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Sample records for local structural bias

  1. AWSEM-MD: Protein Structure Prediction Using Coarse-grained Physical Potentials and Bioinformatically Based Local Structure Biasing

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Aram; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Zheng, Weihua; Clementi, Cecilia; Wolynes, Peter G.; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained protein force field. AWSEM contains physically motivated terms, such as hydrogen bonding, as well as a bioinformatically based local structure biasing term, which efficiently takes into account many-body effects that are modulated by the local sequence. When combined with appropriate local or global alignments to choose memories, AWSEM can be used to perform de novo protein structure prediction. Herein we present structure prediction results for a particular choice of local sequence alignment method based on short residue sequences called fragments. We demonstrate the model’s structure prediction capabilities for three levels of global homology between the target sequence and those proteins used for local structure biasing, all of which assume that the structure of the target sequence is not known. When there are no homologs in the database of structures used for local structure biasing, AWSEM calculations produce structural predictions that are somewhat improved compared with prior works using related approaches. The inclusion of a small number of structures from homologous sequences improves structure prediction only marginally but when the fragment search is restricted to only homologous sequences, AWSEM can perform high resolution structure prediction and can be used for kinetics and dynamics studies. PMID:22545654

  2. Bias-dependent local structure of water molecules at an electrochemical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroza, Luana; Brandimarte, Pedro; Rocha, Alexandre R.; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi

    2015-03-01

    Following the need for new - and renewable - sources of energy worldwide, fuel cells using electrocatalysts can be thought of as a viable option. Understanding the local structure of water molecules at the interfaces of the metallic electrodes is a key problem. Notably the system is under an external potential bias, which makes the task of simulating this setup difficult. A first principle description of all components of the system is the most appropriate methodology in order to advance understanding of electrochemical processes. There, the metal is usually charged. To correctly compute the effect of an external bias potential applied to electrodes, we combine density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods (NEGF), with and without van der Waals interactions. In this work, we apply this methodology to study the electronic properties and forces of one water molecule and water monolayer at the interface of gold electrodes. We find that the water molecule has a different torque direction depending on the sign of the bias applied. We also show that it changes the position of the most stable configuration indicating that the external bias plays an important role in the structural properties of the interface. We acknowledge financial support from FAPESP.

  3. Lagrangian bias in the local bias model

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Sheth, Ravi K. E-mail: sheth@ictp.it

    2012-11-01

    It is often assumed that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in the initial Lagrangian dark matter density fluctuation field. We show that if this Lagrangian bias is local, and the initial conditions are Gaussian, then the two-point cross-correlation between halos and mass should be linearly proportional to the mass-mass auto-correlation function. This statement is exact and valid on all scales; there are no higher order contributions, e.g., from terms proportional to products or convolutions of two-point functions, which one might have thought would appear upon truncating the Taylor series of the halo bias function. In addition, the auto-correlation function of locally biased tracers can be written as a Taylor series in the auto-correlation function of the mass; there are no terms involving, e.g., derivatives or convolutions. Moreover, although the leading order coefficient, the linear bias factor of the auto-correlation function is just the square of that for the cross-correlation, it is the same as that obtained from expanding the mean number of halos as a function of the local density only in the large-scale limit. In principle, these relations allow simple tests of whether or not halo bias is indeed local in Lagrangian space. We discuss why things are more complicated in practice. We also discuss our results in light of recent work on the renormalizability of halo bias, demonstrating that it is better to renormalize than not. We use the Lognormal model to illustrate many of our findings.

  4. Measuring non-local Lagrangian peak bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Chan, Kwan Chuen; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2014-06-01

    We investigate non-local Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We begin by writing down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the non-local ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we develop a one-point cross-correlation technique to measure bias factors associated with χ2-distributed quantities. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before we apply it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order non-local contributions -2χ _{10}(k_1\\cdot k_2) and χ _{01}[3(k_1\\cdot k_2)^2-k_1^2 k_2^2], where k_1, k_2 are wave modes. We can reproduce our measurement of χ10 if we allow for an offset between the Lagrangian halo centre-of-mass and the peak position. The sign and magnitude of χ10 is consistent with Lagrangian haloes sitting near linear density maxima. The resulting contribution to the halo bias can safely be ignored for M = 1013 M⊙ h-1, but could become relevant at larger halo masses. For the second non-local bias χ01 however, we measure a much larger magnitude than predicted by our model. We speculate that some of this discrepancy might originate from non-local Lagrangian contributions induced by non-spherical collapse.

  5. Local gravitational redshifts can bias cosmological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Davis, Tamara M.; Wiis, Jophiel

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of cosmological parameters via the distance-redshift relation usually rely on models that assume a homogenous universe. It is commonly presumed that the large-scale structure evident in our Universe has a negligible impact on the measurement if distances probed in observations are sufficiently large (compared to the scale of inhomogeneities) and are averaged over different directions on the sky. This presumption does not hold when considering the effect of the gravitational redshift caused by our local gravitational potential, which alters light coming from all distances and directions in the same way. Despite its small magnitude, this local gravitational redshift gives rise to noticeable effects in cosmological inference using SN Ia data. Assuming conservative prior knowledge of the local potential given by sampling a range of gravitational potentials at locations of Milky-Way-like galaxies identified in cosmological simulations, we show that ignoring the gravitational redshift effect in a standard data analysis leads to an additional systematic error of ~1% in the determination of density parameters and the dark energy equation of state. We conclude that our local gravitational field affects our cosmological inference at a level that is important in future observations aiming to achieve percent-level accuracy.

  6. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273

  7. Local Effects of Biased Electrodes in the Divertor of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Campanell, M. D.; Lyons, B. C.; Maqueda, R. J.; Raitses, Y.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.

    2012-05-07

    The goal of this paper is to characterize the effects of small non-axisymmetric divertor plate electrodes on the local scrape-off layer plasma. Four small rectangular electrodes were installed into the outer divertor plates of NSTX. When the electrodes were located near the outer divertor strike point and biased positively, there was an increase in the nearby probe currents and probe potentials and an increase in the LiI light emission at the large major radius end of these electrodes. When an electrode located farther outward from the outer divertor strike point was biased positively, there was sometimes a significant decrease in the LiI light emission at the small major radius end of this electrode, but there were no clear effects on the nearby probes. No non-local effects were observed with the biasing of these electrodes.

  8. Precision measurement of the local bias of dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeyras, Titouan; Wagner, Christian; Baldauf, Tobias; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-02-01

    We present accurate measurements of the linear, quadratic, and cubic local bias of dark matter halos, using curved "separate universe" N-body simulations which effectively incorporate an infinite-wavelength overdensity. This can be seen as an exact implementation of the peak-background split argument. We compare the results with the linear and quadratic bias measured from the halo-matter power spectrum and bispectrum, and find good agreement. On the other hand, the standard peak-background split applied to the Sheth & Tormen (1999) and Tinker et al. (2008) halo mass functions matches the measured linear bias parameter only at the level of 10%. The prediction from the excursion set-peaks approach performs much better, which can be attributed to the stochastic moving barrier employed in the excursion set-peaks prediction. We also provide convenient fitting formulas for the nonlinear bias parameters b2(b1) and b3(b1), which work well over a range of redshifts.

  9. OPTIMIZATION BIAS IN ENERGY-BASED STRUCTURE PREDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Physics-based computational approaches to predicting the structure of macromolecules such as proteins are gaining increased use, but there are remaining challenges. In the current work, it is demonstrated that in energy-based prediction methods, the degree of optimization of the sampled structures can influence the prediction results. In particular, discrepancies in the degree of local sampling can bias the predictions in favor of the oversampled structures by shifting the local probability distributions of the minimum sampled energies. In simple systems, it is shown that the magnitude of the errors can be calculated from the energy surface, and for certain model systems, derived analytically. Further, it is shown that for energy wells whose forms differ only by a randomly assigned energy shift, the optimal accuracy of prediction is achieved when the sampling around each structure is equal. Energy correction terms can be used in cases of unequal sampling to reproduce the total probabilities that would occur under equal sampling, but optimal corrections only partially restore the prediction accuracy lost to unequal sampling. For multiwell systems, the determination of the correction terms is a multibody problem; it is shown that the involved cross-correlation multiple integrals can be reduced to simpler integrals. The possible implications of the current analysis for macromolecular structure prediction are discussed. PMID:25552783

  10. Prism adaptation reverses the local processing bias in patients with right temporo-parietal junction lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rafal, Robert D.; List, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Lesions to the right temporo-parietal cortex commonly result in hemispatial neglect. Lesions to the same area are also associated with hyperattention to local details of a scene and difficulty perceiving the global structure. This local processing bias is an important factor contributing to neglect and may contribute to the higher prevalence of the disorder following right compared with left hemisphere strokes. In recent years, visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms has been introduced as a promising treatment for hemispatial neglect. Explanations for these improvements have generally described a leftward realignment of attention, however, the present investigation provides evidence that prism adaptation reduces the local processing bias. Five patients with right temporal-parietal junction lesions were asked to identify the global or local levels of hierarchical figures before and after visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation the patients had difficulty ignoring the local elements when identifying the global component. Following prism adaptation, however, this pattern was reversed, with greater global interference during local level identification. The results suggest that prism adaptation may improve non-spatially lateralized deficits that contribute to the neglect syndrome. PMID:19416951

  11. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  12. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-05

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local inmore » space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. Furthermore, we describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.« less

  13. Bias in the effective field theory of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We study how to describe collapsed objects, such as galaxies, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures. The overdensity of galaxies at a given location and time is determined by the initial tidal tensor, velocity gradients and spatial derivatives of the regions of dark matter that, during the evolution of the universe, ended up at that given location. Similarly to what was recently done for dark matter, we show how this Lagrangian space description can be recovered by upgrading simpler Eulerian calculations. We describe the Eulerian theory. We show that it is perturbatively local in space, but non-local in time, and we explain the observational consequences of this fact. We give an argument for why to a certain degree of accuracy the theory can be considered as quasi time-local and explain what the operator structure is in this case. We describe renormalization of the bias coefficients so that, after this and after upgrading the Eulerian calculation to a Lagrangian one, the perturbative series for galaxies correlation functions results in a manifestly convergent expansion in powers of k/kNL and k/kM, where k is the wavenumber of interest, kNL is the wavenumber associated to the non-linear scale, and kM is the comoving wavenumber enclosing the mass of a galaxy.

  14. Estimating the Bias of Local Polynomial Approximations Using the Peano Kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J., and Machorro, E.

    2012-03-22

    These presentation visuals define local polynomial approximations, give formulas for bias and random components of the error, and express bias error in terms of the Peano kernel. They further derive constants that give figures of merit, and show the figures of merit for 3 common weighting functions. The Peano kernel theorem yields estimates for the bias error for local-polynomial-approximation smoothing that are superior in several ways to the error estimates in the current literature.

  15. Non-local bias contribution to third-order galaxy correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Hoffmann, K.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-10-01

    We study halo clustering bias with second- and third-order statistics of halo and matter density fields in the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge simulation. We verify that two-point correlations deliver reliable estimates of the linear bias parameters at large scales, while estimations from the variance can be significantly affected by non-linear and possibly non-local contributions to the bias function. Combining three-point auto- and cross-correlations we find, for the first time in configuration space, evidence for the presence of such non-local contributions. These contributions are consistent with predicted second-order non-local effects on the bias functions originating from the dark matter tidal field. Samples of massive haloes show indications of bias (local or non-local) beyond second order. Ignoring non-local bias causes 20-30 and 5-10 per cent overestimation of the linear bias from three-point auto- and cross-correlations, respectively. We study two third-order bias estimators that are not affected by second-order non-local contributions. One is a combination of three-point auto- and cross-correlations. The other is a combination of third-order one- and two-point cumulants. Both methods deliver accurate estimations of the linear bias. Ignoring non-local bias causes higher values of the second-order bias from three-point correlations. Our results demonstrate that third-order statistics can be employed for breaking the growth-bias degeneracy.

  16. Exposure to an Urban Environment Alters the Local Bias of a Remote Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caparos, Serge; Ahmed, Lubna; Bremner, Andrew J.; de Fockert, Jan W.; Linnell, Karina J.; Davidoff, Jules

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that populations in the Western world exhibit a local bias compared to East Asian populations that is widely ascribed to a difference between individualistic and collectivist societies. However, we report that traditional Himba--a remote interdependent society--exhibit a strong local bias compared to both Japanese and…

  17. Asymmetric bias in user guided segmentations of brain structures.

    PubMed

    Maltbie, Eric; Bhatt, Kshamta; Paniagua, Beatriz; Smith, Rachel G; Graves, Michael M; Mosconi, Matthew W; Peterson, Sarah; White, Scott; Blocher, Joseph; El-Sayed, Mohammed; Hazlett, Heather C; Styner, Martin A

    2012-01-16

    Brain morphometric studies often incorporate comparative hemispheric asymmetry analyses of segmented brain structures. In this work, we present evidence that common user guided structural segmentation techniques exhibit strong left-right asymmetric biases and thus fundamentally influence any left-right asymmetry analyses. In this study, MRI scans from ten pediatric subjects were employed for studying segmentations of amygdala, globus pallidus, putamen, caudate, and lateral ventricle. Additionally, two pediatric and three adult scans were used for studying hippocampus segmentation. Segmentations of the sub-cortical structures were performed by skilled raters using standard manual and semi-automated methods. The left-right mirrored versions of each image were included in the data and segmented in a random order to assess potential left-right asymmetric bias. Using shape analysis we further assessed whether the asymmetric bias is consistent across subjects and raters with the focus on the hippocampus. The user guided segmentation techniques on the sub-cortical structures exhibited left-right asymmetric volume bias with the hippocampus displaying the most significant asymmetry values (p<0.01). The hippocampal shape analysis revealed the bias to be strongest on the lateral side of the body and medial side of the head and tail. The origin of this asymmetric bias is considered to be based in laterality of visual perception; therefore segmentations with any degree of user interaction contain an asymmetric bias. The aim of our study is to raise awareness in the neuroimaging community regarding the presence of the asymmetric bias and its influence on any left-right hemispheric analyses. We also recommend reexamining previous research results in the light of this new finding. PMID:21889995

  18. A new configurational bias scheme for sampling supramolecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gernier, Robin; Curk, Tine; Dubacheva, Galina V.; Richter, Ralf P.; Mognetti, Bortolo M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new simulation scheme which allows an efficient sampling of reconfigurable supramolecular structures made of polymeric constructs functionalized by reactive binding sites. The algorithm is based on the configurational bias scheme of Siepmann and Frenkel and is powered by the possibility of changing the topology of the supramolecular network by a non-local Monte Carlo algorithm. Such a plan is accomplished by a multi-scale modelling that merges coarse-grained simulations, describing the typical polymer conformations, with experimental results accounting for free energy terms involved in the reactions of the active sites. We test the new algorithm for a system of DNA coated colloids for which we compute the hybridisation free energy cost associated to the binding of tethered single stranded DNAs terminated by short sequences of complementary nucleotides. In order to demonstrate the versatility of our method, we also consider polymers functionalized by receptors that bind a surface decorated by ligands. In particular, we compute the density of states of adsorbed polymers as a function of the number of ligand-receptor complexes formed. Such a quantity can be used to study the conformational properties of adsorbed polymers useful when engineering adsorption with tailored properties. We successfully compare the results with the predictions of a mean field theory. We believe that the proposed method will be a useful tool to investigate supramolecular structures resulting from direct interactions between functionalized polymers for which efficient numerical methodologies of investigation are still lacking.

  19. A new configurational bias scheme for sampling supramolecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    De Gernier, Robin; Mognetti, Bortolo M.; Curk, Tine; Dubacheva, Galina V.; Richter, Ralf P.

    2014-12-28

    We present a new simulation scheme which allows an efficient sampling of reconfigurable supramolecular structures made of polymeric constructs functionalized by reactive binding sites. The algorithm is based on the configurational bias scheme of Siepmann and Frenkel and is powered by the possibility of changing the topology of the supramolecular network by a non-local Monte Carlo algorithm. Such a plan is accomplished by a multi-scale modelling that merges coarse-grained simulations, describing the typical polymer conformations, with experimental results accounting for free energy terms involved in the reactions of the active sites. We test the new algorithm for a system of DNA coated colloids for which we compute the hybridisation free energy cost associated to the binding of tethered single stranded DNAs terminated by short sequences of complementary nucleotides. In order to demonstrate the versatility of our method, we also consider polymers functionalized by receptors that bind a surface decorated by ligands. In particular, we compute the density of states of adsorbed polymers as a function of the number of ligand–receptor complexes formed. Such a quantity can be used to study the conformational properties of adsorbed polymers useful when engineering adsorption with tailored properties. We successfully compare the results with the predictions of a mean field theory. We believe that the proposed method will be a useful tool to investigate supramolecular structures resulting from direct interactions between functionalized polymers for which efficient numerical methodologies of investigation are still lacking.

  20. A new configurational bias scheme for sampling supramolecular structures.

    PubMed

    De Gernier, Robin; Curk, Tine; Dubacheva, Galina V; Richter, Ralf P; Mognetti, Bortolo M

    2014-12-28

    We present a new simulation scheme which allows an efficient sampling of reconfigurable supramolecular structures made of polymeric constructs functionalized by reactive binding sites. The algorithm is based on the configurational bias scheme of Siepmann and Frenkel and is powered by the possibility of changing the topology of the supramolecular network by a non-local Monte Carlo algorithm. Such a plan is accomplished by a multi-scale modelling that merges coarse-grained simulations, describing the typical polymer conformations, with experimental results accounting for free energy terms involved in the reactions of the active sites. We test the new algorithm for a system of DNA coated colloids for which we compute the hybridisation free energy cost associated to the binding of tethered single stranded DNAs terminated by short sequences of complementary nucleotides. In order to demonstrate the versatility of our method, we also consider polymers functionalized by receptors that bind a surface decorated by ligands. In particular, we compute the density of states of adsorbed polymers as a function of the number of ligand-receptor complexes formed. Such a quantity can be used to study the conformational properties of adsorbed polymers useful when engineering adsorption with tailored properties. We successfully compare the results with the predictions of a mean field theory. We believe that the proposed method will be a useful tool to investigate supramolecular structures resulting from direct interactions between functionalized polymers for which efficient numerical methodologies of investigation are still lacking. PMID:25554182

  1. Biased galaxy formation and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlind, Andreas Alan

    The biased relation between the galaxy and mass distributions lies at the intersection of large scale structure in the universe and the process of galaxy formation. I study the nature of galaxy bias and its connections to galaxy clustering and galaxy formation physics. Galaxy bias has traditionally been viewed as an obstacle to constraining cosmological parameters by studying galaxy clustering. I examine the effect of bias on measurements of the cosmological density parameter Wm by techniques that exploit the gravity-induced motions of galaxies. Using a variety of environmental bias models applied to N-body simulations, I find that, in most cases, the quantity estimated by these techniques is the value of W0.6m/bs , where bs is the ratio of rms galaxy fluctuations to rms mass fluctuations on large scales. Moreover, I find that different methods should, in principle, agree with each other and it is thus unlikely that non-linear or scale-dependent bias is responsible for the discrepancies that exist among current measurements. One can also view the influence of bias on galaxy clustering as a strength rather than a weakness, since it provides us with a potentially powerful way to constrain galaxy formation theories. With this goal in mind, I develop the "Halo Occupation Distribution" (HOD), a physically motivated and complete formulation of bias that is based on the distribution of galaxies within virialized dark matter halos. I explore the sensitivity of galaxy clustering statistics to features of the HOD and focus on how the HOD may be empirically constrained from galaxy clustering data. I make the connection to the physics of galaxy formation by studying the HOD predicted by the two main theoretical methods of modeling galaxy formation. I find that, despite many differences between them, the two methods predict the same HOD, suggesting that galaxy bias is determined by robust features of the hierarchical galaxy formation process rather than details of gas cooling

  2. Local Scrape-Off Layer Control Using Biased electrodes in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S J; Maqueda, R J; Roquemore, A L; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Marsala, R J; Raitses, Y; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2009-06-23

    An experiment was designed to test the theory that biased electrodes can affect the local scrape-off layer (SOL) width by creating a strong radial ExB drift [Cohen, R.H. and Ryutov, D.D, Nucl. Fusion 37, 621 (1997)]. These electrodes were located near the outer midplane in the SOL of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The electrodes were biased at up to {+-} 100 Volts, and the radial profile of the plasma between them was measured by an array of Langmuir probes. The biasing caused large changes in the local SOL profiles at least qualitatively consistent with this theory.

  3. Local scrape-off layer control using biased electrodes in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S. J.; Maqueda, R. J.; Roquemore, A. L.; Bush, C. E.; Kaita, R.; Marsala, R. J.; Raitses, Y.; Cohen, R. H.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2009-04-01

    An experiment was designed to test the theory that biased electrodes can affect the local scrape-off layer (SOL) width by creating a strong radial ExB drift [Cohen, R.H. and Ryutov, D.D, Nucl. Fusion 37, 621 (1997)]. These electrodes were located near the outer midplane in the SOL of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The electrodes were biased at up to 100 Volts, and the radial profile of the plasma between them was measured by an array of Langmuir probes. The biasing caused large changes in the local SOL profiles at least qualitatively consistent with this theory.

  4. Asymmetric bias in user guided segmentations of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styner, Martin; Smith, Rachel G.; Graves, Michael M.; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Peterson, Sarah; White, Scott; Blocher, Joe; El-Sayed, Mohammed; Hazlett, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Brain morphometric studies often incorporate comparative asymmetry analyses of left and right hemispheric brain structures. In this work we show evidence that common methods of user guided structural segmentation exhibit strong left-right asymmetric biases and thus fundamentally influence any left-right asymmetry analyses. We studied several structural segmentation methods with varying degree of user interaction from pure manual outlining to nearly fully automatic procedures. The methods were applied to MR images and their corresponding left-right mirrored images from an adult and a pediatric study. Several expert raters performed the segmentations of all structures. The asymmetric segmentation bias is assessed by comparing the left-right volumetric asymmetry in the original and mirrored datasets, as well as by testing each sides volumetric differences to a zero mean standard t-tests. The structural segmentations of caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, amygdala and hippocampus showed a highly significant asymmetric bias using methods with considerable manual outlining or landmark placement. Only the lateral ventricle segmentation revealed no asymmetric bias due to the high degree of automation and a high intensity contrast on its boundary. Our segmentation methods have been adapted in that they are applied to only one of the hemispheres in an image and its left-right mirrored image. Our work suggests that existing studies of hemispheric asymmetry without similar precautions should be interpreted in a new, skeptical light. Evidence of an asymmetric segmentation bias is novel and unknown to the imaging community. This result seems less surprising to the visual perception community and its likely cause is differences in perception of oppositely curved 3D structures.

  5. The electronic structure of diodes probed under bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Park, Jeong; Gabor, Somorjai

    2009-03-01

    Chemists have known for decades that when metal nano-particles are affixed to a catalytically inactive oxide surface, the catalytic turnover rate of the array is more than 10 times that of a metal surface alone. However, the mechanism behind the effect is not clear. To understand the catalytic activity of the interface between the metal nano-structures and the oxide substrate, we have investigated the electronic structure of Pt and Pd doped diodes on a TiO2 substrate. The devices were put under bias during the measurements in an attempt to reproduce the potential differences found over the diode when used as a catalyst. This is challenging for electron based measuring techniques, but using photon-in, photon-out techniques we have successfully probed the electronic structure of Pt and Pd doped diodes under bias. The results from soft x-ray absorption and emission will be presented.

  6. Estimating the Bias of Local Polynomial Approximation Methods Using the Peano Kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.; Machorro, E.; Luttman, A.

    2013-03-01

    The determination of uncertainty of an estimate requires both the variance and the bias of the estimate. Calculating the variance of local polynomial approximation (LPA) estimates is straightforward. We present a method, using the Peano Kernel Theorem, to estimate the bias of LPA estimates and show how this can be used to optimize the LPA parameters in terms of the bias-variance tradeoff. Figures of merit are derived and values calculated for several common methods. The results in the literature are expanded by giving bias error bounds that are valid for all lengths of the smoothing interval, generalizing the currently available asymptotic results that are only valid in the limit as the length of this interval goes to zero.

  7. Structural bias in the sentencing of felony defendants.

    PubMed

    Sutton, John R

    2013-09-01

    As incarceration rates have risen in the US, so has the overrepresentation of African Americans and Latinos among prison inmates. Whether and to what degree these disparities are due to bias in the criminal courts remains a contentious issue. This article pursues two lines of argument toward a structural account of bias in the criminal law, focusing on (1) cumulative disadvantages that may accrue over successive stages of the criminal justice process, and (2) the contexts of racial disadvantage in which courts are embedded. These arguments are tested using case-level data on male defendants charged with felony crimes in urban US counties in 2000. Multilevel binary and ordinal logit models are used to estimate contextual effects on pretrial detention, guilty pleas, and sentence severity, and cumulative effects are estimated as conditional probabilities that are allowed to vary by race across all three outcomes. Results yield strong, but qualified, evidence of cumulative disadvantage accruing to black and Latino defendants, but do not support the contextual hypotheses. When the cumulative effects of bias are taken into account, the estimated probability of the average African American or Latino felon going to prison is 26% higher than that of the average Anglo. PMID:23859726

  8. 'Autistic' local processing bias also found in children gifted in realistic drawing.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer E; Redash, Amanda; Coleman, Katelyn; Haimson, Jennifer; Winner, Ellen

    2010-06-01

    We investigated whether typically-developing children with a gift for drawing realistically show the local processing bias seen in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty-seven 6-12 year-olds made an observational drawing (scored for level of realism) and completed three local processing tasks, and parents completed the Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test (CAST). Drawing score predicted local processing performance on all tasks independently of verbal IQ, age, and years of art lessons. Drawing score also predicted more frequent repetitive behaviors as assessed by the CAST. Thus, skill in realistic drawing is associated with a strong local processing bias and a tendency towards repetitive behaviors, showing that traits found in individuals with ASD irrespective of artistic talent are also found in typically developing children with artistic talent. PMID:20049633

  9. Interloper bias in future large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Hirata, Christopher M.; Doré, Olivier; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation spectroscopic surveys will map the large-scale structure of the observable universe, using emission line galaxies as tracers. While each survey will map the sky with a specific emission line, interloping emission lines can masquerade as the survey's intended emission line at different redshifts. Interloping lines from galaxies that are not removed can contaminate the power spectrum measurement, mixing correlations from various redshifts and diluting the true signal. We assess the potential for power spectrum contamination, finding that an interloper fraction worse than 0.2% could bias power spectrum measurements for future surveys by more than 10% of statistical errors, while also biasing power spectrum inferences. We also construct a formalism for predicting cosmological parameter measurement bias, demonstrating that a 0.15%-0.3% interloper fraction could bias the growth rate by more than 10% of the error, which can affect constraints on gravity from upcoming surveys. We use the COSMOS Mock Catalog (CMC), with the emission lines rescaled to better reproduce recent data, to predict potential interloper fractions for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) and the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We find that secondary line identification, or confirming galaxy redshifts by finding correlated emission lines, can remove interlopers for PFS. For WFIRST, we use the CMC to predict that the 0.2% target can be reached for the WFIRST Hα survey, but sensitive optical and near-infrared photometry will be required. For the WFIRST [O III] survey, the predicted interloper fractions reach several percent and their effects will have to be estimated and removed statistically (e.g., with deep training samples). These results are optimistic as the CMC does not capture the full set of correlations of galaxy properties in the real Universe, and they do not include blending effects. Mitigating interloper contamination will be crucial to the next generation of

  10. Local magnetoresistance through Si and its bias voltage dependence in ferromagnet/MgO/silicon-on-insulator lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y. Tanamoto, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Inokuchi, T.; Hamaya, K.; Tezuka, N.

    2014-05-07

    Local magnetoresistance (MR) through silicon (Si) and its bias voltage (V{sub bias}) (bias current (I{sub bias})) dependence in ferromagnet (FM)/MgO/silicon-on-insulator lateral spin valves are investigated. From the experimental measurements, we find that the local-MR through Si increases with increasing V{sub bias}. This anomalous increase of local-MR as a function of V{sub bias} can be understood by considering the standard drift-diffusion theory improved by taking into account the difference in the interface resistances and first order quantum effect between FM/MgO/Si (source) and Si/MgO/FM (drain) interfaces. The interface resistance dependence on experimentally obtained local-MR ratios also agrees with the improved standard spin diffusion theory. These results indicate that experimentally observed local-MR is certainly related to the spin signal through the Si bulk band.

  11. Localization based on two-stage treatment for dealing with noisy and biased distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyeonwoo; Lee, Jewon; Kim, Daehyun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2012-12-01

    Localization can be performed by trilateration in which the coordinates of a target are calculated by using the coordinates of reference points and the distances between each reference point and the target. Because the distances are measured on the basis of the time-of-flight of various kinds of signals, they contain errors which are the noise and bias. The presence of bias can become a major problem because its magnitude is generally unknown. In this article, we propose an algorithm that combines the Kalman filter (KF) and the least square (LS) algorithm to treat noisy and biased distances measured by chirp spread spectrum ranging defined in IEEE 802.15.4a. By using the KF, we remove the noise in the measured distance; hence, the noise-eliminated distance, which still contains bias, is obtained. The next step consists of the calculation of the target coordinates by using the weighted LS algorithm. This algorithm uses the noise-eliminated distance obtained by using the KF, and the weighting parameters of the algorithm are determined to reduce the effects of bias. To confirm the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, we present the results of indoor localization experiments.

  12. Dy-V magnetic interaction and local structure bias on the complex spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃ (x=0 and 0.2)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan, J.-Q.; Cao, H. B.; McGuire, M. A.; Ren, Y.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D. G.

    2013-06-10

    The spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃ (x=0 and 0.2) was studied by measuring x-ray powder diffraction, magnetization, specific heat, and neutron single-crystal diffraction. The results show that G-OO/C-AF and C-OO/G-AF phases coexist in Dy0.8Tb0.20VO3 in the temperature range 2–60 K, and the volume fraction of each phase is temperature and field dependent. The ordering of Dy moments at T* = 12 K induces a transition from G-OO/C-AF to a C-OO/G-AF phase. Magnetic fields suppress the long-range order of Dy moments and thus the C-OO/G-AF phase below T*. The polarized moments induced at the Dy sublattice by external magnetic fieldsmore » couple to the V 3d moments, and this coupling favors the G-OO/C-AF state. Also discussed is the effect of the Dy-V magnetic interaction and local structure distortion on the spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃.« less

  13. Dy-V magnetic interaction and local structure bias on the complex spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃ (x=0 and 0.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J.-Q.; Cao, H. B.; McGuire, M. A.; Ren, Y.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D. G.

    2013-06-10

    The spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃ (x=0 and 0.2) was studied by measuring x-ray powder diffraction, magnetization, specific heat, and neutron single-crystal diffraction. The results show that G-OO/C-AF and C-OO/G-AF phases coexist in Dy0.8Tb0.20VO3 in the temperature range 2–60 K, and the volume fraction of each phase is temperature and field dependent. The ordering of Dy moments at T* = 12 K induces a transition from G-OO/C-AF to a C-OO/G-AF phase. Magnetic fields suppress the long-range order of Dy moments and thus the C-OO/G-AF phase below T*. The polarized moments induced at the Dy sublattice by external magnetic fields couple to the V 3d moments, and this coupling favors the G-OO/C-AF state. Also discussed is the effect of the Dy-V magnetic interaction and local structure distortion on the spin and orbital ordering in Dy₁₋xTbxVO₃.

  14. On the estimation and correction of bias in local atrophy estimations using example atrophy simulations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swati; Rousseau, François; Heitz, Fabrice; Rumbach, Lucien; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Brain atrophy is considered an important marker of disease progression in many chronic neuro-degenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). A great deal of attention is being paid toward developing tools that manipulate magnetic resonance (MR) images for obtaining an accurate estimate of atrophy. Nevertheless, artifacts in MR images, inaccuracies of intermediate steps and inadequacies of the mathematical model representing the physical brain volume change, make it rather difficult to obtain a precise and unbiased estimate. This work revolves around the nature and magnitude of bias in atrophy estimations as well as a potential way of correcting them. First, we demonstrate that for different atrophy estimation methods, bias estimates exhibit varying relations to the expected atrophy and these bias estimates are of the order of the expected atrophies for standard algorithms, stressing the need for bias correction procedures. Next, a framework for estimating uncertainty in longitudinal brain atrophy by means of constructing confidence intervals is developed. Errors arising from MRI artifacts and bias in estimations are learned from example atrophy simulations and anatomies. Results are discussed for three popular non-rigid registration approaches with the help of simulated localized brain atrophy in real MR images. PMID:23988649

  15. ASSEMBLY BIAS AND THE DYNAMICAL STRUCTURE OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Faltenbacher, Andreas; White, Simon D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Millennium Simulation we examine assembly bias for the halo properties: shape, triaxiality, concentration, spin, shape of the velocity ellipsoid, and velocity anisotropy. For consistency, we determine all these properties using the same set of particles, namely all gravitationally self-bound particles belonging to the most massive substructure of a given friends-of-friends halo. We confirm that near-spherical and high-spin halos show enhanced clustering. The opposite is true for strongly aspherical and low-spin halos. Further, below the typical collapse mass, M{sub *}, more concentrated halos show stronger clustering, whereas less concentrated halos are less clustered which is reversed for masses above M{sub *}. Going beyond earlier work we show that: (1) oblate halos are more strongly clustered than prolate ones; (2) the dependence of clustering on the shape of the velocity ellipsoid coincides with that of the real-space shape, although the signal is stronger; (3) halos with weak velocity anisotropy are more clustered, whereas radially anisotropic halos are more weakly clustered; (4) for all highly clustered subsets we find systematically less radially biased velocity anisotropy profiles. These findings indicate that the velocity structure of halos is tightly correlated with environment.

  16. Spatial smoothing systematically biases the localization of reward-related brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Sacchet, Matthew D.; Knutson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods with enhanced spatial resolution such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) suggest that the subcortical striatum plays a critical role in human reward processing. Analysis of FMRI data requires several preprocessing steps, some of which entail tradeoffs. For instance, while spatial smoothing can enhance statistical power, it may also bias localization towards regions that contain more gray than white matter. In a meta-analysis and reanalysis of an existing dataset, we sought to determine whether spatial smoothing could systematically bias the spatial localization of foci related to reward anticipation in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). An Activation Likelihood Estimate (ALE) meta-analysis revealed that peak ventral striatal ALE foci for studies that used smaller spatial smoothing kernels (i.e. < 6 mm FWHM) were more anterior than those identified for studies that used larger kernels (i.e. > 7 mm FWHM). Additionally, subtraction analysis of findings for studies that used smaller versus larger smoothing kernels revealed a significant cluster of differential activity in the left relatively anterior NAcc (Talairach coordinates: −10, 9, −1). A second meta-analysis revealed that larger smoothing kernels were correlated with more posterior localizations of NAcc activation foci (p < 0.015), but revealed no significant associations with other potentially relevant parameters (including voxel volume, magnet strength, and publication date). Finally, repeated analysis of a representative dataset processed at different smoothing kernels (i.e., 0–12 mm) also indicated that smoothing systematically yielded more posterior activation foci in the NAcc (p < 0.005). Taken together, these findings indicate that spatial smoothing can systematically bias the spatial localization of striatal activity. These findings have implications both for historical interpretation of past findings related to reward processing and for the analysis of future studies

  17. Zooming into creativity: individual differences in attentional global-local biases are linked to creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Zmigrod, Sharon; Zmigrod, Leor; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    While recent studies have investigated how processes underlying human creativity are affected by particular visual-attentional states, we tested the impact of more stable attention-related preferences. These were assessed by means of Navon's global-local task, in which participants respond to the global or local features of large letters constructed from smaller letters. Three standard measures were derived from this task: the sizes of the global precedence effect, the global interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the global level on local processing), and the local interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the local level on global processing). These measures were correlated with performance in a convergent-thinking creativity task (the Remote Associates Task), a divergent-thinking creativity task (the Alternate Uses Task), and a measure of fluid intelligence (Raven's matrices). Flexibility in divergent thinking was predicted by the local interference effect while convergent thinking was predicted by intelligence only. We conclude that a stronger attentional bias to visual information about the "bigger picture" promotes cognitive flexibility in searching for multiple solutions. PMID:26579030

  18. Zooming into creativity: individual differences in attentional global-local biases are linked to creative thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zmigrod, Sharon; Zmigrod, Leor; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    While recent studies have investigated how processes underlying human creativity are affected by particular visual-attentional states, we tested the impact of more stable attention-related preferences. These were assessed by means of Navon’s global-local task, in which participants respond to the global or local features of large letters constructed from smaller letters. Three standard measures were derived from this task: the sizes of the global precedence effect, the global interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the global level on local processing), and the local interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the local level on global processing). These measures were correlated with performance in a convergent-thinking creativity task (the Remote Associates Task), a divergent-thinking creativity task (the Alternate Uses Task), and a measure of fluid intelligence (Raven’s matrices). Flexibility in divergent thinking was predicted by the local interference effect while convergent thinking was predicted by intelligence only. We conclude that a stronger attentional bias to visual information about the “bigger picture” promotes cognitive flexibility in searching for multiple solutions. PMID:26579030

  19. On the spin bias of satellite galaxies in the local group-like environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Lemson, Gerard E-mail: lemson@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-05-01

    We utilize the Millennium-II simulation databases to study the spin bias of dark subhalos in the Local Group-like systems which have two prominent satellites with comparable masses. Selecting the group-size halos with total mass similar to that of the Local Group (LG) from the friends-of-friends halo catalog and locating their subhalos from the substructure catalog, we determine the most massive (main) and second to the most massive (submain) ones among the subhalos hosted by each selected halo. When the dimensionless spin parameter (λ) of each subhalo is derived from its specific angular momentum and circular velocity at virial radius, a signal of correlation is detected between the spin parameters of the subhalos and the main-to-submain mass ratios of their host halos at z = 0: the higher main-to-submain mass ratio a host halo has, the higher mean spin parameter its subhalos have. It is also found that the correlations exist even for the subhalo progenitors at z = 0.5 and 1. Our interpretation of this result is that the subhalo spin bias is not a transient effect but an intrinsic property of a LG-like system with higher main-to- submain mass ratio, caused by stronger anisotropic stress in the region. A cosmological implication of our result is also discussed.

  20. Biased diffusion in three-dimensional comb-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Dagdug, Leonardo; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study biased diffusion of point Brownian particles in a three-dimensional comb-like structure formed by a main cylindrical tube with identical periodic cylindrical dead ends. It is assumed that the dead ends are thin cylinders whose radius is much smaller than both the radius of the main tube and the distance between neighboring dead ends. It is also assumed that in the main tube, the particle, in addition to its regular diffusion, moves with a uniform constant drift velocity. For such a system, we develop a formalism that allows us to derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the first two moments of the particle displacement along the main tube axis. Inverting these Laplace transforms numerically, one can find the time dependences of the two moments for arbitrary values of both the drift velocity and the dead-end length, including the limiting case of infinitely long dead ends, where the unbiased diffusion becomes anomalous at sufficiently long times. The expressions for the Laplace transforms are used to find the effective drift velocity and diffusivity of the particle as functions of its drift velocity in the main tube and the tube geometric parameters. As might be expected from common-sense arguments, the effective drift velocity monotonically decreases from the initial drift velocity to zero as the dead-end length increases from zero to infinity. The effective diffusivity is a more complex, non-monotonic function of the dead-end length. As this length increases from zero to infinity, the effective diffusivity first decreases, reaches a minimum, and then increases approaching a plateau value which is proportional to the square of the particle drift velocity in the main tube.

  1. Removing the ISW-lensing bias from the local-form primordial non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Rotti, Aditya E-mail: aditya@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-04-01

    The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect produces a secondary temperature aniso\\-tropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as CMB photons travel through time-varying potentials along the line-of-sight. The main contribution comes from redshifts z∼<2, where dark energy leads to a decay of potentials. As the same photons are gravitationally lensed by these decaying potentials, there exists a high degree of correlation between the ISW effect and CMB lensing, leading to a non-zero three-point correlation (bispectrum) of the observed temperature anisotropy. This ISW-lensing bispectrum, whose shape resembles that of the so-called ''local-form'' primordial bispectrum parametrized by f{sub NL}, is known to be the largest contamination of f{sub NL}. In order to avoid a spurious detection of primordial non-Gaussianity, we need to remove the ISW-lensing bias. In this work, we investigate three debiasing methods: (I) subtraction of an expected, ensemble average of the ISW-lensing bispectrum; (II) subtraction of a measured ISW-lensing bispectrum; and (III) direct subtraction of an estimated ISW signal from an observed temperature map. One may use an estimation of the ISW map from external non-CMB data or that from the CMB data themselves. As the methods II and III are based on fewer assumptions about the nature of dark energy, they are preferred over the method I. While the methods I and II yield unbiased estimates of f{sub NL} with comparable error bars, the method III yields a biased result when the underlying primordial f{sub NL} is non-zero and the ISW map is estimated from a lensing potential reconstructed from the observed temperature map. One of the sources of the bias is a lensing reconstruction noise bias which is independent of f{sub NL} and can be calculated precisely, but other f{sub NL}-dependent terms are difficult to compute reliably. We thus conclude that the method II is the best, model-independent way to remove the ISW-lensing bias of f{sub NL

  2. Bias-voltage-controlled ac and dc magnetotransport phenomena in hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. V.; Tarasov, A. S.; Smolyakov, D. A.; Varnakov, S. N.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2015-06-01

    We report some ac and dc magnetotransport phenomena in silicon-based hybrid structures. The giant impedance change under an applied magnetic field has been experimentally found in the metal/insulator/semiconductor (MIS) diode with the Schottky barrier based on the Fe/SiO2/p-Si and Fe/SiO2/n-Si structures. The maximum effect is found to observe at temperatures of 10-30 K in the frequency range 10 Hz-1 MHz. Below 1 kHz the magnetoresistance can be controlled in a wide range by applying a bias to the device. A photoinduced dc magnetoresistance of over 104% has been found in the Fe/SiO2/p-Si back-to-back Schottky diode. The observed magnetic-field-dependent effects are caused by the interface states localized in the insula-tor/semiconductor interface.

  3. Exchange bias in ferrite hollow nanoparticles originated by complex internal magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasi, Emilio; Lima, Enio, Jr.; Vargas, Jose M.; Zysler, Roberto D.; Arbiol, Jordi; Ibarra, Alfonso; Goya, Gerardo F.; Ibarra, M. Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Iron-oxide hollow nanospheres (HNS) may present unusual magnetic behavior as a consequence of their unique morphology. Here, we report the unusual magnetic behavior of HNS that are 9 nm in diameter. The magnetic properties of HNS originate in their complex magnetic structure, as evidenced by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. We observe a bias in the hysteresis when measured at very low temperature in the field cooling protocol (10 kOe). In addition, dc (static) and ac (dynamic) magnetization measurements against temperature and applied field reveal a frustrated order of the system below 10 K. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies reveal that the HNS are composed of small crystalline clusters of about 2 nm in diameter, which behave as individual magnetic entities. Micromagnetic simulations (using conjugate gradient in order to minimize the total energy of the system) reproduce the experimentally observed magnetic behavior. The model considers the hollow particles as constituted by small ordered clusters embedded in an antiferromagnetic environment (spins localized outside the clusters). In addition, the surface spins (in both inner and outer surfaces of the HNS) are affected by a local surface anisotropy. The strong effective magnetic anisotropy field of the clusters induces the bias observed when the system is cooled in the presence of a magnetic external field. This effect propagates through the exchange interaction into the entire particle.

  4. Clustering of local group distances: Publication bias or correlated measurements? II. M31 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m−M){sub 0}{sup M31}=24.46±0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m−M){sub 0}{sup LMC}=18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  5. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? II. M31 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m-M)_0^M31 = 24.46 +/- 0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m-M)_0^LMC = 18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  6. Cosmic Flows and the Structure of the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The Local Volume is the area of the cosmos we can analyze in most detail with respect to the properties of its galaxy population, their abundance, their inner structure, their distribution, and their formation. Indeed, many challenges of the cosmological concordance model such as the substructure crisis or the surprising occurrence of vast planes of satellite galaxies are intimately linked to observations of the local galaxy population. However, owing to the peculiar environment of our Milky Way system and its cosmic neighborhood, the Local Volume may also be severely biased. Cosmography, i.e. the reconstruction of the local cosmic web from cosmic flows, and constrained simulations of structure formation as a tool to produce simulated local group analogues provide a powerful method to analyze and quantify these biases. Possible applications include the analysis of the local distribution of dwarf galaxies around luminous galaxies and the characterization of the mass accretion history of these objects. Thanks to the extension of galaxy velocity data out to distances in excess of 200Mpc, we are now capable to reconstruct the 3D matter distribution out to these distances, thus constraining the formation history of object such as the Virgo Cluster.

  7. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Verdery, Ashton M.; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network. PMID:26679927

  8. Network Structure and Biased Variance Estimation in Respondent Driven Sampling.

    PubMed

    Verdery, Ashton M; Mouw, Ted; Bauldry, Shawn; Mucha, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores bias in the estimation of sampling variance in Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS). Prior methodological work on RDS has focused on its problematic assumptions and the biases and inefficiencies of its estimators of the population mean. Nonetheless, researchers have given only slight attention to the topic of estimating sampling variance in RDS, despite the importance of variance estimation for the construction of confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. In this paper, we show that the estimators of RDS sampling variance rely on a critical assumption that the network is First Order Markov (FOM) with respect to the dependent variable of interest. We demonstrate, through intuitive examples, mathematical generalizations, and computational experiments that current RDS variance estimators will always underestimate the population sampling variance of RDS in empirical networks that do not conform to the FOM assumption. Analysis of 215 observed university and school networks from Facebook and Add Health indicates that the FOM assumption is violated in every empirical network we analyze, and that these violations lead to substantially biased RDS estimators of sampling variance. We propose and test two alternative variance estimators that show some promise for reducing biases, but which also illustrate the limits of estimating sampling variance with only partial information on the underlying population social network. PMID:26679927

  9. Macroscopic locality with equal bias reproduces with high fidelity a quantum distribution achieving the Tsirelson's bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, Md. Rajjak; Banik, Manik; Das, Subhadipa; Rai, Ashutosh; Kunkri, Samir

    2013-11-01

    Two physical principles, macroscopic locality (ML) and information causality (IC), so far have been most successful in distinguishing quantum correlations from post-quantum correlations. However, there are also some post-quantum probability distributions which cannot be distinguished with the help of these principles. Thus, it is interesting to see whether consideration of these two principles, separately, along with some additional physically plausible constraints, can explain some interesting quantum features which are otherwise hard to reproduce. In this paper we show that in a Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt scenario, ML along with the constraint of equal bias for the concerned observables, almost reproduces the quantum joint probability distribution corresponding to a maximal quantum Bell violation, which is unique up to relabeling. From this example and earlier work of Cavalcanti, Salles, and Scarani, we conclude that IC and ML are inequivalent physical principles; satisfying one does not imply that the other is satisfied.

  10. Localized structures in gaseous combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Edgar; Lo Jacono, David; Bergeon, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We consider a flame between a pair of porous walls at x = +/- 1 that allow fuel and oxidizer to diffuse into the burn region from opposite sides. The burn process is described by a binary one-step process of Arrhenius type. The heat released is redistributed via radiation. Convection is ignored. In 1D the low and high temperature states are connected by an S-shaped branch with a fold at low Damköhler number below which extinction takes place. Various instabilities occur on the upper (flame) branch leading to different time-dependent but 1D flames. In 2D the situation is dramatically modified: near the extinction region the burn front breaks up into structures that are localized in the direction along the front, with multiple branches of such states bifurcating from the fold. These correspond to states with n = 1 , 2 , ⋯ identical and equispaced hotspots. Further bifurcations generate states in which the hotspots are nonidentical and separated by unequal distances. All these states are present in the same parameter interval, implying great sensitivity of the system to initial conditions.

  11. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.

  12. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  13. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina

    2015-02-24

    Nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. With many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies. PMID:25559112

  14. Bias-Corrected Estimation of Noncentrality Parameters of Covariance Structure Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko

    2005-01-01

    A bias-corrected estimator of noncentrality parameters of covariance structure models is discussed. The approach represents an application of the bootstrap methodology for purposes of bias correction, and utilizes the relation between average of resample conventional noncentrality parameter estimates and their sample counterpart. The…

  15. Localized structure of Euglena bioconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Shoji, Erika; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hiroshima University Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Bioconvection of a suspension of Euglena gracilis, a photosensitive flagellate whose body length is approximately 50 micrometers, was experimentally studied. Under strong light intensity, Euglena has a negative phototaxis; they tend to go away from the light source. When the bright illumination is given from the bottom, a large scale spatio-temporal pattern is generated as a result of interaction between Euglena and surrounding flow. Recently, localized convection pattern had been reported, however, the generation process and interaction of the localized convection cells has not been analyzed. We performed experimental study to understand the localization mechanism, in particular, the onset of bioconvection and lateral localization behavior due to phototaxis. Experiments started from different initial condition suggests a bistability near the onset of the convection as binary fluid convection that also shows localized convection cells. Dynamics of localized convections cells, which is similar to the binary fluid convection case although the basic equations are not the same, is also reported.

  16. Structural insights into biased G protein-coupled receptor signaling revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmeh, Rita; Damian, Marjorie; Cottet, Martin; Orcel, Hélène; Mendre, Christiane; Durroux, Thierry; Sharma, K. Shivaji; Durand, Grégory; Pucci, Bernard; Trinquet, Eric; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Deupi, Xavier; Bron, Patrick; Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, representing the largest group of therapeutic targets. Recent studies show that some GPCRs signal through both G protein and arrestin pathways in a ligand-specific manner. Ligands that direct signaling through a specific pathway are known as biased ligands. The arginine-vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R), a prototypical peptide-activated GPCR, is an ideal model system to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling. Although the native hormone arginine-vasopressin leads to activation of both the stimulatory G protein (Gs) for the adenylyl cyclase and arrestin pathways, synthetic ligands exhibit highly biased signaling through either Gs alone or arrestin alone. We used purified V2R stabilized in neutral amphipols and developed fluorescence-based assays to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling for the V2R. Our studies demonstrate that the Gs-biased agonist stabilizes a conformation that is distinct from that stabilized by the arrestin-biased agonists. This study provides unique insights into the structural mechanisms of GPCR activation by biased ligands that may be relevant to the design of pathway-biased drugs. PMID:22493271

  17. Latent structure in random sequences drives neural learning toward a rational bias

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanlong; O’Reilly, Randall C.; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Smith, Jack W.; Liu, Xun; Wang, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    People generally fail to produce random sequences by overusing alternating patterns and avoiding repeating ones—the gambler’s fallacy bias. We can explain the neural basis of this bias in terms of a biologically motivated neural model that learns from errors in predicting what will happen next. Through mere exposure to random sequences over time, the model naturally develops a representation that is biased toward alternation, because of its sensitivity to some surprisingly rich statistical structure that emerges in these random sequences. Furthermore, the model directly produces the best-fitting bias-gain parameter for an existing Bayesian model, by which we obtain an accurate fit to the human data in random sequence production. These results show that our seemingly irrational, biased view of randomness can be understood instead as the perfectly reasonable response of an effective learning mechanism to subtle statistical structure embedded in random sequences. PMID:25775565

  18. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Michelle L.; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A.; Schnell, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns. PMID:23735560

  19. Carrier-density-wave transport and local internal electric field measurements in biased metal-oxide-semiconductor n-Si devices using contactless laser photo-carrier radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Pawlak, Micha; Shaughnessy, Derrick

    2004-11-01

    Laser infrared photo-carrier radiometry was used with an n-type Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) diode and with a Si-SiO2 structure with a transparent electrode and under external bias. Application of three-dimensional PCR theory yielded values of the minority carrier (hole) transport properties in the presence of the thus created local internal electric field at fixed frequencies. Furthermore, the internal electric field at fixed applied voltage was calculated. Under the combination of increased temperature and voltage, the sub-interface position of the carrier-density-wave centroid was found to depend on a trade-off between increased recombination lifetime and decreased ambipolar (conductivity) mobility. The ability of PCR to measure local internal electric fields by combining applied bias sweeps and frequency scans appears to pave the way towards the contactless reconstruction of depth profiles of these fields in active devices.

  20. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  1. Fine-scale population genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal in the smooth snake (Coronella austriaca) in southern England

    PubMed Central

    Pernetta, A P; Allen, J A; Beebee, T J C; Reading, C J

    2011-01-01

    Human-induced alteration of natural habitats has the potential to impact on the genetic structuring of remnant populations at multiple spatial scales. Species from higher trophic levels, such as snakes, are expected to be particularly susceptible to land-use changes. We examined fine-scale population structure and looked for evidence of sex-biased dispersal in smooth snakes (Coronella austriaca), sampled from 10 heathland localities situated within a managed coniferous forest in Dorset, United Kingdom. Despite the limited distances between heathland areas (maximum <6 km), there was a small but significant structuring of populations based on eight microsatellite loci. This followed an isolation-by-distance model using both straight line and ‘biological' distances between sampling sites, suggesting C. austriaca's low vagility as the causal factor, rather than closed canopy conifer forest exerting an effect as a barrier to dispersal. Within population comparisons of male and female snakes showed evidence for sex-biased dispersal, with three of four analyses finding significantly higher dispersal in males than in females. We suggest that the fine-scale spatial genetic structuring and sex-biased dispersal have important implications for the conservation of C. austriaca, and highlight the value of heathland areas within commercial conifer plantations with regards to their future management. PMID:21343947

  2. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles). PMID:23263300

  3. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  4. Visual capture of a stereo sound: Interactions between cue reliability, sound localization variability, and cross-modal bias.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Christopher; Zhou, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Multisensory interactions involve coordination and sometimes competition between multiple senses. Vision usually dominates audition in spatial judgments when light and sound stimuli are presented from two different physical locations. This study investigated the influence of vision on the perceived location of a phantom sound source placed in a stereo sound field using a pair of loudspeakers emitting identical signals that were delayed or attenuated relative to each other. Results show that although a similar horizontal range (+/-45°) was reported for timing-modulated and level-modulated signals, listeners' localization performance showed greater variability for the timing signals. When visual stimuli were presented simultaneously with the auditory stimuli, listeners showed stronger visual bias for timing-modulated signals than level-modulated and single-speaker control signals. Trial-to-trial errors remained relatively stable over time, suggesting that sound localization uncertainty has an immediate and long-lasting effect on the across-modal bias. Binaural signal analyses further reveal that interaural differences of time and intensity-the two primary cues for sound localization in the azimuthal plane-are inherently more ambiguous for signals placed using timing. These results suggest that binaural ambiguity is intrinsically linked with localization variability and the strength of cross-modal bias in sound localization. PMID:27475171

  5. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? I. The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Wicker, James E.; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) represents a key local rung of the extragalactic distance ladder yet the galaxy's distance modulus has long been an issue of contention, in particular in view of claims that most newly determined distance moduli cluster tightly—and with a small spread—around the "canonical" distance modulus, (m - M)0 = 18.50 mag. We compiled 233 separate LMC distance determinations published between 1990 and 2013. Our analysis of the individual distance moduli, as well as of their two-year means and standard deviations resulting from this largest data set of LMC distance moduli available to date, focuses specifically on Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable-star tracer populations, as well as on distance estimates based on features in the observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We conclude that strong publication bias is unlikely to have been the main driver of the majority of published LMC distance moduli. However, for a given distance tracer, the body of publications leading to the tightly clustered distances is based on highly non-independent tracer samples and analysis methods, hence leading to significant correlations among the LMC distances reported in subsequent articles. Based on a careful, weighted combination, in a statistical sense, of the main stellar population tracers, we recommend that a slightly adjusted canonical distance modulus of (m - M)0 = 18.49 ± 0.09 mag be used for all practical purposes that require a general distance scale without the need for accuracies of better than a few percent.

  6. Clustering of local group distances: publication bias or correlated measurements? I. The large Magellanic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Wicker, James E.; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) represents a key local rung of the extragalactic distance ladder yet the galaxy's distance modulus has long been an issue of contention, in particular in view of claims that most newly determined distance moduli cluster tightly—and with a small spread—around the 'canonical' distance modulus, (m – M){sub 0} = 18.50 mag. We compiled 233 separate LMC distance determinations published between 1990 and 2013. Our analysis of the individual distance moduli, as well as of their two-year means and standard deviations resulting from this largest data set of LMC distance moduli available to date, focuses specifically on Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable-star tracer populations, as well as on distance estimates based on features in the observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We conclude that strong publication bias is unlikely to have been the main driver of the majority of published LMC distance moduli. However, for a given distance tracer, the body of publications leading to the tightly clustered distances is based on highly non-independent tracer samples and analysis methods, hence leading to significant correlations among the LMC distances reported in subsequent articles. Based on a careful, weighted combination, in a statistical sense, of the main stellar population tracers, we recommend that a slightly adjusted canonical distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 18.49 ± 0.09 mag be used for all practical purposes that require a general distance scale without the need for accuracies of better than a few percent.

  7. Role of return current in the excitation of electronmagnetohydrodynamic structures by biased electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, G.; Mattoo, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Srivastava, P. K.; Anitha, V. P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the role of return current in excitation of electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) structures. It is shown that only when return currents are excited parallel or anti-parallel to the background magnetic field the EMHD structures can be excited by a biased electrode in the plasma.

  8. Local Polarization Dynamics and Bias-Induced Phase Transitions in Ferroelectric Relaxors: Time-resolved Spectroscopy and Ergodic Gap Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, S. V.; Rodriguez, B.; Nikiforov, M. P.; Balke, N.; Jesse, S.; Ovchinnikov, O. S.; Bokov, A. A.; Ye, Z.-G.

    2009-03-01

    Mesoscopic domain structure and dynamics in PMN-PT solis solutions is studied using spatially resolved time- and voltage spectroscopic imaging modes. For compositions close to the MPB, we observe the formation of classical ferroelectric domains with rough self-affine boundaries. In the ergodic phase (PMN and PMN-10PT), the formation of non-classical labyrinthine domain patterns characterized by a single characteristic length scale is observed. The (a) persistence of these patterns well above Tc and (b) the fact that cannot be switched by tip bias suggest that they can be attributed to the frozen polarization component. Spatial variability of polarization relaxation dynamics in PMN-10PT is studied. Local relaxation attributed to the reorientation of polar nanoregions was found to follow stretched exponential dependence, with β 0.4, much larger than the macroscopic value determined from dielectric spectra (β 0.09). The spatial inhomogeneity of relaxation time distribution with the presence of 100-200 nm ``fast'' and ``slow'' regions is observed. The results are analyzed to map the Vogel-Fulcher temperatures on the nanoscale. The applicability of this technique to map ``ergodic gap'' distribution on the surface is discussed. Research supported by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC.

  9. Realistic drawing talent in typical adults is associated with the same kind of local processing bias found in individuals with ASD.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer E; Winner, Ellen

    2011-09-01

    A local processing bias has been found in individuals with autism as well as in typical children with a gift for drawing realistically. This study investigated whether a local processing bias in typical adults is more strongly associated with drawing realism or autistic-like traits. Forty-two adults made an observational drawing (scored for realism), completed four measures that assessed a local processing bias, and completed the Autism-spectrum Quotient (AQ) which assesses autistic-like traits. Drawing Realism score and not AQ score was associated with a local processing bias as shown by performance on two of the tasks. Typical adults who score high in the ability to draw realistically show the same kind of local processing bias found in individuals with ASD. PMID:21116699

  10. Introduction: Dissipative localized structures in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Taki, Majid; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Localized structures belong to the class of dissipative structures found far from equilibrium. Contributions from the most representative groups working on a various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, mathematics, optics, and laser physics are presented. The aim of this issue is to gather specialists from these fields towards a cross-fertilization among these active areas of research and thereby to present an overview of the state of art in the formation and the characterization of dissipative localized structures. Nonlinear optics and laser physics have an important part in this issue because of potential applications in information technology. In particular, localized structures could be used as "bits" for parallel information storage and processing.

  11. Effects of Sample Selection Bias on the Accuracy of Population Structure and Ancestry Inference

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash; Xing, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Population stratification is an important task in genetic analyses. It provides information about the ancestry of individuals and can be an important confounder in genome-wide association studies. Public genotyping projects have made a large number of datasets available for study. However, practical constraints dictate that of a geographical/ethnic population, only a small number of individuals are genotyped. The resulting data are a sample from the entire population. If the distribution of sample sizes is not representative of the populations being sampled, the accuracy of population stratification analyses of the data could be affected. We attempt to understand the effect of biased sampling on the accuracy of population structure analysis and individual ancestry recovery. We examined two commonly used methods for analyses of such datasets, ADMIXTURE and EIGENSOFT, and found that the accuracy of recovery of population structure is affected to a large extent by the sample used for analysis and how representative it is of the underlying populations. Using simulated data and real genotype data from cattle, we show that sample selection bias can affect the results of population structure analyses. We develop a mathematical framework for sample selection bias in models for population structure and also proposed a correction for sample selection bias using auxiliary information about the sample. We demonstrate that such a correction is effective in practice using simulated and real data. PMID:24637351

  12. Local fields in conductor surface electromigration: A first-principles study in the low-bias ballistic limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, Kirk H; Zhu, Wenguang; Stocks, George Malcolm; Guo, Hong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing first-principles quantum transport calculations, we investigate the role of local fields in conductor surface electromigration. A nanometer-thick Ag(100) thin film is adopted as our prototypical conductor, where we demonstrate the existence of intense local electric fields at atomic surface defects under an external bias. It is shown that such local fields can play an important role in driving surface electromigration and electrical breakdown. The intense fields originate from the relatively short (atomic-scale) screening lengths common to most elemental metals. This general short-range screening trend is established self-consistently within an intuitive picture of linear response electrostatics. The findings shed new light on the underlying physical origins of surface electromigration and point to the possibility of harnessing local fields to engineer electromigration at the nanoscale.

  13. Correlation between substrate bias, growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Aiping; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai; Wu, Huaping; Jia, Zechun

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films which are deposited at different substrate biases by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique with PH 3 as the dopant source. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, residual stress measurement, UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy and temperature-dependent conductivity measurement. The atomic fraction of phosphorus in the films as a function of substrate bias is obtained by XPS analysis. The optimum bias for phosphorus incorporation is about -80 V. Raman spectra show that the amorphous structures of all samples with atomic-scaled smooth surface are not remarkably changed when PH 3 is implanted, but some small graphitic crystallites are formed. Moreover, phosphorus impurities and higher-energetic impinging ions are favorable for the clustering of sp 2 sites dispersed in sp 3 skeleton and increase the level of structural ordering for ta-C:P films, which further releases the compressive stress and enhances the conductivity of the films. Our analysis establishes an interrelationship between microstructure, stress state, electrical properties, and substrate bias, which helps to understand the deposition mechanism of ta-C:P films.

  14. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  15. Crystal Structure Manipulation of the Exchange Bias in an Antiferromagnetic Film

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Su, Tang; Song, Qi; Xing, Wenyu; Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Zhangyuan; Ma, Xiumei; Gao, Peng; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Exchange bias is one of the most extensively studied phenomena in magnetism, since it exerts a unidirectional anisotropy to a ferromagnet (FM) when coupled to an antiferromagnet (AFM) and the control of the exchange bias is therefore very important for technological applications, such as magnetic random access memory and giant magnetoresistance sensors. In this letter, we report the crystal structure manipulation of the exchange bias in epitaxial hcp Cr2O3 films. By epitaxially growing twined oriented Cr2O3 thin films, of which the c axis and spins of the Cr atoms lie in the film plane, we demonstrate that the exchange bias between Cr2O3 and an adjacent permalloy layer is tuned to in-plane from out-of-plane that has been observed in oriented Cr2O3 films. This is owing to the collinear exchange coupling between the spins of the Cr atoms and the adjacent FM layer. Such a highly anisotropic exchange bias phenomenon is not possible in polycrystalline films. PMID:27329336

  16. Structural tuning of nanogaps using electromigration induced by field emission current with bipolar biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Mamiko; Ito, Mitsuki; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2015-07-07

    We report a new method for fabrication of Ni nanogaps based on electromigration induced by a field emission current. This method is called “activation” and is demonstrated here using a current source with alternately reversing polarities. The activation procedure with alternating current bias, in which the current source polarity alternates between positive and negative bias conditions, is performed with planar Ni nanogaps defined on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at room temperature. During negative biasing, a Fowler-Nordheim field emission current flows from the source (cathode) to the drain (anode) electrode. The Ni atoms at the tip of the drain electrode are thus activated and then migrate across the gap from the drain to the source electrode. In contrast, in the positive bias case, the field emission current moves the activated atoms from the source to the drain electrode. These two procedures are repeated until the tunnel resistance of the nanogaps is successively reduced from 100 TΩ to 48 kΩ. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies showed that the gap separation narrowed from approximately 95 nm to less than 10 nm because of the Ni atoms that accumulated at the tips of both the source and drain electrodes. These results show that the alternately biased activation process, which is a newly proposed atom transfer technique, can successfully control the tunnel resistance of the Ni nanogaps and is a suitable method for formation of ultrasmall nanogap structures.

  17. Crystal Structure Manipulation of the Exchange Bias in an Antiferromagnetic Film.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Su, Tang; Song, Qi; Xing, Wenyu; Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Zhangyuan; Ma, Xiumei; Gao, Peng; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Exchange bias is one of the most extensively studied phenomena in magnetism, since it exerts a unidirectional anisotropy to a ferromagnet (FM) when coupled to an antiferromagnet (AFM) and the control of the exchange bias is therefore very important for technological applications, such as magnetic random access memory and giant magnetoresistance sensors. In this letter, we report the crystal structure manipulation of the exchange bias in epitaxial hcp Cr2O3 films. By epitaxially growing twined oriented Cr2O3 thin films, of which the c axis and spins of the Cr atoms lie in the film plane, we demonstrate that the exchange bias between Cr2O3 and an adjacent permalloy layer is tuned to in-plane from out-of-plane that has been observed in oriented Cr2O3 films. This is owing to the collinear exchange coupling between the spins of the Cr atoms and the adjacent FM layer. Such a highly anisotropic exchange bias phenomenon is not possible in polycrystalline films. PMID:27329336

  18. Crystal Structure Manipulation of the Exchange Bias in an Antiferromagnetic Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Su, Tang; Song, Qi; Xing, Wenyu; Chen, Yangyang; Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Zhangyuan; Ma, Xiumei; Gao, Peng; Shi, Jing; Han, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Exchange bias is one of the most extensively studied phenomena in magnetism, since it exerts a unidirectional anisotropy to a ferromagnet (FM) when coupled to an antiferromagnet (AFM) and the control of the exchange bias is therefore very important for technological applications, such as magnetic random access memory and giant magnetoresistance sensors. In this letter, we report the crystal structure manipulation of the exchange bias in epitaxial hcp Cr2O3 films. By epitaxially growing twined oriented Cr2O3 thin films, of which the c axis and spins of the Cr atoms lie in the film plane, we demonstrate that the exchange bias between Cr2O3 and an adjacent permalloy layer is tuned to in-plane from out-of-plane that has been observed in oriented Cr2O3 films. This is owing to the collinear exchange coupling between the spins of the Cr atoms and the adjacent FM layer. Such a highly anisotropic exchange bias phenomenon is not possible in polycrystalline films.

  19. Irradiation induced pulsations of reverse biased metal oxide/silicon structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Tabacnics, M.; Rizutto, M. de A; Silva, A. de O D; Chandra, A.; Golovanov, V.; Ivanovskaya, M.; Khirunenko, L.

    2007-08-20

    Specific electronic features have been found in structures consisting of metal oxide layers on silicon substrates upon swift heavy ion irradiation. These features are linked to the appearance of radiation-induced negative differential resistances in the structures. In the reversed bias direction they show high frequency current pulsations at around {approx}10 kHz frequency. Their amplitude increases with increasing applied voltage. The pulsation frequency also shows a small increase. The current amplitude depends on the ion fluence and flux.

  20. Patterns and localized structures in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, M. G.; Escaff, D.; Kenkre, V. M.

    2005-11-01

    Patterns, fronts, and localized structures of a prototypical model for population dynamics interaction are studied. The physical content of the model is the coexistence of a simple random walk for the motion of the individuals with a nonlinearity in the competitive struggle for resources which simultaneously stresses the Allee effect and interaction at a distance. Mathematically, the model is variational and exhibits coexistence between different stable extended states. Solutions are obtained, the phase diagram is constructed, and the emergence of localized structures is investigated.

  1. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  2. Local refinement of RCM simulations based on the theory of Copulas: An application to bias correct WRF precipitation for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ganquan; Vogl, Stefanie; Laux, Patrick; Wagner, Sven; Kunstmann, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation information is crucial for regional hydrological and agricultural climate change impact studies. Regional climate models (RCMs) are suitable tools to provide high spatial resolution precipitation products at regional scales, however, they are usually biased not only in absolute values, but also in reproducing observed spatial patterns. Therefore, bias correction techniques are required to obtain suited meteorological information on regional scale. We present a Copula-based method to correct precipitation fields from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by merging modelled fields with gridded observation data. Germany is selected as our research domain. High resolution (7km) WRF simulations are used in this study, which is driven by ERA40 reanalysis data for 1971-2000. REGNIE data from Germany Weather Service (DWD) were used as gridded observation data source (1km/daily) and rescaled to 7km for this application. The critical step of this proposed bias correction approach is the establishment of bivariate Copula models, each of them consists of two marginal distributions and one Copula function. The marginal distributions are used to describe the statistical properties of REGNIE and WRF-ERA40 data, while the theoretical Copula function represents the dependence structure between REGNIE and WRF-ERA40 data. Based on this Copula model, the conditional distribution of REGNIE conditioned on WRF-ERA40 can be derived. To generate bias corrected WRF-ERA40 precipitation, a random sample of possible outcomes is drawn from this conditional distribution. This also allows for a quantitative estimation of the inherent uncertainties. The expectation/median/mode value of the stochastic samples can be used as an estimation of the corrected value. For the application, a split-sampling approach is used. Results show that the marginal distributions of REGNIE and WRF-ERA40 are different which implies deficiencies of the WRF-ERA40 simulations to reproduce the

  3. Structure Process, Weak Values and Local Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    We explain how weak values and the local momentum can be better understood in terms of Bohm's notion of structure process. The basic ideas of this approach can be expressed in a fully algebraic way, generalising Heisenberg's original matrix mechanics. This approach leads to questions that are now being experimentally investigated by our group at University College London.

  4. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  5. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  6. Artefacts and biases affecting the evaluation of scoring functions on decoy sets for protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Handl, Julia; Knowles, Joshua; Lovell, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Decoy datasets, consisting of a solved protein structure and numerous alternative native-like structures, are in common use for the evaluation of scoring functions in protein structure prediction. Several pitfalls with the use of these datasets have been identified in the literature, as well as useful guidelines for generating more effective decoy datasets. We contribute to this ongoing discussion an empirical assessment of several decoy datasets commonly used in experimental studies. Results: We find that artefacts and sampling issues in the large majority of these data make it trivial to discriminate the native structure. This underlines that evaluation based on the rank/z-score of the native is a weak test of scoring function performance. Moreover, sampling biases present in the way decoy sets are generated or used can strongly affect other types of evaluation measures such as the correlation between score and root mean squared deviation (RMSD) to the native. We demonstrate how, depending on type of bias and evaluation context, sampling biases may lead to both over- or under-estimation of the quality of scoring terms, functions or methods. Availability: Links to the software and data used in this study are available at http://dbkgroup.org/handl/decoy_sets. Contact: simon.lovell@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19297350

  7. Performance enhancement of ITO/oxide/semiconductor MOS-structure silicon solar cells with voltage biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Min-Chun; Lee, Yi-Yu; Hou, Zhong-Fu; Liao, Changn-Jyun

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the photovoltaic performance enhancement of a p-n junction silicon solar cell using a transparent-antireflective ITO/oxide film deposited on the spacing of the front-side finger electrodes and with a DC voltage applied on the ITO-electrode. The depletion width of the p-n junction under the ITO-electrode was induced and extended while the absorbed volume and built-in electric field were also increased when the biasing voltage was increased. The photocurrent and conversion efficiency were increased because more photo-carriers are generated in a larger absorbed volume and because the carriers transported and collected more effectively due to higher biasing voltage effects. Compared to a reference solar cell (which was biased at 0 V), a conversion efficiency enhancement of 26.57% (from 12.42% to 15.72%) and short-circuit current density enhancement of 42.43% (from 29.51 to 42.03 mA/cm2) were obtained as the proposed MOS-structure solar cell biased at 2.5 V. In addition, the capacitance-volt (C-V) measurement was also used to examine the mechanism of photovoltaic performance enhancement due to the depletion width being enlarged by applying a DC voltage on an ITO-electrode.

  8. Performance enhancement of ITO/oxide/semiconductor MOS-structure silicon solar cells with voltage biasing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Min-Chun; Lee, Yi-Yu; Hou, Zhong-Fu; Liao, Changn-Jyun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the photovoltaic performance enhancement of a p-n junction silicon solar cell using a transparent-antireflective ITO/oxide film deposited on the spacing of the front-side finger electrodes and with a DC voltage applied on the ITO-electrode. The depletion width of the p-n junction under the ITO-electrode was induced and extended while the absorbed volume and built-in electric field were also increased when the biasing voltage was increased. The photocurrent and conversion efficiency were increased because more photo-carriers are generated in a larger absorbed volume and because the carriers transported and collected more effectively due to higher biasing voltage effects. Compared to a reference solar cell (which was biased at 0 V), a conversion efficiency enhancement of 26.57% (from 12.42% to 15.72%) and short-circuit current density enhancement of 42.43% (from 29.51 to 42.03 mA/cm(2)) were obtained as the proposed MOS-structure solar cell biased at 2.5 V. In addition, the capacitance-volt (C-V) measurement was also used to examine the mechanism of photovoltaic performance enhancement due to the depletion width being enlarged by applying a DC voltage on an ITO-electrode. PMID:25593550

  9. A structural alphabet for local protein structures: improved prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Etchebest, Catherine; Benros, Cristina; Hazout, Serge; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2005-06-01

    Three-dimensional protein structures can be described with a library of 3D fragments that define a structural alphabet. We have previously proposed such an alphabet, composed of 16 patterns of five consecutive amino acids, called Protein Blocks (PBs). These PBs have been used to describe protein backbones and to predict local structures from protein sequences. The Q16 prediction rate reaches 40.7% with an optimization procedure. This article examines two aspects of PBs. First, we determine the effect of the enlargement of databanks on their definition. The results show that the geometrical features of the different PBs are preserved (local RMSD value equal to 0.41 A on average) and sequence-structure specificities reinforced when databanks are enlarged. Second, we improve the methods for optimizing PB predictions from sequences, revisiting the optimization procedure and exploring different local prediction strategies. Use of a statistical optimization procedure for the sequence-local structure relation improves prediction accuracy by 8% (Q16 = 48.7%). Better recognition of repetitive structures occurs without losing the prediction efficiency of the other local folds. Adding secondary structure prediction improved the accuracy of Q16 by only 1%. An entropy index (Neq), strongly related to the RMSD value of the difference between predicted PBs and true local structures, is proposed to estimate prediction quality. The Neq is linearly correlated with the Q16 prediction rate distributions, computed for a large set of proteins. An "expected" prediction rate QE16 is deduced with a mean error of 5%. PMID:15822101

  10. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  11. Identifying and removing structural biases in climate models with history matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Daniel; Blaker, Adam T.; Hampton, Charlotte; Salter, James

    2015-09-01

    We describe the method of history matching, a method currently used to help quantify parametric uncertainty in climate models, and argue for its use in identifying and removing structural biases in climate models at the model development stage. We illustrate the method using an investigation of the potential to improve upon known ocean circulation biases in a coupled non-flux-adjusted climate model (the third Hadley Centre Climate Model; HadCM3). In particular, we use history matching to investigate whether or not the behaviour of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which is known to be too strong in HadCM3, represents a structural bias that could be corrected using the model parameters. We find that it is possible to improve the ACC strength using the parameters and observe that doing this leads to more realistic representations of the sub-polar and sub-tropical gyres, sea surface salinities (both globally and in the North Atlantic), sea surface temperatures in the sinking regions in the North Atlantic and in the Southern Ocean, North Atlantic Deep Water flows, global precipitation, wind fields and sea level pressure. We then use history matching to locate a region of parameter space predicted not to contain structural biases for ACC and SSTs that is around 1 % of the original parameter space. We explore qualitative features of this space and show that certain key ocean and atmosphere parameters must be tuned carefully together in order to locate climates that satisfy our chosen metrics. Our study shows that attempts to tune climate model parameters that vary only a handful of parameters relevant to a given process at a time will not be as successful or as efficient as history matching.

  12. On the effect of bias on the behavior of MOS structures subjected to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using a quantitative model [6], the analysis of published data on the effect of the gate bias on the behavior of MOS structure subjected to ionizing radiation is performed. It is shown that, along with hydrogen-containing traps, there are hydrogen-free hole traps in samples with a low content of hydrogen; traps of both types are distributed inhomogeneously over the thickness of the gate insulator. In addition to ionized hydrogen, neutral hydrogen is involved in the formation of surface states and provides the main contribution to this process at negative gate bias. A decrease in the shift of the threshold voltage in the case of high fields is caused by an increase in the drift component of the hole drain to the electrodes.

  13. Giant exchange bias in Mn2FeGa with hexagonal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, H. G.; Zhang, X. J.; Ma, X. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present the experimental observation that polycrystalline Mn2+xFe1-xGa (x = -0.2, 0, 0.2, 0.4) compounds can be synthesized to be D019-type (Ni3Sn-type) hexagonal structure with space group P63/mmc. A giant exchange bias field up to 1.32 kOe was achieved in hexagonal Mn2FeGa alloy at 5 K. A cluster glass state is confirmed by ac susceptibility measurement under different driving frequencies. Interestingly, robust horizontal and vertical shifts in magnetic hysteresis loop were simultaneously observed at 5 K under high cooling field up to 90 kOe. The large exchange bias is originated from the large exchange anisotropy between cluster glass phase and ferrimagnetic matrix. The vertical shift is thought to be attributed to the incomplete reversal of frozen cluster spins.

  14. Resonance magnetoelectric effect without a bias field in a piezoelectric langatate-hysteretic ferromagnet monolithic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, D. A.; Fetisov, L. Y.; Fetisov, Y. K.; Chashin, D. V.; Ekonomov, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    The frequency, field, temperature, and amplitude characteristics of the direct magnetoelectric effect are studied in a planar monolithic structure consisting of a piezoelectric langatate crystal and a layer of electrolytic nickel. A relation between the magnetic and magnetoelectric properties of the structure is demonstrated, which explains the effects observed in structures with hysteretic layers. At the planar acoustic resonance frequency of the structure (about 70 kHz), the effect amounting to 23 V/(Oe cm) in the absence of a bias field is discovered. In the temperature interval 150-400 K, the amount of the effect changes nearly twofold, the resonance frequency changes by about 1%, and the Q factor on cooling rises to about 8 × 103. The field sensitivity of the structure is on the order of 1 V/Oe, which makes it possible to detect magnetic fields with an amplitude down to ˜10-6 Oe.

  15. Structural Integrity of Proteins under Applied Bias during Solid-State Nanopore Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Khanzada, Raja Raheel; Mahmood, Mohammed A. I.; Ashfaq, Adnan; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-03-01

    The translocation behavior of proteins through solid-state nanopores can be used as a new way to detect and identify proteins. The ionic current through a nanopore that flows under applied bias gets perturbed when a biomolecule traverses the Nanopore. It is important for a protein detection scheme to know of any changes in the three-dimensional structure of the molecule during the process. Here we report the data on structural integrity of protein during translocation through nanopore under different applied biases. Nanoscale Molecular Dynamic was used to establish a framework to study the changes in protein structures as these travelled across the nanopore. The analysis revealed the contributions of structural changes of protein to its ionic current signature. As a model, thrombin protein crystalline structure was imported and positioned inside a 6 nm diameter pore in a 6 nm thick silicon nitride membrane. The protein was solvated in 1 M KCl at 295 K and the system was equilibrated for 20 ns to attain its minimum energy state. The simulation was performed at different electric fields from 0 to 1 kCal/(mol.Å.e). RMSD, radial distribution function, movement of the center of mass and velocity of the protein were calculated. The results showed linear increments in the velocity and perturbations in ionic current profile with increasing electric potential. Support Acknowledged from NSF through ECCS-1201878.

  16. Exchange-bias in amorphous ferromagnetic and polycrystalline antiferromagnetic bilayers: Structural study and micromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, A.; Dean, J.; Kovacs, A.; Zeltser, A.; Carey, M. J.; Geiger, D.; Hrkac, G.; Schrefl, T.; Allwood, D.

    2011-04-01

    We study the role of the structure of antiferromagnetic polycrystalline metallic films in determining the magnetic properties of an exchange-coupled amorphous ferromagnetic layer. The bilayers are sputter-deposited, highly textured {111} Ir22Mn78 and Co65.5Fe14.5B20 thin films. We focus on structural characterization of Ir22Mn78 as a function of layer thickness in the range having the strongest influence over the exchange-bias field and training effect. We have used transmission electron microscopy to characterize defects in the form of interface steps and roughness, interdiffusion, twin- and grain-boundaries. Such defects can result in uncompensated magnetic spins in the antiferromagnet, which then contribute to exchange-bias. These experimental results form the basis of a general model, which uses finite element micromagnetic simulations. The model incorporates the experimental structural parameters of the bilayer by implementing a surface integral technique that allows numerical calculations to solve the transition from an amorphous to a granular structure. As a result, a detailed calculation of the underlying magnetic structure within the antiferromagnetic material is achieved. These calculations are in good agreement with micromagnetic imaging using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and the macro-magnetic properties of these bilayers.

  17. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Roland F; Moshkin, Yuri M; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H G; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C M; Giepmans, Ben N G; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin. Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila salivary glands showed bands that co-localized with heterochromatin proteins HP1 and the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR. Staining was retained in SUUR knock-out mutants but lost upon overexpression of SUUR. Somatic cells in Macrostomum lignano were strongly labeled, but pluripotent stem cells labeled weakly. Similarly, germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries were weakly labeled compared to most other cells. The unexpected presence of G4 structures in heterochromatin and the difference in G4 staining between somatic cells and stem cells with germline DNA in ciliates, flatworms, flies and mammals point to a conserved role for G4 structures in nuclear organization and cellular differentiation. PMID:26384414

  18. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F.; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H.G.; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V.; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C.M.; Giepmans, Ben N.G.; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin. Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila salivary glands showed bands that co-localized with heterochromatin proteins HP1 and the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR. Staining was retained in SUUR knock-out mutants but lost upon overexpression of SUUR. Somatic cells in Macrostomum lignano were strongly labeled, but pluripotent stem cells labeled weakly. Similarly, germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries were weakly labeled compared to most other cells. The unexpected presence of G4 structures in heterochromatin and the difference in G4 staining between somatic cells and stem cells with germline DNA in ciliates, flatworms, flies and mammals point to a conserved role for G4 structures in nuclear organization and cellular differentiation. PMID:26384414

  19. Local Order in the Unfolded State: Conformational Biases and Nearest Neighbor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Toal, Siobhan; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, which contain significant levels of disorder yet perform complex biologically functions, as well as unwanted aggregation, has motivated numerous experimental and theoretical studies aimed at describing residue-level conformational ensembles. Multiple lines of evidence gathered over the last 15 years strongly suggest that amino acids residues display unique and restricted conformational preferences in the unfolded state of peptides and proteins, contrary to one of the basic assumptions of the canonical random coil model. To fully understand residue level order/disorder, however, one has to gain a quantitative, experimentally based picture of conformational distributions and to determine the physical basis underlying residue-level conformational biases. Here, we review the experimental, computational and bioinformatic evidence for conformational preferences of amino acid residues in (mostly short) peptides that can be utilized as suitable model systems for unfolded states of peptides and proteins. In this context particular attention is paid to the alleged high polyproline II preference of alanine. We discuss how these conformational propensities may be modulated by peptide solvent interactions and so called nearest-neighbor interactions. The relevance of conformational propensities for the protein folding problem and the understanding of IDPs is briefly discussed. PMID:25062017

  20. PCR Biases Distort Bacterial and Archaeal Community Structure in Pyrosequencing Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ameet J.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2012-01-01

    As 16S rRNA gene targeted massively parallel sequencing has become a common tool for microbial diversity investigations, numerous advances have been made to minimize the influence of sequencing and chimeric PCR artifacts through rigorous quality control measures. However, there has been little effort towards understanding the effect of multi-template PCR biases on microbial community structure. In this study, we used three bacterial and three archaeal mock communities consisting of, respectively, 33 bacterial and 24 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences combined in different proportions to compare the influences of (1) sequencing depth, (2) sequencing artifacts (sequencing errors and chimeric PCR artifacts), and (3) biases in multi-template PCR, towards the interpretation of community structure in pyrosequencing datasets. We also assessed the influence of each of these three variables on α- and β-diversity metrics that rely on the number of OTUs alone (richness) and those that include both membership and the relative abundance of detected OTUs (diversity). As part of this study, we redesigned bacterial and archaeal primer sets that target the V3–V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene, along with multiplexing barcodes, to permit simultaneous sequencing of PCR products from the two domains. We conclude that the benefits of deeper sequencing efforts extend beyond greater OTU detection and result in higher precision in β-diversity analyses by reducing the variability between replicate libraries, despite the presence of more sequencing artifacts. Additionally, spurious OTUs resulting from sequencing errors have a significant impact on richness or shared-richness based α- and β-diversity metrics, whereas metrics that utilize community structure (including both richness and relative abundance of OTUs) are minimally affected by spurious OTUs. However, the greatest obstacle towards accurately evaluating community structure are the errors in estimated mean relative abundance of

  1. Amazonian landscapes and the bias in field studies of forest structure and biomass

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, David C.; Asner, Gregory P.; Knapp, David E.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Martin, Roberta E.; Sinca, Felipe; Tupayachi, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Tropical forests convert more atmospheric carbon into biomass each year than any terrestrial ecosystem on Earth, underscoring the importance of accurate tropical forest structure and biomass maps for the understanding and management of the global carbon cycle. Ecologists have long used field inventory plots as the main tool for understanding forest structure and biomass at landscape-to-regional scales, under the implicit assumption that these plots accurately represent their surrounding landscape. However, no study has used continuous, high-spatial-resolution data to test whether field plots meet this assumption in tropical forests. Using airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) acquired over three regions in Peru, we assessed how representative a typical set of field plots are relative to their surrounding host landscapes. We uncovered substantial mean biases (9–98%) in forest canopy structure (height, gaps, and layers) and aboveground biomass in both lowland Amazonian and montane Andean landscapes. Moreover, simulations reveal that an impractical number of 1-ha field plots (from 10 to more than 100 per landscape) are needed to develop accurate estimates of aboveground biomass at landscape scales. These biases should temper the use of plots for extrapolations of forest dynamics to larger scales, and they demonstrate the need for a fundamental shift to high-resolution active remote sensing techniques as a primary sampling tool in tropical forest biomass studies. The potential decrease in the bias and uncertainty of remotely sensed estimates of forest structure and biomass is a vital step toward successful tropical forest conservation and climate-change mitigation policy. PMID:25422434

  2. Amazonian landscapes and the bias in field studies of forest structure and biomass.

    PubMed

    Marvin, David C; Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Anderson, Christopher B; Martin, Roberta E; Sinca, Felipe; Tupayachi, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests convert more atmospheric carbon into biomass each year than any terrestrial ecosystem on Earth, underscoring the importance of accurate tropical forest structure and biomass maps for the understanding and management of the global carbon cycle. Ecologists have long used field inventory plots as the main tool for understanding forest structure and biomass at landscape-to-regional scales, under the implicit assumption that these plots accurately represent their surrounding landscape. However, no study has used continuous, high-spatial-resolution data to test whether field plots meet this assumption in tropical forests. Using airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) acquired over three regions in Peru, we assessed how representative a typical set of field plots are relative to their surrounding host landscapes. We uncovered substantial mean biases (9-98%) in forest canopy structure (height, gaps, and layers) and aboveground biomass in both lowland Amazonian and montane Andean landscapes. Moreover, simulations reveal that an impractical number of 1-ha field plots (from 10 to more than 100 per landscape) are needed to develop accurate estimates of aboveground biomass at landscape scales. These biases should temper the use of plots for extrapolations of forest dynamics to larger scales, and they demonstrate the need for a fundamental shift to high-resolution active remote sensing techniques as a primary sampling tool in tropical forest biomass studies. The potential decrease in the bias and uncertainty of remotely sensed estimates of forest structure and biomass is a vital step toward successful tropical forest conservation and climate-change mitigation policy. PMID:25422434

  3. Novel measures of linkage disequilibrium that correct the bias due to population structure and relatedness

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Siberchicot, A; Nicolas, S; Doligez, A; This, P; Cierco-Ayrolles, C

    2012-01-01

    Among the several linkage disequilibrium measures known to capture different features of the non-independence between alleles at different loci, the most commonly used for diallelic loci is the r2 measure. In the present study, we tackled the problem of the bias of r2 estimate, which results from the sample structure and/or the relatedness between genotyped individuals. We derived two novel linkage disequilibrium measures for diallelic loci that are both extensions of the usual r2 measure. The first one, rS2, uses the population structure matrix, which consists of information about the origins of each individual and the admixture proportions of each individual genome. The second one, rV2, includes the kinship matrix into the calculation. These two corrections can be applied together in order to correct for both biases and are defined either on phased or unphased genotypes. We proved that these novel measures are linked to the power of association tests under the mixed linear model including structure and kinship corrections. We validated them on simulated data and applied them to real data sets collected on Vitis vinifera plants. Our results clearly showed the usefulness of the two corrected r2 measures, which actually captured ‘true' linkage disequilibrium unlike the usual r2 measure. PMID:21878986

  4. Novel measures of linkage disequilibrium that correct the bias due to population structure and relatedness.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Siberchicot, A; Nicolas, S; Doligez, A; This, P; Cierco-Ayrolles, C

    2012-03-01

    Among the several linkage disequilibrium measures known to capture different features of the non-independence between alleles at different loci, the most commonly used for diallelic loci is the r(2) measure. In the present study, we tackled the problem of the bias of r(2) estimate, which results from the sample structure and/or the relatedness between genotyped individuals. We derived two novel linkage disequilibrium measures for diallelic loci that are both extensions of the usual r(2) measure. The first one, r(S)(2), uses the population structure matrix, which consists of information about the origins of each individual and the admixture proportions of each individual genome. The second one, r(V)(2), includes the kinship matrix into the calculation. These two corrections can be applied together in order to correct for both biases and are defined either on phased or unphased genotypes.We proved that these novel measures are linked to the power of association tests under the mixed linear model including structure and kinship corrections. We validated them on simulated data and applied them to real data sets collected on Vitis vinifera plants. Our results clearly showed the usefulness of the two corrected r(2) measures, which actually captured 'true' linkage disequilibrium unlike the usual r(2) measure. PMID:21878986

  5. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? III. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Aiming at providing a firm mean distance estimate to the SMC, and thus to place it within the internally consistent Local Group distance framework we recently established, we compiled the current largest database of published distance estimates to the galaxy. Based on careful statistical analysis, we derive mean distance estimates to the SMC using eclipsing binary systems, variable stars, stellar population tracers, and star cluster properties. Their weighted mean leads to a final recommendation for the mean SMC distance of (m-M)0SMC=18.96+/- 0.02 mag, where the uncertainty represents the formal error. Systematic effects related to lingering uncertainties in extinction corrections, our physical understanding of the stellar tracers used, and the SMC's complex geometry—including its significant line of sight depth, its irregular appearance which renders definition of the galaxy's center uncertain, as well as its high inclination and possibly warped disk—may contribute additional uncertainties possibly exceeding 0.15-0.20 mag.

  6. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describe the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.

  7. On the statistics of biased tracers in the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Angulo, Raul; Fasiello, Matteo; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2015-09-09

    With the completion of the Planck mission, in order to continue to gather cosmological information it has become crucial to understand the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe to percent accuracy. The Effective Field Theory of LSS (EFTofLSS) is a novel theoretical framework that aims to develop an analytic understanding of LSS at long distances, where inhomogeneities are small. We further develop the description of biased tracers in the EFTofLSS to account for the effect of baryonic physics and primordial non-Gaussianities, finding that new bias coefficients are required. Then, restricting to dark matter with Gaussian initial conditions, we describemore » the prediction of the EFTofLSS for the one-loop halo-halo and halo-matter two-point functions, and for the tree-level halo-halo-halo, matter-halo-halo and matter-matter-halo three-point functions. Several new bias coefficients are needed in the EFTofLSS, even though their contribution at a given order can be degenerate and the same parameters contribute to multiple observables. We develop a method to reduce the number of biases to an irreducible basis, and find that, at the order at which we work, seven bias parameters are enough to describe this extremely rich set of statistics. We then compare with the output of an N-body simulation where the normalization parameter of the linear power spectrum is set to σ8 = 0.9. For the lowest mass bin, we find percent level agreement up to k ≃ 0.3 h Mpc–1 for the one-loop two-point functions, and up to k ≃ 0.15 h Mpc–1 for the tree-level three-point functions, with the k-reach decreasing with higher mass bins. In conclusion, this is consistent with the theoretical estimates, and suggests that the cosmological information in LSS amenable to analytical control is much more than previously believed.« less

  8. Experimental evidence of resonant tunneling via localized DQW states in an asymmetric triple barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, Rober

    2003-04-01

    In this work we report on field-induced features appearing in the tunneling current traces of a biased asymmetric triple barrier resonant tunneling device in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. A theoretical model that satisfactorily explains the origin of these features is discussed. The reported data evidences the localized nature of the quantum states in thin layer asymmetric double-quantum-well structures.

  9. Striatal structure and function predict individual biases in learning to avoid pain

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, Eran; Hauser, Tobias U.; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is an elemental inducer of avoidance. Here, we demonstrate that people differ in how they learn to avoid pain, with some individuals refraining from actions that resulted in painful outcomes, whereas others favor actions that helped prevent pain. These individual biases were best explained by differences in learning from outcome prediction errors and were associated with distinct forms of striatal responses to painful outcomes. Specifically, striatal responses to pain were modulated in a manner consistent with an aversive prediction error in individuals who learned predominantly from pain, whereas in individuals who learned predominantly from success in preventing pain, modulation was consistent with an appetitive prediction error. In contrast, striatal responses to success in preventing pain were consistent with an appetitive prediction error in both groups. Furthermore, variation in striatal structure, encompassing the region where pain prediction errors were expressed, predicted participants’ predominant mode of learning, suggesting the observed learning biases may reflect stable individual traits. These results reveal functional and structural neural components underlying individual differences in avoidance learning, which may be important contributors to psychiatric disorders involving pathological harm avoidance behavior. PMID:27071092

  10. Structural optimization and structure-functional selectivity relationship studies of G protein-biased EP2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seiji; Watanabe, Toshihide; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Goto, Yoshikazu; Yamane, Shinsaku; Watanabe, Akio; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Kinoshita, Atsushi; Okada, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kousuke; Maruyama, Toru

    2016-05-15

    The modification of the novel G protein-biased EP2 agonist 1 has been investigated to improve its G protein activity and develop a better understanding of its structure-functional selectivity relationship (SFSR). The optimization of the substituents on the phenyl ring of 1, followed by the inversion of the hydroxyl group on the cyclopentane moiety led to compound 9, which showed a 100-fold increase in its G protein activity compared with 1 without any increase in β-arrestin recruitment. Furthermore, SFSR studies revealed that the combination of meta and para substituents on the phenyl moiety was crucial to the functional selectivity. PMID:27055938

  11. NiO/Fe(001): Magnetic anisotropy, exchange bias, and interface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynczak, E.; Luches, P.

    2013-06-21

    The magnetic and structural properties of NiO/Fe epitaxial bilayers grown on MgO(001) were studied using magnetooptic Kerr effect (MOKE) and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The bilayers were prepared under ultra high vacuum conditions using molecular beam epitaxy with oblique deposition. Two systems were compared: one showing the exchange bias (100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe), ML stands for a monolayer, and another where the exchange bias was not observed (50ML-NiO/50ML-Fe). For both, the magnetic anisotropy was found to be complex, yet dominated by the growth-induced uniaxial anisotropy. The training effect was observed for the 100ML-NiO/24ML-Fe system and quantitatively described using the spin glass model. The composition and magnetic state of the interfacial Fe layers were studied using {sup 57}Fe-CEMS. An iron oxide phase (Fe{sup 3+}{sub 4}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 1}O{sub 7}), as thick as 31 A, was identified at the NiO/Fe interface in the as-deposited samples. The ferrimagnetic nature of the interfacial iron oxide film explains the complex magnetic anisotropy observed in the samples.

  12. Does survey method bias the description of northern goshawk nest-site structure?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daw, S.K.; DeStefano, S.; Steidl, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Past studies on the nesting habitat of northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) often relied on nests found opportunistically, either during timber-sale operations, by searching apparently 'good' goshawk habitat, or by other search methods where areas were preselected based on known forest conditions. Therefore, a bias in the characterization of habitat surrounding northern goshawk nest sites may exist toward late-forest structure (large trees, high canopy closure). This potential problem has confounded interpretation of data on nesting habitat of northern goshawks and added to uncertainty in the review process to consider the species for federal listing as threatened or endangered. Systematic survey methods, which strive for complete coverage of an area and often use broadcasts of conspecific calls, have been developed to overcome these potential biases, but no study has compared habitat characteristics around nests found opportunistically with those found systematically. We compared habitat characteristics in a 0.4-ha area around nests found systematically (n = 27) versus those found opportunistically (n = 22) on 3 national forests in eastern Oregon. We found that both density of large trees (systematic: x?? = 16.4 ?? 3.1 trees/ha; x?? ?? SE; opportunistic: x?? = 21.3 ?? 3.2; P = 0.56) and canopy closure (systematic: x?? = 72 ?? 2%; opportunistic: x?? = 70 ?? 2%; P = 0.61) were similar around nests found with either search method. Our results diminish concern that past survey methods mischaracterized northern goshawk nest-site structure. However, because northern goshawks nest in a variety of forest cover types with a wide range of structural characteristics, these results do not decrease the value of systematic survey methods in determining the most representative habitat descriptions for northern goshawks. Rigorous survey protocols allow repeatability and comparability of monitoring efforts and results over time.

  13. Reduction of model structure bias in the prediction of critical source areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M.; Stamm, C.; Schneider, M. K.; Reichert, P.

    2009-04-01

    Effective mitigation strategies to reduce the contamination of surface waters by agrochemicals rely on an accurate identification of critical source areas (CSA). We used a spatially distributed hydrological model to identify CSA in a small agricultural catchment in Switzerland. Since the knowledge about model parameters is coarse, prior predictions of CSA involve large uncertainties. We investigated to which degree river discharge data can constrain parameter values and improve the prediction. Thereby, we combined the prior knowledge used for the prior prediction with additional river discharge data within a Bayesian inference approach. In order to consider the effect of uncertainty in input data and in the model structure we formulated the likelihood function with an autoregressive error model additive to the river discharge calculated by the deterministic hydrological model. The additional information gained from river discharge data slightly reduced the width of some of the marginal parameter distributions and the prediction uncertainty for high or low-risk areas. However, the analysis of the statistical assumptions of the inference process revealed deficits in the model structure. Thus the base flow during dry periods tended to be overestimated. By making the percolation process water table dependent the base flow prediction could be improved. These improvements in model structure significantly reduced the model structure bias and thus improved the statistical basis of the probabilistic CSA prediction. Furthermore, the improved model structure led to a large constraint of the CSA prediction uncertainty.

  14. Selection bias in species distribution models: An econometric approach on forest trees based on structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ay, J. S.; Guillemot, J.; Doyen, L.; Leadley, P.

    2014-12-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are widely used to study and predict the outcome of global changes on species. In human dominated ecosystems the presence of a given species is the result of both its ecological suitability and human footprint on nature such as land use choices. Land use choices may thus be responsible for a selection bias in the presence/absence data used in SDM calibration. We present a structural modelling approach (i.e. based on structural equation modelling) that accounts for this selection bias. The new structural species distribution model (SSDM) estimates simultaneously land use choices and species responses to bioclimatic variables. A land use equation based on an econometric model of landowner choices was joined to an equation of species response to bioclimatic variables. SSDM allows the residuals of both equations to be dependent, taking into account the possibility of shared omitted variables and measurement errors. We provide a general description of the statistical theory and a set of applications on forest trees over France using databases of climate and forest inventory at different spatial resolution (from 2km to 8km). We also compared the outputs of the SSDM with outputs of a classical SDM (i.e. Biomod ensemble modelling) in terms of bioclimatic response curves and potential distributions under current climate and climate change scenarios. The shapes of the bioclimatic response curves and the modelled species distribution maps differed markedly between SSDM and classical SDMs, with contrasted patterns according to species and spatial resolutions. The magnitude and directions of these differences were dependent on the correlations between the errors from both equations and were highest for higher spatial resolutions. A first conclusion is that the use of classical SDMs can potentially lead to strong miss-estimation of the actual and future probability of presence modelled. Beyond this selection bias, the SSDM we propose represents

  15. The Local Universe of Disk Galaxies: Energy, Mass, and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Simon P.

    2015-08-01

    This talk will explore three themes: (1) Our understanding of the space density of disk systems in the nearby (z<0.1) Universe, their global properties including their panchromatic (FUV-far-IR) information (energy outputs), their dust properties (masses and temperatures), their (specific) star-formation rates, and ultimately the amount of stellar mass locked up in disc components. (2) The completeness of our local surveys, with a particular focus on the severe impact of low surface brightness selection bias, and how these can be overcome using the upcoming deep imaging studies. (3) The complexity of automated structural decomposition and experiences and results from profiling 8000 galaxies at z<0.06 allowing us to derive key relations such as the mass-size relation of disc systems. The data shown is drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. The GAMA survey builds upon the SDSS legacy by extending 2mags deeper spectroscopically (r<19.8mag) and also including panchromatic data from GALEX, VST, VISTA, WISE and Herschel-Atlas and shortly ASKAP for 300,000 galaxies over 250sq deg of sky. This talk will be aligned with the GAMA Panchromatic Data Release where all imaging data products will be publicly released.

  16. The relationship between level of autistic traits and local bias in the context of the McGurk effect.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Yuta; Asai, Tomohisa; Wakabayashi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The McGurk effect is a well-known illustration that demonstrates the influence of visual information on hearing in the context of speech perception. Some studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display abnormal processing of audio-visual speech integration, while other studies showed contradictory results. Based on the dimensional model of ASD, we administered two analog studies to examine the link between level of autistic traits, as assessed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), and the McGurk effect among a sample of university students. In the first experiment, we found that autistic traits correlated negatively with fused (McGurk) responses. Then, we manipulated presentation types of visual stimuli to examine whether the local bias toward visual speech cues modulated individual differences in the McGurk effect. The presentation included four types of visual images, comprising no image, mouth only, mouth and eyes, and full face. The results revealed that global facial information facilitates the influence of visual speech cues on McGurk stimuli. Moreover, individual differences between groups with low and high levels of autistic traits appeared when the full-face visual speech cue with an incongruent voice condition was presented. These results suggest that individual differences in the McGurk effect might be due to a weak ability to process global facial information in individuals with high levels of autistic traits. PMID:26175705

  17. Multipeak self-biased magnetoelectric coupling characteristics in four-phase Metglas/Terfenol-D/Be-bronze/PMN-PT structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongyan; Lu, Caijiang; Bing, Han

    2015-04-01

    This letter develops a self-biased magnetoelectric (ME) structure Metglas/Terfenol-D/Be-bronze/PMN-PT (MTBP) consisting of a magnetization-graded Metglas/Terfenol-D layer, a elastic Be-bronze plate, and a piezoelectric 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) plate. By using the magnetization-graded Metglas/Terfenol-D layer and the elastic Be-bronze plate, multi-peak self-biased ME responses are obtained in MTBP structure. The experimental results show that the MTBP structure with two layers of Metglas foil has maximum zero-biased ME voltage coefficient (MEVC). As frequency increases from 0.5 to 90 kHz, eleven large peaks of MEVC with magnitudes of 0.75-33 V/(cm Oe) are observed at zero-biased magnetic field. The results demonstrate that the proposed multi-peak self-biased ME structure may be useful for multifunctional devices such as multi-frequency energy harvesters or low-frequency ac magnetic field sensors.

  18. Spatial structure arising from neighbour-dependent bias in collective cell movement.

    PubMed

    Binny, Rachelle N; Haridas, Parvathi; James, Alex; Law, Richard; Simpson, Matthew J; Plank, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of collective cell movement often neglect the effects of spatial structure, such as clustering, on the population dynamics. Typically, they assume that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density (the mean-field assumption) which means that cell-cell interactions occurring over short spatial ranges are not accounted for. However, in vitro cell culture studies have shown that spatial correlations can play an important role in determining collective behaviour. Here, we take a combined experimental and modelling approach to explore how individual-level interactions give rise to spatial structure in a moving cell population. Using imaging data from in vitro experiments, we quantify the extent of spatial structure in a population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To understand how this spatial structure arises, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) and simulate cell movement in two spatial dimensions. Our model allows an individual's direction of movement to be affected by interactions with other cells in its neighbourhood, providing insights into how directional bias generates spatial structure. We consider how this behaviour scales up to the population level by using the IBM to derive a continuum description in terms of the dynamics of spatial moments. In particular, we account for spatial correlations between cells by considering dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells). Our numerical results suggest that the moment dynamics description can provide a good approximation to averaged simulation results from the underlying IBM. Using our in vitro data, we estimate parameters for the model and show that it can generate similar spatial structure to that observed in a 3T3 fibroblast cell population. PMID:26893970

  19. Spatial structure arising from neighbour-dependent bias in collective cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Parvathi; James, Alex; Law, Richard; Simpson, Matthew J.; Plank, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models of collective cell movement often neglect the effects of spatial structure, such as clustering, on the population dynamics. Typically, they assume that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density (the mean-field assumption) which means that cell–cell interactions occurring over short spatial ranges are not accounted for. However, in vitro cell culture studies have shown that spatial correlations can play an important role in determining collective behaviour. Here, we take a combined experimental and modelling approach to explore how individual-level interactions give rise to spatial structure in a moving cell population. Using imaging data from in vitro experiments, we quantify the extent of spatial structure in a population of 3T3 fibroblast cells. To understand how this spatial structure arises, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) and simulate cell movement in two spatial dimensions. Our model allows an individual’s direction of movement to be affected by interactions with other cells in its neighbourhood, providing insights into how directional bias generates spatial structure. We consider how this behaviour scales up to the population level by using the IBM to derive a continuum description in terms of the dynamics of spatial moments. In particular, we account for spatial correlations between cells by considering dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells). Our numerical results suggest that the moment dynamics description can provide a good approximation to averaged simulation results from the underlying IBM. Using our in vitro data, we estimate parameters for the model and show that it can generate similar spatial structure to that observed in a 3T3 fibroblast cell population. PMID:26893970

  20. Uniparental Markers in Italy Reveal a Sex-Biased Genetic Structure and Different Historical Strata

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Harmant, Christine; Useli, Antonella; Sanz, Paula; Yang-Yao, Daniele; Manry, Jeremy; Ciani, Graziella; Luiselli, Donata; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David; Pettener, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Located in the center of the Mediterranean landscape and with an extensive coastal line, the territory of what is today Italy has played an important role in the history of human settlements and movements of Southern Europe and the Mediterranean Basin. Populated since Paleolithic times, the complexity of human movements during the Neolithic, the Metal Ages and the most recent history of the two last millennia (involving the overlapping of different cultural and demic strata) has shaped the pattern of the modern Italian genetic structure. With the aim of disentangling this pattern and understanding which processes more importantly shaped the distribution of diversity, we have analyzed the uniparentally-inherited markers in ∼900 individuals from an extensive sampling across the Italian peninsula, Sardinia and Sicily. Spatial PCAs and DAPCs revealed a sex-biased pattern indicating different demographic histories for males and females. Besides the genetic outlier position of Sardinians, a North West–South East Y-chromosome structure is found in continental Italy. Such structure is in agreement with recent archeological syntheses indicating two independent and parallel processes of Neolithisation. In addition, date estimates pinpoint the importance of the cultural and demographic events during the late Neolithic and Metal Ages. On the other hand, mitochondrial diversity is distributed more homogeneously in agreement with older population events that might be related to the presence of an Italian Refugium during the last glacial period in Europe. PMID:23734255

  1. Detection of Chromosomal Structural Alterations in Single Cells by SNP Arrays: A Systematic Survey of Amplification Bias and Optimized Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Nakano, Yoko; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Kato, Tadafumi

    2007-01-01

    Background In single-cell human genome analysis using whole-genome amplified product, a strong amplification bias involving allele dropout and preferential amplification hampers the quality of results. Using an oligonucleotide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we systematically examined the nature of this amplification bias, including frequency, degree, and preference for genomic location, and we assessed the effects of this amplification bias on subsequent genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a large variability in amplification bias among the amplified products obtained by multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and this bias had a severe effect on the genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. We established optimal experimental conditions for pre-screening for high-quality amplified products, processing array data, and analyzing chromosomal structural alterations. Using this optimized protocol, we successfully detected previously unidentified chromosomal structural alterations in single cells from a lymphoblastoid cell line. These alterations were subsequently confirmed by karyotype analysis. In addition, we successfully obtained reproducible chromosomal copy number profiles of single cells from the cell line with a complex karyotype, indicating the applicability and potential of our optimized workflow. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the quality of amplification products should be critically assessed before using them for genomic analyses. The method of MDA-based whole-genome amplification followed by SNP array analysis described here will be useful for exploring chromosomal alterations in single cells. PMID:18074030

  2. Effect of negative bias on the composition and structure of the tungsten oxide thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meihan; Lei, Hao; Wen, Jiaxing; Long, Haibo; Sawada, Yutaka; Hoshi, Yoichi; Uchida, Takayuki; Hou, Zhaoxia

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films were deposited at room temperature under different negative bias voltages (Vb, 0 to -500 V) by DC reactive magnetron sputtering, and then the as-deposited films were annealed at 500 °C in air atmosphere. The crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical composition and transmittance of the tungsten oxide thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The XRD analysis reveals that the tungsten oxide films deposited at different negative bias voltages present a partly crystallized amorphous structure. All the films transfer from amorphous to crystalline (monoclinic + hexagonal) after annealing 3 h at 500 °C. Furthermore, the crystallized tungsten oxide films show different preferred orientation. The morphology of the tungsten oxide films deposited at different negative bias voltages is consisted of fine nanoscale grains. The grains grow up and conjunct with each other after annealing. The tungsten oxide films deposited at higher negative bias voltages after annealing show non-uniform special morphology. Substoichiometric tungsten oxide films were formed as evidenced by XPS spectra of W4f and O1s. As a result, semi-transparent films were obtained in the visible range for all films deposited at different negative bias voltages.

  3. Towards structural controllability of local-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ma, Yilin; Wu, Yafang; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi

    2016-05-01

    Controlling complex networks is of vital importance in science and engineering. Meanwhile, local-world effect is an important ingredient which should be taken into consideration in the complete description of real-world complex systems. In this letter, structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. Through extensive numerical simulations, firstly, effects of local world size M and network size N on structural controllability are examined. For local-world networks with sparse topological configuration, compared to network size, local-world size can induce stronger influence on controllability, however, for dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and local-world effect can be neglected. Secondly, relationships between controllability and topological properties are analyzed. Lastly, the robustness of local-world networks under targeted attacks regarding structural controllability is discussed. These results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity and connectivity patterns of complex systems.

  4. Scale dependence of the halo bias in general local-type non-Gaussian models I: analytical predictions and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2012-08-01

    The large-scale clustering pattern of biased tracers is known to be a powerful probe of the non-Gaussianities in the primordial fluctuations. The so-called scale-dependent bias has been reported in various type of models of primordial non-Gaussianities. We focus on local-type non-Gaussianities, and unify the derivations in the literature of the scale-dependent bias in the presence of multiple Gaussian source fields as well as higher-order coupling to cover the models described by frequently-discussed f{sub NL}, g{sub NL} and t{sub NL} parameterization. We find that the resultant power spectrum is characterized by two parameters responsible for the shape and the amplitude of the scale-dependent bias in addition to the Gaussian bias factor. We show how (a generalized version of) Suyama-Yamaguchi inequality between f{sub NL} and t{sub NL} can directly be accessible from the observed power spectrum through the dependence on our new parameter which controls the shape of the scale-dependent bias. The other parameter for the amplitude of the scale-dependent bias is shown to be useful to distinguish the simplest quadratic non-Gaussianities (i.e., f{sub NL}-type) from higher-order ones (g{sub NL} and higher), if one measures it from multiple species of galaxies or clusters of galaxies. We discuss the validity and limitations of our analytic results by comparison with numerical simulations in an accompanying paper.

  5. Invariant current approach to wave propagation in locally symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetakis, V. E.; Diakonou, M. K.; Morfonios, C. V.; Kalozoumis, P. A.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    A theory for wave mechanical systems with local inversion and translation symmetries is developed employing the two-dimensional solution space of the stationary Schrödinger equation. The local symmetries of the potential are encoded into corresponding local basis vectors in terms of symmetry-induced two-point invariant currents which map the basis amplitudes between symmetry-related points. A universal wavefunction structure in locally symmetric potentials is revealed, independently of the physical boundary conditions, by using special local bases which are adapted to the existing local symmetries. The local symmetry bases enable efficient computation of spatially resolved wave amplitudes in systems with arbitrary combinations of local inversion and translation symmetries. The approach opens the perspective of a flexible analysis and control of wave localization in structurally complex systems.

  6. The effect of sex-biased dispersal on opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure and inbreeding risk.

    PubMed

    Blyton, Michaela D J; Banks, Sam C; Peakall, Rod

    2015-04-01

    Natal sex-biased dispersal has long been thought to reduce the risk of inbreeding by spatially separating opposite-sexed kin. Yet, comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study, we quantified the effectiveness of sex-biased dispersal as an inbreeding avoidance strategy by combining spatially explicit simulations and empirical data. We quantified the extent of kin clustering by measuring the degree of spatial autocorrelation among opposite-sexed individuals (FM structure). This allowed us to systematically explore how the extent of sex-biased dispersal, generational overlap, and mate searching distance, influenced both kin clustering, and the resulting inbreeding in the absence of complementary inbreeding avoidance strategies. Simulations revealed that when sex-biased dispersal was limited, positive FM genetic structure developed quickly and increased as the mate searching distance decreased or as generational overlap increased. Interestingly, complete long-range sex-biased dispersal did not prevent the development of FM genetic structure when generations overlapped. We found a very strong correlation between FM genetic structure and both FIS under random mating, and pedigree-based measures of inbreeding. Thus, we show that the detection of FM genetic structure can be a strong indicator of inbreeding risk. Empirical data for two species with different life history strategies yielded patterns congruent with our simulations. Our study illustrates a new application of spatial genetic autocorrelation analysis that offers a framework for quantifying the risk of inbreeding that is easily extendable to other species. Furthermore, our findings provide other researchers with a context for interpreting observed patterns of opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure. PMID:25761248

  7. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-01

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S2 positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S2 values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S2 spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S2 spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S2. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses.

  8. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-10

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S_{2} positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S_{2} values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S_{2} spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S_{2} spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S_{2}. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses. PMID:27341261

  9. Bias activated dielectric response of excitons and excitonic Mott transition in quantum confined lasers structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Amit; Bansal, Kanika; Datta, Shouvik; Alshammari, Marzook S.; Henini, Mohamed

    In contrast to the widely reported optical techniques, there are hardly any investigations on corresponding electrical signatures of condensed matter physics of excitonic phenomena. We studied small signal steady state capacitance response in III-V materials based multi quantum well (AlGaInP) and MBE grown quantum dot (InGaAs) laser diodes to identify signatures of excitonic presence. Conductance activation by forward bias was probed using frequency dependent differential capacitance response (fdC/df), which changes characteristically with the onset of light emission indicating the occurrence of negative activation energy. Our analysis shows that it is connected with a steady state population of exciton like bound states. Calculated average energy of this bound state matches well with the binding energy of weakly confined excitons in this type of structures. Further increase in charge injection decreases the differential capacitive response in AlGaInP based diodes, indicating a gradual Mott transition of excitonic states into electron hole plasma. This electrical description of excitonic Mott transition is fully supplemented by standard optical spectroscopic signatures of band gap renormalization and phase space filling effects.

  10. Sample Size Requirements for Structural Equation Models: An Evaluation of Power, Bias, and Solution Propriety

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Erika J.; Harrington, Kelly M.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Miller, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Determining sample size requirements for structural equation modeling (SEM) is a challenge often faced by investigators, peer reviewers, and grant writers. Recent years have seen a large increase in SEMs in the behavioral science literature, but consideration of sample size requirements for applied SEMs often relies on outdated rules-of-thumb. This study used Monte Carlo data simulation techniques to evaluate sample size requirements for common applied SEMs. Across a series of simulations, we systematically varied key model properties, including number of indicators and factors, magnitude of factor loadings and path coefficients, and amount of missing data. We investigated how changes in these parameters affected sample size requirements with respect to statistical power, bias in the parameter estimates, and overall solution propriety. Results revealed a range of sample size requirements (i.e., from 30 to 460 cases), meaningful patterns of association between parameters and sample size, and highlight the limitations of commonly cited rules-of-thumb. The broad “lessons learned” for determining SEM sample size requirements are discussed. PMID:25705052

  11. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T. N.; Gregory, Karen J.; Tosh, Dilip K.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Biased agonism at G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias “fingerprints” for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N6 or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  12. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T N; Gregory, Karen J; Tosh, Dilip K; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A; May, Lauren T

    2016-07-01

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias "fingerprints" for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N(6) or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  13. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G.

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  14. Finding Common Ground: Creating Local Governance Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutchler, Sue E.; And Others

    As federal, state, and local policy makers attend to the economic, educational, social, and health-related needs of children, they are beginning to share a vision of a "seamless web" of high-quality, comprehensive, continuous services for children and their families. It remains a challenging goal because of the complexity of children's needs and…

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of (Fe/Mn) exchange-biased multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bahoui, A.; Genevois, C.; Juraszek, J.; Bordel, C.; Ledue, D.

    2013-05-01

    Exchange-biasing of ferromagnetic (F) Fe layers by adjacent antiferromagnetic (AF) Mn layers has been investigated in (Fe/Mn)10 multilayered films. This study has been focused on the relationship between the evolution of the exchange-bias field and the evolution of the film microstructure as a function of the deposition temperature. The increase of the deposition temperature results in the formation of an Fe-Mn alloy at the interfaces and columnar features whose size increases with the deposition temperature. In parallel, the exchange-bias field decreases significantly, due to interface roughness.

  16. Implications of room temperature oxidation on crystal structure and exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Formo, Eric V.; Freeman, Katherine; Schieber, Natalie P.; Gai, Zheng; Rondinone, Adam J.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we describe how the exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles depends on the size focusing and temperature treatment of precursor Co nanoparticles before oxidation at ambient conditions. By appealing to magnetization, microscopy, neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements we found that as-synthesized Co nanoparticles readily oxidize in air only after 20 days. The highest exchange bias field of 814 Oe is observed at T = 2K. When the same nanoparticles are centrifuged and annealed at 70 °C in vacuum prior to oxidation, the exchange bias field is increased to 2570 Oe. Annealing of Co nanoparticles in vacuum improvesmore » their crystallinity and prevents complete oxidation, so that Co-core/CoO-shell structure is preserved even after 120 days. The crystal structure of CoO shell in both samples is different from its bulk counterpart. Implications of such distorted CoO shells on exchange bias are discussed. Coating of Co nanoparticles with amorphous silica shell makes them resistant to oxidation, but ultimately modifies the crystal structure of both Co core and SiO2 shell.« less

  17. Implications of room temperature oxidation on crystal structure and exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Formo, Eric V.; Freeman, Katherine; Schieber, Natalie P.; Gai, Zheng; Rondinone, Adam J.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we describe how the exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles depends on the size focusing and temperature treatment of precursor Co nanoparticles before oxidation at ambient conditions. By appealing to magnetization, microscopy, neutron and synchrotron x-ray measurements we found that as-synthesized Co nanoparticles readily oxidize in air only after 20 days. The highest exchange bias field of 814 Oe is observed at T = 2K. When the same nanoparticles are centrifuged and annealed at 70 °C in vacuum prior to oxidation, the exchange bias field is increased to 2570 Oe. Annealing of Co nanoparticles in vacuum improves their crystallinity and prevents complete oxidation, so that Co-core/CoO-shell structure is preserved even after 120 days. The crystal structure of CoO shell in both samples is different from its bulk counterpart. Implications of such distorted CoO shells on exchange bias are discussed. Coating of Co nanoparticles with amorphous silica shell makes them resistant to oxidation, but ultimately modifies the crystal structure of both Co core and SiO2 shell.

  18. Comparative proteomics reveals a significant bias toward alternative protein isoforms with conserved structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; del Pozo, Angela; Frankish, Adam; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Harrow, Jennifer; Ashman, Keith; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2012-09-01

    Advances in high-throughput mass spectrometry are making proteomics an increasingly important tool in genome annotation projects. Peptides detected in mass spectrometry experiments can be used to validate gene models and verify the translation of putative coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we have identified peptides that cover 35% of the genes annotated by the GENCODE consortium for the human genome as part of a comprehensive analysis of experimental spectra from two large publicly available mass spectrometry databases. We detected the translation to protein of "novel" and "putative" protein-coding transcripts as well as transcripts annotated as pseudogenes and nonsense-mediated decay targets. We provide a detailed overview of the population of alternatively spliced protein isoforms that are detectable by peptide identification methods. We found that 150 genes expressed multiple alternative protein isoforms. This constitutes the largest set of reliably confirmed alternatively spliced proteins yet discovered. Three groups of genes were highly overrepresented. We detected alternative isoforms for 10 of the 25 possible heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, proteins with a key role in the splicing process. Alternative isoforms generated from interchangeable homologous exons and from short indels were also significantly enriched, both in human experiments and in parallel analyses of mouse and Drosophila proteomics experiments. Our results show that a surprisingly high proportion (almost 25%) of the detected alternative isoforms are only subtly different from their constitutive counterparts. Many of the alternative splicing events that give rise to these alternative isoforms are conserved in mouse. It was striking that very few of these conserved splicing events broke Pfam functional domains or would damage globular protein structures. This evidence of a strong bias toward subtle differences in CDS and likely conserved cellular function and structure is remarkable and

  19. Genetic Population Structure of the Ground Beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus, Inhabiting a Fragmented and Polluted Landscape: Evidence for Sex-Biased Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Lagisz, Malgorzata; Wolff, Kirsten; Sanderson, Roy A; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Ground beetles are an integral and functionally important part of many terrestrial ecosystems. Habitat change often influences population genetic structure of carabid beetles. In this study, genetic variation, population differentiation, and sex-specific dispersal patterns were studied in the forest ground beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus F. (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in a fragmented and metal-polluted landscape to assess the consequences of human-induced changes on the population genetic structure. Genotypic variation at five microsatellite loci was screened in 309 beetles from 21 sample locations around zinc-and-lead smelter in southern Poland. Low levels of genetic differentiation among sampling sites were observed, suggesting high gene flow among populations. A negative correlation was found between levels of genetic differentiation and habitat patch size. No significant effects of metal pollution, in terms of genetic bottlenecks and genetic differentiation, were observed. Analyses revealed weak genetic clustering that is loosely tied to the geographic position of the sampled populations. Several tests of sex-biased dispersal were conducted. Most of them indicated male-biased dispersal. Differing levels of dispersal between females and males resulted in sex-specific spatial genetic patterns. Genetic differentiation was significantly correlated with geographical distance for males, but not for females, who were more diverged locally. Also, the effect of habitat patch size was sex-dependent, supporting the finding of different dispersal patterns between the sexes. This study demonstrated the application of microsatellite markers to answer questions regarding complex interactions between population structure and physical properties of the landscape. In the study system, migration appears to be sufficient to override potential effects of environmental pollution as well as habitat fragmentation. This investigation of population genetic structure indicated, for

  20. Local structure of equality constrained NLP problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mari, J.

    1994-12-31

    We show that locally around a feasible point, the behavior of an equality constrained nonlinear program is described by the gradient and the Hessian of the Lagrangian on the tangent subspace. In particular this holds true for reduced gradient approaches. Applying the same ideas to the control of nonlinear ODE:s, one can device first and second order methods that can be applied also to stiff problems. We finally describe an application of these ideas to the optimization of the production of human growth factor by fed-batch fermentation.

  1. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  2. Correlation of exchange bias with magneto-structural effects across the compensation temperature of Co(Cr1-xFex)2O4 (x = 0.05 and 0.075)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ram; Padam, R.; Rayaprol, S.; Siruguri, Vasudeva; Pal, D.

    2016-03-01

    A small amount of Fe (5% and 7.5%) substitution in the Cr-site of the multiferroic compound CoCr2O4 leads to a magnetization reversal. In these compounds, we report a sign change in the exchange bias across the compensation temperature, accompanied by a non-monotonic change in the local moments across the compensation temperature. Such non-monotonic change in the magnetic moments is triggered by a similar change in the lattice structure. We relate here the sign change of exchange bias with that of the crystalline energy of the lattice and the Zeeman energy term arising from the anti-site disorder.

  3. Non Linear Optimization Applied to Angle-Of Satellite Based Geo-Localization for Biased and Time-Drifting Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Daniel; Roos, Jason; Robinson, Jace; Carpenter, William; Martin, Richard; Taylor, Clark; Sugrue, Joseph; Terzuoli, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sensors are used in a variety of geolocation systems. Many use Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements to estimate the most likely location of a signal. When an object does not emit an RF signal, Angle of Arrival (AOA) measurements using optical or infrared frequencies become more feasible than TDOA or RSS measurements. AOA measurements can be created from any sensor platform with any sort of optical sensor, location and attitude knowledge to track passive objects. Previous work has created a non-linear optimization (NLO) method for calculating the most likely estimate from AOA measurements. Two new modifications to the NLO algorithm are created and shown to correct AOA measurement errors by estimating the inherent bias and time-drift in the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) of the AOA sensing platform. One method corrects the sensor bias in post processing while treating the NLO method as a module. The other method directly corrects the sensor bias within the NLO algorithm by incorporating the bias parameters as a state vector in the estimation process. These two methods are analyzed using various Monte-Carlo simulations to check the general performance of the two modifications in comparison to the original NLO algorithm.

  4. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  5. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a ``global-local`` finite element analysis. A ``global`` analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A ``local`` layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the ``global`` analysis are used as loads to the ``local`` analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  6. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a global-local'' finite element analysis. A global'' analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A local'' layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the global'' analysis are used as loads to the local'' analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  7. Dynamic quasi-energy-band modulation and exciton effects in biased superlattices driven by a two-color far-infrared field: Disappearance of dynamic localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashima, Kenta; Hino, Ken-Ichi; Toshima, Nobuyuki

    2003-12-01

    A theoretical study of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductor superlattices in ac-dc fields, termed the dynamic Wannier-Stark ladder (DWSL), is done. The biased superlattices are driven by two far-infrared fields with different frequencies and relative phase of δ. Here, the frequency of the first laser is equal to the Bloch frequency ωB of the system under study, while that of the second laser is equal to 2ωB. Quasienergies of the DWSL are calculated based on the Floquet theorem, and the associated linear photoabsorption spectra are evaluated. For δ=0, a gourd-shaped quasi-energy structure characteristic of both dynamic localization (DL) and delocalization (DDL), similar to the usual DWSL driven by a single laser, appears. By changing the ratio of the two laser strengths, however, the width of the quasi-energy band and the locations of both DL and DDL vary noticeably. As for δ≠0, on the other hand, band collapse and the associated DL do not necessarily follow. In fact, DL vanishes and the quasi-energy degeneracy is lifted in a certain range of δ. Just DDL remains over the entire range of the laser strength, eventually resulting in a plateaulike band structure in the linear absorption spectra. The basic physics underlying this phenomenon, which can be readily interpreted in terms of a closed analytical expression, is that all quasi-energies for given crystal momenta are out of phase with each other as a function of laser strength without converging to a single point of energy. This is a feature of this DWSL which sharply distinguishes it from a conventional DWSL generated using a single laser to drive it. Furthermore, an exciton effect is incorporated with the above noninteracting problem, so that exciton dressed states are formed. It is found that this effect gives rise to more involved quasi-energy structures and a more pronounced release of the energy degeneracy of DL, leading again to the formation of a band structure in the absorption

  8. Influence of bias voltage on structural and optical properties of TiN{sub x} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Omveer; Dahiya, Raj P.; Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Parmod

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Ti thin films were deposited on Si substrate using DC sputtering technique. Indigenous hot cathode arc discharge plasma system was used for nitriding over these samples, where the plasma parameters and work piece can be controlled independently. A mixture of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} gases (in the ratio of 80:20) was supplied into the plasma chamber. The effect of bias voltage on the crystal structure, morphology and optical properties was investigated by employing various physical techniques such as X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and UV-Vis spectrometry. It was found that bias voltage affects largely the crystal structure and band gap which in turn is responsible for the modifications in optical properties of the deposited films.

  9. Effect of substrate bias on the structural and electrical properties of sputtered Mo thin films on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaxiong

    2016-01-01

    The metal molybdenum (Mo) thin films deposited on flexible substrates can act as the contact electrode of flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se2 or Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells. In this work, in order to enhance the structural and electrical characteristics of flexible Mo thin films, a negative substrate bias was applied during the direct current sputtering of Mo thin films. The flexible substrates used for growing the Mo films were stainless steel foils and polyimides. The characteristics of Mo thin films were studied by x-ray diffraction and sheet resistance measurements. The measured results reveal that an optimal value of negative substrate bias can be found for improving the electrical and structural characteristics of Mo thin films on flexible substrates. The minimum sheet resistances of Mo thin films are 2.50 Ω/sq and 2.73 Ω/sq for the stainless steel foil and polyimide substrates, respectively. PMID:27339280

  10. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  11. Groundtruthing Next-Gen Sequencing for Microbial Ecology–Biases and Errors in Community Structure Estimates from PCR Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Polson, Shawn W.; Wommack, K. Eric; Williamson, Shannon J.; McDonald, Ian R.; Cary, S. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of microbial communities by high-throughput pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA gene PCR amplicons has transformed microbial ecology research and led to the observation that many communities contain a diverse assortment of rare taxa–a phenomenon termed the Rare Biosphere. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of pyrosequencing read quality on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness for contrived communities, yet there is limited information on the fidelity of community structure estimates obtained through this approach. Given that PCR biases are widely recognized, and further unknown biases may arise from the sequencing process itself, a priori assumptions about the neutrality of the data generation process are at best unvalidated. Furthermore, post-sequencing quality control algorithms have not been explicitly evaluated for the accuracy of recovered representative sequences and its impact on downstream analyses, reducing useful discussion on pyrosequencing reads to their diversity and abundances. Here we report on community structures and sequences recovered for in vitro-simulated communities consisting of twenty 16S rRNA gene clones tiered at known proportions. PCR amplicon libraries of the V3–V4 and V6 hypervariable regions from the in vitro-simulated communities were sequenced using the Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium platform. Commonly used quality control protocols resulted in the formation of OTUs with >1% abundance composed entirely of erroneous sequences, while over-aggressive clustering approaches obfuscated real, expected OTUs. The pyrosequencing process itself did not appear to impose significant biases on overall community structure estimates, although the detection limit for rare taxa may be affected by PCR amplicon size and quality control approach employed. Meanwhile, PCR biases associated with the initial amplicon generation may impose greater distortions in the observed community structure. PMID:22970184

  12. Local structure analyzers as determinants of preattentive pattern discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kröse, B J

    1987-01-01

    Contemporary literature suggests that preattentive texture or pattern discrimination is induced by differences between local structure features or "textons." This paper presents a model for the description of such local structure features based on the computation of local autocorrelations within the image. By means of this structure model a measure of structure dissimilarity is introduced. Experiments have been carried out to test a hypothesized relation between the detectability of a target pattern in a field of background patterns and the value of the structure dissimilarity measure. The experimental results show that it seems justified to relate, in a quantitative way, the detectability of the target pattern to the value of the structure dissimilarity measure. PMID:3828403

  13. Glass formation and local topological instability of atomic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.

    1997-12-31

    A direct connection between the local topology of the atomic structure of liquids and glasses and thermodynamic quantities through the atomic level stresses is suggested for metallic alloys. In particular the role of local topological instability in the phase transformation involving liquid and glass will be discussed. It is pointed out that a single local geometrical criterion can explain various phase transformations, such as melting, glass transition, and glass formation by solid state reaction and liquid quenching.

  14. Local Influence Analysis of Nonlinear Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    By regarding the latent random vectors as hypothetical missing data and based on the conditional expectation of the complete-data log-likelihood function in the EM algorithm, we investigate assessment of local influence of various perturbation schemes in a nonlinear structural equation model. The basic building blocks of local influence analysis…

  15. Convergence among Data Sources, Response Bias, and Reliability and Validity of a Structured Job Analysis Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jack E.; Hakel, Milton D.

    1979-01-01

    Examined are questions pertinent to the use of the Position Analysis Questionnaire: Who can use the PAQ reliably and validly? Must one rely on trained job analysts? Can people having no direct contact with the job use the PAQ reliably and validly? Do response biases influence PAQ responses? (Author/KC)

  16. Using Category Structures to Test Iterated Learning as a Method for Identifying Inductive Biases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Christian, Brian R.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the problems studied in cognitive science are inductive problems, requiring people to evaluate hypotheses in the light of data. The key to solving these problems successfully is having the right inductive biases--assumptions about the world that make it possible to choose between hypotheses that are equally consistent with the observed…

  17. Localized vibrations: moles in structure-land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Maas, John H.

    1992-03-01

    Functional groups reveal specific information about their direct surroundings; in fact, they form the moles, the undercover agents, in molecules. However, as with agents, the information is produced in coded form (spectral data) so one has to know the code in detail before the message is completely understood. The substantially improved accuracy (wavenumber, intensity) and sensitivity brought about by FT-instruments, in combination with computer software, offer extended spectral information. Functional groups can now be examined in great detail. Obviously the amount of deducible structural items is group dependent, implying that one has to pursue the probing qualities of a functionality prior to use. The OH-group, and more in particular the OH-stretching vibration, proves to be an extremely good mole. Its potentials are demonstrated on conformational studies of various saturated alcohols, the presence of OH(DOT)(DOT)(DOT)(pi) bridges, the strength and type of OH(DOT)(DOT)(DOT)O bridges, all in an apolar solvent, and on the disclosure of different hydrogen bonds in some solid samples.

  18. Proteins comparison through probabilistic optimal structure local alignment

    PubMed Central

    Micale, Giovanni; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Ferro, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple local structure comparison helps to identify common structural motifs or conserved binding sites in 3D structures in distantly related proteins. Since there is no best way to compare structures and evaluate the alignment, a wide variety of techniques and different similarity scoring schemes have been proposed. Existing algorithms usually compute the best superposition of two structures or attempt to solve it as an optimization problem in a simpler setting (e.g., considering contact maps or distance matrices). Here, we present PROPOSAL (PROteins comparison through Probabilistic Optimal Structure local ALignment), a stochastic algorithm based on iterative sampling for multiple local alignment of protein structures. Our method can efficiently find conserved motifs across a set of protein structures. Only the distances between all pairs of residues in the structures are computed. To show the accuracy and the effectiveness of PROPOSAL we tested it on a few families of protein structures. We also compared PROPOSAL with two state-of-the-art tools for pairwise local alignment on a dataset of manually annotated motifs. PROPOSAL is available as a Java 2D standalone application or a command line program at http://ferrolab.dmi.unict.it/proposal/proposal.html. PMID:25228906

  19. Protein tertiary structure recognition using optimized Hamiltonians with local interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R A; Luthey-Schulten, Z A; Wolynes, P G

    1992-01-01

    Protein folding codes embodying local interactions including surface and secondary structure propensities and residue-residue contacts are optimized for a set of training proteins by using spin-glass theory. A screening method based on these codes correctly matches the structure of a set of test proteins with proteins of similar topology with 100% accuracy, even with limited sequence similarity between the test proteins and the structural homologs and the absence of any structurally similar proteins in the training set. PMID:1409599

  20. Charge movement in a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor structure with carbon doped buffer under applied substrate bias

    SciTech Connect

    Pooth, Alexander; Uren, Michael J.; Cäsar, Markus; Kuball, Martin; Martin, Trevor

    2015-12-07

    Charge trapping and transport in the carbon doped GaN buffer of a GaN-based hetero-structure field effect transistor (HFET) has been investigated under both positive and negative substrate bias. Clear evidence of redistribution of charges in the carbon doped region by thermally generated holes is seen, with electron injection and capture observed during positive bias. Excellent agreement is found with simulations. It is shown that these effects are intrinsic to the carbon doped GaN and need to be controlled to provide reliable and efficient GaN-based power HFETs.

  1. Structure and interfacial analysis of nanoscale TiNi thin film prepared by biased target ion beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Huilong; Hamilton, Reginald F. Horn, Mark W.

    2015-07-15

    Ultrathin, 65 nm thick, TiNi alloy films were fabricated by cosputtering Ti and Ni targets using the recently developed biased target ion beam deposition technique. Preheating the substrate by exposure to a low energy ion source resulted in as-deposited films with a pure B2 atomic crystal structure containing no secondary crystal structures or precipitates. Continuous films were produced with a smooth surface and minimal substrate/film interfacial diffusion. The diffusion layer was a small ratio of film thickness, which is a prerequisite for the B2 phase to undergo the martensitic transformation in ultrathin films.

  2. A Novel Integrated Structure with a Radial Displacement Sensor and a Permanent Magnet Biased Radial Magnetic Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinji; Zhang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel integrated structure is proposed in order to reduce the axial length of the high speed of a magnetically suspended motor (HSMSM) to ensure the maximum speed, which combines radial displacement sensor probes and the permanent magnet biased radial magnetic bearing in HSMSM. The sensor probes are integrated in the magnetic bearing, and the sensor preamplifiers are placed in the control system of the HSMSM, separate from the sensor probes. The proposed integrated structure can save space in HSMSMs, improve the working frequency, reduce the influence of temperature on the sensor circuit, and improve the stability of HSMSMs. PMID:24469351

  3. Suppression of photo-bias induced instability for amorphous indium tungsten oxide thin film transistors with bi-layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Po-Tsun; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Chih-Jui

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the instability induced by bias temperature illumination stress (NBTIS) for an amorphous indium-tungsten-oxide thin film transistor (a-IWO TFT) with SiO2 backchannel passivation layer (BPL). It is found that this electrical degradation phenomenon can be attributed to the generation of defect states during the BPL process, which deteriorates the photo-bias stability of a-IWO TFTs. A method proposed by adding an oxygen-rich a-IWO thin film upon the a-IWO active channel layer could effectively suppress the plasma damage to channel layer during BPL deposition process. The bi-layer a-IWO TFT structure with an oxygen-rich back channel exhibits superior electrical reliability of device under NBTIS.

  4. Communication: Estimating the initial biasing potential for λ-local-elevation umbrella-sampling (λ-LEUS) simulations via slow growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, Noah S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2014-11-28

    In a recent article [Bieler et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3006–3022 (2014)], we introduced a combination of the λ-dynamics (λD) approach for calculating alchemical free-energy differences and of the local-elevation umbrella-sampling (LEUS) memory-based biasing method to enhance the sampling along the alchemical coordinate. The combined scheme, referred to as λ-LEUS, was applied to the perturbation of hydroquinone to benzene in water as a test system, and found to represent an improvement over thermodynamic integration (TI) in terms of sampling efficiency at equivalent accuracy. However, the preoptimization of the biasing potential required in the λ-LEUS method requires “filling up” all the basins in the potential of mean force. This introduces a non-productive pre-sampling time that is system-dependent, and generally exceeds the corresponding equilibration time in a TI calculation. In this letter, a remedy is proposed to this problem, termed the slow growth memory guessing (SGMG) approach. Instead of initializing the biasing potential to zero at the start of the preoptimization, an approximate potential of mean force is estimated from a short slow growth calculation, and its negative used to construct the initial memory. Considering the same test system as in the preceding article, it is shown that of the application of SGMG in λ-LEUS permits to reduce the preoptimization time by about a factor of four.

  5. Electrical Pulse Modification and Reversal of the Exchange-Bias in Magnetic Tunnel Junction Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Tseng, Hsin-Wei; Ralph, Dan; Buhrman, Robert

    2010-03-01

    The use of antiferromagnetic layers to exchange-bias (EB) the reference layer is common in spin-torque (ST) experiments. Previous work has shown that the EB in both MTJs and spin valves can be degraded or reversed by electrical pulses, with the effect being attributed to heating or possibly to ST effects in the spin valve case. We have studied EB modification due to individual electrical pulses in the presence of a small external field (<50Oe) in FeCoB/MgO/FeCoB/IrMn MTJs as a function of MgO thickness. For MgO thickness = 1.7 nm, RA = 5 x 10^3φμm^2, pulses with Jc = 4 x 10^4A/cm^2 and V = 1.8 V, can repeatedly and reliably reverse the EB. For 1.3 nm barriers, RA =150φμm^2, much higher power pulses, Jc = 6 x 10^5A/cm^2 and V = 0.9 V, are required for reversal. Such results indicate that a combination of heating and ST, with the latter possibly involving the field-like spin torque component at high bias, is responsible for EB reversal in our MTJs. We will discuss the details of the EB reversal behavior and report the phase diagram for reversal as function of electrical and field bias.

  6. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  7. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-06-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis.

  8. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-11-07

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  9. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process. PMID:25377487

  10. Global/local methods for probabilistic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic global/local method is proposed to reduce the computational requirements of probabilistic structural analysis. A coarser global model is used for most of the computations with a local more refined model used only at key probabilistic conditions. The global model is used to establish the cumulative distribution function (cdf) and the Most Probable Point (MPP). The local model then uses the predicted MPP to adjust the cdf value. The global/local method is used within the advanced mean value probabilistic algorithm. The local model can be more refined with respect to the g1obal model in terms of finer mesh, smaller time step, tighter tolerances, etc. and can be used with linear or nonlinear models. The basis for this approach is described in terms of the correlation between the global and local models which can be estimated from the global and local MPPs. A numerical example is presented using the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis program with the finite element method used for the structural modeling. The results clearly indicate a significant computer savings with minimal loss in accuracy.

  11. Structure and local structure of perovskite based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossell Abrodos, Marta Dacil

    Perovskites, with general formula ABX3, where A and B are cations and X is an anion, form a very important class of inorganic crystals whose physical properties are extensively used in many technological applications. The basic, so-called aristotype structure, consists of an infinite array of corner-linked anion octahedra, with the A cations in the spaces between the octahedra and a B cation at the center of each octahedron. Interesting physical properties are often related to the flexibility of the perovskite structure to deform or to form non-stoichiometric compositions. In this thesis, four perovskite-related systems are studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is of prime interest to analyze the influence of the structure and microstructure on the physical properties of these systems. (1) The anion-deficient Sr4Fe6O12+delta (delta < 1) derivatives. These materials are mixed conducting oxides with high oxygen and electronic conductivity. A complete characterization of the structure of these anion-deficient compounds is deduced from electron diffraction and high-resolution TEM. The presence of anion vacancies in the Sr4Fe6O12+delta (delta < 1) structure is suggested to have an influence on the transport properties. (2) The CaRMnSnO6 (R = La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Dy) double perovskites. A random distribution of the Ca and R cations over the A positions and Mn and Sn cations over the B positions is found. Due to a random distribution of the Mn 3+ and Sn4+ cations, a spin glass behavior was found for CaLaMnSnO6. (3) The K3AlF6 elpasolite-type (or ordered double perovskite) structure. This compound is of high technological importance since it is a basic component of the melts for low temperature electrolysis in aluminum smelting. A sequence of phase transitions at different temperatures in K3AlF6 along with the data on unit cell dimensions and space symmetry of three major polymorphs is reported. (4) Ca 2Fe2O5 brownmillerite-type thin films deposited on three different

  12. Effects of substrate bias on structure and mechanical properties of (AlCrNbSiTiV)N coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ping-Kang; Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2009-06-01

    AlCrNbSiTiV nitride films were deposited by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and the effects of substrate bias on the chemical composition, structure and mechanical properties of the deposited films were investigated. AlCrNbSiTiV nitride films exhibit a single FCC NaCl-type structure and have the stoichiometric nitride ratio of (Al, Cr, Nb, Si, Ti, V)50N50. The deposition rate decreases with increasing substrate bias due to resputtering effects and densification of films, which also leads to less obvious columnar structure, reduced grain size, smaller surface roughness and transition of preferred orientation from the (1 1 1) plane to the (2 0 0) plane. The nitride film deposited at -100 V exhibits the maximum compressive stress around 4.5 GPa and attains a peak hardness and an elastic modulus of 42 GPa and 350 GPa, respectively, which fall in the superhard grade. Moreover, the film keeps its hardness at the superhard grade even after its residual compressive stress was partially released by annealing at 1073 K for 5 h. The structural evolution mechanism and strengthening mechanism are both discussed.

  13. Analyses of genetic structure of Tibeto-Burman populations reveals sex-biased admixture in southern Tibeto-Burmans.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bo; Xie, Xuanhua; Gao, Song; Li, Hui; Shi, Hong; Song, Xiufeng; Qian, Tingzhi; Xiao, Chunjie; Jin, Jianzhong; Su, Bing; Lu, Daru; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Jin, Li

    2004-05-01

    An unequal contribution of male and female lineages from parental populations to admixed ones is not uncommon in the American continents, as a consequence of directional gene flow from European men into African and Hispanic Americans in the past several centuries. However, little is known about sex-biased admixture in East Asia, where substantial migrations are recorded. Tibeto-Burman (TB) populations were historically derived from ancient tribes of northwestern China and subsequently moved to the south, where they admixed with the southern natives during the past 2600 years. They are currently extensively distributed in China and Southeast Asia. In this study, we analyze the variations of 965 Y chromosomes and 754 mtDNAs in >20 TB populations from China. By examining the haplotype group distributions of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers and their principal components, we show that the genetic structure of the extant southern Tibeto-Burman (STB) populations were primarily formed by two parental groups: northern immigrants and native southerners. Furthermore, the admixture has a bias between male and female lineages, with a stronger influence of northern immigrants on the male lineages (approximately 62%) and with the southern natives contributing more extensively to the female lineages (approximately 56%) in the extant STBs. This is the first genetic evidence revealing sex-biased admixture in STB populations, which has genetic, historical, and anthropological implications. PMID:15042512

  14. Local and global solution for a nonlocal Fokker-Planck equation related to the adaptive biasing force process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrachid, Houssam; Lelièvre, Tony; Talhouk, Raafat

    2016-05-01

    We prove global existence, uniqueness and regularity of the mild, Lp and classical solution of a non-linear Fokker-Planck equation arising in an adaptive importance sampling method for molecular dynamics calculations. The non-linear term is related to a conditional expectation, and is thus non-local. The proof uses tools from the theory of semigroups of linear operators for the local existence result, and an a priori estimate based on a supersolution for the global existence result.

  15. The Local Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, M. M.; Li, Wenjing; Driver, M. S.; Oyler, N. A.; Caruso, A. N.

    2011-03-01

    Thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B5 C:Hx) and technical boron carbide (B4 C:Cy) are important materials in next-generation solid-state neutron detectors and refractory electronics. Optimizing the electrical carrier transport and electronic structure of these films for the stated applications has been severely hindered by: (1) their lack of long-range periodicity; (2) the ability of boron-rich solids to form complex polyhedra; and, (3) the possibility that carbon atoms incorporate into the polyhedral structures in an intraicosahedral fashion or that they bridge polyhedral structures in an intericosahedral fashion. The use of traditional spectroscopies that are sensitive to local coordination environment have been inadequate in the determination of the local physical structure because of either poor resolution or very low interaction cross sections. However, magic spinning angle (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR), does have the signal-to-noise and rigor to extract the local physical coordination structure of these materials, despite the challenges associated with deltahedra-based structures. This poster will describe the progress and challenges in structure determination through a comparison of unknown samples to known calibration standards using MAS techniques, in the context of furthering the general understanding of the electronic structure of a-B5 C:Hx and B4 C:Cy thin films.

  16. Correlation of Local Structure and Electronic Properties of Glass Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Adelstein, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Wide band gap glasses such as silica and its derivatives are typically considered insulators. However, electronic transport in glasses can be important for certain applications, such as when used as the host material for a scintillator radiation detector. Here we explore the relationship between local structure in glass materials and the corresponding electronic properties of carrier transport and charge trapping. We present a novel analysis that decomposes the distribution of localized band tail states in terms of specific local structural features in the glass. Comparison of the structure-related transport properties of different glass compositions is given, using silica and sodium silicate as prototypes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Confidence-Guided Local Structure Prediction with HHfrag

    PubMed Central

    Kalev, Ivan; Habeck, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to assess the reliability of local structure prediction from sequence. We introduce a greedy algorithm for filtering and enrichment of dynamic fragment libraries, compiled with remote-homology detection methods such as HHfrag. After filtering false hits at each target position, we reduce the fragment library to a minimal set of representative fragments, which are guaranteed to have correct local structure in regions of detectable conservation. We demonstrate that the location of conserved motifs in a protein sequence can be predicted by examining the recurrence and structural homogeneity of detected fragments. The resulting confidence score correlates with the local RMSD of the representative fragments and allows us to predict torsion angles from sequence with better accuracy compared to existing machine learning methods. PMID:24146881

  18. Influences of consolidation processes on local paper structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjoo

    The accurate measurement of the structural parameters such as thickness, grammage, apparent density and surface topography, and the proper evaluation of the variation of each parameter, are very important not only for predicting the end use properties of the paper, but also for diagnosing the pa permaking processes. The difficulty of the measurement of thickness at fine scale ˜1 mm has been an impediment to the understanding of local paper structure. To address this problem, a twin laser profilometer instrument (TLP) for non-contacting measurement of local thickness and surface topography was developed, characterized and calibrated in this work. The fundamental relationships between structural parameters were reexamined with various handsheet samples. The effects of wet pressing on the local paper structure were evaluated using laboratory static press and commercial press felts. The different press pressure had no significant influence on the local density variation of the handsheet samples. The influences of felts on the surface topography were also successfully observed. The different densification effects of soft nip and hard nip calendering processes were evaluated by direct comparison of structural parameters before and after processing. The much higher selective reduction in local thickness (larger reduction for the thicker area) by the hard nip calendering process resulted in different relationships between structural parameters. The various periodic variations in the paper structure were also detected, analyzed and identified. The effects of different forming elements such as the conventional foil system and the velocity induced drainage (VID) system on the paper structure and end use properties were evaluated with pilot machine trials and commercial product produced using different forming elements. Generally, the VID samples showed better formation, less two sidedness in the fine distribution through thickness direction, and less densification during

  19. Our Milky Way structure in the context of local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way is the closest galaxy to us, and has been studied extensively due to its proximity. Understanding its structure and dynamics will help us understand spiral galaxies in general. I will review the latest research progress in the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way in the context of local galaxies. I will cover most structural components (the bulge/bar, disk, and spiral structures) and discuss the implications of some new results on the formation history of our home galaxy.

  20. Local Function Conservation in Sequence and Structure Space

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S.; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de). PMID:18604264

  1. A novel method to compare protein structures using local descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein structure comparison is one of the most widely performed tasks in bioinformatics. However, currently used methods have problems with the so-called "difficult similarities", including considerable shifts and distortions of structure, sequential swaps and circular permutations. There is a demand for efficient and automated systems capable of overcoming these difficulties, which may lead to the discovery of previously unknown structural relationships. Results We present a novel method for protein structure comparison based on the formalism of local descriptors of protein structure - DEscriptor Defined Alignment (DEDAL). Local similarities identified by pairs of similar descriptors are extended into global structural alignments. We demonstrate the method's capability by aligning structures in difficult benchmark sets: curated alignments in the SISYPHUS database, as well as SISY and RIPC sets, including non-sequential and non-rigid-body alignments. On the most difficult RIPC set of sequence alignment pairs the method achieves an accuracy of 77% (the second best method tested achieves 60% accuracy). Conclusions DEDAL is fast enough to be used in whole proteome applications, and by lowering the threshold of detectable structure similarity it may shed additional light on molecular evolution processes. It is well suited to improving automatic classification of structure domains, helping analyze protein fold space, or to improving protein classification schemes. DEDAL is available online at http://bioexploratorium.pl/EP/DEDAL. PMID:21849047

  2. Impact of scale dependent bias and nonlinear structure growth on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect: Angular power spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert E.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Seljak, Uros

    2009-09-15

    We investigate the impact of nonlinear evolution of the gravitational potentials in the {lambda}CDM model on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum, and on the cross-power spectrum of the CMB and a set of biased tracers of the mass. We use an ensemble of N-body simulations to directly follow the potentials and compare the results to analytic PT methods. The predictions from the PT match the results to high precision for k<0.2h Mpc{sup -1}. We compute the nonlinear corrections to the angular power spectrum and find them to be <10% of linear theory for l<100. These corrections are swamped by the cosmic variance. On scales l>100 the departures are more significant; however, the CMB signal is more than a factor 10{sup 3} larger at this scale. Nonlinear ISW effects therefore play no role in shaping the CMB power spectrum for l<1500. We analyze the CMB-density tracer cross spectrum using simulations and renormalized bias PT, and find good agreement. The usual assumption is that nonlinear evolution enhances the growth of structure and counteracts the linear ISW on small scales, leading to a change in sign of the CMB large-scale structure cross spectrum at small scales. However, PT analysis suggests that this trend reverses at late times when the logarithmic growth rate f=dlnD/dlna<0.5 or {omega}{sub m}(z)<0.3. Numerical results confirm these expectations and we find no sign change in ISW large-scale structure cross power for low redshifts. Corrections due to nonlinearity and scale dependence of the bias are found to be <10% for l<100, and are therefore below the signal to noise of the current and future measurements. Finally, we estimate the cross-correlation coefficient between the CMB and halos and show that it can be made to match that for the dark matter and CMB to within 5% for thin redshift shells, thus mitigating the need to model bias evolution.

  3. Local Structure of Implicated Pd in Si Using PAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, D. A.; Dogra, R.; Byrne, A. P.; Ridgway, M. C.; Bartels, J.; Vianden, R.

    2004-11-01

    TDPAC has been employed to study the local structure of implanted palladium in silicon utilizing 87 75 keV γ γ cascade of probe nucleus 100Pd. The observed hyperfine parameters revealed the presence of Pd V defect pair only in highly doped n-type silicon. A dumbbell structure with substitutional palladium and silicon vacancy as nearest neigbor is suggested for this defect.

  4. Intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility. PMID:11752497

  5. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  6. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible. PMID:27563967

  7. Local Structure of CuIn3Se5

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Wei, S. H.; Leyarovska, N.; Johnson, J. W.; Zhang, S. B.; Stanbery, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of a detailed EXAFS study of the Cu-K, In-K, and Se-K edges CuIn3Se5 are reported. The Cu and In first nearest neighbor local structures were found to be almost identical to those in CuInSe2.

  8. The Changing Market Structure of Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Angela

    The growth in competition for revenues, along with the advent of cable, independent television and video cassette recorders (VCR), may signify a change in the market structure of local television news. To explain if and how this change may be occurring, an explanation of economic theory as well as evidence from "Broadcast and Cable Yearbook" and…

  9. Structures of Participation in the "University of Local Knowledge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Penny; Irish, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    "Structures of Participation" concerns a recent media arts project, the University of Local Knowledge (ULK). ULK is simultaneously a critique of established academic institutions and disciplines and a system for self-organized learning among the residents of Knowle West, an area of south Bristol (UK). Beginning in 2009, the Knowle West…

  10. Taking advantage of local structure descriptors to analyze interresidue contacts in protein structures and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Juliette; Regad, Leslie; Etchebest, Catherine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-11-15

    Interresidue protein contacts in proteins structures and at protein-protein interface are classically described by the amino acid types of interacting residues and the local structural context of the contact, if any, is described using secondary structures. In this study, we present an alternate analysis of interresidue contact using local structures defined by the structural alphabet introduced by Camproux et al. This structural alphabet allows to describe a 3D structure as a sequence of prototype fragments called structural letters, of 27 different types. Each residue can then be assigned to a particular local structure, even in loop regions. The analysis of interresidue contacts within protein structures defined using Voronoï tessellations reveals that pairwise contact specificity is greater in terms of structural letters than amino acids. Using a simple heuristic based on specificity score comparison, we find that 74% of the long-range contacts within protein structures are better described using structural letters than amino acid types. The investigation is extended to a set of protein-protein complexes, showing that the similar global rules apply as for intraprotein contacts, with 64% of the interprotein contacts best described by local structures. We then present an evaluation of pairing functions integrating structural letters to decoy scoring and show that some complexes could benefit from the use of structural letter-based pairing functions. PMID:18491388

  11. Off-easy-plane antiferromagnetic spin canting in coupled FePt/NiO bilayer structure with perpendicular exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tenghua; Itokawa, Nobuhide; Wang, Jian; Yu, Youxing; Harumoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2016-08-01

    We report on the investigation of perpendicular exchange bias in FePt (001 ) /NiO (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) orthogonal exchange couple with FePt partially L 10 ordered. From initial magnetization curve measurement and magnetic domain imaging, we find that, for the as-grown bilayer structure, the FePt layer experiences a small-angle magnetization rotation when it is magnetized near to saturation in film normal direction. After field cooling, the bilayer structure shows a significant enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, indicating the field mediated coupling between the spins across the FePt/NiO interface. According to Koon's theoretical calculation on the basis of lowest energy ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling configuration for compensated spins at antiferromagnetic side, we consider slightly slanted Ni spins at the interface off the (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) easy plane can stabilize the spin coupling between FePt and NiO and result in the observed exchange bias in this paper. This consideration was further confirmed by stripe domain width calculation.

  12. PredyFlexy: flexibility and local structure prediction from sequence

    PubMed Central

    de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Bornot, Aurélie; Craveur, Pierrick; Etchebest, Catherine; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Protein structures are necessary for understanding protein function at a molecular level. Dynamics and flexibility of protein structures are also key elements of protein function. So, we have proposed to look at protein flexibility using novel methods: (i) using a structural alphabet and (ii) combining classical X-ray B-factor data and molecular dynamics simulations. First, we established a library composed of structural prototypes (LSPs) to describe protein structure by a limited set of recurring local structures. We developed a prediction method that proposes structural candidates in terms of LSPs and predict protein flexibility along a given sequence. Second, we examine flexibility according to two different descriptors: X-ray B-factors considered as good indicators of flexibility and the root mean square fluctuations, based on molecular dynamics simulations. We then define three flexibility classes and propose a method based on the LSP prediction method for predicting flexibility along the sequence. This method does not resort to sophisticate learning of flexibility but predicts flexibility from average flexibility of predicted local structures. The method is implemented in PredyFlexy web server. Results are similar to those obtained with the most recent, cutting-edge methods based on direct learning of flexibility data conducted with sophisticated algorithms. PredyFlexy can be accessed at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/dsimb_tools/predyflexy/. PMID:22689641

  13. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ras, D. Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-15

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe{sub 2} layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w{sup 2} and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  14. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-01

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  15. Localization of acoustic modes in periodic porous silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves in multilayer structures based on porous silicon and the experimental measurement of acoustic transmission for the structures in the gigahertz range are reported and studied theoretically. The considered structures exhibit band gaps in the transmission spectrum and these are localized modes inside the band gap, coming from defect layers introduced in periodic systems. The frequency at which the acoustic resonances appear can be tuned by changing the porosity and/or thickness of the defect layer. PMID:25206317

  16. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Szakál, Alex Markó, Márton Cser, László

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  17. Exchange bias and magnetic properties induced by intrinsic structural distortion in CaMn3O6 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. Y.; Huang, K.; Wu, H. Y.; Feng, Y.; Wang, L.; Tang, Z.; Zhang, L.

    2014-01-01

    Single-crystalline CaMn3O6 nanoribbons have been synthesized by a molten-salt method. To explore the origin of the magnetism of nanosized antiferromagnetic (AFM) manganites, a comparative study has been conducted for CaMn3O6 (CMO-1) and post-growth vacuum annealed (CMO-2) nanoribbons. A lattice expansion resulting from oxygen release during vacuum annealing is observed. Correspondingly, AFM ordering in CMO-2 is further suppressed, and ferromagnetism and spin-glass (SG)-like behavior are significantly enhanced, which are presumed attributable to the intrinsic structural distortions induced by oxygen vacancies. In this case, side and surface effects are not decisive factors. In addition, this study provided observations of the exchange bias effect in manganite nanoribbons with an AFM-SG-like-ferromagnetic (FM) structure, as compared with the typical AFM-core-FM-shell.

  18. Early detection of local buckling in structural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Bashir; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke

    2005-05-01

    Most structural health monitoring analyses to date have focused on the determination of damage in the form of crack growth in metallic materials or delamination or other types of damage growth in composite materials. However, in many applications, local instability in the form of buckling can be the precursor to more extensive damage and unstable failure of the structure. If buckling could be detected in the very early stages, there is a possibility of taking preventive measures to stabilize and save the structure. Relatively few investigations have addressed this type of damage initiation in structures. Recently, during the structural health monitoring of a wind turbine blade, local buckling was identified as the cause of premature failure. A stress wave propagation technique was used in this test to detect the precursor to the buckling failure in the form of early changes in the local curvature of the blade. These conditions have also been replicated in the laboratory and results are reported in this paper. A composite column was subjected to axial compression to induce various levels of buckling deformation. Two different techniques were used to detect the precursors to buckling in this column. The first identifier is the change in the vibration shapes and natural frequencies of the column. The second is the change in the characteristics of diagnostic Lamb waves during the buckling deformation. Experiments indicate that very small changes in curvature during the initial stages of buckling are detectable using the structural health monitoring techniques. The experimental vibration characteristics of the column with slight initial curvatures compared qualitatively with finite element results. The finite element analysis is used to identify the frequencies that are most sensitive to buckling deformation, and to select suitable locations for the placement of sensors that can detect even small changes in the local curvature.

  19. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  20. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Emanuel A; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J

    2015-10-27

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  1. Support for a link between the local processing bias and social deficits in autism: an investigation of embedded figures test performance in non-clinical individuals.

    PubMed

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N; Maybery, Murray T; Bayliss, Donna M; Sng, Adelln A H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the degree to which specific subsets of autistic-like traits relate to performance on the Embedded Figures Test (Witkin et al. in A manual for the embedded figures test. Consulting Psychologists Press, Palo Alto, CA, 1971). In the first group-based investigation with this focus, students were selected for their extreme scores (either high or low) on each of the 'Social Skills' and 'Details/Patterns' factors of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al. in J Austim Dev Disord 31:5-17, 2001). The resulting 2 × 2 factorial design permitted examination of the degree to which the social and non-social autistic-like traits separately relate to EFT performance. Surprisingly, in two studies, superior EFT performance was found to relate only to greater social difficulty, suggesting that the local processing bias in autism may be linked specifically to the social deficits. PMID:22434280

  2. Structural complexity, movement bias, and metapopulation extinction risk in dendritic ecological networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell Grant, Evan H.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial complexity in metacommunities can be separated into 3 main components: size (i.e., number of habitat patches), spatial arrangement of habitat patches (network topology), and diversity of habitat patch types. Much attention has been paid to lattice-type networks, such as patch-based metapopulations, but interest in understanding ecological networks of alternative geometries is building. Dendritic ecological networks (DENs) include some increasingly threatened ecological systems, such as caves and streams. The restrictive architecture of dendritic ecological networks might have overriding implications for species persistence. I used a modeling approach to investigate how number and spatial arrangement of habitat patches influence metapopulation extinction risk in 2 DENs of different size and topology. Metapopulation persistence was higher in larger networks, but this relationship was mediated by network topology and the dispersal pathways used to navigate the network. Larger networks, especially those with greater topological complexity, generally had lower extinction risk than smaller and less-complex networks, but dispersal bias and magnitude affected the shape of this relationship. Applying these general results to real systems will require empirical data on the movement behavior of organisms and will improve our understanding of the implications of network complexity on population and community patterns and processes.

  3. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  4. Binding-activated localization microscopy of DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ingmar; Ries, Jonas; Klotzsch, Enrico; Ewers, Helge; Vogel, Viola

    2011-09-14

    Many nucleic acid stains show a strong fluorescence enhancement upon binding to double-stranded DNA. Here we exploit this property to perform superresolution microscopy based on the localization of individual binding events. The dynamic labeling scheme and the optimization of fluorophore brightness yielded a resolution of ∼14 nm (fwhm) and a spatial sampling of 1/nm. We illustrate our approach with two different DNA-binding dyes and apply it to visualize the organization of the bacterial chromosome in fixed Escherichia coli cells. In general, the principle of binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) can be extended to other dyes and targets such as protein structures. PMID:21838238

  5. Fluctuations and local ice structure in model supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, S. D.; Patey, G. N.

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale simulations (up to 32 000 molecules) are used to analyze local structures and fluctuations for the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P water models, under deeply supercooled conditions, near previously proposed liquid-liquid critical points. Bulk freezing does not occur in our simulations, but correlations between molecules with local ice-like structure (ice-like molecules) are strong and long ranged (˜4 nm), exceeding the shortest dimension of smaller simulation cells at the lowest temperatures considered. Correlations between ice-like molecules decay slowly at low temperature, on the order of a hundred nanoseconds. Local ice-like structure is strongly correlated with highly tetrahedral liquid structure at all times, both structures contribute to density fluctuations, and to the associated anomalous scattering. For the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P models, we show that the apparent spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separations, recently reported [T. Yagasaki, M. Matsumoto, and H. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014)] for small rectangular simulation cells below the proposed critical points, exhibit strong system size dependence and do not occur at all in the largest systems we consider. Furthermore, in the smaller rectangular systems where layers of different densities do occur, we find that the appearance of a region of low density is always accompanied simultaneously by an excess of local ice density, with no separation in time. Our results suggest that the density differences observed in direct simulations for the two models considered here are likely due to long-range correlations between ice-like molecules and do not provide strong evidence of liquid-liquid phase separation.

  6. Gender Bias in Compensation Structures: A Case Study of Its Historical Basis and Persistence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Marlene

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways in which historical wage structures still influence current salaries and underpay for female-dominated jobs. Examines the origins of the California State Civil Service's compensation structure, and finds that gender discrimination explicitly lowered wages for female-dominated jobs. Provides quantitative and qualitative evidence of…

  7. Population genetic structure of the African elephant in Uganda based on variation at mitochondrial and nuclear loci: evidence for male-biased gene flow.

    PubMed

    Nyakaana, S; Arctander, P

    1999-07-01

    A drastic decline has occurred in the size of the Uganda elephant population in the last 40 years, exacerbated by two main factors; an increase in the size of the human population and poaching for ivory. One of the attendant consequences of such a decline is a reduction in the amount of genetic diversity in the surviving populations due to increased effects of random genetic drift. Information about the amount of genetic variation within and between the remaining populations is vital for their future conservation and management. The genetic structure of the African elephant in Uganda was examined using nucleotide variation of mitochondrial control region sequences and four nuclear microsatellite loci in 72 individuals from three localities. Eleven mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were observed, nine of which were geographically localized. We found significant genetic differentiation between the three populations at the mitochondrial locus while three out of the four microsatellite loci differentiated KV and QE, one locus differentiated KV and MF and no loci differentiated MF and QE. Expected heterozygosity at the four loci varied between 0.51 and 0.84 while nucleotide diversity at the mitochondrial locus was 1.4%. Incongruent patterns of genetic variation within and between populations were revealed by the two genetic systems, and we have explained these in terms of the differences in the effective population sizes of the two genomes and male-biased gene flow between populations. PMID:10447852

  8. Monaural sound localization based on structure-induced acoustic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  9. Monaural Sound Localization Based on Structure-Induced Acoustic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  10. A local average distance descriptor for flexible protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein structures are flexible and often show conformational changes upon binding to other molecules to exert biological functions. As protein structures correlate with characteristic functions, structure comparison allows classification and prediction of proteins of undefined functions. However, most comparison methods treat proteins as rigid bodies and cannot retrieve similarities of proteins with large conformational changes effectively. Results In this paper, we propose a novel descriptor, local average distance (LAD), based on either the geodesic distances (GDs) or Euclidean distances (EDs) for pairwise flexible protein structure comparison. The proposed method was compared with 7 structural alignment methods and 7 shape descriptors on two datasets comprising hinge bending motions from the MolMovDB, and the results have shown that our method outperformed all other methods regarding retrieving similar structures in terms of precision-recall curve, retrieval success rate, R-precision, mean average precision and F1-measure. Conclusions Both ED- and GD-based LAD descriptors are effective to search deformed structures and overcome the problems of self-connection caused by a large bending motion. We have also demonstrated that the ED-based LAD is more robust than the GD-based descriptor. The proposed algorithm provides an alternative approach for blasting structure database, discovering previously unknown conformational relationships, and reorganizing protein structure classification. PMID:24694083

  11. Accounting for selection bias in species distribution models: An econometric approach on forested trees based on structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Jean-Sauveur; Guillemot, Joannès; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K.; Doyen, Luc; Leadley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are widely used to study and predict the outcome of global change on species. In human dominated ecosystems the presence of a given species is the result of both its ecological suitability and human footprint on nature such as land use choices. Land use choices may thus be responsible for a selection bias in the presence/absence data used in SDM calibration. We present a structural modelling approach (i.e. based on structural equation modelling) that accounts for this selection bias. The new structural species distribution model (SSDM) estimates simultaneously land use choices and species responses to bioclimatic variables. A land use equation based on an econometric model of landowner choices was joined to an equation of species response to bioclimatic variables. SSDM allows the residuals of both equations to be dependent, taking into account the possibility of shared omitted variables and measurement errors. We provide a general description of the statistical theory and a set of application on forested trees over France using databases of climate and forest inventory at different spatial resolution (from 2km to 8 km). We also compared the output of the SSDM with outputs of a classical SDM in term of bioclimatic response curves and potential distribution under current climate. According to the species and the spatial resolution of the calibration dataset, shapes of bioclimatic response curves the modelled species distribution maps differed markedly between the SSDM and classical SDMs. The magnitude and directions of these differences were dependent on the correlations between the errors from both equations and were highest for higher spatial resolutions. A first conclusion is that the use of classical SDMs can potentially lead to strong miss-estimation of the actual and future probability of presence modelled. Beyond this selection bias, the SSDM we propose represents a crucial step to account for economic constraints on tree

  12. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  13. Local structure co-occurrence pattern for image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Jia; Lu, Yinghua; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Image description and annotation is an active research topic in content-based image retrieval. How to utilize human visual perception is a key approach to intelligent image feature extraction and representation. This paper has proposed an image feature descriptor called the local structure co-occurrence pattern (LSCP). LSCP extracts the whole visual perception for an image by building a local binary structure, and it is represented by a color-shape co-occurrence matrix which explores the relationship of multivisual feature spaces according to visual attention mechanism. As a result, LSCP not only describes low-level visual features integrated with texture feature, color feature, and shape feature but also bridges high-level semantic comprehension. Extensive experimental results on an image retrieval task on the benchmark datasets, corel-10,000, MIT VisTex, and INRIA Holidays, have demonstrated the usefulness, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed LSCP.

  14. Dynamics of Localized Structures in Systems with Broken Parity Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, J.; Camelin, P.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2016-04-01

    A great variety of nonlinear dissipative systems are known to host structures having a correlation range much shorter than the size of the system. The dynamics of these localized structures (LSs) has been investigated so far in situations featuring parity symmetry. In this Letter we extend this analysis to systems lacking this property. We show that the LS drifting speed in a parameter varying landscape is not simply proportional to the parameter gradient, as found in parity preserving situations. The symmetry breaking implies a new contribution to the velocity field which is a function of the parameter value, thus leading to a new paradigm for LSs manipulation. We illustrate this general concept by studying the trajectories of the LSs found in a passively mode-locked laser operated in the localization regime. Moreover, the lack of parity affects significantly LSs interactions which are governed by asymmetrical repulsive forces.

  15. Local thermal properties of the crust and thermochronometric data - how much can we bias the calculated denudation amount?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuszczak, Katarzyna; Persano, Cristina; Braun, Jean; Stuart, Finlay

    2016-04-01

    Low temperature thermochronometers are mainly used to decipher crustal denudation histories. However, these methods provide cooling paths that can be confidently translated into denudation rates only if the geothermal gradient at the time of cooling is known. As past geothermal gradients cannot be directly measured, they can be sometimes estimated from the thermochronometric data, when borehole data or vertical profiles are available. In all the other cases, our knowledge of the spatial and temporal variation of the geothermal gradient is limited. It is common practice in many thermochronometric studies to calculate the amounts and rates of denudation through time assuming a constant, average present-day value for the geothermal gradient. In this study, using 1D and 3D (Pecube) models, we have investigated the impact of crustal heat production and thermal conductivity (κ) on the estimated values of denudation, taking central west Britain as our case study. In this region, the apatite fission track (AFT) ages describe a characteristic U-shape pattern with early Cenozoic ages in the English Lake District and older, up to 200 Ma ages northwards in S Scotland, and southwards in N Wales. This pattern, which could be referred to a difficult to justify localized, differential denudation, can actually be best explained as an effect of the spatially variable heat production. The insulating effect of low thermal conductivity Upper Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, composed largely by chalk, increases the palaeogeothermal gradient and reduces the amounts of denudation, especially in the Lake District, where a heat productive granite batholith increases the local heat flow. The observed AFT age pattern may be, therefore, explained without any significant variation of early Cenozoic denudation across central west Britain. If the thermal proprieties of the crust are not taken into account, denudation in the Lake District will be overestimated by a factor of 1.5-2.0 and the mechanisms

  16. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Luikart, Gordon; Sage, George K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Adams, Layne G.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale of genetic structure and the amount of gene flow in 301 Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the landscape level using 15 nuclear microsatellites and 473 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region. Dall’s sheep exhibited significant genetic structure within contiguous mountain ranges, but mtDNA structure occurred at a broader geographic scale than nuclear DNA within the study area, and mtDNA structure for other North American mountain sheep populations. No evidence of male-mediated gene flow or greater philopatry of females was observed; there was little difference between markers with different modes of inheritance (pairwise nuclear DNA F ST = 0.004–0.325; mtDNA F ST = 0.009–0.544), and males were no more likely than females to be recent immigrants. Historical patterns based on mtDNA indicate separate northern and southern lineages and a pattern of expansion following regional glacial retreat. Boundaries of genetic clusters aligned geographically with prominent mountain ranges, icefields, and major river valleys based on Bayesian and hierarchical modeling of microsatellite and mtDNA data. Our results suggest that fine-scale genetic structure in Dall’s sheep is influenced by limited dispersal, and structure may be weaker in populations occurring near ancestral levels of density and distribution in continuous habitats compared to other alpine ungulates that have experienced declines and marked habitat fragmentation.

  17. Electron transport in electrically biased inverse parabolic double-barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Bati; S, Sakiroglu; I, Sokmen

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical study of resonant tunneling is carried out for an inverse parabolic double-barrier structure subjected to an external electric field. Tunneling transmission coefficient and density of states are analyzed by using the non-equilibrium Green’s function approach based on the finite difference method. It is found that the resonant peak of the transmission coefficient, being unity for a symmetrical case, reduces under the applied electric field and depends strongly on the variation of the structure parameters.

  18. Local and near surface structure from diffraction (Preface)

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Ice, Gene E

    2010-01-01

    This special topic of Materials Science and Engineering A highlights novel applications of X-ray and neutron diffraction for the analysis of a range of materials, including conventional and nanostructured materials, thin films, bio-inspired materials, and superalloys. The development of ultra-brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources and recent advances in neutron diffraction provide important new opportunities for the analysis of local and near surface material structures at multiple length scales.

  19. Local earthquake (LE) tomography with joint inversion for P- and S-wave velocities using structural constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryggvason, Ari; Linde, Niklas

    2006-04-01

    In local earthquake (LE) tomography for P- and S-wave velocities (or Vp/Vs ratios), constraints punishing deviations from a given Vp/Vs ratio are often used. In a synthetic model test we demonstrate that though such constraints inhibit unreasonable Vp/Vs ratio variations, they bias the resulting Vp/Vs ratios. As an alternative approach, structural constraints based on the cross-product of the model gradients can be used to constrain the joint P- and S-wave inversion. We show that the resulting models are as low in artifacts as if a Vp/Vs damping was used, but the resulting Vp/Vs ratios are less biased, which is important for a quantitative interpretation of physical properties and processes in the Earth.

  20. Bias dependence of spin injection/transport properties of a perpendicularly magnetized FePt/MgO/GaAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsugi, Rento; Kunihashi, Yoji; Sanada, Haruki; Kohda, Makoto; Gotoh, Hideki; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Nitta, Junsaku

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate injection and transport of perpendicularly spin-polarized electrons in an FePt/MgO/n-GaAs structure. Spin-polarized electrons were injected from a perpendicularly magnetized FePt layer into an n-GaAs layer through a MgO barrier and detected by spatially resolved Kerr rotation microscopy. By measuring the Hanle effect, we reveal that the injected/extracted spin polarizations drastically vary with bias voltages. A spin lifetime of 3.5 ns is obtained that is consistent with the result from pump-probe measurements. This direct observation of perpendicularly polarized spin injection and lateral transport is one step toward realizing future spintronic devices.

  1. Sympathetic bias.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Peart, Sandra J

    2008-06-01

    We wish to deal with investigator bias in a statistical context. We sketch how a textbook solution to the problem of "outliers" which avoids one sort of investigator bias, creates the temptation for another sort. We write down a model of the approbation seeking statistician who is tempted by sympathy for client to violate the disciplinary standards. We give a simple account of one context in which we might expect investigator bias to flourish. Finally, we offer tentative suggestions to deal with the problem of investigator bias which follow from our account. As we have given a very sparse and stylized account of investigator bias, we ask what might be done to overcome this limitation. PMID:17925315

  2. Origin of the vertebrate body plan via mechanically biased conservation of regular geometrical patterns in the structure of the blastula.

    PubMed

    Edelman, David B; McMenamin, Mark; Sheesley, Peter; Pivar, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We present a plausible account of the origin of the archetypal vertebrate bauplan. We offer a theoretical reconstruction of the geometrically regular structure of the blastula resulting from the sequential subdivision of the egg, followed by mechanical deformations of the blastula in subsequent stages of gastrulation. We suggest that the formation of the vertebrate bauplan during development, as well as fixation of its variants over the course of evolution, have been constrained and guided by global mechanical biases. Arguably, the role of such biases in directing morphology-though all but neglected in previous accounts of both development and macroevolution-is critical to any substantive explanation for the origin of the archetypal vertebrate bauplan. We surmise that the blastula inherently preserves the underlying geometry of the cuboidal array of eight cells produced by the first three cleavages that ultimately define the medial-lateral, dorsal-ventral, and anterior-posterior axes of the future body plan. Through graphical depictions, we demonstrate the formation of principal structures of the vertebrate body via mechanical deformation of predictable geometrical patterns during gastrulation. The descriptive rigor of our model is supported through comparisons with previous characterizations of the embryonic and adult vertebrate bauplane. Though speculative, the model addresses the poignant absence in the literature of any plausible account of the origin of vertebrate morphology. A robust solution to the problem of morphogenesis-currently an elusive goal-will only emerge from consideration of both top-down (e.g., the mechanical constraints and geometric properties considered here) and bottom-up (e.g., molecular and mechano-chemical) influences. PMID:27392530

  3. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and ζ but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles α and γ. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes. PMID:23473492

  4. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2013-03-05

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and z but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles a and g. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes.

  5. Analyzing the sequence-structure relationship of a library of local structural prototypes.

    PubMed

    Benros, Cristina; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Hazout, Serge

    2009-01-21

    We present a thorough analysis of the relation between amino acid sequence and local three-dimensional structure in proteins. A library of overlapping local structural prototypes was built using an unsupervised clustering approach called "hybrid protein model" (HPM). The HPM carries out a multiple structural alignment of local folds from a non-redundant protein structure databank encoded into a structural alphabet composed of 16 protein blocks (PBs). Following previous research focusing on the HPM protocol, we have considered gaps in the local structure prototype. This methodology allows to have variable length fragments. Hence, 120 local structure prototypes were obtained. Twenty-five percent of the protein fragments learnt by HPM had gaps. An investigation of tight turns suggested that they are mainly derived from three PB series with precise locations in the HPM. The amino acid information content of the whole conformational classes was tackled by multivariate methods, e.g., canonical correlation analysis. It points out the presence of seven amino acid equivalence classes showing high propensities for preferential local structures. In the same way, definition of "contrast factors" based on sequence-structure properties underline the specificity of certain structural prototypes, e.g., the dependence of Gly or Asn-rich turns to a limited number of PBs, or, the opposition between Pro-rich coils to those enriched in Ser, Thr, Asn and Glu. These results are so useful to analyze the sequence-structure relationships, but could also be used to improve fragment-based method for protein structure prediction from sequence. PMID:18977232

  6. Sample Size Requirements for Structural Equation Models: An Evaluation of Power, Bias, and Solution Propriety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Erika J.; Harrington, Kelly M.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Miller, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Determining sample size requirements for structural equation modeling (SEM) is a challenge often faced by investigators, peer reviewers, and grant writers. Recent years have seen a large increase in SEMs in the behavioral science literature, but consideration of sample size requirements for applied SEMs often relies on outdated rules-of-thumb.…

  7. Bias and Efficiency in Structural Equation Modeling: Maximum Likelihood versus Robust Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2011-01-01

    In the structural equation modeling literature, the normal-distribution-based maximum likelihood (ML) method is most widely used, partly because the resulting estimator is claimed to be asymptotically unbiased and most efficient. However, this may not hold when data deviate from normal distribution. Outlying cases or nonnormally distributed data,…

  8. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    J Rygel; Y Chen; C Pantano; T Shibata; J Du; L Kokou; R Woodman; J Belcher

    2011-12-31

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  9. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  10. Assessing the local identifiability of probabilistic knowledge structures.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Heller, Jürgen; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2012-12-01

    Given a collection Q of problems, in knowledge space theory Doignon & Falmagne, (International Journal of Man-Machine Studies 23:175-196, 1985) the knowledge state of a student is the collection K ⊆ Q of all problems that this student is capable of solving. A knowledge structure is a pair (Q, ), where is a collection of knowledge states that contains at least the empty set and Q. A probabilistic knowledge structure (PKS) is a knowledge structure (Q, , π), where π is a probability distribution on the knowledge states. The PKS that has received the most attention is the basic local independence model BLIM; Falmagne & Doignon, (British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology 41:1-23, 1988a, Journal of Mathematical Psychology 32:232-258, 1988b). To the best of our knowledge, systematic investigations in the literature concerning the identifiability of the BLIM are totally missing. Based on the theoretical work of Bamber and van Santen (Journal of Mathematical Psychology 29:443-473, 1985), the present article is aimed to present a method and a corresponding computerized procedure for assessing the local identifiability of the BLIM, which is applicable to any finite knowledge structure of moderate size. PMID:22588988

  11. Local structural excitations in model glass systems under applied load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayamjyoti, S.; Löffler, J. F.; Derlet, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The potential-energy landscape of a model binary Lennard-Jones structural glass is investigated as a function of applied external strain, in terms of how local structural excitations (LSEs) respond to the load. Using the activation relaxation technique and nudged elastic band methods, the evolving structure and barrier energy of such LSEs are studied in detail. For the case of a tensile/compressive strain, the LSE barrier energies generally decrease/increase, whereas under pure shear, it may either increase or decrease resulting in a broadening of the barrier energy distribution. It is found that how a particular LSE responds to an applied strain is strongly controlled by the LSE's far-field internal stress signature prior to loading.

  12. Electronic-structure calculation for metals by local optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C.; Min, B.I.; Benedek, R.; Garner, J.

    1989-03-15

    Recent work by Car and Parrinello has generated considerable interest in the calculation of electronic structure by nonlinear optimization. The technique introduced by these authors, dynamical simulated annealing, is designed for problems that involve energy barriers. When local optimization suffices to determine the energy minimum, more direct methods are available. In this paper we apply the algorithm suggested by Williams and Soler to calculate the electronic structure of metals, using a plane-wave expansion for the electronic orbitals and an electron-ion pseudopotential of the Kleinman-Bylander form. Radial pseudopotentials were taken from the compilation of Bachelet, Hamann, and Schlueter. Calculations are performed to optimize the electronic structure (i) with fixed atomic configuration, or (ii) with the atomic volume being optimized simultaneously. It is found that the dual optimization (ii) converges in essentially the same number of steps as the static lattice optimization (i). Numerical results are presented for Li, K, Al, and simple-cubic P.

  13. Role of nonlinear localized structures and turbulence in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Neha; Yadav, Nitin; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we have analyzed the field localization of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the presence of background density perturbation, which are assumed to be originated by the three dimensionally propagating low frequency KAW. These localized structures play an important role for energy transportation at smaller scales in the dispersion range of magnetic power spectrum. For the present model, governing dynamic equations of high frequency pump KAW and low frequency KAW has been derived by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. Further, these coupled equations have been numerically solved to analyze the resulting localized structures of pump KAW and magnetic power spectrum in the magnetopause regime. Numerically calculated spectrum exhibits inertial range having spectral index of -3/2 followed by steeper scaling; this steepening in the turbulent spectrum is a signature of energy transportation from larger to smaller scales. In this way, the proposed mechanism, which is based on nonlinear wave-wave interaction, may be useful for understanding the particle acceleration and turbulence in magnetopause.

  14. Phase behavior and local structure of liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynewever, Herb

    In this work we use a combination of theory and computer simulation to study the phase behavior of liquid crystalline polymers and the local structure of polymer melts. We review experimental and simulation evidence which shows that long and stiff molecules form orientationally ordered phases at packing fractions intermediate between the liquid and the solid. With the aid of a two-molecule simulation, we are able to apply Onsager's theory [Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 51, 627 (1949)] for liquid crystal formation to flexible molecules without any additional approximations. Our results have a quantitative advantage over other theories in comparison with computer simulation data such as for the liquid-liquid crystal phase diagram. We also study the local structure of polymer melts using a two-molecule simulation to apply the density functional theories of Donley, Curro, and McCoy [J. Chem. Phys. 101 , 3205 (1994)1; and Yethiraj and Woodward [J. Chem. Phys 102 , 5499 (1995)]. The accuracy of these methods rivals that of integral equation theories in their predictions of local order. Further, the two-molecule simulation facilitates a more direct calculation of the equation of state via the monitoring of orientational correlations.

  15. High Resolution Local Structure-Constrained Image Upsampling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Ronggang; Wang, Wenmin; Gao, Wen

    2015-11-01

    With the development of ultra-high-resolution display devices, the visual perception of fine texture details is becoming more and more important. A method of high-quality image upsampling with a low cost is greatly needed. In this paper, we propose a fast and efficient image upsampling method that makes use of high-resolution local structure constraints. The average local difference is used to divide a bicubic-interpolated image into a sharp edge area and a texture area, and these two areas are reconstructed separately with specific constraints. For reconstruction of the sharp edge area, a high-resolution gradient map is estimated as an extra constraint for the recovery of sharp and natural edges; for the reconstruction of the texture area, a high-resolution local texture structure map is estimated as an extra constraint to recover fine texture details. These two reconstructed areas are then combined to obtain the final high-resolution image. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method recovered finer pixel-level texture details and obtained top-level objective performance with a low time cost compared with state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26186777

  16. Protein structure prediction with local adjust tabu search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein folding structure prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the bioinformatics domain. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the simplified structure model and the computational method should be adopted in the research. The AB off-lattice model is one of the simplification models, which only considers two classes of amino acids, hydrophobic (A) residues and hydrophilic (B) residues. Results The main work of this paper is to discuss how to optimize the lowest energy configurations in 2D off-lattice model and 3D off-lattice model by using Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. In order to avoid falling into local minimum and faster convergence to the global minimum, we introduce a novel method (SATS) to the protein structure problem, which combines simulated annealing algorithm and tabu search algorithm. Various strategies, such as the new encoding strategy, the adaptive neighborhood generation strategy and the local adjustment strategy, are adopted successfully for high-speed searching the optimal conformation corresponds to the lowest energy of the protein sequences. Experimental results show that some of the results obtained by the improved SATS are better than those reported in previous literatures, and we can sure that the lowest energy folding state for short Fibonacci sequences have been found. Conclusions Although the off-lattice models is not very realistic, they can reflect some important characteristics of the realistic protein. It can be found that 3D off-lattice model is more like native folding structure of the realistic protein than 2D off-lattice model. In addition, compared with some previous researches, the proposed hybrid algorithm can more effectively and more quickly search the spatial folding structure of a protein chain. PMID:25474708

  17. Local measurement of optically induced photocurrent in semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesova, Marketa; Dobis, Pavel; Tomanek, Pavel; Uhdeova, Nadezda

    2003-07-01

    Photocurrent (PC) spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated to be helpful experimental method to investigate the local properties of bulk semiconductors, microstructures, surfaces and interfaces. We have measured locally induced PC of semiconductor quantum structures using a technique of reflection Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope (r-SNOM) in combination with Ti:Sapphire laser and tuning dye laser and with He-Ne laser. The r-SNOM employs an uncoated and/or Au-metalized single-mode fiber tip both in illumination and collection mode. Taking opportunity of the high lateral resolution of the microscope and combining it with fast micro-PL, it is possible to locate e.g. defects in a multiple quantum well grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Near-field characteristics of measured quantities are also discussed.

  18. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  19. Exchange bias of spin valve structure with a top-pinned Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/IrMn

    SciTech Connect

    You, C. Y.; Furubayashi, T.; Takahashi, Y. K.; Goripati, H. S.; Hono, K.

    2008-07-07

    We have investigated the exchange bias of a directly top-pinned Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/IrMn structure. An exchange bias was realized on the as-deposited samples, in which Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} exhibits a fully amorphous structure. A current-in-plane giant magnetoresistance effect was demonstrated on simple Ru/CoFeB/Cu/CoFeB/IrMn/Ru stacks prior to and after annealing. The amorphous CoFeB layer partially crystallized from the interface with a Cu spacer layer after annealed at 280 deg. C.

  20. Unimodal biometric system based on local topology structure preserving projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huanxi; Lv, Xiaowei; Li, Xiong; Liu, Yuncai

    2009-11-01

    We propose a unified unimodal biometric system that is suitable for most individual modalities, e.g., face and gait. The proposed system consists of three steps: (1) preprocessing raw biometric data, (2) determining the intrinsic low-dimensional subspace of preprocessed data by local topology structure preserving projections (LTSPP), and (3) performing the classification in the determined subspace using the intraclass distance sum. In the proposed system, LTSPP is a novel subspace algorithm that focuses not only on the class information but also on the local topology structure. In terms of representing the separability of different classes, LTSPP projects the interclass margin data far apart. Meanwhile, LTSPP preserves the intraclass topology structures by using linear reconstruction coefficients. Compared with other subspace methods, LTSPP possesses more discriminant abilities and is more suitable for biometric recognition. In addition, both preprocessing each raw datum into unit and performing the classification using the intraclass distance sum are helpful to improve the recognition rates. We carry out various recognition experiments using the Yale and HumanID gait databases. The encouraging experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our unified unimodal biometric system, and the proposed LTSPP algorithm for this system can yield the best recognition rates compared to the other algorithms.

  1. Biased predecision processing.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories. PMID:12848220

  2. Thresholds of surface codes on the general lattice structures suffering biased error and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2014-12-04

    A family of surface codes with general lattice structures is proposed. We can control the error tolerances against bit and phase errors asymmetrically by changing the underlying lattice geometries. The surface codes on various lattices are found to be efficient in the sense that their threshold values universally approach the quantum Gilbert-Varshamov bound. We find that the error tolerance of the surface codes depends on the connectivity of the underlying lattices; the error chains on a lattice of lower connectivity are easier to correct. On the other hand, the loss tolerance of the surface codes exhibits an opposite behavior; the logical information on a lattice of higher connectivity has more robustness against qubit loss. As a result, we come upon a fundamental trade-off between error and loss tolerances in the family of surface codes with different lattice geometries.

  3. Localization-Based Super-Resolution Imaging of Cellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows direct visualization of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. However, the spatial resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopes is limited by diffraction to ~250 nm, prompting the development of super-resolution microscopy which offers resolution approaching the scale of single proteins, i.e., ~20 nm. Here, we describe protocols for single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging, using focal adhesion proteins as an example and employing either photoswitchable fluorophores or photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. These protocols should also be easily adaptable to imaging a broad array of macromolecular assemblies in cells whose components can be fluorescently tagged and assemble into high density structures. PMID:23868582

  4. Localized structures in dissipative media: from optics to plant ecology

    PubMed Central

    Tlidi, M.; Staliunas, K.; Panajotov, K.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Clerc, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Localized structures (LSs) in dissipative media appear in various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, optics and laser physics. The proposal for this Theme Issue was to gather specialists from various fields of nonlinear science towards a cross-fertilization among active areas of research. This is a cross-disciplinary area of research dominated by nonlinear optics due to potential applications for all-optical control of light, optical storage and information processing. This Theme Issue contains contributions from 18 active groups involved in the LS field and have all made significant contributions in recent years. PMID:25246688

  5. Hindsight Bias.

    PubMed

    Roese, Neal J; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2012-09-01

    Hindsight bias occurs when people feel that they "knew it all along," that is, when they believe that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. Hindsight bias embodies any combination of three aspects: memory distortion, beliefs about events' objective likelihoods, or subjective beliefs about one's own prediction abilities. Hindsight bias stems from (a) cognitive inputs (people selectively recall information consistent with what they now know to be true and engage in sensemaking to impose meaning on their own knowledge), (b) metacognitive inputs (the ease with which a past outcome is understood may be misattributed to its assumed prior likelihood), and (c) motivational inputs (people have a need to see the world as orderly and predictable and to avoid being blamed for problems). Consequences of hindsight bias include myopic attention to a single causal understanding of the past (to the neglect of other reasonable explanations) as well as general overconfidence in the certainty of one's judgments. New technologies for visualizing and understanding data sets may have the unintended consequence of heightening hindsight bias, but an intervention that encourages people to consider alternative causal explanations for a given outcome can reduce hindsight bias. PMID:26168501

  6. The brain structure and spontaneous activity baseline of the behavioral bias in trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Meng; Hou, Xin; Tan, Yafei; Fu, Yixiao; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with trait anxiety are often considered to be predisposed to psychiatric disorders. However, there is great heterogeneity in the development of psychiatric disorders in this group of people and the nature of the trait anxiety is still unclear. So, we decided to explore the correlations of brain structure and brain activity with trait anxiety in normal individuals. Specifically, we investigated the correlations between trait anxiety and regional grey matter volume (rGMV) and regional BOLD, using the Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (ALFF) as an index in 382 university students. The results showed that the level of trait anxiety was negatively correlated with rGMV in the right middle occipital gyrus. This result indicates that individuals with high trait anxiety tend to have less image processing on conscious level. Furthermore, we found that trait anxiety was positively correlated with the ALFF in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus and the right supplementary motor area, and negatively correlated with the ALFF in the cerebellum and the thalamus. These results indicate that individuals with high trait anxiety may be more sensitive to relationships and sensory information. Overall, this study's findings suggest that individuals with high trait anxiety have attenuated image processing on the conscious level, and exhibit stronger induced sensibility and over-processing of relationships, which is a brain imaging precondition for psychiatric disorders. PMID:27340090

  7. Local structure studies of materials using pair distribution function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Joseph W.

    A collection of pair distribution function studies on various materials is presented in this dissertation. In each case, local structure information of interest pushes the current limits of what these studies can accomplish. The goal is to provide insight into the individual material behaviors as well as to investigate ways to expand the current limits of PDF analysis. Where possible, I provide a framework for how PDF analysis might be applied to a wider set of material phenomena. Throughout the dissertation, I discuss 0 the capabilities of the PDF method to provide information pertaining to a material's structure and properties, ii) current limitations in the conventional approach to PDF analysis, iii) possible solutions to overcome certain limitations in PDF analysis, and iv) suggestions for future work to expand and improve the capabilities PDF analysis.

  8. Local Strain Evaluation of Strained-SOI Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuda, Koji; Mizuno, Tomohisa; Numata, Toshinori; Tezuka, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Moriyama, Yoshihiko; Nakaharai, Shu; Takagi, Shin-Ichi

    The strain relaxation within a strained-Si on SiGe on insulator (SGOI) structure might be one of the key issues in development of strained-Si MOSFET devices for high-performance ULSIs. In order to investigate the strain relaxation within the thin strained-Si layers, a new characterization technique to directly evaluate a local strain variation in the layers is required. Hence, we have developed the nano-beam electron diffraction (NBD) method which has a lateral resolution of 10 nm and a strain resolution of 0.1%. In this paper, we discuss a detailed investigation of whether the NBD method could be utilized to clarify a strain in a strained-Si layer on the SGOI structures.

  9. Local structures of copper-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2008-12-01

    We report the local structures of a series of copper-doped zinc oxide films using polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption spectroscopy. The films were grown by pulsed-laser ablation under various conditions. The results show that films where copper exists solely as clusters are not ferromagnetic. The results also show that some of the copper-doped zinc oxide films are not ferromagnetic despite the fact that the copper substitution for zinc in the ZnO lattice is in the Cu2+ state, which provides the necessary unpaired spins for ferromagnetism. Therefore, Cu2+/Zn2+ substitution is not the only imperative condition for ferromagnetism to occur. We present characteristics unique to the electronic and atomic structure of ferromagnetic films and argue that the increased covalence of the CuZn-O bond found in these films is a prerequisite for the spin alignments in a substitutionally copper-doped zinc oxide film.

  10. Global functions in global-local finite-element analysis of localized stresses in prismatic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Stanley B.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in the global local finite-element method (GLFEM) is the availability of global functions for the given problem. The role and mathematical requirements of these global functions in a GLFEM analysis of localized stress states in prismatic structures are discussed. A method is described for determining these global functions. Underlying this method are theorems due to Toupin and Knowles on strain energy decay rates, which are related to a quantitative expression of Saint-Venant's principle. It is mentioned that a mathematically complete set of global functions can be generated, so that any arbitrary interface condition between the finite element and global subregions can be represented. Convergence to the true behavior can be achieved with increasing global functions and finite-element degrees of freedom. Specific attention is devoted to mathematically two-dimensional and three-dimensional prismatic structures. Comments are offered on the GLFEM analysis of NASA flat panel with a discontinuous stiffener. Methods for determining global functions for other effects are also indicated, such as steady-state dynamics and bodies under initial stress.