auxiliary processor. And the auxiliary processor transfers the data to the host processor via the Ethernet interface. In the experiment, the BOTDA monitoring system and the Raman monitoring system work on the same optical unit of the OPPC simultaneously; In the data processing aspect, the auxiliary processor of Raman transfers the temperature data to the host processor of Brillouin via the Ethernet interface, and then the host processor of Brillouin uses the temperature data combining itself strain-temperature data to achieve the high sampling rate and high-precision strain separation via data decoupling calculation. The data decoupling calculation is achieved through the interpolation, filtering, feature point alignment, and the singular point prediction

  12. Western Hellenic subduction and Cephalonia Transform: local earthquakes and plate transport and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachpazi, M.; Hirn, A.; Clément, C.; Haslinger, F.; Laigle, M.; Kissling, E.; Charvis, P.; Hello, Y.; Lépine, J.-C.; Sapin, M.; Ansorge, J.

    2000-04-01

    Focal parameters of local earthquakes in the region of the Ionian Islands of western Greece are constrained with a temporary dense array of three-component seismographs operated jointly offshore and onshore. Seismic deformation is documented to be confined to the east of the N20°E-striking steep continental slope west of Cephalonia island, the right-lateral Cephalonia Transform Fault, CTF, inferred from large earthquakes. The pre-Apulian continental material appears to be only deforming east of the transform fault, where it is in upper plate position to the Hellenic subduction. East of the transform fault, the transmission velocity tomography from local earthquakes, compared in depth-section with a previous marine reflection profile, provides evidence in support of a shallow landward dipping boundary around 12 km deep under the Ionian Islands along which they may override the lower plate. On either side of this interface local earthquakes occur with different focal mechanisms, in support with its interpretation as the interplate. Under Cephalonia island, reverse-faulting deforms the upper plate along NW-SE structures, which may also be affected by left-lateral bookshelf-faulting. Small earthquakes show normal faulting along the western coast of Cephalonia and its extension 20 km SSW, the trace of the CTF as inferred from the occurrence of the large strike-slip earthquakes. Another group of normal-fault earthquakes locates in the lower plate from under Cephalonia to Zante, just outboard of a possible change of interplate dip suggested from reflection seismics landward under the islands. These normal-fault earthquakes appear to coincide in position with that of the load imposed by the upper plate transported over them, rather than occurring in an outer rise, outboard the plate boundary and trench, as observed in other subductions and attributed to the control by the flexural bending of the lower plate under the pull of the sinking slab. Interpretation has to

  13. Quantifying velocity, strain rate and stress distribution in coalescing salt sheets for safer drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, R.; van Harmelen, A.

    2015-03-01

    Reaching sub-salt hydrocarbon targets in the deeper part of the Gulf of Mexico requires drilling through a salt canopy. The suture zones in the salt canopy are potential drilling hazards due to anomalous pressure behaviour of entrapped sediments. The Pólya vector field of coalescing salt sheets inside the canopy is used to explain suture formation and distinguish between upright and inclined suture contacts. Our analytical models, based on complex potentials, provide exact solutions for multiple source flows as they compete for space when spreading into the viscous continuum of the salt canopy. The velocity gradient tensor yields the strain rate tensor, which is used to map the principal strain rate magnitude inside the canopy. Quantification of one of the principal strain rates is sufficient because the plane deformation assumption ensures the two principal strain rates are equal in magnitude (but of opposite sign); the third principal dimension can have neither strain nor deviatoric stress. Visualization of the locations where the principal stress vanishes or peaks (with highs and lows) is useful for pre-drilling plans because such peaks must be avoided and the stress-free locations provide the safer drilling sites. A case study-of the Walker Ridge region-demonstrates the practical application of our new method.

  14. Classical swine fever virus (C strain) distribution in organ samples of inoculated piglets.

    PubMed

    Lorena, J; Barlic-Maganja, D; Lojkić, M; Madić, J; Grom, J; Cac, Z; Roić, B; Terzić, S; Lojkić, I; Polancec, D; Cajavec, S

    2001-07-01

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and a nested polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription (RT-PCR) were used for the detection of the Chinese strain (C strain) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in blood and tissue samples of experimentally inoculated piglets. One group of 10 piglets was inoculated with C strain material from rabbits and a second one with material from infected minipig kidney (MPK) cell culture. Tested blood samples were taken on the day of inoculation as well as on days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 13 and 16. Samples of spleen, tonsil and brain tissue were collected from piglets on days 6, 8, 10, 13 and 16 and tested for glycoprotein E(RNS) and protein NS2-3 using commercially available ELISA kits. E(RNS) and NS2-3 were detected earlier in blood samples of piglets inoculated with the C strain propagated in a cell culture. Regardless of propagation the presence of the viral E(RNS) and NS2-3 was detected in spleen and tonsil samples simultaneously. The C strain propagated in a cell culture was found in only one brain sample, whereas, the virus propagated in rabbits was detected in 70% of the brain samples. For the detection of the CSFV RNA in blood samples, a part within the 5' non-coding region was amplified. The differences in the results gained by antigen detection in blood samples decreased when nested RT-PCR was used. PMID:11356313

  15. The local subsurface water and chlorine distributions evaluated by DAN/MSL in Curiosity observational campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Hardgrove, Craig; Sanin, Anton; Lisov, Denis; Golovin, Dmitry; Jun, Insoo; Kozyrev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexey; Mischna, Michael; Moersch, Jeffrey; Nikiforov, Sergey; Tate, Cristopher; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    The measurements with the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover are presented and analyzed as a summary of observations acquired during several special observational campaigns at the Yellowknife Bay area (first discovery of habitability environment), at the striated units of Kimberley formation, at outcrops studied in Pahrump Hills (at the base of Mt Sharp) and in high silica area discovered in Marias Pass (Mudstone facies of the Murray formation). DAN data were analyzed to test local and global variability in the distribution of bulk hydrogen and neutron-absorbing elements, characterized as chlorine-equivalent concentration. Using multi instrument approach in the data analysis we have compared DAN estimations of subsurface H and Cl distributions with inhomogeneity of local geological context, top surface measurements of chlorine with APXS and with SAM measurements of absorbed H2O extracted from the drilled samples based on low temperature evolved gas analysis.

  16. Profiling the local carrier concentration and dopant distribution across a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, J. C.; Chang, A. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. We further use 3D atom probe tomography, which enables 3D imaging with a few Angstrom resolution, to profile the distribution of Si dopants. We discuss the correlation between the Si dopant distribution and the observed carrier concentration profile.

  17. Shifts in winter distribution in birds: effects of global warming and local habitat change.

    PubMed

    Valiela, Ivan; Bowen, Jennifer L

    2003-11-01

    As global warming intensified toward the end of the 20th century, there was a northward shift in winter ranges of bird species in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. These poleward shifts were correlated to local increases in minimum winter temperatures and global temperature anomalies. This evidence, plus other recent results, suggests that during the last two decades global warming has led to massive and widespread biogeographic shifts with potentially major ecological and human consequences. Local habitat changes associated with urban sprawl affected mainly forest birds with more northern winter distributions. In Cape Cod, the effects of warming on bird distributions are more substantial at the start of the 21st century, than those of habitat alteration, but as urban sprawl continues its importance may rival that of global warming. PMID:14703907

  18. Distributed Range-Free Localization Algorithm Based on Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinh, Pham Doan; Kawai, Makoto

    In Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs), determining the physical location of nodes (localization) is very important for many network services and protocols. This paper proposes a new Distributed Range-free Localization Algorithm Based on Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) to deal with this issue. Our proposed algorithm utilizes only connectivity information to determine the location of nodes. By utilizing the intersection areas between radio coverage of neighboring nodes, the algorithm has maximized the correlation between neighboring nodes in distributed implementation of SOM and reduced the SOM learning time. An implementation of the algorithm on Network Simulator 2 (NS-2) was done with the mobility consideration to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm. From our intensive simulations, the results show that the proposed scheme achieves very good accuracy in most cases.

  19. Knowledge-base browsing: an application of hybrid distributed/local connectionist networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Tariq; Israel, Peggy

    1990-08-01

    We describe a knowledge base browser based on a connectionist (or neural network) architecture that employs both distributed and local representations. The distributed representations are used for input and output thereby enabling associative noise-tolerant interaction with the environment. Internally all representations are fully local. This simplifies weight assignment and facilitates network configuration for specific applications. In our browser concepts and relations in a knowledge base are represented using " microfeatures. " The microfeatures can encode semantic attributes structural features contextual information etc. Desired portions of the knowledge base can then be associatively retrieved based on a structured cue. An ordered list of partial matches is presented to the user for selection. Microfeatures can also be used as " bookmarks" they can be placed dynamically at appropriate points in the knowledge base and subsequently used as retrieval cues. A proof-of-concept system has been implemented for an internally developed Honeywell-proprietary knowledge acquisition tool. 1.

  20. Strain localization in granodiorite mylonites: a microstructural and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study of the South Mountains core complex, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, R. M.; Miranda, E.

    2009-12-01

    The quantification of strain localization in detachment fault shear zones is essential to the study of continental core complex development and permits insight into continental crust rheology during extension. We present a microstructural and EBSD study of naturally deformed shear zone rocks from the footwall of the South Mountains, Arizona, core complex to interpret the deformation mechanisms that lead to strain localization along the detachment fault. The footwall of the South Mountains core complex is dominated by a Miocene composite pluton that exhibits Miocene extensional mylonitic fabrics associated with the structural development of the core complex. The composite pluton is composed of granodiorite, granite, and quartzolite, but the granodiorite is the most voluminous of the intrusive units. The detachment fault shear zone is developed within the granodiorite and quartzolite intrusive units. We conducted a microstructural and EBSD study of the Tertiary South Mountains granodiorite and quartzolite mylonites to determine the deformation mechanisms that promote strain localization. We hypothesize that the strength of quartz strongly influences strain localization in the naturally deformed granodiorite mylonites and quartzolite mylonites. The five samples were collected on an up-structure traverse through the ~60 meter thick mylonitic shear zone towards the interpreted detachment fault surface. Microstructural observation of quartz grains reveals the presence of elongate ‘ribbon grains’ with subgrain development along the rims of these grains, and irregular and sinuous sutured grain boundaries. We interpret these microstructures as evidence of Regimes 2 and 3 dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, the plagioclase feldspar and potassium feldspar crystals are microfractured with limited development of bulging grain boundaries on the rims of the feldspar grains, which we interpret as evidence of Regime 1 dynamic recrystallization. Up the traverse in the

  1. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  2. Cooperative Localization for Mobile Networks: A Distributed Belief Propagation–Mean Field Message Passing Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Burak; Urup, Daniel N.; Meyer, Florian; Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard H.; Hlawatsch, Franz

    2016-06-01

    We propose a hybrid message passing method for distributed cooperative localization and tracking of mobile agents. Belief propagation and mean field message passing are employed for, respectively, the motion-related and measurement-related part of the factor graph. Using a Gaussian belief approximation, only three real values per message passing iteration have to be broadcast to neighboring agents. Despite these very low communication requirements, the estimation accuracy can be comparable to that of particle-based belief propagation.

  3. Evaluating the sensitivity of local temperature distributions to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Stainforth, D. A.; Watkins, N. W.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change adaptation activities takes place at regional and local scales. The sensitivity of climate to increasing greenhouse gases is, however, most often studied at the global scale [Knutti and Hegerl 2008, and references therein]. At adaptation relevant spatial scales information is most often based on simulations of complex climate models [Murphy et al. 2009, Tebaldi et al. 2005]. These face significant questions of robustness and reliability as a basis for forecasts on such scales [Stainforth et al., 2007]. Here we propose a different approach, using observational timeseries to evaluate the sensitivity of different parts of the local climatic distribution. There are many advantages to such an approach: it avoids issues relating to model imperfections, it can be focused on decision relevant thresholds [e.g. Porter and Semenov, 2005], and it inherently integrates information relating to local climatic influences. Our approach takes timeseries of local daily temperature from specific locations and extracts the changing cumulative distribution function (cdf) over time. We use the e-obs dataset to construct such cdf-timeseries for locations across Europe. We analyse these changing cdfs using a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural variability and/or the consequences of climate change. This deconstruction facilitates an assessment of the sensitivity of different quantiles of the distributions. These sensitivities are shown to be geographically varying across Europe; as one would expect given the different influences on local climate between, say, Western Scotland and central Italy. We nevertheless find many regionally consistent patterns of response of potential value in adaptation planning. Both the methodology and a sensitivity analysis will be presented. The technique has the potential to be applied to many other variables in addition to

  4. Evaluating the sensitivity of local temperature distributions to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Stainforth, D.; Watkins, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change adaptation activities takes place at regional and local scales. The sensitivity of climate to increasing greenhouse gases is, however, most often studied at the global scale [Knutti and Hegerl 2008, and references therein]. At adaptation relevant spatial scales information is most often based on simulations of complex climate models [Murphy et al. 2009, Tebaldi et al. 2005]. These face significant questions of robustness and reliability as a basis for forecasts on such scales [Stainforth et al., 2007]. Here we propose a different approach, using observational timeseries to evaluate the sensitivity of different parts of the local climatic distribution. There are many advantages to such an approach: it avoids issues relating to model imperfections, it can be focused on decision relevant thresholds [e.g. Porter and Semenov, 2005], and it inherently integrates information relating to local climatic influences. Our approach takes timeseries of local daily temperature from specific locations and extracts the changing cumulative distribution function (cdf) over time. We use the e-obs dataset to construct such cdf-timeseries for locations across Europe. We analyse these changing cdfs using a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural variability and/or the consequences of climate change. This deconstruction facilitates an assessment of the sensitivity of different quantiles of the distributions. These sensitivities are shown to be geographically varying across Europe; as one would expect given the different influences on local climate between, say, Western Scotland and central Italy. We nevertheless find many regionally consistent patterns of response of potential value in adaptation planning. Both the methodology and a sensitivity analysis will be presented. The technique has the potential to be applied to many other variables in addition to

  5. Stress and Strain Distributions during Machining of Ti-6Al-4V at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Fahim

    Dry and liquid nitrogen pre-cooled Ti-6Al-4V samples were machined at a cutting speed of 43.2 m/min and at low (0.1 mm/rev) to high (0.4 mm/rev) feed rates for understanding the effects of temperature and strain rate on chip microstructures. During cryogenic machining, it was observed that between feed rates of 0.10 and 0.30 mm/rev, a 25% pressure reduction on tool occurred. Smaller number of chips and low tool/chip contact time and temperature were observed (compared to dry machining under ambient conditions). An in-situ set-up that consisted of a microscope and a lathe was constructed and helped to propose a novel serrated chip formation mechanism when microstructures (strain localization) and surface roughness were considered. Dimpled fracture surfaces observed in high-speed-machined chips were formed due to stable crack propagation that was also recorded during in-situ machining. An instability criterion was developed that showed easier strain localization within the 0.10-0.30mm/rev feed rate range.

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping and Distribution of Coxiella burnetii Strains from Field Samples in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Renaville, Bénédicte; Martinelle, Ludovic; Renaville, Robert; Thys, Christine; Smeets, François; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Grégoire, Fabien; Delooz, Laurent; Czaplicki, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The genotypic characterization of Coxiella burnetii provides useful information about the strains circulating at the farm, region, or country level and may be used to identify the source of infection for animals and humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the strains of C. burnetii circulating in caprine and bovine Belgian farms using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technique. Direct genotyping was applied to different samples (bulk tank milk, individual milk, vaginal swab, fetal product, and air sample). Besides the well-known SNP genotypes, unreported ones were found in bovine and caprine samples, increasing the variability of the strains found in the two species in Belgium. Moreover, multiple genotypes were detected contemporarily in caprine farms at different years of sampling and by using different samples. Interestingly, certain SNP genotypes were detected in both bovine and caprine samples, raising the question of interspecies transmission of the pathogen. PMID:26475104

  7. Local Voltage Support from Distributed Energy Resources to Prevent Air Conditioner Motor Stalling

    SciTech Connect

    Baone, Chaitanya A; Xu, Yan; Kueck, John D

    2010-01-01

    Microgrid voltage collapse often happens when there is a high percentage of low inertia air-conditioning (AC) motors in the power systems. The stalling of the AC motors results in Fault Induced Delayed Voltage Recovery (FIDVR). A hybrid load model including typical building loads, AC motor loads, and other induction motor loads is built to simulate the motoring stalling phenomena. Furthermore, distributed energy resources (DE) with local voltage support capability are utilized to boost the local bus voltage during a fault, and prevent the motor stalling. The simulation results are presented. The analysis of the simulation results show that local voltage support from multiple DEs can effectively and economically solve the microgrid voltage collapse problem.

  8. Distribution of the Height of Local Maxima of Gaussian Random Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dan; Schwartzman, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Let {f(t) : t ∈ T} be a smooth Gaussian random field over a parameter space T, where T may be a subset of Euclidean space or, more generally, a Riemannian manifold. We provide a general formula for the distribution of the height of a local maximum P{f(t0)>u∣t0 is a local maximum of f(t)} when f is non-stationary. Moreover, we establish asymptotic approximations for the overshoot distribution of a local maximum P{f(t0)>u+v∣t0 is a local maximum of f(t) and f(t0) > v} as v → ∞. Assuming further that f is isotropic, we apply techniques from random matrix theory related to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble to compute such conditional probabilities explicitly when T is Euclidean or a sphere of arbitrary dimension. Such calculations are motivated by the statistical problem of detecting peaks in the presence of smooth Gaussian noise. PMID:26478714

  9. Strain Partitioning and Localization within Dobe Graben Using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-INSAR) and Shuttle Radar Terrain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Z. S.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Byrnes, J. M.; Bridges, D.

    2014-12-01

    the measured population of fault throws (n= 30) in 12 traverses totaling 48 km revealed a negative power fit distribution indicated a strong strain localization by the graben boarder faults.

  10. Experimental evaluation of the strength distribution of E-glass fibres at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    1995-07-01

    A bimodal Weibull distribution function was applied to analyse the strength distribution of glass fibre bundles under tensile impact. The simulation was performed using a one-dimensional damage constitutive model. The results show that there were two concurrent flaw populations in the fracture process. The regression analysis using the bimodal Weibull distribution function was in good agreement with experiment.

  11. Local elasticity of strained DNA studied by all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2011-08-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly subjected to various mechanical stresses arising from its biological functions and cell packaging. If the local mechanical properties of DNA change under torsional and tensional stress, the activity of DNA-modifying proteins and transcription factors can be affected and regulated allosterically. To check this possibility, appropriate steady forces and torques were applied in the course of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with AT- and GC-alternating sequences. It is found that the stretching rigidity grows with tension as well as twisting. The torsional rigidity is not affected by stretching, but it varies with twisting very strongly, and differently for the two sequences. Surprisingly, for AT-alternating DNA it passes through a minimum with the average twist close to the experimental value in solution. For this fragment, but not for the GC-alternating sequence, the bending rigidity noticeably changes with both twisting and stretching. The results have important biological implications and shed light on earlier experimental observations.

  12. Elastographic imaging of strain distribution in the anterior cruciate ligament and at the ligament-bone insertions.

    PubMed

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Gallina, Jason; Fung-Kee-Fung, Simon D; Konofagou, Elisa E; Lu, Helen H

    2006-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) functions as a mechanical stabilizer in the tibiofemoral joint, and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. To improve the clinical outcome of tendon grafts used for ACL reconstructions, our long-term goal is to promote graft-bone integration via the regeneration of the native ligament-bone interface. An understanding of strain distribution at this interface is crucial for functional scaffold design and clinical evaluation. Experimental determination, however, has been difficult due to the small length scale of the insertion sites. This study utilizes ultrasound elastography to characterize the response of the ACL and ACL-bone interface under tension. Specifically, bovine tibiofemoral joints were mounted on a material testing system and loaded in tension while radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired at 5 MHz. Axial strain elastograms between RF frames and a reference frame were generated using crosscorrelation and recorrelation techniques. Elastographic analyses revealed that when the joint was loaded in tension, complex strains with both compressive and tensile components occurred at the tibial insertion, with higher strains found at the insertion sites. In addition, the displacement was greatest at the ACL proper and decreased in value gradually from ligament to bone, likely a reflection of the matrix organization at the ligament-bone interface. Our results indicate that elastography is a novel method that can be readily used to characterize the mechanical properties of the ACL and its insertions into bone. PMID:16900541

  13. A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Römling, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains. PMID:26014207

  14. Stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface of two splinted overdenture systems using 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was accomplished to assess the biomechanical state of different retaining methods of bar implant-overdenture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two 3D finite element models were designed. The first model included implant overdenture retained by Hader-clip attachment, while the second model included two extracoronal resilient attachment (ERA) studs added distally to Hader splint bar. A non-linear frictional contact type was assumed between overdentures and mucosa to represent sliding and rotational movements among different attachment components. A 200 N was applied at the molar region unilaterally and perpendicular to the occlusal plane. Additionally, the mandible was restrained at their ramus ends. The maximum equivalent stress and strain (von Mises) were recorded and analyzed at the bone-implant interface level. RESULTS The values of von Mises stress and strain of the first model at bone-implant interface were higher than their counterparts of the second model. Stress concentration and high value of strain were recognized surrounding implant of the unloaded side in both models. CONCLUSION There were different patterns of stress-strain distribution at bone-implant interface between the studied attachment designs. Hader bar-clip attachment showed better biomechanical behavior than adding ERA studs distal to hader bar. PMID:24049576

  15. Finite-temperature local protein sequence alignment: percolation and free-energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, S; Melchert, O; Hartmann, A K

    2009-12-01

    Sequence alignment is a tool in bioinformatics that is used to find homological relationships in large molecular databases. It can be mapped on the physical model of directed polymers in random media. We consider the finite-temperature version of local sequence alignment for proteins and study the transition between the linear phase and the biologically relevant logarithmic phase, where the free energy grows linearly or logarithmically with the sequence length. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size-scaling analysis, we determine the phase diagram in the plane that is spanned by the gap costs and the temperature. We use the most frequently used parameter set for protein alignment. The critical exponents that describe the parameter-driven transition are found to be explicitly temperature dependent. Furthermore, we study the shape of the (free-) energy distribution close to the transition by rare-event simulations down to probabilities on the order 10(-64). It is well known that in the logarithmic region, the optimal score distribution (T=0) is described by a modified Gumbel distribution. We confirm that this also applies for the free-energy distribution (T>0). However, in the linear phase, the distribution crosses over to a modified Gaussian distribution. PMID:20365196

  16. Effect of local surface potential distribution on its relaxation in polycrystalline ferroelectric films.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Park, M.; Buhlmann, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Ko, H.; Kim, J.; No, K.; Materials Science Division; Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology; Samsung Advance Inst. of Tech.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the effect of local surface potential distribution on its relaxation in the polycrystalline ferroelectric thin films. A lower surface potential region, i.e., potential pit, is generated near a grain boundary. The deep potential pit has a faster relaxation than the area far away from the potential pit due to the acceleration of the screen charge draining near the grain boundary and the domains formed by applying higher voltage have a faster relaxation due to the larger gradient of screen charge distribution. In addition, the surface potential and its relaxation depend on the sign of applying voltage. The result shows that the surface potential distribution may influence significantly to the reliability of bit signal on the memory devices.

  17. Optical time-domain reflectometry for distributed sensing of the structural strain and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangping, Xie; Leong Keey, Seah; Asundi, Anand

    1999-11-01

    A unique structure of microbend optical fiber sensor (MOFS) for measuring tensile and compressive strain is described in this paper. The average measuring sensitivity for tensile strain is 35 μɛ using 3 MOFS arrays. The repeatability and stability of MFOS are better than 18 μɛ. The loss sensitivity of single-mode (SM) fiber and multi-mode (MM) fiber used in MOFS, as well as the relationship between the pulse width of diode laser and loss sensitivity are also studied in this paper. From these studies, some conclusions have been obtained. They are (1) the loss sensitivity and repeatability of SM fiber are better when compared to MM fiber in MOFS, and (2) the variation of pulse width of laser would only influent the signal-to-noise ratio and dynamic range, but has no contribution to loss sensitivity. Experimental results also show that loss of SM fiber highly depends on the wavelength of laser, but MM fiber has no such property. The loss of SM fiber between the wavelength of 1550 and 1310 nm is about the ratio of 6.5. Therefore, the experiments reported in this paper used a wavelength of 1310 nm to measure tensile strain and 1550 nm to measure compressive strain based on the above property of SM fiber, without changing the configuration of MOFS.

  18. Optical time-domain reflectometry for distributed sensing of the structural strain and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guangping; Seah, Leong K.; Asundi, Anand K.

    1999-11-01

    A unique structure of microbend optical fiber sensor (MOFS) for measuring tensile and compressive strain is described in this paper. The average measuring sensitivity for tensile strain is 35 (mu) (epsilon) using 3 MOFS arrays. The repeatability and stability of MOFS are better than 18 (mu) (epsilon) . The loss sensitivity of single-mode (SM) fiber and multi-mode (MM) fiber used in MOFS, as well as the relationship between the pulse width of diode laser and loss sensitivity are also studied in this paper. From these studied, some conclusions have been obtained. There are 1) the los sensitivity and repeatability of SM fiber are better when compared to MM fiber in MOFS, and 2) the variation of pulse width of laser would only influent the signal-to-noise ratio and dynamic range, but has no contribution to loss sensitivity. Experimental result also show that loss of SM fiber highly depends on the wavelength of laser, but MM fiber has no such property. The loss of Sm fiber between the wavelength of 1550nm and 1310nm is about the ratio of 6.5. Therefore, the experiments reported in this paper used wavelength of 1310nm to measure tensile strain and 1550nm to measure compressive strain based on the above property of SM fiber, without changing the configuration of MOFS.

  19. The distribution of stresses and strains in the mating elements disk tools working bodies of roadheaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoreshok, A. A.; Mametyev, L. E.; Borisov, A. Yu; Vorobyev, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Presents the results of modeling the stress-strain state in the mating structural elements of the attachment disk tools various design on triangular and tetrahedral prisms working bodies of roadheaders selective action in the destruction of coalface of heterogeneous structure.

  20. Enhanced Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum: Geographical Distribution of Strain Types and Association with Neurosyphilis

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Christina M.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Godornes, Charmie; Reid, Tara; Behets, Frieda; Rompalo, Anne; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Yin, Yue-Ping; Mulcahy, Fiona; Golden, Matthew R.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Strain typing is a tool for determining diversity and epidemiology of infections. Methods T. pallidum DNA was isolated from 158 syphilis patients from the US, China, Ireland, and Madagascar and from 15 T. pallidum isolates. Six typing targets were assessed: 1) number of 60 bp repeats in acidic repeat protein gene; 2) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of T. pallidum repeat (tpr) subfamily II genes; 3) RFLP analysis of tprC gene; 4) determination of tprD allele in tprD gene locus; 5) presence of 51 bp insertion between tp0126/tp0127; 6) sequence analysis of 84 bp region of tp0548. The combination of #1 and #2 comprises the CDC T. pallidum subtyping method. Results Adding sequence analysis of tp0548 to the CDC method yielded the most discriminating typing system. Twenty-four strain types were identified and designated as CDC subtype/tp0548 sequence. Type 14d/f was seen in 5 of 6 locations. In Seattle, strain types changed from 1999– 2008 (p<0.001). Twenty-two (50%) of 44 patients infected with type 14d/f had neurosyphilis compared to 9 (23%) of 39 infected with the other types combined (p=0.01). Conclusion We describe an enhanced T. pallidum strain typing system that shows biological and clinical relevance. PMID:20868271

  1. Diversity and distribution of anaeromyxobacter strains in a uranium-contaminated subsurface environment with a nonuniform groundwater flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sara H; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M; Sanford, Robert A; Löffler, Frank E

    2009-06-01

    Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <10(5) cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 10(8) cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial

  2. Identification, localization, and distribution of the PilT protein in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Brossay, L; Paradis, G; Fox, R; Koomey, M; Hébert, J

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against a highly conserved protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with a molecular size of 40 kDa was isolated and characterized. The protein antigen detected by this MAb was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting in all strains of N. gonorrhoeae tested across a wide range of serovars. The 40-kDa protein was found to be expressed at relatively low levels and localized to both the cytosolic and cytoplasmic membrane fractions. Screening of a lambda gt11 expression library derived from gonococcal genomic DNA with the anti-40-kDa MAb and DNA sequence analysis suggested that the 40-kDa protein and the product of the gonococcal pilT gene were identical. Immunoblotting analysis of gonococcal mutants carrying defined mutations in the pilT gene confirmed that the 40-kDa protein was indeed PilT. The N-terminal sequence derived by microsequencing of the protein purified from gonococci led to the correction of the previously published pilT gene sequence. Sequencing of the pilT gene from three different strains revealed an extremely high degree of conservation at both the amino acid and DNA levels. Images PMID:8188352

  3. Inferring local competition intensity from patch size distributions: a test using biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-01-01

    Dryland vegetation is inherently patchy. This patchiness goes on to impact ecology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Recently, researchers have proposed that dryland vegetation patch sizes follow a power law which is due to local plant facilitation. It is unknown what patch size distribution prevails when competition predominates over facilitation, or if such a pattern could be used to detect competition. We investigated this question in an alternative vegetation type, mosses and lichens of biological soil crusts, which exhibit a smaller scale patch-interpatch configuration. This micro-vegetation is characterized by competition for space. We proposed that multiplicative effects of genetics, environment and competition should result in a log-normal patch size distribution. When testing the prevalence of log-normal versus power law patch size distributions, we found that the log-normal was the better distribution in 53% of cases and a reasonable fit in 83%. In contrast, the power law was better in 39% of cases, and in 8% of instances both distributions fit equally well. We further hypothesized that the log-normal distribution parameters would be predictably influenced by competition strength. There was qualitative agreement between one of the distribution's parameters (μ) and a novel intransitive (lacking a 'best' competitor) competition index, suggesting that as intransitivity increases, patch sizes decrease. The correlation of μ with other competition indicators based on spatial segregation of species (the C-score) depended on aridity. In less arid sites, μ was negatively correlated with the C-score (suggesting smaller patches under stronger competition), while positive correlations (suggesting larger patches under stronger competition) were observed at more arid sites. We propose that this is due to an increasing prevalence of competition transitivity as aridity increases. These findings broaden the emerging theory surrounding dryland patch size distributions

  4. Distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor with centimeter spatial resolution by coherent probe-pump technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Wan, Yidun; Ravet, Fabien; Chen, Liang

    2005-05-01

    We present a sensing principle of the distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor by coherent probe-pump technique that offers a new method to achieve centimeter spatial resolution with high frequency resolution. A combination of continuous wave (cw) and pulse source as the probe (Stokes) beam and cw laser as the pump beam have resulted in stronger Brillouin interaction of Stokes and pump inside the pulse-length in the form of cw-pump and pulse-pump interactions. We find that the coherent portion inside the pulse-length of these two interactions due to the same phase has a very high Brillouin amplification. The Brillouin profile originating from the coherent interaction of pulse-pump with cw-pump results in high temperature and strain accuracy with centimeter resolution, which has been verified by successfully detecting 1.5 cm out-layer crack on an optical ground wire (OPGW) cable.

  5. High spatial resolution, dynamic, and distributed fiber optic strain sensing based on phasorial Brillouin dynamic gratings reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, A.; Langer, T.; Tur, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel fiber-optic sensing technique based on the distributed measurement of Brillouin-induced phase-shift in the reflection from Brillouin dynamic gratings in polarization-maintaining fibers. Subject to signal to noise considerations, the strain sensitivity of the phase-shift in the reflection of a pulsed probe, orthogonally polarized to the gratings-generating pumps, is independent of the pulse width, suggesting the potential to achieve higher spatial resolutions than those offered by slope-assisted, phasorial Brillouin sensing techniques in standard single-mode fibers. We report the measurement of 500Hz strain vibrations (at a sampling rate of 1MHz) with a spatial resolution of 20cm.

  6. Streicker Bridge: a comparison between Bragg-grating long-gauge strain and temperature sensors and Brillouin scattering-based distributed strain and temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Chen, Jeremy; Hubbell, David

    2011-04-01

    The Streicker Bridge at Princeton University campus has been equipped with two fiber-optic sensing technologies: discrete long-gauge sensing, based on Fiber Bragg-Gratings (FBG), and truly-distributed sensing, based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA). The sensors were embedded in concrete during the construction. The early age measurements, including hydration swelling and contraction, and post-tensioning of concrete were registered by both systems and placed side by side in order to compare their performances. Aside from the usual behavior, an unusual increase in strain was detected by several sensors in various cross-sections. The nature of this event is still under investigation, but preliminary study indicates early-age cracking as the cause. The comparison between the two monitoring systems shows good agreement in the areas where no unusual behavior was detected, but some discrepancies are noticed at locations where unusual behavior occurred and during the early age of concrete. These discrepancies are attributed to the spatial resolution of the distributed monitoring system and the temperature influences at early age. In this paper, general information concerning the Streicker Bridge project is given. The monitoring systems and their specifications are briefly presented. The monitoring data are analyzed and a comparison between the two systems is performed.

  7. Integrating a local database into the StarView distributed user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    A distributed user interface to the Space Telescope Data Archive and Distribution Service (DADS) known as StarView is being developed. The DADS architecture consists of the data archive as well as a relational database catalog describing the archive. StarView is a client/server system in which the user interface is the front-end client to the DADS catalog and archive servers. Users query the DADS catalog from the StarView interface. Query commands are transmitted via a network and evaluated by the database. The results are returned via the network and are displayed on StarView forms. Based on the results, users decide which data sets to retrieve from the DADS archive. Archive requests are packaged by StarView and sent to DADS, which returns the requested data sets to the users. The advantages of distributed client/server user interfaces over traditional one-machine systems are well known. Since users run software on machines separate from the database, the overall client response time is much faster. Also, since the server is free to process only database requests, the database response time is much faster. Disadvantages inherent in this architecture are slow overall database access time due to the network delays, lack of a 'get previous row' command, and that refinements of a previously issued query must be submitted to the database server, even though the domain of values have already been returned by the previous query. This architecture also does not allow users to cross correlate DADS catalog data with other catalogs. Clearly, a distributed user interface would be more powerful if it overcame these disadvantages. A local database is being integrated into StarView to overcome these disadvantages. When a query is made through a StarView form, which is often composed of fields from multiple tables, it is translated to an SQL query and issued to the DADS catalog. At the same time, a local database table is created to contain the resulting rows of the query. The

  8. Effects of Cross-Sectional Ovalization on Springback and Strain Distribution of Circular Tubes Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yafei; E, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Springback and cross-sectional ovalization are two important defects in the bending formation of tubular parts. In this article, an analytic model considering ovalization is presented to calculate the springback and tangential strain in tube bending. Compared with the calculation neglecting ovalization, the proposed model could better predict the trends of springback angle over bending radius ratio and wall thickness ratio. Moreover, calculation of the tangential strain indicates that the bending deformation is more severe in the middle than at the ends of a bent tube. Through comparison of the results of this model and the calculations neglecting ovalization, it is shown that the effects of ovalization on springback are negligible only if the bending radius ratio and the wall thickness ratio are large enough. Also, the influence of ovalization differs a lot from one material to another.

  9. A model of local distribution of saturation in a fractured layer, and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Yuichi Niibori; Tadashi Chida

    1994-01-20

    This paper describes a model of local distribution of liquid water (or steam) saturation in a fractured layer. The model, based on the Bernoulli trials as a probability density function of saturation, gives the following relation between the average value of the relative permeability for the water phase, k{sub rwa}, and the arithmetical mean of saturation, S{sub wa}: k{sub rwa}=S{sub wa}{sup m} where m is an index representing the non-uniformity of saturation (1<=m<=4). When m=4, the saturation is distributed uniformly. The proposed model also gives the average value for the relative permeability of the steam phase, k{sub rga}, as follows: k{sub rga}=1-S{sub wa}{sup m}-2S{sub wa}+2S{sub wa}{sup (2m+1)/3} These relations are applied to analysis of some experimental data already reported by the authors. Also, this presentation shows the validity of the Bernoulli trials as a density probability function of saturation in comparison with other kinds of such functions: the normal distribution, the triangle distribution and the beta distribution.

  10. Microstructure and nanohardness distribution in a polycrystalline Zn deformed by high strain rate impact

    SciTech Connect

    Dirras, G.; Ouarem, A.; Couque, H.; Gubicza, J.; Szommer, P.; Brinza, O.

    2011-05-15

    Polycrystalline Zn with an average grain size of about 300 {mu}m was deformed by direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar at a velocity of 29 m/s. An inhomogeneous grain structure was found consisting of a center region having large average grain size of 20 {mu}m surrounded by a fine-grained rim with an average grain size of 6 {mu}m. Transmission electron microscopy investigations showed a significant dislocation density in the large-grained area while in the fine-grained rim the dislocation density was negligible. Most probably, the higher strain yielded recrystallization in the outer ring while in the center only recovery occurred. The hardening effect of dislocations overwhelms the smaller grain size strengthening in the center part resulting in higher nanohardness in this region than in the outer ring. - Graphical Abstract: (a): EBSD micrograph showing the initial microstructure of polycrystalline Zn that was subsequently submitted to high strain rate impact. (b): an inhomogeneous grain size refinement was obtained which consists of a central coarse-grained area, surrounded by a fine-grained recrystallized rim. The black arrow points to the disc center. Research Highlights: {yields} A polycrystalline Zn specimen was submitted to high strain rate impact loading. {yields} Inhomogeneous grain refinement occurred due to strain gradient in impacted sample. {yields} A fine-grained recrystallized rim surrounded the coarse-grained center of specimen. {yields} The coarse-grained center exhibited higher hardness than the fine-grained rim. {yields} The higher hardness of the center was caused by the higher dislocation density.

  11. Regional arterial stress-strain distributions referenced to the zero-stress state in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Day, Judd; Yuan, Zhuang Feng; Gregersen, Hans

    2002-02-01

    Morphometric and stress-strain properties were studied in isolated segments of the thoracic aorta, abdominal aorta, left common carotid artery, left femoral artery, and the left pulmonary artery in 16 male Wistar rats. The mechanical test was performed as a distension experiment where the proximal end of the arterial segment was connected via a tube to the container used for applying pressures to the segment and the distal end was left free. Outer wall dimensions were obtained from digitized images of the arterial segments at different pressures as well as at no-load and zero-stress states. The results showed that the morphometric data, such as inner and outer circumference, wall and lumen area, wall thickness, wall thickness-to-inner radius ratio, and normalized outer diameter, as a function of the applied pressures, differed between the five arteries (P < 0.01). The opening angle was largest in the pulmonary artery and smallest in thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). The absolute value of both the inner and outer residual strain and the residual strain gradient were largest in the femoral artery and smallest in the thoracic aorta (P < 0.01). In the circumferential and longitudinal direction, the arterial wall was stiffest in the femoral artery and in the thoracic aorta, respectively, and most compliant in the pulmonary artery. These results show that the morphometric and biomechanical properties referenced to the zero-stress state differed between the five arterial segments. PMID:11788411

  12. Effects of acetabular resurfacing component material and fixation on the strain distribution in the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M S; Northmore-Ball, M D; Tanner, K E

    2002-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model of an implanted pelvis was developed as part of a project investigating an all-polymer hip resurfacing design. The model was used to compare this novel design with a metal-on-metal design in current use and a metal-on-polymer design typical of early resurfacing implants. The model included forces representing the actions of 22 muscles as well as variable cancellous bone stiffness and variable cortical shell thickness. The hip joint reaction force was applied via contact modelled between the femoral and acetabular components of the resurfacing prosthesis. Five load cases representing time points through the gait cycle were analysed. The effect of varying fixation conditions was also investigated. The highest cancellous bone strain levels were found at mid-stance, not heel-strike. Remote from the acetabulum there was little effect of prosthesis material and fixation upon the von Mises stresses and maximum principal strains. Implant material appeared to have little effect upon cancellous bone strain failure with both bended and unbonded bone-implant interfaces. The unbonded implants increased stresses in the subchondral bone at the centre of the acetabulum and increased cancellous bone loading, resembling behaviour obtained previously for the intact acetabulum. PMID:12206520

  13. A Local Scalable Distributed Expectation Maximization Algorithm for Large Peer-to-Peer Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaduri, Kanishka; Srivastava, Ashok N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a local distributed algorithm for expectation maximization in large peer-to-peer environments. The algorithm can be used for a variety of well-known data mining tasks in a distributed environment such as clustering, anomaly detection, target tracking to name a few. This technology is crucial for many emerging peer-to-peer applications for bioinformatics, astronomy, social networking, sensor networks and web mining. Centralizing all or some of the data for building global models is impractical in such peer-to-peer environments because of the large number of data sources, the asynchronous nature of the peer-to-peer networks, and dynamic nature of the data/network. The distributed algorithm we have developed in this paper is provably-correct i.e. it converges to the same result compared to a similar centralized algorithm and can automatically adapt to changes to the data and the network. We show that the communication overhead of the algorithm is very low due to its local nature. This monitoring algorithm is then used as a feedback loop to sample data from the network and rebuild the model when it is outdated. We present thorough experimental results to verify our theoretical claims.

  14. Observability and Estimation of Distributed Space Systems via Local Information-Exchange Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmani, Amirreza; Mesbahi, Mehran; Fathpour, Nanaz; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we develop an approach to formation estimation by explicitly characterizing formation's system-theoretic attributes in terms of the underlying inter-spacecraft information-exchange network. In particular, we approach the formation observer/estimator design by relaxing the accessibility to the global state information by a centralized observer/estimator- and in turn- providing an analysis and synthesis framework for formation observers/estimators that rely on local measurements. The noveltyof our approach hinges upon the explicit examination of the underlying distributed spacecraft network in the realm of guidance, navigation, and control algorithmic analysis and design. The overarching goal of our general research program, some of whose results are reported in this paper, is the development of distributed spacecraft estimation algorithms that are scalable, modular, and robust to variations inthe topology and link characteristics of the formation information exchange network. In this work, we consider the observability of a spacecraft formation from a single observation node and utilize the agreement protocol as a mechanism for observing formation states from local measurements. Specifically, we show how the symmetry structure of the network, characterized in terms of its automorphism group, directly relates to the observability of the corresponding multi-agent system The ramification of this notion of observability over networks is then explored in the context of distributed formation estimation.

  15. Strain Distribution in Central Europe: FEM Modeling and Comparison with GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araszkiewicz, A.; Bogusz, J.; Jarosinski, M.; Lenik, K.

    2012-12-01

    The main aim of this research is to demonstrate how the results of permanent GPS measurements can be understand in terms of recent geodynamics by applying numerical modeling method. On the other hand, the results of modeling are testing the consistency of the GPS measurements. The method of finite element analysis was applied to develop two-dimensional model of strain and stress field in Central Europe. The FEM model was prepared in the ABAQUS software, consisting of graphic modules and ABAQUS/CAE and ABAQUS Standard modules for solving the static task. The structure of the model was created in the plane Cartesian coordinate system, assuming that for this size of model the earth curvature will not affect the stress and strain direction significantly. Simplified elastic model with frictional contact elements was used for defining mechanical properties of the model. The model consists of 48 parts representing major tectonic units/blocks characterized by different material properties. The stiffness of tectonic blocks expressed by Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio was determined based on the lithospheric thickness, surface heat flow and simplified lithological column of the lithosphere. For dislocations, different values of friction coefficient was tested in course of the trial-and-error modeling than the best fitted options were finally adopted in the model. The dynamic (force and pressure) boundary conditions were applied to the elastic model based on the recent tectonic stress directions from the World Stress Map Database. To allow fast changes of the loads the model boundary were designed normal to tectonic stresses. After each computing round the simulated stress and strain were compared with that measured, paying special attention to the GPS measurements from Poland and the adjacent areas. We have used coordinates and velocities from EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) densified by Polish national Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS) ASG-EUPOS. They were obtained

  16. Grain Growth Pinning and Strain Localization: Implications for Plagioclase Flow Laws and Strength of the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, L.; Hirth, G.

    2005-12-01

    The rheology of the lower crust remains poorly understood despite its importance for understanding the strength of plates, driving forces for plate motion, and how strain is translated up to and/or down from the brittle upper crust. In this study we evaluate the applicability of experimental flow laws using insights from the analysis of naturally deformed gabbros from lower oceanic crust (Hole 735B, Southwest Indian Ridge). For comparison with experimentally-derived flow laws, we evaluate stress, temperature, and deformation mechanism in the SWIR samples. Strain is localized in discrete shear zones, and we assume a strain rate of 10-12 to 10-14 s-1. Differential stress ranges from ~20 to 150 MPa, estimated by grain size piezometry with the empirical relationship of Twiss (1977). Syn-deformation temperatures are 800-950 °C, calculated by Fe-Mg-Ca exchange between recrystallized orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene pairs using QUILF (Andersen et al., 1993). Finally, deformation mechanisms were analyzed by measuring the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) with an electron back scattered detector (EBSD) on a scanning electron microscope. Monophase layers within the shear zones have LPOs indicative of deformation by dislocation creep at all grain sizes (down to 12.5 μm). Polyphase layers have random or very weak fabrics implying dominance of diffusion creep, even in samples with a relatively coarse grain size (well within the dislocation creep field). Plagioclase grains in the polyphase layers are smaller than those in monophase layers indicating that grain growth is apparently inhibited by clinopyroxene at grain boundaries. The variation in plagioclase grain size fits models that account for the size and abundance of a pinning phase. We conclude: 1) Flow law parameters for dry An100 (Rybacki and Dresen, 2000) agree well with natural polyphase gabbro shear zones. This is a relatively `strong' flow law that predicts viscosities higher than olivine flow laws for a wet upper

  17. Addressing potential local adaptation in species distribution models: implications for conservation under climate change.

    PubMed

    Hällfors, Maria Helena; Liao, Jishan; Dzurisin, Jason; Grundel, Ralph; Hyvärinen, Marko; Towle, Kevin; Wu, Grace C; Hellmann, Jessica J

    2016-06-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have been criticized for involving assumptions that ignore or categorize many ecologically relevant factors such as dispersal ability and biotic interactions. Another potential source of model error is the assumption that species are ecologically uniform in their climatic tolerances across their range. Typically, SDMs treat a species as a single entity, although populations of many species differ due to local adaptation or other genetic differentiation. Not taking local adaptation into account may lead to incorrect range prediction and therefore misplaced conservation efforts. A constraint is that we often do not know the degree to which populations are locally adapted. Lacking experimental evidence, we still can evaluate niche differentiation within a species' range to promote better conservation decisions. We explore possible conservation implications of making type I or type II errors in this context. For each of two species, we construct three separate Max-Ent models, one considering the species as a single population and two of disjunct populations. Principal component analyses and response curves indicate different climate characteristics in the current environments of the populations. Model projections into future climates indicate minimal overlap between areas predicted to be climatically suitable by the whole species vs. population-based models. We present a workflow for addressing uncertainty surrounding local adaptation in SDM application and illustrate the value of conducting population-based models to compare with whole-species models. These comparisons might result in more cautious management actions when alternative range outcomes are considered. PMID:27509755

  18. Addressing potential local adaptation in species distribution models: implications for conservation under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hällfors, Maria Helena; Liao, Jishan; Dzurisin, Jason D. K.; Grundel, Ralph; Hyvärinen, Marko; Towle, Kevin; Wu, Grace C.; Hellmann, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have been criticized for involving assumptions that ignore or categorize many ecologically relevant factors such as dispersal ability and biotic interactions. Another potential source of model error is the assumption that species are ecologically uniform in their climatic tolerances across their range. Typically, SDMs to treat a species as a single entity, although populations of many species differ due to local adaptation or other genetic differentiation. Not taking local adaptation into account, may lead to incorrect range prediction and therefore misplaced conservation efforts. A constraint is that we often do not know the degree to which populations are locally adapted, however. Lacking experimental evidence, we still can evaluate niche differentiation within a species' range to promote better conservation decisions. We explore possible conservation implications of making type I or type II errors in this context. For each of two species, we construct three separate MaxEnt models, one considering the species as a single population and two of disjunct populations. PCA analyses and response curves indicate different climate characteristics in the current environments of the populations. Model projections into future climates indicate minimal overlap between areas predicted to be climatically suitable by the whole species versus population-based models. We present a workflow for addressing uncertainty surrounding local adaptation in SDM application and illustrate the value of conducting population-based models to compare with whole-species models. These comparisons might result in more cautious management actions when alternative range outcomes are considered.

  19. Human gait recognition using patch distribution feature and locality-constrained group sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Huang, Yi; Zeng, Zinan; Xu, Xinxing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new patch distribution feature (PDF) (i.e., referred to as Gabor-PDF) for human gait recognition. We represent each gait energy image (GEI) as a set of local augmented Gabor features, which concatenate the Gabor features extracted from different scales and different orientations together with the X-Y coordinates. We learn a global Gaussian mixture model (GMM) (i.e., referred to as the universal background model) with the local augmented Gabor features from all the gallery GEIs; then, each gallery or probe GEI is further expressed as the normalized parameters of an image-specific GMM adapted from the global GMM. Observing that one video is naturally represented as a group of GEIs, we also propose a new classification method called locality-constrained group sparse representation (LGSR) to classify each probe video by minimizing the weighted l(1, 2) mixed-norm-regularized reconstruction error with respect to the gallery videos. In contrast to the standard group sparse representation method that is a special case of LGSR, the group sparsity and local smooth sparsity constraints are both enforced in LGSR. Our comprehensive experiments on the benchmark USF HumanID database demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly proposed feature Gabor-PDF and the new classification method LGSR for human gait recognition. Moreover, LGSR using the new feature Gabor-PDF achieves the best average Rank-1 and Rank-5 recognition rates on this database among all gait recognition algorithms proposed to date. PMID:21724511

  20. Uncertainty in identifying local extinctions: the distribution of missing data and its effects on biodiversity measures.

    PubMed

    Boakes, Elizabeth H; Fuller, Richard A; McGowan, Philip J K; Mace, Georgina M

    2016-03-01

    Identifying local extinctions is integral to estimating species richness and geographic range changes and informing extinction risk assessments. However, the species occurrence records underpinning these estimates are frequently compromised by a lack of recorded species absences making it impossible to distinguish between local extinction and lack of survey effort-for a rigorously compiled database of European and Asian Galliformes, approximately 40% of half-degree cells contain records from before but not after 1980. We investigate the distribution of these cells, finding differences between the Palaearctic (forests, low mean human influence index (HII), outside protected areas (PAs)) and Indo-Malaya (grassland, high mean HII, outside PAs). Such cells also occur more in less peaceful countries. We show that different interpretations of these cells can lead to large over/under-estimations of species richness and extent of occurrences, potentially misleading prioritization and extinction risk assessment schemes. To avoid mistakes, local extinctions inferred from sightings records need to account for the history of survey effort in a locality. PMID:26961894

  1. Uncertainty in identifying local extinctions: the distribution of missing data and its effects on biodiversity measures

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Richard A.; McGowan, Philip J. K.; Mace, Georgina M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying local extinctions is integral to estimating species richness and geographic range changes and informing extinction risk assessments. However, the species occurrence records underpinning these estimates are frequently compromised by a lack of recorded species absences making it impossible to distinguish between local extinction and lack of survey effort—for a rigorously compiled database of European and Asian Galliformes, approximately 40% of half-degree cells contain records from before but not after 1980. We investigate the distribution of these cells, finding differences between the Palaearctic (forests, low mean human influence index (HII), outside protected areas (PAs)) and Indo-Malaya (grassland, high mean HII, outside PAs). Such cells also occur more in less peaceful countries. We show that different interpretations of these cells can lead to large over/under-estimations of species richness and extent of occurrences, potentially misleading prioritization and extinction risk assessment schemes. To avoid mistakes, local extinctions inferred from sightings records need to account for the history of survey effort in a locality. PMID:26961894

  2. Free-space optical technology and distribution architecture for broadband metro and local services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodley, J. P.; Britz, David M.; Bowen, D. J.; Lundgren, Carl W.

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper addresses the hardware and operational requirements for broadband metro and local services using line of sight wireless Free Space Optical Communication (FSOC) optical links. The primary considerations for successful optical wireless service provisions include link availability, type of service and integration into existing fiber optic networks. A comprehensive link analysis for broadband access services is presented. This paper addresses FSOC critical atmospheric transmission impairments and describes one possible FSOC/network fiber optic interface and routing scenario. This paper will also detail methods to restor FSOC service links that have failed due to atmospheric impairments. This paper will detail the use of secondary radio (mm wave or ISM band radio) link architectures to provide critical transmission back-up for data, emergency and voice call services. An FSOC back-up link for existing millimeter-wave radio local services is also discussed. A co-operative network of FSOC links is discussed for achieving availability requirements for metro and local distribution services. This paper also describes one possible rooftop routing scenario using optical cross- connect architectures located at each node of the local FSOC access network. Rooftop routing will utilize the technology flexibility and system redundancy described above to provide high `five nines' metro service availability. This paper will also describe a proposed FSOC test installation to study link architectures, performance of such links, and vendor product interface and evaluation.

  3. Lung distribution, quantification, co-localization and speciation of silver nanoparticles after lung exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Stijn; Larue, Camille; Sarret, Geraldine; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2015-10-01

    Large knowledge gaps still exist on the toxicological mechanisms of silver (Ag) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs); a comprehensive understanding of the sources, biodistribution, toxicity and transformation of Ag ENPs along their life cycle and after transfer in living organisms is needed. In a previous study, mice were pulmonary exposed to Ag ENPs and local (lung) and systemic toxic effects together with biodistribution to organs including heart, liver, spleen and kidney were investigated. Here, Ag lung distribution, local concentration, co-localization with other elements such as Fe, Cu and S, and speciation were determined after lung exposure to Ag ENPs using micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), micro X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (μXANES) and micro proton-induced X-ray emission (μPIXE) techniques. We found that approximately a quarter of all macrophages in the lumen of the airways contained ENPs. High local concentrations of Ag were also detected in the lung tissue, probably phagocytized by macrophages. The largest part of the ENPs was dissolved and complexed to thiol-containing molecules. Increased concentrations of Fe and Cu observed in the Ag-rich spots suggest that these molecules are metallothioneins (MTs). These results give more insights on the behavior of Ag ENPs in the lung in vivo and will help in the understanding of the toxicological mechanisms of Ag ENPs. PMID:26162856

  4. Local endwall heat/mass-transfer distributions in pin fin channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Kim, Y. S.; Han, J. C.

    1987-10-01

    Naphthalene sublimination experiments were conducted to study the effects of the pin configuration, the pin length-to-diameter ratio, and the entrance length on local endwall heat/mass transfer in a channel with short pin fins (pin length-to-diameter ratios of 0.5 and 1.0). The detailed distributions of the local endwall heat/mass-transfer coefficient were obtained for staggered and aligned arrays of pin fins, for the spanwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratio of 2.5, and for streamwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 2.5. The Reynolds numbers were kept at about 33,000. Overall- and row-averaged Nusselt numbers compared very well with those from previous heat-transfer studies.

  5. Stress avoidance in a common annual: reproductive timing is important for local adaptation and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, T M; Watson, M A

    2005-11-01

    Adaptation to local environments may be an important determinant of species' geographic range. However, little is known about which traits contribute to adaptation or whether their further evolution would facilitate range expansion. In this study, we assessed the adaptive value of stress avoidance traits in the common annual Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) by performing a reciprocal transplant across a broad latitudinal gradient extending to the species' northern border. Populations were locally adapted and stress avoidance traits accounted for most fitness differences between populations. At the northern border where growing seasons are cooler and shorter, native populations had evolved to reproduce earlier than native populations in the lower latitude gardens. This clinal pattern in reproductive timing corresponded to a shift in selection from favouring later to earlier reproduction. Thus, earlier reproduction is an important adaptation to northern latitudes and constraint on the further evolution of this trait in marginal populations could potentially limit distribution. PMID:16313471

  6. Distributed characterization of localized and stationary dynamic Brillouin gratings in polarization maintaining optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Fabrizio; Sengupta, Dipankar; Palmieri, Luca; Santagiustina, Marco

    2016-03-21

    We experimentally generate localized and stationary dynamic Brillouin gratings in a 5 m long polarization maintaining fiber by phase-modulation of the pumps with a pseudo-random bit sequence. The dynamic Brillouin gratings are characterized in terms of length, bandwidth, group delay and group delay ripple, optical signal-to-noise ratio and peak to sidelobe ratio by measuring the distribution of the complex reflected signal along the fiber through swept-wavelength interferometry. By numerical processing, the performance of an optimal modulation format enabling null off-peak reflections are estimated and compared to the pseudo-random bit sequence case. PMID:27136783

  7. Quantifying how the full local distribution of daily precipitation is changing and its uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stainforth, David; Chapman, Sandra; Watkins, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The study of the consequences of global warming would benefit from quantification of geographical patterns of change at specific thresholds or quantiles, and better understandings of the intrinsic uncertainties in such quantities. For precipitation a range of indices have been developed which focus on high percentiles (e.g. rainfall falling on days above the 99th percentile) and on absolute extremes (e.g. maximum annual one day precipitation) but scientific assessments are best undertaken in the context of changes in the whole climatic distribution. Furthermore, the relevant thresholds for climate-vulnerable policy decisions, adaptation planning and impact assessments, vary according to the specific sector and location of interest. We present a methodology which maintains the flexibility to provide information at different thresholds for different downstream users, both scientists and decision makers. We develop a method[1,2] for analysing local climatic timeseries to assess which quantiles of the local climatic distribution show the greatest and most robust changes in daily precipitation data. We extract from the data quantities that characterize the changes in time of the likelihood of daily precipitation above a threshold and of the amount of precipitation on those days. Our method is a simple mathematical deconstruction of how the difference between two observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural statistical variability and/or the consequences of secular climate change. This deconstruction facilitates an assessment of how fast different quantiles of precipitation distributions are changing. This involves not only determining which quantiles and geographical locations show the greatest and smallest changes, but also those at which uncertainty undermines the ability to make confident statements about any change there may be. We demonstrate this approach using E-OBS gridded data[3] which are timeseries of local daily

  8. Macroscopic locality with equal bias reproduces with high fidelity a quantum distribution achieving the Tsirelson's bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, Md. Rajjak; Banik, Manik; Das, Subhadipa; Rai, Ashutosh; Kunkri, Samir

    2013-11-01

    Two physical principles, macroscopic locality (ML) and information causality (IC), so far have been most successful in distinguishing quantum correlations from post-quantum correlations. However, there are also some post-quantum probability distributions which cannot be distinguished with the help of these principles. Thus, it is interesting to see whether consideration of these two principles, separately, along with some additional physically plausible constraints, can explain some interesting quantum features which are otherwise hard to reproduce. In this paper we show that in a Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt scenario, ML along with the constraint of equal bias for the concerned observables, almost reproduces the quantum joint probability distribution corresponding to a maximal quantum Bell violation, which is unique up to relabeling. From this example and earlier work of Cavalcanti, Salles, and Scarani, we conclude that IC and ML are inequivalent physical principles; satisfying one does not imply that the other is satisfied.

  9. Non--Local Approach to the Analysis of the Stress Distribution in Granular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. E.; Kenkre, V. M.; Hurd, A. J.

    1998-03-01

    A continuum mechanical theory of the stress distribution in granular materials is presented, where the transformation of the vertical spatial coordinate into a formal time variable converts the study of the static stress distribution into a generally non--Markoffian, i.e., memory-possessing (non-local) propagation analysis. Previous treatments (J. -P). Bouchaud, M. E. Cates, and P. Claudin, J. Phys. I France 5, 639 (1995). (C. -h). Liu, S. R. Nagel, D. A. Schecter, S. N. Coppersmith, S. Majumdar, O. Narayan, and T. A. Witten, Science 269, 513 (1995). are shown to be particular cases of our theory corresponding to, respectively, wave-like and dif fusive limits of the general evolution. Calculations are presented for the example of ceramic or metal powder compaction in dies, with emphasis on the understanding of previously unexplained features as seen in experimental data found in the literature o ver the past 50 years. Specific proposals for new experimental investigations are presented.

  10. Evolution of the Distribution of Wealth in an Economic Environment Driven by Local Nash Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    We present and analyze a model for the evolution of the wealth distribution within a heterogeneous economic environment. The model considers a system of rational agents interacting in a game theoretical framework, through fairly general assumptions on the cost function. This evolution drives the dynamic of the agents in both wealth and economic configuration variables. We consider a regime of scale separation where the large scale dynamics is given by a hydrodynamic closure with a Nash equilibrium serving as the local thermodynamic equilibrium. The result is a system of gas dynamics-type equations for the density and average wealth of the agents on large scales. We recover the inverse gamma distribution as an equilibrium in the particular case of quadratic cost functions which has been previously considered in the literature.

  11. Improved finite strip Mindlin plate bending element using assumed shear strain distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin/Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-code linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking phenomenon was observed with the newly developed element.

  12. Assumed strain distributions for a finite strip plate bending element using Mindlin-Reissner plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Mullen, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A linear finite strip plate element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory is developed. The analysis is suitable for both thin and thick plates. In the formulation, new transverse shear strains are introduced and assumed constant in each two-node linear strip. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for the analysis of plates are presented for different support and loading conditions and a wide range of thicknesses. No sign of shear locking is observed with the newly developed element.

  13. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Mamaev, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, D. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J. E.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Ustinov, V. M.; Vasiliev, A. P.; Zhukov, A. E.; Roberts, J. S.

    2008-02-06

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  14. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L.G.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J.E.; Kuz'michev, V.V.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V.S.; Roberts, J.S.; Utstinov, V.M.; Vasiliev, D.A.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Yashin, Yu.P.; Zhukov, A.E.; /St. Petersburg Polytechnic Inst. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /SLAC /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst. /Sheffield U.

    2007-11-28

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  15. [Distribution of emm genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes strains: analogy with the vaccine in development].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Uğur; Oryaşın, Erman; Eskin, Zeynep; Türk Dağı, Hatice; Fındık, Duygu; Tuncer, Inci; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2013-04-01

    among the vaccine types. All of the strains were found susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, lincomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin and linezolid, however six isolates were resistant to levofloxacin (MIC= 4 and 16 µg/ml) and one isolate was resistant to tetracycline (MIC= 16 µg/ml). In conclusion, this preliminary local study with limited number of invasive and non-invasive S.pyogenes isolates, emphasized the need for larger scale multi-center studies to determine the analogy and efficacy of the vaccine in development. PMID:23621731

  16. A new estimation of manganese distribution for local dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Men-Quan; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of abundance for iron-peak elements in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is important for galaxy evolution and supernova (SN) nucleosynthesis. Nowadays, manganese (Mn) is one of the most observed iron-peak elements in local dSphs. Studies of its distributions allow us to derive and understand the evolution history of these dSphs. We improve a phenomenological model by a two-curve model including a new initial condition, that includes detailed calculations of SN explosion rates and yields. We compare the results with the observed Mn distribution data for three dSphs: Fornax, Sculpture and Sextans. We find that the model can describe the observed Fe and Mn distributions well simultaneously for the three dSphs. The results also indicate that the initial conditions should be determined by the low metallicity samples in the beginning time of the galaxies and the previous assumption of metellicity-dependant Mn yield of SNIa is not needed when a wide mass range of core-collapse SNe is included. Our method is applicable to the chemical evolution of other iron-peak elements in dSphs and can be modified to provide more detailed processes for the evolution of dSphs.

  17. Bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis: chemical composition and tissue distribution of four Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Rimpiläinen, M; Lehtonen, L; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2000-06-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan structure, whereas that of L. fermentum was different. Likewise, all arthritogenic cell walls were resistant to lysozyme degradation, whereas the L. fermentum cell wall was lysozyme sensitive. Muramic acid was observed in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes in considerably larger amounts after injection of an arthritogenic L. casei cell wall than following injection of a nonarthritogenic L. fermentum cell wall. The L. casei cell wall also persisted in the tissues longer than the L. fermentum cell wall. The present results, taken together with those published previously, underline the possibility that the chemical structure of peptidoglycan is important in determining the arthritogenicity of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:10816508

  18. Nanoscale strain mapping in battery nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Ulvestad, A. Kim, J. W.; Dietze, S. H.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Cho, H. M.; Meng, Y. S.; Harder, R.; Fohtung, E.

    2014-02-17

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is used to map the local three dimensional strain inhomogeneity and electron density distribution of two individual LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4−δ} cathode nanoparticles in both ex-situ and in-situ environments. Our reconstructed images revealed a maximum strain of 0.4%. We observed different variations in strain inhomogeneity due to multiple competing effects. The compressive/tensile component of the strain is connected to the local lithium content and, on the surface, interpreted in terms of a local Jahn-Teller distortion of Mn{sup 3+}. Finally, the measured strain distributions are discussed in terms of their impact on competing theoretical models of the lithiation process.

  19. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  20. Integrated real-time monitoring system for strain/temperature distribution based on simultaneous wavelength and time division multiplexing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yongbo; Li, Peng; Liu, Yanju; Asundi, Anand; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-08-01

    Based on the combination of wavelength- and time-division multiplexing technique, a novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor multiplexing system is proposed, which can be used for monitoring the two-dimensional strain and temperature field distribution in large structures. The FBG sensing unit is encoded simultaneously in both wavelength and time domains. Using the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) resonant cavity technology, a large capacity multiplexing technology with mixed time-division and wave-division multiplexing (TDM+WDM) is presented. The sensor array contains many groups with each group composed of many sensors. The group is addressed by TDM mode and each sensor of the groups is accessed by WDM mode. Therefore, the total multiplexing capacity is multiplication of TDM and WDM. In theory, more than 1000 sensors can be multiplexed on one single fiber. The feasibility of the scheme was experimentally demonstrated through a sensor system with a two dimensional FBG sensing network with 5×5 sensors arrays. In addition, the strain/temperature distribution in an aluminum plate was measured at real time under different loading/heating by using above FBG sensing network.

  1. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions